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Sample records for alpha radiation effectively

  1. Risk estimates for the health effects of alpha radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides risk estimates for various health effects of alpha radiation. Human and animal data have been used to characterize the shapes of dose-response relations and the effects of various modifying factors, but quantitative risk estimates are based solely on human data: for lung cancer, on miners in the Colorado plateau, Czechoslovakia, Sweden, Ontario and Newfoundland; for bone and head cancers, on radium dial painters and radium-injected patients. Slopes of dose-response relations for lung cancer show a tendency to decrease with increasing dose. Linear extrapolation is unlikely to underestimate the excess risk at low doses by more than a factor of l.5. Under the linear cell-killing model, our best estimate

  2. Alpha radiation effects on weapons-grade plutonium encapsulating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Mehmet

    The scientific understanding of material problems in the long-term storage of plutonium pits is investigated using experimental and theoretical models. The durability of the plutonium pit depends on the integrity of the metal cladding that encapsulates the plutonium. Given sufficient time, the energetic alpha particles (helium nuclei) produced by nuclear decay of the plutonium would degrade the mechanical strength of the metal cladding which could lead to cladding failure and dispersion of plutonium. It is shown that the long-term behavior of the encapsulating materials can be simulated by beam implantation and subsequent analysis using experimental techniques of Electron Microscopy and Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP). In addition computer simulations using the TRIM code were made in order to correlate the measurements to cladding damage. The Neutron Depth Profiling measurements done with samples that had 10 16 cm-2 3He beam implant dose showed no helium redistribution, indicating no microcracking between bubbles, for both beryllium and stainless steel, the pit cladding materials of interest. However, helium redistribution and significant helium loss were observed for samples with a beam implant dose of 1018 cm-2 , indicating microstructural damage. The SEM observations were consistent with the NDP measurements. The proper interpretation of the results rests on the realization that (i)the deleterious effects are related to helium concentration, not implant dose, and (ii)a specified maximum concentration of helium is achieved with a much smaller dose when monoenergetic ions are implanted using beam geometry than for the situation where Pu alphas stop in the pit cladding. Helium is distributed over a much smaller depth interval for beam implantation of monoenergetic ions as compared to the pit cladding implanted ions. Taking this effect into account and using the calculated pit implant dose gives a pit storage time for the 1016 cm-2 beam implant dose results equal to

  3. Damage radiation alpha effects in sintered waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have subjected the borosilicate glass to thermal neutron irradiation in a reactor, with an accumulated fluence equivalent to approximately E3, E4, E5, y E6 years of waste disposal. We considered the following potential effects of accumulated alpha decay: a) Changes in the density; b) Changes in the dissolution rates; c) Changes in the microstructure of the sintered glass. (author)

  4. Gamma radiation effects in capacitance of alpha alumina doped with rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the study of the gamma radiation influence on the dielectric properties of alpha-alumina doped with rare earths. The work deals with the possibility of determine the absorbed dose by capacitance measurements of the material. The samples were synthesized by sol–gel processes and Pechini, and best dopant concentration value was determined based on data from samples that supplied better behavior for luminescence dosimetry. A decrease in capacitance values with increasing radiation doses was experimentally verified. Ionization process produced excited charges carries, which are trapped in metastable states, which can change the characteristics of the dielectric alpha-alumina sample. - Highligths: ► We study the effect of gamma radiation on dieletric propertier in rare earths doped alumina. ► Increasing gamma radiation dose decreases the capacitance of all samples. ► We have discussed a model for reduction of capacitance with dose. ► We propose the use of the capacitance measurement on alumina samples for determining absorbed gamma radiation

  5. Effect of long-term exposure to mobile phone radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequence of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Shahin-jafari, Ariyo; Bayat, Mansour; Shahhosseiny, Mohammad Hassan; Tajik, Parviz; Roudbar-mohammadi, Shahla

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, communication industries have witnessed a tremendous expansion, while, the biological effects of electromagnetic waves have not been fully elucidated. Current study aimed at evaluating the mutagenic effect of long-term exposure to 900-MHz radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequences of Candida albicans. A standard 900 MHz radiation generator was used for radiation. 10 ml volumes from a stock suspension of C. albicans were transferred into 10 polystyrene tubes. Five tubes were ...

  6. Effect of long-term exposure to mobile phone radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequence of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin-Jafari, Ariyo; Bayat, Mansour; Shahhosseiny, Mohammad Hassan; Tajik, Parviz; Roudbar-Mohammadi, Shahla

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, communication industries have witnessed a tremendous expansion, while, the biological effects of electromagnetic waves have not been fully elucidated. Current study aimed at evaluating the mutagenic effect of long-term exposure to 900-MHz radiation on alpha-Int1 gene sequences of Candida albicans. A standard 900 MHz radiation generator was used for radiation. 10 ml volumes from a stock suspension of C. albicans were transferred into 10 polystyrene tubes. Five tubes were exposed at 4 °C to a fixed magnitude of radiation with different time periods of 10, 70, 210, 350 and 490 h. The other 5 tubes were kept far enough from radiation. The samples underwent genomic DNA extraction. PCR amplification of alpha-Int1 gene sequence was done using one set of primers. PCR products were resolved using agarose gel electrophoresis and the nucleotide sequences were determined. All samples showed a clear electrophoretic band around 441 bp and further sequencing revealed the amplified DNA segments are related to alpha-Int1 gene of the yeast. No mutations in the gene were seen in radiation exposed samples. Long-term exposure of the yeast to mobile phone radiation under the above mentioned conditions had no mutagenic effect on alpha-Int1 gene sequence. PMID:27081370

  7. Lyman alpha radiation in external galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1990-01-01

    The Ly alpha line of atomic hydrogen is often a luminous component of the radiation emitted by distant galaxies. Except for those galaxies which have a substantial central source of non-stellar ionizing radiation, most of the Ly alpha radiation emitted by galaxies is generated within regions of the interstellar medium which are photoionized by starlight. Conversely, much of the energy radiated by photoionized regions is carried by the Ly alpha line. Only hot, massive stars are capable of ionizing hydrogen in the interstellar medium which surrounds them, and because such stars are necessarily short-lived, Ly alpha emission traces regions of active star formation. Researchers argue that the strength of the Ly alpha emission observed from external galaxies may be used to estimate quantitatively the dust content of the emitting region, while the Ly alpha line profile is sensitive to the presence of shock waves. Interstellar dust particles and shock waves are intimately associated with the process of star formation in two senses. First, both dust particles and shock waves owe their existence to stellar activity; second, they may both serve as agents which facilitate the formation of stars, shocks by triggering gravitational instabilities in the interstellar gas that they compress, and dust by shielding star-forming molecular clouds from the ionizing and dissociative effects of external UV radiation. By using Ly alpha observations as a probe of the dust content in diffuse gas at high redshift, we might hope to learn about the earliest epochs of star formation.

  8. The effect of Lyman $\\alpha$ radiation on mini-Neptune atmospheres around M stars: application to GJ 436b

    CERN Document Server

    Miguel, Yamila; Linsky, Jeffrey L; Rugheimer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Mini-Neptunes orbiting M stars are a growing population of known exoplanets. Some of them are located very close to their host star, receiving large amounts of UV radiation. Many M stars emit strong chromospheric emission in the H I Lyman $\\alpha$ line (Ly$\\alpha$) at 1215.67 \\AA, the brightest far-UV emission line. We show that the effect of incoming Ly$\\alpha$ flux can significantly change the photochemistry of mini-Neptunes' atmospheres. We use GJ 436b as an example, considering different metallicities for its atmospheric composition. For solar composition, H$_2$O-mixing ratios show the largest change because of Ly$\\alpha$ radiation. H$_2$O absorbs most of this radiation, thereby shielding CH$_4$, whose dissociation is driven mainly by radiation at other far-UV wavelengths ($\\sim1300$ \\AA). H$_2$O photolysis also affects other species in the atmosphere, including H, H$_2$, CO$_2$, CO, OH and O. For an atmosphere with high metallicity, H$_2$O- and CO$_2$-mixing ratios show the biggest change, thereby shield...

  9. Effects of alpha radiation on plutonium incorporated in dosimetric materials by ESR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in situ alpha irradiation effects of some ESR dosimetric materials namely alanine, 2-methyl alanine and ammonium tartrate were studied by incorporating 1% plutonium by weight in them. The radical intensity was monitored as a function of alpha dose. It was found that in the dose region 1-35 kGy ammonium tartrate showed better signal intensity, linearity and dose response as compared to the other materials. This was attributed to the single radical produced in case of the tartrate giving a sharp spectrum and the fast relaxation times owing to less saturation of ESR signals. (author)

  10. Effect of low alpha-radiation field on corrosion rates of UO2 under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Alpha-radiolysis constitutes an important factor, which may affect the corrosion behavior of spent fuel in contact with groundwater in a geologic repository. The so-called alpha-doped UO2, i.e. UO2 containing short-lived alpha-emitters, can reproduce type and levels of activity of 'old' spent fuel at different ages. Previous experiments showed significant effects of radiolysis at relatively high alpha-activity levels [1, 2]. Studies on the corrosion of low alpha-activity 233U-doped UO2(s) were carried out as static leaching tests under different nominal redox conditions. Pellets of UO2 containing ∼10, ∼1 and 0 wt. % 233U were leached at room temperature in carbonated water under anoxic conditions (Eh ∼0). Some degree of pre-oxidation occurred on the fuel surface prior to water contact: this was responsible for a noticeable initial release. The initial release was higher for higher alpha-activity fuel samples. Increasing uranium concentration in solution with time was observed for the material containing 10 w/0 233U, indicating a significant radiolytic enhancement of the fuel corrosion. An extremely low dissolution rate was measured for the material doped with 1 wt. % 233U, while a decrease of the uranium concentration in the leachate was observed in the case of undoped UO2. These results confirm previous conclusions that radiolysis, at least down to an upper bound activity level relevant to long term storage scenarios (UO2 containing 10 wt. % 233U), can support oxidizing dissolution processes under conditions characterized by low-oxygen concentration. The results presented in this work were carried out as a part of a EC co-funded project on spent fuel stability [3] and in collaboration with ENRESA-CIEMAT [4]. [1] J. Cobos, L. Havela, V.V. Rondinella, J. De Pablo, T. Gouder, J.P. Glatz, P. Carbol, Hj. Matzke, Radiochim. Acta, 90 (2002) 597-602. [2] V.V. Rondinella, Hj. Matzke, J. Cobos, and T. Wiss, Radiochim. Acta, 88 (2000

  11. Can {alpha}-tocopherol and {beta}-carotene supplementation reduce adverse radiation effects on salivary glands?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funegaard, U.; Johansson, I.; Ericson, T. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cariology; Malmer, B.; Henriksson, R. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-12-31

    In this study, we evaluated whether supplementation with antioxidant vitamins can reduce the adverse effects of irradiation on the salivary glands in the rat. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were given a basic diet providing 0.6 mg {alpha}-tocopherol and no {beta}-carotene per day. In two groups the basic diet was supplemented with 3.4 mg {alpha}-tocopherol and 6 mg {beta}-carotene per day from 14 days before irradiation until 12 days after complete irradiation. One group of rats given basic diet and one group given supplemented diet were irradiated with 7 Gy daily for five consecutive days. Isoproterenol and pilocarpine-stimulated whole saliva was collected from all rats 2, 4 and 26 weeks after irradiation. Vitamin-supplemented irradiated rats had higher secretion rates on all three occasions compared with those of irradiated rats given basic diet. The changes in saliva composition seen in irradiated rats were less accentuated in vitamin-supplemented, irradiated rats. The proportions of acinar cells were significantly decreased both in parotid and submandibular glands 26 weeks after irradiation. Supplementation with {alpha}-tocopherol and {beta}-carotene did not alter the morphology of the glands. (author).

  12. Fluorescence Quenching of Alpha-Fetoprotein by Gold Nanoparticles: Effect of Dielectric Shell on Non-Radiative Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence quenching spectrometry was applied to study the interactions between gold colloidal nanoparticles and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. Experimental results show that the gold nanoparticles can quench the fluorescence emission of adsorbed AFP effectively. Furthermore, the intensity of fluorescence emission peak decreases monotonously with the increasing gold nanoparticles content. A mechanism based on surface plasmon resonance–induced non-radiative decay was investigated to illuminate the effect of a dielectric shell on the fluorescence quenching ability of gold nanoparticles. The calculation results show that the increasing dielectric shell thickness may improve the monochromaticity of fluorescence quenching. However, high energy transfer efficiency can be obtained within a wide wavelength band by coating a thinner dielectric shell.

  13. Study of the antioxidant effect of {alpha}-tocopherol on low-density lipoprotein peroxidation induced at low and high {gamma}-radiation dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Abdelouahed [Research Centre on Aging and Department of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 4C4 (Canada)]. E-mail: abdelouahed.khalil@usherbrooke.ca; Milochevitch, Christelle [Research Centre on Aging and Department of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 4C4 (Canada)

    2005-02-01

    It is well known that vitamin E ({alpha}-tocopherol, {alpha}-toc) is a very efficient lipid soluble antioxidant and several studies showed its beneficial action in the prevention and reduction of atherosclerosis. However, some in vitro studies suggest a prooxidant role of vitamin E, which could occur under given circumstances. This study was thus designed to investigate the antioxidant vs. prooxidant effect of vitamin E with regards to LDL peroxidation induced under different oxidative stress conditions. LDL was enriched with {alpha}-tocopherol and different {alpha}-toc/LDL ratios were studied (8.0{+-}2.5, 14.3{+-}3.0, 33.3{+-}3.7, 42.7{+-}3.5 and 48.2{+-}4.5 molecules of {alpha}-toc/LDL particle). Enriched and control LDL were oxidized by action of {sup {center_dot}}OH and O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} free radicals produced by {gamma}-radiolysis at different dose rates. Susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was examined by the measure of conjugated diene and TBARS formation as well as LDL endogenous {alpha}-toc disappearance. Increasing LDL {alpha}-toc concentration reduced the LDL susceptibility to oxidation and their oxidizability. {alpha}-toc disappearance rates were comprised between 43 and 8.3x10{sup -10} M s{sup -1} and decreased with the radiation dose rate. Our results support an antioxidant role for {alpha}-tocopherol at high and low oxidative stress conditions.

  14. The alpha channeling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  15. Measurement of $\\alpha_{s}$ with Radiative Hadronic Events

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkays, A Jr; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schiecks, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2008-01-01

    Hadronic final states with a hard isolated photon are studied using data taken at centre-of-mass energies around the mass of the Z0 boson with the OPAL detector at LEP. The strong coupling alpha S is extracted by comparing data and QCD predictions for event shape observables at average reduced centre-of-mass energies ranging from 24 GeV to 78 GeV, and the energy dependence of alpha S is studied. Our results are consistent with the running of alpha S as predicted by QCD and show that within the uncertainties of our analysis event shapes in hadronic Z0 decays with hard and isolated photon radiation can be described by QCD at reduced centre-of-mass energies. Combining all values from different event shape observables and energies gives alpha S (Mz)=0.1182 pm 0.0015(stat.) pm 0.0101(syst.).

  16. Remote Optical Detection of Alpha Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha emitting radiation sources are typically hard to detect with conventional detectors due to the short range of alpha particles in the air. However, previous studies have shown that remote detection of alpha radiation is possible by measuring the ionization-induced fluorescence of air molecules. The alpha-induced ultraviolet (UV) light is mainly emitted by molecular nitrogen and its fluorescence properties are well known. The benefit of this method is the long range of UV photons in the air. Secondly, the detection is possible also under a strong beta and gamma radiation backgrounds as they do not cause localized molecular excitation. In this work, the optical detection was studied using two different detection schemes; spectral separation of fluorescence from the background lighting and coincidence detection of UV photons originating from a single radiative decay event. Our spectrally integrated measurements have shown that one alpha decay event yields up to 400 fluorescence photons in the air and all these UV photons are induced in a 5 ns time-window. On the other hand, the probability of a background coincidence event in 5 ns scale is very rare compared to the number of background photons. This information can be applied in fluorescence coincidence filtering to discriminate the alpha radiation initiated fluorescence signal from much more intense background lighting. A device called HAUVA (Handheld Alpha UV Application) was built during this work for demonstration purposes. HAUVA utilizes spectral filtering and it is designed to detect alpha emitters from a distance of about 40 cm. Using specially selected room lighting, the device is able to separate 1 kBq alpha emitter from the background lighting with 1 second integration time. (author)

  17. Effects of alpha, gamma, and alpha-recoil radiation on borosilicate glass containing Savannah River Plant defense high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Savannah River Plant, the reference process for the immobilization of defense high-level waste (DHLW) for geologic storage is vitrification into borosilicate glass. During geologic storage for 106 y, the glass would be exposed to approx. 3 x 1010 rad of β radiation, approx. 1010 rad of γ radiation, and 1018 particles/g glass for both α and α-recoil radiation. This paper discusses tests of the effect of these radiations on the leachability and density of the glass. Even though the doses were large, no effect of the radiations was detected that reduced the effectiveness of the glass for long-term storage of DHLW even at doses corresponding to 106 years storage for the actual glass. For the tests, glass containing simulated DHLW was prepared from frit of the reference composition. Three methods were used to irradiate the glass: external irradiations with beams of approx. 200 keV Xe or Pb ions, internal irradiations with Cm-244 doped glass, and external irradiations with Co-60 γ rays. Results with both Xe and Pb ions indicate that a dose of 3 x 1013 ions/cm2 (simulating > 106 years storage) does not significantly increase the leachability of the glass in deionized water. Tests with Cm-244 doped glass show no increase in leach rate in water or brine up to a dose of 1018 α and α-recoils/g glass. Results of larger doses are being examined. The density of the Cm-244 doped glass has decreased by 1% at a dose of 1018 particles/g glass. With γ-radiation, the density has changed by 10 rad. Results of leach tests in deionized water and brine indicated that this very large dose of γ-radiation increased the leach rate by only 20%. Also, the leach rates are lower in brine

  18. Effect of UV radiation on the bulk etching rate activation energy and response of Cr-39 to alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of CR-39 plastic sheets is exposed to UV radiation from mercury lamp for different periods of time. Then irradiated by alpha particles from 241Am point source at different energies. The Bulk etching rate activation energy is calculated for non-exposed and exposed sheets for time periods of 1.5 and 3 hr. It is found that their energy values are 0.76, 0.75 and 0.72 eV respectively. The track diameter (d) is calculated for different exposure times, it is found that d increased gradually as the exposure time increases before saturation. Further, two samples are irradiated by alpha particles but one is pre-exposed to UV for a time period of 3 h before being exposed to alpha, then the response function (V) is calculated for both. The values of V decreased for pre-exposed sample. The present data are the first measurements of the recent nuclear track laboratory at the experimental nuclear physics department, NRC, AEA

  19. Lyman-alpha radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Aaron; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical impact of Lyman-alpha (Ly{\\alpha}) radiation pressure on galaxy formation depends on the rate and duration of momentum transfer between Ly{\\alpha} photons and neutral hydrogen gas. Although photon trapping has the potential to multiply the effective force, ionizing radiation from stellar sources may relieve the Ly{\\alpha} pressure before appreciably affecting the kinematics of the host galaxy or efficiently coupling Ly{\\alpha} photons to the outflow. We present self-consistent Ly{\\alpha} radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of high-$z$ galaxy environments by coupling the Cosmic Ly{\\alpha} Transfer code (COLT) with spherically symmetric Lagrangian frame hydrodynamics. The accurate but computationally expensive Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations are feasible under the one-dimensional approximation. In certain cases Ly{\\alpha} feedback significantly enhances the velocity of the shell of gas expanding around a central source. Radiative feedback alone is capable of ejecting baryons into the i...

  20. Effects of alpha, gamma, and alpha-recoil radiation on borosilicate glass containing Savannah River Plant defense high-level nuclear waste. [Lead ions-250 keV; xenon ions-160 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    At the Savannah River Plant, the reference process for the immobilization of defense high-level waste (DHLW) for geologic storage is vitrification into borosilicate glass. During geologic storage for 10/sup 6/ y, the glass would be exposed to approx. 3 x 10/sup 10/ rad of ..beta.. radiation, approx. 10/sup 10/ rad of ..gamma.. radiation, and 10/sup 18/ particles/g glass for both ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..-recoil radiation. This paper discusses tests of the effect of these radiations on the leachability and density of the glass. Even though the doses were large, no effect of the radiations was detected that reduced the effectiveness of the glass for long-term storage of DHLW even at doses corresponding to 10/sup 6/ years storage for the actual glass. For the tests, glass containing simulated DHLW was prepared from frit of the reference composition. Three methods were used to irradiate the glass: external irradiations with beams of approx. 200 keV Xe or Pb ions, internal irradiations with Cm-244 doped glass, and external irradiations with Co-60 ..gamma.. rays. Results with both Xe and Pb ions indicate that a dose of 3 x 10/sup 13/ ions/cm/sup 2/ (simulating > 10/sup 6/ years storage) does not significantly increase the leachability of the glass in deionized water. Tests with Cm-244 doped glass show no increase in leach rate in water or brine up to a dose of 10/sup 18/ ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..-recoils/g glass. Results of larger doses are being examined. The density of the Cm-244 doped glass has decreased by 1% at a dose of 10/sup 18/ particles/g glass. With ..gamma..-radiation, the density has changed by < 0.05% at a dose of 8.5 x 10/sup 10/ rad. Results of leach tests in deionized water and brine indicated that this very large dose of ..gamma..-radiation increased the leach rate by only 20%. Also, the leach rates are lower in brine.

  1. Alpha-recoil effect on the dissolution of betafite: rapid natural annealing of radiation damage within a metamict phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betafite, a radioactive mineral, is the Ti-rich member of the pyrochlore group, A/sub 1-2/B2X6Y/sub 0-1/, (Fd3m, Z = 8), where A = Ca, Na, U, Th, REE (rare earth elements, Y, Ba, Sr, Bi, Pb; B = Nb, Ti, Ta, Zr, Sn, Fe: X = oxygen; Y = 0, OH and F. The pyrochlore structure (or structural derivatives, e.g. zirconolite in SYNROC) is a common constituent of polyphase, crystalline radioactive waste forms. Naturally occurring minerals with this structure often occur in the metamict state. Therefore, a principal concern is the effect of alpha-recoil damage on the structure and dissolution behavior of synthetic, analogue, waste-form phases which contain actinides. The authors describe the dissolution behavior of 238U, 234U, 232Th, 230Th and 228Th in betafite during leaching in a bicarbonate-carbonate solution. Results indicate enhanced leaching of recently produced alpha-recoil damage as evidenced by the more rapid dissolution rate of 228Th relative to 232Th and 230Th, and only slightly enhanced leaching of older damage as evidenced by a small increase in the dissolution rate of 234U relative to 238U. These experiments demonstrate that individual alpha-recoil tracks are preserved for some time as disordered regions of higher chemical reactivity in already fully-damaged, aperiodic structures. The authors estimate an annealing time for the alpha-recoil tracks of 2000 +/- 1300 yr in the metastable, aperiodic structure. Similar alpha-recoil tracks should be formed and annealed in other aperiodic nuclear waste forms, such as borosilicate glass

  2. Combined effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and ionizing radiation on the induction of apoptosis in 5637 bladder carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baierlein, S.A.; Distel, L.; Sieber, R.; Weiss, C.; Roedel, C.; Sauer, R.; Roedel, F. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Background and Purpose: Apoptosis can be induced by distinct but overlapping pathways. Ionizing radiation induces apoptosis by an ''intrinsic'', mitochondria-dependent pathway. Ligation of tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-){alpha}, FAS (CD95) or TRAIL receptors are typical representatives of an extrinsic, death-receptor-mediated pathway. In this study the effect of irradiation, treatment with the cytokine TNF-{alpha}, or a combination of both on the induction of apoptosis and clonogenic survival of bladder carcinoma cells was investigated. Material and Methods: 5637 bladder carcinoma cells were treated with different concentrations of recombinant TNF-{alpha} (0-10 ng/ml), irradiated with single doses ranging from 0.5 to 10 Gy, or a combination of both modalities. Apoptotic cells were quantified by the TUNEL assay up to 96 h following treatment, clonogenic cell survival by a clonogenic assay. Synergistic effects of both modalities were evaluated using isobolographic analysis. Results: Irradiation of 5637 carcinoma cells resulted in a discontinuous dose dependence of the apoptotic fraction with a pronounced increase in the range of 0-2 Gy and a slighter increase at 2-10 Gy. The percentage of apoptotic carcinoma cells also increased continuously after treatment with lower concentrations of TNF-{alpha} reaching a plateau at concentrations of 5.0-10.0 ng/ml. Isobolographic analysis revealed a supraadditive interrelationship between irradiation and TNF-{alpha} in the range between 0.005 and 0.5 ng/ml, and an additive effect for TNF-{alpha} concentrations > 0.5 ng/ml. The additive effects were confirmed in clonogenic survival assays with reduced survival fractions following combined TNF-{alpha} administration and irradiation. Conclusion: The combination of two apoptosis-inducing modalities resulted in a synergistic effect on the induction of apoptosis in 5637 bladder carcinoma cells. Although a radiosensitizing effect still has to be proven in animal models

  3. Radiation damage effects from alpha particle and influence of thermal annealing to defects at room temperature in silicon multiplication avalanche photo diode (MAPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing interest of new generation accelerators demand to produce detectors based on semiconductors which have radiation hardness. The getting progress in detectors based on semiconductor do not allow to say that the problem was solved. Thus producing radiation hardness detectors became problem for today. In the last several years the advanced progress in area MAPD allows to use this type diode in high energy physics as multiplier tube and detectors so investigation of radiation hardness of MAPD is very important. Influence of high energy protons, neutron and positron to MAPD were investigated. Influence of alpha particle is not investigated yet so this paper dedicated to investigate influence of alpha particle to MAPD.

  4. Model of cell response to {\\alpha}-particle radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Longjian

    2012-01-01

    Starting from a general equation for organism (or cell system) growth and attributing additional cell death rate (besides the natural rate) to therapy, we derive an equation for cell response to {\\alpha} radiation. Different from previous models that are based on statistical theory, the present model connects the consequence of radiation with the growth process of a biosystem and each variable or parameter has meaning regarding the cell evolving process. We apply this equation to model the dose response for {\\alpha}-particle radiation. It interprets the results of both high and low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. When LET is high, the additional death rate is a constant, which implies that the localized cells are damaged immediately and the additional death rate is proportional to the number of cells present. While at low LET, the additional death rate includes a constant term and a linear term of radiation dose, implying that the damage to some cell nuclei has a time accumulating effect. This model ...

  5. The effect of combining recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha with local radiation on tumor control probability of a human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF-α) on a human glioblastoma multiforme (U87) xenograft in nude mice, and to study the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation on the tumor control probability of this tumor model. Methods and Materials: U87 xenograft was transplanted SC into the right hindleg of NCr/Sed nude mice (7-8 weeks old, male). When tumors reached a volume of about 110 mm3, mice were randomly assigned to treatment: rHuTNF-α alone compared with normal saline control; or local radiation plus rHuTNF-α vs. local radiation plus normal saline. Parameters of growth delay, volume doubling time, percentage of necrosis, and cell loss factor were used to assess the antitumor effects of rHuTNF-α on this tumor. The TCD50 (tumor control dose 50%) was used as an endpoint to determine the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation. Results: Tumor growth in mice treated with a dose of 150 μg/kg body weight rHuTNF-α, IP injection daily for 7 consecutive days, was delayed about 8 days compared to that in controls. Tumors in the treatment group had a significantly longer volume doubling time, and were smaller in volume and more necrotic than matched tumors in control group. rHuTNF-α also induced a 2.3 times increase of cell loss factor. The administration of the above-mentioned dose of rHuTNF-α starting 24 h after single doses of localized irradiation under hypoxic condition, resulted in a significant reduction in TCD50 from the control value of 60.9 Gy to 50.5 Gy (p 50 value in the treatment vs. the control groups

  6. Characteristic of the new scintillators for alpha radiation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper authors present results of development of new glass scintillators for alpha radiation spectrometry. Physical and luminescence parameters of proposed scintillators are compared. Used materials and methods as well as alpha spectra of Rn-222, Po-218 and Po-214 are presented. (J.K.)

  7. The effect of alpha-interferon, cyclosporine A, and radiation-induced immune suppression on morphine-induced hypothermia and tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, P M; Harper, C; Dafny, N

    1986-12-01

    An interconnection between the immune and the central nervous systems has been suggested by investigators studying the actions of several types of immune modifying agents and procedures upon opiate related phenomena. These studies have included the effects of altering immune system function by administration of either alpha-interferon, cyclosporine or radiation exposure upon naloxone-precipitated opiate withdrawal and upon opioid antinociceptive effects. The present study extends these earlier investigations by examining the effect of immune modulation upon opiate induced hypothermia. The results demonstrate that interferon and cyclosporine have no effects on baseline temperature or morphine induced hypothermia, while irradiation exposure elicits hyperthermia without affecting morphine-induced hypothermia. Finally, neither cyclosporine nor irradiation affect the development of tolerance to morphine induced hypothermia, while a single injection of the immune system modifier interferon was able to prevent the development of such tolerance. These observations suggest that yet another opiate-related phenomenon may be regulated at least in part by the immune system. These results together with our previous findings are further evidence of a link between the immune system and the CNS mediated through the opioid system. In addition, these studies further support our earlier hypothesis that "Interferon" is one of the endogenous substances which serves to prevent the development of tolerance and dependence to endogenous opioids. PMID:3784774

  8. Proposal of a weight factor for alpha radiation aiming biota radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several proposals based on the environmental radioprotection of calculating the absorbed dose in biota have been suggested. The absorbed dose expresses the deposition of energy per mass unit. The differences in biological effects of the absorbed dose can be quantified by applying a correction factor to the absorbed dose. The correction factor for radiation is easier to establish, because radiations exist in smaller number (alpha, beta, neutrons and photons) and can be set for groups of organisms. This work aims to propose a correction factor for radiation, in order to adequate the concept of absorbed dose currently used to the concept of equivalent dose. A survey of the literature on correction factors proposed for alpha radiation was carried out and, when possible, the biological endpoint was identified, as well as the radionuclide and the biological target. A variation of the weight factor for alpha radiation from 1 to 377 was observed and a number of biological endpoints, biological target and alpha emitter radionuclide were identified. Finally we propose a weight value for alpha radiation of 40, and we propose also the name of correction factor for radiation alpha as being ecological radiation weighting factor (WRE) the name 'equivalent dose for flora and fauna' (HTFF) to name of the new dose. (author)

  9. The effects and control of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; ionising radiation (alpha and beta particles, gamma- and X-radiation, neutrons, half-life, sources of radiation); biological effects; risk estimates (somatic) (early effects, delayed effects); risk estimates (hereditary); control of radiation; risk estimates (accidents). (U.K.)

  10. Health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is energy that travels through space as electromagnetic waves or a stream of fast moving particles. In the workplace, the sources of ionizing radiation are radioactive substances, nuclear power plants, x-ray machines and nuclear devices used in medicine, research and industry. Commonly encountered types of radiation are alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Alpha particles have very little penetrating power and pose a risk only when the radioactive substance is deposited inside the body. Beta particles are more penetrating than alpha particles and can penetrate the outer body tissues causing damage to the skin and the eyes. Gamma rays are highly penetrating and can cause radiation damage to the whole body. The probability of radiation-induced disease depends on the accumulated amount of radiation dose. The main health effects of ionizing radiation are cancers in exposed persons and genetic disorders in the children, grandchildren and subsequent generations of the exposed parents. The fetus is highly sensitive to radiation-induced abnormalities. At high doses, radiation can cause cataracts in the eyes. There is no firm evidence that ionizing radiation causes premature aging. Radiation-induced sterility is highly unlikely for occupational doses. The data on the combined effect of ionizing radiation and other cancer-causing physical and chemical agents are inconclusive

  11. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of our research work is to provide -- with the aid of biophysical models of radiation action -- information on human risks following exposure to radon alpha particles. The approach proposed consists of (1) developing appropriate models (parametric and non-parametric) for alpha radiation induction of relevant end points (survival, cellular transformation), (2) providing an accurate physical characterization of the particle tracks in terms of nanodosimetric distributions, (3) supporting the models by detailed, molecular studies of the direct and indirect effects of alpha particles on DNA. Activities in the second year of this project are described

  12. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of our research work is to provide -- with the aid of biophysical models of radiation action -- information on human risks following exposure to radon alpha particles. The approach proposed consists of (1) developing appropriate models (parametric and non-parametric) for alpha radiation induction of relevant end points (survival, cellular transformation), (2) providing an accurate physical characterization of the particle tracks in terms of nanodosimetric distributions, (3) supporting the models by detailed, molecular studies of the direct and indirect effects of alpha particles on DNA. Activities in the second year of this project are described.

  13. 3D Lyman-alpha radiation transfer. I. Understanding Lyman-alpha line profile morphologies

    OpenAIRE

    Verhamme, Anne; Schaerer, Daniel; Maselli, Antonella

    2006-01-01

    Using a Monte Carlo technique, we have developed a 3D lyman-alpha radiation transfer code allowing for prescribed arbitrary hydrogen density, ionisation, temperature structures, and dust distribution, and arbitrary velocity fields and UV photon sources. We have examined the lyman-alpha line profiles predicted for several simple geometrical configurations and their dependence on the main input parameters. Overall, we find line profiles reaching from doubly peaked symmetric emission to symmetri...

  14. Alpha radiation measurement - Recommendations dossier for measurements optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Used in the medical domain, in the military industry or in the electronuclear industry, the alpha radiation, by its detection and measurement, is of prime importance for the environmental control, the follow up of any industrial technical operation or the measurement of the health impact of radioactivity. This book gathers the basic knowledge, both practical and theoretical, and the necessary recommendations that any operator, technician or engineer would need to know for the use of alpha spectroscopy as a quantitative and qualitative method of analysis. It supplies information in the domains of: - sources preparation for alpha spectroscopy measurement; - measurements implementation for each technique: proportional counter, semiconductor alpha spectroscopy, grid chamber and liquid scintillation; - results processing and display; - quality assurance. It makes a synthesis of the know-how of laboratories in the fabrication of thin sources by supplying simple but important rules as well as information allowing to deal with the physical and chemical limits of thin sources. It lists the techniques relative to alpha particles detection and describes for each of them their sensitivity, advantages and drawbacks, and field of use. It introduces in the simplest as possible manner the mathematical tools needed for spectra deconvolution with some practical examples allowing to illustrate some complex situations encountered. It supplies to the user the theoretical and practical background necessary for the production of reliable and valid results. Finally, it includes and discusses the recent considerations about the calculation of decision threshold and detection limits. Content: 1 - reference documents: scientific and technical documents, standards, nuclear data; 2 - natural and artificial alpha radioactivity: discovery of alpha radiation, natural alpha radioactivity, artificial alpha radioactivity (medical, industrial exposure), dating method using nuclear phenomena; 3

  15. Evaluation of pGL1-TNF-alpha therapy in combination with radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Andres, M. L.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-term control of high-grade brain tumors is rarely achieved with current therapeutic regimens. In this study a new plasmid-based human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression vector was synthesized (pGL1-TNF-alpha) and evaluated together with radiation in the aggressive, rapidly growing C6 rat glioma model. pGL1-TNF-alpha was successfully transfected into C6 cells in vitro using a cationic polyamine method. Expression was detected up to 7 days and averaged 0.4 ng of TNF-alpha in the culture medium from 1x10(5) cells. The expressed protein was biologically functional, as evidenced by growth inhibition of L929, a TNF-alpha-susceptible cell line. Using fluorescence-labeled monoclonal antibodies and laser scanning cytometry, we confirmed that both the P55 and P75 receptors for TNF-alpha were present on the C6 cell membrane. However, the receptors were present at low density and P55 was expressed more than the P75 receptor. These findings were in contrast to results obtained with TNF-alpha-susceptible L929 cells. Tests in athymic mice showed that pGL1-TNF-alpha administered intratumorally 16-18 h before radiation (each modality given three times) significantly inhibited C6 tumor progression (Palpha alone did not slow tumor growth and radiation alone had little effect on tumor growth. These results indicate that pGL1-TNF-alpha has potential to augment the antitumor effects of radiation against a tumor type that is virtually incurable.

  16. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaider, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report on a theory for describing the biological effects of ionizing radiation in particular radon [alpha] particles. Behind this approach is the recognition that biological effects such as chromosome aberrations, cellular transformation, cellular inactivation, etc, are the result of a hierarchic sequence of radiation effects. We indicate how to treat each of the individual processes in this sequence, and also how to relate one effect to the hierarchically superior one.

  17. Redistribution of radiation for the wings of Lyman-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelnik, J.-B.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Voslamber, D.

    1981-01-01

    Earlier work on redistribution of radiation by collisions for isolated lines is extended to overlapping lines, and an explicit expression for the frequency redistribution is given for Lyman-alpha. This expression is valid, even when the emitted photon is in the (non-impact) line wings. A simple physical explanation of the result is possible.

  18. Dislocations and radiation damage in {alpha}-uranium; Dislocations et effets des radiations dans l'uranium {alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leteurtre, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Dislocations in {alpha}-uranium were studied by electron microscopy. Electropolishing of thin foils was performed at low temperature (-110 deg. C) to prevent oxidation. Burgers vectors of twins dislocations are defined. Interactions between slip and twinning are studied from both experimental and theoretical point of view. Samples irradiated at several burn-up were examined. In order to explain our micrographic results, and also all information gathered in literature about radiation damage in {alpha}-uranium, a coherent model is propound for the fission particles effects. We analyse the influences of parameters: temperature, dislocation density, impurity content. The number of point defects created by one initial fission is determined for pure and annealed metal. The importance of the self-anneal which occurs immediately in each displacement spike, and the anneal due to a new fission on the damage resulting from a previous fission, are estimated. The focussing distance in [100] direction is found to be about 1000 Angstrom, at 4 deg. K. (author) [French] Ce travail est une etude par microscopie electronique des dislocations induites dans l'uranium {alpha}, soit par deformation plastique, soit par irradiation. Une methode de preparation des lames minces a basse temperature (-110 deg. C) a ete mise au point. Les vecteurs de Burgers des diverses dislocations de macles de ce metal ont ete definis. Les interactions glissements- maclages sont etudiees experimentalement et theoriquement. Des echantillons irradies a divers taux de combustion ont ete examines. Pour expliquer nos resultats micrographiques, et aussi l'ensemble des informations recueillies dans la litterature concernant l'endommagement par irradiation de l'uranium-{alpha}, nous proposons un modele coherent de l'effet des fragments de fission dans ce metal. L'influence des parametres: temperature, densite de dislocations, impuretes est analysee. Le nombre de defauts ponctuels crees

  19. Study of radiation effects on the cell structure and evaluation of the dose delivered by x-ray and {alpha}-particles microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosior, Ewelina; Cloetens, Peter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bohic, Sylvain [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38000 Grenoble (France); INSERM U-836 (Team 6: Synchrotron Radiation and Medical Research), Grenoble Institut of Neuroscience, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2012-12-24

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to study radiation effects on cells. Experiments were performed on freeze-dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European synchrotron radiation facility. Quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass and is used to evaluate the structural changes due to irradiation during X-ray fluorescence experiments. Complementary to phase contrast imaging, scanning transmission ion microscopy is performed and doses of all the experiments are compared. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the proposed approach to study radiation-induced damage at the sub-cellular level.

  20. 3D Lyman-alpha radiation transfer. I. Understanding Lyman-alpha line profile morphologies

    CERN Document Server

    Verhamme, A; Maselli, A; Verhamme, Anne; Schaerer, Daniel; Maselli, Antonella

    2006-01-01

    Using a Monte Carlo technique, we have developed a 3D lyman-alpha radiation transfer code allowing for prescribed arbitrary hydrogen density, ionisation, temperature structures, and dust distribution, and arbitrary velocity fields and UV photon sources. We have examined the lyman-alpha line profiles predicted for several simple geometrical configurations and their dependence on the main input parameters. Overall, we find line profiles reaching from doubly peaked symmetric emission to symmetric Voigt (absorption) in static configurations with increasing dust content, and asymmetric red-(blue-) shifted emission lines with a blue (red) counterpart ranging from absorption to emission (with increasing line/continuum strength) in expanding (infalling) media. The following results are of interest for the interpretation of lya profiles from galaxies. 1/ Standard lya absorption line fitting of global spectra of galaxies may lead to an underestimate of the true hydrogen column density in certain geometrical conditions....

  1. Lyman-alpha radiative transfer during the Epoch of Reionization: contribution to 21-cm signal fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Semelin, B; Baek, S

    2007-01-01

    During the epoch of reionization, Ly-alpha photons emitted by the first stars can couple the neutral hydrogen spin temperature to the kinetic gas temperature, providing the opportunity to observe the gas in emission or absorption in the 21-cm line. Given the bright foregrounds, it is of prime importance to determine precisely the fluctuations signature of the signal, to be able to extract it by its correlation power. LICORICE is a Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code, coupled to the dynamics via an adaptative Tree-SPH code. We present here the Ly-alpha part of the implementation, and validate it through three classical tests. Contrary to previous works, we do not assume that P_alpha, the number of scatterings of Ly-alpha photons per atom per second, is proportional to the Ly-alpha background flux, but take into account the scatterings in the Ly-alpha line wings. The latter have the effect to steepen the radial profile of P_alpha around each source, and re-inforce the contrast of the fluctuations. In the partic...

  2. Biological stress responses induced by alpha radiation exposure in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, A.; Horemans, N.; Van Hees, M.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Knapen, D.; Blust, R. [University of Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    To enhance the robustness of radiation protection criteria for biota, additional information on the biological impact of radionuclides on non-human biota is needed. In particular the effects of alpha emitting isotopes have been poorly studied within a radioecological contextual though they exhibit a high linear energy transfer which can cause significant biological damage when taken up by organisms. Therefore, it is not only essential to measure alpha radiation toxicity, but also try to understand the underlying mechanisms of this stressor. The current study aimed to contribute to a better knowledge of the fundamental processes regulating alpha radiation stress response mechanisms in higher plants. {sup 241}Am was primarily selected as it is an almost pure alpha emitter and, as a daughter nuclide of {sup 241}Pu, it will become one of the dominant pollutants in plutonium affected areas. The aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor has proven its value in eco-toxicological research as representative of higher aquatic plants (OECD guideline nr. 221) and will be used to analyze alpha radiation stress in plant systems. An individual growth inhibition test was set up by means of single dose-response curve in order to identify the Effective Dose Rates (EDR-values) for frond size and biomass. As the mean path length is small for alpha particles, the accumulation of the radionuclide inside species represents almost exclusively the dosimetry. Therefore, quantification of {sup 241}Am uptake and {sup 241}Am distribution were evaluated separately for roots and fronds taking the activity concentrations of growth medium into account. Taken together with the respective dose conversion coefficients from the ERICA tool, this allowed to construct an accurate dosimetric model to determine internal and external dose rates. Different standard media were tested on growth rate and biomass to analyse the amount of {sup 241}Am taken up by the plants exposed from 2.5 to 100 kBq/L. From these

  3. Determination of alpha constant value for brazilian reality aiming de radiation protection optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to present a methodology for the calculation of the alpha constant taking into account the actual conditions in Brazil. This constant is used for the minimization of the worker doses meaning the optimization of radiation protection. The alpha constant represents a monetary value to establish the health detriment associated to the stochastic effects for unit of collective dose, and is directly related to the value of the human life. Along the years, several methods have been developed to obtain the most appropriate value for the alpha constant. These methods will be objects of analysis of this work. This work presents two methods for determination of the alpha constant: 'human capital' that is based on GDP of the country and 'willingness-to-pay' that is established for the value that the population would be willing to pay for the safety of the nuclear and radioactive facilities. A new methodology for the calculation of the alpha constant has been proposed in this study, that is the combination of two method previously mentioned, and recommends a new value of US$ 16,000.00 per man-sievert. Currently the value established by CNEN is US$ 10,000.00 per men sievert. This work also presents, in full details, the main mathematical tools for the elaboration of the optimization of the radiation protection: cost-benefit analysis, extended cost-benefit analysis and multi attribute utility analysis. An applied example, for an uranium mine radiation protection optimization was used to compare those two values of the alpha constant. (author)

  4. Radiation induced structural changes in alpha-copper-zinc alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During irradiation of alpha-copper-zinc alloys with high energy electrons and protons a decrease of the electrical resistivity due to an increase of the degree of short range order is observed through radiation enhanced diffusion followed by an increase of the electrical resistivity through the formation of radiation induced interstitial clusters. The initial formation rate of interstitial clusters increases about linearly with the displacement rate for electron and proton irradiation. The largest initial formation rate is found between 60 and 1300C becoming negligibly small above 1580C and decreases drastically below 600C. The dynamic steady state interstitial cluster concentration increases with decreasing irradiation temperature in the investigated temperature range between 158 and 400C. Above 1580C the formation rate of interstitial clusters is negligibly small. Thus the transition temperature for radiation induced interstitial cluster formation is 1580C, depending mainly on the migration activation energy of vacancies. The radiation induced interstitial clusters are precipitates in those alloys in which the diffusion rate of the undersized component atoms via an interstitialcy diffusion mechanism is larger than that of the other atoms

  5. Interaction of alpha particles at the cellular level - Implications for the radiation weighting factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since low dose effects of alpha particles are produced by cellular hits in a relatively small fraction of exposed cells, the present study focuses on alpha particle interactions in bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to inhaled radon progeny. A computer code was developed for the calculation of microdosimetric spectra, dose and hit probabilities for alpha particles emitted from uniform and non-uniform source distributions in cylindrical and Y-shaped bronchial airway geometries. Activity accumulations at the dividing spur of bronchial airway bifurcations produce hot spots of cellular hits, indicating that a small fraction of cells located at such sites may receive substantially higher doses. While presently available data on in vitro transformation frequencies suggest that the relative biological effectiveness for alpha particles ranges from about 3 to 10, the effect of inhomogeneous activity distributions of radon progeny may slightly increase the radiation weighting factor relative to a uniform distribution. Thus a radiation weighting factor of about 10 may be more realistic than the current value of 20, at least for lung cancer risk following inhalation of short-lived radon progeny. (authors)

  6. Relativistic effects in Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Iršič, Vid; Viel, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We present the calculation of the Lyman-alpha (Lyman-$\\alpha$) transmitted flux fluctuations with full relativistic corrections to the first order. Even though several studies exist on relativistic effects in galaxy clustering, this is the first study to extend the formalism to a different tracer of underlying matter at unique redshift range ($z = 2 - 5$). Furthermore, we show a comprehensive application of our calculations to the Quasar- Lyman-$\\alpha$ cross-correlation function. Our results indicate that the signal of relativistic effects can be as large as 30% at Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale, which is much larger than anticipated and mainly due to the large differences in density bias factors of our tracers. We construct an observable, the anti-symmetric part of the cross- correlation function, that is dominated by the relativistic signal and offers a new way to measure the relativistic terms at relatively small scales. The analysis shows that relativistic effects are important when considerin...

  7. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles. Progress report, July 1990--June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaider, M.

    1992-12-31

    We report on a theory for describing the biological effects of ionizing radiation in particular radon {alpha} particles. Behind this approach is the recognition that biological effects such as chromosome aberrations, cellular transformation, cellular inactivation, etc, are the result of a hierarchic sequence of radiation effects. We indicate how to treat each of the individual processes in this sequence, and also how to relate one effect to the hierarchically superior one.

  8. Radiation effects and radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig./MG) With 8 maps in appendix

  9. The alpha effectiveness of the dating ESR signal in barite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alpha effectiveness was investigated for an ESR signal due to SO3− in barite by comparing the dose responses of the signal for gamma irradiation and for He ion implantation with an energy of 4 MeV. The value was obtained to be 0.043 ± 0.018 for samples from Morocco and to be 0.0089 ± 0.0006 for Kanehira Mine. The dose response for He ion implantation for the latter sample better fits to a correlation line but the signal shape changes with gamma ray dose, indicating contribution from an unknown radiation sensitive signal, while the former sample shows the same signal shapes. A value of 0.043 ± 0.018 is adopted as the alpha effectiveness of SO3− signal in barite, which is used for ESR dating of submarine hydrothermal activity. - Highlights: ► The alpha effectiveness is one of the essential factors in ESR dating. ► The alpha effectiveness value was determined for barite. ► The dose responses for gamma and for He ion implantation were compared. ► A sample shows signal shape change by gamma ray irradiation.

