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Sample records for alpha radiation effectively

  1. Risk estimates for the health effects of alpha radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides risk estimates for various health effects of alpha radiation. Human and animal data have been used to characterize the shapes of dose-response relations and the effects of various modifying factors, but quantitative risk estimates are based solely on human data: for lung cancer, on miners in the Colorado plateau, Czechoslovakia, Sweden, Ontario and Newfoundland; for bone and head cancers, on radium dial painters and radium-injected patients. Slopes of dose-response relations for lung cancer show a tendency to decrease with increasing dose. Linear extrapolation is unlikely to underestimate the excess risk at low doses by more than a factor of l.5. Under the linear cell-killing model, our best estimate

  2. Alpha radiation effects on weapons-grade plutonium encapsulating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Mehmet

    The scientific understanding of material problems in the long-term storage of plutonium pits is investigated using experimental and theoretical models. The durability of the plutonium pit depends on the integrity of the metal cladding that encapsulates the plutonium. Given sufficient time, the energetic alpha particles (helium nuclei) produced by nuclear decay of the plutonium would degrade the mechanical strength of the metal cladding which could lead to cladding failure and dispersion of plutonium. It is shown that the long-term behavior of the encapsulating materials can be simulated by beam implantation and subsequent analysis using experimental techniques of Electron Microscopy and Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP). In addition computer simulations using the TRIM code were made in order to correlate the measurements to cladding damage. The Neutron Depth Profiling measurements done with samples that had 10 16 cm-2 3He beam implant dose showed no helium redistribution, indicating no microcracking between bubbles, for both beryllium and stainless steel, the pit cladding materials of interest. However, helium redistribution and significant helium loss were observed for samples with a beam implant dose of 1018 cm-2 , indicating microstructural damage. The SEM observations were consistent with the NDP measurements. The proper interpretation of the results rests on the realization that (i)the deleterious effects are related to helium concentration, not implant dose, and (ii)a specified maximum concentration of helium is achieved with a much smaller dose when monoenergetic ions are implanted using beam geometry than for the situation where Pu alphas stop in the pit cladding. Helium is distributed over a much smaller depth interval for beam implantation of monoenergetic ions as compared to the pit cladding implanted ions. Taking this effect into account and using the calculated pit implant dose gives a pit storage time for the 1016 cm-2 beam implant dose results equal to

  3. Radiation-electromagnetic effect in germanium crystals irradiated with high-energy. cap alpha. particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Babichenko, V.S.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.; Rzhanov, A.E.; Filippov, V.I.

    1984-05-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the radiation-electromagnetic effect in germanium crystals irradiated in a cyclotron with ..cap alpha.. particles of energies up to 40 MeV. The high excitation rate, the bulk nature of generation of nonequilibrium carriers and defects, and their spatial distributions gave rise to several special features in the dependence of the emf due to the radiation-electromagnetic effect on the particle flux, fluence, and parameters of samples. Theoretical calculations carried out allowing for the specific nature of the interaction of ..cap alpha.. particles with crystals agreed well with the experimental results. The radiation-electromagnetic effect could be used to obtain information on the nature of the spatial distribution of the density of nonequilibrium carriers along the trajectory of a particle in a crystal.

  4. Radiation electromagnetic effect in germanium crystals under high-energy. cap alpha. -particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Babichenko, V.S.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.; Rzhanov, A.E.; Filippov, V.I.

    1984-05-01

    Results of experimental investigation into radiation electromagnetic effect (REM) in samples of germanium crystals under approximately 40 MeV ..cap alpha..-particle irradiation in a cyclotron are presented. A high level of excitation, volumetric character of generation of non-equilibrium carriers and formation of defects as well as the form of their spatial distribution are shown to result in some peculiarities of the EMF of the REM effect on the particle flux, fluence and sample parameters. Agreement of theoretical calculations, conducted with account of specificity of ..cap alpha..-particle interaction with a crystal, and experimental data is obtained. It is revealed that the REM effect can be applied in obtaining data on spatial distribution of non-equilibrium carrier concentrations along the particle trajectory in the crystal.

  5. The effect of Lyman $\\alpha$ radiation on mini-Neptune atmospheres around M stars: application to GJ 436b

    CERN Document Server

    Miguel, Yamila; Linsky, Jeffrey L; Rugheimer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Mini-Neptunes orbiting M stars are a growing population of known exoplanets. Some of them are located very close to their host star, receiving large amounts of UV radiation. Many M stars emit strong chromospheric emission in the H I Lyman $\\alpha$ line (Ly$\\alpha$) at 1215.67 \\AA, the brightest far-UV emission line. We show that the effect of incoming Ly$\\alpha$ flux can significantly change the photochemistry of mini-Neptunes' atmospheres. We use GJ 436b as an example, considering different metallicities for its atmospheric composition. For solar composition, H$_2$O-mixing ratios show the largest change because of Ly$\\alpha$ radiation. H$_2$O absorbs most of this radiation, thereby shielding CH$_4$, whose dissociation is driven mainly by radiation at other far-UV wavelengths ($\\sim1300$ \\AA). H$_2$O photolysis also affects other species in the atmosphere, including H, H$_2$, CO$_2$, CO, OH and O. For an atmosphere with high metallicity, H$_2$O- and CO$_2$-mixing ratios show the biggest change, thereby shield...

  6. Effects of alpha radiation on plutonium incorporated in dosimetric materials by ESR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in situ alpha irradiation effects of some ESR dosimetric materials namely alanine, 2-methyl alanine and ammonium tartrate were studied by incorporating 1% plutonium by weight in them. The radical intensity was monitored as a function of alpha dose. It was found that in the dose region 1-35 kGy ammonium tartrate showed better signal intensity, linearity and dose response as compared to the other materials. This was attributed to the single radical produced in case of the tartrate giving a sharp spectrum and the fast relaxation times owing to less saturation of ESR signals. (author)

  7. Effect of low alpha-radiation field on corrosion rates of UO2 under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Alpha-radiolysis constitutes an important factor, which may affect the corrosion behavior of spent fuel in contact with groundwater in a geologic repository. The so-called alpha-doped UO2, i.e. UO2 containing short-lived alpha-emitters, can reproduce type and levels of activity of 'old' spent fuel at different ages. Previous experiments showed significant effects of radiolysis at relatively high alpha-activity levels [1, 2]. Studies on the corrosion of low alpha-activity 233U-doped UO2(s) were carried out as static leaching tests under different nominal redox conditions. Pellets of UO2 containing ∼10, ∼1 and 0 wt. % 233U were leached at room temperature in carbonated water under anoxic conditions (Eh ∼0). Some degree of pre-oxidation occurred on the fuel surface prior to water contact: this was responsible for a noticeable initial release. The initial release was higher for higher alpha-activity fuel samples. Increasing uranium concentration in solution with time was observed for the material containing 10 w/0 233U, indicating a significant radiolytic enhancement of the fuel corrosion. An extremely low dissolution rate was measured for the material doped with 1 wt. % 233U, while a decrease of the uranium concentration in the leachate was observed in the case of undoped UO2. These results confirm previous conclusions that radiolysis, at least down to an upper bound activity level relevant to long term storage scenarios (UO2 containing 10 wt. % 233U), can support oxidizing dissolution processes under conditions characterized by low-oxygen concentration. The results presented in this work were carried out as a part of a EC co-funded project on spent fuel stability [3] and in collaboration with ENRESA-CIEMAT [4]. [1] J. Cobos, L. Havela, V.V. Rondinella, J. De Pablo, T. Gouder, J.P. Glatz, P. Carbol, Hj. Matzke, Radiochim. Acta, 90 (2002) 597-602. [2] V.V. Rondinella, Hj. Matzke, J. Cobos, and T. Wiss, Radiochim. Acta, 88 (2000

  8. Comparison of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and mobile phone GSM 900 radiation in the Allium cepa test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnya, Dmitry S; Romanovsky, Anton V

    2013-01-20

    The goal of this study was to compare the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and GSM 900 modulated mobile phone (model Sony Ericsson K550i) radiation in the Allium cepa test. Three groups of bulbs were exposed to mobile phone radiation during 0 (sham), 3 and 9h. A positive control group was treated during 20min with plutonium-239 alpha-radiation. Mitotic abnormalities, chromosome aberrations, micronuclei and mitotic index were analyzed. Exposure to alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 and exposure to modulated radiation from mobile phone during 3 and 9h significantly increased the mitotic index. GSM 900 mobile phone radiation as well as alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 induced both clastogenic and aneugenic effects. However, the aneugenic activity of mobile phone radiation was more pronounced. After 9h of exposure to mobile phone radiation, polyploid cells, three-groups metaphases, amitoses and some unspecified abnormalities were detected, which were not registered in the other experimental groups. Importantly, GSM 900 mobile phone radiation increased the mitotic index, the frequency of mitotic and chromosome abnormalities, and the micronucleus frequency in a time-dependent manner. Due to its sensitivity, the A. cepa test can be recommended as a useful cytogenetic assay to assess cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.

  9. Protective effects of alpha lipoic acid on radiation-induced salivary gland injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Kim, Kyung Mi; Jung, Myeong Hee; Jung, Jung Hwa; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy is a treatment for patients with head and neck (HN) cancer. However, radiation exposure to the HN often induces salivary gland (SG) dysfunction. We investigated the effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced SG injury in rats. Results ALA preserved acinoductal integrity and acinar cell secretary function following irradiation. These results are related to the mechanisms by which ALA inhibits oxidative stress by inhibiting gp91 mRNA and 8-OHdG expression and apoptosis of acinar cells and ductal cells by inactivating MAPKs in the early period and expression of inflammation-related factors including NF-κB, IκB-α, and TGF-β1 and fibrosis in late irradiated SG. ALA effects began in the acute phase and persisted for at least 56 days after irradiation. Materials and Methods Rats were assigned to followings: control, ALA only (100 mg/kg, i.p.), irradiated, and ALA administered 24 h and 30 min prior to irradiation. The neck area including the SG was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose, 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Rats were killed at 4, 7, 28, and 56 days after radiation. Conclusions Our results show that ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced SG injury in patients with HN cancer. PMID:27072584

  10. Remote Optical Detection of Alpha Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha emitting radiation sources are typically hard to detect with conventional detectors due to the short range of alpha particles in the air. However, previous studies have shown that remote detection of alpha radiation is possible by measuring the ionization-induced fluorescence of air molecules. The alpha-induced ultraviolet (UV) light is mainly emitted by molecular nitrogen and its fluorescence properties are well known. The benefit of this method is the long range of UV photons in the air. Secondly, the detection is possible also under a strong beta and gamma radiation backgrounds as they do not cause localized molecular excitation. In this work, the optical detection was studied using two different detection schemes; spectral separation of fluorescence from the background lighting and coincidence detection of UV photons originating from a single radiative decay event. Our spectrally integrated measurements have shown that one alpha decay event yields up to 400 fluorescence photons in the air and all these UV photons are induced in a 5 ns time-window. On the other hand, the probability of a background coincidence event in 5 ns scale is very rare compared to the number of background photons. This information can be applied in fluorescence coincidence filtering to discriminate the alpha radiation initiated fluorescence signal from much more intense background lighting. A device called HAUVA (Handheld Alpha UV Application) was built during this work for demonstration purposes. HAUVA utilizes spectral filtering and it is designed to detect alpha emitters from a distance of about 40 cm. Using specially selected room lighting, the device is able to separate 1 kBq alpha emitter from the background lighting with 1 second integration time. (author)

  11. The alpha channeling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  12. Photostability of glycine to Lyman {alpha} radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira-Rodrigues, A.M. [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Homem, M.G.P. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Naves de Brito, A. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil); Ponciano, C.R.; Silveira, E.F. da [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The amino acids already detected in Solar System bodies and researched in Interstellar Medium are of particular importance for the chemistry related to the origin of life since they are constituents of all living organisms. To interpret the viability of amino acids in pre-biotic astrochemistry is important to investigate the stability of these compounds in extraterrestrial surroundings. This study investigates, in the laboratory, the stability of glycine to the action of ultraviolet radiation, in spectral region around the wavelength of the Lyman {alpha} line (1216 ) produced by a hydrogen lamp. {sup 252}Cf-PDMS of positive and negative desorbed ions was performed for glycine, before and during the irradiation, and the dependence of the ion desorption yields on the irradiation time is determined. As a result, the relative photostability curves of the molecular and dimer ions are observed to be a single exponential decay with a time constant 376 min for positive desorbed ions and 675 min for negative ones. The photodissociation cross section found for glycine molecule at room temperature, when positive secondary ions are considered, is 17 Mb; this value drops to 9 Mb when negative secondary ions are analyzed. This new methodology offers a complementary way of understanding the photonic interaction in amino acids, allowing discussion on polymerization and/or radiation induced phase transition effects. (author)

  13. Lyman-alpha radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Aaron; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical impact of Lyman-alpha (Ly{\\alpha}) radiation pressure on galaxy formation depends on the rate and duration of momentum transfer between Ly{\\alpha} photons and neutral hydrogen gas. Although photon trapping has the potential to multiply the effective force, ionizing radiation from stellar sources may relieve the Ly{\\alpha} pressure before appreciably affecting the kinematics of the host galaxy or efficiently coupling Ly{\\alpha} photons to the outflow. We present self-consistent Ly{\\alpha} radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of high-$z$ galaxy environments by coupling the Cosmic Ly{\\alpha} Transfer code (COLT) with spherically symmetric Lagrangian frame hydrodynamics. The accurate but computationally expensive Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations are feasible under the one-dimensional approximation. In certain cases Ly{\\alpha} feedback significantly enhances the velocity of the shell of gas expanding around a central source. Radiative feedback alone is capable of ejecting baryons into the i...

  14. Effects of alpha, gamma, and alpha-recoil radiation on borosilicate glass containing Savannah River Plant defense high-level nuclear waste. [Lead ions-250 keV; xenon ions-160 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    At the Savannah River Plant, the reference process for the immobilization of defense high-level waste (DHLW) for geologic storage is vitrification into borosilicate glass. During geologic storage for 10/sup 6/ y, the glass would be exposed to approx. 3 x 10/sup 10/ rad of ..beta.. radiation, approx. 10/sup 10/ rad of ..gamma.. radiation, and 10/sup 18/ particles/g glass for both ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..-recoil radiation. This paper discusses tests of the effect of these radiations on the leachability and density of the glass. Even though the doses were large, no effect of the radiations was detected that reduced the effectiveness of the glass for long-term storage of DHLW even at doses corresponding to 10/sup 6/ years storage for the actual glass. For the tests, glass containing simulated DHLW was prepared from frit of the reference composition. Three methods were used to irradiate the glass: external irradiations with beams of approx. 200 keV Xe or Pb ions, internal irradiations with Cm-244 doped glass, and external irradiations with Co-60 ..gamma.. rays. Results with both Xe and Pb ions indicate that a dose of 3 x 10/sup 13/ ions/cm/sup 2/ (simulating > 10/sup 6/ years storage) does not significantly increase the leachability of the glass in deionized water. Tests with Cm-244 doped glass show no increase in leach rate in water or brine up to a dose of 10/sup 18/ ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..-recoils/g glass. Results of larger doses are being examined. The density of the Cm-244 doped glass has decreased by 1% at a dose of 10/sup 18/ particles/g glass. With ..gamma..-radiation, the density has changed by < 0.05% at a dose of 8.5 x 10/sup 10/ rad. Results of leach tests in deionized water and brine indicated that this very large dose of ..gamma..-radiation increased the leach rate by only 20%. Also, the leach rates are lower in brine.

  15. Alpha-recoil effect on the dissolution of betafite: rapid natural annealing of radiation damage within a metamict phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betafite, a radioactive mineral, is the Ti-rich member of the pyrochlore group, A/sub 1-2/B2X6Y/sub 0-1/, (Fd3m, Z = 8), where A = Ca, Na, U, Th, REE (rare earth elements, Y, Ba, Sr, Bi, Pb; B = Nb, Ti, Ta, Zr, Sn, Fe: X = oxygen; Y = 0, OH and F. The pyrochlore structure (or structural derivatives, e.g. zirconolite in SYNROC) is a common constituent of polyphase, crystalline radioactive waste forms. Naturally occurring minerals with this structure often occur in the metamict state. Therefore, a principal concern is the effect of alpha-recoil damage on the structure and dissolution behavior of synthetic, analogue, waste-form phases which contain actinides. The authors describe the dissolution behavior of 238U, 234U, 232Th, 230Th and 228Th in betafite during leaching in a bicarbonate-carbonate solution. Results indicate enhanced leaching of recently produced alpha-recoil damage as evidenced by the more rapid dissolution rate of 228Th relative to 232Th and 230Th, and only slightly enhanced leaching of older damage as evidenced by a small increase in the dissolution rate of 234U relative to 238U. These experiments demonstrate that individual alpha-recoil tracks are preserved for some time as disordered regions of higher chemical reactivity in already fully-damaged, aperiodic structures. The authors estimate an annealing time for the alpha-recoil tracks of 2000 +/- 1300 yr in the metastable, aperiodic structure. Similar alpha-recoil tracks should be formed and annealed in other aperiodic nuclear waste forms, such as borosilicate glass

  16. Combined effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and ionizing radiation on the induction of apoptosis in 5637 bladder carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baierlein, S.A.; Distel, L.; Sieber, R.; Weiss, C.; Roedel, C.; Sauer, R.; Roedel, F. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Background and Purpose: Apoptosis can be induced by distinct but overlapping pathways. Ionizing radiation induces apoptosis by an ''intrinsic'', mitochondria-dependent pathway. Ligation of tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-){alpha}, FAS (CD95) or TRAIL receptors are typical representatives of an extrinsic, death-receptor-mediated pathway. In this study the effect of irradiation, treatment with the cytokine TNF-{alpha}, or a combination of both on the induction of apoptosis and clonogenic survival of bladder carcinoma cells was investigated. Material and Methods: 5637 bladder carcinoma cells were treated with different concentrations of recombinant TNF-{alpha} (0-10 ng/ml), irradiated with single doses ranging from 0.5 to 10 Gy, or a combination of both modalities. Apoptotic cells were quantified by the TUNEL assay up to 96 h following treatment, clonogenic cell survival by a clonogenic assay. Synergistic effects of both modalities were evaluated using isobolographic analysis. Results: Irradiation of 5637 carcinoma cells resulted in a discontinuous dose dependence of the apoptotic fraction with a pronounced increase in the range of 0-2 Gy and a slighter increase at 2-10 Gy. The percentage of apoptotic carcinoma cells also increased continuously after treatment with lower concentrations of TNF-{alpha} reaching a plateau at concentrations of 5.0-10.0 ng/ml. Isobolographic analysis revealed a supraadditive interrelationship between irradiation and TNF-{alpha} in the range between 0.005 and 0.5 ng/ml, and an additive effect for TNF-{alpha} concentrations > 0.5 ng/ml. The additive effects were confirmed in clonogenic survival assays with reduced survival fractions following combined TNF-{alpha} administration and irradiation. Conclusion: The combination of two apoptosis-inducing modalities resulted in a synergistic effect on the induction of apoptosis in 5637 bladder carcinoma cells. Although a radiosensitizing effect still has to be proven in animal models

  17. Model of cell response to {\\alpha}-particle radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Longjian

    2012-01-01

    Starting from a general equation for organism (or cell system) growth and attributing additional cell death rate (besides the natural rate) to therapy, we derive an equation for cell response to {\\alpha} radiation. Different from previous models that are based on statistical theory, the present model connects the consequence of radiation with the growth process of a biosystem and each variable or parameter has meaning regarding the cell evolving process. We apply this equation to model the dose response for {\\alpha}-particle radiation. It interprets the results of both high and low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. When LET is high, the additional death rate is a constant, which implies that the localized cells are damaged immediately and the additional death rate is proportional to the number of cells present. While at low LET, the additional death rate includes a constant term and a linear term of radiation dose, implying that the damage to some cell nuclei has a time accumulating effect. This model ...

  18. Mechanism of radiation graft of methyl-. cap alpha. -fluoroacrylate and. cap alpha. ,. beta. ,. beta. -trifluorostyrene on perfluorinated copolymer. [Cobalt 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivankin, A.N.; Tevlina, A.S.; Zagorets, P.A. (Moskovskij Khimiko-Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1983-04-01

    The kinetics of radiation-induced graft copolymerization of methyl-..cap alpha..-fluoroacrylate and ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., ..beta..-trifluorostyrene to perfluorinated copolymer of hexafluoropropylene with tetrafluoroethylene has been studied. The orders of the grafting reaction towards the monomer and dose rate as well as the values of rate constants of radiation-induced grafting at various temperatures were determined, the effective activation energy of grafting (20.6 kJ/mol) was calculated. The kinetic scheme of elementary acts of radiation-induced graft copolymerization is discussed.

  19. The effect of combining recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha with local radiation on tumor control probability of a human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF-α) on a human glioblastoma multiforme (U87) xenograft in nude mice, and to study the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation on the tumor control probability of this tumor model. Methods and Materials: U87 xenograft was transplanted SC into the right hindleg of NCr/Sed nude mice (7-8 weeks old, male). When tumors reached a volume of about 110 mm3, mice were randomly assigned to treatment: rHuTNF-α alone compared with normal saline control; or local radiation plus rHuTNF-α vs. local radiation plus normal saline. Parameters of growth delay, volume doubling time, percentage of necrosis, and cell loss factor were used to assess the antitumor effects of rHuTNF-α on this tumor. The TCD50 (tumor control dose 50%) was used as an endpoint to determine the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation. Results: Tumor growth in mice treated with a dose of 150 μg/kg body weight rHuTNF-α, IP injection daily for 7 consecutive days, was delayed about 8 days compared to that in controls. Tumors in the treatment group had a significantly longer volume doubling time, and were smaller in volume and more necrotic than matched tumors in control group. rHuTNF-α also induced a 2.3 times increase of cell loss factor. The administration of the above-mentioned dose of rHuTNF-α starting 24 h after single doses of localized irradiation under hypoxic condition, resulted in a significant reduction in TCD50 from the control value of 60.9 Gy to 50.5 Gy (p 50 value in the treatment vs. the control groups

  20. Health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is energy that travels through space as electromagnetic waves or a stream of fast moving particles. In the workplace, the sources of ionizing radiation are radioactive substances, nuclear power plants, x-ray machines and nuclear devices used in medicine, research and industry. Commonly encountered types of radiation are alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Alpha particles have very little penetrating power and pose a risk only when the radioactive substance is deposited inside the body. Beta particles are more penetrating than alpha particles and can penetrate the outer body tissues causing damage to the skin and the eyes. Gamma rays are highly penetrating and can cause radiation damage to the whole body. The probability of radiation-induced disease depends on the accumulated amount of radiation dose. The main health effects of ionizing radiation are cancers in exposed persons and genetic disorders in the children, grandchildren and subsequent generations of the exposed parents. The fetus is highly sensitive to radiation-induced abnormalities. At high doses, radiation can cause cataracts in the eyes. There is no firm evidence that ionizing radiation causes premature aging. Radiation-induced sterility is highly unlikely for occupational doses. The data on the combined effect of ionizing radiation and other cancer-causing physical and chemical agents are inconclusive

  1. The effects and control of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; ionising radiation (alpha and beta particles, gamma- and X-radiation, neutrons, half-life, sources of radiation); biological effects; risk estimates (somatic) (early effects, delayed effects); risk estimates (hereditary); control of radiation; risk estimates (accidents). (U.K.)

  2. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of our research work is to provide -- with the aid of biophysical models of radiation action -- information on human risks following exposure to radon alpha particles. The approach proposed consists of (1) developing appropriate models (parametric and non-parametric) for alpha radiation induction of relevant end points (survival, cellular transformation), (2) providing an accurate physical characterization of the particle tracks in terms of nanodosimetric distributions, (3) supporting the models by detailed, molecular studies of the direct and indirect effects of alpha particles on DNA. Activities in the second year of this project are described

  3. Dislocations and radiation damage in {alpha}-uranium; Dislocations et effets des radiations dans l'uranium {alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leteurtre, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Dislocations in {alpha}-uranium were studied by electron microscopy. Electropolishing of thin foils was performed at low temperature (-110 deg. C) to prevent oxidation. Burgers vectors of twins dislocations are defined. Interactions between slip and twinning are studied from both experimental and theoretical point of view. Samples irradiated at several burn-up were examined. In order to explain our micrographic results, and also all information gathered in literature about radiation damage in {alpha}-uranium, a coherent model is propound for the fission particles effects. We analyse the influences of parameters: temperature, dislocation density, impurity content. The number of point defects created by one initial fission is determined for pure and annealed metal. The importance of the self-anneal which occurs immediately in each displacement spike, and the anneal due to a new fission on the damage resulting from a previous fission, are estimated. The focussing distance in [100] direction is found to be about 1000 Angstrom, at 4 deg. K. (author) [French] Ce travail est une etude par microscopie electronique des dislocations induites dans l'uranium {alpha}, soit par deformation plastique, soit par irradiation. Une methode de preparation des lames minces a basse temperature (-110 deg. C) a ete mise au point. Les vecteurs de Burgers des diverses dislocations de macles de ce metal ont ete definis. Les interactions glissements- maclages sont etudiees experimentalement et theoriquement. Des echantillons irradies a divers taux de combustion ont ete examines. Pour expliquer nos resultats micrographiques, et aussi l'ensemble des informations recueillies dans la litterature concernant l'endommagement par irradiation de l'uranium-{alpha}, nous proposons un modele coherent de l'effet des fragments de fission dans ce metal. L'influence des parametres: temperature, densite de dislocations, impuretes est analysee. Le nombre de defauts ponctuels crees

  4. Study of radiation effects on the cell structure and evaluation of the dose delivered by x-ray and {alpha}-particles microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosior, Ewelina; Cloetens, Peter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bohic, Sylvain [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38000 Grenoble (France); INSERM U-836 (Team 6: Synchrotron Radiation and Medical Research), Grenoble Institut of Neuroscience, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2012-12-24

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to study radiation effects on cells. Experiments were performed on freeze-dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European synchrotron radiation facility. Quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass and is used to evaluate the structural changes due to irradiation during X-ray fluorescence experiments. Complementary to phase contrast imaging, scanning transmission ion microscopy is performed and doses of all the experiments are compared. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the proposed approach to study radiation-induced damage at the sub-cellular level.

  5. Lyman-alpha radiative transfer during the Epoch of Reionization: contribution to 21-cm signal fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Semelin, B; Baek, S

    2007-01-01

    During the epoch of reionization, Ly-alpha photons emitted by the first stars can couple the neutral hydrogen spin temperature to the kinetic gas temperature, providing the opportunity to observe the gas in emission or absorption in the 21-cm line. Given the bright foregrounds, it is of prime importance to determine precisely the fluctuations signature of the signal, to be able to extract it by its correlation power. LICORICE is a Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code, coupled to the dynamics via an adaptative Tree-SPH code. We present here the Ly-alpha part of the implementation, and validate it through three classical tests. Contrary to previous works, we do not assume that P_alpha, the number of scatterings of Ly-alpha photons per atom per second, is proportional to the Ly-alpha background flux, but take into account the scatterings in the Ly-alpha line wings. The latter have the effect to steepen the radial profile of P_alpha around each source, and re-inforce the contrast of the fluctuations. In the partic...

  6. Chemistry of a protoplanetary disk with grain settling and Lyman alpha radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fogel, Jeffrey K J; Bergin, Edwin A; Calvet, Nuria; Semenov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We present results from a model of the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks. In our models we directly calculate the changing propagation and penetration of a high energy radiation field with Lyman alpha radiation included. We also explore the effect on our models of including dust grain settling. We find that, in agreement with earlier studies, the evolution of dust grains plays a large role in determining how deep the UV radiation penetrates into the disk. Significant grain settling at the midplane leads to much smaller freeze-out regions and a correspondingly larger molecular layer, which leads to an increase in column density for molecular species such as CO, CN and SO. The inclusion of Lyman alpha radiation impacts the disk chemistry through specific species that have large photodissociation cross sections at 1216 A. These include HCN, NH3 and CH4, for which the column densities are decreased by an order of magnitude or more due to the presence of Lyman alpha radiation in the UV spectrum. A few spe...

  7. Biological stress responses induced by alpha radiation exposure in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, A.; Horemans, N.; Van Hees, M.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Knapen, D.; Blust, R. [University of Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    To enhance the robustness of radiation protection criteria for biota, additional information on the biological impact of radionuclides on non-human biota is needed. In particular the effects of alpha emitting isotopes have been poorly studied within a radioecological contextual though they exhibit a high linear energy transfer which can cause significant biological damage when taken up by organisms. Therefore, it is not only essential to measure alpha radiation toxicity, but also try to understand the underlying mechanisms of this stressor. The current study aimed to contribute to a better knowledge of the fundamental processes regulating alpha radiation stress response mechanisms in higher plants. {sup 241}Am was primarily selected as it is an almost pure alpha emitter and, as a daughter nuclide of {sup 241}Pu, it will become one of the dominant pollutants in plutonium affected areas. The aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor has proven its value in eco-toxicological research as representative of higher aquatic plants (OECD guideline nr. 221) and will be used to analyze alpha radiation stress in plant systems. An individual growth inhibition test was set up by means of single dose-response curve in order to identify the Effective Dose Rates (EDR-values) for frond size and biomass. As the mean path length is small for alpha particles, the accumulation of the radionuclide inside species represents almost exclusively the dosimetry. Therefore, quantification of {sup 241}Am uptake and {sup 241}Am distribution were evaluated separately for roots and fronds taking the activity concentrations of growth medium into account. Taken together with the respective dose conversion coefficients from the ERICA tool, this allowed to construct an accurate dosimetric model to determine internal and external dose rates. Different standard media were tested on growth rate and biomass to analyse the amount of {sup 241}Am taken up by the plants exposed from 2.5 to 100 kBq/L. From these

  8. Determination of alpha constant value for brazilian reality aiming de radiation protection optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to present a methodology for the calculation of the alpha constant taking into account the actual conditions in Brazil. This constant is used for the minimization of the worker doses meaning the optimization of radiation protection. The alpha constant represents a monetary value to establish the health detriment associated to the stochastic effects for unit of collective dose, and is directly related to the value of the human life. Along the years, several methods have been developed to obtain the most appropriate value for the alpha constant. These methods will be objects of analysis of this work. This work presents two methods for determination of the alpha constant: 'human capital' that is based on GDP of the country and 'willingness-to-pay' that is established for the value that the population would be willing to pay for the safety of the nuclear and radioactive facilities. A new methodology for the calculation of the alpha constant has been proposed in this study, that is the combination of two method previously mentioned, and recommends a new value of US$ 16,000.00 per man-sievert. Currently the value established by CNEN is US$ 10,000.00 per men sievert. This work also presents, in full details, the main mathematical tools for the elaboration of the optimization of the radiation protection: cost-benefit analysis, extended cost-benefit analysis and multi attribute utility analysis. An applied example, for an uranium mine radiation protection optimization was used to compare those two values of the alpha constant. (author)

  9. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  10. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-alpha line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, the impact of some previously ignored radiative transfer effects is calculated. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-alpha line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-alpha line blueward of the hydrogen ...

  11. Space radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors briefly discusses the radiation environment in near-earth space and it's influences on material, and electronic devices using in space airship, also, the research developments in space radiation effects are introduced

  12. Relativistic effects in Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Iršič, Vid; Viel, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We present the calculation of the Lyman-alpha (Lyman-$\\alpha$) transmitted flux fluctuations with full relativistic corrections to the first order. Even though several studies exist on relativistic effects in galaxy clustering, this is the first study to extend the formalism to a different tracer of underlying matter at unique redshift range ($z = 2 - 5$). Furthermore, we show a comprehensive application of our calculations to the Quasar- Lyman-$\\alpha$ cross-correlation function. Our results indicate that the signal of relativistic effects can be as large as 30% at Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale, which is much larger than anticipated and mainly due to the large differences in density bias factors of our tracers. We construct an observable, the anti-symmetric part of the cross- correlation function, that is dominated by the relativistic signal and offers a new way to measure the relativistic terms at relatively small scales. The analysis shows that relativistic effects are important when considerin...

  13. Alpha-risk: a European project on the quantification of risks associated with multiple radiation exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurier, D.; Monchaux, G.; Tirmarche, M. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Darby, S. [Cancer Research UK, Oxford (United Kingdom); Cardis, E. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, 69 - Lyon (France); Binks, K. [Westlakes Scientific Consulti ng Ltd, Moor Row (United Kingdom); Hofmann, W. [Salzburg Univ. (Austria); Muirhead, C. [Health Protection Agency, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The Alpha-Risk research project is being conducted within the Sixth European Framework Programme (EC-FP6, 2005 -2008). It aims to improve the quantification of risks associated with multiple exposures, taking into account the contribution of different radionuclides and external exposure using specific organ dose calculations. The Alpha-Risk Consortium involves 18 partners from 9 countries, and is coordinated by the IRSN. Its composition allows a multidisciplinary collaboration between researchers in epidemiology, dosimetry, statistics, modelling and risk assessment. Alpha-Risk brings together major epidemiological studies in Europe, which are able to evaluate long-term health effects of internal exposure from radionuclides. It includes large size cohort and case-control studies, with accurate registration of individual annual exposures: uranium miner studies, studies on lung cancer and indoor radon exposure, and studies of lung cancer and leukaemia among nuclear workers exposed to transuranic nuclides (mainly uranium and plutonium), for whom organ doses will be reconstructed individually. The contribution of experts in dosimetry will allow the calculation of organ doses in presence of multiple exposures (radon decay products, uranium dust and external gamma exposure). Expression of the risk per unit organ dose will make it possible to compare results with those from other populations exposed to external radiation. The multidisciplinary approach of Alpha-Risk promotes the development of coherent and improved methodological approaches regarding risk modelling. A specific work - package is dedicated to the integration of results and their use for risk assessment, especially for radon. Alpha-Risk will contribute to a better understanding of long-term health risks following chronic low doses from internal exposures. The project also has the great potential to help resolve major public health concerns about the effects of low and/or protracted exposures, especially

  14. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  15. Quantification of actinide alpha-radiation damage in minerals and ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnan, Ian; Cho, Herman; Weber, William J

    2007-01-11

    There are large amounts of heavy alpha-emitters in nuclear waste and nuclear materials inventories stored in various sites around the world. These include plutonium and minor actinides such as americium and curium. In preparation for geological disposal there is consensus that actinides that have been separated from spent nuclear fuel should be immobilized within mineral-based ceramics rather than glass because of their superior aqueous durability and lower risk of accidental criticality. However, in the long term, the alpha-decay taking place in these ceramics will severely disrupt their crystalline structure and reduce their durability. A fundamental property in predicting cumulative radiation damage is the number of atoms permanently displaced per alpha-decay. At present, this number is estimated to be 1,000-2,000 atoms/alpha in zircon. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance, spin-counting experiments that measure close to 5,000 atoms/alpha in radiation-damaged natural zircons. New radiological nuclear magnetic resonance measurements on highly radioactive, 239Pu zircon show damage similar to that caused by 238U and 232Th in mineral zircons at the same dose, indicating no significant effect of half-life or loading levels (dose rate). On the basis of these measurements, the initially crystalline structure of a 10 weight per cent 239Pu zircon would be amorphous after only 1,400 years in a geological repository (desired immobilization timescales are of the order of 250,000 years). These measurements establish a basis for assessing the long-term structural durability of actinide-containing ceramics in terms of an atomistic understanding of the fundamental damage event. PMID:17215840

  16. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  17. Effects of internally deposited alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study seeks to identify and quantify the human health effects of occupational exposures to radium, use the health effects data from the radium study to predict responses to other alpha-emitting and/or bone-seeking radionuclides at occupational exposure levels and above, and predict the effects of these radionuclides, specifically environmental radium and its daughters, at nonoccupational exposure levels. 14 refs

  18. alpha/beta radiation detector using wavelength and delayed fluorescence discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Maekawa, T

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a novel two-layer radiation detector for alpha/beta simultaneous counting for dust radiation monitoring in nuclear power plants. For alpha/beta discrimination, wavelength and delayed fluorescence discrimination techniques were newly developed. To establish the wavelength discrimination, we adopted a two-layer scintillator consisting of the plastic scintillator (NE-111A) and Y sub 2 O sub 2 S(Eu) whose emission spectra are quite different. To reject the mixed beta signal in the alpha detection layer, we used the delayed fluorescence characteristics of Y sub 2 O sub 2 S(Eu) in the signal processing. We manufactured the detector and tested its feasibility and the detection performance for dust radiation monitoring. Finally, we concluded that the performance of this new alpha/beta detector using the new discrimination methods is suitable for dust radiation monitoring.

  19. Growth and Characterization of alpha-PbO for Room Temperature Radiation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Erin Leigh

    A global trading structure and high throughput of shipping containers into ports around the world increases the chance of nuclear terrorism via cargo containers. Harmless radioactive sources confuse and impede detection of the materials that pose a real threat, making spectroscopy difficult and requiring detectors with high resolution. The current methods that are used to check containers in ports have security flaws, and only 5% of all shipping containers are checked. The development of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors is one of the protocols being advanced to alleviate this risk because they can function at room temperature and they are cost effective, easily produced, and have high resolution. This dissertation has addressed the current lack of "perfect" room temperature detector materials by investigating alpha-PbO, a novel material in this field. This includes the development of a growth process for alpha-PbO thin films, as well as its structural and performance characterization as a detector material. Because we intend alpha-PbO to be a photoconductive detector, it should have certain properties. A photoconductive detector consists of a highly resistive material with a voltage bias across it. It absorbs incident gamma-rays, creating electron-hole pairs that provide a signal. To function well, it must have a high atomic number and a high density in order to absorb high-energy photons via the photoelectric effect. It should also have a large resistivity and a wide band gap to avoid large leakage currents at room temperature. Finally, it must have good charge carrier transport properties and detector resolution in order to be able to determine the characteristic energy peaks of the radiation-emitting source. We chose alpha-PbO because it has a very high Z and a very high density and a band gap in the correct range. It also has a rich history of use as a photoconductor that reaches back to the 1950s. Numerous methods have been used to grow thin films of alpha

  20. Black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels:The $ (Z \\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Wanping; Mei, Xuesong; Lu, Jingjun; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The next-to-leading order black-body radiation(BBR) shift to atomic energy-levels, namely $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction, was studied by using the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics(NRQED). We also estimate the one-loop contribution of quadrupole and the two-loop contributions of BBR-shift of the thermal(real) photon. These corrections have not been investigated before. The order of magnitude BBR-shift indicates the one-loop contribution of quadrupole is stronger than the previou...

  1. Black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels:The $ (Z \\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Wanping; Lu, Jingjun; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The next-to-leading order black-body radiation(BBR) shift to atomic energy-levels, namely $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction, was studied by using the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics(NRQED) at first. This $T^{2}$-dependent correction has not been investigated before, and only contains the contribution of eletric-dipole of thermal photon. In order to study the contribution of multipolar. We estimate the two-loop contributions of BBR-shift by using quantum electrodynamics approach(QED), and find both one-loop and two-loop diagram contribute to the $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction. Integrating the results which are obtained by these two approaches, the $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction we derived is in principle applicable to multi-electron atoms and contains the contribution of multipolar. The order of magnitude BBR-shift indicates this next-to-leading order BBR-shift may be as significant as the leading order in the multi-electron atoms or cold ones.

  2. Alpha particle effects on MHD ballooning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period, as the first step towards the goal of detail understanding of the effects of alpha particle on MHD Ballooning Modes, a new numerical approach to investigate the stability of low-frequency fluctuations in high temperature tokamaks was developed by solving the gyrokinetic equations for the ion and electron directly as an initial value problem. The advantage of this approach is the inclusion of many important kinetic features of the problem without approximations and computationally more economical than particle-pushing simulation. The ion-temperature-gradient-mode was investigated to benchmark this new simulation technique. Previous results in literature were recovered. Both the adiabatic electron model and the full drift-kinetic electron model are studied. Numerical result shows that the full drift-kinetic electron model is more unstable. The development of subcycling technique to handle the fast electron bounce time is particularly significant to apply this new approach to the alpha particle problem since alpha particle bounce frequency is also significantly higher than the mode frequency. This new numerical technique will be the basis of future study of the microstability in high temperature tokamaks with alpha particles (or any energetic species). 15 refs., 13 figs

  3. Biophysical radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation is based upon the absorption of energy in molecular structures of a cell. Because of the quantum nature of radiation large fluctuations of energy concentration in subcellulare regions has to be considered. In addition both the spatial distribution of a sensitive molecular target and cellulare repair processes has to be taken into consideration for an assessment of radiation action. In radiation protection the difference between the quality factor and the Relative Biological Effectiveness has a fundamental meaning and will be discussed in more detail. The present report includes a short review on some relevant models on radiation action and a short discussion on effects of low dose irradiation. (orig.)

  4. Effect of Pilates Training on Alpha Rhythm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhijie Bian; Hongmin Sun; Chengbiao Lu; Li Yao; Shengyong Chen; Xiaoli Li

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of Pilates training on the brain function was investigated through five case studies. Alpha rhythm changes during the Pilates training over the different regions and the whole brain were mainly analyzed, including power spectral density and global synchronization index (GSI). It was found that the neural network of the brain was more active, and the synchronization strength reduced in the frontal and temporal regions due to the Pilates training. These results support...

  5. An alpha-omega-dynamo with an alpha-effect due to magnetostrophic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D.