  10. Effects of internally deposited alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study seeks to identify and quantify the human health effects of occupational exposures to radium, use the health effects data from the radium study to predict responses to other alpha-emitting and/or bone-seeking radionuclides at occupational exposure levels and above, and predict the effects of these radionuclides, specifically environmental radium and its daughters, at nonoccupational exposure levels. 14 refs

  11. Early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Snipes, M.B.; Newton, G.J.; Eidson, A.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.

    1988-03-01

    This report summarizes an inhalation exposure experiment that concerns early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung of rats. Both morbidity at 18 months and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined for rats exposed to the beta-emitter /sup 147/Pm, the alpha-emitter /sup 238/Pu, or both combined. The results were used to validate hazard-function models that were developed (1)for pulmonary functional morbidity at 18 months and (2) for lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis within 18 months. Both models were found to adequately predict the experimental observations after combined chronic alpha and beta irradiation of the lung. A relative biological effectiveness of approximately 7 was obtained for /sup 238/Pu alpha radiation compared to /sup 147/Pm beta radiation for both pulmonary functional morbidity and lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. 12 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles. Final performance technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this project was to develop theoretical/computational tools for evaluating the risks incurred by populations exposed to radon alpha particles. Topics of concern include the following: compound dual radiation action (general aspects); a mathematical formalism describing the yield of radiation induced single-and double-strand DNA breaks, and its dependence on radiation quality; a study of the excited states in cytosine and guanine stacks in the Hartree-Fock and exciton approximations; nanodosimetry of radon alpha particles; application of the HSEF to assessing radiation risks in the practice of radiation protection; carcinogenic risk coefficients at environmental levels of radon exposures: a microdosimetric approach; and hit-size effectiveness approach in radiation protection

  13. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles. Final performance technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaider, M.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this project was to develop theoretical/computational tools for evaluating the risks incurred by populations exposed to radon alpha particles. Topics of concern include the following: compound dual radiation action (general aspects); a mathematical formalism describing the yield of radiation induced single-and double-strand DNA breaks, and its dependence on radiation quality; a study of the excited states in cytosine and guanine stacks in the Hartree-Fock and exciton approximations; nanodosimetry of radon alpha particles; application of the HSEF to assessing radiation risks in the practice of radiation protection; carcinogenic risk coefficients at environmental levels of radon exposures: a microdosimetric approach; and hit-size effectiveness approach in radiation protection.

  14. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  15. RADIATION AND EFFECTS ON HUMAN HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan YAREN

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In modern world, living without radiation is impossible. Radiation is defined as ?energy transmitted through space as waves or particles? and also determined as ?particles or waves emitted from the nucleus of unstable radioactive atoms to become stable? Mainly two types of radiation are exist; ionising radiation and non-ionising radiation. Ionising radiation is consist of alpha, beta particules, neutrons, x rays and gamma rays. Ionising radiation which can be measured by ion chambers, geiger-Mueller detectors, Scintillation Counters, fluorescent counters etc. Has harmfull effects on human health in levels of molecular, cellular, tissue, organs and organ systems. These harmfull effects can also be named somatic and genetic. One of the most encountered problem is ?Acute Radiation Syndrom? which has three sub syndroms called haematopoetic syndrom, gastrointestinal syndrom and neurovascular syndrom. Exposure time, distance and armorisation are the key elements of protection from radiation. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(4.000: 199-208

  16. Radiation-induced peroxidation of lipid dissolved in organic solvent and its inhibition by alpha-tocopherol and cepharanthine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of cepharanthine and alpha-tocopherol on radiation-induced peroxidation of lipids dissolved in methanol(MeOH)-chloroform (CHCl3)-H2O(v/v, 2/1/0.8) were examined. alpha-Tocopherol strongly inhibited radiation-induced peroxidation of lipids dissolved in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O. However, cepharanthine exhibited a weak inhibitory action in this system. The change in the absorption spectrum of alpha-tocopherol and cepharanthine by X-irradiation was measured. The reagents were dissolved in 95% EtOH acidified with 20 mM HCl and in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O. alpha-Tocopherol exhibited the change in its absorption spectrum in both systems, and seemed to be oxidized at a high rate by free radicals. However, cepharanthine slightly exhibited the change in its spectrum in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O, but not in acidified EtOH

  17. Radiation-induced peroxidation of lipid dissolved in organic solvent and its inhibition by alpha-tocopherol and cepharanthine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, N.; Joja, I.; Kuroda, M.; Fujishima, M.; Miyake, M.; Aono, K.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of cepharanthine and alpha-tocopherol on radiation-induced peroxidation of lipids dissolved in methanol(MeOH)-chloroform (CHCl3)-H2O(v/v, 2/1/0.8) were examined. alpha-Tocopherol strongly inhibited radiation-induced peroxidation of lipids dissolved in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O. However, cepharanthine exhibited a weak inhibitory action in this system. The change in the absorption spectrum of alpha-tocopherol and cepharanthine by X-irradiation was measured. The reagents were dissolved in 95% EtOH acidified with 20 mM HCl and in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O. alpha-Tocopherol exhibited the change in its absorption spectrum in both systems, and seemed to be oxidized at a high rate by free radicals. However, cepharanthine slightly exhibited the change in its spectrum in MeOH-CHCl3-H2O, but not in acidified EtOH.

  18. Alpha particle effects on MHD ballooning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period, as the first step towards the goal of detail understanding of the effects of alpha particle on MHD Ballooning Modes, a new numerical approach to investigate the stability of low-frequency fluctuations in high temperature tokamaks was developed by solving the gyrokinetic equations for the ion and electron directly as an initial value problem. The advantage of this approach is the inclusion of many important kinetic features of the problem without approximations and computationally more economical than particle-pushing simulation. The ion-temperature-gradient-mode was investigated to benchmark this new simulation technique. Previous results in literature were recovered. Both the adiabatic electron model and the full drift-kinetic electron model are studied. Numerical result shows that the full drift-kinetic electron model is more unstable. The development of subcycling technique to handle the fast electron bounce time is particularly significant to apply this new approach to the alpha particle problem since alpha particle bounce frequency is also significantly higher than the mode frequency. This new numerical technique will be the basis of future study of the microstability in high temperature tokamaks with alpha particles (or any energetic species). 15 refs., 13 figs

  19. Alpha-risk: a European project on the quantification of risks associated with multiple radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alpha-Risk research project is being conducted within the Sixth European Framework Programme (EC-FP6, 2005 -2008). It aims to improve the quantification of risks associated with multiple exposures, taking into account the contribution of different radionuclides and external exposure using specific organ dose calculations. The Alpha-Risk Consortium involves 18 partners from 9 countries, and is coordinated by the IRSN. Its composition allows a multidisciplinary collaboration between researchers in epidemiology, dosimetry, statistics, modelling and risk assessment. Alpha-Risk brings together major epidemiological studies in Europe, which are able to evaluate long-term health effects of internal exposure from radionuclides. It includes large size cohort and case-control studies, with accurate registration of individual annual exposures: uranium miner studies, studies on lung cancer and indoor radon exposure, and studies of lung cancer and leukaemia among nuclear workers exposed to transuranic nuclides (mainly uranium and plutonium), for whom organ doses will be reconstructed individually. The contribution of experts in dosimetry will allow the calculation of organ doses in presence of multiple exposures (radon decay products, uranium dust and external gamma exposure). Expression of the risk per unit organ dose will make it possible to compare results with those from other populations exposed to external radiation. The multidisciplinary approach of Alpha-Risk promotes the development of coherent and improved methodological approaches regarding risk modelling. A specific work - package is dedicated to the integration of results and their use for risk assessment, especially for radon. Alpha-Risk will contribute to a better understanding of long-term health risks following chronic low doses from internal exposures. The project also has the great potential to help resolve major public health concerns about the effects of low and/or protracted exposures, especially

  20. Molecular effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of radiobiology based on the effects of radiation in cells and tissues. Though the primary constituents of tissues are DNA and chromosomes, thus we need to know the effects of radiation in its molecular level before going for its effect in tissue level. The most abundant molecule inside the body is water molecule, and any type of radiation effect to water molecule might affect the whole body functionality. Brief knowledge about the effect of radiation in molecular level on the basis of hydrolysis of water; and radiation damage to DNA and chromosome will be helpful to understand the basics of radiobiology. (author)

  1. Quantification of actinide alpha-radiation damage in minerals and ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnan, Ian; Cho, Herman; Weber, William J

    2007-01-11

    There are large amounts of heavy alpha-emitters in nuclear waste and nuclear materials inventories stored in various sites around the world. These include plutonium and minor actinides such as americium and curium. In preparation for geological disposal there is consensus that actinides that have been separated from spent nuclear fuel should be immobilized within mineral-based ceramics rather than glass because of their superior aqueous durability and lower risk of accidental criticality. However, in the long term, the alpha-decay taking place in these ceramics will severely disrupt their crystalline structure and reduce their durability. A fundamental property in predicting cumulative radiation damage is the number of atoms permanently displaced per alpha-decay. At present, this number is estimated to be 1,000-2,000 atoms/alpha in zircon. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance, spin-counting experiments that measure close to 5,000 atoms/alpha in radiation-damaged natural zircons. New radiological nuclear magnetic resonance measurements on highly radioactive, 239Pu zircon show damage similar to that caused by 238U and 232Th in mineral zircons at the same dose, indicating no significant effect of half-life or loading levels (dose rate). On the basis of these measurements, the initially crystalline structure of a 10 weight per cent 239Pu zircon would be amorphous after only 1,400 years in a geological repository (desired immobilization timescales are of the order of 250,000 years). These measurements establish a basis for assessing the long-term structural durability of actinide-containing ceramics in terms of an atomistic understanding of the fundamental damage event. PMID:17215840

  2. Effect of Pilates Training on Alpha Rhythm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhijie Bian; Hongmin Sun; Chengbiao Lu; Li Yao; Shengyong Chen; Xiaoli Li

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of Pilates training on the brain function was investigated through five case studies. Alpha rhythm changes during the Pilates training over the different regions and the whole brain were mainly analyzed, including power spectral density and global synchronization index (GSI). It was found that the neural network of the brain was more active, and the synchronization strength reduced in the frontal and temporal regions due to the Pilates training. These results support...

  3. Space radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors briefly discusses the radiation environment in near-earth space and it's influences on material, and electronic devices using in space airship, also, the research developments in space radiation effects are introduced

  4. Radiation effects in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented

  5. The Alpha Dynamo Effects in Laboratory Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Stewart C. Prager

    2001-10-16

    A concise review of observations of the alpha dynamo effect in laboratory plasmas is given. Unlike many astrophysical systems, the laboratory pinch plasmas are driven magnetically. When the system is overdriven, the resultant instabilities cause magnetic and flow fields to fluctuate, and their correlation induces electromotive forces along the mean magnetic field. This alpha-effect drives mean parallel electric current, which, in turn, modifies the initial background mean magnetic structure towards the stable regime. This drive-and-relax cycle, or the so-called self-organization process, happens in magnetized plasmas in a timescale much shorter than resistive diffusion time, thus it is a fast and unquenched dynamo process. The observed alpha-effect redistributes magnetic helicity (a measure of twistedness and knottedness of magnetic field lines) but conserves its total value. It can be shown that fast and unquenched dynamos are natural consequences of a driven system where fluctuations are statistically either not stationary in time or not homogeneous in space, or both. Implications to astrophysical phenomena will be discussed.

  6. An alpha-omega-dynamo with an alpha-effect due to magnetostrophic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D.

    1987-03-01

    The effects of the latitude dependence of the dynamic alpha-effect on the solution of equations of alpha-omega-dynamos are investigated. The equations of kinematic rotationally symmetric alpha-omega-dynamos are evaluated using the spherical solar dynamo model of Deinzer and Stix (1971), in which the induction effects, differential rotation, and alpha-effect act in two separate infinitesimal thin shells. Butterfly diagrams are derived and analyzed. It is observed that the diagram has two branches: the ordinary sunspot branch, migrating from midlatitudes toward the equator during the cycle, and the polar branch, which migrates from the midlatitudes toward the pole. It is also found that, in order to obtain the correct propagation direction of the two dynamos, the alpha of the magnetostrophic waves requires a rotation decreasing with depth. The influence of various locations of the induction layers of alpha- and omega-effect are examined.

  7. Future radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the units used in radiation protection. The radiation hazards incurred by human populations can be divided into early and late somatic radiation effects and genetic radiation effects. Examples and motivations of risk analysis estimates are given. For genetic radiation effects, the siginificance dose and the doubling dose are defined. The minimum permissible dose for different human populations are compared with the doses received from natural radioactivity with medical applications. The risk caused by nuclear reactors and fall-out and its consequences are given for the year 1972 and estimated for the year 2000

  8. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  9. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed

  10. Radiation chemical investigations of Fricke solution using 30 MeV alpha beam from cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic investigations on the radiolysis of liquid systems using 30 MeV alpha beam from cyclotron at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) have been initiated. A liquid target assembly incorporating current measurement devices in solution as well as on the target assembly window has been designed. Suitable aluminium absorbers of different thickness have been used to extract different energies of alpha ranging from 24.82 MeV to 6.41 MeV corresponding to the LET range of 2.77 eV/A0 to 7.98 eV/A0. A fricke solution using 10 mM Fe2+ in 0.8 NH2SO4 in presence of 5mM NaCl under continuous oxygen bubbling has been radiolysed with radiation of different LET. The effect of LET on the G(Fe3+) has been investigated and the results are discussed. (author)

  11. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  12. Nature of boundary radiation of alpha-CdSe layers obtained by isovalent replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P.Makhniy

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of boundary radiation of alpha-CdSe layers are investigated by lambda-modulation method. It is determined that dominating radiation is caused by annihilation of binding excitons. It is shown that residual atoms of sulfur’s isovalent impurity take part in forming of excitons radiation.

  13. Determination of molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in rat mesenteric artery by radiation inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation inactivation of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the purified plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery has been performed with high energy electrons at -45 to -55 degrees C. Alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptor inactivation was monitored with [3H] prazosin and [3H]yohimbine binding, respectively. Internal endogenous and external standards of known molecular weight were used in these studies to determine the molecular size. The average value of D37 for the [3H]prazosin binding site was 6.75 +/- 0.62 Mrad (n = 4) with an estimated molecular size of 122,921 +/- 11,329 Daltons. However, the average value of D37 for the [3H] yohimbine binding site was higher (D37 = 10.05 +/- 0.91 Mrad) and accordingly the molecular size of this binding site was less than the [3H]prazosin binding sites (molecular weight = 82,540 +/- 7478 Daltons; n = 4). Irradiation did not change the dissociation constant of either radioligand, suggesting that the loss of the radioligand binding sites after radiation is due to receptor protein inactivation. These results confirm our earlier finding that [3H]prazosin and [3H]yohimbine bind to two distinct sites in the plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery. Whether both of these sites are the subunits of a common macromolecule of alpha adrenoceptor on vascular smooth muscle in rat mesenteric artery cannot be concluded from these results. This report is the first one in the literature on the molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 binding sites in vascular smooth muscle

  14. Black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels:The $ (Z \\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Wanping; Lu, Jingjun; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The next-to-leading order black-body radiation(BBR) shift to atomic energy-levels, namely $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction, was studied by using the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics(NRQED) at first. This $T^{2}$-dependent correction has not been investigated before, and only contains the contribution of eletric-dipole of thermal photon. In order to study the contribution of multipolar. We estimate the two-loop contributions of BBR-shift by using quantum electrodynamics approach(QED), and find both one-loop and two-loop diagram contribute to the $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction. Integrating the results which are obtained by these two approaches, the $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction we derived is in principle applicable to multi-electron atoms and contains the contribution of multipolar. The order of magnitude BBR-shift indicates this next-to-leading order BBR-shift may be as significant as the leading order in the multi-electron atoms or cold ones.

  15. Growth and Characterization of alpha-PbO for Room Temperature Radiation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Erin Leigh

    A global trading structure and high throughput of shipping containers into ports around the world increases the chance of nuclear terrorism via cargo containers. Harmless radioactive sources confuse and impede detection of the materials that pose a real threat, making spectroscopy difficult and requiring detectors with high resolution. The current methods that are used to check containers in ports have security flaws, and only 5% of all shipping containers are checked. The development of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors is one of the protocols being advanced to alleviate this risk because they can function at room temperature and they are cost effective, easily produced, and have high resolution. This dissertation has addressed the current lack of "perfect" room temperature detector materials by investigating alpha-PbO, a novel material in this field. This includes the development of a growth process for alpha-PbO thin films, as well as its structural and performance characterization as a detector material. Because we intend alpha-PbO to be a photoconductive detector, it should have certain properties. A photoconductive detector consists of a highly resistive material with a voltage bias across it. It absorbs incident gamma-rays, creating electron-hole pairs that provide a signal. To function well, it must have a high atomic number and a high density in order to absorb high-energy photons via the photoelectric effect. It should also have a large resistivity and a wide band gap to avoid large leakage currents at room temperature. Finally, it must have good charge carrier transport properties and detector resolution in order to be able to determine the characteristic energy peaks of the radiation-emitting source. We chose alpha-PbO because it has a very high Z and a very high density and a band gap in the correct range. It also has a rich history of use as a photoconductor that reaches back to the 1950s. Numerous methods have been used to grow thin films of alpha

  16. Black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels:The $ (Z \\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Wanping; Mei, Xuesong; Lu, Jingjun; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The next-to-leading order black-body radiation(BBR) shift to atomic energy-levels, namely $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction, was studied by using the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics(NRQED). We also estimate the one-loop contribution of quadrupole and the two-loop contributions of BBR-shift of the thermal(real) photon. These corrections have not been investigated before. The order of magnitude BBR-shift indicates the one-loop contribution of quadrupole is stronger than the previou...

  17. Effects of $\\alpha$-cluster breaking on 3$\\alpha$ cluster structures in $^{12}$C

    OpenAIRE

    Suhara, Tadahiro; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the effects of $\\alpha$-cluster breaking on 3$\\alpha$ cluster structures in $^{12}$C, we investigate $^{12}$C using a hybrid model that combines the Brink-Bloch cluster model with the $p_{3/2}$ subshell closure wave function. We have found that $\\alpha$-cluster breaking caused by spin-orbit force significantly changes cluster structures of excited $0^{+}$ states through orthogonality to lower states. Spatially developed cluster components of the $0^{+}_{2}$ state are reduced. The $...

  18. Radiation effects in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  19. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure causes damage to biological systems and these damages are mediated by the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species targeting vital cellular components such as DNA and membranes. DNA repair systems and the endogenous cellular biochemical defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species and antioxidants enzymes like reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione peroxidase catalase etc. fail upon exposures to higher as well as chronic radiation doses leading to alterations in cell functions, cell death or mutations. Radioprotectors prevent these alterations and protect cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiations. Radioprotectors are of great importance due to their possible and potential application during planned radiation exposures such as radiotherapy, diagnostic scanning, clean up operations in nuclear accidents, space expeditions etc. and Unplanned radiations exposures such as accidents in nuclear industry, nuclear terrorism, natural background radiation etc. Many of the available synthetic radioprotectors are toxic to mammalian system at doses required to be effective as radioprotector. Increasing uses of ionizing radiation have drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards their undesired side effects produced in various tissues and for modifying them to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiation. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Radioprotectors are chemicals that modify a cell's response to radiation. Radioprotectors are drugs that protect normal (non cancerous) cells from the damage caused by radiation therapy. These agents promote the repair of normal cells that are exposed to radiation. Various chemicals, like Cysteamine, MPG , WR-2721 have been tested for the protection against harmful effects of radiation. These radio

  20. Comparison of discrimination methods for alpha radiation signals using imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discrimination of different radiation signals is important for quantitative measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides by using the technique of imaging plates (IPs). In this study, four discrimination algorithms previously proposed for discriminating and counting the incident alpha signals were experimentally compared from the view points of linearity response, the discrimination capability of alpha signals from beta signals and the detection uncertainty. The results showed that all the methods had a good linearity response and could discriminate alpha signals from beta signals. In general, a larger region of interest (ROI) has a higher detection efficiency, but the discrimination capability of alpha signals from beta signals is worse. By taking into account both the detection efficiency and the uncertainty of detection, the algorithm using an ROI of 5 x 100 μm x 100 μm was considered to be the most appropriate method for quantitative measurements of alpha radiation. (authors)

  1. Alpha particle response study of polycrstalline diamond radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Chemical vapor deposition has opened the possibility to grow high purity synthetic diamond at relatively low cost. This has opened up uses of diamond based detectors for wide range of applications. These detectors are most suitable for harsh environments where standard semiconductor detectors cannot work. In this paper, we present the fabrication details and performance study of polycrystalline diamond based radiation detector. Effect of different operating parameters such as bias voltage and shaping time for charge collection on the performance of detector has been studied.

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on

  3. Biophysical radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation is based upon the absorption of energy in molecular structures of a cell. Because of the quantum nature of radiation large fluctuations of energy concentration in subcellulare regions has to be considered. In addition both the spatial distribution of a sensitive molecular target and cellulare repair processes has to be taken into consideration for an assessment of radiation action. In radiation protection the difference between the quality factor and the Relative Biological Effectiveness has a fundamental meaning and will be discussed in more detail. The present report includes a short review on some relevant models on radiation action and a short discussion on effects of low dose irradiation. (orig.)

  4. Effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After recalling radiation-matter interaction, influence on radiation effects of chemical composition, structure, irradiation atmosphere, dose rate, temperature of organic materials and evolution of electrical, mechanical and physical properties are reviewed. Then behaviour under irradiation of main organic materials: elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, oils and paints are examined. 68 refs

  5. Portable alpha, beta, gamma, x and neutron radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Here below there is short information about new instrument developed in SPE ATOMTEX, which will be produced at the close of the year. The instrument consists of the main unit, including built-in detector Nal (Tl) of diameter 25x40 mm and photomultiplier tube, analog devices (amplifier, multichannel pulse-height analyzer of 256 channels, high-voltage power supply, LED stabilization scheme of measuring path) and digital devices (microprocessor for data processing, control and storage, liquid crystal display, interface). The main unit operates also as processing and indication device of connected external detection units: α, β-radiation contamination scintillator detection unit; x, γ-radiation detection unit with silicon detector to measure equivalent dose and equivalent dose rate and n-radiation detection unit with proportional 3He-counters. Because of scintillator detector Nal (Tl), the main unit, operating in counting mode, searches and detects effectively x- and gamma-radiation sources with the energy from 30 keV to 3 MeV. The point source of 137Cs of 50 kBq is detected at the distance of 10 cm for 2s. Ambient equivalent dose and equivalent dose rate are measured with this detector using the method of instrumental spectrum transformation into dose. In this case the energy range is from 40 keV to 3 meV. Energy relationship of readings do not exceed ± 15% with respect to the energy of 0,662 MeV. The range of ambient equivalent dose rate measurement is from 0,05 μSv/h to 0,05 mSv/h, with response time of 20 s at background change from 0,05 μSv/h to 0,1 μSv/h. The main unit operates also as selective express-radiometer, which could evaluate sample activity by single gamma-line. Measurement geometry is Marinelly's vessel of 0,5 l. The lower limit of measuring activity is 300 Bq/l without lead shield and 20 Bq/l with it with measurement time of 10 min. The unit weighs not more than 0,9 kg. External detection units connect to interface socket by turns

  6. Effect of Pilates Training on Alpha Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Bian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of Pilates training on the brain function was investigated through five case studies. Alpha rhythm changes during the Pilates training over the different regions and the whole brain were mainly analyzed, including power spectral density and global synchronization index (GSI. It was found that the neural network of the brain was more active, and the synchronization strength reduced in the frontal and temporal regions due to the Pilates training. These results supported that the Pilates training is very beneficial for improving brain function or intelligence. These findings maybe give us some line evidence to suggest that the Pilates training is very helpful for the intervention of brain degenerative diseases and cogitative dysfunction rehabilitation.

  7. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Lyman Alpha Emitters. I. Statistics of Spectra and Luminosity

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zheng; Cen, Renyue; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    We combine a cosmological reionization simulation with box size of 100Mpc/h on a side and a Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha (Lya) radiative transfer code to model Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z~5.7. The model introduces Lya radiative transfer as the single factor for transforming the intrinsic Lya emission properties into the observed ones. Spatial diffusion of Lya photons from radiative transfer results in extended Lya emission and only the central part with high surface brightness can be observed...

  8. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    The objective of our research work is to provide -- with the aid of biophysical models of radiation action -- information on human risks following exposure to radon alpha particles. The approach proposed consists of (1) developing appropriate models (parametric and non-parametric) for alpha radiation induction of relevant end points (survival, cellular transformation), (2) providing an accurate physical characterization of the particle tracks in terms of nanodosimetric distributions, (3) supporting the models by detailed, molecular studies of the direct and indirect effects of alpha particles on DNA. Activities in the second year of this project are described.

  9. Order (alpha^2 Gamma, alpha^3 Gamma) Binding Effects in Orthopositronium Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Richard J.; Lepage, G. Peter

    2000-01-01

    We present a new, simplified analysis of the low-energy electron-positron interaction, and use the resulting effective theory to calculate the binding effects that contribute to the decay rate, Gamma, of orthopositronium, through Order(alpha^3 ln(alpha) Gamma). We express the total decay rate in terms of the annihilation rate for a free electron and positron at threshold, which has just recently been computed to sufficient precision. Our result corrects errors in a previous analysis.

  10. Exoelectron emission studies of irradiated catalysts. [Gamma radiation; Alpha beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzembaev, K.K.; Sokolskij, D.V.; Burtsev, A.F.; Asubaev, M.K. (AN Kazakhskoj SSR, Alma-Ata. Inst. Organicheskogo Kataliza i Ehlektrokhimii); Kortov, V.S.; Kalentiev, V.A. (Sverdlovskij Politekhnicheskij Inst., Sverdlovsk (USSR))

    1983-01-01

    Catalytic and exoemission properties of ..gamma..-irradiated Pd/SiO/sub 2/ and ..cap alpha..-irradiated Fe/Al catalysts have been found to change sympatically. The character of the active centers formed on the catalyst surface under irradiation is discussed. 9 refs.

  11. Dynamical Screening Effect on $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ Resonant Scattering and Thermal Nuclear Scattering Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Xiaojun; Müller, Berndt

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical screening effect in the QED plasma on the $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ scattering at the $^8$Be resonance. Dynamical screening leads to an imaginary part of the potential which results in a thermal width for the resonance and dominates over the previously considered static screening effect. As a result, both the resonance energy and width increase with the plasma temperature. Furthermore, dynamical screening can have a huge impact on the $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ thermal nuclear scattering rate. For example, when the temperature is around $10$ keV, the rate is suppressed by a factor of about $900$. We expect similar thermal suppressions of nuclear reaction rates to occur in nuclear reactions dominated by an above threshold resonance with a thermal energy. Dynamical screening effects on nuclear reactions can be relevant to cosmology and astrophysics.

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sound evaluation of the consequences of releases of radioactivity into the environment, especially of those large amounts, and of the effectiveness of different protective measures, requires thorough concern of the various aspects of the radiological effects. The effects of ionizing radiation were reviewed according to the following characterization: Affected subject (somatic, genetic and psychological effects); Duration of irradiation (acute and chronic irradiation); Latent period (early and late effects); Dose-effect relationship (stochastic and non-stochastic effects); Population affected (e.g. children, pregnant women). In addition to the lethal effects which are generally considered extensively in all the evaluations of the consequences of radioactivity releases, such effects as early symptoms and morbidity are emphasized in this review. The dependence of the effects on dose rates, repair mechanism and medical treatment is discussed, and the uncertainties involved with their evaluation is highlighted. The differences between QF (quality factor) and RBE (relative biological effectiveness) of different radiation sources are interpreted. Synergystic effects and the effectiveness of various means of medication are discussed. It is suggested that all radiological effects, including those resulting from relatively low radiation doses, e.g. foetus deformations, fertility impairment, prodomal - leading to psychological effects, should be considered within the evaluation of the consequences of radioactivity releases and of the effectiveness of protective measures. Limits of the repair factors to be considered within the evaluation of the effects of chronic exposures are proposed

  13. Combination of pGL1-TNF-alpha gene and radiation (proton and gamma-ray) therapy against brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D S; Li, J; Kajioka, E H; Andres, M L; Moyers, M F; Slater, J M

    2000-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to determine if treatment with the newly constructed plasmid vector for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (pGL1-TNF-alpha) could enhance the radiation-induced growth reduction of C6 rat glioma. In addition, two different forms of ionizing radiation (gamma-rays and protons) were utilized. Body and spleen mass, leukocyte blastogenesis, and flow cytometry analysis of cell populations in blood and spleen were performed to detect toxicity, if any, and to identify mechanisms that may correlate with the anti-tumor action of combination therapy. C6 tumor cells were implanted subcutaneously into athymic mice and allowed to become established before treatment initiation. pGL1-TNF-alpha was injected into the implanted tumors, which were then irradiated 16-18 hr later; each modality was administered three times over 8-9 days. The addition of pGL1-TNF-alpha significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of radiation (p < 0.05). The effect was more than additive, since pGL1-TNF-alpha alone did not slow tumor progression and radiation alone had only a modest effect. Administration of pGL1-TNF-alpha together with proton radiation resulted in tumor volumes that were 23% smaller than those following pGL1-TNF-alpha + gamma-ray treatment; a similar differential in tumor size was observed in the groups receiving only radiation. Body weights and blood and spleen cell analyses did not reveal treatment-related toxicity. High basal proliferation of blood leukocytes and increased B cell levels in the spleen were associated with pGL1-TNF-alpha + 60Co (gamma-radiation) or proton treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the pGL1-TNF-alpha/radiation combination is effective and safe under the conditions employed. This is the first study to combine gene and proton radiation therapy and to show, under controlled experimental conditions, that proton radiation may have a greater effect against malignant tumors compared to the same physical dose of gamma-radiation. PMID

  14. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book covers all aspects of biological radiation effects and provides the fundamental basis for understanding the necessity of radiation protection as well as applications in radiotherapy. The physical basis is dealt with in some detail, and the effects at the subcellular and the cellular level are thoroughly discussed, taking into account modern developments and techniques. The effects on the human organism are reviewed, both from the point of view of applications in medicine as well as with regard to radiation hazards (teratogenic, gonadal and carcinogenic effects). It can be used by graduate students as an introduction and as a source book for all who want to become acquainted with this important field. It is an extended version of the original German book containing updated information and new material. (orig.) With 273 figs

  15. Telomere Length in Aged Mayak PA Nuclear Workers Chronically Exposed to Internal Alpha and External Gamma Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherthan, Harry; Sotnik, Natalia; Peper, Michel; Schrock, Gerrit; Azizova, Tamara; Abend, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres consist of GC-rich DNA repeats and the "shelterin" protein complex that together protect chromosome ends from fusion and degradation. Telomeres shorten with age due to incomplete end replication and upon exposure to environmental and intrinsic stressors. Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to modulate telomere length. However, the response of telomere length in humans chronically exposed to radiation is poorly understood. Here, we studied relative telomere length (RTL) by IQ-FISH to leukocyte nuclei in a group of 100 workers from the plutonium production facility at the Mayak Production Association (PA) who were chronically exposed to alpha-emitting ((239)Pu) radiation and/or gamma (photon) radiation, and 51 local residents serving as controls, with a similar mean age of about 80 years. We applied generalized linear statistical models adjusted for age at biosampling and the second exposure type on a linear scale and observed an age-dependent telomere length reduction. In those individuals with the lowest exposure, a significant reduction of about 20% RTL was observed, both for external gamma radiation (≤1 Gy) and internal alpha radiation (≤0.05-0.1 Gy to the red bone marrow). In highly exposed individuals (>0.1 Gy alpha, 1-1.5 Gy gamma), the RTL was similar to control. Stratification by gender revealed a significant (∼30%) telomere reduction in low-dose-exposed males, which was absent in females. While the gender differences in RTL may reflect different working conditions, lifestyle and/or telomere biology, absence of a dose response in the highly exposed individuals may reflect selection against cells with short telomeres or induction of telomere-protective effects. Our observations suggest that chronic systemic exposure to radiation leads to variable dose-dependent effects on telomere length. PMID:27340887

  16. Effects of radiation damage on SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern has been expressed in several quarters that the integrity of SYNROC as a waste form might be compromised by the effects of alpha radiation damage on its constituent minerals. The evidence discussed herein addresses that concern. Radiation damage to crystal lattices is caused dominantly by alpha emitters (actinide elements) present in zirconolite and perovskite phases. We have seen that the zirconolite phase in SYNROC containing 10% of HLW would require about 106 years before becoming completely metamict, i.e., losing the capacity to diffract X-rays. By this time, the alpha activity in SYNROC would have declined to a value smaller than that present in a natural uranium ore body. This level of activity can be considered effectively safe for a waste form buried in a suitable geologic repository. Moreover, even when metamict, the zirconolite continues to demonstrate a remarkable capacity to immobilize U, Th and their decay daughter products. The isotopic measurements on Sri Lanka and Jimberlana zirconolites demonstrated that these metamict minerals had behaved as closed systems for U, Th and Pb for periods of 560 and 2500 million years, respectively, despite intense radiation damage (SYNROC equivalent ages, about or greater than 109 years). Moreover, the Sri Lanka zirconolite was sufficiently tight to immobilize a considerable proportion of radiogenic helium, one of the most mobile of elements, for 560 million years. Our data on perovskite are limited and more work remains to be done. Nevertheless, present results indicate that perovskites are even more resistant to radiation damage than zirconolite

  17. Lyman alpha Radiative Transfer in Cosmological Simulations using Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Laursen, Peter; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    A numerical code for solving various Lyman alpha (Lya) radiative transfer (RT) problems is presented. The code is suitable for an arbitrary, three-dimensional distribution of Lya emissivity, gas temperature, density, and velocity field. Capable of handling Lya RT in an adaptively refined grid-based structure, it enables detailed investigation of the effects of clumpiness of the interstellar (or intergalactic) medium. The code is tested against various geometrically and physically idealized configurations for which analytical solutions exist, and subsequently applied to three "Lyman-break galaxies", extracted from high-resolution cosmological simulations at redshift z = 3.6. Proper treatment of the Lya scattering reveals a diversity of surface brightness (SB) and line profiles. Specifically, for a given galaxy the maximum observed SB can vary by an order of magnitude, and the total flux by a factor of 3 - 6, depending on the viewing angle. This may provide an explanation for differences in observed properties ...

  18. Development of optical monitor of alpha radiations based on CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima accident has highlighted the need to intensify efforts to develop sensitive detectors to monitor the release of alpha emitting radionuclides in the environment caused by the meltdown of the discharged spent fuel. Conventionally, proportional counting, scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry are employed to assay the alpha emitting radionuclides but these techniques are difficult to be configured for online operations. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) offer an alternative off line sensitive technique to measure alpha emitters as well as fissile radionuclides at ultra-trace level in the environment. Recently, our group has reported the first ever attempt to use reflectance based fiber optic sensor (FOS) to quantify the alpha radiations emitted from 232Th. In the present work, an effort has been made to develop an online FOS to monitor alpha radiations emitted from 241Am source employing CR-39 as detector. Here, we report the optical response of CR-39 (on exposure to alpha radiations) employing techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Reflectance Spectroscopy. In the present work GEANT4 simulation of transport of alpha particles in the detector has also been carried out. Simulation includes validation test wherein the projected ranges of alpha particles in the air, polystyrene and CR-39 were calculated and were found to agree with the literature values. An attempt has been further made to compute the fluence as a function of the incidence angle and incidence energy of alphas. There was an excellent correlation in experimentally observed track density with the simulated fluence. The present work offers a novel approach to design an online CR-39 based fiber optic sensor (CRFOS) to measure the release of nanogram quantity of 241Am in the environment. - Highlights: • Fiber Optics Reflectance Sensor based on CR-39 was employed to monitor online low level alpha radiations emitted from 241Am. • Change in reflectance was found to be

  19. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  20. Radiation damage effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The summarized data suggest that both glass and crystalline waste forms may sustain substantial doses of α-decay damage and still retain their durability. Radiation effects in glasses are less pronounced and less complicated than that in single or poly-phase ceramics; thus, the latter category requires careful research and consideration. Perhaps the most important conclusion is that short-term actinide doping experiments in crystalline phases provide a realistic simulation of long-term effects based on the comparison of observed radiation effects in Pu-doped zircon and naturally damaged zircon (there is a 107 difference in dose rate). Deviations from the similarity in effect (e.g., saturation dose) may be attributed to low-temperature, long-term annealing effects

  1. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  2. Genetic effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are reviewed from studies on the genetic effects of x radiation in mice and the extrapolation of the findings for estimating genetic hazards in man is discussed. Data are included on the frequency of mutation induction following acute or chronic irradiation of male or female mice at various doses and dose rates

  3. The relationship between alpha B-crystallin and radiational cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To examine the expression of soluble α B-crystallin in radiation cataract of rat lens, and to probe the correlation between αB-crystallin and the radiation cataract. Methods: Eyes were irradiated with linear accelerator to establish the model of radiation cataract, rats were divided into the control group, experimental control group and X-irradiated group. All rats were sacrificed three months later, then the lenses were isolated carefully and homogenized in lysate. Lens homogenate was divided into soluble and insoluble fractions by centrifugating at 15000 g at 4 degree C for 20 minutes. The super-natant was obtained for the detection of αB-crystallin with western blot analysis. Results: Observed three months, lens in the normal control group and experimental control group were transparent; typical radiation cataract was formed by degrees in the 25 Gy groups. The soluble αB-crystallin level markedly decreased compared to the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: X-ray can degrade the soluble αB-crystallin level in lens and lead to cataract. (authors)

  4. Gamma and alpha radiation contamination of forest litter in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The part of the results of big research program on contamination of forests in Poland has been performed and discussed. Long lived γ-radiation nuclides in forest litters have been measured in 127 sites. The maps of contamination have been shown as an field investigations results. 49 refs, 10 figs, 4 tabs

  5. Old and new versions of the alpha radiation theory of petroleum origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of petroleum formation and the world distribution of fossil fuels deposits were recent clarified. However, the source of energy associated with petroleum genesis is still largely debatable. Evidence accumulated over the years allows to demonstrate the energetic feasibility of a modern version of the old alpha radiation theory of petroleum origin. This theory is reviewed and examined critically under new light to be reformulated by taking advantage of relevant interdisciplinary data mostly not available when the old alpha radiation theory was suggested, developed and then discredited. The geological ages accepted for the formation of most of the known petroleum reserves are within a range that makes long-lived natural alpha emitters a feasible energy source for at least part of the energy necessary for the formation of petroleum hydrocarbon. (author)

  6. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to the biological response found in cells (called bystander cells) which are not irradiated directly by ionizing radiation but are next to cells irradiated directly by ionizing radiation. In the present paper, the effects of Magnolol, an extract from the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha-particle induced bystander effects. In our experiments, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in PADC-film based dishes and were irradiated with low fluences of alpha particles passing through the PADC films. The precise number of cells traversed or missed by alpha particles could be determined by studying the alpha-particle tracks developed on the PADC films upon subsequent chemical etching. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to analyze the biological response of bystander cells in terms of DNA strand breaks. With the pretreatment of Magnolol, the DNA strand breaks in bystander cells were reduced, which showed that the alpha-particle induced bystander effects were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol. Since Magnolol is an antioxidant which can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), our results give support to that ROS play a role in the bystander signal transmission in our experiments.

  7. Protective Role of Alpha Lipoic Acid Against Disorders Induced by Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation interacts with living cells, causing a variety of biochemical changes depending on exposed and absorbed doses, duration of exposure, interval after exposure and susceptibility of tissues to ionizing radiation. So, it may increase the oxidative stress and damage of body organs. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA-also known as thioctic acid) appears to be readily absorbed from an oral dose and converts easily to its reduced form, dihydro lipoic acid (DHLA), in many tissues of the body. ALA can neutralize free radicals in both fatty and watery regions of cells. The present study has been designed to evaluate the possible efficiency of ALA as antioxidant and radio-protector against radiation induced oxidative stress in different organs (liver, kidney and heart) in rats through estimation of the activity of markers of serum liver, kidney and heart function, in addition to the histopathological differentiation of these organs by light and electron microscope. Five equal groups were conducted for the study: control, ALA (30 mg/kg body wt), irradiated (each rat was exposed to 6 Gy as a fractionated dose of gamma (γ) radiation), irradiated plus ALA (each rat received ALA for 9 days simultaneously during exposure) and ALA plus irradiation plus ALA groups (each rat received ALA for a week pre-exposure plus 9 days during exposure). Radiation doses were fractionated dose levels of 2 Gy each 3 days to reach accumulative dose of 6 Gy. After 3 days of each exposure rats were sacrificed, except, those left for recovery test one month after last exposure. The results revealed that whole body γ-irradiation of rats induces oxidative stress in liver, kidney and heart obviously manifested by significant elevation in alanine and aspartate transaminase ( ALT and AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), urea, creatinine and creatine kinase (CK-MB). ALA treated-irradiated rats showed lower significantly values indicating remarkable improvement in all measured parameters and

  8. Maintenance experiences with hand and foot monitor for monitoring alpha and beta radiation of personnel in NFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NFC is producing natural uranium and enriched uranium fuels for various reactors including PHWR etc. Monitoring of α and β radiations in the active plants of NFC is very much essential in many aspects. The personnel who are handling radiation materials have to be monitored for α radiation of hands and cloths and β radiation of feet. So the Alpha and Beta Monitor became important monitoring equipment for monitoring α and β radiations of persons working in active plants of NFC. Many Alpha and Beta Monitors of make, ECIL, PLA, and Nucleonix etc. were being used in active plants in NFC. Basically α and β radiation monitors consists of four PMT (Photo Multiplier Tubes) for detection of radiation of hands and one PMT for monitoring clothes. The PMT use ZnS (Ag) as the scintillator for detection of α radiation. GM tubes are used to detect β radiation of feet. The latest Hand and Foot Monitors have been incorporated with PC based monitoring system along with software for making the monitoring process more efficient and user friendly. As an instrumentation maintenance team for these monitors, our experiences are varied. These monitors are to be periodically maintained and tested for its effective functioning in monitoring the nuclear radiation. The monitors procured from M/s. ECIL were being used since long time in these areas. The instrumentation maintenance had faced some problems with these monitors such as frequent failure of High Voltage cards, Amplifier and Counter PCB cards. Modifications were made in the circuits of High Voltage and Counter cards to minimize the failure rate and for loading of Display and Monitoring Software through Hard disk instead of from floppy disk. So the availability of monitors for monitoring radiation got improved. Later the introduction of more sophisticated α and β radiation monitors of M/s. PLA make in these areas further improved monitoring of radiation of personnel working in active areas. These monitors are more user

  9. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  10. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last day of March 1978 marked the completion of the first 3 years of operation of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF was established on 1 April 1975 as successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which had been in continuous operation since 1947. This record of the first 3 years of operation consists of selected reports and other documents prepared in the course of conducting the business of RERF and includes a brief history, a late radiation effects that might be conducted at RERF. The wisdom and thought given to the research program and its operation by the Scientific Council and the Board of Directors is reflected in the minutes of their meetings which are included in the Appendix. (Mori, K.)

  11. Radiation effects in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current understanding of radiation damage in metals is reviewed, simplifying the actual complexity of the effects by considering some aspects separately. The production of point defects in metals, the primary damage state are first studied. The second part of the lecture is devoted to the evolution of this primary damage state as a function of temperature and dose: the steady state concentration of point defects, the nucleation of secondary defects and their growth are successively considered

  12. Cumulative radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In five previous papers, the concept of Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) has been presented as a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Simple nomographic and tabular methods for the solution of practical problems in radiotherapy are now described. An essential feature of solving a CRE problem is firstly to present it in a concise and readily appreciated form, and, to do this, nomenclature has been introduced to describe schedules and regimes as compactly as possible. Simple algebraic equations have been derived to describe the CRE achieved by multi-schedule regimes. In these equations, the equivalence conditions existing at the junctions between schedules are not explicit and the equations are based on the CREs of the constituent schedules assessed individually without reference to their context in the regime as a whole. This independent evaluation of CREs for each schedule has resulted in a considerable simplification in the calculation of complex problems. The calculations are further simplified by the use of suitable tables and nomograms, so that the mathematics involved is reduced to simple arithmetical operations which require at the most the use of a slide rule but can be done by hand. The order of procedure in the presentation and calculation of CRE problems can be summarised in an evaluation procedure sheet. The resulting simple methods for solving practical problems of any complexity on the CRE-system are demonstrated by a number of examples. (author)

  13. Effect of Alpha-Particle Irradiation on Brain Glycogen in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, L. S.; Klatzo, Igor; Miquel, Jaime; Tobias, Cornelius; Haymaker, Webb

    1962-01-01

    The studies of Klatzo, Miquel, Tobias and Haymaker (1961) have shown that one of the earliest and most sensitive indications of the effects of alpha-particle irradiation on rat bran is the appearance of glycogen granules mainly in the neuroglia of the exposed area of the brain. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) positive, alpha-amylase soluble granules were demonstrated within 12 hr after irradiation, preceding by approximately 36 hr the first microscopically detectable vascular permeability disturbances, as shown by the fluorescein labeled serum protein technique. These studies suggested that the injurious effects of alpha-particle energy were on cellular elements primarily, according to the physical properties and distribution of the radiation in the tissue, and that the vascular permeability disturbances played a secondary role in pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to correlate the histochemical observations on glycogen with a quantitative assessment of the glycogen in the irradiated brain tissue. It is felt that such a study may contribute to the understanding of radiation injury at the molecular level. A practical aspect of this problem is that the information on biological radiation effects due to accelerated particles from the cyclotron source, is employed in this study, is applicable to radiation from cosmic particles both in free space and entrapped in the Van Allen belts.

  14. Radiation effects in SYNROC-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes SYNROC-D and the irradiation it will be subjected to over the first million years of storage. This will include about 8 x 1024 alpha decays per m3 and a total ionization dose of about 1 x 1011 rads. Methods of simulating the radiation effects are discussed. Previous work by others is reviewed and compared on a dpa basis. 238Pu doping experiments to simulate internal alpha decay are described, and the progress is discussed. It is concluded that dose rate effects on swelling and metamictization of perovskite and zirconolite are small over a wide range of dose rate, and that swelling and metamictization in these minerals does not anneal significantly over geological time periods

  15. Use of studies with laboratory animals to assess the potential early health effects of combined internal alpha and beta irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential health impacts of radionuclides released in nuclear accidents are of major concern to the public and to regulatory and other governmental agencies. One mode of potential exposure is by inhalation of airborne radionuclides, which could lead to combined internal irradiation by high (alpha) and low (beta) linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. Epidemiological data for health effects of human inhalation exposure are too limited to derive reliable estimates of risks of potential health effects. However, results of studies in which beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to insoluble radioactive aerosols can be used to estimate expected effects in humans. Data for mortality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis caused by internal irradiation of dog lungs by alpha or beta radiations are used to derive the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha irradiation compared to beta irradiation; predict the expected combined effects of alpha and beta irradiation of dog lungs; and extrapolate the results to humans. The extrapolation to humans assumed that, for similar ages at exposure, dog and human lungs have similar sensitivities to lung irradiation. Results of theoretical calculations related to mortality from early effects indicated that the synergistic effects of high- and low-LET radiations should depend on the percentages of the total dose contributed by high- and low-LET radiations, and for very low or very high doses, synergistic effects should be negligible. 23 refs., 8 figs

  16. Effect of alpha1-blockers on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the clinical efficiency of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones. Materials and Methods From January 2007 to January 2013, 84 patients who have uncomplicated lower ureteral stones treated by ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium laser were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups, group A (44 patients received indwelled double-J stents and group B (40 patients were treated by alpha1-adrenergic antagonists without stents. All cases of group B were treated with alpha1 blocker for 1 week. Results The mean operative time of group A was significantly longer than group B. The incidences of hematuria, flank/abdominal pain, frequency/urgency after surgery were statistically different between both groups. The stone-free rate of each group was 100%. Conclusions The effect of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists is more significant than indwelling stent after ureteroscopic lithotripsy in treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones.