    1987-03-01

    The effects of the latitude dependence of the dynamic alpha-effect on the solution of equations of alpha-omega-dynamos are investigated. The equations of kinematic rotationally symmetric alpha-omega-dynamos are evaluated using the spherical solar dynamo model of Deinzer and Stix (1971), in which the induction effects, differential rotation, and alpha-effect act in two separate infinitesimal thin shells. Butterfly diagrams are derived and analyzed. It is observed that the diagram has two branches: the ordinary sunspot branch, migrating from midlatitudes toward the equator during the cycle, and the polar branch, which migrates from the midlatitudes toward the pole. It is also found that, in order to obtain the correct propagation direction of the two dynamos, the alpha of the magnetostrophic waves requires a rotation decreasing with depth. The influence of various locations of the induction layers of alpha- and omega-effect are examined.

  6. Alpha effect and turbulent diffusion from convection

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Brandenburg, A

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) Aims: To study turbulent transport coefficients that describe the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in turbulent convection. Methods: We use the test field method together with 3D numerical simulations of turbulent convection with shear and rotation to compute turbulent transport coefficients describing the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in mean-field theory in the kinematic regime. 1D mean-field models are used with the derived turbulent transport coefficients to compare with direct simulations. Results: The alpha-effect increases monotonically as rotation increases. Turbulent diffusivity, eta_t, is proportional to the square of the turbulent vertical velocity. Whereas eta_t decreases approximately inversely proportional to the wavenumber of the field, the alpha-effect and turbulent pumping show a more complex behaviour. In the presence of shear and no rotation a small alpha-effect is induced which does not seem to show any consistent trend as a function of shear. If the shear is ...

  7. The Alpha Dynamo Effects in Laboratory Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Stewart C. Prager

    2001-10-16

    A concise review of observations of the alpha dynamo effect in laboratory plasmas is given. Unlike many astrophysical systems, the laboratory pinch plasmas are driven magnetically. When the system is overdriven, the resultant instabilities cause magnetic and flow fields to fluctuate, and their correlation induces electromotive forces along the mean magnetic field. This alpha-effect drives mean parallel electric current, which, in turn, modifies the initial background mean magnetic structure towards the stable regime. This drive-and-relax cycle, or the so-called self-organization process, happens in magnetized plasmas in a timescale much shorter than resistive diffusion time, thus it is a fast and unquenched dynamo process. The observed alpha-effect redistributes magnetic helicity (a measure of twistedness and knottedness of magnetic field lines) but conserves its total value. It can be shown that fast and unquenched dynamos are natural consequences of a driven system where fluctuations are statistically either not stationary in time or not homogeneous in space, or both. Implications to astrophysical phenomena will be discussed.

  8. Ly{alpha} DOMINANCE OF THE CLASSICAL T TAURI FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindhelm, Eric [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); France, Kevin; Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Bergin, Edwin [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yang Hao [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Brown, Joanna M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Valenti, Jeff, E-mail: eric@boulder.swri.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation plays an important role in determining chemical abundances in protoplanetary disks. H I Lyman {alpha} (Ly{alpha}) is suspected to be the dominant component of the FUV emission from Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), but is difficult to measure directly due to circumstellar and interstellar H I absorption. To better characterize the intrinsic Ly{alpha} radiation, we present FUV spectra of 14 CTTSs taken with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph instruments. H{sub 2} fluorescence, commonly seen in the spectra of CTTSs, is excited by Ly{alpha} photons, providing an indirect measure of the Ly{alpha} flux incident upon the warm disk surface. We use observed H{sub 2} progression fluxes to reconstruct the CTTS Ly{alpha} profiles. The Ly{alpha} flux correlates with total measured FUV flux, in agreement with an accretion-related source of FUV emission. With a geometry-independent analysis, we confirm that in accreting T Tauri systems Ly{alpha} radiation dominates the FUV flux ({approx}1150 A -1700 A). In the systems surveyed this one line comprises 70%-90% of the total FUV flux.

  9. Radiation piezoelectric effect in germanium single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.

    1977-06-01

    Irradiation with ionizing particles of a germanium single crystal and uniaxial deformation at right-angles to the particle beam produced an electric field and a corresponding emf due to the radiation piezoelectric effect. Measurements were carried out when such a single crystal was irradiated with ..cap alpha.. particles and protons. The piezoelectric emf increased linearly with the compressive stress and the ..cap alpha..-particle flux intensity. The emf depended weakly on the particle energy. The observed effect was due to the anisotropy resulting from uniaxial deformation.

  10. Portable alpha, beta, gamma, x and neutron radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Here below there is short information about new instrument developed in SPE ATOMTEX, which will be produced at the close of the year. The instrument consists of the main unit, including built-in detector Nal (Tl) of diameter 25x40 mm and photomultiplier tube, analog devices (amplifier, multichannel pulse-height analyzer of 256 channels, high-voltage power supply, LED stabilization scheme of measuring path) and digital devices (microprocessor for data processing, control and storage, liquid crystal display, interface). The main unit operates also as processing and indication device of connected external detection units: α, β-radiation contamination scintillator detection unit; x, γ-radiation detection unit with silicon detector to measure equivalent dose and equivalent dose rate and n-radiation detection unit with proportional 3He-counters. Because of scintillator detector Nal (Tl), the main unit, operating in counting mode, searches and detects effectively x- and gamma-radiation sources with the energy from 30 keV to 3 MeV. The point source of 137Cs of 50 kBq is detected at the distance of 10 cm for 2s. Ambient equivalent dose and equivalent dose rate are measured with this detector using the method of instrumental spectrum transformation into dose. In this case the energy range is from 40 keV to 3 meV. Energy relationship of readings do not exceed ± 15% with respect to the energy of 0,662 MeV. The range of ambient equivalent dose rate measurement is from 0,05 μSv/h to 0,05 mSv/h, with response time of 20 s at background change from 0,05 μSv/h to 0,1 μSv/h. The main unit operates also as selective express-radiometer, which could evaluate sample activity by single gamma-line. Measurement geometry is Marinelly's vessel of 0,5 l. The lower limit of measuring activity is 300 Bq/l without lead shield and 20 Bq/l with it with measurement time of 10 min. The unit weighs not more than 0,9 kg. External detection units connect to interface socket by turns

  11. Radiation Effects In Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ram K.

    2011-06-01

    Protecting space missions from severe exposures from radiation, in general, and long duration/deep space human missions, in particular, is a critical design driver, and could be a limiting factor. The space radiation environment consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar particle events (SPE), trapped radiation, and includes ions of all the known elements over a very broad energy range. These ions penetrate spacecraft materials producing nuclear fragments and secondary particles that damage biological tissues and microelectronic devices. One is required to know how every element (and all isotopes of each element) in the periodic table interacts and fragments on every other element in the same table as a function of kinetic energy ranging over many decades. In addition, the accuracy of the input information and database, in general and nuclear data in particular, impacts radiation exposure health assessments and payload penalty. After a brief review of effects of space radiation on materials and electronics, human space missions to Mars is discussed.

  12. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Lyman Alpha Emitters. I. Statistics of Spectra and Luminosity

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zheng; Cen, Renyue; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    We combine a cosmological reionization simulation with box size of 100Mpc/h on a side and a Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha (Lya) radiative transfer code to model Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z~5.7. The model introduces Lya radiative transfer as the single factor for transforming the intrinsic Lya emission properties into the observed ones. Spatial diffusion of Lya photons from radiative transfer results in extended Lya emission and only the central part with high surface brightness can be observed...

  13. Lyman alpha dominance of the Classical T Tauri FUV Radiation Field

    CERN Document Server

    Schindhelm, Eric; Herczeg, Gregory; Bergin, Edwin; Yang, Hao; Brown, Alexander; Brown, Joanna; Linsky, Jeffrey; Valenti, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation plays an important role in determining chemical abundances in protoplanetary disks. HI Lyman alpha is suspected to be the dominant component of the FUV emission from Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), but is difficult to measure directly due to circumstellar and interstellar HI absorption. To better characterize the intrinsic Lyman alpha radiation, we present FUV spectra of 14 CTTSs taken with the Hubble Space Telescope COS and STIS instruments. H2 fluorescence, commonly seen in the spectra of CTTSs, is excited by Lyman alpha photons, providing an indirect measure of the Lyman alpha flux incident upon the warm disk surface. We use observed H2 progression fluxes to reconstruct the CTTS Lyman alpha profiles. The Lyman alpha flux correlates with total measured FUV flux, in agreement with an accretion-related source of FUV emission. With a geometry-independent analysis, we confirm that in accreting T Tauri systems Lyman alpha radiation dominates the FUV flux (~1150 - 1700 Angstroms)....

  14. Ly-alpha Radiative Transfer in Cosmological Simulations and Application to a z~8 Emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Tasitsiomi, A

    2005-01-01

    We develop a Ly-alpha radiative transfer (RT) Monte Carlo code for cosmological simulations.High resolution,along with appropriately treated cooling can result in simulated environments with very high optical depths.Thus,solving the Ly-alpha RT problem in cosmological simulations can take an unrealistically long time.For this reason,we develop methods to speed up the Ly-alpha RT.With these accelerating methods,along with the parallelization of the code,we make the problem of Ly-alpha RT in the complex environments of cosmological simulations tractable.We test the RT code against simple Ly-alpha emitter models,and then we apply it to the brightest Ly-alpha emitter of a gasdynamics+N-body Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) simulation at z~8.We find that recombination rather than cooling radiation Ly-alpha photons is the dominant contribution to the intrinsic Ly-alpha luminosity of the emitter,which is ~2.3x10e44 ergs/s.The size of the emitter is pretty small,making it unresolved for currently available instruments....

  15. Combination of pGL1-TNF-alpha gene and radiation (proton and gamma-ray) therapy against brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D S; Li, J; Kajioka, E H; Andres, M L; Moyers, M F; Slater, J M

    2000-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to determine if treatment with the newly constructed plasmid vector for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (pGL1-TNF-alpha) could enhance the radiation-induced growth reduction of C6 rat glioma. In addition, two different forms of ionizing radiation (gamma-rays and protons) were utilized. Body and spleen mass, leukocyte blastogenesis, and flow cytometry analysis of cell populations in blood and spleen were performed to detect toxicity, if any, and to identify mechanisms that may correlate with the anti-tumor action of combination therapy. C6 tumor cells were implanted subcutaneously into athymic mice and allowed to become established before treatment initiation. pGL1-TNF-alpha was injected into the implanted tumors, which were then irradiated 16-18 hr later; each modality was administered three times over 8-9 days. The addition of pGL1-TNF-alpha significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of radiation (p < 0.05). The effect was more than additive, since pGL1-TNF-alpha alone did not slow tumor progression and radiation alone had only a modest effect. Administration of pGL1-TNF-alpha together with proton radiation resulted in tumor volumes that were 23% smaller than those following pGL1-TNF-alpha + gamma-ray treatment; a similar differential in tumor size was observed in the groups receiving only radiation. Body weights and blood and spleen cell analyses did not reveal treatment-related toxicity. High basal proliferation of blood leukocytes and increased B cell levels in the spleen were associated with pGL1-TNF-alpha + 60Co (gamma-radiation) or proton treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the pGL1-TNF-alpha/radiation combination is effective and safe under the conditions employed. This is the first study to combine gene and proton radiation therapy and to show, under controlled experimental conditions, that proton radiation may have a greater effect against malignant tumors compared to the same physical dose of gamma-radiation. PMID

  16. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  17. Effects of radiation damage on SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern has been expressed in several quarters that the integrity of SYNROC as a waste form might be compromised by the effects of alpha radiation damage on its constituent minerals. The evidence discussed herein addresses that concern. Radiation damage to crystal lattices is caused dominantly by alpha emitters (actinide elements) present in zirconolite and perovskite phases. We have seen that the zirconolite phase in SYNROC containing 10% of HLW would require about 106 years before becoming completely metamict, i.e., losing the capacity to diffract X-rays. By this time, the alpha activity in SYNROC would have declined to a value smaller than that present in a natural uranium ore body. This level of activity can be considered effectively safe for a waste form buried in a suitable geologic repository. Moreover, even when metamict, the zirconolite continues to demonstrate a remarkable capacity to immobilize U, Th and their decay daughter products. The isotopic measurements on Sri Lanka and Jimberlana zirconolites demonstrated that these metamict minerals had behaved as closed systems for U, Th and Pb for periods of 560 and 2500 million years, respectively, despite intense radiation damage (SYNROC equivalent ages, about or greater than 109 years). Moreover, the Sri Lanka zirconolite was sufficiently tight to immobilize a considerable proportion of radiogenic helium, one of the most mobile of elements, for 560 million years. Our data on perovskite are limited and more work remains to be done. Nevertheless, present results indicate that perovskites are even more resistant to radiation damage than zirconolite

  18. Telomere Length in Aged Mayak PA Nuclear Workers Chronically Exposed to Internal Alpha and External Gamma Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherthan, Harry; Sotnik, Natalia; Peper, Michel; Schrock, Gerrit; Azizova, Tamara; Abend, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres consist of GC-rich DNA repeats and the "shelterin" protein complex that together protect chromosome ends from fusion and degradation. Telomeres shorten with age due to incomplete end replication and upon exposure to environmental and intrinsic stressors. Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to modulate telomere length. However, the response of telomere length in humans chronically exposed to radiation is poorly understood. Here, we studied relative telomere length (RTL) by IQ-FISH to leukocyte nuclei in a group of 100 workers from the plutonium production facility at the Mayak Production Association (PA) who were chronically exposed to alpha-emitting ((239)Pu) radiation and/or gamma (photon) radiation, and 51 local residents serving as controls, with a similar mean age of about 80 years. We applied generalized linear statistical models adjusted for age at biosampling and the second exposure type on a linear scale and observed an age-dependent telomere length reduction. In those individuals with the lowest exposure, a significant reduction of about 20% RTL was observed, both for external gamma radiation (≤1 Gy) and internal alpha radiation (≤0.05-0.1 Gy to the red bone marrow). In highly exposed individuals (>0.1 Gy alpha, 1-1.5 Gy gamma), the RTL was similar to control. Stratification by gender revealed a significant (∼30%) telomere reduction in low-dose-exposed males, which was absent in females. While the gender differences in RTL may reflect different working conditions, lifestyle and/or telomere biology, absence of a dose response in the highly exposed individuals may reflect selection against cells with short telomeres or induction of telomere-protective effects. Our observations suggest that chronic systemic exposure to radiation leads to variable dose-dependent effects on telomere length. PMID:27340887

  19. Telomere Length in Aged Mayak PA Nuclear Workers Chronically Exposed to Internal Alpha and External Gamma Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherthan, Harry; Sotnik, Natalia; Peper, Michel; Schrock, Gerrit; Azizova, Tamara; Abend, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres consist of GC-rich DNA repeats and the "shelterin" protein complex that together protect chromosome ends from fusion and degradation. Telomeres shorten with age due to incomplete end replication and upon exposure to environmental and intrinsic stressors. Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to modulate telomere length. However, the response of telomere length in humans chronically exposed to radiation is poorly understood. Here, we studied relative telomere length (RTL) by IQ-FISH to leukocyte nuclei in a group of 100 workers from the plutonium production facility at the Mayak Production Association (PA) who were chronically exposed to alpha-emitting ((239)Pu) radiation and/or gamma (photon) radiation, and 51 local residents serving as controls, with a similar mean age of about 80 years. We applied generalized linear statistical models adjusted for age at biosampling and the second exposure type on a linear scale and observed an age-dependent telomere length reduction. In those individuals with the lowest exposure, a significant reduction of about 20% RTL was observed, both for external gamma radiation (≤1 Gy) and internal alpha radiation (≤0.05-0.1 Gy to the red bone marrow). In highly exposed individuals (>0.1 Gy alpha, 1-1.5 Gy gamma), the RTL was similar to control. Stratification by gender revealed a significant (∼30%) telomere reduction in low-dose-exposed males, which was absent in females. While the gender differences in RTL may reflect different working conditions, lifestyle and/or telomere biology, absence of a dose response in the highly exposed individuals may reflect selection against cells with short telomeres or induction of telomere-protective effects. Our observations suggest that chronic systemic exposure to radiation leads to variable dose-dependent effects on telomere length.

  20. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  1. Radiation damage effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The summarized data suggest that both glass and crystalline waste forms may sustain substantial doses of α-decay damage and still retain their durability. Radiation effects in glasses are less pronounced and less complicated than that in single or poly-phase ceramics; thus, the latter category requires careful research and consideration. Perhaps the most important conclusion is that short-term actinide doping experiments in crystalline phases provide a realistic simulation of long-term effects based on the comparison of observed radiation effects in Pu-doped zircon and naturally damaged zircon (there is a 107 difference in dose rate). Deviations from the similarity in effect (e.g., saturation dose) may be attributed to low-temperature, long-term annealing effects

  2. Genetic effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are reviewed from studies on the genetic effects of x radiation in mice and the extrapolation of the findings for estimating genetic hazards in man is discussed. Data are included on the frequency of mutation induction following acute or chronic irradiation of male or female mice at various doses and dose rates

  3. Effect of Pilates Training on Alpha Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Bian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of Pilates training on the brain function was investigated through five case studies. Alpha rhythm changes during the Pilates training over the different regions and the whole brain were mainly analyzed, including power spectral density and global synchronization index (GSI. It was found that the neural network of the brain was more active, and the synchronization strength reduced in the frontal and temporal regions due to the Pilates training. These results supported that the Pilates training is very beneficial for improving brain function or intelligence. These findings maybe give us some line evidence to suggest that the Pilates training is very helpful for the intervention of brain degenerative diseases and cogitative dysfunction rehabilitation.

  4. The relationship between alpha B-crystallin and radiational cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To examine the expression of soluble α B-crystallin in radiation cataract of rat lens, and to probe the correlation between αB-crystallin and the radiation cataract. Methods: Eyes were irradiated with linear accelerator to establish the model of radiation cataract, rats were divided into the control group, experimental control group and X-irradiated group. All rats were sacrificed three months later, then the lenses were isolated carefully and homogenized in lysate. Lens homogenate was divided into soluble and insoluble fractions by centrifugating at 15000 g at 4 degree C for 20 minutes. The super-natant was obtained for the detection of αB-crystallin with western blot analysis. Results: Observed three months, lens in the normal control group and experimental control group were transparent; typical radiation cataract was formed by degrees in the 25 Gy groups. The soluble αB-crystallin level markedly decreased compared to the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: X-ray can degrade the soluble αB-crystallin level in lens and lead to cataract. (authors)

  5. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  6. Protective Role of Alpha Lipoic Acid Against Disorders Induced by Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation interacts with living cells, causing a variety of biochemical changes depending on exposed and absorbed doses, duration of exposure, interval after exposure and susceptibility of tissues to ionizing radiation. So, it may increase the oxidative stress and damage of body organs. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA-also known as thioctic acid) appears to be readily absorbed from an oral dose and converts easily to its reduced form, dihydro lipoic acid (DHLA), in many tissues of the body. ALA can neutralize free radicals in both fatty and watery regions of cells. The present study has been designed to evaluate the possible efficiency of ALA as antioxidant and radio-protector against radiation induced oxidative stress in different organs (liver, kidney and heart) in rats through estimation of the activity of markers of serum liver, kidney and heart function, in addition to the histopathological differentiation of these organs by light and electron microscope. Five equal groups were conducted for the study: control, ALA (30 mg/kg body wt), irradiated (each rat was exposed to 6 Gy as a fractionated dose of gamma (γ) radiation), irradiated plus ALA (each rat received ALA for 9 days simultaneously during exposure) and ALA plus irradiation plus ALA groups (each rat received ALA for a week pre-exposure plus 9 days during exposure). Radiation doses were fractionated dose levels of 2 Gy each 3 days to reach accumulative dose of 6 Gy. After 3 days of each exposure rats were sacrificed, except, those left for recovery test one month after last exposure. The results revealed that whole body γ-irradiation of rats induces oxidative stress in liver, kidney and heart obviously manifested by significant elevation in alanine and aspartate transaminase ( ALT and AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), urea, creatinine and creatine kinase (CK-MB). ALA treated-irradiated rats showed lower significantly values indicating remarkable improvement in all measured parameters and

  7. Dynamical Screening Effect on $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ Resonant Scattering and Thermal Nuclear Scattering Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Xiaojun; Müller, Berndt

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical screening effect in the QED plasma on the $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ scattering at the $^8$Be resonance. Dynamical screening leads to an imaginary part of the potential which results in a thermal width for the resonance and dominates over the previously considered static screening effect. As a result, both the resonance energy and width increase with the plasma temperature. Furthermore, dynamical screening can have a huge impact on the $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ thermal nuclear scattering rate. For example, when the temperature is around $10$ keV, the rate is suppressed by a factor of about $900$. We expect similar thermal suppressions of nuclear reaction rates to occur in nuclear reactions dominated by an above threshold resonance with a thermal energy. Dynamical screening effects on nuclear reactions can be relevant to cosmology and astrophysics.

  8. Radiation effects in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrt, D.; Vogel, W. (Otto-Schott-Inst., Chemische Fakultaet, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    Glass was produced by man about 4000 years ago. The scientific exploration of glass is very young and closely connected with Jena. Fraunhofer, Goethe, Dobereiner, Abbe, Zeiss and Schott are famous names on this field. Both crystals and glasses are solids. However, there are fundamental differences in their properties and behavior. Glass is a thermodynamically unstable state and has a defect structure compared to the crystal. Glass and its properties are subject to a variety of changes under the influence of high energy radiation. In general, effects extend from the reduction of specific ions to the collapse of the entire network. Ultraviolet and X-ray radiation effects on UV-transmitting glasses will be discussed. (orig.).

  9. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last day of March 1978 marked the completion of the first 3 years of operation of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF was established on 1 April 1975 as successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which had been in continuous operation since 1947. This record of the first 3 years of operation consists of selected reports and other documents prepared in the course of conducting the business of RERF and includes a brief history, a late radiation effects that might be conducted at RERF. The wisdom and thought given to the research program and its operation by the Scientific Council and the Board of Directors is reflected in the minutes of their meetings which are included in the Appendix. (Mori, K.)

  10. Cumulative radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In five previous papers, the concept of Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) has been presented as a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Simple nomographic and tabular methods for the solution of practical problems in radiotherapy are now described. An essential feature of solving a CRE problem is firstly to present it in a concise and readily appreciated form, and, to do this, nomenclature has been introduced to describe schedules and regimes as compactly as possible. Simple algebraic equations have been derived to describe the CRE achieved by multi-schedule regimes. In these equations, the equivalence conditions existing at the junctions between schedules are not explicit and the equations are based on the CREs of the constituent schedules assessed individually without reference to their context in the regime as a whole. This independent evaluation of CREs for each schedule has resulted in a considerable simplification in the calculation of complex problems. The calculations are further simplified by the use of suitable tables and nomograms, so that the mathematics involved is reduced to simple arithmetical operations which require at the most the use of a slide rule but can be done by hand. The order of procedure in the presentation and calculation of CRE problems can be summarised in an evaluation procedure sheet. The resulting simple methods for solving practical problems of any complexity on the CRE-system are demonstrated by a number of examples. (author)

  11. Helicity and alpha-effect by current-driven instabilities of helical magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gellert, M; Hollerbach, R

    2011-01-01

    Helical magnetic background fields with adjustable pitch angle are imposed on a conducting fluid in a differentially rotating cylindrical container. The small-scale kinetic and current helicities are calculated for various field geometries, and shown to have the opposite sign as the helicity of the large-scale field. These helicities and also the corresponding $\\alpha$-effect scale with the current helicity of the background field. The $\\alpha$-tensor is highly anisotropic as the components $\\alpha_{\\phi\\phi}$ and $\\alpha_{zz}$ have opposite signs. The amplitudes of the azimuthal $\\alpha$-effect computed with the cylindrical 3D MHD code are so small that the operation of an $\\alpha\\Omega$ dynamo on the basis of the current-driven, kink-type instabilities of toroidal fields is highly questionable. In any case the low value of the $\\alpha$-effect would lead to very long growth times of a dynamo in the radiation zone of the Sun and early-type stars of the order of mega-years.

  12. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  13. K{alpha}{sub 1} radiation from heavy, helium-like ions produced in relativistic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surzhykov, A.; Jentschura, U.D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Stoehlker, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Fritzsche, S. [Kassel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2006-11-15

    Bound-state transitions in few-electron, heavy ions following radiative electron capture are studied within the framework of the density matrix theory and the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock approach. Special attention is paid to the K{alpha}{sub 1}(1s{sub 1/2}2p{sub 3/2}{sup 1,3}P{sub J=1,2}{yields}1s{sub 1/2}{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub J=0}) radiative decay of helium-like uranium U{sup 90+} projectiles. This decay has recently been observed at the GSI facility in Darmstadt, giving rise to a surprisingly isotropic angular distribution, which is inconsistent with previous experiments and calculations based on a 'one-particle' model. We show that the unexpected isotropy essentially results from the mutual cancellation of the angular distributions of the {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields}{sup 1}S{sub 0} electric dipole and {sup 3}P{sub 2}{yields}{sup 1}S{sub 0} magnetic quadrupole transitions, both of which contribute to the K{alpha}{sub 1} radiation. Detailed computations on the anisotropy of the K{alpha}{sub 1} radiation have been carried out for a wide range of projectile energies and are compared to available experimental data. (orig.)

  14. Radiation effects in SYNROC-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Guinan, M.W.

    1981-09-30

    This paper describes SYNROC-D and the irradiation it will be subjected to over the first million years of storage. This will include about 8 x 10/sup 24/ alpha decays per m/sup 3/ and a total ionization dose of about 1 x 10/sup 11/ rads. Methods of simulating the radiation effects are discussed. Previous work by others is reviewed and compared on a dpa basis. /sup 238/Pu doping experiments to simulate internal alpha decay are described, and the progress is discussed. It is concluded that dose rate effects on swelling and metamictization of perovskite and zirconolite are small over a wide range of dose rate, and that swelling and metamictization in these minerals does not anneal significantly over geological time periods.

  15. Radiation effects in SYNROC-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes SYNROC-D and the irradiation it will be subjected to over the first million years of storage. This will include about 8 x 1024 alpha decays per m3 and a total ionization dose of about 1 x 1011 rads. Methods of simulating the radiation effects are discussed. Previous work by others is reviewed and compared on a dpa basis. 238Pu doping experiments to simulate internal alpha decay are described, and the progress is discussed. It is concluded that dose rate effects on swelling and metamictization of perovskite and zirconolite are small over a wide range of dose rate, and that swelling and metamictization in these minerals does not anneal significantly over geological time periods

  16. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work examines ionizing radiations: what they are, where they come from, their actions and consequences, finally the norms and preventive measures necessary to avoid serious contamination, whether the individual or the population in general is involved. Man has always been exposed to natural irradiation, but owing to the growing use of ionizing radiations both in medicine and in industry, not to mention nuclear tests and their use as an argument of dissuasion, the irradiation of human beings is increasing daily. Radioactive contamination does remain latent, apart from acute cases, but this is where the danger lies since the consequences may not appear until long after the irradiation. Of all biological effects due to the action of radioelements the genetic risk is one of the most important, affecting the entire population and especially the generations to come. The risk of cancer and leukemia induction plays a substantial part also since a large number of people may be concerned, depending on the mode of contamination involved. All these long-term dangers do not of course exclude the various general or local effects to which the individual alone may be exposed and which sometimes constitute a threat to life. As a result the use of ionizing radiations must be limited and should only be involved if no other process can serve instead. The regulations governing radioelements must be stringent and their application strictly supervised for the better protection of man. This protection must be not only individual but also collective since pollution exists in air, water and land passes to plants and animals and finally reaches the last link in the food chain, man

  17. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Lyman Alpha Emitters: I. Statistics of Spectra and Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Zheng; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    We combine a cosmological reionization simulation with box size of 100Mpc/h on a side and a Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha (Lya) radiative transfer code to model Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z~5.7. The model introduces Lya radiative transfer as the single factor for transforming the intrinsic Lya emission properties into the observed ones. Spatial diffusion of Lya photons from radiative transfer results in extended Lya emission and only the central part with high surface brightness can be observed. Because of radiative transfer, the appearance of LAEs depends on density and velocity structures in circumgalactic and intergalactic media as well as the viewing angle, which leads to a broad distribution of apparent (observed) Lya luminosity for a given intrinsic Lya luminosity. Radiative transfer also causes frequency diffusion of Lya photons. The resultant Lya line is asymmetric with a red tail. The peak of the Lya line shifts towards longer wavelength and the shift is anti-correlated with the apparent to intrinsic L...

  18. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. It is intended that the bibliography will be updated regularly

  19. The effects of temperature on the radiation chemistry of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.J.T. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on polymers is dependent on a number of factors. One of the most important factors is the radiolysis temperature. This paper discusses the effects of the {alpha}-transition and the other secondary transitions, as well as the ceiling and melting temperatures, on the nature of the radiolysis reactions which occur for a number of polymers. Some implications of changes in the radiation chemistry of polymers with a change in the temperature are also considered. (author).

  20. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and the genotoxicity induced by {alpha} radiation in an A549 cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belchior, Ana, E-mail: anabelchior@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional no 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal) and Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Gil, Octavia Monteiro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional no 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Almeida, Pedro [Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Vaz, Pedro [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional no 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2011-09-15

    Exposure to radon and its progenies represents one of the greatest risks of ionizing radiation from natural sources. Nowadays, these risks are assessed by the extrapolation of biological effects observed from epidemiological data. In the present study, we made a dose response curve, to evaluate the in vitro response of A549 human lung cells to {alpha}-radiation resulting from the decay of a {sup 210}Po source, evaluated by the cytokinesis blocked micronuclei assay. The clonogenic assay was used to measure the survival cell fraction. As expected, the results revealed an increase of cellular damage with increased doses made evident from the increased number of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell (BN). Besides this study involving the biological effects induced by direct irradiation, and due to the fact that radiation-induced genomic instability is thought to be an early event in radiation carcinogenesis, we analyzed the genomic instability in early and delayed untargeted effects, by using the medium transfer technique. The obtained results show that unirradiated cells exposed to irradiated medium reveal a higher cellular damage in earlier effects when compared to the delayed effects. The obtained results may provide clues for the biodosimetric determination of radon dose to airway cells at cumulative exposures.

  1. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  2. Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of soalr particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Solar Particle Events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra in shielding are discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

  3. Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of solar particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

    1994-01-01

    The solar particle events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra in shielding discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

  4. Effect of Alpha-Particle Irradiation on Brain Glycogen in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, L. S.; Klatzo, Igor; Miquel, Jaime; Tobias, Cornelius; Haymaker, Webb

    1962-01-01

    The studies of Klatzo, Miquel, Tobias and Haymaker (1961) have shown that one of the earliest and most sensitive indications of the effects of alpha-particle irradiation on rat bran is the appearance of glycogen granules mainly in the neuroglia of the exposed area of the brain. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) positive, alpha-amylase soluble granules were demonstrated within 12 hr after irradiation, preceding by approximately 36 hr the first microscopically detectable vascular permeability disturbances, as shown by the fluorescein labeled serum protein technique. These studies suggested that the injurious effects of alpha-particle energy were on cellular elements primarily, according to the physical properties and distribution of the radiation in the tissue, and that the vascular permeability disturbances played a secondary role in pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to correlate the histochemical observations on glycogen with a quantitative assessment of the glycogen in the irradiated brain tissue. It is felt that such a study may contribute to the understanding of radiation injury at the molecular level. A practical aspect of this problem is that the information on biological radiation effects due to accelerated particles from the cyclotron source, is employed in this study, is applicable to radiation from cosmic particles both in free space and entrapped in the Van Allen belts.

  5. Chemical effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  6. Cooling Radiation and the Lyman-alpha Luminosity of Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fardal, M A; Gardner, J P; Hernquist, L E; Weinberg, D H; Davé, R; Fardal, Mark A.; Katz, Neal; Gardner, Jeffrey P.; Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, David H.; Dav\\'e, Romeel

    2000-01-01

    We examine the cooling radiation from forming galaxies in hydrodynamic simulations of the LCDM model (cold dark matter with a cosmological constant), focusing on the Ly-alpha line luminosities of high-redshift systems. Primordial composition gas condenses within dark matter potential wells, forming objects with masses and sizes comparable to the luminous regions of observed galaxies. As expected, the energy radiated in this process is comparable to the gravitational binding energy of the baryons, and the total cooling luminosity of the galaxy population peaks at z ~= 2. However, in contrast to the classical picture of gas cooling from the \\sim 10^6 K virial temperature of a typical dark matter halo, we find that most of the cooling radiation is emitted by gas with T < 20,000 K. As a consequence, roughly 50% of this cooling radiation emerges in the Ly-alpha line. While a galaxy's cooling luminosity is usually smaller than the ionizing continuum luminosity of its young stars, the two are comparable in the mo...

  7. Semi-Automatic Segmentation of Optic Radiations and LGN, and Their Relationship to EEG Alpha Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Bernier, Michaël; Garyfallidis, Eleftherios; Whittingstall, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    At rest, healthy human brain activity is characterized by large electroencephalography (EEG) fluctuations in the 8-13 Hz range, commonly referred to as the alpha band. Although it is well known that EEG alpha activity varies across individuals, few studies have investigated how this may be related to underlying morphological variations in brain structure. Specifically, it is generally believed that the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and its efferent fibres (optic radiation, OR) play a key role in alpha activity, yet it is unclear whether their shape or size variations contribute to its inter-subject variability. Given the widespread use of EEG alpha in basic and clinical research, addressing this is important, though difficult given the problems associated with reliably segmenting the LGN and OR. For this, we employed a multi-modal approach and combined diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and EEG in 20 healthy subjects to measure structure and function, respectively. For the former, we developed a new, semi-automated approach for segmenting the OR and LGN, from which we extracted several structural metrics such as volume, position and diffusivity. Although these measures corresponded well with known morphology based on previous post-mortem studies, we nonetheless found that their inter-subject variability was not significantly correlated to alpha power or peak frequency (p >0.05). Our results therefore suggest that alpha variability may be mediated by an alternative structural source and our proposed methodology may in general help in better understanding the influence of anatomy on function such as measured by EEG or fMRI. PMID:27383146

  8. Semi-Automatic Segmentation of Optic Radiations and LGN, and Their Relationship to EEG Alpha Waves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Renauld

    Full Text Available At rest, healthy human brain activity is characterized by large electroencephalography (EEG fluctuations in the 8-13 Hz range, commonly referred to as the alpha band. Although it is well known that EEG alpha activity varies across individuals, few studies have investigated how this may be related to underlying morphological variations in brain structure. Specifically, it is generally believed that the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN and its efferent fibres (optic radiation, OR play a key role in alpha activity, yet it is unclear whether their shape or size variations contribute to its inter-subject variability. Given the widespread use of EEG alpha in basic and clinical research, addressing this is important, though difficult given the problems associated with reliably segmenting the LGN and OR. For this, we employed a multi-modal approach and combined diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and EEG in 20 healthy subjects to measure structure and function, respectively. For the former, we developed a new, semi-automated approach for segmenting the OR and LGN, from which we extracted several structural metrics such as volume, position and diffusivity. Although these measures corresponded well with known morphology based on previous post-mortem studies, we nonetheless found that their inter-subject variability was not significantly correlated to alpha power or peak frequency (p >0.05. Our results therefore suggest that alpha variability may be mediated by an alternative structural source and our proposed methodology may in general help in better understanding the influence of anatomy on function such as measured by EEG or fMRI.

  9. Terrestrial radiation effects in ULSI devices and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Eishi H

    2014-01-01

    A practical guide on how mathematical approaches can be used to analyze and control radiation effects in semiconductor devices within various environments Covers faults in ULSI devices to failures in electronic systems caused by a wide variety of radiation fields, including electrons, alpha -rays, muons, gamma rays, neutrons and heavy ions. Readers will learn the environmental radiation features at the ground or avionics altitude. Readers will also learn how to make numerical models from physical insight and what kind of mathematical approaches should be implemented to analyze the radiation effects. A wide variety of mitigation techniques against soft-errors are reviewed and discussed. The author shows how to model sophisticated radiation effects in condensed matter in order to quantify and control them. The book provides the reader with the knowledge on a wide variety of radiation fields and their effects on the electronic devices and systems. It explains how electronic systems including servers and rout...

  10. Use of studies with laboratory animals to assess the potential early health effects of combined internal alpha and beta irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential health impacts of radionuclides released in nuclear accidents are of major concern to the public and to regulatory and other governmental agencies. One mode of potential exposure is by inhalation of airborne radionuclides, which could lead to combined internal irradiation by high (alpha) and low (beta) linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. Epidemiological data for health effects of human inhalation exposure are too limited to derive reliable estimates of risks of potential health effects. However, results of studies in which beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to insoluble radioactive aerosols can be used to estimate expected effects in humans. Data for mortality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis caused by internal irradiation of dog lungs by alpha or beta radiations are used to derive the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha irradiation compared to beta irradiation; predict the expected combined effects of alpha and beta irradiation of dog lungs; and extrapolate the results to humans. The extrapolation to humans assumed that, for similar ages at exposure, dog and human lungs have similar sensitivities to lung irradiation. Results of theoretical calculations related to mortality from early effects indicated that the synergistic effects of high- and low-LET radiations should depend on the percentages of the total dose contributed by high- and low-LET radiations, and for very low or very high doses, synergistic effects should be negligible. 23 refs., 8 figs

  11. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, electron and alpha radiation in rat skin. Comprehensive progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1976. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Albert, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Rat skin has been studied for a number of years as a model of radiation carcinogenesis in a solid tissue. Accessibility of the skin enables the tumors to be detected early so that growth rate, proliferation rate, and onset times can be established accurately and, of course, the superficial location permits an accurate assessment of doses and a localization of the radiation to the tissue of interest. We have been attempting to establish as accurately as possible the nature of the dose response curve, i.e., the rate of tumor occurrence as of function of radiation dose, and the importance of tumor induction of radiologic factors, such as dose rate, fractionation, dose localization, linear energy transfer and of biologic factors, such as the proliferative state of the hair follicles and epidermis at the time of and subsequent to irradiation. The interaction of radiation and other carcinogens, especially ultraviolet light, is under study because of epidemiologic evidence suggesting a potential synergism for induction of scalp tumors. Radiobiological recovery processes have been studied in tumor response experiments using split doses of radiation separated by various times. The recovery rate for electron induced tumors has been measured, and the oncogenic effects of high LET particles (proton, alpha, argon) are being investigated.

  12. Photodiode radiation hardness, lyman-alpha emitting galaxies and photon detection in liquid argon neutrino detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Brian

    My dissertation is comprised of three projects: 1) studies of Lyman-alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs), 2) radiation hardness studies of InGaAs photodiodes (PDs), and 3) scintillation photon detection in liquid argon (LAr) neutrino detectors. I began work on the project that has now become WFIRST, developing a science case that would use WFIRST after launch for the observation of LAEs. The radiation hardness of PDs was as an effort to support the WFIRST calibration team. When WFIRST was significantly delayed, I joined an R&D effort that applied my skills to work on photon detection in LAr neutrino detectors. I report results on a broadband selection method developed to detect high equivalent width (EW) LAEs. Using photometry from the CFHT-Legacy Survey Deep 2 and 3 fields, I have spectroscopically confirmed 63 z=2.5-3.5 LAEs using the WIYN/Hydra spectrograph. Using UV continuum-fitting techniques I computed properties such as EWs, internal reddening and star formation rates. 62 of my LAEs show evidence to be normal dust-free LAEs. Second, I present an investigation into the effects of ionizing proton radiation on commercial off-the-shelf InGaAs PDs. I developed a monochromator-based test apparatus that utilized NIST-calibrated reference PDs. I tested the PDs for changes to their dark current, relative responsivity as a function of wavelength, and absolute responsivity. I irradiated the test PDs using 30, 52, and 98 MeV protons at the IU Cyclotron Facility. I found the InGaAs PDs showed increased dark current as the fluence increased with no evidence of broadband response degradation at the fluences expected at an L2 orbit and a 10-year mission lifetime. Finally, I detail my efforts on technology development of both optical detector technologies and waveshifting light guide construction for LAr vacuum UV scintillation light. Cryogenic neutrino detectors use photon detection for both accelerator based science and for SNe neutrino detection and proton decay. I have

  13. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  14. Radiative Transfer with Finite Elements II. Ly-alpha Line Transfer in Moving Media

    CERN Document Server

    Meinkoehn, E

    2002-01-01

    A finite element method for solving the resonance line transfer problem in moving media is presented. The algorithm works in three spatial dimensions on unstructured grids which are adaptively refined by means of an a posteriori error indicator. Frequency discretization is implemented via a first-order Euler scheme. We discuss the resulting matrix structure for coherent isotropic scattering and complete redistribution. The solution is performed using an iterative procedure, where monochromatic radiative transfer problems are successively solved. The present implementation is applicable for arbitrary model configurations with an optical depth up to 10^(3-4). Results of Ly-alpha line transfer calculations for a spherically symmetric model, a disk-like configuration, and a halo containing three source regions are discussed. We find the characteristic double-peaked Ly-alpha line profile for all models with an optical depth > 1. In general, the blue peak of the profile is enhanced for models with infall motion and...

  15. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  16. Radiation-electromagnetic effect in germanium single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.