  17. Effective liquid drop description for alpha decay of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodriguez, O.; Guzman, F. [Instituto Superior de Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear (ISCTN), La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, F. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1998-06-01

    Alpha decay half-lives are presented in the framework of an effective liquid drop model for different combination of mass transfer descriptions and inertia coefficients. Calculated half-life-values for ground-state to ground-state favoured alpha transitions are compared with available, updated experimental data. Results have shown that the present model is very suitable to treat the alpha decay process on equal foot as cluster radioactivity and cold fission processes. Better agreement with the data is found when the sub-set of even-even alpha emitters are considered in the calculation. (author) 44 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.; e-mail: telo at ird.gov.br

  18. Biological dosimeter for UV-radiation and alpha particles, based on DNA damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bioluminescence method for determination of biologically relevant (DNA damaging) doses of UV-radiation and alpha particles is developed. The method is based on bacterial luminescence as a bio-marker regulated by the SOS system. Cultures of E. coli cells transformed with the plasmid pPSL1 which carries the lux gene under control of the col promotor, an SOS-controlling gene, is used. The lux gene encode the enzyme luciferase which takes part in the reaction, resulting in the emission of a visible light at 490 nm. The light output is measured by photomultiplier and one channel analyzer. SOS-response kinetic curves of bacteria, UV-irradiated and treated with alpha particles, are obtained. An assessment of the risk from solar UV-radiation is made. The method has the sensitivity required to be used as biological UV-dosimeter (author)

  19. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work examines ionizing radiations: what they are, where they come from, their actions and consequences, finally the norms and preventive measures necessary to avoid serious contamination, whether the individual or the population in general is involved. Man has always been exposed to natural irradiation, but owing to the growing use of ionizing radiations both in medicine and in industry, not to mention nuclear tests and their use as an argument of dissuasion, the irradiation of human beings is increasing daily. Radioactive contamination does remain latent, apart from acute cases, but this is where the danger lies since the consequences may not appear until long after the irradiation. Of all biological effects due to the action of radioelements the genetic risk is one of the most important, affecting the entire population and especially the generations to come. The risk of cancer and leukemia induction plays a substantial part also since a large number of people may be concerned, depending on the mode of contamination involved. All these long-term dangers do not of course exclude the various general or local effects to which the individual alone may be exposed and which sometimes constitute a threat to life. As a result the use of ionizing radiations must be limited and should only be involved if no other process can serve instead. The regulations governing radioelements must be stringent and their application strictly supervised for the better protection of man. This protection must be not only individual but also collective since pollution exists in air, water and land passes to plants and animals and finally reaches the last link in the food chain, man

  20. Cranial nerve damage in patients after alpha (heavy)-particle radiation to the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The records of 161 patients were reviewed to determine if radiation damage had occurred following cranial irradiation. All of these patients had received alpha-particle radiation to their pituitary glands during the period when this form of therapy was given for diabetic retinopathy. Extraocular muscle palsy developed in 11 of these patients, iridoplegia in six, and fifth nerve damage in six. All of the palsies developed within a short period following their irradiation, and a definite dose relationship was present. The dose rate was approximately 100 rads/min for all cases. Fractionation varied but it is known for all cases

  1. Cranial nerve damage in patients after alpha (heavy)-particle radiation to the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The records of 161 patients were reviewed to determine if radiation damage had occurred following cranial irradiation. All of these patients had received alpha-particle radiation to their pituitary glands for diabetic retinopathy. Extraocular muscle palsy developed in 11 of these patients, iridoplegia in six, and fifth nerve damage in six. All of the palsies developed within a short period following their irradiation, and a definite dose relationship was present. The estimated doses to the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cranial nerves was calculated at a saggital plane 13 to 15 mm from the pituitary by using computer-drawn dosimetry charts for the respective aperture size

  2. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Lyman Alpha Emitters: I. Statistics of Spectra and Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Zheng; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    We combine a cosmological reionization simulation with box size of 100Mpc/h on a side and a Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha (Lya) radiative transfer code to model Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z~5.7. The model introduces Lya radiative transfer as the single factor for transforming the intrinsic Lya emission properties into the observed ones. Spatial diffusion of Lya photons from radiative transfer results in extended Lya emission and only the central part with high surface brightness can be observed. Because of radiative transfer, the appearance of LAEs depends on density and velocity structures in circumgalactic and intergalactic media as well as the viewing angle, which leads to a broad distribution of apparent (observed) Lya luminosity for a given intrinsic Lya luminosity. Radiative transfer also causes frequency diffusion of Lya photons. The resultant Lya line is asymmetric with a red tail. The peak of the Lya line shifts towards longer wavelength and the shift is anti-correlated with the apparent to intrinsic L...

  3. Effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  4. Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of soalr particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Solar Particle Events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra in shielding are discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

  5. Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of solar particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

    1994-01-01

    The solar particle events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra in shielding discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

  6. Radiation effects and radiation risks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig.) With 10 maps in appendix

  7. The effects of temperature on the radiation chemistry of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.J.T. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on polymers is dependent on a number of factors. One of the most important factors is the radiolysis temperature. This paper discusses the effects of the {alpha}-transition and the other secondary transitions, as well as the ceiling and melting temperatures, on the nature of the radiolysis reactions which occur for a number of polymers. Some implications of changes in the radiation chemistry of polymers with a change in the temperature are also considered. (author).

  8. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  9. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and the genotoxicity induced by {alpha} radiation in an A549 cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belchior, Ana, E-mail: anabelchior@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional no 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal) and Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Gil, Octavia Monteiro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional no 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Almeida, Pedro [Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Vaz, Pedro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional no 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2011-09-15

    Exposure to radon and its progenies represents one of the greatest risks of ionizing radiation from natural sources. Nowadays, these risks are assessed by the extrapolation of biological effects observed from epidemiological data. In the present study, we made a dose response curve, to evaluate the in vitro response of A549 human lung cells to {alpha}-radiation resulting from the decay of a {sup 210}Po source, evaluated by the cytokinesis blocked micronuclei assay. The clonogenic assay was used to measure the survival cell fraction. As expected, the results revealed an increase of cellular damage with increased doses made evident from the increased number of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell (BN). Besides this study involving the biological effects induced by direct irradiation, and due to the fact that radiation-induced genomic instability is thought to be an early event in radiation carcinogenesis, we analyzed the genomic instability in early and delayed untargeted effects, by using the medium transfer technique. The obtained results show that unirradiated cells exposed to irradiated medium reveal a higher cellular damage in earlier effects when compared to the delayed effects. The obtained results may provide clues for the biodosimetric determination of radon dose to airway cells at cumulative exposures.

  10. The radiation chemistry of CMPO: Part 2. Alpha radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Gary S. Groenewold; Christian Ekberg; Gunnar Skarnemark; Jay A. LaVerne; Mikael Nilsson; Jeremy Pearson; Nicholas C. Schmitt; Richard D. Tillotson; Lonnie G. Olson; Gracy Elias

    2014-01-01

    Octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in dodecane was subjected to a-irradiation using a He-ion beam, 244 Cm isotopic a-rays, and He and Li ions created by the n,a reaction of 10B in a nuclear reactor. Post-irradiation samples were analyzed for the radiolytically-induced decrease in CMPO concentration, the appearance of degradation products, and their Am solvent extraction distribution ratios. The –G CMPO-value for the radiolytic degradation of CMPO was found to be very low compared to values previously reported for ?-irradiation. Additionally, isotopic irradiation to absorbed a-doses as high as 600 kGy in aerated solution had no effect on Am solvent extraction or stripping. The main CMPO radiolysis products identified in He-ion beam irradiated samples by ESI-MS include amides, an acidic amide, and amines produced by bond rupture on either side of the CMPO carbonyl group. Deaerated samples irradiated using the reactor in the absence of an aqueous phase, or with a dilute nitric acid aqueous phase showed small but measurable decreases in CMPO concentration with increasing absorbed doses. Higher concentrations of nitric acid resulted in lower decomposition rates for the CMPO. The radio-protection by dissolved oxygen and nitric acid previously found for ?-irradiated CMPO also occurs for a-irradiation. This suggests that similar free-radical mechanisms operate in the high-LET system, but with lower degradation yields due to the lower overall radical concentrations produced.

  11. Effects of chronic internal alpha irradiation on physiology, growth and reproductive success of Daphnia magna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daphnids were chronically exposed to waterborne Am-241, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, ranging in concentration from 0.4 to 40 Bq ml-1. Am-241 amounts were monitored in the medium, daphnid tissues and cuticles. Corresponding average dose rates of 0.02, 0.11 and 0.99 mGy h-1 were calculated for whole organisms with internal α-radiation contributing 99% of total dose rates. Effects of internal alpha irradiation on respiration and ingestion rates, adult, egg and neonate individual dry masses, fecundity and larval resistance to starvation were examined in 23-day experiments. Daphnids showed increased respiratory demand after 23 days at the highest dose rate, suggesting increased metabolic cost of maintenance due to coping with alpha radiological stress. Although no effect was detected on ingestion rates between contaminated and control daphnids, exposure to dose rates of 0.11 mGy h-1 or higher, resulted in a significant 15% reduction in body mass. Fecundity remained unchanged over the 23-day period, but individual masses of eggs and neonates were significantly smaller compared to the control. This suggested that increased metabolic expenditure in chronically alpha-radiated daphnids came at the expense of their energy investment per offspring. As a consequence, neonates showed significantly reduced resistance to starvation at every dose rate compared to the control. Our observations are discussed in comparison with literature results reported for cadmium, a chemical toxicant which affects feeding activity and strongly reduces individual energy uptake

  12. A synopsis of collective alpha effects and implications for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigmar, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the following: Alpha Interaction with Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes; Alpha Interaction with Ballooning Modes; Alpha Interaction with Fishbone Oscillations; and Implications for ITER.

  13. Semi-Automatic Segmentation of Optic Radiations and LGN, and Their Relationship to EEG Alpha Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Bernier, Michaël; Garyfallidis, Eleftherios; Whittingstall, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    At rest, healthy human brain activity is characterized by large electroencephalography (EEG) fluctuations in the 8-13 Hz range, commonly referred to as the alpha band. Although it is well known that EEG alpha activity varies across individuals, few studies have investigated how this may be related to underlying morphological variations in brain structure. Specifically, it is generally believed that the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and its efferent fibres (optic radiation, OR) play a key role in alpha activity, yet it is unclear whether their shape or size variations contribute to its inter-subject variability. Given the widespread use of EEG alpha in basic and clinical research, addressing this is important, though difficult given the problems associated with reliably segmenting the LGN and OR. For this, we employed a multi-modal approach and combined diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and EEG in 20 healthy subjects to measure structure and function, respectively. For the former, we developed a new, semi-automated approach for segmenting the OR and LGN, from which we extracted several structural metrics such as volume, position and diffusivity. Although these measures corresponded well with known morphology based on previous post-mortem studies, we nonetheless found that their inter-subject variability was not significantly correlated to alpha power or peak frequency (p >0.05). Our results therefore suggest that alpha variability may be mediated by an alternative structural source and our proposed methodology may in general help in better understanding the influence of anatomy on function such as measured by EEG or fMRI. PMID:27383146

  14. Semi-Automatic Segmentation of Optic Radiations and LGN, and Their Relationship to EEG Alpha Waves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Renauld

    Full Text Available At rest, healthy human brain activity is characterized by large electroencephalography (EEG fluctuations in the 8-13 Hz range, commonly referred to as the alpha band. Although it is well known that EEG alpha activity varies across individuals, few studies have investigated how this may be related to underlying morphological variations in brain structure. Specifically, it is generally believed that the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN and its efferent fibres (optic radiation, OR play a key role in alpha activity, yet it is unclear whether their shape or size variations contribute to its inter-subject variability. Given the widespread use of EEG alpha in basic and clinical research, addressing this is important, though difficult given the problems associated with reliably segmenting the LGN and OR. For this, we employed a multi-modal approach and combined diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and EEG in 20 healthy subjects to measure structure and function, respectively. For the former, we developed a new, semi-automated approach for segmenting the OR and LGN, from which we extracted several structural metrics such as volume, position and diffusivity. Although these measures corresponded well with known morphology based on previous post-mortem studies, we nonetheless found that their inter-subject variability was not significantly correlated to alpha power or peak frequency (p >0.05. Our results therefore suggest that alpha variability may be mediated by an alternative structural source and our proposed methodology may in general help in better understanding the influence of anatomy on function such as measured by EEG or fMRI.

  15. Alpha effect due to buoyancy instability of a magnetic layer

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    A strong toroidal field can exist in form of a magnetic layer in the overshoot region below the solar convection zone. This motivates a more detailed study of the magnetic buoyancy instability with rotation. We calculate the alpha effect due to helical motions caused by a disintegrating magnetic layer in a rotating density-stratified system with angular velocity Omega making an angle theta with the vertical. We also study the dependence of the alpha effect on theta and the strength of the ini...

  16. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of studies on radiation effects in light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, detectors, optical isolators and optical fibers. It is shown that the study of radiation damage in these devices can provide valuable information concerning the nature of the devices themselves, as well as methods of hardening these devices for applications in radiation environments

  17. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. It is intended that the bibliography will be updated regularly

  18. Cooling Radiation and the Lyman-alpha Luminosity of Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fardal, M A; Gardner, J P; Hernquist, L E; Weinberg, D H; Davé, R; Fardal, Mark A.; Katz, Neal; Gardner, Jeffrey P.; Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, David H.; Dav\\'e, Romeel

    2000-01-01

    We examine the cooling radiation from forming galaxies in hydrodynamic simulations of the LCDM model (cold dark matter with a cosmological constant), focusing on the Ly-alpha line luminosities of high-redshift systems. Primordial composition gas condenses within dark matter potential wells, forming objects with masses and sizes comparable to the luminous regions of observed galaxies. As expected, the energy radiated in this process is comparable to the gravitational binding energy of the baryons, and the total cooling luminosity of the galaxy population peaks at z ~= 2. However, in contrast to the classical picture of gas cooling from the \\sim 10^6 K virial temperature of a typical dark matter halo, we find that most of the cooling radiation is emitted by gas with T < 20,000 K. As a consequence, roughly 50% of this cooling radiation emerges in the Ly-alpha line. While a galaxy's cooling luminosity is usually smaller than the ionizing continuum luminosity of its young stars, the two are comparable in the mo...

  19. Effect of chemicals on fungal alpha-amylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, F S; Abdel-Moneim, A A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 8 growth regulators at concentrations of 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 ppm on the activity of fungal (Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris) alpha-amylase was studied. Indol acetic acid (IAA) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 2% and 7% at 1,000 ppm. The other 6 growth regulators, indol butyric acid (IBA), gibberellic acid, cumarin, cycocel (CCC), atonik-G and kylar, did not inhibit but stimulated alpha-amylase activity (0 to 9%) at 1,000 ppm. All growth regulators studied inhibited alpha-amylase activity at 5,000 and 10,000 ppm concentration except kylar. The effect of organic acids and formaldehyde at 0.01, 0.005, and 0.001 M was studied. Acetic acid stimulated alpha-amylase at all concentrations, but formic acid, oxalic acid, lactic acid and citric acid inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 91, 100, 100 and 79%, respectively, at a concentration of 0.01 M, while by 31, 100, 15 and 20%, respectively, at 0.005 M. Formaldehyde induced 7, 3 and 2% inhibition at 0.01, 0.005 and 0.001 M, respectively. At 0.01 M either sorbitol or fructose inhibited alpha-amylase by 8%, Maltose 7%, sucrose 6%, phenol, glucose and galactose each by 5%, ethanol, glycerol, arabinose and sodium benzoate each by 4%, isopropanol and mannitol 1%, but methanol and ammonium citrate dibasic did not inhibit alpha-amylase. The results indicate that CuCl2, SnCl2, AgNO3 and Fe2(SO4)3 were the strongest inhibitors, followed by Cd(C2H3O2), HgCl2, Na2-EDTA, Na2HPO4, and CaCl2 in decreasing order. NaCl, NaBr and Mn SO4 did not inhibit alpha-amylase at concentrations from 10 mM to 0.01 mM. PMID:2515680

  20. Terrestrial radiation effects in ULSI devices and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Eishi H

    2014-01-01

    A practical guide on how mathematical approaches can be used to analyze and control radiation effects in semiconductor devices within various environments Covers faults in ULSI devices to failures in electronic systems caused by a wide variety of radiation fields, including electrons, alpha -rays, muons, gamma rays, neutrons and heavy ions. Readers will learn the environmental radiation features at the ground or avionics altitude. Readers will also learn how to make numerical models from physical insight and what kind of mathematical approaches should be implemented to analyze the radiation effects. A wide variety of mitigation techniques against soft-errors are reviewed and discussed. The author shows how to model sophisticated radiation effects in condensed matter in order to quantify and control them. The book provides the reader with the knowledge on a wide variety of radiation fields and their effects on the electronic devices and systems. It explains how electronic systems including servers and rout...

  1. Chemical effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  2. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  3. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, electron and alpha radiation in rat skin. Comprehensive progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1976. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Albert, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Rat skin has been studied for a number of years as a model of radiation carcinogenesis in a solid tissue. Accessibility of the skin enables the tumors to be detected early so that growth rate, proliferation rate, and onset times can be established accurately and, of course, the superficial location permits an accurate assessment of doses and a localization of the radiation to the tissue of interest. We have been attempting to establish as accurately as possible the nature of the dose response curve, i.e., the rate of tumor occurrence as of function of radiation dose, and the importance of tumor induction of radiologic factors, such as dose rate, fractionation, dose localization, linear energy transfer and of biologic factors, such as the proliferative state of the hair follicles and epidermis at the time of and subsequent to irradiation. The interaction of radiation and other carcinogens, especially ultraviolet light, is under study because of epidemiologic evidence suggesting a potential synergism for induction of scalp tumors. Radiobiological recovery processes have been studied in tumor response experiments using split doses of radiation separated by various times. The recovery rate for electron induced tumors has been measured, and the oncogenic effects of high LET particles (proton, alpha, argon) are being investigated.

  4. A critical review of radiation effects on borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the experimental values have been obtained by loading the glass with alpha emitters like Cm 244 and Pu 238. The data existing in literature on stored energy, and density variation are presented and discussed. Attention is given to the variation of the leaching rate due to the radiation effect. Samples loaded with alpha emitters have given data up to 0.17 dpa and such bombarded with heavy ions show large effects due to dose rate effects. A study on defect formation has shown that under electrons irradiation, formation of bubbles is possible. (DG)

  5. High spatial resolution photographs of the sun in L alpha radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    Photographs of the sun in predominantly L alpha radiation (centered at 1215.67 A) with 3-sec spatial resolution were taken from an Aerobee rocket shortly after fourth contact by the moon on the eclipse day of July 10, 1972. This preliminary reporting of the results describes the instrument and shows two of the photographs taken. The supergranulation is manifest, and active regions and filaments are well resolved over the entire disk. Densitometer traces across the disk are presented, giving the flux incident on the earth from active regions, cell boundaries, and filaments.

  6. Lung cancer induced in hamsters by low doses of alpha radiation from 210Po

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancers have been induced in 9 to 53 percent of hamsters given multiple intratracheal instillations of polonium-210 in amounts yielding lifetime exposures of 15 to 300 rads to the lungs. Cigarette smokers have previously been estimated to receive 20 rads to areas of the bronchial epithelium from deposited polonium-210. This finding thus supports the hypothesis that alpha radiation resulting from the polonium-210 or lead-210 present in cigarette smoke may be a significant causative factor in human lung cancer. (U.S.)

  7. The fibrate decreases radiation sensitivity via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-mediated superoxide dismutase induction in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xianguang; An, Zhengzhe; Song, Hye Jin; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seong Soon [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Ran [Konkuk University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The fibrates are ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} and used clinically as hypolipidemic drugs. The fibrates are known to cause peroxisome proliferation, enhance superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression and catalase activity. The antioxidant actions of the fibrates may modify radiation sensitivity. Here, we investigated the change of the radiation sensitivity in two cervix cancer cell lines in combination with fenofi brate (FF). Activity and protein expression of SOD were measured according to the concentration of FF. The mRNA expressions were measured by using real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Combined cytotoxic effect of FF and radiation was measured by using clonogenic assay. In HeLa cells total SOD activity was increased with increasing FF doses up to 30 {mu}M. In the other hand, the catalase activity was increased a little. As with activity the protein expression of SOD1 and SOD2 was increased with increasing doses of FF. The mRNAs of SOD1, SOD2, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased with increasing doses of FF. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by radiation was decreased by preincubation with FF. The surviving fractions (SF) by combining FF and radiation was higher than those of radiation alone. In Me180 cells SOD and catalase activity were not increased with FF. Also, the mRNAs of SOD1, SOD2, and PPAR{alpha} were not increased with FF. However, the mRNA of PPAR{gamma} was increased with FF. FF can reduce radiation sensitivity by ROS scavenging via SOD induction in HeLa. SOD induction by FF is related with PPAR{alpha}.

  8. Experimental long-term exposures of fish to low dose rate gamma- or alpha-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While it is well known that α-radiation is much more damaging than γ-radiation (on an equal absorbed dose basis) to man and mammals, there are no data available to compare the effects of these radiations on fish. As many authorised disposals of radioactivity are made to sea or rivers and include α- and γ-emitters it is important that such data is obtained so that estimates of the combined biological damaging effects may be made. This paper describes experiments made to examine the comparative effects of chronic exposure to α- or γ-radiation on reproductive endpoints in a representative fish, the zebrafish Danio rerio. Fish were exposed to γ-radiation or α-radiation for approximately 1 year. The fish were allowed to breed once per week and for each breeding opportunity the total numbers of eggs, numbers of eggs viable at 24 hours and eggs hatching successfully were recorded. Dose rate groups were 300, 1000 or 7400μGy h-1 for γ-radiation and 9.6, 19, 84 and 214μGy h-1 for α-radiation. None of the α-radiation groups showed significant effects on any measure of egg production while among γ-radiation groups only the highest, 7400μGy h-1 group showed an effect. This was a rapid decrease in total number of eggs and viable eggs laid per opportunity, leading to a failure to lay any after 20 weekly opportunities. There was, however, no significant decrease in any group in the hatch rate of eggs which were viable at 24 hours. Comparison of the highest α-radiation dose rate which produced no effect (214μGy h-1) and the γ-radiation dose rate which had a significant effect (7400μGy h-1) gives a relative biological effect (RBEα) of <35. (author)

  9. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given

  10. Traversal of cells by radiation and absorbed fraction estimates for electrons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration of the pathlength which radiation traverses in a cell is central to algorithms for estimating energy deposition on a cellular level. Distinct pathlength distributions occur for radionuclides: (1) uniformly distributed in space about the cell (referred to as μ-randomness); (2) uniformly distributed on the surface of the cell (S-randomness); and (3) uniformly distributed within the cell volume (I-randomness). For a spherical cell of diameter d, the mean pathlengths are 2/3d, and 3/4d, respectively, for these distributions. Algorithms for simulating the path of radiation through a cell are presented and the absorbed fraction in the cell and its nucleus are tabulated for low energy electrons and alpha particles emitted on the surface of spherical cells. The algorithms and absorbed fraction data should be of interest to those concerned with the dosimetry of radionuclide-labeled monoclonal antibodies. 8 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  11. Radiation protection and health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine carries with it a responsibility to both patient and personnel to maximize the diagnostic and therapeutic benefit while minimizing the potential for any adverse health effects. Shortly after the discovery of the x-ray in 1895 the potential for acute health hazards of ionizing radiation became apparent. However, the risks of ionizing radiation were poorly understood and many early users did not believe that anyone could be hurt by something that could not be detected by any of the human senses. Many experiments on the biologic effects of ionizing radiation began in the early 1900s, and the first radiation protection standards were proposed by the British Roentgen Society in 1915. We now realize that these pioneers had a very limited knowledge of the potential hazards and radiation protection principles. Today more scientific data are available on the health effects of, detection of, and protection from ionizing radiation than any other physical agent or chemical known. In addition, use of many forms of ionizing radiation is heavily regulated at both national and state levels. This paper discusses how maternal contamination with radionuclides may cause irradiation of the fetus even if the radionuclide is not transferred across the placenta. This is mostly true for radionuclides that decay yielding relatively penetrating radiations

  12. Genetic effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter, the BEIR Committee has reviewed and reevaluated the data that are pertinent to the estimation of genetic risks to humans from low levels of ionizing radiation. The present report summarizes the methods and conclusions of previous committees. In deriving new risk figures, it places rather more emphasis on the results of the studies of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors than have previous BEIR reports. However, the committee has also made use of the extensive radiation studies carried out with mice, which are briefly reviewed. 174 ref

  13. Synchrotron radiation study of the uranium chemical species electrodeposited for alpha spectrometry sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burciaga V, D. C.; Mendez, C. G.; Esparza P, H.; Fuentes C, L.; Fuentes M, L.; Montero C, M. E. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Beesley, A. M. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Crespo, M. T., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.m [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    Alpha spectrometry (As) with semiconductor detectors has applications in nuclear decay data measurements, environmental, geological and nuclear wastes studies and other works requiring determination of actinide and other alpha emitter contents. In order to obtain accurate measurements by producing good resolution alpha spectra, As sources must be thin and uniform. As sources produced by electrodeposition consist of a radioactive deposit onto a metallic substrate (cathode of the electrolytic cell). Natural U sources prepared by the Hallstadius method have co-deposited Pt, originated from the dissolution of the anode during the electrodeposition. A recent work published else-where has reported a study on the morphology and spatial distribution of the U/Pt deposits with the related chemical speciation of U, using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure. The purpose of this work is to explain the structure of the Pt/U deposits. We have obtained new spectra of the U L III edge X-ray absorption fine structure by total electron yield at Stanford Synchrotron radiation light source, Bl 2-3. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (Gi-XRD) patterns were obtained at Stanford Synchrotron radiation light source, Bl 11-3. Gi-XRD patterns show a bimodal distribution of grain sizes of Pt, with dimensions {approx} 5 and 20 nm; schoepite diffraction signals suggest grain dimensions of {approx} 5 nm, i.e. with low crystallization. X-ray absorption fine structure spectra were fitted assuming two different structures: uranyl hydroxide and schoepite, and results were compared. U-U path shows low intensity that also may be a result of low crystallization. (Author)

  14. Effects of radiation; Effets des radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  15. Metabolism and biological effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emphasis of much of the current and planned research on the toxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides is directed toward the complexities of actual and potential conditions of occupational environmental exposures of human beings. These, as well as the more limited studies on mechanisms of biological transport and effects, should increase our ability to predict health risks more accurately and to deal more confidently with human exposures, if and when they occur

  16. On surface clustering and Pauli principle effects in alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the correct description of nuclear surface region in alpha decay calculations is pointed out. A model is proposed takinq into account explicitly surface clustering and Pauli principle effects which are essential in this region. A method for solving the main integrodifferential equation of the model by using the oscillator shell basis and the Collatz method is worked out. The first numerical results are obtained for nonlocal potential of the atpha particle-daughter nucleus interaction

  17. The effects of cosmic radiation on implantable medical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuits, with the benefits of low power consumption, represent the state of the art technology for implantable medical devices. Three significant sources of radiation are classified as having the ability to damage or alter the behavior of implantable electronics; Secondary neutron cosmic radiation, alpha particle radiation from the device packaging and therapeutic doses(up to 70 Gγ) of high energy radiation used in radiation oncology. The effects of alpha particle radiation from the packaging may be eliminated by the use of polyimide or silicone rubber die coatings. The relatively low incidence of therapeutic radiation incident on an implantable device and the use of die coating leaves cosmic radiation induced secondary neutron single event upset (SEU) as the main pervasive ionising radiation threat to the reliability of implantable devices. A theoretical model which predicts the susceptibility of a RAM cell to secondary neutron cosmic radiation induced SEU is presented. The model correlates well within the statistical uncertainty associated with both the theoretical and field estimate. The predicted Soft Error Rate (SER) is 4.8 x l0-12 upsets/(bit hr) compared to an observed upset rate of 8.5 x 10-12 upsets/(bit hr) from 20 upsets collected over a total of 284672 device days. The predicted upset rate may increase by up to 20% when consideration is given to patients flying in aircraft The upset rate is also consistent with the expected geographical variations of the secondary cosmic ray neutron flux, although insufficient upsets precluded a statistically significant test. This is the first clinical data set obtained indicating the effects of cosmic radiation on implantable devices. Importantly, it may be used to predict the susceptibility of future to the implantable device designs to the effects of cosmic radiation

  18. The effects of cosmic radiation on implantable medical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, P. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuits, with the benefits of low power consumption, represent the state of the art technology for implantable medical devices. Three significant sources of radiation are classified as having the ability to damage or alter the behavior of implantable electronics; Secondary neutron cosmic radiation, alpha particle radiation from the device packaging and therapeutic doses(up to 70 G{gamma}) of high energy radiation used in radiation oncology. The effects of alpha particle radiation from the packaging may be eliminated by the use of polyimide or silicone rubber die coatings. The relatively low incidence of therapeutic radiation incident on an implantable device and the use of die coating leaves cosmic radiation induced secondary neutron single event upset (SEU) as the main pervasive ionising radiation threat to the reliability of implantable devices. A theoretical model which predicts the susceptibility of a RAM cell to secondary neutron cosmic radiation induced SEU is presented. The model correlates well within the statistical uncertainty associated with both the theoretical and field estimate. The predicted Soft Error Rate (SER) is 4.8 x l0{sup -12} upsets/(bit hr) compared to an observed upset rate of 8.5 x 10{sup -12} upsets/(bit hr) from 20 upsets collected over a total of 284672 device days. The predicted upset rate may increase by up to 20% when consideration is given to patients flying in aircraft The upset rate is also consistent with the expected geographical variations of the secondary cosmic ray neutron flux, although insufficient upsets precluded a statistically significant test. This is the first clinical data set obtained indicating the effects of cosmic radiation on implantable devices. Importantly, it may be used to predict the susceptibility of future to the implantable device designs to the effects of cosmic radiation.

  19. Alpha effect due to buoyancy instability of a magnetic layer

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    A strong toroidal field can exist in form of a magnetic layer in the overshoot region below the solar convection zone. This motivates a more detailed study of the magnetic buoyancy instability with rotation. We calculate the alpha effect due to helical motions caused by a disintegrating magnetic layer in a rotating density-stratified system with angular velocity Omega making an angle theta with the vertical. We also study the dependence of the alpha effect on theta and the strength of the initial magnetic field. We carry out three-dimensional hydromagnetic simulations in Cartesian geometry. A turbulent EMF due to the correlations of the small scale velocity and magnetic field is generated. We use the test-field method to calculate the transport coefficients of the inhomogeneous turbulence produced by the layer. We show that the growth rate of the instability and the twist of the magnetic field vary monotonically with the ratio of thermal conductivity to magnetic diffusivity. The resulting alpha effect is inho...

  20. Anomalous radiation effects on oxide material surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various different kind of radiation influence on surface properties, in particular, adsorptive, was revealed and at some cases the general observation regularity of the radiation adsorption is upset. So, the hydrogen photo-adsorption is not observed on silicon dioxide and on some other oxides. At the same time hydrogen adsorption takes place at the same oxides irradiation by more power nuclear particles, such as gamma-rays, protons of high energies, alpha-particles, neutrons, high-velocity electrons, and also at a X-ray irradiation. At the same time oxygen adsorption takes place on the majority of the studied oxides. So it is possible to conclude that at the irradiated adsorbents the formation of electronic centers is general regularity. The radiation adsorption of oxygen is well studied on many systems and its regularities are established on numerous experiments. On an example of such oxide systems, as silicon dioxide, oxides of rare-earth elements, beryllium oxide, aluminum oxide, the zeolites we have studied a general regularity of the oxygen and hydrogen radiation adsorption, i.e. their electron-hole properties at irradiation by protons with energy 30 MeV, alpha-particles and ions of helium-3 with energy 40 and 50 MeV, gamma-rays and ultra-violet-radiation, and also neutrons from the nuclear reactor. Parallel with adsorptive properties of oxides their paramagnetic properties and thermal desorption characteristics in a wide range of temperatures were studied. The received data have allowed to find the dependence of paramagnetic centers from adsorptive centers. It was established that the adsorptive centers do not always coincide with paramagnetic ones and vise versa. It was established that the anomalous effects in a radiation adsorption at irradiation of the oxide rare-earth elements on of scandium, lanthanum, erbium and dysprosium oxides are observed. It was found out that radiation adsorption of hydrogen is absent on oxides of a lanthanum, erbium and

  1. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  2. Radiation effects on structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support

  3. Effects of radiation on erythropoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the pioneer work of Heineke (1903; 1905) many workers have studied the effect of radiation on haemopoiesis. Their work has been reviewed by Bloom (1948), by Jacobson (1954) and more recently by Bond et al. (1965). The subject continues to stimulate much interest but is now more concerned with the effects of radiation on the multipotential stem cell pool than on radiation damage to the erythropoietic cells themselves. Death from haemopoietic failure following an LD50/30 dose of radiation is probably not attributable to failure of erythropoiesis; while damage to the erythropoietic system certainly plays a part in the syndrome, it is not a major factor contributing to the death of the animal. Although the severity and time course of the response vary with the species studied, the general effects of radiation on erythropoiesis are similar in all mammalian bone marrow studied to date. Likewise, though the severity of the reaction varies somewhat with the energy of the radiation and has been used to compare the relative biological effectiveness of different types of radiation (Sinclair et al., 1962; Sztanyik, 1967), the response is different only in degree and not in its fundamental pattern. The initial syndrome of depression and recovery will therefore be described largely by reference to work performed on the response of the rat to single acute exposures of either whole-body or partial-body irradiation with conventional X-rays

  4. Low level radiation: biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is imperative that physicians and scientists using radiations in health care delivery continue to assess the benefits derived, vs. potential risk, to patients and radiation workers being exposed to radiation in its various forms as part of our health delivery system. Insofar as possible we should assure our patients and ourselves that the benefits outweigh the potential hazards involved. Inferences as to the possible biological effects of low level radiation are generally based on extrapolations from those effects observed and measured following acute exposures to considerably higher doses of radiation. Thus, in order to shed light on the question of the possible biological effects of low level radiation, a wide variety of studies have been carried out using cells in culture and various species of plant and animal life. This manuscript makes reference to some of those studies with indications as to how and why the studies were done and the conclusions that might be drawn there from. In addition reference is made to the handling of this information by scientists, by environmentalists, and by the news media. Unfortunately, in many instances the public has been misled by what has been said and/or written. It is hoped that this presentation will provide an understandable and reasonable perspective on the various appropriate uses of radiation in our lives and how such uses do provide significant improvement in our health and in our quality of life

  5. Alpha-tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation combined injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay K.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Beattie, Lindsay A.; Ducey, Elizabeth J.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of alpha-tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors in mitigating combined injury associated with acute radiation exposure in combination with secondary physical wounding. CD2F1 mice were exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and then transfused intravenously with 5 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from TS- and AMD3100-injected mice after irradiation. Within 1 h after irradiation, mice were exposed to secondary wounding. Mice were observed for 30 d after irradiation and cytokine analysis was conducted by multiplex Luminex assay at various time-points after irradiation and wounding. Our results initially demonstrated that transfusion of TS-mobilized progenitors from normal mice enhanced survival of acutely irradiated mice exposed 24 h prior to transfusion to supralethal doses (11.5–12.5 Gy) of 60Co gamma-radiation. Subsequently, comparable transfusions of TS-mobilized progenitors were shown to significantly mitigate severe combined injuries in acutely irradiated mice. TS administered 24 h before irradiation was able to protect mice against combined injury as well. Cytokine results demonstrated that wounding modulates irradiation-induced cytokines. This study further supports the conclusion that the infusion of TS-mobilized progenitor-containing PBMCs acts as a bridging therapy in radiation-combined-injury mice. We suggest that this novel bridging therapeutic approach involving the infusion of TS-mobilized hematopoietic progenitors following acute radiation exposure or combined injury might be applicable to humans. PMID:23814114

  6. Alpha-tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation combined injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of alpha-tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors in mitigating combined injury associated with acute radiation exposure in combination with secondary physical wounding. CD2F1 mice were exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and then transfused intravenously with 5 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from TS- and AMD3100-injected mice after irradiation. Within 1 h after irradiation, mice were exposed to secondary wounding. Mice were observed for 30 d after irradiation and cytokine analysis was conducted by multiplex Luminex assay at various time-points after irradiation and wounding. Our results initially demonstrated that transfusion of TS-mobilized progenitors from normal mice enhanced survival of acutely irradiated mice exposed 24 h prior to transfusion to supralethal doses (11.5–12.5 Gy) of 60Co gamma-radiation. Subsequently, comparable transfusions of TS-mobilized progenitors were shown to significantly mitigate severe combined injuries in acutely irradiated mice. TS administered 24 h before irradiation was able to protect mice against combined injury as well. Cytokine results demonstrated that wounding modulates irradiation-induced cytokines. This study further supports the conclusion that the infusion of TS-mobilized progenitor-containing PBMCs acts as a bridging therapy in radiation-combined-injury mice. We suggest that this novel bridging therapeutic approach involving the infusion of TS-mobilized hematopoietic progenitors following acute radiation exposure or combined injury might be applicable to humans. (author)

  7. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed

  8. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  9. BEGe detector response to alpha and beta-radiation near its p+ electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Phase II of the GERDA (Germanium Detector Array) experiment Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors will continue the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of 76Ge. The main feature of these detectors is their small p+ electrode used for signal read-out. Due to the thin dead layer of the p+ contact, surface events close to this electrode represent a potential background for the search of 0νββ. A study was conducted to determine the response of the detector to alpha and beta-radiation using movable collimated sources within a custom-build cryostat. Preliminary results of this study and a possible method to discriminate these events will be presented.

  10. BEGe detector response to alpha and beta-radiation near its p{sup +} electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Agostini, Matteo; Barnabe-Heider, Marik; Budjas, Dusan; Schoenert, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    In Phase II of the GERDA (Germanium Detector Array) experiment Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors will continue the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 76}Ge. The main feature of these detectors is their small p{sup +} electrode used for signal read-out. Due to the thin dead layer of the p{sup +} contact, surface events close to this electrode represent a potential background for the search of 0{nu}{beta}{beta}. A study was conducted to determine the response of the detector to alpha and beta-radiation using movable collimated sources within a custom-build cryostat. Preliminary results of this study and a possible method to discriminate these events will be presented.

  11. Radiation effects in ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on alpha-decay event damage (a particle and recoil-nucleus) that results in atomic-scale disorder which causes changes in the molar volume, corrosion rate, stored energy, mechanical properties, and macrostructure of ceramics. These changes particularly of volume and corrosion rate, have critical implications for the long-term durability of nuclear waste forms, such as the polyphase. Ti-based ceramic Synroc. This paper reviews data on actinide-bearing (U and Th) phases of great age (>100 m.y.) found in nature and compares these results to observation on actinide-doped phases (Pu and Cm) of nearly equivalent α-decay doses. Of particular interest is evidence for annealing of radiation damage effects over geologic periods of time under ambient conditions

  12. Radiation risk to low fluences of alpha particles may be greater than we thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H; Suzuki, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Vannais, D; Chen, G; Trosko, J E; Waldren, C A; Hei, T K

    2001-12-01

    Based principally on the cancer incidence found in survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) and the United States National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that estimates of cancer risk for low dose exposure be extrapolated from higher doses by using a linear, no-threshold model. This recommendation is based on the dogma that the DNA of the nucleus is the main target for radiation-induced genotoxicity and, as fewer cells are directly damaged, the deleterious effects of radiation proportionally decline. In this paper, we used a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction (either 100% or making risk estimates for low dose, high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation exposure. PMID:11734643

  13. Monitoring of gross alpha in the air and exposure gamma radiation on and around the coal fire power at Paiton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal is burned in furnace operating at up to 1,700 oC in order to produce electrical energy and ash (bottom ash and fly-ash). The fly-ash is released to the atmosphere or environment around the coal fire power. Therefore, the environmental radioactivity monitoring should be carried out for gross alpha in the air and exposure gamma radiation. The measurement of gross alpha have been carried out using the alpha scintillation counter with the ZnS(Ag) detector, and measurement of gamma radiation using the high pressure ion chamber. The results obtained showed that the gross alpha in the air were the ranging from (7.1 ± 1,2) mBq m-3 to (12.2 ± 1.9) mBq m-3 and the exposure gamma radiation were (3.69 ± 0.11) μR/h to (9.55 ± 0.15) μR/h. The data were still lower than the limit of the maximum permissible concentration and annual intake for breathing but the gross alpha data were higher than in the nuclear installations. (authors)

  14. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1 – absence of effects (stress recognition), 2 – activation (adaptive response), and 3 – inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure. - Highlights: • Luminous bacteria demonstrate nonlinear dose-effect relation in radioactive solutions. • Response to low-dose radiation includes 3 stages: threshold, activation, inhibition. • ROS are responsible for low-dose effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides. • Luminous marine bacteria are a convenient tool to study radiation hormesis

  15. A microscopic description for the alpha decay of nuclei using a realistic effective interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, D N

    2002-01-01

    The process of alpha disintegration has been studied theoretically in the framework of a microscopic superasymmetric fission model (MSAFM). The nuclear interaction potential required for the alpha decay process has been calculated by folding in the density distribution functions of the alpha nucleus and the daughter nucleus with a realistic effective interaction. The nuclear microscopic alpha-nucleus potential thus obtained has been used along with the Coulomb interaction potential to calculate the action integral within the WKB approximation. This subsequently results in a parameter free calculation for the half lives of the alpha decays of nuclei. The model is successful in calculating the half lives of the alpha disintegration processes of nuclei.

  16. SU-C-303-02: Correlating Metabolic Response to Radiation Therapy with HIF-1alpha Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To understand radiation induced alterations in cellular metabolism which could be used to assess treatment or normal tissue response to aid in patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. This work aims to compare the metabolic response of two head and neck cell lines, one malignant (UM-SCC-22B) and one benign (Normal Oral Keratinocyte), to ionizing radiation. Responses are compared to alterations in HIF-1alpha expression. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Measurements of metabolism and HIF-1alpha expression were taken before and X minutes after a 10 Gy dose of radiation delivered via an orthovoltage x-ray source. In vitro changes in metabolic activity were measured via fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to assess the mean lifetime of NADH autofluorescence following a dose of 10 Gy. HIF-1alpha expression was measured via immunohistochemical staining of in vitro treated cells and expression was quantified using the FIJI software package. Results: FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways for malignant cells; whereas this benign cell line showed little change in metabolic signature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant changes in HIF-1alpha expression in response to 10 Gy of radiation that correlate to metabolic profiles. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in metabolic activity and HIF-1alpha expression. These alterations occur on time scales approximating the duration of common radiation treatments (approximately tens of minutes). Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response

  17. SU-C-303-02: Correlating Metabolic Response to Radiation Therapy with HIF-1alpha Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, D [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Peeters, W [Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, GA (United States); Nickel, K [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R; Van Der Kogel, A; Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To understand radiation induced alterations in cellular metabolism which could be used to assess treatment or normal tissue response to aid in patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. This work aims to compare the metabolic response of two head and neck cell lines, one malignant (UM-SCC-22B) and one benign (Normal Oral Keratinocyte), to ionizing radiation. Responses are compared to alterations in HIF-1alpha expression. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Measurements of metabolism and HIF-1alpha expression were taken before and X minutes after a 10 Gy dose of radiation delivered via an orthovoltage x-ray source. In vitro changes in metabolic activity were measured via fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to assess the mean lifetime of NADH autofluorescence following a dose of 10 Gy. HIF-1alpha expression was measured via immunohistochemical staining of in vitro treated cells and expression was quantified using the FIJI software package. Results: FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways for malignant cells; whereas this benign cell line showed little change in metabolic signature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant changes in HIF-1alpha expression in response to 10 Gy of radiation that correlate to metabolic profiles. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in metabolic activity and HIF-1alpha expression. These alterations occur on time scales approximating the duration of common radiation treatments (approximately tens of minutes). Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response.

  18. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  19. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Cory D. Cress; McMorrow, Julian J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Landi, Brian J.; Seth M. Hubbard; Messenger, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  20. Study of alpha-tocopherol as a protector of damages induced to the skin by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study was carried out in animals for determining the characteristics of alpha-tocopherol protection against lesions caused by free radicals produced by ionizing radiation. Two different concentrations of alpha-tocopherol were applied on the same exposed sample. A linear electron accelerator of 6 MeV was used for the production of free radicals and a dose of 2800 cGy. The lesions were submitted to clinical studies for anatomic pathologies. The conclusion of this study is that alpha-tocopherol applied to skin before and immediately after the exposure to ionizing radiation has the capability to protect it, developing a perfectly differentiated epidermis and of greater thickness than normally considered

  1. Radon, radiation effects and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies among Rn-exposed miners revealed a significant increase in lung tumour occurrence with increased exposure to radon daughters. Radiation exposure of the lungs also is given through inhalation of Rn-decay products released from the building material of residential houses. The resulting lung cancer risk is one of the major issues of radiation protection of the population. Extensive data collections are available on Rn-concentrations in room air. Building planning and design should make better use of these data, particularly for selection of materials and design of the basement and foundation of buildings, as radon daughters are the major source of radiation exposure of the population. (DG)

  2. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficient dose of ionizing radiation (I.R.), expressed in sievert is a weighting of the deposited energy (absorbed dose in grays) by factors that take into account the radiation hazard and tissues radiosensitivity. it is useful in radiation protection because it allows to add exposures to ionizing radiation of different nature. for low doses, it has no probabilistic value. The determinist effects of ionizing radiation are observed from thresholds of several hundred of milli sievert. The seriousness grows with the dose. The whole-body doses exceeding 8 Sv are always lethal. The radio-induced cancers are observed only for doses exceeding 100 to 200 mSv for adults, delivered at a self important dose rate. Their seriousness does not depend on the dose. Their appear fortuity (stochastic effect) with a various individual susceptibility, genetically determined. The number of eventual radio-induced cancers coming from the exposure of a high number of persons to low dose of ionizing radiation (<100 mSv) cannot be evaluated with a linear without threshold model. these models, however usually used, do not take into account the biological reality of cell defense mechanisms, tissues or whole body defense mechanisms, these one being different against low or high doses of ionizing radiation. Against low doses, the preponderant mechanism is the elimination of potentially dangerous damaged cells. Against high doses, the repair of damaged cells is imperative to preserve the tissue functions. It can lead to DNA repair errors (radio-induced mutations) and canceration. The radio-induced congenital malformations are effects with threshold. The radio-induced carcinogenesis in utero is a stochastic effect. The radio-induced hereditary congenital malformations have never been highlighted for man. (N.C.)

  3. Effects of gamma-Radiation on Select Lipids and Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolph, Jacob; Mauer, Lisa; Perchonok, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Radiation encountered on an extended duration space mission (estimates of 3 Sieverts for a mission to Mars) poses a threat not only to human health, but also to the quality, nutritional value, and palatability of the food system. Free radicals generated by radiation interaction with foods may initiate many unwanted reactions including: 1) autoxidation in lipids that alters flavor, odor, and concentrations of essential fatty acids, and 2) depletion of antioxidants food products and dietary supplements. Studies have shown that antioxidants may provide long term health protection from oxidative stress caused by radiation exposure; therefore, consumption of antioxidants will be important. Stability of essential fatty acids is also important for astronauts long-term health status. The objectives of this study were to characterize the effects of low dose gamma-radiation on lipids and antioxidants by monitoring oxidation and reducing power, respectively, in model systems. Select oils and antioxidants were exposed to levels of gamma-radiation ranging from 0 to 1000 Gy (1 Gy = 1 Sv) using a Gammacell 220 and stored at ambient or elevated temperatures (65 C) for up to 3 months prior to analysis. A Fricke dosimeter was used to verify differences between the radiation doses administered. Primary and secondary products of lipid oxidation in soybean and peanut oils were monitored using conjugated diene and 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBARs) assays. Changes in fatty acid composition and formation and vitamin E levels were also measured. The reducing power of antioxidant compounds, including vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, was determined using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Significant differences (alpha =0.05) were present between all radiation doses tested using the Fricke dosimeter. Increasing radiation doses above 3 Sv resulted in significantly (alpha =0.05) elevated levels of oxidation and free fatty acids in soybean and peanut oils. Decreases in

  4. Effect of cetuximab in combination with alpha-radioimmunotherapy in cultured squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The monoclonal antibody cetuximab, targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is a promising molecular targeting agent to be used in combination with radiation for anticancer therapy. In this study, effects of cetuximab in combination with alpha-emitting radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in a panel of cultured human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were assessed. Methods: SCC cell lines were characterized and treated with cetuximab in combination with anti-CD44v6 RIT using the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36 (211At-cMAb U36). Effects on 211At-cMAb U36 uptake, internalization and cell proliferation were then assessed in SCC cells. Results: Cetuximab in combination with 211At-cMAb U36 mediated increased growth inhibition compared to RIT or cetuximab alone in two cell lines. However, cetuximab also mediated radioprotective effects compared to RIT alone in two cell lines. The radioprotective effects occurred in the cell lines in which cetuximab clearly inhibited cell growth during radiation exposure. Cetuximab treatment also influenced 211At-cMAb-U36 uptake and internalization, suggesting interactions between CD44v6 and EGFR. Conclusions: Results from this study demonstrate the vast importance of further clarifying the mechanisms of cetuximab and radiation response, and the relationship between EGFR and suitable RIT targets. This is important not only in order to avoid potential radioprotective effects, but also in order to find and utilize potential synergistic effects from these combinations.