    1980-10-01

    An experimental study was made of the radiation-electromagnetic effect in germanium single crystals when excess carriers were generated by bombardment with ..cap alpha.. particles, protons, or x rays in magnetic fields up to 8 kOe. The source of ..cap alpha.. particles and protons was a cyclotron and x rays were provided by a tube with a copper anode. The radiation-electromagnetic emf increased linearly on increase in the magnetic field and was directly proportional to the flux of charged particles at low values of the flux, reaching saturation at high values of the flux (approx.5 x 10/sup 11/ particles .cm/sup -2/ .sec/sup -1/). In the energy range 4--40 MeV the emf was practically independent of the ..cap alpha..-particle energy. The sign of the emf was reversed when samples with a ground front surface were irradiated. Measurements of the photoelectromagnetic and Hall effects in the ..cap alpha..-particle-irradiated samples showed that a p-n junction was produced by these particles and its presence should be allowed for in investigations of the radiation-electromagnetic effect. The measured even radiation-electromagnetic emf increased quadratically on increase in the magnetic field. An investigation was made of the barrier radiation-voltaic effect (when the emf was measured between the irradiated and unirradiated surfaces). Special masks were used to produce a set of consecutive p-n junctions in germanium crystals irradiated with ..cap alpha.. particles. A study of the photovoltaic and photoelectromagnetic effects in such samples showed that the method could be used to increase the efficiency of devices utilizing the photoelectromagnetic effect.

  17. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given

  18. Effect of alpha1-blockers on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the clinical efficiency of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones. Materials and Methods From January 2007 to January 2013, 84 patients who have uncomplicated lower ureteral stones treated by ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium laser were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups, group A (44 patients received indwelled double-J stents and group B (40 patients were treated by alpha1-adrenergic antagonists without stents. All cases of group B were treated with alpha1 blocker for 1 week. Results The mean operative time of group A was significantly longer than group B. The incidences of hematuria, flank/abdominal pain, frequency/urgency after surgery were statistically different between both groups. The stone-free rate of each group was 100%. Conclusions The effect of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists is more significant than indwelling stent after ureteroscopic lithotripsy in treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones.

  19. 浓缩铀235U脑内污染对新生大鼠神经行为发育的影响%Effects of Cerebral Exposure to Alpha Radiation by 235  U on Neurobehavior Development of Neonatal Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古桂雄; 朱寿彭; 王六一; 杨淑琴; 朱玲俐

    2001-01-01

    采用多项指标研究235U对新生大鼠神经行为的影响,新生大鼠(<24 h)侧脑室单次注入2 μl 不同浓度的235U,各剂量组的浓度分别为0,1,5,10 μg / 2 μl,观察α辐射体对新生大鼠早期神经行为发 育的影响。其结果在各组中,张耳、体毛生长、萌牙时间未见明显差异;而开眼时间、游泳运动、听觉惊愕、向亲性行为和4种生理性反射如负趋地性、平面翻正、抓握反射、空中翻正在不同剂量污染组中均有延迟,并有剂量反应依赖关系。提示235U脑内污染新生大鼠后可导致神经行为发育延迟。%Effects of cerebral exposure to alpha radiation from radionuclide 235 U on the neurobehavior development of neonatal rats were studied by determination of multiple parameters.Neonatal rats were radiated with one single injection of 2 μl alpha radionuclide of 235 U into the lateral ventric l e of the rat brain at the 1st postnatal day(<24hrs)at a dose of 0,1,5,10 μg of 235 U,respectively.These rats were observed for the early neurobeh avior development,Among these groups,there was no significant difference in body hair sprouting,pinna detachment,and incisor eruption,In the radiation group,the retardation was found significantly different from those in the controls,such as the age acquisition in physiological markers as eye opening,sensuous function as auditory startle,movement and coordination function,and activity in swimming.Four physiological reflexes,such as negative geotaxis,surface righting,grasping,reflex suspension,and the tendency behavior were also retarded.For most parameters there was a dose-dependent effect.The neonatal rats having cerebral exposure to alpha radiation by 235 U showed delayed neurobehavior development.

  20. Experimental long-term exposures of fish to low dose rate gamma- or alpha-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While it is well known that α-radiation is much more damaging than γ-radiation (on an equal absorbed dose basis) to man and mammals, there are no data available to compare the effects of these radiations on fish. As many authorised disposals of radioactivity are made to sea or rivers and include α- and γ-emitters it is important that such data is obtained so that estimates of the combined biological damaging effects may be made. This paper describes experiments made to examine the comparative effects of chronic exposure to α- or γ-radiation on reproductive endpoints in a representative fish, the zebrafish Danio rerio. Fish were exposed to γ-radiation or α-radiation for approximately 1 year. The fish were allowed to breed once per week and for each breeding opportunity the total numbers of eggs, numbers of eggs viable at 24 hours and eggs hatching successfully were recorded. Dose rate groups were 300, 1000 or 7400μGy h-1 for γ-radiation and 9.6, 19, 84 and 214μGy h-1 for α-radiation. None of the α-radiation groups showed significant effects on any measure of egg production while among γ-radiation groups only the highest, 7400μGy h-1 group showed an effect. This was a rapid decrease in total number of eggs and viable eggs laid per opportunity, leading to a failure to lay any after 20 weekly opportunities. There was, however, no significant decrease in any group in the hatch rate of eggs which were viable at 24 hours. Comparison of the highest α-radiation dose rate which produced no effect (214μGy h-1) and the γ-radiation dose rate which had a significant effect (7400μGy h-1) gives a relative biological effect (RBEα) of <35. (author)

  1. Effects of radiation; Effets des radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  2. A critical review of radiation effects on borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the experimental values have been obtained by loading the glass with alpha emitters like Cm 244 and Pu 238. The data existing in literature on stored energy, and density variation are presented and discussed. Attention is given to the variation of the leaching rate due to the radiation effect. Samples loaded with alpha emitters have given data up to 0.17 dpa and such bombarded with heavy ions show large effects due to dose rate effects. A study on defect formation has shown that under electrons irradiation, formation of bubbles is possible. (DG)

  3. Effects of chronic internal alpha irradiation on physiology, growth and reproductive success of Daphnia magna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daphnids were chronically exposed to waterborne Am-241, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, ranging in concentration from 0.4 to 40 Bq ml-1. Am-241 amounts were monitored in the medium, daphnid tissues and cuticles. Corresponding average dose rates of 0.02, 0.11 and 0.99 mGy h-1 were calculated for whole organisms with internal α-radiation contributing 99% of total dose rates. Effects of internal alpha irradiation on respiration and ingestion rates, adult, egg and neonate individual dry masses, fecundity and larval resistance to starvation were examined in 23-day experiments. Daphnids showed increased respiratory demand after 23 days at the highest dose rate, suggesting increased metabolic cost of maintenance due to coping with alpha radiological stress. Although no effect was detected on ingestion rates between contaminated and control daphnids, exposure to dose rates of 0.11 mGy h-1 or higher, resulted in a significant 15% reduction in body mass. Fecundity remained unchanged over the 23-day period, but individual masses of eggs and neonates were significantly smaller compared to the control. This suggested that increased metabolic expenditure in chronically alpha-radiated daphnids came at the expense of their energy investment per offspring. As a consequence, neonates showed significantly reduced resistance to starvation at every dose rate compared to the control. Our observations are discussed in comparison with literature results reported for cadmium, a chemical toxicant which affects feeding activity and strongly reduces individual energy uptake

  4. The fibrate decreases radiation sensitivity via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-mediated superoxide dismutase induction in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xianguang; An, Zhengzhe; Song, Hye Jin; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seong Soon [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Ran [Konkuk University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The fibrates are ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} and used clinically as hypolipidemic drugs. The fibrates are known to cause peroxisome proliferation, enhance superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression and catalase activity. The antioxidant actions of the fibrates may modify radiation sensitivity. Here, we investigated the change of the radiation sensitivity in two cervix cancer cell lines in combination with fenofi brate (FF). Activity and protein expression of SOD were measured according to the concentration of FF. The mRNA expressions were measured by using real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Combined cytotoxic effect of FF and radiation was measured by using clonogenic assay. In HeLa cells total SOD activity was increased with increasing FF doses up to 30 {mu}M. In the other hand, the catalase activity was increased a little. As with activity the protein expression of SOD1 and SOD2 was increased with increasing doses of FF. The mRNAs of SOD1, SOD2, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased with increasing doses of FF. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by radiation was decreased by preincubation with FF. The surviving fractions (SF) by combining FF and radiation was higher than those of radiation alone. In Me180 cells SOD and catalase activity were not increased with FF. Also, the mRNAs of SOD1, SOD2, and PPAR{alpha} were not increased with FF. However, the mRNA of PPAR{gamma} was increased with FF. FF can reduce radiation sensitivity by ROS scavenging via SOD induction in HeLa. SOD induction by FF is related with PPAR{alpha}.

  5. Traversal of cells by radiation and absorbed fraction estimates for electrons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration of the pathlength which radiation traverses in a cell is central to algorithms for estimating energy deposition on a cellular level. Distinct pathlength distributions occur for radionuclides: (1) uniformly distributed in space about the cell (referred to as μ-randomness); (2) uniformly distributed on the surface of the cell (S-randomness); and (3) uniformly distributed within the cell volume (I-randomness). For a spherical cell of diameter d, the mean pathlengths are 2/3d, and 3/4d, respectively, for these distributions. Algorithms for simulating the path of radiation through a cell are presented and the absorbed fraction in the cell and its nucleus are tabulated for low energy electrons and alpha particles emitted on the surface of spherical cells. The algorithms and absorbed fraction data should be of interest to those concerned with the dosimetry of radionuclide-labeled monoclonal antibodies. 8 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  6. A synopsis of collective alpha effects and implications for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigmar, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the following: Alpha Interaction with Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes; Alpha Interaction with Ballooning Modes; Alpha Interaction with Fishbone Oscillations; and Implications for ITER.

  7. Radiation effects on structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support

  8. Synchrotron radiation study of the uranium chemical species electrodeposited for alpha spectrometry sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burciaga V, D. C.; Mendez, C. G.; Esparza P, H.; Fuentes C, L.; Fuentes M, L.; Montero C, M. E. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Beesley, A. M. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Crespo, M. T., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.m [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    Alpha spectrometry (As) with semiconductor detectors has applications in nuclear decay data measurements, environmental, geological and nuclear wastes studies and other works requiring determination of actinide and other alpha emitter contents. In order to obtain accurate measurements by producing good resolution alpha spectra, As sources must be thin and uniform. As sources produced by electrodeposition consist of a radioactive deposit onto a metallic substrate (cathode of the electrolytic cell). Natural U sources prepared by the Hallstadius method have co-deposited Pt, originated from the dissolution of the anode during the electrodeposition. A recent work published else-where has reported a study on the morphology and spatial distribution of the U/Pt deposits with the related chemical speciation of U, using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure. The purpose of this work is to explain the structure of the Pt/U deposits. We have obtained new spectra of the U L III edge X-ray absorption fine structure by total electron yield at Stanford Synchrotron radiation light source, Bl 2-3. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (Gi-XRD) patterns were obtained at Stanford Synchrotron radiation light source, Bl 11-3. Gi-XRD patterns show a bimodal distribution of grain sizes of Pt, with dimensions {approx} 5 and 20 nm; schoepite diffraction signals suggest grain dimensions of {approx} 5 nm, i.e. with low crystallization. X-ray absorption fine structure spectra were fitted assuming two different structures: uranyl hydroxide and schoepite, and results were compared. U-U path shows low intensity that also may be a result of low crystallization. (Author)

  9. The effects of cosmic radiation on implantable medical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, P. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuits, with the benefits of low power consumption, represent the state of the art technology for implantable medical devices. Three significant sources of radiation are classified as having the ability to damage or alter the behavior of implantable electronics; Secondary neutron cosmic radiation, alpha particle radiation from the device packaging and therapeutic doses(up to 70 G{gamma}) of high energy radiation used in radiation oncology. The effects of alpha particle radiation from the packaging may be eliminated by the use of polyimide or silicone rubber die coatings. The relatively low incidence of therapeutic radiation incident on an implantable device and the use of die coating leaves cosmic radiation induced secondary neutron single event upset (SEU) as the main pervasive ionising radiation threat to the reliability of implantable devices. A theoretical model which predicts the susceptibility of a RAM cell to secondary neutron cosmic radiation induced SEU is presented. The model correlates well within the statistical uncertainty associated with both the theoretical and field estimate. The predicted Soft Error Rate (SER) is 4.8 x l0{sup -12} upsets/(bit hr) compared to an observed upset rate of 8.5 x 10{sup -12} upsets/(bit hr) from 20 upsets collected over a total of 284672 device days. The predicted upset rate may increase by up to 20% when consideration is given to patients flying in aircraft The upset rate is also consistent with the expected geographical variations of the secondary cosmic ray neutron flux, although insufficient upsets precluded a statistically significant test. This is the first clinical data set obtained indicating the effects of cosmic radiation on implantable devices. Importantly, it may be used to predict the susceptibility of future to the implantable device designs to the effects of cosmic radiation.

  10. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  11. Alpha effect due to buoyancy instability of a magnetic layer

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    A strong toroidal field can exist in form of a magnetic layer in the overshoot region below the solar convection zone. This motivates a more detailed study of the magnetic buoyancy instability with rotation. We calculate the alpha effect due to helical motions caused by a disintegrating magnetic layer in a rotating density-stratified system with angular velocity Omega making an angle theta with the vertical. We also study the dependence of the alpha effect on theta and the strength of the ini...

  12. Alpha radioactivity in tobacco leaves: Effect of fertilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nain, Mahabir [Department of Physics, Government College Karnal, Haryana 132001 (India)], E-mail: mnain@rediffmail.com; Chauhan, R.P. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Chakarvarti, S.K. [Department of Applied Physics, NIT, Kurukshetra 136119 (India)

    2008-08-15

    The link between cigarette smoke and cancer has long been established. Smokers are 10 times at a greater risk of developing lung cancer than that of non-smokers. The toxicity in tobacco is considered mainly due to the presence of chemi-toxins like nicotine, tar, aromatic hydrocarbons, sterols and many other materials leading to mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. There are many reports on the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides viz., {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in tobacco. Investigations on alpha-emitting radionuclides, especially on {sup 210}Po have gained significant importance as alpha interactions with chromosomes of cells may contribute to early arteriosclerosis developments in tobacco smokers. Due to relatively high activity concentration of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb that are found in tobacco and its product cigarette can increase the internal intake of both the radionuclides and their concentrations in lung tissues. This causes an increase in the internal radiation dose which enhances the instances of lung cancer. Many workers have tried to explain the role of {sup 210}Po in tobacco in the epidemiological investigation of cancer and tumour formation. In the present work, the estimation of alpha radioactivity in tobacco leaves taken from tobacco plants grown using different types of chemical fertilizers like diammonium phosphate (DAP), zinc sulphate, potash, super phosphate, urea etc. in varying amounts before the plantation of the seedlings has been made. For these measurements we used {alpha}-sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors. The results indicate an increase in alpha radioactivity with the use of some fertilizers.

  13. Temperature effects on radiation damage to silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Leslie, J.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W. (SCIPP, Univ. California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)); Boissevain, J.G.; Ferguson, P.; Holzscheiter, K.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sommer, W.F.; Sondheim, W.E.; Ziock, H.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Ellison, J.A.; Fleming, J.K.; Jerger, S.; Joyce, D.; Lietzke, C.; Wimpenny, S.J. (Univ. California, Riverside, CA (United States)); Matthews, J.A.J.; Skinner, D. (Univ. New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Motivated by the large particle fluences anticipated for the SSC and LHC, we are performing a systematic study of radiation damage to silicon microstrip detectors. Here we report radiation effects on detectors cooled to 0deg C (the proposed operating point for a large SSC silicon tracker) including leakage currents and change in depletion voltage. We also present results on the annealing behavior of the radiation damage. Finally, we report results of charge collection measurements of the damaged detectors made with an [sup 241]Am [alpha] source. (orig.).

  14. Low level radiation: biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is imperative that physicians and scientists using radiations in health care delivery continue to assess the benefits derived, vs. potential risk, to patients and radiation workers being exposed to radiation in its various forms as part of our health delivery system. Insofar as possible we should assure our patients and ourselves that the benefits outweigh the potential hazards involved. Inferences as to the possible biological effects of low level radiation are generally based on extrapolations from those effects observed and measured following acute exposures to considerably higher doses of radiation. Thus, in order to shed light on the question of the possible biological effects of low level radiation, a wide variety of studies have been carried out using cells in culture and various species of plant and animal life. This manuscript makes reference to some of those studies with indications as to how and why the studies were done and the conclusions that might be drawn there from. In addition reference is made to the handling of this information by scientists, by environmentalists, and by the news media. Unfortunately, in many instances the public has been misled by what has been said and/or written. It is hoped that this presentation will provide an understandable and reasonable perspective on the various appropriate uses of radiation in our lives and how such uses do provide significant improvement in our health and in our quality of life

  15. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  16. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  17. Effect of chemicals on fungal alpha-amylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, F S; Abdel-Moneim, A A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 8 growth regulators at concentrations of 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 ppm on the activity of fungal (Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris) alpha-amylase was studied. Indol acetic acid (IAA) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 2% and 7% at 1,000 ppm. The other 6 growth regulators, indol butyric acid (IBA), gibberellic acid, cumarin, cycocel (CCC), atonik-G and kylar, did not inhibit but stimulated alpha-amylase activity (0 to 9%) at 1,000 ppm. All growth regulators studied inhibited alpha-amylase activity at 5,000 and 10,000 ppm concentration except kylar. The effect of organic acids and formaldehyde at 0.01, 0.005, and 0.001 M was studied. Acetic acid stimulated alpha-amylase at all concentrations, but formic acid, oxalic acid, lactic acid and citric acid inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 91, 100, 100 and 79%, respectively, at a concentration of 0.01 M, while by 31, 100, 15 and 20%, respectively, at 0.005 M. Formaldehyde induced 7, 3 and 2% inhibition at 0.01, 0.005 and 0.001 M, respectively. At 0.01 M either sorbitol or fructose inhibited alpha-amylase by 8%, Maltose 7%, sucrose 6%, phenol, glucose and galactose each by 5%, ethanol, glycerol, arabinose and sodium benzoate each by 4%, isopropanol and mannitol 1%, but methanol and ammonium citrate dibasic did not inhibit alpha-amylase. The results indicate that CuCl2, SnCl2, AgNO3 and Fe2(SO4)3 were the strongest inhibitors, followed by Cd(C2H3O2), HgCl2, Na2-EDTA, Na2HPO4, and CaCl2 in decreasing order. NaCl, NaBr and Mn SO4 did not inhibit alpha-amylase at concentrations from 10 mM to 0.01 mM. PMID:2515680

  18. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  19. Radiation risk to low fluences of alpha particles may be greater than we thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H; Suzuki, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Vannais, D; Chen, G; Trosko, J E; Waldren, C A; Hei, T K

    2001-12-01

    Based principally on the cancer incidence found in survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) and the United States National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that estimates of cancer risk for low dose exposure be extrapolated from higher doses by using a linear, no-threshold model. This recommendation is based on the dogma that the DNA of the nucleus is the main target for radiation-induced genotoxicity and, as fewer cells are directly damaged, the deleterious effects of radiation proportionally decline. In this paper, we used a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction (either 100% or making risk estimates for low dose, high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation exposure. PMID:11734643

  20. Radiation effects in ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on alpha-decay event damage (a particle and recoil-nucleus) that results in atomic-scale disorder which causes changes in the molar volume, corrosion rate, stored energy, mechanical properties, and macrostructure of ceramics. These changes particularly of volume and corrosion rate, have critical implications for the long-term durability of nuclear waste forms, such as the polyphase. Ti-based ceramic Synroc. This paper reviews data on actinide-bearing (U and Th) phases of great age (>100 m.y.) found in nature and compares these results to observation on actinide-doped phases (Pu and Cm) of nearly equivalent α-decay doses. Of particular interest is evidence for annealing of radiation damage effects over geologic periods of time under ambient conditions

  1. BEGe detector response to alpha and beta-radiation near its p+ electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Phase II of the GERDA (Germanium Detector Array) experiment Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors will continue the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of 76Ge. The main feature of these detectors is their small p+ electrode used for signal read-out. Due to the thin dead layer of the p+ contact, surface events close to this electrode represent a potential background for the search of 0νββ. A study was conducted to determine the response of the detector to alpha and beta-radiation using movable collimated sources within a custom-build cryostat. Preliminary results of this study and a possible method to discriminate these events will be presented.

  2. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  3. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Cory D. Cress; McMorrow, Julian J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Landi, Brian J.; Seth M. Hubbard; Messenger, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  4. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Theodorakis, C.W.; Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    1996-12-31

    Natural populations have always been exposed to background levels of ionizing radiation; however, with the event of the nuclear age, studies about the effects of higher-than-background levels of ionizing radiation on individuals or populations of organisms became important. Originally, concern was focused on survival after large, acute radiation doses, and numerous studies document the somatic and genetic effects of acute ionizing radiation. However, there is a growing realization that chronic long-term exposure to higher-than-background levels of environmental radiation is more likely than is large acute exposure. Less than 10% of the literature on ionizing radiation effects deals with chronic long-term effects, and very few studies involve natural populations. In 1977, mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis, were experimentally introduced into a 0,45 ha, decommissioned, radioactive waste pond where the measured dose at the sediment-water interface was 1,150 rad/year. One year later, the fecundity of the population had not changed significantly. Eighteen years later, studies of the fish showed an inverse correlation between DNA strand breakage and fecundity in the contaminated pond. More recent studies have provided evidence that genetic diversity of the fish has increased in the contaminated site. These fish also have a greater prevalence of certain DNA banding patterns. Individuals displaying these banding patterns have a higher fecundity and lower degree of DNA strand breakage than individuals with less common banding patterns. Gambusia affinis has apparently adapted to the high background radiation, successfully surviving for approximately 50 generations. 31 refs, 5 figs.