  5. Effect of cetuximab in combination with alpha-radioimmunotherapy in cultured squamous cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestor, Marika, E-mail: marika.nestor@bms.uu.s [Unit of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Unit of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Sundstroem, Magnus [Unit of Molecular Pathology, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University (Sweden); Anniko, Matti [Unit of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Tolmachev, Vladimir [Unit of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-01-15

    Aim: The monoclonal antibody cetuximab, targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is a promising molecular targeting agent to be used in combination with radiation for anticancer therapy. In this study, effects of cetuximab in combination with alpha-emitting radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in a panel of cultured human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were assessed. Methods: SCC cell lines were characterized and treated with cetuximab in combination with anti-CD44v6 RIT using the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36 ({sup 211}At-cMAb U36). Effects on {sup 211}At-cMAb U36 uptake, internalization and cell proliferation were then assessed in SCC cells. Results: Cetuximab in combination with {sup 211}At-cMAb U36 mediated increased growth inhibition compared to RIT or cetuximab alone in two cell lines. However, cetuximab also mediated radioprotective effects compared to RIT alone in two cell lines. The radioprotective effects occurred in the cell lines in which cetuximab clearly inhibited cell growth during radiation exposure. Cetuximab treatment also influenced {sup 211}At-cMAb-U36 uptake and internalization, suggesting interactions between CD44v6 and EGFR. Conclusions: Results from this study demonstrate the vast importance of further clarifying the mechanisms of cetuximab and radiation response, and the relationship between EGFR and suitable RIT targets. This is important not only in order to avoid potential radioprotective effects, but also in order to find and utilize potential synergistic effects from these combinations.

  6. Genetic radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of genetic damage arising from irradiation are identified; (1) gene or point mutations at the level of the DNA molecule, which contains the genetic code. (2) chromosome breakage which may lead to translocations (3) uncontrolled distribution of the chromosomes into the daughter cells. Tabular information is drawn mainly from the UNSCEAR report, 1977, on the risk factors of genetic damage from various irradiation levels. Some detailed effects on genetic structure are described for recessive mutations, dominant mutations and trans-locations. Experimental work has in some cases been guided by X-ray irradiation with single and double dose effects, including tests on mice, for which subsequent herdity may be examined. (G.C.)

  7. Studies on the biological effects of internal exposure of alpha emitters. Carcinogenicity test of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outlines of carcinogenicity tests in animals given with injected or inhaled plutonium (Pu) were described. Insoluble 239PuO2 particles were nasally inhaled in rats maintained for life. The dose response relationship between incidence of their lung tumor and absorbed radiation dose in the lung revealed that>1 Gy dose increased the incidence of malignant lung tumors, which differed from findings in the U.S. probably due to the difference between particle sizes. Further, a carcinogenic mechanism specific for alpha-ray was suggested based on tumor-related gene analysis. After soluble 239Pu (citrate salt) was injected in mice, significant reduction of lifetime and early tumor- or non-tumor-death were observed when the bone dose exceeded 3 Gy. Tumors were mostly osteosarcoma, lymphoma and other soft tissue solid cancers and were different from those induced by gamma-ray, X-ray and neutron irradiation. Studies on the strain difference, on the carcinogenic mechanism and alpha-ray induced mutation and transformation are in progress, which may lead to elucidation of the biological effects of internal exposure of alpha-emitters. (K.H.)

  8. On the effect of the ionising background on the Ly{\\alpha} forest autocorrelation function

    CERN Document Server

    Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Busca, Nicolás G

    2014-01-01

    An analytical framework is presented to understand the effects of a fluctuating intensity of the cosmic ionising background on the correlations of the Ly{\\alpha} forest transmission fraction measured in quasar spectra. In the absence of intensity fluctuations, the Ly{\\alpha} power spectrum should have the expected cold dark matter power spectrum with redshift distortions in the linear regime, with a bias factor b_{\\delta} and a redshift distortion parameter {\\beta} that depend on redshift but are independent of scale. The intensity fluctuations introduce a scale dependence in both b_{\\delta} and {\\beta}, but keeping their product b_{\\delta}{\\beta} fixed. Observations of the Ly{\\alpha} correlations and cross-correlations with radiation sources like those being done at present in the BOSS survey of SDSS-III (Busca et al. 2013; Slosar et al. 2013; Font-Ribera et al. 2014) have the potential to measure this scale dependence, which reflects the biasing properties of the sources and absorbers of the ionising backgr...

  9. Calculation of the Electronic Parameters of an Al/DNA/p-Si Schottky Barrier Diode Influenced by Alpha Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Maktuff Jaber Al-Ta'ii

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of materials such as inorganic semiconductors have been employed as detectors for nuclear radiation, the importance of which has increased significantly due to recent nuclear catastrophes. Despite the many advantages of this type of materials, the ability to measure direct cellular or biological responses to radiation might improve detector sensitivity. In this context, semiconducting organic materials such as deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA have been studied in recent years. This was established by studying the varying electronic properties of DNA-metal or semiconductor junctions when exposed to radiation. In this work, we investigated the electronics of aluminium (Al/DNA/silicon (Si rectifying junctions using their current-voltage (I-V characteristics when exposed to alpha radiation. Diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance were determined for different irradiation times. The observed results show significant changes with exposure time or total dosage received. An increased deviation from ideal diode conditions (7.2 to 18.0 was observed when they were bombarded with alpha particles for up to 40 min. Using the conventional technique, barrier height values were observed to generally increase after 2, 6, 10, 20 and 30 min of radiation. The same trend was seen in the values of the series resistance (0.5889–1.423 Ω for 2–8 min. These changes in the electronic properties of the DNA/Si junctions could therefore be utilized in the construction of sensitive alpha particle detectors.

  10. [Obtaining and characteristics of domestic preparation interferon alpha-2b with prolonged effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokholenko, Ia A; Porubleva, L V; Dubeĭ, I Ia; Rebriev, A V; Sutugina, L P; Gromovoĭ, T Iu; Pokrovskiĭ, V A; Obolenskaia, M Iu; Chernykh, S I

    2008-01-01

    Pegylated interferon alpha-2b (PEG-IFN alpha-2b) is a domestic preparation of a modified recombinant interferon alpha-2b with prolonged effect. The preparation was obtained by N-terminal pegylation of IFN alpha-2b with polyethylene glycol (PEG). This paper presents the method of PEG-IFN alpha-2b synthesis and characteristics of the obtained product. PAAG electrophoresis, Western blot analysis and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry confirm that the preparation is an N-terminal pegylated IFN alpha-2b that contains no more than 10% of dipegylated IFN alpha-2b. The comparison of PEG-IFN alpha-2b with its foreign analogue has revealed the similarity of their biological activity and pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:19351063

  11. Biopositive Effects of Ionizing Radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper was written for a talk given by E. Broda in Vienna for an event organised by the chemical physical society, the Austrian biochemical society and the Austrian biophysical society in December 1972. In this paper Broda analyses the question of biopositive effects of ionizing radiation. (nowak)

  12. Radiation Effects on Polymer Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Winslow, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Report compiles data on effects of radiation on physical properties of synthetic organic materials. Emphasis on materials of interest to nuclear-equipment and nuclear-reactor designers. Data covers five categories of polymeric materials: Insulators, elastomeric seals and gaskets, lubricants, adhesives, and coatings. More than 250 materials represented.

  13. Mathematical models for radiation effects on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we are proposing a theoretical approach of basic mathematical models for radiation effect on human health. The largest natural sources of radiation exposure to humans are radon gas. While radon gas has always been in the environment, awareness of its contribution to human radiation exposure has increased in recent years. Radon's primary pathway is through air space in soil and rock. Pressure differences between the soil and the inside of buildings may cause radon gas to move indoors. Radon decays to radon daughters, some of which emit alpha radiation. Alpha-emitting radon daughters are adsorbed on to dust particles which, when inhaled, are trapped in the lungs and may cause gene damage, mutations and finally cancer. Exposure to excess UV radiation increases risk of skin cancer but there is also a dark side. The incidence of all types of skin cancer is related to exposure to UV radiation. Non-melanoma skin cancer, eye melanoma, and lip cancer have also been related to natural UV light

  14. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everyone is exposed to a complex mix of electromagnetic fields (EMF) of different frequencies that permeate our environment. Exposures to these EMF are increasing significantly as technology advances unabated and new applications are found. Technological progress in the broadest sense of the word has always been associated with various hazards and risks, both perceived and real. The industrial, commercial and household application on EMF is no exception. Throughout the world, the general public is concerned that exposure to EMF from such sources as high voltage power lines, broadcasting networks, mobile telephones and their base stations could lead to adverse health consequences, especially in children. As a result, the construction of new power lines and broadcasting and mobile telephone network has met with considerable opposition in many countries. Public exposure to EMF is regulated by a variety of voluntary and legal limits, together with various national safety standards. Guidelines are designed to avoid all identified hazards, from short and long term exposure, recommended limits. The aim of this paper is to report the summary of the actual scientific knowledge about the potential health effects and hazards due to man made EMF and the new tendencies of the social and political choices

  15. Two-stream cyclotron radiative instabilities due to the marginally mirror-trapped fraction for fustion alphas in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown here that the marginally mirror-trapped fraction of the newly-born fusion alpha particles in the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction dominated tokamak plasmas can induce a two-stream cyclotron radiative instability for the fast Alfven waves propagating near the harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency ωcα. This can explain both the experimentally observed time behavior and the spatially localized origin of the fusion product ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in TFTR at frequencies ω ∼ mωcα

  16. On the excitation of Lyman beta and Balmer alpha radiation by electron-impact dissociation of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaughlin, R. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    The cross sections for the excitation of Ly-beta and H-alpha when methane is dissociated by electron impact have values of 17.1 by 10 to the -19th power sq cm and 26.0 by 10 to the -19th power sq cm, respectively, at an electron impact energy of 100 eV. These results are in disagreement with the implications of recent polarization measurements of H-alpha radiation that suggest negligible H(3p) excitation in the dissociation of CH4 by electron impact.

  17. Space radiation effects and microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humans in space are exposed both to space radiation and microgravity. The question whether radiation effects are modified by microgravity is an important aspect in risk estimation. No interaction is expected at the molecular level since the influence of gravity is much smaller than that of thermal motion. Influences might be expected, however, at the cellular and organ level. For example, changes in immune competence could modify the development of radiogenic cancers. There are no data so far in this area. The problem of whether intracellular repair of radiation-induced DNA lesions is changed under microgravity conditions was recently addressed in a number of space experiments. The results are reviewed; they show that repair processes are not modified by microgravity

  18. Radiation monitoring by radiation effect of aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high energy and high intensity accelerator facilities need the radiation monitoring with temporal and spatial resolutions. Numerical estimations are made for the radiation monitoring using the sampling method of aerosol Alanine. The aerosol Alanine put into the monitoring area through the duct. The intensity of radicals in the collected throughput Alanine of about 50 mg after passing through the monitoring area is measured by the ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) method. Key parameters in the system are the aerosol particle diameter and its intensity, the duct diameter and length, and the aerosol flow rate inside the duct. The maximum dose rate more than 108 Gy/h is possible to measure assuming the duct of 100 cm2 in area and 10 m in length, and the aerosol flow rate of 1000 L/min. The temporal resolution of the order of minutes is obtainable when the aerosol particle size is 0.1 μm. As a result of numerical estimation based on empirical simulations, it is to be promising to apply a proposed scheme to the radiation monitoring for accelerator fields. (Y. Tanaka)

  19. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation

  20. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1984-10-21

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation.

  1. The Influence of the Photoionizing Radiation Spectrum on Metal-Line Ratios in Ly(alpha) Forest Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Mark L.; Shull, J. Michael

    1997-01-01

    Recent measurements of Si IV/C IV ratios in the high-redshift Ly(alpha) forest (Songaila & Cowie, AJ, 112, 335 (1996a); Savaglio et at., A&A (in press) (1997)) have opened a new window on chemical enrichment and the first generations of stars. However, the derivation of accurate Si/C abundances requires reliable ionization corrections, which are strongly dependent on the spectral shape of the metagalactic ionizing background and on the 'local effects' of hot stars in nearby galaxies. Recent models have assumed power-law quasar ionizing backgrounds plus a decrement at 4 Ryd to account for He II attenuation in intervening clouds. However, we show that realistic ionizing backgrounds based on cosmological radiative transfer models produce more complex ionizing spectra between 1-5 Ryd that are critical to interpreting ions of Si and C. We also make a preliminary investigation of the effects of He II ionization front nonoverlap. Because the attenuation and reemission by intervening clouds enhance Si IV relative to C the observed high Si IV/C IV ratios do not require an unrealistic Si overproduction (Si/C greater than or equal to 3 (Si/C)(solar mass)). If the ionizing spectrum is dominated by 'local effects' from massive stars, even larger Si IV/C IV ratios are possible. However, unless stellar radiation dominates quasars by more than a factor of 10, we confirm the evidence for some Si overproduction by massive stars; values Si/C approx. 2(Si/C)(solar mass) fit the measurements better than solar abundances. Ultimately, an adequate interpretation of the ratios of C IV, Si IV, and C II may require hot, collisionally ionized gas in a multiphase medium.

  2. Minimal tau approximation and simulations of the alpha effect

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A

    2005-01-01

    The validity of a closure called the minimal tau approximation (MTA), is tested in the context of dynamo theory, wherein triple correlations are assumed to provide relaxation of the turbulent electromotive force. Under MTA, the alpha effect in mean field dynamo theory becomes proportional to a relaxation time scale multiplied by the difference between kinetic and current helicities. It is shown that the value of the relaxation time is positive and, in units of the turnover time at the forcing wavenumber, it is of the order of unity. It is quenched by the magnetic field -- roughly independently of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, this independence becomes uncertain at large magnetic Reynolds number. Kinetic and current helicities are shown to be dominated by large scale properties of the flow.

  3. Simulations of the anisotropic kinetic and magnetic alpha effects

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A

    2007-01-01

    The validity of a closure called the minimal tau approximation (MTA), is tested in the context of dynamo theory, wherein triple correlations are assumed to provide relaxation of the turbulent electromotive force. Under MTA, the alpha effect in mean field dynamo theory becomes proportional to a relaxation time scale multiplied by the difference between kinetic and current helicities. It is shown that the value of the relaxation time is positive and, in units of the turnover time at the forcing wavenumber, it is of the order of unity. It is quenched by the magnetic field -- roughly independently of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, this independence becomes uncertain at large magnetic Reynolds number. Kinetic and current helicities are shown to be dominated by large scale properties of the flow.

  4. Effects of high let radiation at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete evaluation of the impact of nuclear energy technologies on human health requires: identification and characterization of hazardous agents and their effects, which is well advanced; quantitative dose-effect relations for important effects under various conditions of radiation exposure and biological variation, which needs more work but which has been advancing fairly well, particularly in experimental animal research; an understanding of the cellular and tissue mechanisms of the hazardous effects in relation to the microdosimetry of the agents, which has advanced slowly and to a relatively limited degree; and integration of the dose-effect relations and mechanistic knowledge into theories and models which are intended to be predictive for estimation of human health risks at pertinent low levels of exposure. Several theories, hypotheses or models of radiation carcinogenesis, and some for alpha radiation in particular, have been developed on the basis of dose-effect relations in the necessary attempt to predict the hazards of low levels of radiation exposure for purposes of radiation protection in advance of adequate data on dose-effect relations and mchanisms. As such these theories or models have necessarily involved strings of explicit and implicit assumptions concerning mechanisms and the nature of dose-effect relations below the dose regions at which effects have been observed. Nevertheless, they have been useful in stimulating research to test their assumptions and in assuming the interpretation of data

  5. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  6. Research on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researches on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA have been carried out in different sections. In recent years, the organizations were rearranged to attain better research circumstances, and new research programs started. At present, radiation effect studies focus on radiation effect mechanisms at atomic, molecular and cellular levels including simulation studies, and protection studies focus on dosimetry for conditions difficult to cover with currently used methods and data as well as the related basic studies. The outlines of the whole studies and also some descriptions on selected subjects will be given in this paper. (author)

  7. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  8. Electrical behavior of stored erythrocytes after exposure to gamma radiation and the role of {alpha}-lipoic acid as radioprotector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selim, Nabila S. [Biophysics Laboratory, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, POB 29 Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Desouky, Omar S. [Biophysics Laboratory, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, POB 29 Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: omardesouky@yahoo.com; Elbakrawy, Eman M. [Biophysics Laboratory, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, POB 29 Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Rezk, Rezk A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-06-15

    The effects of {gamma} rays (25, 50 and 100 Gy) on stored erythrocytes were studied by measuring their dielectric properties and observing their morphology under scanning electron microscopy. Alpha lipoic acid (a potent natural antioxidant) was introduced prior to irradiation for radioprotection. It can be concluded that the dose level of 25 Gy can be considered a safe sterile dose; however, irradiation doses of 50 and 100 Gy should be applied with the addition of {alpha}-acid to preserve the cell viability.

  9. Ionizing radiation fluctuations and large-scale structure in the Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Croft, R A C

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the large-scale inhomogeneities of the hydrogen ionizing radiation field in the Universe at redshift z=3. Using a raytracing algorithm, we simulate a model in which quasars are the dominant sources of radiation. We make use of large scale N-body simulations of a LambdaCDM universe, and include such effects as finite quasar lifetimes and output on the lightcone, which affects the shape of quasar light echoes. We create Lya forest spectra that would be generated in the presence of such a fluctuating radiation field, finding that the power spectrum of the Lya forest can be suppressed by as much as 15 % for modes with k=0.05-1 Mpc/h. This relatively small effect may have consequences for high precision measurements of the Lya power spectrum on larger scales than have yet been published. We also investigate another radiation field probe, the cross-correlation of quasar positions and the Lya forest. For both quasar lifetimes which we simulate (10^7 yr and 10^8 yr), we expect to see a strong decrease ...

  10. Analgesic effect of interferon-alpha via mu opioid receptor in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C L; Son, L X; Lu, C L; You, Z D; Wang, Y X; Sun, L Y; Cui, R Y; Liu, X Y

    2000-03-01

    Using the tail-flick induced by electro-stimulation as a pain marker, it was found that pain threshold (PT) was significantly increased after injecting interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) into the lateral ventricle of rats. This effect was dosage-dependent and abolished by monoclonal antibody (McAb) to IFN alpha. Naloxone could inhibit the analgesic effect of IFN alpha, suggesting that the analgesic effect of IFN alpha be related to the opioid receptors. Beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), the mu specific receptor antagonist could completely block the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. The selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist, ICI174,864 and the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-BNI both failed to prevent the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. IFN alpha could significantly inhibit the production of the cAMP stimulated by forskolin in SK-N-SH cells expressing the mu-opioid receptor, not in NG108-15 cells expressing the delta-opioid receptor uniformly. The results obtained provide further evidence for opioid activity of IFN alpha and suggest that this effect is mediated by central opioid receptors of the mu subtype. The evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that multiple actions of cytokines, such as immunoregulatory and neuroregulatory effects, might be mediated by distinct domains of cytokines interacting with different receptors. PMID:10676852

  11. Influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, the influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect in alpha-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined. The bystander effect was studied through medium transfer experiments. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was performed to quantify the chromosome damage induced by alpha-particle irradiation. Our results showed that the alpha-particle induced micronuclei (MN) frequencies were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol.

  12. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 (211At) and natural bismuth-212 (212Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 (223Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs

  13. Relative response of TL and component-resolved OSL to alpha and beta radiations in annealed sedimentary quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polymeris, George S., E-mail: polymers@auth.gr [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' ATHENA' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); ISIK University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Physics Department, Sile 34980, Istanbul (Turkey); Afouxenidis, Dimitrios; Raptis, Spyridoula [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' ATHENA' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Liritzis, Ioannis [Laboratory of Archaeometry, Dept. of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean, 1 Demokratias Ave., 85100 Rhodes (Greece); Tsirliganis, Nestor C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' ATHENA' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, George [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2011-10-15

    Knowledge of the relative luminescence response to alpha and beta radiation is very important in TL and OSL dating. In the present study the relative alpha to beta response is studied in a sedimentary quartz sample, previously fired at 900 deg. C for 1 h, in the dose region between 1 and 128 Gy, for both thermoluminescence (TL) and linearly modulated optically stimulated luminescence (LM - OSL). The LM - OSL measurements were performed at room temperature and at 125 deg. C. All OSL signals were deconvolved into their individual components. Comparison of OSL curves after alpha and beta irradiation strongly supports that quartz OSL components follow first order kinetics in both cases. In the case of TL, the relative alpha to beta response is found to be very different for each TL glow-peak, but it does not depend strongly on irradiation dose. In the case of LM - OSL measurements, it is found that the relative behaviour of the alpha to beta response is different for three distinct regions, namely the fast OSL component, the region of medium OSL component originating from the TL glow-peak at 110 deg. C when stimulation takes place at room temperature and finally the region of slow OSL component. Following stimulation at ambient temperature, the relative alpha to beta response of all components was not observed to depend significantly on dose, with the value of ratio being 0.03 and a tendency to decrease with increasing dose. However, in the case of measurements performed at 125 deg. C, the relative response of the fast components is much enhanced, and for the remaining components it increases with increasing dose. Special care must be taken to examine the relative alpha to beta response of the fast component at 125 deg. C which contrasts the relative response of the TL peak at ca. 325 deg. C. The implications for the dating of annealed quartz are also briefly discussed. - Highlights: > Relative alpha to beta response for TL and LM-OSL is studied in annealed sedimentary

  14. Continuous three-dimensional radiation dosimetry in tissue-equivalent phantoms using electron paramagnetic resonance in L-. cap alpha. -alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, L.; Maryanski, M.; Ciesielski, B.; Forman, A.; Reinstein, L.E.; Meek, A.G.

    1987-07-01

    A new tissue-equivalent phantom material has been developed which also acts as a dosimeter. The new phantom material has a similar elemental composition to that of soft tissue and has a density 1.1 g/cm/sup 3/. The phantom has an agar-gel base, and contains crystallized L-..cap alpha..-alanine which traps radiation-induced free radicals. Samples from the phantom were analyzed by an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer and the intensity of the EPR signal was related to the absorbed dose. When calibrated, the phantom material acts as a dosimeter, with applications in radiation therapy.

  15. Induction of immunogenic cell death by radiation-upregulated karyopherin alpha 2 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Hee; Jung, Seung-Youn; Kang, Seong-Mook; Kim, Mi-Hyoung; Ahn, Jiyeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lim, Dae-Seog; Nam, Seon Young; Song, Jie-Young

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests the potential for radiation therapy to generate antitumor immune responses against tumor cells by inducing immunogenic cell death and phenotypic changes. We recently found that ionizing radiation upregulated karyopherin α2 (KPNA2) in HT-29 colorectal tumor cells using quantitative proteomic analysis. To determine whether this increased KPNA2 could function as a damage-associated molecular pattern to induce antitumor immune responses, mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were treated with KPNA2. KPNA2 enhanced the surface expression of CD40, CD54, CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II on BMDCs. DCs treated with KPNA2 exhibited increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IL-23, and TNF-α. Co-culture of CD4(+) T cells and KPNA2-treated DCs resulted in induction of Th1/17 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17) and reduction of TGF-β production. Moreover, KPNA2-treated DCs were capable of increasing granzyme B and perforin expression in cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These results demonstrated that radiation-induced dying colorectal cancer cells released considerable amounts of KPNA2 that induce the maturation and activation of DCs for synergistic antitumor effect of radiation. PMID:27107455

  16. Radiation Transport of Heliospheric Lyman-alpha from Combined Cassini and Voyager Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, W.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Sandel, B.; Forrester, T.; Quemerais, E.; Moebius, E.; Esposito, L.; Stewart, I.; McClintock, W.; Jouchoux, A.; Colwell, J.; Izmodenov, V.; Malama, Y.; Shemansky, D.; Ajello, J.; Hansen, C.; Bzowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Heliospheric neutral hydrogen scatters solar Lyman-alpha radiation from the Sun with '27-day' intensity modulations observed near Earth due to the Sun's rotation combined with Earth's orbital motion. These modulations are increasingly damped in amplitude at larger distances from the Sun due to multiple scattering in the heliosphere, providing a diagnostic of the interplanetary neutral hydrogen density independent of instrument calibration. This paper presents Cassini data from 2003-2004 obtained downwind near Saturn at approximately 10 AU that at times show undamped '27-day' waves in good agreement with the single-scattering models of Pryor et al., 1992. Simultaneous Voyager 1 data from 2003- 2004 obtained upwind at a distance of 88.8-92.6 AU from the Sun show waves damped by a factor of -0.21. The observed degree of damping is interpreted in terms of Monte Carlo multiple-scattering calculations (e.g., Keller et al., 1981) applied to two heliospheric hydrogen two-shock density distributions (discussed in Gangopadhyay et al., 2006) calculated in the frame of the Baranov-Malama model of the solar wind interaction with the two-component (neutral hydrogen and plasma) interstellar wind (Baranov and Malama 1993, Izmodenov et al., 2001, Baranov and Izmodenov, 2006). We conclude that multiple scattering is definitely occurring in the outer heliosphere. Both models compare favorably to the data, using heliospheric neutral H densities at the termination shock of 0.085 cm(exp -3) and 0.095 cm(exp -3). This work generally agrees with earlier discussions of Voyager data in Quemerais et al., 1996 showing the importance of multiple scattering but is based on Voyager data obtained at larger distances from the Sun (with larger damping) simultaneously with Cassini data obtained closer to the Sun.

  17. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space and a Rindler space with the surface gravity for acceleration.

  18. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space...

  19. The influence of salt aerosol on alpha radiation detection by WIPP continuous air monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, W.T.; Walker, B.A. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) performance was evaluated to determine if CAMs could detect accidental releases of transuranic radioactivity from the underground repository. Anomalous alpha spectra and poor background subtraction were observed and attributed to salt deposits on the CAM sampling filters. Microscopic examination of salt laden sampling filters revealed that aerosol particles were forming dendritic structures on the surface of the sampling filters. Alpha CAM detection efficiency decreased exponentially as salt deposits increased on the sampling filters, suggesting that sampling-filter salt was performing like a fibrous filter rather than a membrane filter. Aerosol particles appeared to penetrate the sampling-filter salt deposits and alpha particle energy was reduced. These findings indicate that alpha CAMs may not be able to detect acute releases of radioactivity, and consequently CAMs are not used as part of the WIPP dynamic confinement system. 12 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A phase I pilot study of pelvic radiation and alpha-2a interferon in patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of alpha-2a interferon given by subcutaneous injection and combined with high dose pelvic radiation for locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I pilot study, patients with locally advanced, unresectable, or recurrent rectal cancer with or without distant metastases received external beam pelvic radiotherapy over 5 to 6 weeks combined with escalating doses of alpha-2a interferon. Interferon was escalated in increments of 3 million units for each patient cohort, starting at 3 million units subcutaneously 3 days weekly during pelvic radiation. Radiotherapy consisted of 44 Gy (2 Gy fractions) to the pelvis followed by a boost of 6 Gy or 16 Gy to gross pelvic tumor, depending on the presence or absence of small bowel in the boost field, respectively. Between 1991 and 1993, 10 patients were treated on this study, five with locally advanced and five with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Results: At 6 million units of interferon, Grade 3 (WHO criteria) toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (one), leukopenia (one), and neutropenia (one). One patient died of a massive GI bleed at this dose level. Death was not felt to be treatment related. The maximum tolerated dose of interferon was 3 million units three times weekly with radiation. Three patients had unusual complications at 4, 6, and 6 months possibly related to treatment. The first had a right distal ureteric stricture with a right urinoma. The second had a sudden left foot drop that has remained stable. The third had sudden onset of bilateral lower extremity paraplegia with spontaneous resolution. Conclusions: The maximally tolerated dose of interferon alpha-2a given three times weekly during pelvic radiation was 3 million units based on acute side effects. Nevertheless, even at this dose level there were three unusual subacute complications possibly related to treatment. Caution is advised when

  1. Combination effect of recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha with antimicrobial agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, S.; Minami, A.; Fujimoto, K; Kojima, T.

    1989-01-01

    Combination effects of recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha with ceftazidime, moxalactam, gentamicin, enoxacin, amphotericin B, miconazole, or an immunoglobulin preparation were evaluated in systemic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Candida albicans in normal mice and systemic infection with P. aeruginosa in mice with leukopenia induced by preadministration of cyclophosphamide. Synergistic effects were generally observed at interleukin-1 alpha doses as low a...

  2. Effects of alpha-decay on spent fuel corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of results in the area of spent fuel characterization as nuclear waste is presented. These studies are focused on primary aspects of spent fuel corrosion, by considering different fuel compositions and burn ups, as well as a wide set of environmental conditions. The key parameter is the storage time of the fuel e.g. in view of spent fuel retrieval or in view of its final disposal. To extrapolate data obtainable from a laboratory-acceptable timescale to those expected after storage periods of interest have elapsed (amounting in the extreme case to geological ages) is a tough challenge. Emphasis is put on key aspects of fuel corrosion related to fuel properties at a given age and environmental conditions expected in the repository: e.g. the fuel activity (radiolysis effects), the effects of helium build-up and of groundwater composition. A wide range of techniques, from traditional leaching experiments to advanced electrochemistry, and of materials, including spent fuel with different compositions/burnups and analogues like the so-called alpha-doped UO2, are employed for these studies. The results confirm the safety of European underground repository concepts. (authors)

  3. Adverse effects associated with arginine alpha-ketoglutarate containing supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, J M; Majlesi, N; Chan, G M; Olsen, D; Hoffman, R S; Nelson, L S

    2009-05-01

    The athletic performance supplement industry is a multibillion-dollar business and one popular category claims to increase nitric oxide (NO) production. We report three patients presenting to the emergency department with adverse effects. A 33-year-old man presented with palpitations, dizziness, vomiting, and syncope, after the use of NO(2) platinum. His examination and electrocardiogram (ECG) were normal. The dizziness persisted, requiring admission overnight. A 21-year-old man with palpitations and near syncope had used a "nitric oxide" supplement. He was tachycardic to 115 bpm with otherwise normal examination. Laboratory values including methemoglobin, and ECG were unremarkable. He was treated with 1 L of saline with no change in heart rate. He was admitted for observation. A 24-year-old man presented after taking NO-Xplode with palpitations and a headache. His examination, laboratory values, and ECG were normal. He was discharged. The purported active ingredient in these products is arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), which is claimed to increase NO production by supplying the precursor L-arginine. The symptoms could be due to vasodilation from increased levels of NO, though other etiologies cannot be excluded. AAKG containing supplements may be associated with adverse effects requiring hospital admission. PMID:19755457

  4. LRAD, semiconductor, and other radiation detectors applied to environmental monitoring for alpha and beta contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The very short range of alpha particles in air (typically 2 to 3 cm) has severely limited the use of traditional alpha monitors for detecting and identifying small amounts of alpha-producing contamination in soil, water, and other materials. Monitors based on the traditional alpha detector technology are often hard pressed to meet continually increasing sensitivity requirements. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) avoids the distance restriction by detecting the ions produced by the interaction of alpha particles with air, rather than the alpha particles directly. The ions are swept into an ion detector either by a moving air current (generated by a fan) or a weak electric field. The LRAD is limited by the distance the ions can travel in the ∼5-s ion lifetime (1 to 100 m), rather than by the several-centimeter range of the alpha particles. The LRAD can be used to perform sensitive (less than 10 disintegrations per minute per 100 cm2) field scans of large surface areas (ranging from hundreds of square meters of concrete floor to thousands of square meters of soil). Because the 'active' element in a LRAD is a solid-metal ion collection plate, the detector is relatively inexpensive, easy to service, and quite rugged. However, the LRAD cannot supply any spectroscopic information to help identify the contaminant. Semiconductor, ionization chamber, and other types of particle detector can generate clean spectra from small samples of material and can identify trace amounts of surface contamination. Furthermore, these detectors are rugged enough to use routinely in a mobile laboratory for isotope identification of 'hot spots' located by the LRAD system. The combination of the LRAD with either an alpha spectrometer or a mobile laboratory with other particle detectors has applications for field beta-particle monitoring (such as would result from tritium contamination) as well as alpha particle detection. (author)

  5. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  6. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on Luminous Bacteria Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine luminous bacteria were used to monitor toxicity of alpha- (Am-241, U-235+238) and beta- (tritium) radionuclide solutions. Increase or inhibition of bacterial luminescence was observed under exposure to radionuclides. Radiation toxicity of Am and chemical toxicity of U were demonstrated. Effects of U were similar to those of stable heavy metals: sensitivity was about 10-5 M. Sensitivity of the bacteria to Am-241 was 300 Bq/L (10-11M). Inhibition of bacterial growth was observed under exposure to Am-241 and tritium. Role of peroxides and electron transfer processes in the effects of radionuclides on luminous bacteria is discussed.

  7. Angular momentum loss of primordial gas in Lyman-alpha radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Yajima, Hidenobu

    2013-01-01

    We present results on the radiation drag exerted by an isotropic and homogenous background of Lya photons on neutral gas clouds orbiting within HII regions around Population III stars of different masses. The Doppler shift causes a frequency difference between photons moving in the direction of the cloud and opposite to it resulting in a net momentum loss of the cloud in the direction of motion. We find that half of the angular momentum of gas with v_theta 10^8 yr even for low velocity clouds. Our results suggest that a sweet spot exists for the loss of angular momentum by radiation drag for gas clouds at z > 10 and with v ~ 20 km/s. Comparison to dynamical friction forces acting on typical gas clouds suggest that radiation drag is the dominant effect impacting the orbit. We propose that this effect can suppress the formation of extended gas discs in the first galaxies and help gas accretion near galactic centres and central black holes.

  8. Radiation effects on pharmaceuticals and related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sterilization is the method of choice for many medical supplies and devices. However, because of the ionizing nature of gamma radiation, one must consider the effect of such radiation on the physical and chemical properties and on the biological behaviour of pharmaceutical and related materials before the feasibility of radiation sterilization for such products is established. The results of such feasibility studies can lead to an appropriate decision on the suitability of radiation sterilization for a particular pharmaceutical. (author)

  9. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1949-11-16

    This paper discusses procedures for research on biological effects of radiation, using mouse tissue: activation trace analysis including methods and proceedures for handling samples before during and after irradiation; methods and procedures for ion exchange study; method of separation and recovery of copper, iron, zinc, cobalt, pubidium and cesium. Also included are studies of trace elements with radioactive isotopes: the distribution of cobalt 60, zinc 65, and copper 64 in the cytoplasm and nuclei of normal mice and those with tumors. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H-, H/sup o/, and H+ beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 μs to 500 μs length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 σ) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs

  11. Radiation effects on superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting magnets will be used in plasma confinement of future fusion reactors. They will be subjected to neutron irradiation at low temperatures, so information is required on the effects of irradiation at low temperatures upon superconducting properties (critical current density, superconducting transition temperature, etc.) of the superconducting materials, electrical resistivity of the stabilizing materials such as Cu, multifilamentary composite materials of the magnets, and mechanical and electrical properties of the electrical insulating materials. A review is made of the existing data of radiation effects on the superconducting magnets. The superconducting transition temperature of the elements, alloys and compounds decreases with neutron irradiation, more in the compounds than in the alloys. The critical current density J sub(c) of the alloys decreases with fast neutron irradiation at low temperatures. In Nb3Sn, J sub(c) increases by low temperature fast neutron irradiation below the fluence of about 1018n/cm2, and the degradation of J sub(c) appears at over 1018n/cm2. Fast neutron irradiation causes resitivity increase of Cu and Al. Radiation damage in the materials may have large influence on stability characteristics of the composite wires. Extensive studies are necessary to clarify the problems, especially the irradiation effect at low temperatures. (auth.)

  12. Radiation damage effects in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin; Salje, Ekhard

    2002-03-01

    Zircon, ZrSiO_4, is important for geology and geochronology, and has been proposed as a host material to immobilize highly radioactive materials from dismantled weapons and nuclear waste from power stations [1]. In these applications zircon is exposed to alpha-irradiation. Computer simulations have started to be employed to simulate radiation damage in zircon [2], but the origin and microscopic mechanisms of the most important structural changes in zircon - unit cell expansion and large macroscopic swelling at higher doses, strong shear deformation of the crystalline lattice, and polymerization of SiOn units [3], remain unknown. Here, we perform the molecular dynamics simulation of highly energetic recoils in zircon. Basing on the simulation results, we propose the simple picture of the density change in the damaged region that consists of the depleted and densified matter. We find that the experimentally observed structural changes originate from the interaction of the damaged region with the surrounding crystalline lattice: the shear of the lattice around the damaged region causes shear deformation and expansion of the unit cells. The polymers of connected SiOn polyhedra are most commonly present in the densified shell at the periphery of the damaged region. [1] R C Ewing et al, J. Mater. Res. 10, 243 (1995); W J Weber et al, B E Burakov et al, in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XIX, 25-32 and 33-40 (Plenum, New York, 1996); R C Ewing, et al in Crystalline Ceramics: Waste Forms for the Disposal of Weapons Plutonium, NATO Workshop Proceedings 65 (Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1996). [2] B Park et al, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 174108 (1-16) (2001); J P Crocombette and D Ghaleb, J. Nucl. Mater., 295, 167 (2001); K Trachenko et al, J. Appl. Phys., 87, 7702 (2000); K Trachenko et al, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt., 13, 1947 (2001). [3] T Murakami et al, Am. Min., 76, 1510 (1991); H D Holland and D Gottfried, Acta Cryst. 8, 291 (1955).; W J Weber, J. Am

  13. SM22{alpha}-induced activation of p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Gi [Department of Biology, School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Wie, E-mail: ewcho@kribb.re.kr [Daejeon-KRIBB-FHCRC Cooperation Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Gyu, E-mail: igkim@kaeri.re.kr [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression elevates p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. {yields} SM22{alpha}-induced MT-1G activates p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22{alpha}) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22{alpha} overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22{alpha} overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 {mu}g/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} induction or p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22{alpha} overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22{alpha} modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22{alpha} are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  14. Effects of Radiation on MEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Shea, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of MEMS devices to radiation is reviewed, with an emphasis on radiation levels representative of space missions. While silicon and metals generally do not show mechanical degradation at the radiation levels encountered in most missions, MEMS devices have been reported to fail at doses of as few krad, corresponding to less than one year in most orbits. Radiation sensitivity is linked primarily to the impact on device operation of radiation-induced trapped charge in dielectrics...

  15. The Behaviour of Varying-Alpha Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Magueijo, J

    2002-01-01

    We determine the behaviour of a time-varying fine structure 'constant' $\\alpha (t)$ during the early and late phases of universes dominated by the kinetic energy of changing $\\alpha (t)$, radiation, dust, curvature, and lambda, respectively. We show that after leaving an initial vacuum-dominated phase during which $\\alpha$ increases, $\\alpha$ remains constant in universes like our own during the radiation era, and then increases slowly, proportional to a logarithm of cosmic time, during the dust era. If the universe becomes dominated by negative curvature or a positive cosmological constant then $\\alpha$ tends rapidly to a constant value. The effect of an early period of de Sitter or power-law inflation is to drive $\\alpha$ to a constant value. Various cosmological consequences of these results are discussed with reference to recent observational studies of the value of $\\alpha$ from quasar absorption spectra and to the existence of life in expanding universes.

  16. Monte Carlo treatment of Lyman-alpha radiation in a plane-parallel atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modali, S. B.; Brandt, J. C.; Kastner, S. O.

    1972-01-01

    A Monte Carlo technique involving Stokes vectors is used to obtain the state of polarization and intensity of solar Lyman-alpha photons as they diffuse through a plane-parallel homogeneous model of earth's hydrogen envelope. Fine structure of Lyman-alpha and Doppler redistribution of frequencies are taken into account. Comparison of the results with Heath's observed upper limit for polarization of 1.5 per cent implies an optical thickness tau greater than 7 and intensities of 8-10 kilorayleighs for a solar Lyman-alpha flux of 5.8 ergs per sq cm per sec.

  17. Effects of radiation upon gastrointestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary F Otterson

    2007-01-01

    Whether due to therapeutic or belligerent exposure, the gastrointestinal effects of irradiation produce symptoms dreaded by a majority of the population. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping are hallmarks of the prodromal phase of radiation sickness, occurring hours to days following radiation exposure. The prodromal phase is distinct from acute radiation sickness in that the absorptive, secretory and anatomic changes associated with radiation damage are not easily identifiable. It is during this phase of radiation sickness that gastrointestinal motility significantly changes. In addition, there is evidence that motor activity of the gut contributes to some of the acute and chronic effects of radiation.

  18. The Effects of Alpha Particle Confinement on Burning Plasma Tokamak Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Robert P.

    In this thesis, three effects of alpha particle plasma interactions on the global performance of a fusion reactor are studied, namely, (i) the energy coupling efficiency of the fast alpha particles with the bulk plasma, (ii) the relationship between imperfect alpha energy coupling to the bulk plasma and the resultant alpha particle/helium ash fuel dilution; and (iii) the neoclassical bootstrap current induced by fusion born alpha particles calculated self-consistently with the plasma equilibrium. First, the ion drift kinetic equation for the high energy alpha particles is reduced from the exact five dimensional form to a two dimensional form in radius r and energy E (plus time t). The resulting slowing-down diffusion equation is solved by a multiple energy group method. A theoretically based anomalous diffusion coefficient D_sp{alpha}{an} is then introduced from a self-consistent alpha particle Alfven wave turbulence solution (by F. Gang), in which D_sp{alpha}{an } itself depends on the gradient in alpha density. The temporal and spatial behavior of eta_ alpha is analyzed for an ITER-CDA physics phase fusion reactor. We find that eta_ alpha can be as low as 0.95 depending on the plasma operating temperature. Next, the relationship between the alpha-particle power coupling efficiency and the actual alpha-particle power that is coupled with the bulk plasma is investigated, this time taking into account the concomitant helium ash accumulation. It is found that the coupled power varies less than linearly with eta_alpha and is, in fact, significantly depressed for eta_alpha near unity. Combining these effects with a thermal power balance shows that the high temperature "thermally stable" side of the ignition boundary is pushed toward lower temperatures if either D_alpha increases (which results in a lower eta_alpha) or the helium-ash confinement time lengthens. This is a consequence of strengthened fuel dilution and imperfect alpha power coupling. Implications on the

  19. Doses and biological effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic values and their symbols as well as units of physical dosimetry are given. The most important information about biological radiation effects is presented. Polish radiation protection standards are cited. (A.S.)

  20. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yourself during radiation therapy Radiation therapy can damage healthy body tissues in or near the area being treated, which can cause side effects. Many people worry about this part of their cancer treatment. Before ...

  1. Interpretation of spin effects in Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cherenkov radiation effect depends on correlation between electron polarization and photon spirality. This correlation in the given case is interpreted as interference of the charge radiation amplitudes and electron magnetic moment

  2. Inhibitory effects of Turkish folk remedies on inflammatory cytokines: interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilada, E; Ustün, O; Sezik, E; Takaishi, Y; Ono, Y; Honda, G

    1997-09-01

    In this study, in vitro inhibitory effects of 55 extracts or fractions obtained from 10 plant species on interleukin-1 (IL-1alpha, IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) biosynthesis were studied. The following plant materials from Turkish folk medicine for the treatment of various diseases which are thought to be inflammatory in nature e.g. rheumatism, fever, infections, edemas or related inflammatory diseases were selected as the subject of this study: Cistus laurifolius leaves, Clematis flammna flowering herbs, Crataegus orientalis roots, Daphne oleoides ssp. oleoides whole plant, Ecbalium elaterium roots, Rosa canina roots, Rubus discolor roots, Rubus hirtus roots, Sambucus ebulus flowers and leaves, Sambucus nigra flowers and leaves. All plants showed inhibitory activity against at least one of these models in various percentages depending upon the concentration, thus supporting the folkloric utilization. Daphne oleoides was found to be the most active plant against the test models. PMID:9324006

  3. Effect of alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocopheryl quinone on the radiosensitivity of thiol-depleted mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers is increased when mammalian cells are depleted of endogenous glutathione by buthionine sulphoximine pre-treatment in vitro; a similar gain has not been observed in tumors in vivo despite evidence of glutathione depletion in vivo following buthionine sulphoximine treatment. However, concentrations of biological reducing agents other than glutathione were not measured in the in vivo experiments. Other reducing agents found in tumors include alpha-tocopherol, which reduces the sensitizing efficiency of nitro-aromatic sensitizers in thiol-depleted mammalian cells. These data suggest that the failure to observe large gains in misonidazole sensitizing efficiency in thiol-depleted tumors in vivo may be due, in part, to the presence of biological reducing agents such as alpha-tocopherol

  4. Effect of alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocopheryl quinone on the radiosensitivity of thiol-depleted mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgkiss, R.J.; Stratford, M.R.; Watfa, R.R.

    1989-05-01

    The effect of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers is increased when mammalian cells are depleted of endogenous glutathione by buthionine sulphoximine pre-treatment in vitro; a similar gain has not been observed in tumors in vivo despite evidence of glutathione depletion in vivo following buthionine sulphoximine treatment. However, concentrations of biological reducing agents other than glutathione were not measured in the in vivo experiments. Other reducing agents found in tumors include alpha-tocopherol, which reduces the sensitizing efficiency of nitro-aromatic sensitizers in thiol-depleted mammalian cells. These data suggest that the failure to observe large gains in misonidazole sensitizing efficiency in thiol-depleted tumors in vivo may be due, in part, to the presence of biological reducing agents such as alpha-tocopherol.

  5. Stochastic and non-stochastic radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the carcinogenic and the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation are thought to be induced by 'stochastic' mechanisms of action. It is generally accepted that the number of carcinogenic injury is proportional to the radiation dose applied, and that there is no direct relationship between radiation dose and severity of induced injury, so that no threshold dose can be defined. However, the severity of mutagenic effects, resulting for example from cell death or leading to functional disorders or malformations, has been observed to be a function of the radiation dose, so that in principle threshold doses can be defined. These latter effects are called non-stochastic radiation effects. (orig./DG)

  6. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  7. Cosmic Radiation Effects on Avionics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The earth is bombarded by a nearly isotropic flux of energetic charged particles called cosmic rays which interact with air nuclei to generate a cascade of secondary particles building up to a maximum intensity at 60,000 feet. At normal cruising altitudes the radiation is still several hundred times the ground level intensity. These particles are sufficiently energetic and ionising that they can deposit enough charge in a small volume of semiconductor to change the state of a memory cell, while certain devices can be triggered into a state of high current drain, leading to burn-out and hardware failure. These deleterious interactions of individual particles are referred to as single event effects. The authors have flown Cosmic Radiation Effects detectors in a variety of spacecraft and aircraft and illustrative results are presented together with a review of published instances of such phenomena in flight systems. In the future there is likely to be increased susceptibility due to growing reliance on high performance computers using smaller devices operated at lower voltages and flying at higher altitudes. The influence of cosmic rays will have to be properly considered in the assessment of reliability. (author)

  8. Radiative processes in Alpha-ZnAl_2S4: Ti spinel type single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulyuk, Leonid; Klokishner, Sophia; Sushkevich, Konstantin; Koshchug, Dmitrii; Boulon, Georges; Brenier, Alain; Fortin, Emery

    2008-06-01

    The radiative properties of the alpha-ZnAl_2S4 wide band -gap semiconductor (E_g=3.4eV) doped with Ti-ions are investigated . It is shown, that the ZnAl_2S_4:Ti spinel type crystals exhibit a IR luminescence in the spectral range 0.8-1.4 micrometers. The observed spectroscopic and temporal characteristics are assigned to the emission bands arising from the ligand - -Ti^4+ charge transfer for octahedral sites of titanium. Bulk stoichiometric alpha-ZnAl2S4:Ti crystals with impurity concentration 0.1-0.5 at % were grown by a closed tube vapor method with halogen as a transport agent. At temperatures T=2-300K the steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) studies, as well as the optical absorption measurements , were carried out in the spectral range 0.4-1.5 μm using a liquid nitrogen cooled Ge-detector or photomultiplier. The steady-state PL excitation was provided by Ar^+ (λ_ex1=514nm) and He-Ne (Lambda_ex2=633nm) lasers. The PL kinetics has been examined under pulsed excitation (tau_P~10^-8 s) with wavelengths: "green"-λ_ex1P=532nm and "red"-λ_ex2P=630nm (dye laser and OPO) close to Lambda_ex1 and λ_ex2. The EPR studies of the samples have been carried out as well. Under the "green" excitation (λ_ex1), that corresponds to the maximum of the Ti-impurity absorption (λ_abs~510nm), the steady -state PL spectra of ZnAl^2S^4:Ti crystals consist of 2 broad bands centered at λ_1=1.1μm and Lambda_20.8μm. Τhe first component λ_1 dominates in the spectrum at low temperatures (T<200K). At T~300K the shape of the integral spectrum practically is determined by the second broad band Lambda_2. At "red" excitation (λ_ex2, λ_ex2P) the main contribution to the PL spectra in the whole temperature range is provided by the second component, the kinetics of which obeys the exponential law with a single decay time. In contrast to the second band , the emission decay can be described by the superposition of two exponents with different lifetimes. At low

  9. Radiation effects in nuclear waste materials. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The objective of this multidisciplinary, multi-institutional research effort is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels. The goal is to provide the underpinning science and models necessary to assess the performance of glasses and ceramics designed for the immobilization and disposal of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues, excess weapons plutonium, and other highly radioactive waste streams. A variety of experimental and computer simulation methods are employed in this effort. In general, research on glasses focuses on the electronic excitations due to ionizing radiation emitted from beta decay, since this is currently thought to be the principal mechanism for deleterious radiation effects in nuclear waste glasses. Research on ceramics focuses on defects and structural changes induced by the elastic interactions between alpha-decay particles and the atoms in the structure. Radiation effects can lead to changes in physical and chemical properties that may significantly impact long-term performance of nuclear waste materials. The current lack of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in nuclear waste materials makes it impossible to extrapolate the limited existing data bases to larger doses, lower dose rates, different temperature regimes, and different glass compositions or ceramic structures. This report summarizes work after almost 2 years of a 3-year project. Work to date has resulted in 9 publications. Highlights of the research over the past year are presented.'

  10. Health effect of exposure to internally deposited alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The health effect of exposure on human population to internally deposited alpha-emitting radionuclides and their decay products has been considered as most hazardous radiation effect. However, the harmful late effects by the intake of radioactive nuclides are not definite in the epidemiological and clinical viewpoint. Only two cases, radium and thorium, have since long been noted for their deletrious effects to man. As the former, it has been first reported that dial workers in USA using 226Ra can suffer from 'radiumjaw' which is a cancer of the bone of jaws. Another radium isotope, 224Ra, was used for a medical reason as therapy against turberculosis of bone to German children during the years 1946∼1950, and has given rise to bone cancer. As the latter, Thorotrast (the commercial name of a colloidal thorium dioxide preparation), introduced for angiography in 1929 and utilized until about 1950, was found to cause malignant hepatic tumors, liver cirrhosis and blood diseases such as some kinds of leukemia and anemia. In Japan, the former cases have seldom found though, the latter cases are assumed over 1000. Especially, Thorotrast administered war-wounded ex-servicemen in World War II have been beyond 300 persons. The epidemiological and clinico-pathological studies have been demonstrated by the research Group on Biological Effect of Thorium in Special Project Research on Energy, Japan, as a fundamental study of the safe treatment of nuclear fuel materials. The resultant data of the study and risk evaluation of liver cancer for Japanese Thorotrast administered patients are reviewed related to that of another alpha-emitting radionuclides. (author)

  11. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, electron and alpha radiation in rat skin. Comprehensive progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skin has been studied for a number of years as a model of radiation carcinogenesis in a solid tissue. Accessibility of the skin enables the tumors to be detected early so that growth rate, proliferation rate, and onset times can be established accurately and, of course, the superficial location permits an accurate assessment of doses and a localization of the radiation to the tissue of interest. We have been attempting to establish as accurately as possible the nature of the dose response curve, i.e., the rate of tumor occurrence as of function of radiation dose, and the importance of tumor induction of radiologic factors, such as dose rate, fractionation, dose localization, linear energy transfer and of biologic factors, such as the proliferative state of the hair follicles and epidermis at the time of and subsequent to irradiation. The interaction of radiation and other carcinogens, especially ultraviolet light, is under study because of epidemiologic evidence suggesting a potential synergism for induction of scalp tumors. Radiobiological recovery processes have been studied in tumor response experiments using split doses of radiation separated by various times. The recovery rate for electron induced tumors has been measured, and the oncogenic effects of high LET particles (proton, alpha, argon) are being investigated

  12. Ionizing radiation effects on the matter and its applications in research and industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico 04510, D. F. (Mexico); Martinez B, G. [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Km. 12 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, San Cayetano 50200, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiation as alpha and beta particles, electron accelerated, neutron particle, and X-rays and photons with relative high energy, as an useful radiation tool for many applications. the last two kind radiations are know as electromagnetic radiation. The radiation effects on the matter are well know that produces about fourteen processes during interaction with solids, aqueous solution and gases. In applications, commonly it depends of the nature and interest on the material samples that their characteristics can modify with the energy deposited on them. This part is devoted to more important effects produced by ionizing radiation with the matter and talk about the wide range applications recently; crystals radiation detectors and for application in medicine, detection of foodstuffs irradiated for preservation, and the application of ionizing radiation on polymeric materials. (Author)

  13. Effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha infusion on the incretin effect in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke;

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, impaired incretin effect, and increased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Whereas TNF-α infusion at a dose that induces systemic inflammation in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated to induce...

  14. Radiation effects in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  15. Alpha radiation-induced alterations of the proliferation kinetics, chromatin structure and gene expression in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exponentially growing mammalian cells were exposed to 3.4 MeV alpha particles. The chromatin of cells arrested in G2 by alpha irradiation was severely damaged, though all cells were still capable to condensate their chromatin after fusion with mitotic cells. In addition to the common types of aberrations (breaks, gaps, dicentrics and exchanges) cells were found possessing one or more chromosomes with long stretches of undercondensed chromatin. Repair of these lesions was indicated by site specific unscheduled DNA synthesis and by the observation that condensation of these regions improved during G2 arrest. Furthermore, during G2 arrest the synthesis of two cellular proteins was stimulated. This was studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of 35S-methionine labeled cellular proteins. All these findings provided evidence that radiation-induced G2 arrest is caused by chromatin damage, which prevents regular chromosome condensation for mitosis. (orig./MG)

  16. Effect of radioactive isotope 32P upon alpha amylase activity and glucose concentration in chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made to investigate whether alpha amylase activity and glucose concentration in blood plasma can serve as the help in establishing on early diagnosis of organic or functional damage caused by ionizing radiation in chickens. Fifty day old hybrid chickens of heavy 'Jata' breeds of both sexes, were treated by 32P administered intramusculary as sodium orthophosphate in a single dose of 333 MBq per kilogram of body weight. Blood samples was taken from the wing vein on day 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 after administration of 32P. Alpha amylase activity and glucose concentration were determined spectrophotometrically using kits produced by 'Radonja', Sisak. Alpha amylase activity was decreased and glucose concentration was increased during investigated period. Yet, the further investigations are needed to find out whether these two parameters can be used for early diagnosis of injury in chicken organism by ionizing radiation. (author)

  17. Effect of Alpha-Particle Energies on CR-39 Line-Shape Parameters using Positron Annihilation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfy Y. A.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyally diglycol carbonate "CR-39" is widely used as etched track type particle detector. Doppler broadening positron annihilation (DBPAT provides direct information about core and valance electrons in (CR-39 due to radiation effects. It provides a non-destructive and non-interfering probe having a detecting efficiency. This paper reports the effect of irradiation alpha-particle intensity emitted from 241-Am (5.486 MeV source on the line shape S- and W-parameters for CR-39 samples. Modification of the CR-39 samples due to irradiation were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques.

  18. The effects of gamma- and electron beam-irradiation on. alpha. -tocopherol (vitamin E) present as an antioxidant in polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.W.; Crowson, A.; Leathard, D.A.; Mistry, U. (Sheffield Polytechnic (United Kingdom))

    1991-08-19

    The authors have reported on the effects of gamma- and electron beam-irradiation on additives (chiefly hindered phenols and organophosphites) present in food-contact polymers. It has been shown that increasing doses of either form of radiation result in the progressive transformation of such antioxidants into other substances, some of which are the same as products derived from the antioxidant under thermal oxidation conditions, and some of which are different substances. Now, the effect of both electron beam- and gamma-irradiation on {alpha}-tocopherol (vitamin E) present in polypropylene is reported. (author).

  19. The radiation effects of nuclear weapons explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy resulting from nuclear weapons explosions consists of thermal energy (heat radiation), shock waves, initial radiation (nuclear ray flash, gamma and neutron flash), and nuclear radiation of the fission products (fallout). The contribution of the different energy components depends on the energy amounts produced by fission or fusion reactions (A-weapon, H-weapon), on the components used for conversion to helium-4 (deuterium, tritium, lithium), the weapon design (radiation absorption and induced activity in auxiliaries), and on the type of employment (atmospheric, ground, or underground explosion). The damaging effects vary accordingly, consisting of thermal damage, blast effects, and radiation injuries. The effects are explained and compared. (orig.)

  20. Alpha lipoic acid attenuates radiation-induced thyroid injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hwa Jung

    Full Text Available Exposure of the thyroid to radiation during radiotherapy of the head and neck is often unavoidable. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA on radiation-induced thyroid injury in rats. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: healthy controls (CTL, irradiated (RT, received ALA before irradiation (ALA + RT, and received ALA only (ALA, 100 mg/kg, i.p.. ALA was treated at 24 h and 30 minutes prior to irradiation. The neck area including the thyroid gland was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose of 18 Gy using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Greater numbers of abnormal and unusually small follicles in the irradiated thyroid tissues were observed compared to the controls and the ALA group on days 4 and 7 after irradiation. However, all pathologies were decreased by ALA pretreatment. The quantity of small follicles in the irradiated rats was greater on day 7 than day 4 after irradiation. However, in the ALA-treated irradiated rats, the numbers of small and medium follicles were significantly decreased to a similar degree as in the control and ALA-only groups. The PAS-positive density of the colloid in RT group was decreased significantly compared with all other groups and reversed by ALA pretreatment. The high activity index in the irradiated rats was lowered by ALA treatment. TGF-ß1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in irradiated rats and was more severe on the day 7 after radiation exposure than on day 4. Expression of TGF-ß1 was reduced in the thyroid that had undergone ALA pretreatment. Levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1ß and IL-6 did not differ significantly between the all groups. This study provides that pretreatment with ALA decreased the severity of radiation-induced thyroid injury by reducing inflammation and fibrotic infiltration and lowering the activity index. Thus, ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced thyroid injury.

  1. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  2. Protective Effect of Chitin Urocanate Nanofibers against Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuko Ito

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urocanic acid is a major ultraviolet (UV-absorbing chromophore. Chitins are highly crystalline structures that are found predominantly in crustacean shells. Alpha-chitin consists of microfibers that contain nanofibrils embedded in a protein matrix. Acid hydrolysis is a common method used to prepare chitin nanofibrils (NFs. We typically obtain NFs by hydrolyzing chitin with acetic acid. However, in the present study, we used urocanic acid to prepare urocanic acid chitin NFs (UNFs and examined its protective effect against UVB radiation. Hos: HR-1 mice coated with UNFs were UVB irradiated (302 nm, 150 mJ/cm2, and these mice showed markedly lower UVB radiation-induced cutaneous erythema than the control. Additionally, sunburn cells were rarely detected in the epidermis of UNFs-coated mice after UVB irradiation. Although the difference was not as significant as UNFs, the number of sunburn cells in mice treated with acetic acid chitin nanofibrils (ANFs tended to be lower than in control mice. These results demonstrate that ANFs have a protective effect against UVB and suggest that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of NFs influence the protective effect of ANFs against UVB radiation. The combination of NFs with other substances that possess UV-protective effects, such as urocanic acid, may provide an enhanced protective effect against UVB radiation.

  3. Synergy between chemotherapy and alpha particles: effects in cells directly hit and in bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides offers the potential for selective targeting of micrometastatic sites. The short range of alpha particles and limited penetration of the labeled antibody into the tumor make it difficult to deliver a lethal dose to all tumor cells. In an effort to improve the extent and uniformity of tumor cell kill, experiments are underway to evaluate the ability of chemotherapy agents to produce synergistic effects in cells directly hit by alpha particles and in bystander cells. An alpha particle cell irradiation system comprised of planar americium-241 alpha particle sources together with custom-made cell culture dishes with replaceable mylar bottoms has been constructed and characterized. By changing the alpha particle source, the dose rate to cells on the mylar membrane can be varied from 0.0013 Gy/min to 13 Gy/min. The residual range of the alpha particles after exiting the mylar membrane is approximately 30 ∝/m. Preliminary results with alpha particle exposure in the presence or absence of low concentrations of either taxol or oxaliplatin show evidence of synergistic effects. A series of plastic grids have been designed and constructed that can be interposed between the alpha particle source and the cells to partially block the alpha particles. The ratio of open area to shielded area is kept constant at 50% but the diameter and total number of circular openings in the grid is varied, thus changing the proportion of bystander cells present close to the edge between the open and shielded zones. This approach creates a two-dimensional model system for micrometastatic tumors of various sizes where the shielded areas represent the deeper portions of a tumor beyond the range of surface-bound alpha particles. Experiments are underway to determine whether there are synergistic effects between the chemotherapy agents and the bystander cells

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (approximately40 Tm), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, Tecogen, a division of Thermo Power Corporation, a Thermo Electron company, is developing a real-time, field-deployable, alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (patent pending, to be assigned to the Department of Energy). The Thermo Alpha Monitor (TAM) will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste Focus Area and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This instrument for direct counting of alpha-emitters in aqueous streams is presently being developed by Thermo Power under a development program funded by the DOE Environmental Management program (DOE-EM), administered by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Under this contract, Thermo Power has demonstrated a solid-state, silicon-based semiconductor instrument, which uses a proprietary film-based collection system to quantitatively extract the

  5. Universality of nonperturbative QCD effects in radiative B-decays

    CERN Document Server

    Descotes-Genon, S

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate, by an explicit one-loop calculation, that at leading twist the nonperturbative effects in B -> gamma l nu, B -> gamma gamma and B -> gamma l+ l- radiative decays are contained in a common multiplicative factor (\\Lambda_B(E_\\gamma), where E_\\gamma is the energy of the photon). We argue that this result holds also at higher orders. Ratios of the amplitudes for these processes do not depend on scales below the mass of the B-meson (M_B), and can be calculated as perturbative series in \\alpha_s(M_B)

  6. Protective effect of poly ({alpha}-L-glutamate) against UV and {gamma}-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Masakazu E-mail: mfuruta@riast.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Huy, Nguyen Quang; Tsuchiya, Akihito; Nakatsuka, Hiroshige; Hayashi, Toshio

    2004-10-01

    We occasionally found that poly ({alpha}-L-glutamate) showed a superior protective effect on enzymes against UV and {sup 60}Co-{gamma} irradiation. We selected papain and {alpha}-amylase as a model enzyme and irradiated the aqueous solution (10 mg/ml) of each enzyme with UV and {sup 60}Co-{gamma} rays in the presence of poly ({alpha}-L-glutamate) ({alpha}-PGA), poly (glucosyl oxyethyl methacrylate (GEMA)), and glucose (1.25% w/v each). The mixture of the three compounds has a significant protective effect on the activity of papain solution showing 40% of remaining activity twice as much as the control containing no additive at the dose of 15 kGy. Among them, {alpha}-PGA showed the highest protecting effect on the both papain and {alpha}-amylase even after 10-kGy irradiation at which 50% of the activity was retained. {alpha}-PGA also showed significant protective activity on {alpha}-amylase against UV both in solution and under dried state.

  7. Efficacy of Topical Alpha Ointment (Containing Natural Henna Compared to Topical Hydrocortisone (1% in the Healing of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Ansari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This two-arm, randomized clinical study aimed to compare efficacy between topical Alpha ointment and topical hydrocortisone cream (1% in the healing of radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients. Methods: The inclusion criteria comprised newly pathologically proven, locally advanced breast cancer (treated with modified radical mastectomy followed by sequential adjuvant treatments, including chest wall radiotherapy [45-50.4 Gy] and grade 2 and/or 3 chest wall dermatitis. The exclusion criteria were comprised of any underlying disease or medications interfering with the wound healing process, previous history of chest wall radiotherapy, and concurrent use of chemotherapy. Sixty eligible patients were randomly assigned to use either topical Alpha ointment (study arm, n=30 or topical hydrocortisone cream (1% (control arm, n=30 immediately after receiving a total dose of 45-50 Gy chest wall radiotherapy. Results: The mean radiation dose was 49.1 Gy in the control arm and 48.8 Gy in the study arm. The mean dermatitis area was 13.54 cm2 in the control arm and 17.02 cm2 in the study arm. Topical Alpha ointment was more effective on the healing of radiation-induced dermatitis than was topical hydrocortisone cream (1% (P=0.001. This effect was significant in the second week (P=0.007. In addition, Alpha ointment decreased the patients’ complaints such as pain (P<0.001, pruritus (P=0.009, and discharge (P=0.010 effectively and meaningfully. Conclusion: Topical Alpha ointment was more effective on the healing of radiation-induced dermatitis than was topical hydrocortisone cream (1% in our patients with breast cancer. Trial Registration Numbers: IRCT201206099979N1 ACTRN12612000837820

  8. Molecular and cellular effects of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program is concerned with the basic nature of the biological effects of mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental radiations, including those solar ultraviolet and visible radiations responsible for the most common form of human cancer: cancer of the skin. Concentrating on the damages to DNA caused by these radiations, the program attempts to delineate the basic mechanisms whereby such damage may occur. 14 refs

  9. Effects of Alpha- Tocopherol on the Velocity of Low Density Lipoprotein Oxidation by Cupric Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ghaffari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of different concentrations of alpha-tocopherol on in vitro cupric ions induced oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDL. Human native LDL (50 µg protein/ml oxidation was induced by 10 µmol/L of CuSO4. Conjugated dienes were measured spectrophotometrically for up to 440 minutes. The length of the lag phase (Tlag, maximum velocity of the reaction (Vmax and the maximum amount of generated dienes were obtained from kinetic data. Alpha-tocopherol increased Tlag and decreased Vmax with a dependence upon concentration (0-100 µmol/L. There was no difference between the Dmax obtained with cupric ions alone or in the presence of the various concentrations of alpha-tocopherol. The results suggest that alpha-tocopherol may decrease free radicals presence in LDL and thus decrease velocity of LDL oxidation by cupric ions. This mechanism may be a reason for alpha-tocopherol effect in ameliorating atherosclerosis.

  10. Assessment of radiation effects in defense transuranic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actinide concentrations of the defense transuranic (TRU) wastes were analyzed and the potential effects of the radiation on the properties of the wastes after conversion to immobile forms were assessed. The study focused on the contact-handled retrievably-stored wastes. The major components of the current inventory are defense plutonium-contaminated wastes containing various amounts of 241Am. The wastes stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are typical of the wastes in this category. There is also a substantial amount of wastes contaminated with plutonium enriched in 238Pu arising from the Department of Energy's isotopic heat-source programs. Most of these wastes are stored at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Savannah River Plant (SRP) sites. Four reference wastes were selected representing a credible range of actinide activities and were used for estimating radiation doses to the final waste forms based on: INEL first stage sludge, a composite of all wastes at INEL, a composite of all wastes at LANL including both defense and heat source plutonium wastes, and a composite of all heat-source plutonium wastes at SRP free from defense plutonium. From integrated alpha and beta-gamma doses over a 105y storage period, it is concluded that: accumulated beta-gamma doses of 106 to 108 rad over a 105 y storage period will not significantly change physical properties of the waste form. The alpha decay doses are 3-30 x 1016 decays/cm3 (up to 3 x 1010 rad ionizing radiation from alpha particles) accumulated over a 105 y storage period. Radiolytic gas generation can be substantial in waste forms containing water or organic materials. The effect of leachant radiolysis on the leachabilities of TRU waste forms is not sufficiently understood to rule out the need for testing with actinide-doped specimens

  11. Applying radiation health effects data to radiation protection policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from the peer-reviewed scientific literature establish a sound basis to define a low-dose, low-dose-rate, dose-response. These data include human health dose-response studies; immunologically 'whole' animal studies; and cellular and molecular biological studies of complete biological systems for the relevant immunological and physiological responses. Initiatives are required to constructively apply these data to both radiation research and radiation protection policies. First, current low level radiation health effects research must apply existing data to define research projects to integrate and confirm existing dose-response data, with specific emphasis on the biological bases that exist in definitive and reproducible cellular and biological dose-response. Second, dose-response assessment must identify and incorporate all existing substantial and confirmed data, including natural radiation sources, to establish the bases for radiation protection policy for interventions to protect public health and safety. A preliminary assessment of these data is applied to: 1) Specify research that can be constructively applied to describe radiation health effects dose-response. 2) Apply health effects dose-response to radiation and radioactivity applications policies to maximize radiation health effects interventions for occupational applications, medical applications, and other radiation and radioactive materials applications controls to cost-effectively assure public health and safety. An assessment of the proposed revisions to ICRP radiation protection policies is provided that associates the basis for administrative limits with the previous proposal of the US NRC for a 'Below Regulatory Concern' (BRC) policy. This proposal ignores the context of the fact that very low levels of radiation exposure are far within the variations of natural radiation exposures, and therefore can have no gross net consequences. The equivalent failure of the BRC proposal resulted in quick

  12. The chemical behaviour of the hexavalent plutonium in concentrated NaCl solutions under the impact of its own alpha radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The R + D work was to verify whether the laboratory data on the solubility and sorption of radionuclides are in compliance with natural conditions, as studied in the aquifer system of the Gorleben site. The progress report in hand deals with the behaviour of the hexavalent plutonium in strongly salty (5 M NaCl), CO2-free, aqueous solutions under the effects of its own alpha radiation. Profound knowledge of the chemistry of plutonium, one of the major radionuclides in the high-level active waste from nuclear installations, and its behaviour in the natural aquatic environment is a fundamental requirement for any safety analysis of repositories for ultimate disposal of heat producing, radioactive waste. The following studies were performed in order to allow a quantitative assessment of the complex nature of the chemical reactions to be expected in a repository: radiolysis in concentrated NaCl solutions induced by alpha radiation, and the resulting redox reactions of the Cl--ion; radiolysis-induced redox behaviour of the Pu ions; stabilisation of the hexavalent plutonium by way of complexation with anionic ligands of the system (Cl-, OH-, and ClO-); solubility of the solid phase of PuO2(OH)2 in 5 M NaCl under conditions including and not including radiolytic reactions. Absorption spectroscopy and radiometric techniques were the major methods applied. (orig.)

  13. Effects of Therapeutic Radiation on Polymeric Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Shelley Lynn

    2014-01-01

    High levels of ionizing radiation are known to cause degradation and/or cross-linking in polymers. Lower levels of ionizing radiation, such as x-rays, are commonly used in the treatment of cancers. Material characterization has not been fully explored for polymeric materials exposed to therapeutic radiation levels. This study investigated the effects of therapeutic radiation on three porous scaffolds: polycaprolactone (PCL), polyurethane (PU) and gelatin. Porous scaffolds were fabricate...

  14. The radioprotective effect and mechanism of captopril on radiation induced-heart damage in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Seung Hee; Lee, Kyung Ja; Koo, Hea Soo [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    Captopril (angiotension converting enzyme inhibitor) is known to have a radioprotective effect in the lungs, intestines and skin, but its effect in the heart is unclear. To investigate the radioprotective effect and mechanism of captopril in the heart, the histopathological changes and immunohistochemical stains were compared with radiation alone, and radiation combined with captopril, in the rats. The histopathological changes and immunohistochemical stains (TNF {alpha} , TGF {beta} 1, PDGF and FGF2) were examined in the radiation alone and the combined captopril and radiation groups, 2 and 8 weeks after irradiation. Each group consisted of 8 to 10 rats (Sprague-Dawley). Irradiation (12.5 Gy) was given to the left hemithorax in a single fraction. Captopril (50 mg/Kg/d) mixed with water, was given orally and continuously from the first week prior to, up to the 8th week of the experiment. In the radiation alone group, the ventricle at 2 weeks after irradiation showed prominent edema ({rho} = 0.082) and fibrin deposit ({rho} = 0.018) compared to the control group. At 8 weeks, the edema was decreased and fibrosis increased compared to those at 2 weeks. The histopathological changes of the combined group were similar to those of the control group, due to the reduced radiation toxicity at 2 and 8 weeks. The endocardial fibrin deposit ({rho} = 0.047) in the atrium, and the interstitial fibrin deposit ({rho} = 0.019) and edema ({rho} = 0.042) of the ventricle were reduced significantly in the combined group compared to those in the radiation alone group at 2 weeks. The expressions of TNF- {alpha} , TGF- {beta} 1, PDGF and FGF-2 in the radiation alone group were more increased than in the control group, especially in the pericardium and endocardium of the atrium at 2 weeks. At 8 weeks, the pericardial TNF- {alpha} and TGF- {beta} 1, in the radiation alone group continuously increased. The expressions of TNF- {alpha} , TGF- {beta} 1, and PDGF were decreased in the combined

  15. Differential effects of dimethylsulfoxide on the activities of human DNA polymerases alpha and delta.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, M Y; Toomey, N L

    1986-01-01

    The effects of dimethylsulfoxide on the activities of purified human placental DNA polymerase alpha and DNA polymerase delta were examined. DNA polymerase alpha was inhibited by dimethylsulfoxide, whereas DNA polymerase delta was significantly activated, by as much as 6-fold. Kinetic data show that the effect of dimethylsulfoxide on DNA polymerase delta activity was due to a reduction in the apparent Km for its substrate, dTTP. This novel finding of the differential effects of dimethylsulfoxi...

  16. Radiation effect on ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) can be used at a substitute of the bone of human body skeleton. Before being set in to human body, it needs to be sterilized with high energy radiation. Therefore, it is of considerable significance to study the effect of radiation on UHMWPE. Because of ultrahigh molecular weight of this material, there would be a lot of entanglements at molecular chain, its radiation effect would be quite different from that of polyethylene with normal molecular weight. The radiation effect on UHMWPE was studied by means of density and DSC analysis. It has been shown that the density increases with the increase of radiation dose up to 1.13 MGy monotonically. The heat of fusion per unit weight of sample and melting point of UHMWPE increase with dose too, especially at the lower dose of radiation. It could be concluded that during the period of radiation, there would be additional crystallization or crystal perfection taken place

  17. Top-mass effects in differential Higgs production through gluon fusion at order \\alpha_s^4

    CERN Document Server

    Harlander, Robert V; Ozeren, Kemal J; Wiesemann, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Effects from a finite top quark mass on differential distributions in the Higgs+jet production cross section through gluon fusion are studied at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling, i.e. $O(\\alpha_s^4)$. Terms formally subleading in $1/m_t$ are calculated, and their influence on the transverse momentum and rapidity distribution of the Higgs boson are evaluated. We find that, for the differential K-factor, the heavy-top limit is valid at the 2-3% level as long as the transverse momentum of the Higgs remains below about 150 GeV.

  18. Monte Carlo treatment of Lyman-alpha. II - Radiation in a spherical atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modali, S. B.; Brandt, J. C.; Kastner, S. O.

    1975-01-01

    Intensity and state of polarization of solar L-alpha photons as they diffuse through an inhomogeneous, spherically symmetric, isothermal geocorona are theoretically determined. The fine structure of L-alpha and Doppler redistribution of frequencies are taken into account. The calculation use the Monte Carlo technique involving Stokes vectors. Comparison of the results with OGO-4 and OSO-4 observed intensities at an altitude of 650 km shows good agreement. Calculations of the polarization versus solar zenith angle show a residual polarization at large zenith angles which is mainly due to multiply scattered photons.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (∼ 40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and ground water

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (approximately40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and

  1. Long-term effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper approaches the long-term effects of ionizing radiation considering the common thought that killing of cells is the basis for deterministic effects and that the subtle changes in genetic information are important in the development of radiation-induced cancer, or genetic effects if these changes are induced in germ cells

  2. Alpha and beta adrenergic effects on metabolism in contracting, perfused muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Galbo, H

    1982-01-01

    The role of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation for the effect of epinephrine on muscle glycogenolysis, glucose- and oxygen uptake and muscle performance was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter at rest and during electrical stimulation (60 contractions/min). Adrenergic stimulation...... was obtained by epinephrine in a physiological concentration (2.4 X 10(-8) M) and alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade by 10(-5) M phentolamine and propranolol, respectively. Epinephrine enhanced net glycogenolysis during contractions most markedly in slow-twitch red fibers. In these fibers the effect...... stimulation of alpha-adrenergic receptors and had a positive inotropic effect during contractions which was abolished by alpha- as well as by beta-adrenergic blockade. The results indicate that epinephrine has profound effects on contracting muscle, and that these effects are elicited through different...

  3. Effect of dietary alpha-tocopherol supplementation and gamma-irradiation on alpha-tocopherol retention and lipid oxidation in cooked minced chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of dietary alpha-tocopherol supplementation and gamma-irradiation on alpha-tocopherol retention and lipid oxidation in cooked minced chicken during refrigerated storage were studied. Minced breast and thigh meat from broilers fed diets supplemented with 100, 200 or 400 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed was irradiated at 2.5 or 4.0 kGy. Cooked irradiated and unirradiated meat was stored at 4 degrees C for 5 days. alpha-Tocopherol concentrations increased with increasing dietary supplementation. Concentrations decreased during storage, but retention was not affected by irradiation. Lipid stability was determined by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) during storage. TBARS and COPs increased during storage and were reduced by increasing levels of dietary alpha-tocopheryl acetate supplementation. Irradiation accelerated TBARS formation during storage, but this was prevented by supplementation with 200 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed. Irradiation tended to increase COPs during storage, although no consistent effects were observed. In general supplementation with over 400 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed may be required to control cholesterol oxidation in minced chicken. The results suggest that, overall, irradiation had little effect on lipid stability in alpha-tocopherol-supplemented meat following cooking and storage

  4. Ionizing radiation induced production of tumor necrosis factor {alpha} in the Ewing`s sarcoma cell line RM 82 in vitro and in vivo; Nachweis einer strahleninduzierten Produktion von Tumor-Nekrose-Faktor alpha im Ewing-Sarkom RM 82 in vitro und in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruebe, C. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie - Radioonkologie; Finke, C. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie - Radioonkologie; Valen, F. van [Zellbiologisches Lab., Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Schaefer, K.L. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Gerhard-Domagk-Inst. fuer Pathologie; Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Gerhard-Domagk-Inst. fuer Pathologie; Willich, N. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie - Radioonkologie

    1997-08-01

    Aim: The expression of cytokines plays an important role in the transmission of the effects of ionizing radiation to tumor cells and normal tissue. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF {alpha}), a pleiotropic monokine, is of special interest because of its cytotoxic effect on tumor cells and the induction of hemorrhagic necrosis in tumors. We examined the influence of ionizing radiation on TNF {alpha} production in a human Ewing`s sarcoma cell line in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The protein and mRNA levels of the Ewing`s sarcoma cell line RM 82 were examined in vitro with `Enhanced Amplified Sensitivity Immunoassay` (EASIA) and semiquantitative RT-PCR before and after treatment with single doses of 2 to 40 Gy, 1 to 72 hours after irradiation. After successful transplantation to nude mice, the time and dose correlation of TNF {alpha} mRNA production was examined in vivo. Results: In vitro, RM 82 had a basal protein level of TNF {alpha} of 20.1 {+-} 4.3 pg/ml/10{sup 6} cells. We observed a time- and dose-dependent increase of TNF {alpha} expression with a maximum of 125 pg/ml/10{sup 6} (5.9fold) 24 hours after irradiation with 20 Gy. At the mRNA level, the maximal up-regulation occurred 6 to 12 hours after 10 Gy. In vivo, the xenograft tumor maintained the capacity of TNF {alpha} expression. Time- and dose-dependency in mRNA production showed a maximum increase 6 hours after treatment with 10 Gy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Fragestellung: Die Expression von Zytokinen aus Tumor- und Normalgewebszellen spielt bei der Vermittlung der Strahlenwirkung auf Tumoren eine wichtige Rolle. Tumor-Nektrose-Faktor alpha (TNF {alpha}), ein pleiotropes, primaer als Monokin beschriebenes Polypeptid, ist durch seine zytotoxische Wirkung auf Tumorzellen sowie durch die Induktion haemorrhagischer Nekrosen von Tumoren von besonderem Interesse. Die vorliegende Arbeit untersucht den Einfluss ionisierender Strahlen auf die tumorzelleigene Expression von TNF {alpha} an einer humanen Ewing

  5. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  6. Radiation hazards and their effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation can be classified into ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation, based on whether it is capable of ionizing atoms and breaking chemical bonds. Ultraviolet and higher frequency such as X-rays, gamma rays are ionizing. These pose their own special hazards. Non ionizing radiation is associated with two major potential hazards. i.e. electrical and biological. Additionally includes electric current caused by radiation can generate sparks and create a fire or explosive hazards. Strong radiation can induce current capable of delivering an electric shock. Extremely high power electromagnetic radiation can cause electric currents strong enough to create sparks when an induced voltage exceeds the breakdown voltage of surrounding mediums. A 2009 study at the University of Basal in Switzerland found that intermitted exposure of human cells to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field at a flux density of 10 Gy induced a slight but significant increase of DNA fragmentation in the comet assay. Mobile phones radiation and health concerns have been raised, especially following the enormous increase in the use of wireless mobile telephony throughout the world. Mobile phones use electromagnetic radiation in the microwaves range and some believes this may be harmful to human health. (author)

  7. Electroencephalographic effects of ketamine on power, cross-frequency coupling and connectivity in the alpha bandwidth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Blain-Moraes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of propofol-induced unconsciousness have identified characteristic properties of electroencephalographic alpha rhythms that may be mediated by drug activity at -aminobutyric acid (GABA receptors in the thalamus. However, the effect of ketamine, a non-GABAergic anesthetic drug, on alpha oscillations has not been systematically evaluated. We analyzed the electroencephalogram of 28 surgical patients during consciousness and ketamine-induced unconsciousness with a focus on frontal power, frontal cross-frequency coupling, frontal-parietal functional connectivity (measured by coherence and phase lag index, and frontal-to-parietal directional connectivity (measured by directed phase lag index in the alpha bandwidth. Unlike past studies of propofol, ketamine-induced unconsciousness was not associated with increases in the power of frontal alpha rhythms, characteristic cross-frequency coupling patterns of frontal alpha power and slow-oscillation phase, or decreases in coherence in the alpha bandwidth. Like past studies of propofol using undirected and directed phase lag index, ketamine reduced frontal-parietal (functional and frontal-to-parietal (directional connectivity in the alpha bandwidth. These results suggest that directional connectivity changes in the alpha bandwidth may be state-related markers of unconsciousness induced by both GABAergic and non-GABAergic anesthetics.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-06-16

    Thermo Power Corporation has proven the technical viability of an on-line, real-time alpha radionuclide instrument for aqueous sample analysis through laboratory and initial field tests of the instrument. The instrument has been shown to be isotonically sensitive to extremely low (ten parts per trillion, or femto Curies per liter) levels of a broad range of radioisotopes. Performance enhancement and other scaling data obtained during the course of this investigation have shown that on-line, real-time operation is possible, with a sub 30-minute response time analyzing 20 ppb (30 pCi/1) natural uranium. Now that these initial field tests in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have been successfully completed, Thermo Power plans to conduct comprehensive field tests of the instrument. The purpose of these endurance tests will be to determine the endurance characteristics of the Thermo Alpha Monitor for Water when it is used by non-Thermo Power personnel in a series of one or more extended field tests. Such endurance testing is the vital next step towards the commercialization of the Alpha Monitor. Subsequently, it will be possible to provide the DOE with an instrument that has the capability of obtaining rapid feedback about the concentrations of alpha-emitting isotope contamination in effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area). It will also be useful for process control of remediation and D and D operations such as monitoring scrubber/rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium and D and D Focus Areas).

  9. Potential health effects of space radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.

    1993-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be exposed to radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, and possibly solar particle events. The potential health hazards due to these space radiations must be considered carefully to ensure the success of space exploration. Because there is no human radioepidemiological data for acute and late effects of high-LET (Linear-Energy-Transfer) radiation, the biological risks of energetic charged particles have to be estimated from experimental results on animals and cultured cells. Experimental data obtained to date indicate that charged particle radiation can be much more effective than photons in causing chromosome aberrations, cell killing, mutation, and tumor induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) varies with biological endpoints and depends on the LET of heavy ions. Most lesions induced by low-LET radiation can be repaired in mammalian cells. Energetic heavy ions, however, can produce large complex DNA damages, which may lead to large deletions and are irreparable. For high-LET radiation, therefore, there are less or no dose rate effects. Physical shielding may not be effective in minimizing the biological effects on energetic heavy ions, since fragments of the primary particles can be effective in causing biological effects. At present the uncertainty of biological effects of heavy particles is still very large. With further understanding of the biological effects of space radiation, the career doses can be kept at acceptable levels so that the space radiation environment need not be a barrier to the exploitation of the promise of space.

  10. Inhibitory effect of progesterone on the lactogenic and abortive action of prostaglandin F2alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermouth, N T; Deis, R P

    1975-07-01

    The effect of ovariectomy, progesterone and prolactin treatment on the action of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) was determined in pregnant rats. PGF2alpha (150 mug times 2) injected i.p. on day 1. or 18 of pregnancy induced lactogenesis about 25 h later and abortion on days 20 and 21 of pregnancy. Treatment with PGF2alpha (100 mug times 2 or 50 mug times 2) on day 19 induced lactogenesis around 22 or 38 h later, respectively, and abortion on day 21. PHF2alpha treatment on day 17 was less effective. Unilateral ovariectomy on day 17 of pregnancy induced lactogenesis 32 h later but not abortion. PGF2alpha (150 mug times 2) given on the day of surgery advanced lactogenesis 12 h and rats aborted on day 19. Bilateral overiectomy on day 17 induced abortion between days 20 to 21, but if a single dose of PGF2alpha (300 mug) was injected on day 18. all the ovariectomized rats aborted on day 19. Progesterone (10 mg) injected into rats treated with PGF2alpha (150 mug times 2) on day 18, prevented abortion and delayed lactogenesis. Prolactin (1 mg times 4) treatment delayed only abortion. Serum prolactin levels were significantly higher 12 h after the last dose of PGF2alpha (150 mug times 2) in rats treated on days 17, 18 or 19 of pregnancy. Pretreatment with progesterone prevented the rise in prolactin concentration. These result suggest that the lactogenic and abortive action of PGF2alpha may be dependent on the uterine and plasma concentration of progesterone. PMID:1165437

  11. The $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Day, J P; Elhanafy, M; Smith, E; Woodhouse, R; Papp, Z

    2011-01-01

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-$\\alpha$ resonance energies, experimental phase shifts and three-$\\alpha$ binding energies. We found that essentially a simple gaussian can provide a good description of two-$\\alpha$ and three-$\\alpha$ experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  12. Radiation effects on CCD image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade, the micro process technology has advanced and some elaborate semiconductor devices with many microscopic elements in a cell of about 10 μm x 10 μm can be successfully used as radiation detectors and related parts in the field of nuclear physics and engineering. A CCD image sensor, for example, effectively measures details of particle-beam profiles in accelerator applications. This paper describes radiation effects on CCD image sensors. Some CCD samples were irradiated with 60Co gamma-rays and DD and DT neutrons for the examination of the reliability of CCDs used in radiation environments. This paper shows experimental data on radiation effects on CCDs and then discusses the difference in the radiation effects between gamma-rays and neutrons. The following two radiation effects on CCDs are described. One is the transient effect, which is induced by the ionisation process of radiations and is not permanent but recoverable. A CCD responds to radiations as well as light and outputs pseudo signals induced by radiation reactions in the normal video signals during irradiation. The other is the permanent effect, which is caused by the generation of the defects. A CCD image sensor is easily influenced by the trapped holes produced by ionisation in the gate oxide. The defects cause the generation of the leakage current within the depletion region, the trapping of signal charge within the channel of the charge shift register, and the flat band voltage shift which affects the CCD operating bias. (author)

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Haloperidol-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perera Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that exerts its' antipsychotic effects by inhibiting dopaminergic neurons. Although the exact pathophysiology of haloperidol extrapyramidal symptoms are not known, the role of reactive oxygen species in inducing oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of prolonged haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we evaluate the protective effect of alpha lipoic acid against haloperidol-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control, alpha lipoic acid alone (100 mg/kg p.o for 21 days, haloperidol alone (2 mg/kg i.p for 21 days, and haloperidol with alpha lipoic acid groups (for 21 days. Haloperidol treatment significantly decreased levels of the brain antioxidant enzymes super oxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and concurrent treatment with alpha lipoic acid significantly reversed the oxidative effects of haloperidol. Histopathological changes revealed significant haloperidol-induced damage in the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, and substantia nigra. Alpha lipoic acid significantly reduced this damage and there were very little neuronal atrophy. Areas of angiogenesis were also seen in the alpha lipoic acid-treated group. In conclusion, the study proves that alpha lipoic acid treatment significantly reduces haloperidol-induced neuronal damage.

  14. Natural aerosol direct and indirect radiative effects

    OpenAIRE

    Rap, Alexandru; Scott, Catherine E.; Spracklen, Dominick V; Bellouin, Nicolas; Forster, Piers M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Schmidt, Anja; Mann, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Natural aerosol plays a significant role in the Earth's system due to its ability to alter the radiative balance of the Earth. Here we use a global aerosol microphysics model together with a radiative transfer model to estimate radiative effects for five natural aerosol sources in the present-day atmosphere: dimethyl sulfide (DMS), sea-salt, volcanoes, monoterpenes, and wildfires. We calculate large annual global mean aerosol direct and cloud albedo effects especially for DMS-derived sulfate ...

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present situation in studying effects of ionizing radiation on hippocampus of brain was reviewed in these topics, such as the kinetics of hippocampus, influences of ionizing radiation, on neutrons, biochemistry, enzymes, transmitters and synapses in hippocampus and on its electrophysiology, and the neuro-behavior after irradiation of hippocampus of brain, in order to provide information for clarifying the mechanism is radiation effect on hippocampus and for protection of human

  16. The effect of infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against TNF-alpha, on disc herniation resorption - A randomized controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Autio, Reijo A.; Karppinen, Jaro; Niinimaki, Jaakko; Ojala, Risto; Veeger, Nic; Korhonen, Timo; Hurri, Heikki; Tervonen, Osmo

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Randomized, controlled study. Objective. To evaluate the effect of infliximab on herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) resorption. Summary of Background Data. Although the effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) on HNP resorption are not fully understood, TNF-alpha appears to be

  17. The shear-induced alpha-effect and long-term variations in solar dynamo

    OpenAIRE

    Pipin, V. V.

    2007-01-01

    The consequences of the shear-induced alpha effect to the long-term modulation of magnetic activity are examined with the help of the axisymmetric numerical dynamo model that includes the self-consistent description of the angular momentum balance, heat transport and magnetic field generation in the spherical shell. We find that the shear contributions to alpha effect can complicate the long-term behaviour of the large-scale magnetic activity and differential rotation in nonlinear dynamo. Add...

  18. Effect of oilseed cakes on alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305.

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, T.; Chandra, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of oilseed cakes on extracellular thermostable alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305 was investigated. Each oilseed cake was made of groundnut, mustard, sesame, linseed, coconut copra, madhuca, or cotton. alpha-Amylase production was considerably improved in all instances and varied with the oilseed cake concentration in basal medium containing peptone and beef extract. Maximum increases were effected by a low concentration (0.5 to 1.0%) of groundnut or coconu...

  19. The Effect of Alpha-Lipoic Acid on Mitochondrial Superoxide and Glucocorticoid-Induced Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Sharon L. H. Ong; Harpreet Vohra; Yi Zhang; Matthew Sutton; Whitworth, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To examine the effect of alpha-lipoic acid, an antioxidant with mitochondrial superoxide inhibitory properties, on adrenocorticotrophic hormone- (ACTH-HT) and dexamethasone-induced hypertensions (DEX-HT) in rats and if any antihypertensive effect is mediated via mitochondrial superoxide inhibition. Methods. In a prevention study, rats received ground food or alpha-lipoic-acid-laced food (10 mg/rat/day) for 15 nights. Saline, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH, 0.2 mg/kg/day), or dexamet...

  20. Haemopoietic effects of 7 alpha, 17 beta dimethyltestosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some haematic parameters were investigated in female COBS mice treated with 7 alpha, 17 beta Dimethyltestosterone (DMT). The drug causes an increase of circulating platelets in normal mice. Bone marrow graft from DMT-treated donors facilitates in irradiated mice repopulation of white blood cells and platelets but lowers % survival. These data are interpreted on the basis of a 'commitment' and a loss of self-maintenance induced by DMT on CFUs compartment. (author)

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antitumor and immunomodulatory effects

    OpenAIRE

    Scheringa, Marcel

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn the first part of this thesis we examined the possibilities of using the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFcx) for the latter aproach. Although multiple studies have been performed regarding the antitumor action of TNFcx, it is still not clear whether TNFcx has sufficient potential to be used as immunotherapeutic agent in vivo. In this part of this thesis an answer to this important question is given Whereas cancer immunotherapy might benefit from immunostimulation with ...

  2. Separation and determination of 241Am in urine samples from radiation workers using PC88-A and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on their excretion rate through body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This article deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of 241Am isotope in urine samples using Extraction Chromatography (EC) and 243Am tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of americium along with calcium phosphate. This precipitate after treatment is further subjected to calcium oxalate co-precipitation. Separation of Am was carried out by EC column prepared by PC88-A (2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid 2-ethyl hexyl monoester) adsorbed on microporous resin XAD-7 (PC88A-XAD7). Am-fraction was electro-deposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha spectrometer. Ten routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical recovery was obtained in the range 44-60% with a mean and standard deviation of 51 and 4.7% respectively. (author)

  3. Determination of plutonium isotopes in urine samples from radiation workers using 236Pu tracer, anion exchange resin and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on their excretion rate through body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This paper deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of Pu-isotopes in urine samples using anion exchange resin and 236Pu tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of plutonium along with calcium phosphate. Separation of Pu was carried out by Amberlite, IRA-400, anion exchange resin. Pu-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha spectrometer. Twenty routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range 74-96% with a mean and standard deviation of 85 and 6% respectively. (author)

  4. Effects of total dose of ionizing radiation on integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The study of ionizing radiation effects on materials used in electronic devices is of great relevance for the progress of global technological development and, particularly, it is a necessity in some strategic areas in Brazil. Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by radiation and the need for IC's featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics. On the other hand, aerospace agencies are encouraging both scientific community and semiconductors industry to develop hardened-by-design components using standard manufacturing processes to achieve maximum performance, while significantly reducing costs. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the integrated circuits are usually divided into two categories: total ionizing dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; single events effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits. TID is one of the most common effects and may generate degradation in some parameters of the CMOS electronic devices, such as the threshold voltage oscillation, increase of the sub-threshold slope and increase of the off-state current. The effects of ionizing radiation are the creation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide layer changing operation mode parameters of the electronic device. Indirectly, there will be also changes in the device due to the formation of secondary electrons from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the material, since the charge carriers can be trapped both in the oxide layer and in the interface with the oxide. In this work we have investigated the behavior of MOSFET devices fabricated with different

  5. Effects of Proxima Centauri on Planet Formation in Alpha Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Worth, R

    2016-01-01

    Proxima Centauri is an M dwarf approximately 15,000 AU from the Alpha Centauri binary, comoving and likely in a loosely bound orbit. Dynamic simulations show this configuration can form from a more tightly bound triple system. As our nearest neighbors, these stars command great interest as potential planet hosts, and the dynamics of the stars govern the formation of any planets within the system. Here we present a scenario for the evolution of Alpha Centauri A and B and Proxima Centauri as a triple system. Based on N-body simulations, we determine this pathway to formation is plausible, and we quantify the implications for planet formation in the Alpha Centauri binary. We expect this formation scenario may have truncated the circumstellar disk slightly more than a system that formed in the current configuration, but that it most likely does not prevent terrestrial planet formation. We simulate planet formation in this system and find that in most scenarios, two or more terrestrial planets can be expected arou...