  5. SU-C-303-02: Correlating Metabolic Response to Radiation Therapy with HIF-1alpha Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, D [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Peeters, W [Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, GA (United States); Nickel, K [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R; Van Der Kogel, A; Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To understand radiation induced alterations in cellular metabolism which could be used to assess treatment or normal tissue response to aid in patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. This work aims to compare the metabolic response of two head and neck cell lines, one malignant (UM-SCC-22B) and one benign (Normal Oral Keratinocyte), to ionizing radiation. Responses are compared to alterations in HIF-1alpha expression. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Measurements of metabolism and HIF-1alpha expression were taken before and X minutes after a 10 Gy dose of radiation delivered via an orthovoltage x-ray source. In vitro changes in metabolic activity were measured via fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to assess the mean lifetime of NADH autofluorescence following a dose of 10 Gy. HIF-1alpha expression was measured via immunohistochemical staining of in vitro treated cells and expression was quantified using the FIJI software package. Results: FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways for malignant cells; whereas this benign cell line showed little change in metabolic signature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant changes in HIF-1alpha expression in response to 10 Gy of radiation that correlate to metabolic profiles. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in metabolic activity and HIF-1alpha expression. These alterations occur on time scales approximating the duration of common radiation treatments (approximately tens of minutes). Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response.

  6. Effects of gamma-Radiation on Select Lipids and Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolph, Jacob; Mauer, Lisa; Perchonok, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Radiation encountered on an extended duration space mission (estimates of 3 Sieverts for a mission to Mars) poses a threat not only to human health, but also to the quality, nutritional value, and palatability of the food system. Free radicals generated by radiation interaction with foods may initiate many unwanted reactions including: 1) autoxidation in lipids that alters flavor, odor, and concentrations of essential fatty acids, and 2) depletion of antioxidants food products and dietary supplements. Studies have shown that antioxidants may provide long term health protection from oxidative stress caused by radiation exposure; therefore, consumption of antioxidants will be important. Stability of essential fatty acids is also important for astronauts long-term health status. The objectives of this study were to characterize the effects of low dose gamma-radiation on lipids and antioxidants by monitoring oxidation and reducing power, respectively, in model systems. Select oils and antioxidants were exposed to levels of gamma-radiation ranging from 0 to 1000 Gy (1 Gy = 1 Sv) using a Gammacell 220 and stored at ambient or elevated temperatures (65 C) for up to 3 months prior to analysis. A Fricke dosimeter was used to verify differences between the radiation doses administered. Primary and secondary products of lipid oxidation in soybean and peanut oils were monitored using conjugated diene and 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBARs) assays. Changes in fatty acid composition and formation and vitamin E levels were also measured. The reducing power of antioxidant compounds, including vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, was determined using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Significant differences (alpha =0.05) were present between all radiation doses tested using the Fricke dosimeter. Increasing radiation doses above 3 Sv resulted in significantly (alpha =0.05) elevated levels of oxidation and free fatty acids in soybean and peanut oils. Decreases in

  7. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Heat flux and temperature investigation of main radiators for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Gao, Jianmin; Wu, Shaohua; Qin, Yukun

    2016-09-01

    The investigation on heat flux can clarify the thermal condition and explain temperature behavior on the main radiators of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). In this paper, a detailed investigation of heat flux on the AMS main radiators is proposed. The heat transfer process of the AMS main radiators is theoretically analyzed. An updated thermal model of the AMS on the International Space Station (ISS) is developed to calculate the external heat flux density on the AMS main radiators. We conclude the ISS components and operations affect on the solar flux density of the AMS main radiators by reflecting or shading solar illumination. According to the energy conservation on the AMS main radiators, the temperature variation mainly depends on the solar flux change. The investigations are conducive to reference for the long-duration thermal control of the AMS, and knowledge for the thermal conditions on the ISS.

  8. On surface clustering and Pauli principle effects in alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the correct description of nuclear surface region in alpha decay calculations is pointed out. A model is proposed takinq into account explicitly surface clustering and Pauli principle effects which are essential in this region. A method for solving the main integrodifferential equation of the model by using the oscillator shell basis and the Collatz method is worked out. The first numerical results are obtained for nonlocal potential of the atpha particle-daughter nucleus interaction

  9. Metabolism and biological effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emphasis of much of the current and planned research on the toxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides is directed toward the complexities of actual and potential conditions of occupational environmental exposures of human beings. These, as well as the more limited studies on mechanisms of biological transport and effects, should increase our ability to predict health risks more accurately and to deal more confidently with human exposures, if and when they occur

  10. Radiation monitoring by radiation effect of aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high energy and high intensity accelerator facilities need the radiation monitoring with temporal and spatial resolutions. Numerical estimations are made for the radiation monitoring using the sampling method of aerosol Alanine. The aerosol Alanine put into the monitoring area through the duct. The intensity of radicals in the collected throughput Alanine of about 50 mg after passing through the monitoring area is measured by the ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) method. Key parameters in the system are the aerosol particle diameter and its intensity, the duct diameter and length, and the aerosol flow rate inside the duct. The maximum dose rate more than 108 Gy/h is possible to measure assuming the duct of 100 cm2 in area and 10 m in length, and the aerosol flow rate of 1000 L/min. The temporal resolution of the order of minutes is obtainable when the aerosol particle size is 0.1 μm. As a result of numerical estimation based on empirical simulations, it is to be promising to apply a proposed scheme to the radiation monitoring for accelerator fields. (Y. Tanaka)

  11. Alpha effect due to buoyancy instability of a magnetic layer

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    A strong toroidal field can exist in form of a magnetic layer in the overshoot region below the solar convection zone. This motivates a more detailed study of the magnetic buoyancy instability with rotation. We calculate the alpha effect due to helical motions caused by a disintegrating magnetic layer in a rotating density-stratified system with angular velocity Omega making an angle theta with the vertical. We also study the dependence of the alpha effect on theta and the strength of the initial magnetic field. We carry out three-dimensional hydromagnetic simulations in Cartesian geometry. A turbulent EMF due to the correlations of the small scale velocity and magnetic field is generated. We use the test-field method to calculate the transport coefficients of the inhomogeneous turbulence produced by the layer. We show that the growth rate of the instability and the twist of the magnetic field vary monotonically with the ratio of thermal conductivity to magnetic diffusivity. The resulting alpha effect is inho...

  12. Genomic Profiling of a Human Leukemic Monocytic Cell-Line (THP-1 Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined alpha (α- particle radiation effects on global changes in gene expression in human leukemic monocytic cells (THP-1 for the purposes of mining for candidate biomarkers that could be used for the development of a biological assessment tool. THP-1 cells were exposed to α-particle radiation at a dose range of 0 to 1.5 Gy. Twenty-four hours and three days after exposure gene expression was monitored using microarray technology. A total of 16 genes were dose responsive and classified as early onset due to their expression 24 h after exposure. Forty-eight transcripts were dose responsive and classified as late-onset as they were expressed 72 h after exposure. Among these genes, 6 genes were time and dose responsive and validated further using alternate technology. These transcripts were upregulated and associated with biological processes related to immune function, organelle stability and cell signalling/communication. This panel of genes merits further validation to determine if they are strong candidate biomarkers indicative of α-particle exposure.

  13. Calculation of the Electronic Parameters of an Al/DNA/p-Si Schottky Barrier Diode Influenced by Alpha Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Maktuff Jaber Al-Ta'ii

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of materials such as inorganic semiconductors have been employed as detectors for nuclear radiation, the importance of which has increased significantly due to recent nuclear catastrophes. Despite the many advantages of this type of materials, the ability to measure direct cellular or biological responses to radiation might improve detector sensitivity. In this context, semiconducting organic materials such as deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA have been studied in recent years. This was established by studying the varying electronic properties of DNA-metal or semiconductor junctions when exposed to radiation. In this work, we investigated the electronics of aluminium (Al/DNA/silicon (Si rectifying junctions using their current-voltage (I-V characteristics when exposed to alpha radiation. Diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance were determined for different irradiation times. The observed results show significant changes with exposure time or total dosage received. An increased deviation from ideal diode conditions (7.2 to 18.0 was observed when they were bombarded with alpha particles for up to 40 min. Using the conventional technique, barrier height values were observed to generally increase after 2, 6, 10, 20 and 30 min of radiation. The same trend was seen in the values of the series resistance (0.5889–1.423 Ω for 2–8 min. These changes in the electronic properties of the DNA/Si junctions could therefore be utilized in the construction of sensitive alpha particle detectors.

  14. Structural Effects of Oncogenic PI3K alpha Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Gabelli; C Huang; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Physiological activation of PI3K{alpha} is brought about by the release of the inhibition by p85 when the nSH2 binds the phosphorylated tyrosine of activated receptors or their substrates. Oncogenic mutations of PI3K{alpha} result in a constitutively activated enzyme that triggers downstream pathways that increase tumor aggressiveness and survival. Structural information suggests that some mutations also activate the enzyme by releasing p85 inhibition. Other mutations work by different mechanisms. For example, the most common mutation, His1047Arg, causes a conformational change that increases membrane association resulting in greater accessibility to the substrate, an integral membrane component. These effects are examples of the subtle structural changes that result in increased activity. The structures of these and other mutants are providing the basis for the design of isozyme-specific, mutation-specific inhibitors for individualized cancer therapies.

  15. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation

  16. Radiative effects of tropospheric ionisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Aplin

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing evidence that cosmic ray variations may influence clouds and climate, there has been little discussion of the direct radiative effects of atmospheric ionisation. Laboratory experiments show that hydrated molecular cluster-ions, formed in the atmosphere by cosmic rays, absorb in the infra-red continuum at wavelengths of 9–12 μm. The tropospheric magnitude of this effect is estimated: transmittance anomalies from clear sky ion concentrations peak at ~2% at 10 km in the mid-latitudes. A simple isothermal clear sky atmospheric model suggests the integrated effect of the absorption is ~2 Wm−2. The effect appears detectable in existing surface data sets; surface micrometeorological data shows a significant anticorrelation between downwelling infra-red radiation and atmospheric cosmic ray ionisation. This is consistent with the infra-red attenuation observed in laboratory studies of cluster-ion absorption. If atmospheric ionisation from cosmic rays has universally direct radiative effects, then reinterpretation of satellite cloud data may be necessary.

  17. Research on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researches on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA have been carried out in different sections. In recent years, the organizations were rearranged to attain better research circumstances, and new research programs started. At present, radiation effect studies focus on radiation effect mechanisms at atomic, molecular and cellular levels including simulation studies, and protection studies focus on dosimetry for conditions difficult to cover with currently used methods and data as well as the related basic studies. The outlines of the whole studies and also some descriptions on selected subjects will be given in this paper. (author)

  18. Plutonium, Mineralogy and Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.

    2006-05-01

    During the past fifty years, more than 1,800 metric tonnes of Pu and substantial quantities of other "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. Some of these transuranic elements can be a source of energy in fission reactions (e.g., 239Pu), a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np), or are of environmental concern because of their long half- lives and radiotoxicity (e.g., 239Pu, t1/2 = 24,100 years, and 237Np, t1/2 = 2.1 million years). There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these elements: 1.) to "burn" or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; 2.) to "sequester" the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of actinide-bearing minerals, such as zircon or isometric pyrochlore, A2B2O7 (A = rare earths; B = Ti, Zr, Sn, Hf; Fd3m; Z=8), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium. One of the principal concerns has been the accumulation of structural damage caused by alpha-decay events, particularly from the recoil nucleus. Systematic ion beam irradiation studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B = Zr, Hf) are stable to very high fluences of alpha-decay event damage. Some compositions, Gd2Ti2O7, are amorphized at relatively low doses (0.2 displacements per atom, dpa, at room temperature), while other compositions, Gd2Zr2O7, do not amorphize (even at doses of > 40 dpa at 25K), but instead disorder to a defect fluorite structure. By changing the composition of the A-site (e.g., substitution of different rare earth elements), the temperature above which the pyrochlore composition can no longer be amorphized, Tc, varies by >600 K (e.g., Lu2Ti2O7: Tc = 480 K; Gd2Ti2O7: Tc = 1120 K). The variation in response to irradiation as a function of composition can be used to model the long

  19. Effects of high let radiation at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete evaluation of the impact of nuclear energy technologies on human health requires: identification and characterization of hazardous agents and their effects, which is well advanced; quantitative dose-effect relations for important effects under various conditions of radiation exposure and biological variation, which needs more work but which has been advancing fairly well, particularly in experimental animal research; an understanding of the cellular and tissue mechanisms of the hazardous effects in relation to the microdosimetry of the agents, which has advanced slowly and to a relatively limited degree; and integration of the dose-effect relations and mechanistic knowledge into theories and models which are intended to be predictive for estimation of human health risks at pertinent low levels of exposure. Several theories, hypotheses or models of radiation carcinogenesis, and some for alpha radiation in particular, have been developed on the basis of dose-effect relations in the necessary attempt to predict the hazards of low levels of radiation exposure for purposes of radiation protection in advance of adequate data on dose-effect relations and mchanisms. As such these theories or models have necessarily involved strings of explicit and implicit assumptions concerning mechanisms and the nature of dose-effect relations below the dose regions at which effects have been observed. Nevertheless, they have been useful in stimulating research to test their assumptions and in assuming the interpretation of data

  20. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  1. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  2. Radiobiological Effects of Alpha-Particles from Astatine-211: From DNA Damage to Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claesson, Kristina

    2011-05-15

    In recent years, the use of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for radiotherapeutic applications has gained increased interest. Astatine-211 (211At) is an alpha-particle emitting radionuclide, promising for targeted radioimmunotherapy of isolated tumor cells and microscopic clusters. To improve development of safe radiotherapy using 211At it is important to increase our knowledge of the radiobiological effects in cells. During radiotherapy, both tumors and adjacent normal tissue will be irradiated and therefore, it is of importance to understand differences in the radio response between proliferating and resting cells. The aim of this thesis was to investigate effects in fibroblasts with different proliferation status after irradiation with alpha-particles from 211At or X-rays, from inflicted DNA damage, to cellular responses and biological consequences. Throughout this work, irradiation was performed with alpha-particles from 211A or X-rays. The induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human normal fibroblasts were investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and fragment analysis. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 211At for DSB induction varied between 1.4 and 3.1. A small increase of DSBs was observed in cycling cells compared to stationary cells. The repair kinetics was slower after 211At and more residual damage was found after 24 h. Comparison between cells with different proliferation status showed that the repair was inefficient in cycling cells with more residual damage, regardless of radiation quality. Activation of cell cycle arrests was investigated using immunofluorescent labeling of the checkpoint kinase Chk2 and by measuring cell cycle distributions with flow cytometry analysis. After alpha-particle irradiation, the average number of Chk2-foci was larger and the cells had a more affected cell cycle progression for several weeks compared with X-irradiated cells, indicating a more powerful arrest after 211At

  3. Three-dimensional radiative transfer simulations of the scattering polarization of the hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ line in a MHD model of the chromosphere-corona transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Stepan, Jiri; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Probing the magnetism of the upper solar chromosphere requires measuring and modeling the scattering polarization produced by anisotropic radiation pumping in UV spectral lines. Here we apply PORTA (a novel radiative transfer code) to investigate the hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ line in a 3D model of the solar atmosphere resulting from a state of the art MHD simulation. At full spatial resolution the linear polarization signals are very significant all over the solar disk, with a large fraction of the field of view showing line-center amplitudes well above the 1% level. Via the Hanle effect the line-center polarization signals are sensitive to the magnetic field of the model's transition region, even when its mean field strength is only 15 G. The breaking of the axial symmetry of the radiation field produces significant forward-scattering polarization in Ly$\\alpha$, without the need of an inclined magnetic field. Interestingly, the Hanle effect tends to decrease such forward-scattering polarization signals in most of ...

  4. Continuous three-dimensional radiation dosimetry in tissue-equivalent phantoms using electron paramagnetic resonance in L-. cap alpha. -alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, L.; Maryanski, M.; Ciesielski, B.; Forman, A.; Reinstein, L.E.; Meek, A.G.

    1987-07-01

    A new tissue-equivalent phantom material has been developed which also acts as a dosimeter. The new phantom material has a similar elemental composition to that of soft tissue and has a density 1.1 g/cm/sup 3/. The phantom has an agar-gel base, and contains crystallized L-..cap alpha..-alanine which traps radiation-induced free radicals. Samples from the phantom were analyzed by an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer and the intensity of the EPR signal was related to the absorbed dose. When calibrated, the phantom material acts as a dosimeter, with applications in radiation therapy.

  5. On the effect of the ionising background on the Ly{\\alpha} forest autocorrelation function

    CERN Document Server

    Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Busca, Nicolás G

    2014-01-01

    An analytical framework is presented to understand the effects of a fluctuating intensity of the cosmic ionising background on the correlations of the Ly{\\alpha} forest transmission fraction measured in quasar spectra. In the absence of intensity fluctuations, the Ly{\\alpha} power spectrum should have the expected cold dark matter power spectrum with redshift distortions in the linear regime, with a bias factor b_{\\delta} and a redshift distortion parameter {\\beta} that depend on redshift but are independent of scale. The intensity fluctuations introduce a scale dependence in both b_{\\delta} and {\\beta}, but keeping their product b_{\\delta}{\\beta} fixed. Observations of the Ly{\\alpha} correlations and cross-correlations with radiation sources like those being done at present in the BOSS survey of SDSS-III (Busca et al. 2013; Slosar et al. 2013; Font-Ribera et al. 2014) have the potential to measure this scale dependence, which reflects the biasing properties of the sources and absorbers of the ionising backgr...

  6. Radiation effects on pharmaceuticals and related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sterilization is the method of choice for many medical supplies and devices. However, because of the ionizing nature of gamma radiation, one must consider the effect of such radiation on the physical and chemical properties and on the biological behaviour of pharmaceutical and related materials before the feasibility of radiation sterilization for such products is established. The results of such feasibility studies can lead to an appropriate decision on the suitability of radiation sterilization for a particular pharmaceutical. (author)

  7. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  8. Relative response of TL and component-resolved OSL to alpha and beta radiations in annealed sedimentary quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polymeris, George S., E-mail: polymers@auth.gr [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' ATHENA' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); ISIK University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Physics Department, Sile 34980, Istanbul (Turkey); Afouxenidis, Dimitrios; Raptis, Spyridoula [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' ATHENA' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Liritzis, Ioannis [Laboratory of Archaeometry, Dept. of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean, 1 Demokratias Ave., 85100 Rhodes (Greece); Tsirliganis, Nestor C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' ATHENA' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, George [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2011-10-15

    Knowledge of the relative luminescence response to alpha and beta radiation is very important in TL and OSL dating. In the present study the relative alpha to beta response is studied in a sedimentary quartz sample, previously fired at 900 deg. C for 1 h, in the dose region between 1 and 128 Gy, for both thermoluminescence (TL) and linearly modulated optically stimulated luminescence (LM - OSL). The LM - OSL measurements were performed at room temperature and at 125 deg. C. All OSL signals were deconvolved into their individual components. Comparison of OSL curves after alpha and beta irradiation strongly supports that quartz OSL components follow first order kinetics in both cases. In the case of TL, the relative alpha to beta response is found to be very different for each TL glow-peak, but it does not depend strongly on irradiation dose. In the case of LM - OSL measurements, it is found that the relative behaviour of the alpha to beta response is different for three distinct regions, namely the fast OSL component, the region of medium OSL component originating from the TL glow-peak at 110 deg. C when stimulation takes place at room temperature and finally the region of slow OSL component. Following stimulation at ambient temperature, the relative alpha to beta response of all components was not observed to depend significantly on dose, with the value of ratio being 0.03 and a tendency to decrease with increasing dose. However, in the case of measurements performed at 125 deg. C, the relative response of the fast components is much enhanced, and for the remaining components it increases with increasing dose. Special care must be taken to examine the relative alpha to beta response of the fast component at 125 deg. C which contrasts the relative response of the TL peak at ca. 325 deg. C. The implications for the dating of annealed quartz are also briefly discussed. - Highlights: > Relative alpha to beta response for TL and LM-OSL is studied in annealed sedimentary

  9. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1949-11-16

    This paper discusses procedures for research on biological effects of radiation, using mouse tissue: activation trace analysis including methods and proceedures for handling samples before during and after irradiation; methods and procedures for ion exchange study; method of separation and recovery of copper, iron, zinc, cobalt, pubidium and cesium. Also included are studies of trace elements with radioactive isotopes: the distribution of cobalt 60, zinc 65, and copper 64 in the cytoplasm and nuclei of normal mice and those with tumors. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Radiation effects on superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting magnets will be used in plasma confinement of future fusion reactors. They will be subjected to neutron irradiation at low temperatures, so information is required on the effects of irradiation at low temperatures upon superconducting properties (critical current density, superconducting transition temperature, etc.) of the superconducting materials, electrical resistivity of the stabilizing materials such as Cu, multifilamentary composite materials of the magnets, and mechanical and electrical properties of the electrical insulating materials. A review is made of the existing data of radiation effects on the superconducting magnets. The superconducting transition temperature of the elements, alloys and compounds decreases with neutron irradiation, more in the compounds than in the alloys. The critical current density J sub(c) of the alloys decreases with fast neutron irradiation at low temperatures. In Nb3Sn, J sub(c) increases by low temperature fast neutron irradiation below the fluence of about 1018n/cm2, and the degradation of J sub(c) appears at over 1018n/cm2. Fast neutron irradiation causes resitivity increase of Cu and Al. Radiation damage in the materials may have large influence on stability characteristics of the composite wires. Extensive studies are necessary to clarify the problems, especially the irradiation effect at low temperatures. (auth.)