  6. Some characteristics and effects of natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since life first appeared on the Earth, it has, in all its subsequent evolved forms including human, been exposed to natural radiation in the environment both from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources. Being an environmental mutagen, ionising natural radiation may have played a role of some significance in the evolution of early life forms on Earth. It has been estimated by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation that at the present time, exposure to natural radiation globally results in an annual average individual effective dose of about 2.4 mSv. This represents about 80 % of the total dose from all sources. The three most important components of natural radiation exposure are cosmic radiation, terrestrial radioactivity and indoor radon. Each of these components exhibits both geographical and temporal variabilities with indoor radon exposure being the most variable and also the largest contributor to dose for most people. In this account, an overview is given of the characteristics of the main components of the natural radiation environment and some of their effects on humans. In the case of cosmic radiation, these range from radiation doses to aircrew and astronauts to the controversial topic of its possible effect on climate change. In the case of terrestrial natural radiation, accounts are given of a number of human exposure scenarios. (author)

  7. Effect of Radiation-Induced Amorphization on Smectite Dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of radiation-induced amorphization of smectite were investigated using artificial irradiation. Beams of 925 MeV Xenon ions with radiation dose reaching 73 MGy were used to simulate the effects generated by alpha recoil nuclei or fission products in the context of high level nuclear waste repository. Amorphization was controlled by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. An important coalescence of the smectite sheets was observed which lead to a loss of interparticle porosity. The amorphization is revealed by a loss of long-range structure and accompanied by dehydroxylation. The dissolution rate far-from-equilibrium shows that the amount of silica in solution is two times larger in the amorphous sample than in the reference clay, a value which may be enhanced by orders of magnitude when considering the relative surface area of the samples. Irradiation-induced amorphization thus facilitates dissolution of the clay-derived material. This has to be taken into account for the safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repository, particularly in a scenario of leakage of the waste package which would deliver alpha emitters able to amorphize smectite after a limited period of time. (authors)

  8. High-Intensity Synchrotron Radiation Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Suetsugu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Various effects of intense synchrotron radiation on the performance of particle accelerators, especially for storage rings, are discussed. Following a brief introduction to synchrotron radiation, the basic concepts of heat load, gas load, electron emission, and the countermeasures against these effects are discussed.

  9. Impact of alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherol on the radiation induced oxidation of rapeseed oil triacylglycerols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunrath, Robert; Isnardy, Bettina; Solar, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.solar@univie.ac.at; Elmadfa, Ibrahim

    2010-07-15

    Gamma-irradiation (doses: 2, 4, 7, and 10 kGy) was used as oxidation tool to study the antioxidant effects of alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherol (enrichments 500-5000 ppm) in purified rapeseed oil triacylglycerols (RSOTG). Fatty acid composition, tocopherol degradation, primary (conjugated dienes (CD) and peroxide value (POV)) and secondary (p-anisidine value) oxidation products were chosen as test parameters. Fatty acid composition did not change. While secondary oxidation products could not be found in the irradiated samples, the POVs and CDs showed a significant, dose-dependent increase. alpha-Tocopherol did not inhibit the formation of peroxides, whereas gamma- and delta-tocopherol reduced the POVs by more than 30%. No uniform effect of the different tocopherol concentrations at the particular doses could be established. The influence of the individual tocopherols on the CD formation was not pronounced. The degradation of the tocopherols decreased with increasing concentration. None of the tocopherols showed a prooxidant effect.

  10. The effects of (+)-amphetamine, alpha-methyltyrosine, and alpha-methylphenylalanine on the concentrations of m-tyramine and alpha-methyl-m-tyramine in rat striatum.

    OpenAIRE

    Dougan, D. F.; Duffield, A. M.; Duffield, P. H.; Wade, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration in rat striatum of the meta and para isomers of tyramine and alpha-methyltyramine, after the administration of (+)-amphetamine, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) and alpha-methylphenylalanine (AMPA) has been determined using chemical ionization gas chromatography mass spectrometry (c.i.g.c.m.s.). Twenty hours after the last of 7 daily injections of (+)-amphetamine (5 mg kg-1 i.p.) the concentration of alpha-methyl-p-tyramine in striatal tissue increased twofold compared to the ...

  11. Managing the adverse effects of radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkey, Franklin J

    2010-08-15

    Nearly two thirds of patients with cancer will undergo radiation therapy as part of their treatment plan. Given the increased use of radiation therapy and the growing number of cancer survivors, family physicians will increasingly care for patients experiencing adverse effects of radiation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to significantly improve symptoms of depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy, although they have little effect on cancer-related fatigue. Radiation dermatitis is treated with topical steroids and emollient creams. Skin washing with a mild, unscented soap is acceptable. Cardiovascular disease is a well-established adverse effect in patients receiving radiation therapy, although there are no consensus recommendations for cardiovascular screening in this population. Radiation pneumonitis is treated with oral prednisone and pentoxifylline. Radiation esophagitis is treated with dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, and viscous lidocaine. Radiation-induced emesis is ameliorated with 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and steroids. Symptomatic treatments for chronic radiation cystitis include anticholinergic agents and phenazopyridine. Sexual dysfunction from radiation therapy includes erectile dysfunction and vaginal stenosis, which are treated with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and vaginal dilators, respectively. PMID:20704169

  12. Comparison of the effect of alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on muscle contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnus, Jan; Rusiecka, Agnieszka; Czerski, Albert; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Hauzer, Willy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effect of selected agonists and antagonists of alpha-adrenergic receptors on muscle contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta in vitro with particular emphasis on alpha2-adrenergic receptor subtypes. The study was conducted on 30 New Zealand breed rabbits from which specimens of the abdominal aorta were collected. The sections were set up in an automatic water bath in a Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 37 degrees C. The experiments showed that alpha1-adrenergic receptors played the main role in the contractile response ofthe rabbit abdominal aorta. Stimulation of alpha1-adrenergic receptor by administration ofphenylephrine resulted in an increase in smooth muscle tonus ofthe rabbit abdominal aorta by an average of 4.75 mN. The reaction after stimulation of alpha2-adrenergic receptors by similar doses of their agonists was much weaker. Prolonged tissue response time and time needed to reach maximum tonus for alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists were observed. The obtained results confirm the thesis that the alpha1-adrenergic receptor is the most important factor controlling the contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta, but the alpha2-adrenergic receptor is also involved in maintaining muscle tissue tonus. PMID:23767297

  13. Electron production by solar Ly-{\\alpha} line radiation in the ionospheric D-region

    CERN Document Server

    Nina, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen Ly-{\\alpha} line has a dominant influence in photo-ionization processes in the unperturbed terrestrial ionospheric D region. In this paper, we present a procedure of calculating the rate of photo-ionization induced by Ly-{\\alpha} photons based on relaxation of electron density after intensive perturbations like those caused by solar X flares. This theory is applied to the ends of relaxation periods following three cases of solar X flares from May 5, 2010, February 18, 2011 and March 24, 2011. The necessary data on low ionospheric plasma parameters were collected by the very low frequency (VLF) radio-wave technics. The electron concentration is calculated from the amplitude and phase of the VLF signal emitted by the DHO transmitter in Germany and recorded by a receiver located in Serbia.

  14. THE Ly{alpha} LINES OF H I AND He II: A DIFFERENTIAL HANLE EFFECT FOR EXPLORING THE MAGNETISM OF THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca, E-mail: jtb@iac.es, E-mail: stepan@iac.es, E-mail: belluzzi@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    The Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 Angstrom-Sign is one of the spectral lines of choice for EUV channels of narrowband imagers on board space telescopes, which provide spectacular intensity images of the outer solar atmosphere. Since the magnetic field information is encoded in the polarization of the spectral line radiation, it is important to investigate whether the He II line radiation from the solar disk can be polarized, along with its magnetic sensitivity. Here we report some theoretical predictions concerning the linear polarization signals produced by scattering processes in this strong emission line of the solar transition region, taking into account radiative transfer and the Hanle effect caused by the presence of organized and random magnetic fields. We find that the fractional polarization amplitudes are significant ({approx}1%), even when considering the wavelength-integrated signals. Interestingly, the scattering polarization of the Ly{alpha} line of He II starts to be sensitive to the Hanle effect for magnetic strengths B {approx}> 100 G (i.e., for magnetic strengths of the order of and larger than the Hanle saturation field of the hydrogen Ly{alpha} line at 1216 Angstrom-Sign ). We therefore propose simultaneous observations of the scattering polarization in both Ly{alpha} lines to facilitate magnetic field measurements in the upper solar chromosphere. Even the development of a narrowband imaging polarimeter for the He II 304 Angstrom-Sign line alone would be already of great diagnostic value for probing the solar transition region.

  15. Effect of gamma radiation on Campylobacter jejuni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation resistance of Campylobacter jejuni in broth, ground beef, and ground turkey meat was determined using dose levels from 0-200 Krad at -30 +/- 100C, at 0-50C, and at 30 +/- 100C. Irradiation at -300C increased radiation resistance of cultures in ground meats; broth cultures were not greatly influenced by temperature. The effect of culture age on radiation resistance was also evaluated using cells in various physiological phases. Age did not have a pronounced effect on radiation resistance. The largest D10 value for C. jejuni was 32 Krad, which was less than D10 values commonly reported for salmonellae. 20 references, 4 figures

  16. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  17. Radiation Effects on Polymers - XI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghanem, N. A.; El-Awady, N. I.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius;

    1979-01-01

    With the aim of improving properties of cellulose acetate membranes for reverse osmosis desalination, grafting was performed using high energy electrons. In this paper, the grafting parameters (radiation dose and method, monomer concentration, solvents, chain transfer agent and redox system...

  18. The influence of salt aerosol on alpha radiation detection by WIPP continuous air monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) will be used at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to measure airborne transuranic radioactivity that might be present in air exhaust or in work-place areas. WIPP CAMs are important to health and safety because they are used to alert workers to airborne radioactivity, to actuate air-effluent filtration systems, and to detect airborne radioactivity so that the radioactivity can be confined in a limited area. In 1993, the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) reported that CAM operational performance was affected by salt aerosol, and subsequently, the WIPP CAM design and usage were modified. In this report, operational data and current theories on aerosol collection were reviewed to determine CAM quantitative performance limitations. Since 1993, the overall CAM performance appears to have improved, but anomalous alpha spectra are present when sampling-filter salt deposits are at normal to high levels. This report shows that sampling-filter salt deposits directly affect radon-thoron daughter alpha spectra and overall monitor efficiency. Previously it was assumed that aerosol was mechanically collected on the surface of CAM sampling filters, but this review suggests that electrostatic and other particle collection mechanisms are more important than previously thought. The mechanism of sampling-filter particle collection is critical to measurement of acute releases of radioactivity. 41 refs

  19. Radiation effects in polycarbonate capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujisić Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine the influence of neutron and gamma irradiation on the dissipation factor and capacitance of capacitors with polycarbonate dielectrics. The operation of capacitors subject to extreme conditions, such as the presence of ionizing radiation fields, is of special concern in military industry and space technology. Results obtained show that the exposure to a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field causes a decrease of capacitance, while the loss tangent remains unchanged.

  20. Radiation friction vs ponderomotive effect

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, A M; Gelfer, E G; Narozhny, N B; Ruhl, H

    2014-01-01

    The concept of ponderomotive potential is upgraded to a regime in which radiation friction becomes dominant. The radiation friction manifests itself in novel features of long-term capturing of the particles released at the focus and impenetrability of the focus from the exterior. We apply time scales separation to the Landau-Lifshitz equation splitting the particle motion into quivering and slow drift of a guiding center. The drift equation is deduced by averaging over fast motion.

  1. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic

  2. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  3. Total aerosol effect: radiative forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lohmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of precipitation formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical properties, a quantification of the aerosol forcings in the traditional way is difficult to define properly. Here we argue that fast feedbacks should be included because they act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP, that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Based on our results, we recommend RFP as a valid option to compare different forcing agents, and to compare the effects of particular forcing agents in different models.

  4. Total aerosol effect: radiative forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koch

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical properties, a quantification of the aerosol forcings in the traditional way is difficult to properly define. Here we argue that fast feedbacks should be included because they act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP, that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Based on our results, we recommend RFP as a valid option to compare different forcing agents, and to compare the effects of particular forcing agents in different models.

  5. Effect of oilseed cakes on alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, T; Chandra, A K

    1982-08-01

    The effects of oilseed cakes on extracellular thermostable alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305 was investigated. Each oilseed cake was made of groundnut, mustard, sesame, linseed, coconut copra, madhuca, or cotton. alpha-Amylase production was considerably improved in all instances and varied with the oilseed cake concentration in basal medium containing peptone and beef extract. Maximum increases were effected by a low concentration (0.5 to 1.0%) of groundnut or coconut, a high concentration (3%) of linseed or mustard, and an Rintermediate concentration (2%) of cotton, madhuca, or sesame. The oilseed cakes made of groundnut or mustard could completely replace the conventional peptone-beef extract medium as the fermentation base for the production of alpha-amylase by B. licheniformis. The addition of corn steep liquor to cotton, linseed, sesame, or madhuca cake in the medium improved alpha-amylase production. PMID:6181738

  6. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Team, JET [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK

    2016-02-09

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass < A> weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher < A >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with < A > were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion–electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  7. Effects of q(r) on the Alpha Particle Ripple Loss in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.S. Darrow; M. Diesso; R.V. Budny; S. Batha; S.J. Zweben; et al.

    1997-09-01

    An experiment was done with TFTR DT plasmas to determine the effect of the q(r) profile on the alpha particle ripple loss to the outer midplane. The alpha particle loss measurements were made using a radially movable scintillator detector 20 degrees below the outer midplane. The experimental results were compared with TF ripple loss calculations done using a Monte Carlo guiding center orbit following code, ORBIT. Although some of the experimental results are consistent with the ORBIT code modeling, the variation of the alpha loss with the q(r) profiles is not well explained by this code. Quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires a careful analysis of the limiter shadowing effect, which strongly determines the diffusion of alphas into the detector aperture.

  8. Effect of water alpha radiolysis on the spent nuclear fuel UO2 matrix alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching experiments with solution renewal were carried out on UO2 pellets doped with alpha emitters (238/239Pu) to quantify the impact of alpha irradiation on UO2 matrix alteration. Three batches of doped UO2 pellets with different alpha flux levels were studied as well as spent fuel fragments. Interim storage in air of UO2 pellets doped with alpha emitters results in variations of the UO2 surface reactivity, which depends on the alpha particle flux at the interface and on the interim storage duration. The variation in the surface reactivity and the greater uranium release following interim storage cannot be attributed to the effect of alpha radiolysis in aerated media since the uranium release tends toward the same value after several leaching cycles for the doped UO2 pellet batches and spent fuel. However, leaching experiments performed in deaerated media after annealing the samples and pre-leaching the surface suggest that alpha radiolysis does indeed affect the dissolution, which varies with the flux at the UO2/water interface. (authors)

  9. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  10. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma r...

  11. The alpha effectiveness for formation of SO3- in barite: an essential factor for ESR dating of submarine hydrothermal barite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isono, Y.; Toyoda, S.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.

    2013-12-01

    While Kasuya et al. (1991) first pointed out that ESR (electron spin resonance) dating of barite (BaSO4) is possible, the method was first practically applied by Okumura et al. (2010) to a sample formed by the submarine hydrothermal activity. A subsequent study by Sato et al. (2011) studied the thermal stability of the signal and concluded that the dating signal due to SO3- is stable so that dating method is applicable up to at least several thousand years. Barite crystals formed by submarine hydrothermal activities contains large amount of Ra which replaces Ba in the crystal lattice where all dose rate is due to radiation from Ra. Okumura et al. (2010) reported a concentration of 7.7 Bq/g of Ra in a hydrothermal sulfide including barite where the internal alpha dose rate in barite contributes 40 to 60 % of total dose rate. Determination of alpha effectiveness is thus the one of the essential factors for improving the precision of dating of barite by ESR. Toyoda et al. (2012) investigated the alpha effectiveness for the ESR signal due to SO3- in barite by comparing the dose responses of the signal for gamma irradiation and for He ion implantation with an energy of 4 MeV. A value 0.043 ×0.018 was obtained for a sample from Morocco. However, the dose response was far from 'good', where the number of points is not sufficient. The experiments of He ion implantation was repeated in the present study for several samples to determine the precise alpha effectiveness. A value of 0.019 ×0.0096 and 0.0062 ×0.0036 were obtained for the samples from Morocco and from Funaoka Mine, Japan, respectively. The results of further repeated analysis will be presented.

  12. On the effect of the ionising background on the Ly{\\alpha} forest autocorrelation function

    OpenAIRE

    Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Busca, Nicolás G.

    2014-01-01

    An analytical framework is presented to understand the effects of a fluctuating intensity of the cosmic ionising background on the correlations of the Ly{\\alpha} forest transmission fraction measured in quasar spectra. In the absence of intensity fluctuations, the Ly{\\alpha} power spectrum should have the expected cold dark matter power spectrum with redshift distortions in the linear regime, with a bias factor b_{\\delta} and a redshift distortion parameter {\\beta} that depend on redshift but...

  13. Effect of decoyinine on the regulation of alpha-amylase synthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, W L; Chambliss, G H

    1987-01-01

    Decoyinine, an inhibitor of GMP synthetase, allows sporulation in Bacillus subtilis to initiate and proceed under otherwise catabolite-repressing conditions. The effect of decoyinine on alpha-amylase synthesis in B. subtilis, an event which exhibits regulatory features resembling sporulation initiation, was examined. Decoyinine did not overcome catabolite repression of alpha-amylase synthesis in a wild-type strain of B. subtilis but did cause premature and enhanced synthesis in a mutant strai...

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Alpha-Mangostin on Adhesion of Candida albicans to Denture Acrylic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Jamdee, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting denture wearers. It is characterized by the presence of yeast biofilm on the denture, primarily associated with C. albicans. The investigation of agents that can reduce C. albicans adhesion may represent a significant advancement in the prevention and treatment of this disease. This study aims to investigate the effect of alpha-mangostin on the in vitro adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic and germ tube formation by C. albicans and to compare its activity with clotrimazole which is a topical antifungal agent commonly used for the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Materials and Methodology: Alpha-mangostin was extracted by thin layer chromatography. The effect of alpha-mangostin on adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic was determined by using a colorimetric tetrazolium assay and germ tube formation by C. albicans was determined by using the counting chamber. Results: A significant reduction of C. albicans adhesion to denture acrylic was evident after exposure to 2,000 µg/ml of alpha-mangostin for only 15 min. In addition, the 2,000 µg/ml of the alpha-mangostin-treated C. albicans had a reduced ability for germ tube formation. These inhibitory effects of alpha-mangostin were as effective as clotrimazole. Conclusion: Alpha-mangostin has antifungal property against C. albicans by inhibiting the adhesion to denture acrylic and germ tube formation in vitro. These results suggest the potential application of alpha-mangostin as a topical medication or a natural oral hygiene product for treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. PMID:26962371

  15. Concurrent sickle cell anemia and alpha-thalassemia. Effect on pathological properties of sickle erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Embury, S H; Clark, M R; Monroy, G; Mohandas, N

    1984-01-01

    The concurrence of sickle cell anemia and alpha-thalassemia results in less severe hemolytic anemia apparently as a result of reduced intraerythrocytic concentration of hemoglobin S and its retarded polymerization. We have evaluated the effect of alpha-globin gene number on several interrelated properties of sickle erythrocytes (RBC) that are expected to correlate with the hemolytic and rheologic consequences of sickle cell disease. The irreversibly sickled cell number, proportion of very den...

  16. Significance of radiation effects in solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed NRC criteria for disposal of high-level nuclear waste require development of waste packages to contain radionuclide for at least 1000 years, and design of repositories to prevent radionuclide release at an annual rate greater than 1 part in 100,000 of the total activity. The high-level wastes that are now temporarily stored as aqueous salts, sludges, and calcines must be converted to high-integrity solid forms that resist deterioration from radiation and other effects of long-term storage. Spent fuel may be encapsulated for similar long-term storage. Candidate waste forms beside the spent fuel elements themselves, include borosilicate and related glasses, mineral-like crystalline ceramics, concrete formulations, and metal-matrix glass or ceramic composites. these waste forms will sustain damage produced by beta-gamma radiation up to 1012 rads, by alpha radiation up to 1019 particles/g, by internal helium generation greater than about 0.1 atom percent, and by the atom transmutations accompanying radioactive decay. Current data indicate that under these conditions the glass forms suffer only minor volume changes, stored energy deposition, and leachability effects. The crystalline ceramics appear susceptible to the potentially more severe alterations accompanying metamictization and natural analogs of candidate materials are being examined to establish their suitability as waste forms. Helium concentrations in the waste forms are generally below thresholds for severe damage in either glass or crystalline ceramics at low temperatures, but microstructural effects are not well characterized. Transmutation effects remain to be established

  17. Dominant-negative CK2alpha induces potent effects on circadian rhythmicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks organize the precise timing of cellular and behavioral events. In Drosophila, circadian clocks consist of negative feedback loops in which the clock component PERIOD (PER represses its own transcription. PER phosphorylation is a critical step in timing the onset and termination of this feedback. The protein kinase CK2 has been linked to circadian timing, but the importance of this contribution is unclear; it is not certain where and when CK2 acts to regulate circadian rhythms. To determine its temporal and spatial functions, a dominant negative mutant of the catalytic alpha subunit, CK2alpha(Tik, was targeted to circadian neurons. Behaviorally, CK2alpha(Tik induces severe period lengthening (approximately 33 h, greater than nearly all known circadian mutant alleles, and abolishes detectable free-running behavioral rhythmicity at high levels of expression. CK2alpha(Tik, when targeted to a subset of pacemaker neurons, generates period splitting, resulting in flies exhibiting both long and near 24-h periods. These behavioral effects are evident even when CK2alpha(Tik expression is induced only during adulthood, implicating an acute role for CK2alpha function in circadian rhythms. CK2alpha(Tik expression results in reduced PER phosphorylation, delayed nuclear entry, and dampened cycling with elevated trough levels of PER. Heightened trough levels of per transcript accompany increased protein levels, suggesting that CK2alpha(Tik disturbs negative feedback of PER on its own transcription. Taken together, these in vivo data implicate a central role of CK2alpha function in timing PER negative feedback in adult circadian neurons.

  18. Radiative effects in gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A. V.; Zhukovskii, V. Ch.

    1987-10-01

    The definitions of the vacuum state and the analysis of the radiative processes reffer to fundamental problems of non-abelian gayge theories. On the basis of the functional integration in the proper time representation a model of vacuum is examined of the quantum chromodynamics, proposed by Savvidy and Matinyan (Nuclear Physics B, Volume 134, Issue 3, p. 539-545). The supersimmetry of the Dirac equation for fermions in an external constant homogeneous magnetic field is examined. The radiative shift is calculated for the Dirac neutrino mass in an arbitrary external constant electromagnetic field in the framework of the Weinberg-Salam theory. An interpretation of the sign of the neutrino's anomalous magnetic moment is given. The power of the electromagnetic radiation of the moment and characteristic time of the neutrino spirality flipp in an external magnetic field is calculated. Bibliography: 24; Ill. 2

  19. Effects of recombinant human interleukin-6 alone and in combination with recombinant interleukin-1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha on antibacterial resistance in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Czuprynski, C J; Haak-Frendscho, M; Maroushek, N; Brown, J F

    1992-01-01

    In this study, recombinant human interleukin-6 (rIL-6) was tested for its ability to alter the resistance of mice to experimental Listeria monocytogenes infection. Single bolus or repeated injections of rIL-6 by itself did not increase antilisteria resistance. When rIL-6 was injected in combination with suboptimal concentrations of rIL-1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha (rTNF-alpha), it did not augment their abilities to mediate protection in the spleen and had a marginal effect on the l...

  20. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis.

  1. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis

  2. Nuclear radiation and its effect on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief presentation is made of the biological effects on man of nuclear radiation. The sources of such radiation, natural and artificial, are summarised. The philosophy on which the maximum permissible doses to various groups and to the population are based is briefly described. Tables are given illustrating the various aspects discussed. (JIW)

  3. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  4. Radiation effects after exposure during prenetal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The embryo and fetus are very radiosensitive during the total prenatal development period. The quality and extent of radiation effects depend strongly on the developmental stage at which the exposure occurs. During the preimplantation period radiation exposure can cause death of the embryo after radiation doses of 0.2 Gy and higher. Malformations are only observed in very rare cases when genetic predispositions exist. Macroscopic-anatomical malformations are induced only after irradiation during the major organogenesis. On the basis of experimental data with mammals it is assumed that a radiation dose of about 0.2 Gy doubles the malformation risk. Studies in humans give rise to the assumption that the human embryo is more radioresistant than the embryos of mice and rats. Radiation exposure during the major organogenesis and the early fetal period lead to disturbances in the growth and developmental processes. During early fetogenesis (week 8-15 post coruption) high radiosensitity exists for the development of the central nervous system. Radiation doses of 1 Gy cause severe mental retardation in about 50% of exposed fetuses. Analysis of the dose-effect curves shows that there is probably a dose-effect curve with a threshold for this effect. It must be taken into account that radiation exposure during the fetal period also induces cancer. The studies, however, do not allow quantitative estimate of this radiation risk at present. It is therefore generally assumed that the risk is about the same level as for children. (orig.)

  5. Chernobyl health effects: radiation or stress?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to results of wide-scale examination of human population, subjected to the effect of radiation in result of Chernobyl accident. The examined contingents consisted of liquidators, evacuated from 30-km zone, people still living in contamination territories, children of irradiated parents and children, who received large radiation doses. High levels of respiratory system diseases, digestive system diseases, cardiovascular diseases and nervous system diseases were revealed for these people. It was revealed that stress, socio-economic and chemical factors played sufficient role in disease incidence. It is shown that fair of radiation may damage more, than radiation itself

  6. Profiling Transboundary Aerosols over Taiwan and Assessing Their Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chou, Ming-Dah; Tsay, Si-Chee; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Hsu, N. Christina; Giles, David M.; Liu, Gin-Rong; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A synergistic process was developed to study the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties and their effects on solar heating using data retrieved from ground-based radiation measurements and radiative transfer simulations. Continuous MPLNET and AERONET observations were made at a rural site in northern Taiwan from 2005 to 2007. The aerosol vertical extinction profiles retrieved from ground-based lidar measurements were categorized into near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, representing 76% of all cases. Fine-mode (Angstrom exponent, alpha, approx.1.4) and moderate-absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo approx.0.93, asymmetry factor approx.0.73 at 440 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. The column-integrated aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (tau(sub 500nm)) ranges from 0.1 to 0.6 for the near-surface transport type, but can be doubled in the presence of upper-layer aerosol transport. We utilize aerosol radiative efficiency (ARE; the impact on solar radiation per unit change of tau(sub 500nm)) to quantify the radiative effects due to different vertical distributions of aerosols. Our results show that the ARE at the top-of-atmosphere (-23 W/ sq m) is weakly sensitive to aerosol vertical distributions confined in the lower troposphere. On the other hand, values of the ARE at the surface are -44.3, -40.6 and -39.7 W/sq m 38 for near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, respectively. Further analyses show that the impact of aerosols on the vertical profile of solar heating is larger for the near-surface transport type than that of two-layer transport type. The impacts of aerosol on the surface radiation and the solar heating profiles have implications for the stability and convection in the lower troposphere.

  7. Physics of radiation effects in crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, RA

    1986-01-01

    ``Physics of Radiation Effects in Crystals'' is presented in two parts. The first part covers the general background and theory of radiation effects in crystals, including the theory describing the generation of crystal lattice defects by radiation, the kinetic approach to the study of the disposition of these defects and the effects of the diffusion of these defects on alloy compositions and phases. Specific problems of current interest are treated in the second part and include anisotropic dimensional changes in x-uranium, zirconium and graphite, acceleration of thermal creep in reactor ma

  8. Radiation-induced bystander effect: The important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wideł

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available It has long been a central radiobiological dogma that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell death, cytogenetic changes, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, are the results of the direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or indirect damage via water radiolysis products. However, several years ago attention turned to a third mechanism of radiation, termed the “bystander effect” or “radiation-induced bystander effect” (RIBE. This is induced by agents and signals emitted by directly irradiated cells and manifests as a lowering of survival, cytogenetic damage, apoptosis enhancement, and biochemical changes in neighboring non-irradiated cells. The bystander effect is mainly observed in in vitro experiments using very low doses of alpha particles (range; mGy, cGy, but also after conventional irradiation (X-rays, gamma rays at low as well as conventional doses. The mechanisms responsible for the bystander effect are complex and still poorly understood. It is believed that molecular signals released from irradiated cells induce different signaling ways in non-irradiated neighboring cells, leading to the observed events. The molecular signals may be transmitted through gap junction intercellular communication and through a medium transfer mechanism. The nature of these transmitted factors are diverse, and still not defi nitely established. It seems that RIBE may have important clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure. Potentially, this effectmay have important implications in the creation of whole-body or localized side effects in tissues beyond the irradiation fi eld and also in low-dose radiological and radioisotope diagnostics. Factors emitted by irradiated cells may result in the risk of genetic instability, mutations, and second primary cancer induction. They might also have their own part in inducing and extending post-radiation side effects in normal tissue. The

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  10. The Gunn-Peterson effect and the Lyman $\\alpha$ forest

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A

    1997-01-01

    We show that spatial correlations in a stochastic large scale velocity field in an otherwise smooth intergalactic medium (homogeneous comoving density) superposed on the general Hubble flow, may cause a `line-like' structure in QSO spectra similar to the population of unsaturated Ly-alpha forest lines which usually are attributed to individual clouds with 10^{11} <= N(HI) <= 5*10^{13} cm^{-2}. Therefore there is no clear observational distinction between a diffuse intergalactic medium and discrete intergalactic clouds. It follows that the HI-density in the diffuse intergalactic medium might be substantially underestimated if it is determined from the observed intensity distribution near the apparent continuum in high resolution spectra of QSOs. Our tentative estimate implies a diffuse neutral hydrogen opacity tau_{GP} = 0.3 at z = 3 and a current baryon density Omega_{IGM} = 0.08$, assuming a Hubble constant H = 70 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}.

  11. Effect of alpha particles on the stability of Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The macroscopic stability of an ignited EBT reactor is investigated by studying the effects of the alpha particles generated by the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion reaction on the background interchange mode, the interacting interchange mode, and the high-frequency compressional Alfven and coupled modes. A fluid description is used for the background plasma while a kinetic treatment is utilized for the hot electron species and the alpha particles. It is shown that the alphas tend to mildly destabilize the interacting interchange while stabilizing the background interchange due to their sizable Larmor radii. The destabilization is most pronounced when the beta of the alpha particles in highest, i.e., at birth, and recovery of stabilization takes place as these particles slow down toward thermalization. It is also shown that the alphas completely stabilize the high frequency modes so that it can safely be concluded that fusion alphas present no detrimental effects on the stability of an EBT reactor that possesses an appropriate hot electron ring for macroscopic stability

  12. Bi-phasic effect of interferon (IFN)-alpha: IFN-alpha up- and down-regulates interleukin-4 signaling in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten Wessel; Sommer, Viveca Horst; Woetmann, Anders;

    2003-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta is produced by virally infected cells and is believed to play an important role in early phases of the innate immune response. In addition, IFN-alpha/beta inhibits interleukin (IL)-4 signaling in B cells and monocytes, suggesting that IFN-alpha/beta (like IFN-gamma) is......Interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta is produced by virally infected cells and is believed to play an important role in early phases of the innate immune response. In addition, IFN-alpha/beta inhibits interleukin (IL)-4 signaling in B cells and monocytes, suggesting that IFN-alpha/beta (like IFN......-4-mediated STAT6 activation in both CD4+ and CD8+ human T cells. The effect is specific because (i) another interferon, IFN-gamma, does not enhance IL-4-mediated STAT6 activation, (ii) IFN-alpha-mediated STAT1 and STAT2 activation is not modulated by IL-4, and (iii) activation of Janus kinases...

  13. Scattered Lyman-alpha radiation of comet 2012/S1 (ISON) observed by SUMER/SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curdt, W.; Boehnhardt, H.; Germerott, D.; Schuehle, U.; Solanki, S.; Teriaca, L.; Vincent, J.

    2014-07-01

    During its recent perihelion passage, comet ISON came so close to the Sun that it appeared in the field of view (FOV) of the SUMER spectrometer on SOHO and allowed unique observations at far-UV wavelengths with high spatial and temporal resolution. We report results of these observations completed during the comet's encounter with the Sun on November 28.75, 2013. Our data show the dust tail trailing behind the predicted position of the nucleus seen in Lyman-alpha emission as light from the solar disk that is scattered by micron-sized dust particles. The arrow-shaped tail is offset from the trajectory and not aligned with it. We model the dust emission and dynamics to reproduce the appearance of the tail. We could not detect any signature of cometary gas or plasma around the expected position of the nucleus and conclude that the out-gassing processes must have stopped before the comet entered our FOV. Also the model we used to reproduce the observed dust tail needs a sharp fall-off of the dust production hours before perihelion. We compare the radiance of the dust tail to the Lyman-alpha emission of the disk for an estimate of the dust column density. After observing 18 years mostly solar targets, this was the first time that SUMER completed spectroscopic observations of a comet.

  14. The solar O III spectrum. II - Longer wavelengths, line widths, and the He II Lyman alpha radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, S. O.; Behring, W. E.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The solar O III spectrum above 900 A is analyzed, including several visible and infrared lines which are important in nebular studies. The dependence of the line intensities on the rate of photoexcitation by He Ly-alpha is determined, and the observability of these lines in the solar spectrum is studied. The impact approximation is employed to calculate the expected line widths of the stronger solar O III lines. The photoexciting field at 304 A calculated from the observed intensities of the O III lines below 900 A (Bhatia et al., 1982) is compared with the field predicted by a recent model (Avrett et al., 1976). It is shown that additional radiation trapping must be present beyond that given by this model.

  15. Hit rates and radiation doses to nuclei of bone lining cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S.; Kruglikov, I. L.

    1992-01-01

    Factors relating the local concentration of a bone-seeking alpha-particle emitter to the mean hit rate have been determined for nuclei of bone lining cells using a Monte Carlo procedure. Cell nuclei were approximated by oblate spheroids with dimensions and location taken from a previous histomorphometric study. The Monte Carlo simulation is applicable for planar and diffuse labels at plane or cylindrical bone surfaces. Additionally, the mean nuclear dose per hit, the dose mean per hit, the mean track segment length and its second moment, the percentage of stoppers, and the frequency distribution of the dose have been determined. Some basic features of the hit statistics for bone lining cells have been outlined, and the consequences of existing standards of radiation protection with regard to the hit frequency to cell nuclei are discussed.

  16. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, S. [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V. [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} ⋅ 5H{sub 2}O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  17. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO3)4 ⋅ 5H2O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories

  18. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels.

  19. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels

  20. Effects of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiendl, Toni A.; Wiendl, Fritz W.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Franco, Jose G.; Althur, Valter, E-mail: tawiendl@hotmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' F1 were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from Co-60 source at 0,509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2,5; 5,0; 7,5; 10,0; 12,5; 15,0; 20,0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  1. Biological effects of proton radiation: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton radiation provides significant dosimetric advantages when compared with gamma radiation due to its superior energy deposition characteristics. Although the physical aspects of proton radiobiology are well understood, biological and clinical endpoints are understudied. The current practice to assume the relative biological effectiveness of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons to be a generic value of about 1.1 relative to photons likely obscures important unrecognised differentials in biological response between these radiation qualities. A deeper understanding of the biological properties induced by proton radiation would have both radiobiological and clinical impact. This article briefly points to some of the literature pertinent to the effects of protons on tissue-level processes that modify disease progression, such as angiogenesis, cell invasion and cancer metastasis. Recent findings hint that proton radiation may, in addition to offering improved radio-therapeutic targeting, be a means to provide a new dimension for increasing therapeutic benefits for patients by manipulating these tissue-level processes. (authors)

  2. Effect of radiation processing on meat tenderisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of radiation processing (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on the tenderness of three types of popularly consumed meat in India namely chicken, lamb and buffalo was investigated. In irradiated meat samples dose dependant reduction in water holding capacity, cooking yield and shear force was observed. Reduction in shear force upon radiation processing was more pronounced in buffalo meat. Protein and collagen solubility as well as TCA soluble protein content increased on irradiation. Radiation processing of meat samples resulted in some change in colour of meat. Results suggested that irradiation leads to dose dependant tenderization of meat. Radiation processing of meat at a dose of 2.5 kGy improved its texture and had acceptable odour. - Highlights: • Effect of radiation processing on tenderness of three meat systems was evaluated. • Dose dependant reduction in shear force seen in buffalo meat. • Collagen solubility increased with irradiation

  3. Effects of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' F1 were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from Co-60 source at 0,509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2,5; 5,0; 7,5; 10,0; 12,5; 15,0; 20,0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  4. Influence of some exo nucleases in response to the induced genetic damage in Escherichia coli by alpha radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the strategies with those that E. coli counts to overcome to the genetic damage there is the SOS response, a group of genes that participate in repair and/or tolerance that it confers to the bacteria major opportunities of surviving. These genes are repressed and its only are expressed when it happens genetic damage. So that this system is activated it is necessary that DNA of a band exists and in this sense the double ruptures (RDB) its are not able to induce this response unless there is a previous processing. In stumps with defects in certain genes that have to do with repair of RDB (as recO, recJ and xonA) the activity of SOS is smaller than in a wild stump what suggests that these participate in the previous processes to the activation of the response. The ionizing radiation produce among other many lesions, RDB in greater or smaller proportion, depending on the ionization capacity. A parameter to evaluate this capacity is the lineal energy transfer (LET), defined as the average energy given by unit of distance travelled. In general the LET of the corpuscular radiations is a lot but high that of the electromagnetic one, for what produces bigger quantity of ionizations inside a restricted zone and it increases by this way the probability that RDB has been generated. This work has for object to infer the participation of xonA and recJ in this response and to evaluate the damage produced by ionizing radiation of different LET (alpha particles of different energies) in a stump with all the functional repair mechanisms. Its were considered two parameters: the survival and the activity of SOS evaluated by means of the chromo test. The results indicate that the activity of these exo nucleases is necessary for the repair of RDB as well as for the processing of lesions foresaw to the activation of SOS. As for the treatment with alphas of different energies is observed that so much the survival like the activity of SOS vary as the LET of the radiation changes

  5. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

  6. The induction of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo by alpha-particle irradiation in whole Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fanghua; Liu, Ping; Wang, Ting; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-08-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated distant/abscopal bystander effects in A. thaliana seeds and embryos; the postembryonic development of bystander tissues, such as root hair differentiation, primary root elongation, lateral root initiation and survival, were inhibited significantly by localized irradiation with microbeam protons and low-energy ions. In the present study, we further investigated radiation-induced bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in A. thaliana plants using homologous recombination (HR) and the expression level of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene as mutagenic end points. We found that alpha-particle irradiation of distal primary roots of young seedlings resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of HR in the aerial plants; the increased induction of HR occurred in every true leaf over the course of rosette development. Moreover, we also found that localized alpha-particle irradiation of roots induced a short-term up-regulated expression of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene in the nonirradiated aerial plants. These results suggested the existence of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in plants. Treatment with the ROS scavenger DMSO dramatically reduced the effects of localized root irradiation on the induction of HR and expression of the AtRAD54 gene in bystander tissues, suggesting that ROS play a critical role in mediating the bystander mutagenic effects in plants. PMID:20681789

  7. Sterilizing radiation effects on selected polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of radiation effects and their industrial applications are discussed for the following classes of polymers: thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers, films and fibers, and adhesives/coatings/potting compounds. 35 references, 3 tables

  8. Effects of solar radiation on glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Kinser, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation of selected glasses are reported. Optical property degradation is studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Strength changes are measured using a concentric ring bend test. Direct fracture toughness measurements using an indentation test are planned.

  9. Radiation effects blamed on Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strictly speaking, the nature of an epidemiological study would not permit the same causal links to be established as an experimental study does. Instead, it merely provides circumstantial evidence, from which some conclusions can be drawn as to the causative factors in the occurrences recorded. To summarize it may be stated that as fas as the Germans are concerned no scientific evidence has so far been provided to prove health impairments attributable to an added radiation load from the Chernobyl fallout. On the other hand, it can not be denied that there are indications of health damage in a few individuals unreasonably changing their eating habits for fear of radiation injuries. The question as to whether the event instilled a permanent feeling of unease in some population groups still remains largely obscure. (orig.)

  10. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  11. Radiation effects on blood coagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haemorrhage is an important and ominous sign in acute radiation disease. While it is overwhelmingly evident that thrombocytopenia is the major cause of the haemorrhagic diathesis, detailed observations of all of the changes in the coagulation mechanism, fibrinolytic elements and platelet function are lacking. The current knowledge is reviewed in this chapter. In general, changes should be considered in relation to the course of the disease, that is early or late, and whether the observations were made in man or animals

  12. Predicted solar cell edge radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Solar Cell Orbital Test (ASCOT) will test six types of solar cells in a high energy proton environment. During the design of the experiment a question was raised about the effects of proton radiation incident on the edge of the solar cells and whether edge radiation shielding was required. Historical geosynchronous data indicated that edge radiation damage is not detectable over the normal end of life solar cell degradation; however because the ASCOT radiation environment has a much higher and more energetic fluence of protons, considerably more edge damage is expected. A computer analysis of the problem was made by modeling the expected radiation damage at the cell edge and using a network model of small interconnected solar cells to predict degradation in the cell's electrical output. The model indicated that the deepest penetration of edge radiation was at the top of the cell near the junction where the protons have access to the cell through the low density cell/cover adhesive layer. The network model indicated that the cells could tolerate high fluences at their edge as long as there was high electrical resistance between the edge radiated region and the contact system on top of the cell. The predicted edge radiation related loss was less than 2% of maximum power for GaAs/Ge solar cells. As a result, no edge radiation protection was used for ASCOT

  13. Fast Neutron Radiation Effects on Bacillus Subtili

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaoming; REN Zhenglong; ZHANG Jianguo; ZHENG Chun; TAN Bisheng; YANG Chengde; CHU Shijin

    2009-01-01

    To examine the sterilizing effect and mechanism of neutron radiation, Bacillus sub-tilis vat. niger, strain (ATCC 9372) spores were irradiated with the fast neutron from the Chinese fast burst reactor Ⅱ(CFBR-Ⅱ). The plate-count results indicated that the D10 value was 384.6 Gy with a neutron radiation dose rate of 7.4 Gy/min. The rudimental catalase activity of the spores declined obviously with the increase in the radiation dose. Meanwhile, under the scanning electron microscope, no visible influence of the neutron radiation on the spore configuration was detected even if the dose was increased to 4 kGy. The content and distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by neutron radiation at different doses were measured and quantified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Further analysis of the DNA release percentage (PR), the DNA breakage level (L), and the average molecular weight, indicated that DNA fragments were obvi-ously distributed around the 5 kb regions at different radiation doses, which suggests that some points in the DNA molecule were sensitive to neutron radiation. Both PR and L varied regularly to some extent with the increase in radiation dose. Thus neutron radiation has a high sterilization power, and can induce falling enzyme activity and DNA breakage in Bacillus subtilis spores

  14. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    We update previously published Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 data set. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux data sets. Our results clearly show that the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave, and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles, to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance data sets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  15. Radiation effects on biodegradable polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] and its copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] are microbial biodegradable polyesters produced by many types of bacteria. Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(E-caprolactone) (PCL) are also biodegradable synthetic polyesters which have been commercialized. These thermoplastics are expected for wide usage in environmental protection and blocompatible applications. Radiation grafting of hydrophilic monomers onto many polymers, e.g., polyethylene and polypropylene has been studied mainly for biomedical applications. In the present study, radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl monomers onto PHB and P(3HB-co-3HV) was carried out and improvement of their properties was studied. Changes in the properties and biodegradability were compared with the degree of grafting. Radiation-induced crosslinking of PBS and PCL which relatively show thermal and irradiation stability was also carried out to improve their thermal stability or processability. Irradiation to PBS and PCL mainly resulted in crosslinking and characterization of these crosslinked polyesters was investigated

  16. Polarization of Lyman-(alpha) Radiation from Atomic Hydrogen Excited by Electron Impact from Near-Threshold to 1800eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, G. K.; Slevin, J. A.; Dziczek, D.

    1996-01-01

    The polarization of Lyman-(alpha) radiation, produced by electron impact excitation of atomic hydrogen, has been measured for the first time over the extended energy range from near-threshold to 1800eV. Measurements were obtained in a crossed-beams experiment using a silica-reflection linear polarization analyzer in tandem with a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) monochromator to isolate the emitted line radiation.

  17. Inverse Faraday Effect driven by Radiation Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Liseykina, T V; Macchi, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of extremely intense ($>10^{23}~\\mbox{W cm}^{-2}$), circularly polarized laser pulses with thick targets, theory and simulations show that a major fraction of the laser energy is converted into incoherent radiation because of collective electron motion during the "hole boring" dynamics. The effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of an axial magnetic field of tens of gigagauss value. This peculiar "inverse Faraday effect" is demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations including radiation friction.

  18. The 27-day versus 13.5-day variations in the solar Lyman-alpha radiation and the radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamorena, B. A.; Lastovicka, Jan; Rapoport, Z. TS.; Alberca, L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the question of solar periods in absorption, the pattern was studied of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation (the principal ionizing agent of the lower ionosphere) and of the radio wave absorption at five widely spaced places in Europe. When the solar Lyman-alpha flux variability is very well developed, then it dominates in the lower ionospheric variability. The most pronounced Lyman-alpha variation on time scale day-month is the solar rotation variation (about 27 days). When the Lyman-alpha variability is developed rather poorly, as it is typical for periods dominated by the 13.5 day variability, then the lower ionospheric variability appears to be dominated by variations of meteorological origin. The conclusions hold for all five widely spaced placed in Europe.

  19. Accelerated alpha-decay of 232U isotope achieved by exposure of its aqueous solution with gold nanoparticles to laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Simakin, A V

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on laser-induced accelerated alpha-decay of Uranium-232 nuclei under laser exposure of Au nanoparticles in aqueous solutions of its salt. It is demonstrated that the decrease of alpha-activity strongly depends on the peak intensity of the laser radiation in the liquid and is highest at several terawatt per square centimeter. The decrease of alpha-activity of the exposed solutions is accompanied by the deviation of gamma-activities of daughter nuclides of Uranium-232 from their equilibrium values. Possible mechanisms of the laser influence on the alpha-activity are discussed on the basis of the amplification of the electric field of laser wave on metallic nanoparticles.