  11. Effects of radiation upon gastrointestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary F Otterson

    2007-01-01

    Whether due to therapeutic or belligerent exposure, the gastrointestinal effects of irradiation produce symptoms dreaded by a majority of the population. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping are hallmarks of the prodromal phase of radiation sickness, occurring hours to days following radiation exposure. The prodromal phase is distinct from acute radiation sickness in that the absorptive, secretory and anatomic changes associated with radiation damage are not easily identifiable. It is during this phase of radiation sickness that gastrointestinal motility significantly changes. In addition, there is evidence that motor activity of the gut contributes to some of the acute and chronic effects of radiation.

  12. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yourself during radiation therapy Radiation therapy can damage healthy body tissues in or near the area being treated, which can cause side effects. Many people worry about this part of their cancer treatment. Before ...

  13. Doses and biological effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic values and their symbols as well as units of physical dosimetry are given. The most important information about biological radiation effects is presented. Polish radiation protection standards are cited. (A.S.)

  14. Angular momentum loss of primordial gas in Lyman-alpha radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Yajima, Hidenobu

    2013-01-01

    We present results on the radiation drag exerted by an isotropic and homogenous background of Lya photons on neutral gas clouds orbiting within HII regions around Population III stars of different masses. The Doppler shift causes a frequency difference between photons moving in the direction of the cloud and opposite to it resulting in a net momentum loss of the cloud in the direction of motion. We find that half of the angular momentum of gas with v_theta 10^8 yr even for low velocity clouds. Our results suggest that a sweet spot exists for the loss of angular momentum by radiation drag for gas clouds at z > 10 and with v ~ 20 km/s. Comparison to dynamical friction forces acting on typical gas clouds suggest that radiation drag is the dominant effect impacting the orbit. We propose that this effect can suppress the formation of extended gas discs in the first galaxies and help gas accretion near galactic centres and central black holes.

  15. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space and a Rindler space with the surface gravity for acceleration.

  16. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space...

  17. Radiation damage effects in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin; Salje, Ekhard

    2002-03-01

    Zircon, ZrSiO_4, is important for geology and geochronology, and has been proposed as a host material to immobilize highly radioactive materials from dismantled weapons and nuclear waste from power stations [1]. In these applications zircon is exposed to alpha-irradiation. Computer simulations have started to be employed to simulate radiation damage in zircon [2], but the origin and microscopic mechanisms of the most important structural changes in zircon - unit cell expansion and large macroscopic swelling at higher doses, strong shear deformation of the crystalline lattice, and polymerization of SiOn units [3], remain unknown. Here, we perform the molecular dynamics simulation of highly energetic recoils in zircon. Basing on the simulation results, we propose the simple picture of the density change in the damaged region that consists of the depleted and densified matter. We find that the experimentally observed structural changes originate from the interaction of the damaged region with the surrounding crystalline lattice: the shear of the lattice around the damaged region causes shear deformation and expansion of the unit cells. The polymers of connected SiOn polyhedra are most commonly present in the densified shell at the periphery of the damaged region. [1] R C Ewing et al, J. Mater. Res. 10, 243 (1995); W J Weber et al, B E Burakov et al, in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XIX, 25-32 and 33-40 (Plenum, New York, 1996); R C Ewing, et al in Crystalline Ceramics: Waste Forms for the Disposal of Weapons Plutonium, NATO Workshop Proceedings 65 (Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1996). [2] B Park et al, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 174108 (1-16) (2001); J P Crocombette and D Ghaleb, J. Nucl. Mater., 295, 167 (2001); K Trachenko et al, J. Appl. Phys., 87, 7702 (2000); K Trachenko et al, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt., 13, 1947 (2001). [3] T Murakami et al, Am. Min., 76, 1510 (1991); H D Holland and D Gottfried, Acta Cryst. 8, 291 (1955).; W J Weber, J. Am

  18. The influence of salt aerosol on alpha radiation detection by WIPP continuous air monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, W.T.; Walker, B.A. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) performance was evaluated to determine if CAMs could detect accidental releases of transuranic radioactivity from the underground repository. Anomalous alpha spectra and poor background subtraction were observed and attributed to salt deposits on the CAM sampling filters. Microscopic examination of salt laden sampling filters revealed that aerosol particles were forming dendritic structures on the surface of the sampling filters. Alpha CAM detection efficiency decreased exponentially as salt deposits increased on the sampling filters, suggesting that sampling-filter salt was performing like a fibrous filter rather than a membrane filter. Aerosol particles appeared to penetrate the sampling-filter salt deposits and alpha particle energy was reduced. These findings indicate that alpha CAMs may not be able to detect acute releases of radioactivity, and consequently CAMs are not used as part of the WIPP dynamic confinement system. 12 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Radiation effects in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  20. Ionizing radiation effects on the matter and its applications in research and industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico 04510, D. F. (Mexico); Martinez B, G. [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Km. 12 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, San Cayetano 50200, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiation as alpha and beta particles, electron accelerated, neutron particle, and X-rays and photons with relative high energy, as an useful radiation tool for many applications. the last two kind radiations are know as electromagnetic radiation. The radiation effects on the matter are well know that produces about fourteen processes during interaction with solids, aqueous solution and gases. In applications, commonly it depends of the nature and interest on the material samples that their characteristics can modify with the energy deposited on them. This part is devoted to more important effects produced by ionizing radiation with the matter and talk about the wide range applications recently; crystals radiation detectors and for application in medicine, detection of foodstuffs irradiated for preservation, and the application of ionizing radiation on polymeric materials. (Author)

  1. Radiation effects in nuclear waste materials. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J.; Corrales, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US); Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Nastasi, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this multidisciplinary, multi-institutional research effort is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels. The goal is to provide the underpinning science and models necessary to assess the performance of glasses and ceramics designed for the immobilization and disposal of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues, excess weapons plutonium, and other highly radioactive waste streams. A variety of experimental and computer simulation methods are employed in this effort. In general, research on glasses focuses on the electronic excitations due to ionizing radiation emitted from beta decay, since this is currently thought to be the principal mechanism for deleterious radiation effects in nuclear waste glasses. Research on ceramics focuses on defects and structural changes induced by the elastic interactions between alpha-decay particles and the atoms in the structure. Radiation effects can lead to changes in physical and chemical properties that may significantly impact long-term performance of nuclear waste materials. The current lack of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in nuclear waste materials makes it impossible to extrapolate the limited existing data bases to larger doses, lower dose rates, different temperature regimes, and different glass compositions or ceramic structures. This report summarizes work after almost 2 years of a 3-year project. Work to date has resulted in 9 publications. Highlights of the research over the past year are presented.'

  2. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 (211At) and natural bismuth-212 (212Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 (223Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs

  3. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Evaluation of internal alpha-particle radiation exposure and subsequent fertility among a cohort of women formerly employed in the radium dial industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieve, L.A.; Davis, F.; Freels, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    This study examined the effect of internal exposure to {alpha}-particle radiation on subsequent fertility among women employed in radium dial industry prior to 1930, when appreciable amounts of radium were often ingested through the practice of pointing the paint brush with the lips. The analysis was limited to women for whom a radium body burden measurement had been obtained and who were married prior to age 45 (n = 603). Internal radiation dose to the ovary was calculated based on initial intakes of radium-226 and radium-228, average ovarian mass, number and energy of {alpha} particles emitted, fraction of energy absorbed within the ovary, effective retention integrals and estimated photon irradiation. Time between marriage and pregnancy, number of pregnancies and number of live births served as surrogates for fertility. Radiation appeared to have no effect on fertility at estimated cumulative ovarian dose equivalents below 5 Sv; above this dose, however, statistically significant declines in both number of pregnancies and live births were observed. These trends persisted after multivariable adjustment for potential confounding variables and after exclusion of subjects contributing a potential classification or selection bias to the study. Additionally, the high-dose group experienced fewer live births than would have been expected based on population rates. There were no differences in time to first pregnancy between high- and low-dose groups. These results are consistent with earlier studies of {gamma}-ray exposures and suggest that exposure to high doses of radiation from internally deposited radium reduces fertility rather than inducing sterility. 42 refs., 5 tabs.

  5. Evaluation of internal alpha radiation exposure and subsequent infertility among a cohort of women formerly employed in the radium dial industry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieve, L. A.; Davis, F.; Roeske, J.; Handler, A.; Freels, S.; Stinchcomb, T.; Keane, A.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Univ. of Chicago; DePaul Univ.

    1997-02-01

    This study examined the effect of internal exposure to {alpha}-particle radiation on subsequent fertility among women employed in the radium dial industry prior to 1930, when appreciable amounts of radium were often ingested through the practice of pointing the paint brush with the lips. The analysis was limited to women for whom a radium body burden measurement had been obtained and who were married prior to age 45 (n=603). Internal radiation dose to the ovary was calculated based on initial intakes of radium-226 and radium-228, average ovarian mass, number and energy of {alpha} particles emitted, fraction of energy absorbed with in the ovary, effective retention integrals and estimated photon irradiation. Time between marriage and pregnancy, number of pregnancies and number of live births served as surrogates for fertility. Radiation appeared to have no effect on fertility at estimated cumulative ovarian dose equivalents below 5 Sv; above this dose, however, statistically significant declines in both number of pregnancies and live births were observed. These trends persisted after multivariable adjustment for potential confounding variables and after exclusion of subjects contributing a potential classification or selection bias to the study. Additionally, the high-dose group experienced fewer live births than would have been expected based on population rates. There were no differences in time to first pregnancy between high- and low-dose groups. These results are consistent with earlier studies of {gamma}-ray exposures and suggest that exposure to high doses of radiation from internally deposited radium reduces fertility rather than inducing sterility.

  6. Applying radiation health effects data to radiation protection policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from the peer-reviewed scientific literature establish a sound basis to define a low-dose, low-dose-rate, dose-response. These data include human health dose-response studies; immunologically 'whole' animal studies; and cellular and molecular biological studies of complete biological systems for the relevant immunological and physiological responses. Initiatives are required to constructively apply these data to both radiation research and radiation protection policies. First, current low level radiation health effects research must apply existing data to define research projects to integrate and confirm existing dose-response data, with specific emphasis on the biological bases that exist in definitive and reproducible cellular and biological dose-response. Second, dose-response assessment must identify and incorporate all existing substantial and confirmed data, including natural radiation sources, to establish the bases for radiation protection policy for interventions to protect public health and safety. A preliminary assessment of these data is applied to: 1) Specify research that can be constructively applied to describe radiation health effects dose-response. 2) Apply health effects dose-response to radiation and radioactivity applications policies to maximize radiation health effects interventions for occupational applications, medical applications, and other radiation and radioactive materials applications controls to cost-effectively assure public health and safety. An assessment of the proposed revisions to ICRP radiation protection policies is provided that associates the basis for administrative limits with the previous proposal of the US NRC for a 'Below Regulatory Concern' (BRC) policy. This proposal ignores the context of the fact that very low levels of radiation exposure are far within the variations of natural radiation exposures, and therefore can have no gross net consequences. The equivalent failure of the BRC proposal resulted in quick

  7. Monte Carlo treatment of Lyman-alpha radiation in a plane-parallel atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modali, S. B.; Brandt, J. C.; Kastner, S. O.

    1972-01-01

    A Monte Carlo technique involving Stokes vectors is used to obtain the state of polarization and intensity of solar Lyman-alpha photons as they diffuse through a plane-parallel homogeneous model of earth's hydrogen envelope. Fine structure of Lyman-alpha and Doppler redistribution of frequencies are taken into account. Comparison of the results with Heath's observed upper limit for polarization of 1.5 per cent implies an optical thickness tau greater than 7 and intensities of 8-10 kilorayleighs for a solar Lyman-alpha flux of 5.8 ergs per sq cm per sec.

  8. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  9. Radiative processes in Alpha-ZnAl_2S4: Ti spinel type single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulyuk, Leonid; Klokishner, Sophia; Sushkevich, Konstantin; Koshchug, Dmitrii; Boulon, Georges; Brenier, Alain; Fortin, Emery

    2008-06-01

    The radiative properties of the alpha-ZnAl_2S4 wide band -gap semiconductor (E_g=3.4eV) doped with Ti-ions are investigated . It is shown, that the ZnAl_2S_4:Ti spinel type crystals exhibit a IR luminescence in the spectral range 0.8-1.4 micrometers. The observed spectroscopic and temporal characteristics are assigned to the emission bands arising from the ligand - -Ti^4+ charge transfer for octahedral sites of titanium. Bulk stoichiometric alpha-ZnAl2S4:Ti crystals with impurity concentration 0.1-0.5 at % were grown by a closed tube vapor method with halogen as a transport agent. At temperatures T=2-300K the steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) studies, as well as the optical absorption measurements , were carried out in the spectral range 0.4-1.5 μm using a liquid nitrogen cooled Ge-detector or photomultiplier. The steady-state PL excitation was provided by Ar^+ (λ_ex1=514nm) and He-Ne (Lambda_ex2=633nm) lasers. The PL kinetics has been examined under pulsed excitation (tau_P~10^-8 s) with wavelengths: "green"-λ_ex1P=532nm and "red"-λ_ex2P=630nm (dye laser and OPO) close to Lambda_ex1 and λ_ex2. The EPR studies of the samples have been carried out as well. Under the "green" excitation (λ_ex1), that corresponds to the maximum of the Ti-impurity absorption (λ_abs~510nm), the steady -state PL spectra of ZnAl^2S^4:Ti crystals consist of 2 broad bands centered at λ_1=1.1μm and Lambda_20.8μm. Τhe first component λ_1 dominates in the spectrum at low temperatures (T<200K). At T~300K the shape of the integral spectrum practically is determined by the second broad band Lambda_2. At "red" excitation (λ_ex2, λ_ex2P) the main contribution to the PL spectra in the whole temperature range is provided by the second component, the kinetics of which obeys the exponential law with a single decay time. In contrast to the second band , the emission decay can be described by the superposition of two exponents with different lifetimes. At low

  10. Molecular and cellular effects of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program is concerned with the basic nature of the biological effects of mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental radiations, including those solar ultraviolet and visible radiations responsible for the most common form of human cancer: cancer of the skin. Concentrating on the damages to DNA caused by these radiations, the program attempts to delineate the basic mechanisms whereby such damage may occur. 14 refs

  11. Effect of the intergalactic environment on the observability of Ly-alpha emitters during reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Iliev, Ilian T; McDonald, Patrick; Mellema, Garrelt; Pen, Ue-Li

    2007-01-01

    Observations of high-redshift Ly-alpha sources are a major tool for studying the high-redshift Universe. We discuss the effect of the reionizing intergalactic medium on the observability of Ly-alpha sources based on large simulations of early structure formation with radiative transfer. This takes into account self-consistently the reionization history, density, velocity and ionization structures and nonlinear source clustering. We find that all fields are highly anisotropic and as a consequence there are very large variations in opacity among the different lines-of-sight. The velocity effects, from both infall and source peculiar velocity are most important for the luminous sources, affecting the line profile and depressing the bright end of the luminosity function. The line profiles are generally asymmetric and the line centers of the luminous sources are always absorbed due to the high density of the local IGM. For both luminous and average sources the damping wing effects are of similar magnitude and rema...

  12. Minimal tau approximation and simulations of the alpha effect

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A

    2005-01-01

    The validity of a closure called the minimal tau approximation (MTA), is tested in the context of dynamo theory, wherein triple correlations are assumed to provide relaxation of the turbulent electromotive force. Under MTA, the alpha effect in mean field dynamo theory becomes proportional to a relaxation time scale multiplied by the difference between kinetic and current helicities. It is shown that the value of the relaxation time is positive and, in units of the turnover time at the forcing wavenumber, it is of the order of unity. It is quenched by the magnetic field -- roughly independently of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, this independence becomes uncertain at large magnetic Reynolds number. Kinetic and current helicities are shown to be dominated by large scale properties of the flow.

  13. Simulations of the anisotropic kinetic and magnetic alpha effects

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A

    2007-01-01

    The validity of a closure called the minimal tau approximation (MTA), is tested in the context of dynamo theory, wherein triple correlations are assumed to provide relaxation of the turbulent electromotive force. Under MTA, the alpha effect in mean field dynamo theory becomes proportional to a relaxation time scale multiplied by the difference between kinetic and current helicities. It is shown that the value of the relaxation time is positive and, in units of the turnover time at the forcing wavenumber, it is of the order of unity. It is quenched by the magnetic field -- roughly independently of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, this independence becomes uncertain at large magnetic Reynolds number. Kinetic and current helicities are shown to be dominated by large scale properties of the flow.

  14. SM22{alpha}-induced activation of p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Gi [Department of Biology, School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Wie, E-mail: ewcho@kribb.re.kr [Daejeon-KRIBB-FHCRC Cooperation Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Gyu, E-mail: igkim@kaeri.re.kr [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression elevates p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. {yields} SM22{alpha}-induced MT-1G activates p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22{alpha}) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22{alpha} overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22{alpha} overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 {mu}g/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} induction or p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22{alpha} overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22{alpha} modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22{alpha} are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  15. Afterglow-reabsorbed H/sub alpha/ line delay effect in an expanding laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derzhiev, V.I.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Maiorov, S.A.; Yakovlenko, S.I.

    1987-11-28

    The absorption of H/sub ..cap alpha../ line radiation is shown to lead to delay and even to non-monotonic afterglowing if observed along the 'line' of the expanding laser plasma. This makes it possible to explain the emission character of the H/sub ..cap alpha../ line of the O VIII ion (lambda = 10.2 nm) in experiments with 'Novette' set-ups.

  16. Alpha slow-moving high-density-lipoprotein subfraction in serum of a patient with radiation enteritis and peritoneal carcinosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peynet, J.; Legrand, A.; Messing, B.; Thuillier, F.; Rousselet, F.

    1989-04-01

    An alpha slow-moving high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction was seen in a patient presenting with radiation enteritis and peritoneal carcinosis, who was given long-term cyclic parenteral nutrition. This subfraction, observed in addition to normal HDL, was precipitated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) by sodium phosphotungstate-magnesium chloride. The patient's serum lipoproteins were analyzed after fractionation by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The alpha slow-moving HDL floated in the ultracentrifugation subfractions with densities ranging from 1.028 to 1.084 kg/L, and their main apolipoproteins included apolipoprotein E in addition to apolipoprotein A-I. These HDL were larger than HDL2. The pathogenesis of this unusual HDL subfraction is hypothesized.