  20. Effects of radiations on ornamental fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation is a process in which energetic particles or energetic waves travel through a medium or space. There are two distinct types of radiations: ionizing and non-ionizing. Ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays are some examples of radiation. 'Ornamental fish' is designed for aquatic hobbyists and the aquatic industry for several purposes. UV light has two primary uses in fish culture: Controlling green water and disinfecting the water supply. Many proponents of UV disinfection sometimes overlook the additional benefits relating to ornamental fish; those being that cleaner water reduces the stress on the fish by not having to fight off diseases, thus enhancing its immune system and leading to faster growth and more brilliant colors. Ultraviolet sterilizers are often used in aquaria to help control unwanted microorganisms in the water. UV radiation also ensures that exposed pathogens cannot reproduce, thus decreasing the likelihood of a disease outbreak in an aquarium. Despite of these benefits, the ill-effects of radiations cannot be ruled out. Ultraviolet Radiation-induced DNA Damage is seen in the skin of the Platyfish Xiphophorus. Higher radiation doses may cause the gastrointestinal syndrome that leads to defects of the intestinal mucosa barrier with successive contamination of musculature. Exposure to UV radiation can kill the fish and induce sublethal effects in embryos, larvae and adults. The change in skin includes irregularity of skin surface, epidermal oedema, necrosis etc. Irradiation may badly influence the textural attributes of fish muscle. (author)

  1. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects and genomic instability. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm would cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (orig.)

  2. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  3. The radioprotective effect and mechanism of captopril on radiation induced lung damage in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mi Hee; Lee, Kyung Ja; Koo, Hea Soo; Oh, Won Young [College of Medicine, Ewha Women Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    It was reported that Captopril (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor) had an effect to reduce the pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis induced by radiation in rat. We performed this study to investigate the radioprotective effect and mechanism of Captopril. The comparison was made between the radiation only group and the combined Captopril and radiation group by examining histopathologic findings and immunohistochemical stains (TNF {alpha} and TGF {beta}1) at 2 and 8 weeks after irradiation. Each group has 8 to 10 rats (Sprague-Dawley). 12.5 Gy of X-ray was irradiated to the left hemithorax in a single fraction. Captopril (50 mg/kg/d) mixed with water was given per oral and continuously from 1 week prior to irradiation up to 8th week of the experiment. In the combined Captopril and radiation group, the histopathologic changes which were hemorrhage into alveolar space, changes of alveolar epithelium, bronchial epithelium and blood vessels, and perivascular edema were less severe than in the radiation only group at 2 weeks. At 8 weeks, the alveolar epithelial changes and perivascular edema were less prominent in the combined Captopril and radiation group. At 2 weeks, the TNF {alpha} expression of the combined Captopril and radiation group was markedly decreased at the alveolar epithelium (p<0.01), lymphoid tissue (p=0.06) and the macrophage of alveolar space (p<0.01) compared with the radiation only group. Furthermore the TGF {beta}1 expression was significantly prominent at the alveolar epithelium (p<0.02) and the macrophage in alveolar space (p< 0.02). At 8 weeks, the expression of TNF {alpha} and TGF {beta} 1 of most sites, except TGF {beta}1 of the macrophage of alveolar space (p=0.09), showed no significant difference between 2 groups. This study revealed that early lung damage induced by irradiation was reduced with the addition of Captopril in the latent and early pneumonitis phase. The expression of TNF {alpha} and TGF {beta} 1 at 2 weeks and TGF {beta} 1 at

  4. Effect of pH on subunit association and heat protection of soybean alpha-galactosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J. E.; Sarikaya, A.; Herrmann, K. M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Soybeans contain the enzyme alpha-galactosidase, which hydrolyzes alpha-1, 6 linkages in stachyose and raffinose to give sucrose and galactose. We have found that galactose, a competitive product inhibitor of alpha-galactosidase, strongly promotes the heat stability of the tetrameric form of the enzyme at pH 4.0 and at temperatures of up to 70 degrees C for 60 min. Stachyose and raffinose also protect alpha-galactosidase from denaturation at pH 4.0 although to a lesser extent. Glucose and mannose have little effect. At pH 7.0 the enzyme is a monomer, and galactose has no effect on the heat stability of the enzyme. In the absence of heat protection of the enzyme by added sugars, a series deactivation mechanism was found to describe the deactivation data. In comparison, a unimolecular, non-first order deactivation model applies at pH 4.0, where heat protection effects were observed. At a temperature above 60 degrees C, simple deactivation is a suitable model. The results suggest that alpha-galactosidase conformation and heat stability are directly related.

  5. Radiation abuse and its effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper delves into overuse practiced in diagnostic radiography. The conventional attitudes to low-dose irradiation are critically examined, as is the MPD related to individual radiosensitivity. Concern is expressed that a sizeable proportion of radiologists ignore important aspects of the Code of Practice and this attitude is readily emulated in the hospital setting. The author advocates education within the medical profession and the community on the risks involved in radiation abuse and the benefits derived from justified exposures to x rays. (author)

  6. Biological effects and hazards of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis form the main risk to health from exposure to low levels of radiation. This risk effects can be at least qualitatively understood by considering the effects of radiation on cell DNA. Whilst exposure to high levels of radiation results in a number of identifiable effects, exposure to low levels of radiation may result in effects which only manifest themselves after many years. Risk estimates for low levels of radiation have been derived on the basis of a number of assumptions. In the case of uranium mine workers a major hazard arises from the inhalation of radon daughters. Whilst the correlation between radon daughter exposure and lung cancer incidence is well established, the numerical value of the risk factor is the subject of controversy. ICRP 50 gives a value of 10 cases per 106 person-years at risk per WLM (range 5-15 x 10-6 PYR-1 WLM-1). The effect of smoking on lung cancer incidence rates amongst miners is also controversial. Nevertheless, smoking by miners should be discouraged

  7. Predicting decay in free-radical concentration in L-. alpha. -alanine following high-LET radiation exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J.W. (Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)); Olsen, K.J. (University Hospital of Copenhagen, Herlev (Denmark))

    1989-01-01

    Efforts have been made to develop a model that will predict time-dependent decay in radiation-induced free-radical concentration in L-{alpha}-alanine following heavy-charged-particle exposures. The decay rate depends on radiation quality, dose and dose-rate. For low doses, the decay-rate is approx. 0.5 and 1.5% per year following {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray exposures and Linac-produced X-ray or electron exposures. Decay rates, however, have been found to increase as measured from low average doses, sparse single tracks, of heavy charged particles. We have compared measured decay after exposures to low average doses from high-LET particles with predicted decay calculated as function of particle velocity and charge and detector parameters. The predicted decay is obtained by folding measured decay after Linac-produced electron exposures of very high doses into the calculated dose distribution around the heavy ion's path. Preliminary results show agreement between the experimental data and results obtained from this model, within the experimental uncertainty. (author).

  8. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells.A wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was chosen as the biological target.As a parameter to quantify the sensibility of the target to radiation, the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 ) was observed. In our experimental condition a value of (60 ± 1) Gy was measured for LD50 with Dose Rate of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy/min. The method employed to show up the adaptive response phenomenon consisted in exposing the sample to low ''conditioning'' doses, which would initiate these mechanisms. Later the samples with and without conditioning were exposed to higher ''challenging'' doses (such as LD50), and the surviving fractions were compared. In order to maximize the differences, the doses and the time between irradiations were varied. The best results were obtained with both a conditioning dose of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy and a waiting time of 2 hs until the application of the challenging dose. Following this procedures the 80% of the conditioned samples has survived, after receiving the application of the LD50. The adaptive response phenomenon was also verified for a wide range of challenging doses

  9. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is utilized as a model system for studying dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the DNA of the epidermis, including strand breaks and thymine dimers, are measured and compared to the temporal and dose related aspects of tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molecular lesions are compared to split dose recovery as modified by sensitizers and type of radition of oncogenic damage.

  10. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skin is utilized as a model system for studying dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the DNA of the epidermis, including strand breaks and thymine dimers, are measured and compared to the temporal and dose related aspects of tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molecular lesions are compared to split dose recovery as modified by sensitizers and type of radition of oncogenic damage

  11. alpha. sub 2 -mediated effect of dopamine on the motility of the chicken esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Costa, G.; Benedito, S.; Garcia-Sacristan, L.R.A.; Orensanz, L. M. (Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain))

    1990-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), apomorphine and B-HT 933 produced dose related contractions on isolated longitudinal strips of chicken esophagus, whereas phenylephrine elicited no effect. DA induced contractions of myogenic origin, these contractions were insensitive to DA antagonists and were partially suppressed by yohimbine, which suggested an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic implication in this DA effect. This hypothesis was further investigated by performing binding experiments, in which B-HT 933 displaced the binding of ({sup 3}H) DA to esophageal homogenates. The results suggest the participation of an {alpha}{sub 2} - adrenergic receptor in the contractile response elicited by DA in the isolated chicken esophagus.

  12. Radiation effects on fiber-reinforced plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advances in the research on the latent deterioration caused by radiation, not leading to any change in static mechanical features for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) were reviewed aiming to assess a static mechanical characteristics of the epoxide resin, FRP. The deterioration of FRP due to radiation is known to be related to the radiation resistancy of its matrix. The bending strength of CFRP laminated with epoxide was determined as a function of radiation dose and tetraglycidyl-diaminodiphenyl methan (TGDDM) was found to be more resistant to radiation than diglycidyl ether of bisphenol (DGEBA). The bending strength was decreased by heat treatment at a higher temperature following the radiation in both CFRP. So, heat treatment was thought to be useful to detect the latent deterioration which fails to appear in any changes in static characteristics at room temperature. In addition, it is necessary to noninvasively observe the material with regard to the conditions to generate damages due to the fatigue. The results of three-point bending experiment show that when 3 different stressing; compression pressure, and shearing and stretching forces were loaded simultaneously, cracks develop easily. Further, electron radiation caused to increase water absorption of GFRP, suggesting that some damages developed on the interface of GFRP treated with silane coupling reagent might cause occurrence of crack. The latent deterioration due to radiation is detectable in part by estimation of water absorbance and heat treatment effects on FRP. (M.N.)

  13. ART^2 : Coupling Lyman-alpha Line and Multi-wavelength Continuum Radiative Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Zhu, Qirong; Abel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Narrow-band Lya line and broad-band continuum have played important roles in the discovery of high-redshift galaxies in recent years. Hence, it is crucial to study the radiative transfer of both Lya and continuum photons in the context of galaxy formation and evolution in order to understand the nature of distant galaxies. Here, we present a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, All-wavelength Radiative Transfer with Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART^2), which couples Lya line and multi-wavelength continuum, for the study of panchromatic properties of galaxies and interstellar medium. This code is based on the original version of Li et al., and features three essential modules: continuum emission from X-ray to radio, Lya emission from both recombination and collisional excitation, and ionization of neutral hydrogen. The coupling of these three modules, together with an adaptive refinement grid, enables a self-consistent and accurate calculation of the Lya properties. As an example, we apply ART^2...

  14. Phase I evaluation of radiation combined with recombinant interferon alpha-2A and BCNU for patients with high-grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine the safety, toxicity, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of carmustine (BCNU) and interferon alpha-2a (IFN-a) when combined with radiation as initial therapy in high-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed Grade 3 or 4 astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, or gliosarcoma were enrolled after surgery. All received radiation therapy to the brain (64.8 Gy/36 fractions), combined with a single dose of BCNU (200 mg/m2) at the start of radiation. Chemotherapy after completing radiation consisted of BCNU 150 mg/m2 once every 7 weeks, and IFN-a 12 x 106 units/m2 subcutaneously Days 1-3 each week of a 7-week cycle. Subsequent dose modification was based on constitutional symptoms for IFN-a and on myelosuppression for BCNU. Results: Fifteen patients were entered on the study. Four were excluded because they did not receive IFN-a (3 refused treatment and 1 patient left the study due to multiple medical problems). Eleven were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Nonhematological toxicity, mainly lethargy and flu-like symptoms, were dose-limiting for IFN-a. After the first 6 patients were treated per the initial protocol, the frequency of IFN-a administration was decreased to Days 1-3 on weeks 1, 3, and 5 of the 7-week cycle for 5 additional patients. Lethargy, fever, chills, myalgias, alopecia, and anorexia occurred in all patients. Other toxicities included nausea and vomiting (91%), central-nervous-system depression or mood changes (64%), headaches (55%), and elevation of liver enzymes (36%). Grade 3-4 leukopenia occurred in 4 (45%) of 11 patients, and Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia in 3 (27%) of 11 patients. Due to myelosuppressive effects, BCNU dose was not escalated. Median survival of the cohort was 44 months. Objective responses occurred in 5 (56%) of 9 patients and median duration of response was 33 months. The MTD of this combination after radiation therapy is IFN-a 12 x 106 units/m2 Days 1-3, on Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of

  15. Hot accretion disks with pairs: Effects of magnetic field and thermal cyclocsynchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    1994-01-01

    We show the effects of thermal cyclosynchrotron radiation and magnetic viscosity on the structure of hot, two-temperature accretion disks. Magnetic field, B, is assumed to be randomly oriented and the ratio of magnetic pressure to either gas pressure, alpha = P(sub mag)/P(sub gas), or the sum of the gas and radiation pressures, alpha = (P(sub mag)/P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)), is fixed. We find those effects do not change the qualitative properties of the disks, i.e., there are still two critical accretion rates related to production of e(sup +/-) pairs, (M dot)((sup U)(sub cr)) and (M dot)((sup L)(sub cr)), that affect the number of local and global disk solutions, as recently found by Bjoernsson and Svensson for the case with B = 0. However, a critical value of the alpha-viscosity parameter above which those critical accretion rates disappear becomes smaller than alpha(sub cr) = 1 found in the case of B = 0, for P(sub mag) = alpha(P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)). If P(sub mag) = alpha P(sub gas), on the other hand, alpha(sub cr) is still about unity. Moreover, when Comptonized cyclosynchrotron radiation dominates Comptonized bremsstrahlung, radiation from the disk obeys a power law with the energy spectral index of approximately 0.5, in a qualitative agreement with X-ray observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNS) and Galactic black hole candidates. We also extend the hot disk solutions for P(sub mag) = alpha(P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)) to the effectively optically thick region, where they merge with the standard cold disk solutions. We find that the mapping method by Bjoernsson and Svensson gives a good approximation to the disk structure in the hot region and show where it breaks in the transition region. Finally, we find a region in the disk parameter space with no solutions due to the inability of Coulomb heating to supply enough energy to electrons.

  16. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references

  17. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references.

  18. Radiation effects on DNA methylation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of ionizing radiation on DNA methylation in liver, brain and spleen were examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total methylated cytosine level in the genome was reduced within 8 hours after 3.8 Gy of irradiation in liver of adult mice. But no appreciable effect was observed in brain and spleen. When mice were irradiated at newborn, liver DNA revealed no change in methylated cytosine level. Even though slight effects of radiation were detected in he methylation of the c-myc and c-fos genes, they were only temporary and no long-term effects were observed. These data suggest that the effect of radiation on DNA methylation in vivo is not prevailing a DNA damage, but rather influenced much through biological parameters. (author)

  19. Effect of sexual steroids upon ontogeny of alpha-amylase of rat parotid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavia, S L; Sanz, E G; Vermouth, N T; Blanco, A

    1982-04-30

    The effect of gonadectomy (at the 10th day of life) and treatment with sexual steroids (during the first month) upon development of alpha-amylase activity in rat parotid gland has been studied. Alpha-amylase specific activity of parotid glands from 20-day-old orchidectomized rats and from 25-day-old ovariectomized animals was significantly higher than that of intact male and female rats of the same age respectively. Spayed males treated with testosterone (10 microgram/day on the 13th, 15th, and 17th day) and ovariectomized rats treated with oestradiol (2.5 microgram/day from the 16th to the 22nd day) showed values of enzymic activity similar to those of normal animals. Results indicate that oestradiol and testosterone have an inhibitory effect upon the increase of alpha-amylase activity in parotid gland during a very defined period of development. PMID:6178953

  20. Effects of alpha particle transport driven by Alfvenic instabilities on proposed burning plasma scenarios on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consistency of proposed burning plasma scenarios with Alfvenic instabilities driven by alpha particles is investigated. If the alpha particle pressure is above the threshold for resonant excitation of Energetic Particle driven Modes (EPMs), significant modification of the alpha particle pressure profile can take place. Model simulations are performed using the Hybrid MHD-Gyrokinetic Code (HMGC) retaining relevant thermal-plasma parameters, safety factor and alpha particle pressure profiles. ITER monotonic-q and reversed-shear scenarios are considered. A 'hybrid' ITER scenario is also studied and quantitatively compared with the previous ones. We find that, unlike the latter, the former equilibria are unstable. Nonlinear effects on the alpha-particle pressure profile result, however, to be negligible for the monotonic-q case. They can instead be relevant for the reversed-shear scenario. The assessment of such a conclusion requires further investigations concerning the possibility that the strong EPM instability is regulated, in realistic conditions, by nonlinear effects of weaker Alfven modes. (author)

  1. Anti-apoptotic effects of Z alpha1-antitrypsin in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, C M

    2010-05-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency is a genetic disease which manifests as early-onset emphysema or liver disease. Although the majority of alpha(1)-AT is produced by the liver, it is also produced by bronchial epithelial cells, amongst others, in the lung. Herein, we investigate the effects of mutant Z alpha(1)-AT (ZAAT) expression on apoptosis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) and delineate the mechanisms involved. Control, M variant alpha(1)-AT (MAAT)- or ZAAT-expressing cells were assessed for apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, phosphorylation of Bad, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and induced expression of a selection of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Expression of ZAAT in 16HBE14o- cells, like MAAT, inhibited basal and agonist-induced apoptosis. ZAAT expression also inhibited caspase-3 activity by 57% compared with control cells (p = 0.05) and was a more potent inhibitor than MAAT. Whilst ZAAT had no effect on the activity of Bad, its expression activated NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression above control or MAAT-expressing cells. In 16HBE14o- cells but not HEK293 cells, ZAAT upregulated expression of cIAP-1, an upstream regulator of NF-kappaB. cIAP1 expression was increased in ZAAT versus MAAT bronchial biopsies. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which ZAAT may promote human bronchial epithelial cell survival.

  2. Effects of Alpha- Tocopherol on the Velocity of Low Density Lipoprotein Oxidation by Cupric Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ghaffari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nWe studied the effect of different concentrations of alpha-tocopherol on in vitro cupric ions induced oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDL. Human native LDL (50 µg protein/ml oxidation was induced by 10 µmol/L of CuSO4. Conjugated dienes were measured spectrophotometrically for up to 440 minutes. The length of the lag phase (Tlag, maximum velocity of the reaction (Vmax and the maximum amount of generated dienes were obtained from kinetic data. Alpha-tocopherol increased Tlag and decreased Vmax with a dependence upon concentration (0-100 µmol/L. There was no difference between the Dmax obtained with cupric ions alone or in the presence of the various concentrations of alpha-tocopherol. The results suggest that alpha-tocopherol may decrease free radicals presence in LDL and thus decrease velocity of LDL oxidation by cupric ions. This mechanism may be a reason for alpha-tocopherol effect in ameliorating atherosclerosis.

  3. The effects of alpha/theta neurofeedback on personality and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Joshua; Varney, Carolyn; Parkinson, Lesley A; Gruzelier, John H

    2005-05-01

    Alpha/theta neurofeedback has been shown to be successful both in treating addictions and in enhancing artistry in music students. How its effects are mediated are not yet clear. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that alpha/theta neurofeedback works inter alia by normalising extreme personality and raising feelings of well being. 12 participants with high scores for Withdrawal (as measured by the PSQ) were given either alpha/theta neurofeedback or mock feedback and their personality and mood were assessed. Withdrawal scores on the PSQ-80 were not found to change in either group but significant effects were found for the Profile Of Mood States (POMS), with real feedback producing higher overall scores than mock feedback (P = 0.056). Real feedback caused participants to feel significantly more energetic (P < 0.01) than did mock feedback. Sessions of real feedback made participants feel more composed (P < 0.01), agreeable (P < 0.01), elevated (P < 0.01) and confident (P < 0.05), whilst sessions of mock feedback made participants feel more tired (P < 0.05), yet composed (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that, whilst 9 sessions of alpha/theta neurofeedback was insufficient to change personality, improvements in mood may provide a partial explanation for the efficacy of alpha/theta neurofeedback. PMID:15820636

  4. Scattered Lyman-alpha radiation of comet 2012/S1 (ISON) observed by SUMER/SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Curdt, W; Vincent, J -B; Solanki, S K; Schühle, U; Teriaca, L

    2014-01-01

    During its sungrazing perihelion passage, comet ISON appeared in the field of view of the SUMER spectrometer and allowed unique observations at far-ultraviolet wavelengths with high spatial and temporal resolution. We report results of these observations completed on November 28, 2013, when the comet was only 2.82 R_Sun away from the Sun. Our data show the arrow-shaped dust tail in Ly-$\\alpha$ emission trailing behind the predicted position of the nucleus, but offset from the trajectory. We interpret the emission as sunlight that is scattered at micron-sized dust particles. We modeled the dust emission and dynamics to reproduce the appearance of the tail. We were unable to detect any signature of cometary gas or plasma around the expected position of the nucleus and conclude that the outgassing processes must have stopped before the observation started. Moreover, the model we used to reproduce the observed dust tail needs a sharp fall-off of the dust production hours before perihelion transit. We compare the ...

  5. Measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new method for measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers on a nanosecond timescale. The method, which incorporates a streak camera, allows more precise time resolution than other methods and has the advantage of measuring the radiation-induced attenuation as a function of wavelength and time simultaneously. By choosing different light sources and sweep speeds, radiation-induced attenuation may be measured under a variety of experimental configurations. Examples of the type of output obtained with our method are given

  6. Effect of gamma radiation on Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, J.D.; Maxcy, R.B.

    Radiation resistance of Campylobacter jejuni in broth, ground beef, and ground turkey meat was determined using dose levels from 0-200 Krad at -30 +/- 10/sup 0/C, at 0-5/sup 0/C, and at 30 +/- 10/sup 0/C. Irradiation at -30/sup 0/C increased radiation resistance of cultures in ground meats; broth cultures were not greatly influenced by temperature. The effect of culture age on radiation resistance was also evaluated using cells in various physiological phases. Age did not have a pronounced effect on radiation resistance. The largest D/sub 10/ value for C. jejuni was 32 Krad, which was less than D/sub 10/ values commonly reported for salmonellae. 20 references, 4 figures.

  7. Radiation effects on the integrity of paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Books and documents attacked by fungi and insects have already been treated by radiation for disinfestations purposes. However, there is still need to investigate the influence of radiation on the cellulose paper structure. The aim of this research was to study the effects of radiation on paper properties, especially those related to strength and appearance. Paper sheets for this study were prepared in the laboratory, using bleached eucalyptus pulp as raw material. No additives were used to concentrate the attention only on the effects of irradiation on the pure cellulose matrix. The samples were irradiated at IPEN's 60Co Gammacell irradiator with six radiation doses, from 3 to 15 kGy at the dose rate 0.817 Gy/s. The properties of paper sheets were tested after irradiation and compared with unirradiated samples according to ISO methods. No significant changes were detected in paper samples irradiated up to 15 kGy.

  8. The acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation of mouse skin and the factors affecting the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several problems regarding acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation were investigated in order to clarify protection problems of localised doses to the skin. A study into the acute biological effects of different energy beta emitters and the effects of energy and area on the response showed direct relationships between these criteria for a range of different acute responses with different time courses. Three different types of acute response were found and these are described as 'moist desquamation', 'acute ulceration' and 'acute epidermal necrosis'. An unexpected finding was that the lower energy beta emitter 170Tm was as efficient at inducing scab formation as the higher energy 90Sr sources for the same area of exposure. Experiments using 2x4 cm2 exposures to 224Cm alpha particles showed that the response to this poorly penetrating radiation was minimal after doses as high as 180 Gy measured at 10 μm into the skin. In comparison, large area exposure to 170Tm produced areas of prolonged scabbing after doses up to 100 Gy. However, the intensity of the reaction varied between strains. (author)

  9. Internal {alpha} activity: localisation, compositional associations and effects on OSL signals in quartz approaching {beta} saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbidge, C.I. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal)], E-mail: christoph@itn.pt; Dias, M.I.; Prudencio, M.I. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal); Rebelo, L.P. [DGM, INETI, Departamento de Geologia Marinha, Alfragide (Portugal); Cardoso, G. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal); Brito, P. [DGM, INETI, Departamento de Geologia Marinha, Alfragide (Portugal)

    2009-05-15

    Luminescence signals from hydrofluoric acid etched grains of quartz from Mozambican dunes were investigated in terms of elemental impurities, structural defects, and their relationship to internal {alpha} activity, to examine the potential for this to cause differences in signal levels obtainable from natural and laboratory irradiated samples. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) indicated the presence of various types of quartz and mineralogical inclusions. A spatial association of Th and U with Fe in structural defects was observed. Fe concentrations and inclusion sizes indicated that internal {alpha} dose rate would affect the defects that contained these impurities, but would be insignificant to the bulk quartz. A broad range of optically sensitive thermoluminescence (TL) peaks were observed from this material, and indicated a preheating regime of 260 deg. C for 30 s to minimise effects of the observed inclusions and defects on absorbed dose determinations by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Growth in OSL with dose from etched coarse grains preheated in this way approached saturation by 332 Gy of {beta} irradiation ({sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y) and by 4 kGy of {alpha} irradiation (E {approx} 3.5 MeV: approximate natural soil spectrum average, using converted dose rate from {sup 241}Am). This indicated {alpha}-efficiency (k{sub eff}) at saturation of less than 0.08. However, the OSL decay curves contained a small 'medium' component. Structural defects introduced by milling the grains produced a larger 'medium' component with a similar decay rate under optical stimulation, which exhibited high saturation doses (>32 kGy{alpha}, >8.4 kGy{beta}) and {alpha}-efficiency (k{sub eff} = 0.34). Maximum dose normalised OSL signals from the milled material greatly exceeded those obtainable from the whole etched grains. It is inferred that the presence of structural

  10. Interdependence of the radioprotective effects of human recombinant interleukin 1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and murine recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are molecularly distinct cytokines acting on separate receptors. The release of these cytokines can be concomitantly induced by the same signal and from the same cellular source, suggesting that they may cooperate. Administered alone, human recombinant (hr)IL-1 alpha and hrTNF alpha protect lethally irradiated mice from death, whereas murine recombinant GM-CSF and hrG-CSF do not confer similar protection. On a dose basis, IL-1 alpha is a more efficient radioprotector than TNF alpha. At optimal doses, IL-1 alpha is a more radioprotective cytokine than TNF alpha in C57BL/6 and B6D2F1 mice and less effective than TNF alpha in C3H/HeN mice, suggesting that the relative effectiveness of TNF alpha and IL-1 alpha depends on the genetic makeup of the host. Administration of the two cytokines in combination results in additive radioprotection in all three strains. This suggests that the two cytokines act through different radioprotective pathways and argues against their apparent redundancy. Suboptimal, nonradioprotective doses of IL-1 alpha also synergize with GM-CSF or G-CSF to confer optimal radioprotection, suggesting that such an interaction may be necessary for radioprotection of hemopoietic progenitor cells

  11. Influence of thermal barrier effect of grain boundaries on bulk cascades in alpha-zirconium revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yanan; Lai, Wensheng

    2016-03-01

    The effect of grain boundaries (GBs) on bulk cascades in nano-structured alpha-zirconium has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It turns out that the existence of GBs increases the defect productivity in grains, suggesting that the GBs may act as a thermal barrier and postpone the annihilation of defects within grains. Moreover, it is found that the thermal barrier effect of GBs facilitates the shift of symmetric tilt GBs to the grain with higher temperature, and the smaller the tilt angle is, the easier the boundary shift will be. Thus, the influence of GBs on radiation damage in the nano-structured materials comes from the competition between damage increase in grains and defect annihilation at GBs.

  12. Additive effects of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A xenon-mercury high pressure lamp and a double monochromator were used to produce ultraviolet (uv) radiation at 295 nm. Pigmented rabbit eyes were irradiated and evaluated by slitlamp biomicroscopy. Corneal threshold (Hc) was 0.05 J.cm-2 and lens threshold (hL) was 0.75 J.cm-2. Other eyes were irradiated with 2 Hc and evaluated from 4 to 24 h at 4 h intervals. Corneal damage was only greater than that expected from a single Hc exposure if the separation between the two Hc exposures did not exceed 8 h. The most repeatable and reliable corneal response to these levels of uv was the development of corneal epithelial granules

  13. Effect of alpha-radiolysis on the dissolution of UO2 doped with alpha emitters under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The α emissions constitute almost entirely the radiation field of spent nuclear fuel after 500 years in a geological repository. In this work the effect of α-radiolysis on the fuel dissolution in the near field was studied. Pellets of UO2 doped with 10% wt. and 0.1% wt. of ''238 Pu (α-emitter) were prepared using a solgel method which provides homogenous distribution of the dopant in the UO2 matrix. The sintered materials were extensively characterized. Static leaching tests on these materials were carried out under anoxic conditions in deaerated water at room temperature. The results show that the uranium release from the matrix increase for the higher dopant concentration. Under the experimental conditions used it was difficult to observe a clear radiolysis effect on dissolution of the material containing 0.1% wt. of ''238 Pu. In order to study the radiation damage due to α decay in the fluorite type lattice of the UO2, the variation of the lattice parameter as a function of time was measured. An increase of the lattice parameter of approx 0,2% was observed after 1,5 months of storage in the UO2 doped with 10% wt. of plutonium. In the case of the UO2 doped with 0,1% wt. ''238 Pu, the lattice parameter did not vary significantly during the same time interval. The possible effects of damage accumulation on UO2 dissolution are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  14. Thorotrast and in vivo thorium dioxide: numerical simulation of 30 years of alpha radiation absorption by the tissues near a large compact source

    CERN Document Server

    Bianconi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background: The epidemiology of the slightly radioactive contrast agent named Thorotrast presents a very long latency period between the injection and the development of the related pathologies. It is an example of the more general problem posed by a radioactive internal contaminant whose effects are not noteworthy in the short term but become dramatic in the long period. A point that is still to be explored is fluctuations (in space and time) in the localized absorption of radiation by the tissues. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation code has been developed to study over a 30 year period the daily absorption of alpha radiation by micrometer sized portions of tissue placed at a distance of 0-100 micrometers from a model source, that approximates a compact thorium dioxide source in liver or spleen whose size is larger or equal to 20 micrometers. The biological depletion of the daughter nuclei of the thorium series is taken into account. The initial condition assumes chemically purified natural thorium. Results: ...

  15. Radiation effects in the orthophosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Alkiviathes

    Monazite-structure orthophosphates, including LaPOsb4,\\ PrPOsb4,\\ NdPOsb4,\\ SmPOsb4,\\ EuPOsb4,\\ GdPOsb4, and natural monazite, and their zircon-structure analogues, including, ScPOsb4,\\ YPOsb4,\\ TbPOsb4,\\ TmPOsb4,\\ YbPOsb4, and LuPOsb4 were irradiated by 800 KeV Kr ions over the temperature range of 20 to 600 K. The critical amorphization dose was determined in-situ in the electron microscope using selected-area electron diffraction. The monazite-structure compounds, in general, had lower critical amorphization temperatures. Within each structure, the critical amorphization temperature, Tsb{c}, increased with the atomic number of the A-site cation. Structural topology models were insufficient to explain all of the observed differences, however, the ratio of the electronic-to-nuclear stopping powers showed good correlation with the susceptibility to amorphization at elevated temperatures. The variation in the Tsb{c} because of thermal annealing in geologic samples was calculated for the case of uranium in zircon. Equations used to calculate the critical amorphization temperatures were combined with the standard radioactive decay equation to calculate the alpha-decay event dose required for amorphization in terms of a "critical radioelement concentration", Nsb{c}. This allows the prediction of whether or not a mineral will be metamict given the age, radioelement concentration, and ambient temperature. Calculated values of Nsb{c} show good agreement with the previously estimated values for a suite of zircons from Sri Lanka. Ion-beam-amorphized orthophosphates, including fluorapatite, were irradiated by an 80 to 300 keV electron beam in the transmission electron microscope at temperatures between 100 and 800 K. Bright field imaging and selected-area electron diffraction were used to monitor the microstructural evolution. Amorphous LaPOsb4 and ScPOsb4 crystallized to form a randomly oriented polycrystalline assemblage of the same composition as the original

  16. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma rays. There is however, another type of less well-known radiation - charged ion particles, and these atoms stripped of electrons, have different physical properties to the photons of electromagnetic radiation. They are either found in space or created on earth by particle collider facilities, and are of significant recent interest due to their enhanced effectiveness and increasing use in cancer radiotherapy, as well as a health risk to the growing number of people spending time in the space environment. Although there is to date, relatively few studies on the effects of charged particles on the vascular system, a very different picture of the biological effects of these particles compared to photons is beginning to emerge. These under researched biological effects of ion particles have a large impact on the health consequences of exposure. In this short review, we will discuss the effects of charged particles on an important biological process of the vascular system, angiogenesis, which creates and maintains the vasculature and is highly important in tumor vasculogenesis. PMID:24160185

  17. The radiation effects on the living cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is a presentation of particular points discussed during the colloquium of the 15-18 june 1999, for which scientific researches are performed at the CEA/CNRS. They deal with the radiobiology, for the radiation effects on living matter; with the DNA, for the knowledge and repair mechanisms on cells submitted to ionizing radiations; with the exposition to UV in correlation with neoplasms; with the P53 gene which is a tumour suppressor. (A.L.B.)

  18. Evidence for beneficial low level radiation effects and radiation hormesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low doses in the mGy range cause a dual effect on cellular DNA. One effect concerns a relatively low probability of DNA damage per energy deposition event and it increases proportional with dose, with possible bystander effects operating. This damage at background radiation exposure is orders of magnitudes lower than that from endogenous sources, such as ROS. The other effect at comparable doses brings an easily obeservable adaptive protection against DNA damage from any, mainly endogenous sources, depending on cell type, species, and metabolism. Protective responses express adaptive responses to metabolic perturbations and also mimic oxygen stress responses. Adaptive protection operates in terms of DNA damage prevention and repair, and of immune stimulation. It develops with a delay of hours, may last for days to months, and increasingly disappears at doses beyond about 100 to 200 mGy. Radiation-induced apoptosis and terminal cell differentiation occurs also at higher doses and adds to protection by reducing genomic instability and the number of mutated cells in tissues. At low doses, damage reduction by adaptive protection against damage from endogenous sources predictably outweighs radiogenic damage induction. The analysis of the consequences of the particular low-dose scenario shows that the linear-no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis for cancer risk is scientifically unfounded and appears to be invalid in favor of a threshold or hormesis. This is consistent with data both from animal studies and human epidemiological observations on low-dose induced cancer. The LNT hypothesis should be abandoned and be replaced by a hypothesis that is scientifically justified. The appropriate model should include terms for both linear and non-linear response probabilities. Maintaining the LNT-hypothesis as basis for radiation protection causes unressonable fear and expenses. (author)

  19. OSL and TL in LiF:Mg,Ti following alpha particle and beta ray irradiation: Application to mixed-field radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) following irradiation by beta and alpha particles was investigated by the measurement of the excitation and emission spectra of OSL and comparison with thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics. Measurements were also carried out on nominally pure LiF monocrystals. The preferential excitation of OSL compared to TL following high-ionisation density (HID) alpha irradiation is naturally explained via the identification of OSL with the 'two-hit' F2 or F3+ centre, whereas the major component of composite TL glow peak 5 is believed to arise from a 'one-hit' complex defect. This discovery allows near-total discrimination between HID radiation and low-ionisation density radiation and may have significant potential in mixed-field radiation dosimetry. (authors)

  20. Biological effect of radiation on human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved

  1. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  2. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  3. Medical exposure and the effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation gives cracks to genes. The influence is divided into deterministic effect with a threshold value, and the stochastic effect (tumor and genetic effect) which increases according to the exposure amount. Although we are put to various non-artificial radiations, which we cannot be avoided, on the earth, the contamination by artificial radiation can be defended. Artificial radioactive exposure includes medical exposure and non-medical exposure for example by nuclear power plant. As to medical examinations using radiation, the inquiry about the radiation exposure is increasing after the occurrence of the first nuclear power plant disaster of Fukushima. While concern about non-medical radioactive exposure increases, the uneasiness to medical irradiation is also increasing. The dose limit by artificial radioactive exposure other than medical exposure is set up in order to prevent the influence on the health. While the dose limit of the public exposure is set to the lower value than the total dose of non-artificial exposure concerning of a safety margin for all people, the dose limit of medical exposure is not defined, since it is thought that medical irradiation has a benefit for those who receive irradiation. Making an effort to decrease the radiation dose in performing the best medical treatment is the responsibility with which we are burdened. (author)

  4. Yields of Gamma- and X-Ray Radiation of Alpha-Decays of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise knowledge of gamma- and X-rays emission probabilities of uranium isotopes is vital for accurate gamma-spectrometric determination of the isotopic composition and quantity of uranium. The peak intensity ratio methods employing high resolution gammaspectrometry and intrinsic efficiency calibration approach are known to provide most accurate and reliable isotopic information. When applied to unshielded and moderately shielded material, these methods largely benefit from de-convolution of the 90-100 keV narrow spectral interval, which contains intense gamma- and X-ray lines of major uranium isotopes 235U and 238U. These are the 92.37 keV and 92.79 keV gamma-rays of 238U/234Th, and the 93.35 keV ThKα1 X-rays from alpha-decay of 235U. Although the emission probability ratios of these lines were accurately established, their absolute yields are still lacking accuracy. For instance, as resulted from recent study, the yields of 234Th lines become corrected by 30%, compared with their previous values. This consequently raised a question regarding validity of the yield data for the 93.35 keV line of 235U and triggered the present experimental study. This study was later extended to the reexamination of emission probabilities of other 235U gamma-lines with energies above 205 keV. The experimental data used in the current work was collected using SRM 969 and CRM 146 reference uranium samples. (author)

  5. Real-time, automated characterization of surfaces for alpha and beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new data collection system, called ABACUS trademark, has been developed that automates and expedites the collection, conversion, and reporting of radiological survey data of surfaces. Field testing of the system by Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Environmental Technology Section is currently underway. Preliminary results are presented. The system detects, discriminates, and separately displays the results for alpha and beta contamination scans on floors and walls with a single pass. Fixed-position static counting is also possible for quantitative measuring. The system is currently configured with five 100 cm2 dual-phosphor plastic scintillation detectors mounted in a lightweight aluminum fixture that holds the detectors in a fixed array. ABACUS trademark can be configured with other detectors if desired. Ratemeter/scalars traditionally coupled to individual detectors have been replaced by a single unit that houses the power supply and discriminator circuit boards to support up to five detectors. The system is designed to be used by a single operator. Each detector's position and data are transmitted once per second and recorded on a nearby laptop computer. The data are converted to appropriate units, color-coded, and mapped to display graphically the findings for each detector in real-time. Reports can be generated immediately following the survey. Survey data can be exported in a variety of formats. Benefits of ABACUS trademark are: (1) immediate feedback to decision makers using the observational approach to characterization or remediation, (2) thorough documentation of survey results, (3) increased statistical confidence in scans by recording counts every second, (4) reduced paperwork and elimination of transcription errors, and (5) time and cost savings for collection, conversion, mapping, evaluating, and reporting data over traditional methods

  6. Effects of radiation on aquatic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the onset of nuclear age, nuclear fuel cycle products, nuclear medicine techniques, disposal of radio active wastes on land or in water, fall out of testing nuclear weapons has contributed large amount of radio nuclides to the water bodies. Radio nuclides can imbalance aquatic ecosystem resulting in danger to natural life. The biological effects of radiation on aquatic life are mortality, pathophysiological, reproductive, developmental and genetic changes. A broad review of the results obtained about the aquatic organisms related to different phyla indicates that the lower or less developed or more primitive organisms are more resistant than the higher or more advanced, developed and complex organisms to ionizing radiation. The algae, protozoa are more resistant than the insects, crustaceans, molluscs and fishes. The changes in sensitivity between different stages of development have also been noted. A review of the results of exposing salmonoid gametes, eggs, fingerlings and adults to X-rays supports the concepts that radio sensitivity decreases with age. This paper presents a selective review on effects of radiation and radio nuclides on the aquatic life. It include uses and sources of radiation, effective quantity of radiation, lethal and sub lethal effect, effects on survival, growth, reproduction, behaviour, metabolism, carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. (author)

  7. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Naoki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kubota, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kubota-cbu@umin.ac.jp [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kosaka, Kentarou; Akita, Shinsuke; Sasahara, Yoshitarou; Kira, Tomoe [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kuroda, Masayuki [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Bujo, Hideaki [Department of Clinical-Laboratory and Experimental-Research Medicine, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura-shi, Chiba, #285-8741 (Japan); Satoh, Kaneshige [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings.

  8. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings

  9. The effects of ionizing radiation and review of the Young-Woollard document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of a document entitled 'The Health Dangers of Uranium Mining and Jurisdictional Questions' has been prepared. E.R. Young and R.F. Woollard submitted, in 1980, this document to the British Columbia Royal Commission of Inquiry, Health and Environmental Protection - Uranium Mining (INIS-mf--7757). When we reviewed the document it became clear that the views concerning effects of low-level radiation including alpha irradiation do not have scientific consensus. For this reason we have included a brief summary of conclusions produced by various international and national bodies on the effects of radiation on humans

  10. A study of the antioxidant effect of alpha lipoic acids on sperm quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Fatimah Ibrahim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assisted reproductive techniques are useful in helping infertile couples achieve successful conception. Initial studies have shown that sperm cryopreservation, one step in assisted reproduction, causes a dramatic reduction in sperm quality. This has been attributed to, among other things, free radical activities. The aim of the present study was to minimize this oxidative attack by adding an antioxidant into the sperm microenvironment. Alpha lipoic acids were selected for this purpose for their efficient free radical scavenging properties and solubility in lipid and aqueous phases. METHODS: For this investigation, semen from six Boer bucks was pooled. Seminal analysis of the baseline prior to incubation of samples with different concentrations of Alpha lipoic acids (0.00625, 0.0125, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1 mmol/ml was performed, and post-seminal analysis was conducted after a one-hour incubation. The comet assay was used to observe the effect of Alpha lipoic acids on sperm DNA integrity. Statistical analysis using an unpaired t-test with a significance level of p<0.05 was then performed. RESULTS: Our results indicate that the sperm motility rate was improved after incubation with Alpha lipoic acids at a concentration of 0.02 mmol/ml. This concentration was also capable of reducing DNA damage. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, Alpha lipoic acids renders cryoprotection to sperm, thereby improving sperm quality.

  11. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hamilton, Allister B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  12. Effect of alpha-tocopherol on bone formation during distraction osteogenesis: a rabbit model

    OpenAIRE

    Kurklu, Mustafa; Yildiz, Cemil; Kose, Ozkan; Yurttas, Yuksel; Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Serdar, Muhittin; Deveci, Salih

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of alpha-tocopherol on distraction osteogenesis. Materials and methods Right tibias of 30 New Zealand white rabbits were distracted at a rate of 0.5 mm/day for 20 days with a circular external fixator. Experimental group rabbits (n = 15) were administered i.m. 20 mg/kg/day alpha-tocopherol for 30 days. Radiographic examinations were performed at the 20th, 30th and 40th days. Bone scintigraphy was performed at the 5th and 20th days....

  13. Effect of 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitor on Storage Symptoms in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Kang Jun; Kang, Se Hee; Kim, Hyo Sin; Koh, Jun Sung; Kim, Joon Chul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Many patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have storage symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor (5ARI) on storage symptoms in patients with BPH. Methods This study was conducted in 738 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to BPH. Patients with a prostate volume of higher than 30 mL on the transrectal ultrasound were classified into two groups: group A, in which an alpha blocker was solely ad...

  14. [Effect of adrenal stress on activity of proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhina, L M; Kaliman, P A

    1994-01-01

    The effect of adrenal stress on the proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor activities in blood serum and cytosols of the rat organs were investigated. The reliable change was marked only in the alpha-1-PI level research of lung tissue cytosol. The proteolysis suppression was revealed in the heart and kidney tissue, while the proteolysis activation was revealed in serum and less in the lung tissue cytosol. Changes in proteinase level in the myocardium and kidney tissue play the primary role in respect to those of the other research liquids under study. PMID:7747353

  15. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  16. Magnetoconvection and dynamo coefficients Dependence of the alpha-effect on rotation and magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ossendrijver, M; Brandenburg, A

    2001-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of three-dimensional compressible magnetoconvection in a rotating rectangular box that represents a section of the solar convection zone. The box contains a convectively unstable layer, surrounded by stably stratified layers with overshooting convection. The magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, is chosen subcritical, thus excluding spontaneous growth of the magnetic field through dynamo action, and the magnetic energy is maintained by introducing a constant magnetic field into the box, once convection has attained a statistically stationary state. Under the influence of the Coriolis force, the advection of the magnetic field results in a non-vanishing contribution to the mean electric field, given by uxb. From this electric field, we calculate the alpha-effect, separately for the stably and the unstably stratified layers, by averaging over time and over suitably defined volumes. From the variation of alpha we derive an error estimate, and the dependence of alpha on rotation and magne...

  17. The synergetic effect of starch and alpha amylase on the biodegradation of n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, M; Biria, D

    2016-06-01

    The impact of adding soluble starch on biodegradation of n-alkanes (C10-C14) by Bacillus subtilis TB1 was investigated. Gas chromatography was employed to measure the residual hydrocarbons in the system. It was observed that the efficiency of biodegradation improved with the presence of starch and the obtained residual hydrocarbons in the system were 53% less than the samples without starch. The produced bacterial enzymes were studied through electrophoresis and reverse zymography for explaining the observations. The results indicated that the produced amylase by the bacteria can degrade hydrocarbons and the same was obtained by the application of a commercial alpha amylase sample. In addition, in silico docking of alpha-amylase with n-alkanes with different molecular weights was studied by Molegro virtual docker which showed high negative binding energies and further substantiated the experimental observations. Overall, the findings confirmed the catalytic effect of alpha amylase on n-alkanes degradation. PMID:26971168

  18. Combustion synthesis and effects of processing parameters on physical properties of {alpha}-alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, M.V.; Hirschfeld, D.A.; Shea, L.E.

    2000-01-04

    Fine particle porous {alpha}-alumina has been prepared by a wet chemical method of combustion synthesis using an aqueous precursor containing aluminum nitrate (oxidizer) and carbohydrazide, an organic fuel as starting materials. The aluminum nitrate and carbohydrazide were reacted exothermically at 400--600 C. The synthesis of {alpha}-alumina ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was used as a model for understanding the effects of processing parameters on physical properties such as surface area, average pore size, and residual carbon content. The porous powders were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), BET surface area analysis and elemental analysis. The decomposition of the starting materials was investigated using differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TGA). It has been shown that the furnace temperature, fuel/oxidizer ratio, and precursor water content can be tailored to produce powders with different physical properties.

  19. A calorimetric study of solute effects on the kinetic stability of alpha-amylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren Nymand; Andersen, Kim Bruno; Øgendal, Lars Holm;

    2009-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the applications of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to Study solute effects on the kinetics of irreversible protein denaturation. More specifically, denaturation of Bacillus Halmapalus alpha-amylase (BHA) was initiated by addition of EDTA to the calorimetric cell...

  20. Alpha particle effects as a test domain for PAP, a Plasma Apprentice Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of computational tool under development, employing techniques of symbolic computation and artificial intelligence to automate as far as possible the research activities of a human plasma theorist, is described. Its present and potential uses are illustrated using the area of the theory of alpha particle effects in fusion plasmas as a sample domain. (orig.)

  1. Health effects of low level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1982, Prof. Thomas Don Luckey of Missouri Univ. asserted 'Radiation Hormesis' on the Journal of Health Physics and he published two books. CRIEPI initiated the research program on Radiation Hormesis following his assertion to confirm 'is it true or not?' After nearly ten year research activities on data surveys and animal tests with many Universities, we are realizing scientific truth of bio-positive effects by low level radiation exposures. The interesting bio-positive effects we found could be categorized in following five groups. 1) Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 2) Moderation of psychological stress through response of key enzymes, 3) Suppression and therapy of adult-diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, 4) Suppression of cancer through enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes, 5) Suppression of cancer and ratio-adaptive response by activation of DNA repair and apoptosis. In the responses of many specialists to our initiation of radiation hormesis research program following T.D. Luckey's claim about low level radiation, I have to pick up for the first, the great success of Prof. Sakamoto. Prof. Sakamoto had been already applying whole body low dose irradiation for ten years before our radiation hormesis research started on the therapy to suppress the cancer reappearing after treatment. He reported about his successful trial to real patients and showed an enhancement of immune system. (author)

  2. Effect of radiation processing on meat tenderisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatt, Sweetie R.; Chawla, S. P.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The effect of radiation processing (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on the tenderness of three types of popularly consumed meat in India namely chicken, lamb and buffalo was investigated. In irradiated meat samples dose dependant reduction in water holding capacity, cooking yield and shear force was observed. Reduction in shear force upon radiation processing was more pronounced in buffalo meat. Protein and collagen solubility as well as TCA soluble protein content increased on irradiation. Radiation processing of meat samples resulted in some change in colour of meat. Results suggested that irradiation leads to dose dependant tenderization of meat. Radiation processing of meat at a dose of 2.5 kGy improved its texture and had acceptable odour.

  3. Properties of para-terphenyl as detector for alpha, beta and gamma radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Angelone, M; Bellini, F; Bocci, V; Collamati, F; De Lucia, E; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Marafini, M; Materazzo, D; Mattei, I; Morganti, S; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Pillon, M; Recchia, L; Russomando, A; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Camillocci, E Solfaroli; Voena, C

    2013-01-01

    Organic scintillators are often chosen as radiation detectors for their fast decay time and their low Z, while inorganic ones are used when high light ields are required. In this paper we show that a para-terphenyl based detector has a blend of properties of the two categories that can be optimal for energy and position measurements of low energy charged particles. On 0.1% diphenylbutadiene doped para-terphenyl samples we measure a light yield 3.5+-0.2 times larger than a typical organic scintillator (EJ-200), and a rejection power for 660 keV photons, with respect to electrons of the same energy, ranging between 3-11%, depending on the signal threshold. We also measure a light attenuation length = 4.73+-0.06 mm and we demonstrate that, with the measurements performed in this paper, a simulation based on FLUKA can properly reproduce the measured spectra.

  4. The late biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The principal objective of the symposium was to review the current status of understanding of the late biological effects of ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. A second objective was to critically evaluate information obtained from epidemiological studies of human population groups as well as from animal experimentation in order to provide a solid scientific basis upon which problems of current concern, such as radiation protection standards and risk-benefit analysis, could be deliberated. Eighty-one papers were presented in 10 sessions which covered epidemiological studies of late effects in human populations exposed to internal and/or external ionizing radiation; quantitative and qualitative data from animal experimentation of late effects; methodological problems and modern approaches; factors influencing susceptibility or expression of late radiation injury; comparative evaluation of late effects induced by radiation and other environmental pollutants, and problems of risk assessment. In addition, there were two evening sessions for free discussion of problems of interpreting animal data, and of the epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations. Reports on atomic bomb survivors showed that these epidemiological studies are providing dependable data, such as dose-related excess infant mortality. The reports also revealed the need for consensus in the method employed in the interpretation of data. That was also the case with studies on occupationally exposed populations at Hanford plant, where disparate results were presented on radiation-induced neoplasia among radiation workers. These data are, however, considered not so significant in relative terms when compared to risks involved in other industries. It was recommended that national registry systems for the dosimetry and medical records of radiation workers be established and co-ordinated internationally in order to facilitate reliable epidemiological

  5. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  6. Effect of ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol supplementations on serum leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and serum amyloid A levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Jamalan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus Type 2 is one of the most widespread chronic metabolic diseases. In most cases, this type of diabetes is associated with alterations in levels of some inflammatory cytokines and hormones. Considering anti-inflammatory properties of plant extracts rich in ascorbic acid (vitamin C and alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E, anti-diabetic properties of these two well-known antioxidant vitamins were investigated through measurement of serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, insulin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and serum amyloid A (SAA in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Methods: Male patients (n=80 were randomly divided into two groups each consisted of 40 subjects. Test groups were supplemented with ascorbic acid (1000 mg/day or alpha-tocopherol (300 mg/day orally during four weeks. Before and after treatment, serum biochemical factors of subjects were measured and compared. Results: Our results showed that both ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol could induce significant anti-inflammatory effects by decreasing the level of inflammatory factors such as TNF-α, SAA, and hs-CRP in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients. Effects of alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid in decreasing serum leptin level were similar. Ascorbic acid in contrast to alpha-tocopherol diminished fasting insulin and HOMA index but had no effect on LDL serum level. Conclusion: Concerning the obtained results, it is concluded that consumption of supplementary vitamins C and E could decrease induced inflammatory response in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.  It is also possible that vitamin C and vitamin E supplementation can attenuate incidence of some proposed pathological effects of diabetes mellitus.

  7. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  8. Radiation Effect Mechanisms in Electronic Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the electronics industry worldwide achieved great advances from the 70s, with studies on oxidation process in field effect silicon transistors. Thus, there was a need for knowledge of the mechanisms that are present in oxides and interfaces between silicon and silicon oxides, as well as other compound semiconductors due to critical differences between the properties of silicon. Against this background, many studies have been performed to understand reliability and ionization radiation effects on electronic devices. Reliability problems and effects of ionizing radiation on electronic devices are critical, depending on the environment in which the devices are exposed. This is the case of space, avionics, particle accelerators, nuclear reactors. This research area is strategic for space and defense areas. Thus, it is of fundamental importance to conduct tests to qualify electronic devices submitted to irradiation, based on Total Ionizing Dose (Tid), Single Event Effects (SEE) and Displacement Damage (D D). This work shows tests using X-ray and ion beams to test commercial MOS(Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor). The integrated circuits, CD4007, were exposed to 60 MeV 35Cl ion beams using the Sao Paulo 8UD Pelletron Accelerator and 10 keV X-ray radiation using a Shimadzu XRD-7000. The total dose effects due to ionizing radiation in MOSFET devices can lead to trapping of charges in the oxide and at the interface Si/SiO2, which increases or decreases the transistors off-current and leakage currents, and shifts the threshold voltage. Characteristic curves of current as a function of gate voltage, in different irradiation conditions, for p and n-MOSFET transistors, which compose the commercial device, were studied. In Figure it is possible to note different behaviors of the devices as a function of radiation dose due to X-ray radiation and the incidence a 60 MeV 35Cl ion beam

  9. Radiation effects on custom MOS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Thesis consists of four chapters: The first is primarily for background information on the effects of radiation on MOS devices and the theory of wafer bonding; the second gives a full discussion of all practical work carried out for manufacture of Field Effect test Capacitors, the third discusses manufacture of vacuum insulator Field Effect Transistors (FET's) and the fourth discusses the testing of these devices. Using a thermally bonded field effect capacitor structure, a vacuum dielectric was studied for use in high radiation environments with a view to manufacturing a CMOS compatible, micro machined transistor. Results are given in the form of high frequency C-V curves before and after a 120 kGy(Si), 12 MRad(Si), dose from a Co60 source showing a 1 Volt shift. The work is then extended to the design and manufacture of a micro machined, under-etch technique, Field Effect Transistor for use in high radiation areas. Results are shown for Threshold, Subthreshold and Transfer characteristics before and after irradiation up to a total dose of 100kGy or 10MRad. The conclusion from this work is that it should be possible to commercially manufacture practical vacuum dielectric field effect transistors which are radiation hard to at least 120 kGy(Si). (author)

  10. Modulated cycles in an illustrative solar dynamo model with competing alpha effects

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The large-scale magnetic field in the Sun varies with a period of approximately 22 years, although the amplitude of the cycle is subject to long-term modulation with recurrent phases of significantly reduced magnetic activity. It is believed that a hydromagnetic dynamo is responsible for producing this large-scale field, although this dynamo process is not well understood. Within the framework of mean-field dynamo theory, our aim is to investigate how competing mechanisms for poloidal field regeneration (namely a time delayed Babcock-Leighton surface alpha-effect and an interface-type alpha-effect), can lead to the modulation of magnetic activity in a deep-seated solar dynamo model. We solve the standard alpha-omega dynamo equations in one spatial dimension, including source terms corresponding to both of the the competing alpha-effects in the evolution equation for the poloidal field. This system is solved using two different methods. In addition to solving the one-dimensional partial differential equations ...

  11. Significance of radiation effects in solid radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Permar, P H; McDonell, W R

    1980-01-01

    Proposed NRC criteria for disposal of high-level nuclear waste require development of waste packages to contain radionuclide for at least 1000 years, and design of repositories to prevent radionuclide release at an annual rate greater than 1 part in 100,000 of the total activity. The high-level wastes that are now temporarily stored as aqueous salts, sludges, and calcines must be converted to high-integrity solid forms that resist deterioration from radiation and other effects of long-term storage. Spent fuel may be encapsulated for similar long-term storage. Candidate waste forms beside the spent fuel elements themselves, include borosilicate and related glasses, mineral-like crystalline ceramics, concrete formulations, and metal-matrix glass or ceramic composites. these waste forms will sustain damage produced by beta-gamma radiation up to 10/sup 12/ rads, by alpha radiation up to 10/sup 19/ particles/g, by internal helium generation greater than about 0.1 atom percent, and by the atom transmutations accompanying radioactive decay. Current data indicate that under these conditions the glass forms suffer only minor volume changes, stored energy deposition, and leachability effects. The crystalline ceramics appear susceptible to the potentially more severe alterations accompanying metamictization and natural analogs of candidate materials are being examined to establish their suitability as waste forms. Helium concentrations in the waste forms are generally below thresholds for severe damage in either glass or crystalline ceramics at low temperatures, but microstructural effects are not well characterized. Transmutation effects remain to be established.

  12. Alpha effect due to buoyancy instability of a magnetic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, P.; Mitra, D.; Rheinhardt, M.; Brandenburg, A.

    2011-10-01

    Context. A strong toroidal field can exist in form of a magnetic layer in the overshoot region below the solar convection zone. This motivates a more detailed study of the magnetic buoyancy instability with rotation. Aims: We calculate the α effect due to helical motions caused by an unstable magnetic layer in a rotating density-stratified system with angular velocity Ω making an angle θ with the vertical. We also study the dependence of the α effect on θ and the strength of the initial magnetic field. Methods: We carry out three-dimensional hydromagnetic simulations in Cartesian geometry. A turbulent electromotive force (EMF) due to the correlations of the small scale velocity and magnetic field is generated. We use the test-field method to calculate the transport coefficients of the inhomogeneous turbulence produced by the layer. Results: We show that the growth rate of the instability and the twist of the magnetic field vary monotonically with the ratio of thermal conductivity to magnetic diffusivity. The resulting α effect is non-uniform and increases with the strength of the initial magnetic field. It is thus an example of an "anti-quenched" α effect. The α effect is also nonlocal, i.e. scale dependent, requiring around 8-16 Fourier modes to reconstruct the actual mean EMF based on the actual mean field.

  13. Prevention and Treatment of Functional and Structural Radiation Injury in the Rat Heart by Pentoxifylline and Alpha-Tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a severe side effect of thoracic radiotherapy. This study examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) and α-tocopherol on cardiac injury in a rat model of RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received fractionated local heart irradiation with a daily dose of 9 Gy for 5 days and were observed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated with a combination of PTX, 100 mg/kg/day, and α-tocopherol (20 IU/kg/day) and received these compounds either from 1 week before until 6 months after irradiation or starting 3 months after irradiation, a time point at which histopathologic changes become apparent in our model of RIHD. Results: Radiation-induced increases in left ventricular diastolic pressure (in mm Hg: 35 ± 6 after sham-irradiation, 82 ± 11 after irradiation) were significantly reduced by PTX and α-tocopherol (early treatment: 48 ± 7; late treatment: 53 ± 6). PTX and α-tocopherol significantly reduced deposition of collagen types I (radiation only: 3.5 ± 0.2 μm2 per 100 μm2; early treatment: 2.7 ± 0.8; late treatment: 2.2 ± 0.2) and III (radiation only: 13.9 ± 0.8; early treatment: 11.0 ± 1.2; late treatment: 10.6 ± 0.8). On the other hand, radiation-induced alterations in heart/body weight ratios, myocardial degeneration, left ventricular mast cell densities, and most echocardiographic parameters were not significantly altered by PTX and α-tocopherol. Conclusions: Treatment with PTX and α-tocopherol may have beneficial effects on radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function, both when started before irradiation and when started later during the process of RIHD

  14. Biological effect of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the recent findings in studies of low dose radiation effect with those by authors' group. The low dose radiation must be considered in assessment of radiation effects because it induces the biological influence unexpected hitherto; i.e., the bystander effect and genetic instability. The former is a non-targeted effect that non-irradiated cells undergo the influence of directly irradiated cells nearby, which involves cell death, chromosome aberration, micronucleus formation, mutation and carcinogenesis through cellular gap junction and/or by signal factors released. Authors' group has found the radical(s) possessing as long life time as >20 hr released from the targeted cells, a possible mediator of the effect; the generation of aneuploid cells as an early carcinogenetic change; and at dose level <10 Gy, activation of MAPK signal pathway leading to relaxation of chromatin structure. The genetic instability means the loss of stability where replication and conservation of genome are normally maintained, and is also a cause of the late radiation effect. The group has revealed that active oxygen molecules can affect the late effect like delayed cell death, giant cell formation and chromosome aberration, all of which lead to the instability, and is investigating the hypothesis that the telomere instability resulted from the abnormal post-exposure interaction with its nuclear membrane or between chromatin and nuclear matrix, is enhanced by structural distortion of nuclear genes. As well, shown is the possible suppression of carcinogenesis by p53. The group, to elucidate the mechanism underlying the low dose radiation effect, is conducting their studies in consideration of the sequential bases of physical, chemical and biological processes. (R.T.)

  15. Effects of Dust Geometry in Lyman Alpha Galaxies at z = 4.4

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Steven L; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Grogin, Norman; Wang, Junxian

    2007-01-01

    Equivalent widths (EWs) observed in high-redshift Lyman alpha galaxies could be stronger than the EW intrinsic to the stellar population if dust is present residing in clumps in the inter-stellar medium (ISM). In this scenario, continuum photons could be extinguished while the Lyman alpha photons would be resonantly scattered by the clumps, eventually escaping the galaxy. We investigate this radiative transfer scenario with a new sample of six Lyman alpha galaxy candidates in the GOODS CDF-S, selected at z = 4.4 with ground-based narrow-band imaging obtained at CTIO. Grism spectra from the HST PEARS survey confirm that three objects are at z = 4.4, and that another object contains an active galactic nuclei (AGN). If we assume the other five (non-AGN) objects are at z = 4.4, they have rest-frame EWs from 47 -- 190 A. We present results of stellar population studies of these objects, constraining their rest-frame UV with HST and their rest-frame optical with Spitzer. Out of the four objects which we analyzed, t...

  16. Oscillator strengths and radiative transition rates for K{sub {alpha}} lines in gold X-ray spectra: 1s-2p transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahar, Sultana N. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: nahar@astronomy.ohio-state.edu; Pradhan, Anil K.; Sur, Chiranjib [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Oscillator strengths (f), line strengths (S) and radiative decay rates (A) are presented for all 1s-2p transitions in gold (Au) ions. X-ray emission from gold is extensively used, such as in fusion experiments, and in medical research for diagnostics and treatment. The K{sub {alpha}} 1s-2p transitions in gold are found to be in the hard X-ray region of 66-73 keV (0.1888-0.1706A) and are limited to from hydrogen-like to fluorine-like ions as the 2p subshell is filled beyond fluorine. While there are two 1s-2p transitions (1s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{sup o} and 1s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2p{sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{sup o}) for hydrogen-like gold, Au{sup +78}, the number varies depending on the number of electrons in the 2p subshell before and after the transition. For example, there are 35 1s-2p transitions giving the same number of K{sub {alpha}} lines for carbon-like Au, Au{sup +73}. The transitions can be of both types, dipole allowed and intercombination, and are in general strong, that is, A{approx}10{sup 16}/s. However, there are also weak transitions in the set. The present results are obtained from configuration interaction atomic structure calculations using the code SUPERSTRUCTURE which includes relativistic effects in Breit-Pauli approximation. The results have been benchmarked for a few ionic states with other detailed relativistic approaches, such as Dirac-Fock and coupled cluster. Comparisons with the very few transitions in the literature as well as those from other approaches indicate reasonable accuracy for the present results.

  17. Genetic Effects of Pile Radiations in Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In attempts to utilize radiation-induced mutations for rice breeding, it is of primary interest to obtain the fundamental data of the biological effects of pile radiations. Although considerable variation of radiosensitivity was found among rice varieties, Japanese rice was comparatively more susceptible to pile radiations than foreign varieties, and tetraploids were less susceptible as compared with the diploid varieties after irradiation. From die observation of the radiation injury of F1, hybrids it was concluded that, in addition to the contribution of a gene or a gene system, the cytoplasm was related to the intervarietal difference of radiosensitivity. Sterility was more easily induced by pile radiations than X-irradiation. In the X-ray series, chlorophyll mutations on the X1-ear basis reached a maximum frequency at middle doses and decreased at higher doses. In the pile radiation series the frequency increased with increasing doses. The cause of differences of these two series seemed to be a difference of the mean size of mutated sectors between both the radiations. The increment of induced variation on quantitative characters occurred in plus and minus direction with similar frequencies after the treatment of pile radiations. However, the heritable variations did not increase in accordance with neutron flux. The amount of induced variation was more in the progenies of partially sterile X1 ear and less in those which segregated chlorophyll mutants in X2 generation. It was calculated that 1 r of X- and gamma-rays was equivalent to 1-2 x 109 thermal neutrons per cm2 for induction of chlorophyll mutations and of variation on quantitative characters. (author)

  18. Comparing the Effects of Isoflurane and Alpha Chloralose upon Mouse Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lucie A; Bauer, Lucy C; Klaunberg, Brenda A

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mice requires that the physiology of the mouse (body temperature, respiration and heart rates, blood pH level) be maintained in order to prevent changes affecting the outcomes of functional scanning, namely blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) measures and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The anesthetic used to sedate mice for scanning can have major effects on physiology. While alpha chloralose has been commonly used for functional imaging of rats, its effects on physiology are not well characterized in the literature for any species. In this study, we anesthetized or sedated mice with isoflurane or alpha chloralose for up to two hours, and monitored physiological parameters and arterial blood gasses. We found that, when normal body temperature is maintained, breathing rates for both drugs decrease over the course of two hours. In addition, alpha chloralose causes a substantial drop in heart rate and blood pH with severe hypercapnia (elevated blood CO2) that is not seen in isoflurane-treated animals. We suggest that alpha chloralose does not maintain normal mouse physiology adequately for functional brain imaging outcome measures. PMID:27148970

  19. Comparing the Effects of Isoflurane and Alpha Chloralose upon Mouse Physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie A Low

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mice requires that the physiology of the mouse (body temperature, respiration and heart rates, blood pH level be maintained in order to prevent changes affecting the outcomes of functional scanning, namely blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD measures and cerebral blood flow (CBF. The anesthetic used to sedate mice for scanning can have major effects on physiology. While alpha chloralose has been commonly used for functional imaging of rats, its effects on physiology are not well characterized in the literature for any species. In this study, we anesthetized or sedated mice with isoflurane or alpha chloralose for up to two hours, and monitored physiological parameters and arterial blood gasses. We found that, when normal body temperature is maintained, breathing rates for both drugs decrease over the course of two hours. In addition, alpha chloralose causes a substantial drop in heart rate and blood pH with severe hypercapnia (elevated blood CO2 that is not seen in isoflurane-treated animals. We suggest that alpha chloralose does not maintain normal mouse physiology adequately for functional brain imaging outcome measures.

  20. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on bacterial translocation and lipid peroxidation in rats with intestinal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanaider Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Investigate if alpha-tocopherol has a protective effect on intestinal mucosa after obstruction and to evaluate the potential relations between lipid peroxidation and bacterial translocation. METHODS: Ten rats were submitted to a sham laparotomy and six served as control group. A small bowel obstruction was done in sixteen animals and among them eight were pretreated with alpha-tocopherol. Forty-eight hours later, mesenteric lymph node, spleen, liver and blood cultures and also samples from ileal mucosal were obtained, Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels were determined and intestinal histological assessment was performed. RESULTS: Bacterial translocation was significantly increased in the obstructed rats compared with the control, sham and antioxidant pretreated groups (p< 0,05. TBARS (nmol/100mg in untreated obstructed rats increased from 49,0 ± 13,3 in control group to 128,8 ± 40 after 48 hours of intestinal obstruction and achieved 72,3 ± 24,6 in alpha-tocopherol group (p< 0,05. Bacterial adherence to the intestinal epithelial cells surface and mucosal necrosis were significantly increased in the obstructed compared with nonobstructed rats. CONCLUSION: Alpha-tocopherol reduce the deleterious effects of the TBARS over the intestinal mucosal suggesting that in such circumstances there might be an association between bacterial translocation and lipid peroxidation after an intestinal occlusion.

  1. Effects of alpha-tocopherol associated with lovastatin on brain tissue and memory function in SHRSPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Marcela Rodrigues Moreira; Murad, Leonardo Borges; Paganelli, Aline; de Oliveira, Carlos Alberto Basílio; Vianna, Lucia Marques Alves

    2015-10-01

    Strokes are preceded by oxidative stress and inflammation, two processes linked to atherosclerosis and hypertension. Statins have been widely employed to control atherosclerosis; however, there could be neurological implications to its use—including cognitive impairment. Thus,we aimed to determine whether alpha-tocopherol is capable of reversing the neurological side effects of statins and enhancing its anti-inflammatory properties. To assess these effects, 15-week-old stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSPs) were divided into four groups (n = 6, each): alpha-tocopherol (AT), lovastatin (LoV), alpha-tocopherol + lovastatin (AT + LoV), and control (C).We administered 120 IU of alpha-tocopherol diluted in 0.1 ml of coconut oil,whereas the dose of lovastatin was administered at a ratio of 1 mg/kg of rat body weight. The control group received 0.1 ml coconut oil. All animals received the treatments via orogastric gavage.We assessed body weight, diuresis, food and water intake, oxidative stress (malondialdehyde levels), the total cellular injury marker (lactate dehydrogenase), short and long-term memory, cognition, and histopathological changes in the hippocampus. The results demonstrated that lovastatin treatment did not negatively affect the memory of our animal model. In fact, the animals treated with AT and LoV showed improvement in memory and cognition. Additionally, both treatments decrease lactate dehydrogenase and oxidative stress levels. Furthermore, our study also demonstrated hippocampal tissue preservation in the treated groups. PMID:26095118

  2. The alpha-particle irradiator set up at the ISS for radiobiological studies on targeted and non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe the alpha-particle irradiator that has been set up at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita (ISS) for controlled exposure of cultured mammalian cells. It can be equipped with two different sources, namely 2'4'4'Cm and 2'4'1'Am, allowing irradiation at different dose-rates (typically 1-100 mGy/min). The irradiator has dimensions small enough to be inserted into a standard cell culture incubator to perform irradiation of cultured cells in physiological conditions. The dose uniformity is such that the variations in the irradiation area are less than ± 12% of the average dose value on different irradiation areas up to ∼ 25 cm'2. Moreover, in the framework of the FP6 Euratom Integrated Project Non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation (NOTE), Petri dishes were realized for housing permeable membrane insert(s) to be used in co-culture experiments. Aluminium shields were also realized for half shield irradiation experiments. The alpha-particle irradiator of the ISS has been successfully used for studying DNA damage, namely double strand breaks (DSB, as measured by the γ-H2AX assay), in directly hit and in bystander primary human fibroblasts

  3. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, P.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Siemann, D.W.; Shapiro, D.L.; Van Houtte, P.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve.

  4. Effects of gamma radiation in annatto seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annatto bixin has emerged as a major source of natural dyes used in the world notably by the substitution of synthetics harmful to human health and ecologic tendency in obtaining industrial products free of additives with applications in industries textiles; cosmetics; pharmaceutical and food mainly. The aim of this research was to obtain increased of germination rate and dormancy breaking on annatto seeds by gamma radiation. Annatto dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.456 kGy/hour dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination rate and dormancy breaking in the seeds. Five treatments with gamma radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 100; 125; 150 and 175 Gy. After irradiation the annatto seeds were planted as for usual seed production. According to the results obtained in this experiment we can conclude that the low doses of gamma radiation utilized on the annatto seeds did not presented significantly effect on the germination of plants. But the best dose to increase the germination of seeds was 150 Gy. (author)

  5. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve

  6. Effects of gamma radiation in annatto seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Camilo F. de Oliveira, E-mail: camilo.urucum@hotmail.com [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA/EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Harder, Marcia N.C., E-mail: marcia.harder@fatec.sp.gov.br [Centro Paula Souza, Curso Superior de Tecnologia em Bicombustiveis (FATEC), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Filho, Jose C.; Neto, Miguel B., E-mail: jorgecazefilho@yahoo.com.br [Empresa Estadual de Pesquisa Agropecuaria da Paraiba (EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The annatto bixin has emerged as a major source of natural dyes used in the world notably by the substitution of synthetics harmful to human health and ecologic tendency in obtaining industrial products free of additives with applications in industries textiles; cosmetics; pharmaceutical and food mainly. The aim of this research was to obtain increased of germination rate and dormancy breaking on annatto seeds by gamma radiation. Annatto dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.456 kGy/hour dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination rate and dormancy breaking in the seeds. Five treatments with gamma radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 100; 125; 150 and 175 Gy. After irradiation the annatto seeds were planted as for usual seed production. According to the results obtained in this experiment we can conclude that the low doses of gamma radiation utilized on the annatto seeds did not presented significantly effect on the germination of plants. But the best dose to increase the germination of seeds was 150 Gy. (author)

  7. Effects of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Jose Gilmar; Franco, Suely Salumita Haddad; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula Bergamin, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio Haddad [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (LNBio/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia, E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Soya dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.245 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. Five treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 25; 50; 75 and 100 Gy. Seed germination and harvest of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were doses of 25, 50 and 75 Gy. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  8. Effects of gamma radiation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Soya dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.245 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. Five treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 25; 50; 75 and 100 Gy. Seed germination and harvest of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were doses of 25, 50 and 75 Gy. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  9. Effects of Instructions and Biofeedback on EEG-Alpha Production and the Effects of EEG-Alpha Biofeedback Training for Controlling Arousal in a Subsequent Stressful Situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, David S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Results indicate that the instructions (and related information concerning alpha) rather than the biofeedback are critical in alpha biofeedback training and that this training does not appear to have utility for controlling arousal under stress. (Author)

  10. OXIDATIVE STRESS IN SHEEP INDUCED BY CADMIUM CHLORIDE TOXICITY, WITH THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF ALPHA LIPOIC ACID

    OpenAIRE

    Hussien Ali NAJI; Mohammad Mushgil ZENAD

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy toxic metal, with harmful effects on animals and public health. Recently the risk of cadmium toxicity is substantially regarded; the environmental pollution is increased due to multi- uses of this element in various industries. This study was performed to clarify the effects of acute cadmium toxicity in sheep with trail of using alpha lipoic acid as an antioxidant therapeutic substance. Fifteen male lambs aged from 5-to-7 months were divided equally in to three groups,...

  11. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the tensile properties of alpha uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the effect of a superimposed hydrostatic pressure on the tensile properties of four grades of rolled unalloyed alpha uranium. The materials varied in carbon content and heat treatment. The principal effect of increasing pressure is an increase in the ductility of the materials. By not heat treating the uranium after the rolling process, the interaction of carbon content on mechanical properties is almost nullified. (author)

  12. Neuroprotective Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Haloperidol-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Perera Joachim; Tan Joon; Jeevathayaparan S; Chakravarthi Srikumar; Haleagrahara Nagaraja

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that exerts its' antipsychotic effects by inhibiting dopaminergic neurons. Although the exact pathophysiology of haloperidol extrapyramidal symptoms are not known, the role of reactive oxygen species in inducing oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of prolonged haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we evaluate the protective effect of alpha lipoic acid against haloperidol-induced oxidative stress in the ra...

  13. The effects and control of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Written for the layman, this booklet describes the effects of ionising radiation on people, and discusses the somatic hereditary risk estimates, and the measures taken to ensure the safe operation of the nuclear industry. New edition based on the sievert. (U.K.)

  14. Effect of neutron radiation on LED's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect was tested of neutron radiation with a fission energy spectrum and accompanying photons from a 252Cf source, on semiconductor green LED's (Tesla LQ 470). The results are presented. The diode luminosity decreased and a change in light penetrability through the plastic cover material was observed with doses of up to 300 Gy. (author). 2 figs., 1 ref

  15. Soft photon radiation effects in monopole processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infrared problem of the quantum field theory of monopoles and charges is reviewed and discussed in explicit terms. It is shown that the related radiation effects yield a superstrong damping of the cross-section in the relativistic kinematic region, which leads to a possible mechanism for partial monopole confinement. (author)

  16. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  17. [Endogenous opioid system in the realization of the analgesic effect of alpha-tocopherol in reference to algomenorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanovskiĭ, G N; Bakuleva, L P; Luzina, N L; Vinogradov, V A; Iarygin, K N

    1988-02-01

    Beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity was studied in 7 patients with algomenorrhea during pain attack and 15 minutes after alpha-tocopherol administration with a therapeutic aim (till the analgetic effect was reached). There was an increase in beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity after alpha-tocopherol administration. Naloxone administration to 9 patients with algomenorrhea of various etiology resumed the pain. The effect of alpha-tocopherol application for pain relief depended on the pathogenesis of algomenorrhea. At the same time naloxone administration failed to resume the pain in patients, in whom alpha-tocopherol had a strong analgetic effect. It is assumed that the endogenous opioid system participates in alpha-tocopherol effect on pain relief in patients with algomenorrhea. PMID:2964879

  18. Synthesis parameters affecting the exoemission properties of alpha aluminas. [X radiation, beta particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, J.F.; Turpin, D.; Guilhot, B. (Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France). Centre de Chimie Physique); Petel, M. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire)

    1983-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) is used in various fields of solid state physics. This technique was applied to gain an understanding of the mechanical and thermal effects affecting inorganic solids during the preparation phase. The work carried out supplements earlier experiments on the detection by thermoluminescence of defects created in solids, and considers the possibility of applying TSEE to the study of the reactivity of solids. The different stages in the preparation of alumina are described and attempts are made to correlate their effects on triboemission glow curves and TSEE emitted after irradiation.

  19. Remote diagnostic of the hydrogen wall through measurements of the backscattered solar Lyman alpha radiation by Voyager 1/UVS in 1993-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Quémerais, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Sandel, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    We perform a new analysis of the Lyman alpha data obtained by Voyager 1 during the spatial scans in 1993-2003 while Voyager 1 was at 53-88 AU from the Sun. These data are the important source of information on the hydrogen distribution in the outer heliosphere. A sophisticated global kinetic-MHD model of the heliospheric interface and a radiative transfer model are used for the analysis. It is shown for the first time that the ratio of the Lyman alpha intensities detected in the downwind and upwind lines of sight in the outer heliosphere is sensitive to the configuration (peak value and location) of the hydrogen wall. The hydrogen wall is a source of Doppler-shifted backscattered Lyman alpha photons, so it can be seen from inside the heliosphere. Therefore, Voyager 1/ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) Lyman alpha data can be used for remote sensing of the hydrogen wall. We show that our current global model of the outer heliosphere, which is consistent with many other measurements including Lyman alpha data from both Voyager 1 and 2 in 1980-1993, provides a systematically larger downwind to upwind intensity ratio compared with the UVS data in 1993-2003. In order to decrease the ratio, a higher and/or closer hydrogen wall is needed.

  20. Effects of Low Dose Radiation on Mammals 1

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Yutaka; Mine, Mariko; Kishikawa, Masao

    1991-01-01

    Radiation has been applied widely to clinics, researches and industries nowadays. Irradiation by atomic bomb produced many victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Radiation effects on animals and human belings have been reported extensively, especially at a dose range of high amount of radiation. As radiation effects at low dose have not been well studied, it is believed that even a small amount of radiation produces hazardous effects. However, it might not be true. Beneficial effects of a low dos...

  1. Effects of emollients on ultraviolet-radiation-induced erythema of the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several commonly used emollients were studied as to their effectiveness in absorbing and filtering erythema-causing ultraviolet radiation in the 280 to 315 nm range (UVB). Planter's Peanut Oil (Standard Brands) and Mazola Corn Oil (Best Foods Inc.) had no effect; Alpha Keri Bath Oil (Westwood Pharmaceuticals), mineral oil, and Johnson's Baby Oil (Johnson and Johnson Co) had minimal effects. Vaseline Petroleum Jelly (Chesebrough-Ponds Inc.), petrolatum, and hydrophilic ointment substantially reduced the erythema that was induced by exposure to low doses of UVB radiation. Therefore, these emollients may interfere with the therapeutic effects of the ultraviolet radiation component of the Goeckerman treatment when it is administered in low doses to patients with psoriasis

  2. Biological effects of synchrotron radiation on crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐掌雄; 董保中; 等

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of germinating seeds of barley,winter wheat and spring one to synchrotron ultraviolet radiation is barley>winter wheat and spring one.But when dry seeds of the three crops are irradiated by 3.5-22keV X-rays,the sequence of their sensitivity to radiation can be changed.for irradiation of 0.6-3keV ultra soft X-rays,0.40-0.90 of the seedlings of the first generation appear mutation of striped chlorophyll defect.This biological effect has never been found for irradiation of other rays.

  3. Laser radiation effects on Mycoplasma agalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, Cerasela Z.; Grigoriu, Constantin; Dinescu, Maria; Pascale, Florentina; Popovici, Adrian; Gheorghescu, Lavinia; Cismileanu, Ana; Avram, Eugenia

    2002-08-01

    The biological effects of the laser radiation emitted by the Nd:YAG laser (second harmonic, wavelength 532 nm /fluence 32 mJ/cm2/pulse duration 6 ns) on the Mycoplasma agalactiae bacterium were studied. The radiation was found to intensify the multiplication of the bacteria irradiated in TRIS buffer (0.125 M), without however affecting the proteinic composition of the cell membrane. When the bacteria were irradiated in their growth medium (PPLO broth) being later cultivated on a solid medium (PPLO agar), the exclusive presence of the atypical colonies (granular and T-like ones) was noticed.

  4. Processing. alpha. -mercuric iodide by zone refining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, A.; Morgan, S.H.; Henderson, D.O.; Biao, Y.; Zhang, K.; Silberman, E. (Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics); Nason, D.; van den Berg, L.; Ortale-Baccash, C.; Cross, E. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (United States). Santa Barbara Operations)

    1992-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted on zone refining {alpha}-mercuric iodide. Analytical studies using differential scanning calorimetry and anion chromatography indicate that impurities are segregated mainly at the end where zone travel terminates. Early results indicate that single crystals can be readily grown from zone refined material, and the effects of the process on the performance of radiation detectors fabricated from {alpha}-mercuric iodide are being evaluated.

  5. Ionizing radiation effects on biological macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is one of the main environmental factors for life, particularly for human beings. The primary effects of ionizing radiation produce the perturbation of biomacromolecules functionality (DNA and proteins). This effect occurs by direct action and by the indirect way of water molecules radiolysis. These primary effects result in a cascade of biochemical and biological consequences that may finally influence the general functions of the organism. In the last five decades the research activity in this field was focused on the detailed description of the effects on DNA molecules and their biochemical and biological consequences. The reason for this is the importance of the integrity of DNA for the cell life evolution, especially for the cell recovery processes or for the programmed cell death after irradiation. These aspects have main applications in very important fields as radioprotection and radiotherapy. In the present paper the mechanisms of ionizing radiation action at the molecular level will be reviewed, with focus on the protein level effects. Although comparatively a lower number of results was reported concerning the effects of ionizing radiation on the proteins, during the last years this field was reconsidered in the context of a new research trend in the field of genomics and proteomics. The structural changes which occur most often in the proteins are the breaks of chemical links, the chemical moieties ionization (for instance, the oxidation of the proteins) and the inter - protein new links (cross-linking). These changes result in a gradual loss of protein functionality, influencing particularly the ionic transport, the signal transduction across the membrane or intermolecular recognition processes of antibody-antigen type. Some studies on the ion artificial channels (as gramicidin and amphotericin) incorporated in model membranes (BLM-s or liposomes) describe structural and functional changes of the peptides after the exposure to

  6. Full $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$ electroweak radiative corrections to $t \\bar{t} \\gamma$ and $e^-e^+\\gamma$ productions at ILC with GRACE-Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Khiem, P H; Fujimoto, J; Igarashi, M; Ishikawa, T; Kaneko, T; Kato, K; Nakazawa, N; Shimizu, Y; Tobimatsu, K; Ueda, T; Vermaseren, J A M; Yasui, Y

    2013-01-01

    The full $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$ electroweak radiative corrections to $t \\bar{t} \\gamma$ and $e^-e^+\\gamma$ productions at the International Linear Collider (ILC) are presented in this paper. The computation is performed with the help of GRACE-Loop system. In the physical results, we discuss on the cross section, electroweak corrections, and the top quark forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) which are the function of the center-of-mass energy.

  7. Radiation effects in mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research effort is to elucidate the mechanisms for the radiation-induced changes in mammalian cells that lead to cell death, mutation, neoplastic transformation, DNA damage, and chromosomal alterations. Of particular interest are the effects of low-dose-rate and fractionated irradiation on these end points with respect to the mechanisms whereby these effects are influenced by cellular repair processes, inhibitors, and promoters that act at the genetic or biochemical level. 17 refs

  8. Effects of microstructural parameters and back stress on damage mechanisms in {alpha}/{beta} titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helbert, A.L.; Feaugas, X.; Clavel, M. [Univ. de Technologie de Compiegne (France)

    1998-01-23

    Damage initiation and kinetics in four {alpha}/{beta} titanium alloys have been experimentally and numerically investigated. Efforts were focused on triaxiality, {chi} = {Sigma}{sub m}/{Sigma}{sub eq} and internal stresses effects. The study of void nucleation has provided nucleation criteria corresponding to voids at the {alpha}/{beta} interface. This macroscopic nucleation criterion, written as {Sigma}{sub m} = f({var_epsilon}{sub peq}), was explained with the help of microscopic observations. Microscopic parameters such as plastic strain in the {alpha}-phase or local hydrostatic stress {sigma}{sub m}{sup loc} at the {alpha}/{beta} interface have been linked to the damage initiation. Also, the influence of the different heterogeneity levels on the macroscopic nucleation criterion was demonstrated. It has also been shown that internal stresses increased both nucleation and growth kinetics. Damage mechanisms are well described by a Gurson-Tvergaard model modified to take into account internal stresses. In particular, the existence of a material physical property, f{sub c} (void volume fraction at fracture) was shown.

  9. The oxidative mechanism effect of low-level ionizing radiation on the higher nervous activity rats investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the ionizing radiation upon the indices of behavioral reaction of rats as well as ability some antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, beta-carotene) used separately and in complexes to diminish exposure effects according to the studies indices have been studied. The largest protective effect was found for beta-carotene as well for the compositions, witch contain it. In the case of the animal exposure at the dose of 0,05 Gy, usage of alpha-tocopherol could case decline of the rats behavior reactions indices; this suggest that usage of antioxidant therapy demands certain cautiousness

  10. Solar dynamo models with alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local 3D convection calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Tuominen, I

    2006-01-01

    (abridged) Results from kinematic solar dynamo models employing alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local convection calculations are presented. We estimate the magnitude of these effects to be around 2-3 m/s. The rotation profile of the Sun as obtained from helioseismology is applied. We obtain an estimate of the ratio of the two induction effects, C_alpha/C_Omega \\approx 10^-3, which we keep fixed in all models. We also include a one-cell meridional circulation pattern having a magnitude of 10-20 m/s near the surface and 1-2 m/s at the bottom of the convection zone. The model essentially represents a distributed turbulent dynamo, as the alpha-effect is nonzero throughout the convection zone, although it concentrates near the bottom of the convection zone obtaining a maximum around 30 degrees of latitude. Turbulent pumping of the mean fields is predominantly down- and equatorward. We find that, when all these effects are included in the model, it is possible to correctly reproduce many features of the so...

  11. Modification of certain pharmacological effects of ethanol by lipophilic alpha-1 adrenergic agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, M.K.; Dinovo, E.C.; Haddox, V.G.

    1987-09-28

    The influence of four centrally-acting alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonists, namely, 2(2-chloro-5-trifluoromethylphenylimino) imidazolidine (St 587), cirazoline, (-) 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-8-methoxy-5-methylthio-2-naphthalenamine ((-)SKF 89748A) and 2-(2-methylindazol-4-imino)imidazolidine (Sgd 101/75) on the pharmacological effects of ethanol was investigated. All four drugs reduced the duration of ethanol-induced hypnosis in C57B1/6 mice, this effect being proportional to their relative potencies to exert central alpha-1 agonism. In prazosin-pretreated mice, St 587 failed to reduce the hypnotic effect of ethanol, which provided strong evidence for the role of alpha-1 agonism for the hypnosis reducing effect of St 587. Hyperactivity induced in C57B1/6 mice by a subhypnotic dose of ethanol and St 587 was reported earlier. In the present study, St 587, cirazoline and (-)SKF 89748A produced similar response, but no correlation between this effect and ethanol hypnosis blockade could be established. 19 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Radiation effects in brain and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sensitivity of both the brain and spinal cord in prenatal and postnatal stages, in infancy and adult age is represented also in consideration of a combined treatment with methotrexate. In adults, application of important doses of high-energy radiation increases the risk of injurious effects to the central nervous system. If the spinal cord is involved, more than 60% of the radiolesions have a progredient course ending with death. The pathogenesis and disposing factors are referred to, and the incidence of radiation necrosis with regard to age and sex, the degrees of injury and their frequence within different ranges of dosage are analyzed on the basis of data from universal literature. An examination of 'tolerance doses' for the spinal cord is made by means of Strandquist-diagrams and of the Ellis-formula. The slopes of regression lines are reported for various 'degrees of response' in skin, brain and spinal cord following radiation therapy. In the Strandquist-diagram, slopes of regression lines are dependent on the 'degree of response', flattening if skin and spinal cord are affected by radiation in the same degree, necroses having the same slope for both the organs. (orig./MG)

  13. Radiation effects and crystallinity in polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A.; Ungar, G.

    A survey is presented of a series of works on the influence of crystallinity on the radiation induced effects, cross-linking in particular, in polyethylene and paraffins. The principal theme is that the usual conception of random introduction of cross-links into a random assembly of chains needs to be modified in the presence of crystallinity in general and chain folding in particular. A long series of varied investigations on polyethylene have indeed demonstrated through a series of conspicuous effects that not only the ordering intrinsic to crystals and the increased intrachain contacts due to chain folding, but the higher level morphology, the nature and mutual arrangement in particular, have a major influence on the effectivity of the radiation leading to networks. Extension of the works to paraffins identified unsuspected mobility of both the radiation precursor species and the paraffin molecule itself (cross-linked and uncross-linked) within the crystal lattice, leading to phase segregation of the cross-linked species into microscopically identifiable domains together with identifying a trend for the cross-links themselves to form non-randomly in groups. The latter phenomenon, observed also in the molten state, indicates that the departure from randomness in the cross-linking process is much more deep-rooted than originally anticipated, and calls for a general reassessment of our knowledge of cross-linking. Other topics included as part of the general enquiry are the destruction of crystallinity, the promotion of hexagonal phase through radiation, the effect of morphology on chain scission and the general, still unsolved issue of how to assess cross-links by a direct analytical method (involving NMR). The hope is expressed that the bringing together of these varied pieces of work will serve the unification of presently widely diverse areas of experience and might influence developments in the radiation studies of paraffinoid substances.

  14. PGC-1alpha and PGC-1beta have both similar and distinct effects on myofiber switching toward an oxidative phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Frandsen, Lis; Schjerling, Peter; Nishimura, Erica; Grunnet, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha and -1beta (PGC-1alpha and PGC-1beta) were overexpressed by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in cultures of primary rat skeletal muscle cells derived from neonatal myoblasts. Effects on muscle fiber type transition and metabolism...

  15. Working group written presentation: Trapped radiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vampola, Alfred L.; Stuckey, Wayne K.; Coulter, D.; Friebele, E. J.; Hand, K. J.; Hardy, D. A.; Higby, P.; Kolasinski, W. A.; Santoro, R. T.; Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the Trapped Radiation Effects Panel for the Space Environmental Effects on Materials Workshop are presented. The needs of the space community for new data regarding effects of the space environment on materials, including electronics are listed. A series of questions asked of each of the panels at the workshop are addressed. Areas of research which should be pursued to satisfy the requirements for better knowledge of the environment and better understanding of the effects of the energetic charged particle environment on new materials and advanced electronics technology are suggested.

  16. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  17. Radiation effect on PVC/ENR blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of irradiation on the physical properties of Polyvinyl Chloride / Epoxidised Natural Rubber Blends (PVC/ENR blends) were investigated. The enhancement in tensile strength, elongation at break, hardness and aging properties of the blends have confirmed the positive effect of irradiation on the blends. It is evident from gel fraction and infra red spectroscopic studies that the blends of PVC and ENR cross-linked upon irradiation. The results also revealed that at any blend composition, the enhancement in properties depend on irradiation dose which controls the degree of radiation induced cross-linking. In an attempt to maximize the constructive effect of irradiation, the influence of various additives such as stabilizers, radiation sensitizers, fillers and processing aids on the blend properties were studied. The changes in blend properties upon irradiation with the presents of above additives were also presented in this paper

  18. Risk from deterministic effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication provides a review of information for assessing deterministic effects on human health likely to arise from serious overexposure to ionising radiation. It updates information in previous Board publications NRPB-R226 and NRPB-M246. It constitutes a parallel document to Documents of the NRPB, 4, No. 4 (1993), which deals with stochastic effects. These two documents, together with Documents of the NRPB, 6, No. 1 (1995), which deals specifically with stochastic risk at low dose rates, give the current Board view on all health consequences of exposure to ionising radiation. Little new primary information on deterministic effects has become available in recent years. However, advances in techniques for data analysis have been made and are incorporated in the present report. These are presented in a form suitable for use in modelling the consequences to populations of serious radiological incidents. (author)

  19. Combined effects, ionizing radiation plus other agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is clear from cell studies, and confirmed in a general way by animal sudies, that radiation produces effects that are interactive with those due to other physical agents, chemicals of various types, and viruses. Our understanding is limited, however, in respect to the mechanisms of action in cells and, accordingly, even less penetrating in respect to our comprehension of effects in animals. Thus, the conclusion follows at this time, that we are unable to predict responses in humans due to combined action because of our incomplete understanding of individual and combined responses of radiation and other agents in experimental systems. The study of possible public health hazards due to the combined effects of radiation plus other agents is one that should be coverged upon simultaneously by the laboratory investigator and the epidemiologist-public health specialist. What is clear is the likelihood that agents biologically active in their own right may interact. Indeed, an important and significant guiding principle can be extracted from current knowledge. Relative to induced cellular changes, agents that register lesions in the genetic substance of a cell are likely to produce interactive effects. Such effects may become expressed in individual cells, in tissues, or in whole organisms

  20. Microwave radiation - Biological effects and exposure standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, I.R.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal and nonthermal effects of exposure to microwave radiation are discussed and current standards for microwave exposure are examined in light of the proposed use of microwave power transmission from solar power satellites. Effects considered include cataractogenesis at levels above 100 mW/sq cm, and possible reversible disturbances such as headaches, sleeplessness, irritability, fatigue, memory loss, cardiovascular changes and circadian rhythm disturbances at levels less than 10 mW/sq cm. It is pointed out that while the United States and western Europe have adopted exposure standards of 10 mW/sq cm, those adopted in other countries are up to three orders of magnitude more restrictive, as they are based on different principles applied in determining safe limits. Various aspects of the biological effects of microwave transmissions from space are considered in the areas of the protection of personnel working in the vicinity of the rectenna, interactions of the transmitted radiation with cardiac pacemakers, and effects on birds. It is concluded that thresholds for biological effects from short-term microwave radiation are well above the maximal power density of 1 mW/sq cm projected at or beyond the area of exclusion of a rectenna.