  17. Universality of nonperturbative QCD effects in radiative B-decays

    CERN Document Server

    Descotes-Genon, S

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate, by an explicit one-loop calculation, that at leading twist the nonperturbative effects in B -> gamma l nu, B -> gamma gamma and B -> gamma l+ l- radiative decays are contained in a common multiplicative factor (\\Lambda_B(E_\\gamma), where E_\\gamma is the energy of the photon). We argue that this result holds also at higher orders. Ratios of the amplitudes for these processes do not depend on scales below the mass of the B-meson (M_B), and can be calculated as perturbative series in \\alpha_s(M_B)

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (approximately40 Tm), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, Tecogen, a division of Thermo Power Corporation, a Thermo Electron company, is developing a real-time, field-deployable, alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (patent pending, to be assigned to the Department of Energy). The Thermo Alpha Monitor (TAM) will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste Focus Area and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This instrument for direct counting of alpha-emitters in aqueous streams is presently being developed by Thermo Power under a development program funded by the DOE Environmental Management program (DOE-EM), administered by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Under this contract, Thermo Power has demonstrated a solid-state, silicon-based semiconductor instrument, which uses a proprietary film-based collection system to quantitatively extract the

  19. Long-term effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper approaches the long-term effects of ionizing radiation considering the common thought that killing of cells is the basis for deterministic effects and that the subtle changes in genetic information are important in the development of radiation-induced cancer, or genetic effects if these changes are induced in germ cells

  20. Infusions of alpha-2 noradrenergic agonists and antagonists into the amygdala: effects on kindling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, M R; Corcoran, M E

    1993-12-31

    We reported previously that activation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors with infusions of clonidine into the amygdala/pyriform region is sufficient to retard kindling. To characterize further the involvement in kindling of alpha-2 receptors in the amygdala/pyriform, we exposed rats to unilateral intraamygdaloid infusions of a variety of noradrenergic drugs followed by either low-frequency stimulation of the amygdala, to induce rapid kindling, or conventional high-frequency stimulation. Infusions and electrical stimulation were administered once every 48 h. The prophylactic effects of clonidine were blocked by simultaneous infusion of idazoxan, an alpha-2 adrenergic antagonist, which suggests strongly that these effects were produced at an alpha-2 receptor. Intraamygdaloid infusions of xylazine, another alpha-2 agonist, also significantly retarded low-frequency kindling. Unexpectedly, intraamygdaloid infusions of the alpha-2 antagonists idazoxan, yohimbine, and SK&F 104856 failed to accelerate kindling. Infusion of the alpha-1 antagonist corynanthine also failed to affect kindling. We propose that the alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the amygdala/pyriform region contribute to the prophylactic effects of systemically administered clonidine and that the facilitation of kindling observed after systemic administration of alpha-2 antagonists may be due to blockade of alpha-2 adrenoceptors outside of the amygdala/pyriform region.

  1. The Behaviour of Varying-Alpha Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Magueijo, J

    2002-01-01

    We determine the behaviour of a time-varying fine structure 'constant' $\\alpha (t)$ during the early and late phases of universes dominated by the kinetic energy of changing $\\alpha (t)$, radiation, dust, curvature, and lambda, respectively. We show that after leaving an initial vacuum-dominated phase during which $\\alpha$ increases, $\\alpha$ remains constant in universes like our own during the radiation era, and then increases slowly, proportional to a logarithm of cosmic time, during the dust era. If the universe becomes dominated by negative curvature or a positive cosmological constant then $\\alpha$ tends rapidly to a constant value. The effect of an early period of de Sitter or power-law inflation is to drive $\\alpha$ to a constant value. Various cosmological consequences of these results are discussed with reference to recent observational studies of the value of $\\alpha$ from quasar absorption spectra and to the existence of life in expanding universes.

  2. From Mirrors to Windows: Lyman-Alpha Radiative Transfer in a Very Clumpy Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Gronke, Max; McCourt, Michael; Oh, S Peng

    2016-01-01

    Lyman-Alpha (Ly$\\alpha$) is the strongest emission line in the Universe and is frequently used to detect and study the most distant galaxies. Because Lya is a resonant line, photons typically scatter prior to escaping; this scattering process complicates the interpretation of Ly$\\alpha$ spectra, but also encodes a wealth of information about the structure and kinematics of neutral gas in the galaxy. Modeling the Ly$\\alpha$ line therefore allows us to study tiny-scale features of the gas, even in the most distant galaxies. Curiously, observed Ly$\\alpha$ spectra can be modeled successfully with very simple, homogeneous geometries (such as an expanding, spherical shell), whereas more realistic, multiphase geometries often fail to reproduce the observed spectra. This seems paradoxical since the gas in galaxies is known to be multiphase. In this Letter, we show that spectra emerging from extremely clumpy geometries with many clouds along the line of sight converge to the predictions from simplified, homogeneous mo...

  3. Radiation effects on CCD image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade, the micro process technology has advanced and some elaborate semiconductor devices with many microscopic elements in a cell of about 10 μm x 10 μm can be successfully used as radiation detectors and related parts in the field of nuclear physics and engineering. A CCD image sensor, for example, effectively measures details of particle-beam profiles in accelerator applications. This paper describes radiation effects on CCD image sensors. Some CCD samples were irradiated with 60Co gamma-rays and DD and DT neutrons for the examination of the reliability of CCDs used in radiation environments. This paper shows experimental data on radiation effects on CCDs and then discusses the difference in the radiation effects between gamma-rays and neutrons. The following two radiation effects on CCDs are described. One is the transient effect, which is induced by the ionisation process of radiations and is not permanent but recoverable. A CCD responds to radiations as well as light and outputs pseudo signals induced by radiation reactions in the normal video signals during irradiation. The other is the permanent effect, which is caused by the generation of the defects. A CCD image sensor is easily influenced by the trapped holes produced by ionisation in the gate oxide. The defects cause the generation of the leakage current within the depletion region, the trapping of signal charge within the channel of the charge shift register, and the flat band voltage shift which affects the CCD operating bias. (author)

  4. Potential health effects of space radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.

    1993-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be exposed to radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, and possibly solar particle events. The potential health hazards due to these space radiations must be considered carefully to ensure the success of space exploration. Because there is no human radioepidemiological data for acute and late effects of high-LET (Linear-Energy-Transfer) radiation, the biological risks of energetic charged particles have to be estimated from experimental results on animals and cultured cells. Experimental data obtained to date indicate that charged particle radiation can be much more effective than photons in causing chromosome aberrations, cell killing, mutation, and tumor induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) varies with biological endpoints and depends on the LET of heavy ions. Most lesions induced by low-LET radiation can be repaired in mammalian cells. Energetic heavy ions, however, can produce large complex DNA damages, which may lead to large deletions and are irreparable. For high-LET radiation, therefore, there are less or no dose rate effects. Physical shielding may not be effective in minimizing the biological effects on energetic heavy ions, since fragments of the primary particles can be effective in causing biological effects. At present the uncertainty of biological effects of heavy particles is still very large. With further understanding of the biological effects of space radiation, the career doses can be kept at acceptable levels so that the space radiation environment need not be a barrier to the exploitation of the promise of space.

  5. Some characteristics and effects of natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since life first appeared on the Earth, it has, in all its subsequent evolved forms including human, been exposed to natural radiation in the environment both from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources. Being an environmental mutagen, ionising natural radiation may have played a role of some significance in the evolution of early life forms on Earth. It has been estimated by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation that at the present time, exposure to natural radiation globally results in an annual average individual effective dose of about 2.4 mSv. This represents about 80 % of the total dose from all sources. The three most important components of natural radiation exposure are cosmic radiation, terrestrial radioactivity and indoor radon. Each of these components exhibits both geographical and temporal variabilities with indoor radon exposure being the most variable and also the largest contributor to dose for most people. In this account, an overview is given of the characteristics of the main components of the natural radiation environment and some of their effects on humans. In the case of cosmic radiation, these range from radiation doses to aircrew and astronauts to the controversial topic of its possible effect on climate change. In the case of terrestrial natural radiation, accounts are given of a number of human exposure scenarios. (author)

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (approximately40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (∼ 40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and ground water

  8. A review of electrodeposition methods for the preparation of alpha-radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, M.T., E-mail: teresa.crespo@ciemat.es [Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    This paper addresses an approach to the theory and practice of electrodeposition processes of alpha-emitting nuclides. Some of the main contributions made to this field are reviewed, including the rotating disk electrode technique. Also, several interpretations concerning the electrodeposition process as well as a number of practical recommendations are included in the study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theory and practice of alpha-emitting nuclides electrodeposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A review of the main contributions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interpretation and practical recommendations are included.

  9. Monte Carlo treatment of Lyman-alpha. II - Radiation in a spherical atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modali, S. B.; Brandt, J. C.; Kastner, S. O.

    1975-01-01

    Intensity and state of polarization of solar L-alpha photons as they diffuse through an inhomogeneous, spherically symmetric, isothermal geocorona are theoretically determined. The fine structure of L-alpha and Doppler redistribution of frequencies are taken into account. The calculation use the Monte Carlo technique involving Stokes vectors. Comparison of the results with OGO-4 and OSO-4 observed intensities at an altitude of 650 km shows good agreement. Calculations of the polarization versus solar zenith angle show a residual polarization at large zenith angles which is mainly due to multiply scattered photons.

  10. Effects of alpha-decay on spent fuel corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of results in the area of spent fuel characterization as nuclear waste is presented. These studies are focused on primary aspects of spent fuel corrosion, by considering different fuel compositions and burn ups, as well as a wide set of environmental conditions. The key parameter is the storage time of the fuel e.g. in view of spent fuel retrieval or in view of its final disposal. To extrapolate data obtainable from a laboratory-acceptable timescale to those expected after storage periods of interest have elapsed (amounting in the extreme case to geological ages) is a tough challenge. Emphasis is put on key aspects of fuel corrosion related to fuel properties at a given age and environmental conditions expected in the repository: e.g. the fuel activity (radiolysis effects), the effects of helium build-up and of groundwater composition. A wide range of techniques, from traditional leaching experiments to advanced electrochemistry, and of materials, including spent fuel with different compositions/burnups and analogues like the so-called alpha-doped UO2, are employed for these studies. The results confirm the safety of European underground repository concepts. (authors)

  11. Adverse effects associated with arginine alpha-ketoglutarate containing supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, J M; Majlesi, N; Chan, G M; Olsen, D; Hoffman, R S; Nelson, L S

    2009-05-01

    The athletic performance supplement industry is a multibillion-dollar business and one popular category claims to increase nitric oxide (NO) production. We report three patients presenting to the emergency department with adverse effects. A 33-year-old man presented with palpitations, dizziness, vomiting, and syncope, after the use of NO(2) platinum. His examination and electrocardiogram (ECG) were normal. The dizziness persisted, requiring admission overnight. A 21-year-old man with palpitations and near syncope had used a "nitric oxide" supplement. He was tachycardic to 115 bpm with otherwise normal examination. Laboratory values including methemoglobin, and ECG were unremarkable. He was treated with 1 L of saline with no change in heart rate. He was admitted for observation. A 24-year-old man presented after taking NO-Xplode with palpitations and a headache. His examination, laboratory values, and ECG were normal. He was discharged. The purported active ingredient in these products is arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), which is claimed to increase NO production by supplying the precursor L-arginine. The symptoms could be due to vasodilation from increased levels of NO, though other etiologies cannot be excluded. AAKG containing supplements may be associated with adverse effects requiring hospital admission. PMID:19755457

  12. Excitation of the hyperfine transitions of atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and ionized helium 3 by Lyman-alpha radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deguchi, S.; Watson, W.D.

    1985-03-01

    The profile of Lyman-alpha radiation in an expanding gas cloud is calculated in detail in order to determine the color temperature of the radiation scattered by an H I atom within the cloud. The basic methods used include a Sobolov-like treatment and the application of a redistribution function for the scattering that preserves detailed balance when the recoil of the atom is included. It is found that for hydrogen the color temperature approaches the kinetic temperature above tau(L) of 100,000, while for deuterium it tends to be well below the kinetic temperature for tau(L) of about a billion or less, becoming comparable to 3 K for some tau(L). For He-3 ion, the color temperature can become negative. 41 references.

  13. Combination effect of recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha with antimicrobial agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, S.; Minami, A.; Fujimoto, K; Kojima, T.

    1989-01-01

    Combination effects of recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha with ceftazidime, moxalactam, gentamicin, enoxacin, amphotericin B, miconazole, or an immunoglobulin preparation were evaluated in systemic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Candida albicans in normal mice and systemic infection with P. aeruginosa in mice with leukopenia induced by preadministration of cyclophosphamide. Synergistic effects were generally observed at interleukin-1 alpha doses as low a...

  14. Dosimetric properties of alpha-Al(2)O(3):C exposed to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colyott, Leslie Edward

    Scope and method of study. The trapping states of Czochralski-grown α-Al2O3:C were studied using a variety of experimental techniques, including thermoluminescence (TL), phototransferred thermoluminescence (PTTL) and optical absorption measurements. The focus was placed upon those states responsible for the dosimetric behavior of the α- Al2O3:C, following exposure to various forms of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Findings and conclusions. The most effective wavelengths for PTTL are in the short wavelength visible to UV range. The phototransfer processes are complex and appear to involve both electrons and holes. PTTL data suggest that the fading is due to the optical stimulation of charge from the traps into the delocalized bands. At short wavelengths the phototransfer of charge from deep traps into the dosimetry traps must be considered and, thus, the exact wavelength dependence is governed by the radiation and thermal history of the sample. The dose dependence of the TL peak suggests an overlap of several peaks resulting from an array of closely spaced energy levels. A dosimeter which measures the integrated ultraviolet-B (UVB) exposure in air or in water was developed as an application of the PTTL properties of α- Al2O3:C. This dosimeter exploits the increased phototransfer efficiency of α- Al2O3:C to light in the UVB region of the spectrum to produce a near-linear dynamic range of over three decades of UVB exposure. TL and PTTL signals are analyzed, using an algorithm which assumes that a distribution of trapping levels are responsible for the observed TL signals. The signals are deconvolved into unique distribution signatures, which enable the discrimination between irradiations due to gamma/beta, alpha and neutrons. Experiments involving the high temperature anneal of α-Al2O3:C powder in an oxygen atmosphere suggest a diffusion of oxygen vacancies out of the crystal lattice under these conditions, resulting in a decrease in F- and F+- centers. TL

  15. High-Intensity Synchrotron Radiation Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Suetsugu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Various effects of intense synchrotron radiation on the performance of particle accelerators, especially for storage rings, are discussed. Following a brief introduction to synchrotron radiation, the basic concepts of heat load, gas load, electron emission, and the countermeasures against these effects are discussed.

  16. Managing the adverse effects of radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkey, Franklin J

    2010-08-15

    Nearly two thirds of patients with cancer will undergo radiation therapy as part of their treatment plan. Given the increased use of radiation therapy and the growing number of cancer survivors, family physicians will increasingly care for patients experiencing adverse effects of radiation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to significantly improve symptoms of depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy, although they have little effect on cancer-related fatigue. Radiation dermatitis is treated with topical steroids and emollient creams. Skin washing with a mild, unscented soap is acceptable. Cardiovascular disease is a well-established adverse effect in patients receiving radiation therapy, although there are no consensus recommendations for cardiovascular screening in this population. Radiation pneumonitis is treated with oral prednisone and pentoxifylline. Radiation esophagitis is treated with dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, and viscous lidocaine. Radiation-induced emesis is ameliorated with 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and steroids. Symptomatic treatments for chronic radiation cystitis include anticholinergic agents and phenazopyridine. Sexual dysfunction from radiation therapy includes erectile dysfunction and vaginal stenosis, which are treated with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and vaginal dilators, respectively. PMID:20704169

  17. Total aerosol effect: radiative forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lohmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of precipitation formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical properties, a quantification of the aerosol forcings in the traditional way is difficult to define properly. Here we argue that fast feedbacks should be included because they act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP, that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Based on our results, we recommend RFP as a valid option to compare different forcing agents, and to compare the effects of particular forcing agents in different models.

  18. Total aerosol effect: radiative forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koch

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical properties, a quantification of the aerosol forcings in the traditional way is difficult to properly define. Here we argue that fast feedbacks should be included because they act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP, that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Based on our results, we recommend RFP as a valid option to compare different forcing agents, and to compare the effects of particular forcing agents in different models.

  19. Separation and determination of 241Am in urine samples from radiation workers using PC88-A and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on their excretion rate through body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This article deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of 241Am isotope in urine samples using Extraction Chromatography (EC) and 243Am tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of americium along with calcium phosphate. This precipitate after treatment is further subjected to calcium oxalate co-precipitation. Separation of Am was carried out by EC column prepared by PC88-A (2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid 2-ethyl hexyl monoester) adsorbed on microporous resin XAD-7 (PC88A-XAD7). Am-fraction was electro-deposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha spectrometer. Ten routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical recovery was obtained in the range 44-60% with a mean and standard deviation of 51 and 4.7% respectively. (author)

  20. Determination of plutonium isotopes in urine samples from radiation workers using 236Pu tracer, anion exchange resin and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on their excretion rate through body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This paper deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of Pu-isotopes in urine samples using anion exchange resin and 236Pu tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of plutonium along with calcium phosphate. Separation of Pu was carried out by Amberlite, IRA-400, anion exchange resin. Pu-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha spectrometer. Twenty routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range 74-96% with a mean and standard deviation of 85 and 6% respectively. (author)

  1. Radiation friction vs ponderomotive effect

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, A M; Gelfer, E G; Narozhny, N B; Ruhl, H

    2014-01-01

    The concept of ponderomotive potential is upgraded to a regime in which radiation friction becomes dominant. The radiation friction manifests itself in novel features of long-term capturing of the particles released at the focus and impenetrability of the focus from the exterior. We apply time scales separation to the Landau-Lifshitz equation splitting the particle motion into quivering and slow drift of a guiding center. The drift equation is deduced by averaging over fast motion.

  2. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic

  3. Effect of Radiation-Induced Amorphization on Smectite Dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of radiation-induced amorphization of smectite were investigated using artificial irradiation. Beams of 925 MeV Xenon ions with radiation dose reaching 73 MGy were used to simulate the effects generated by alpha recoil nuclei or fission products in the context of high level nuclear waste repository. Amorphization was controlled by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. An important coalescence of the smectite sheets was observed which lead to a loss of interparticle porosity. The amorphization is revealed by a loss of long-range structure and accompanied by dehydroxylation. The dissolution rate far-from-equilibrium shows that the amount of silica in solution is two times larger in the amorphous sample than in the reference clay, a value which may be enhanced by orders of magnitude when considering the relative surface area of the samples. Irradiation-induced amorphization thus facilitates dissolution of the clay-derived material. This has to be taken into account for the safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repository, particularly in a scenario of leakage of the waste package which would deliver alpha emitters able to amorphize smectite after a limited period of time. (authors)

  4. Inhibitory effects of Turkish folk remedies on inflammatory cytokines: interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilada, E; Ustün, O; Sezik, E; Takaishi, Y; Ono, Y; Honda, G

    1997-09-01

    In this study, in vitro inhibitory effects of 55 extracts or fractions obtained from 10 plant species on interleukin-1 (IL-1alpha, IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) biosynthesis were studied. The following plant materials from Turkish folk medicine for the treatment of various diseases which are thought to be inflammatory in nature e.g. rheumatism, fever, infections, edemas or related inflammatory diseases were selected as the subject of this study: Cistus laurifolius leaves, Clematis flammna flowering herbs, Crataegus orientalis roots, Daphne oleoides ssp. oleoides whole plant, Ecbalium elaterium roots, Rosa canina roots, Rubus discolor roots, Rubus hirtus roots, Sambucus ebulus flowers and leaves, Sambucus nigra flowers and leaves. All plants showed inhibitory activity against at least one of these models in various percentages depending upon the concentration, thus supporting the folkloric utilization. Daphne oleoides was found to be the most active plant against the test models. PMID:9324006

  5. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  6. Effect of radioactive isotope 32P upon alpha amylase activity and glucose concentration in chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made to investigate whether alpha amylase activity and glucose concentration in blood plasma can serve as the help in establishing on early diagnosis of organic or functional damage caused by ionizing radiation in chickens. Fifty day old hybrid chickens of heavy 'Jata' breeds of both sexes, were treated by 32P administered intramusculary as sodium orthophosphate in a single dose of 333 MBq per kilogram of body weight. Blood samples was taken from the wing vein on day 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 after administration of 32P. Alpha amylase activity and glucose concentration were determined spectrophotometrically using kits produced by 'Radonja', Sisak. Alpha amylase activity was decreased and glucose concentration was increased during investigated period. Yet, the further investigations are needed to find out whether these two parameters can be used for early diagnosis of injury in chicken organism by ionizing radiation. (author)

  7. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given.

  8. Filamentary Infall of Cold Gas and Escape of Lyman Alpha and Hydrogen Ionizing Radiation from an Interacting High-Redshift Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Rauch, Michael; Haehnelt, Martin G; Gauthier, Jean-Rene; Ravindranath, Swara; Sargent, Wallace L W

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of a peculiar Lyman alpha-emitting galaxy at redshift 3.344, discovered in a deep, blind spectroscopic survey for faint Lyman alpha emitters with the Magellan II telescope in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF). The galaxy exhibits complex Lyman alpha emission, including an extended, asymmetric component that is partially suppressed by damped Lyman alpha absorption, and two spatially elongated, narrow emission features. Archival HST ACS imaging shows evidence for tidal disruption of the stellar component. This V=27 galaxy appears to give us unprecedented insights into two fundamental stages in the formation of structure at high redshift: the inflow of gas into ordinary galaxies, and the escape of ionizing radiation into the intergalactic medium. Neutral hydrogen, falling in partly in form of a narrow filament, appears to emit fluorescent Lyman alpha photons induced by the stellar ionizing flux escaping from the disturbed galaxy. The in-falling material may represent primary cold accreti...

  9. THE EFFECTS OF ALPHA-ADRENOCEPTOR BLOCKADE ON DOPAMINE-INDUCED RENAL VASODILATION AND NATRIURESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMIT, AJ; MEIJER, S; WESSELING, H; DONKER, AJM; REITSMA, WD

    1991-01-01

    To establish the effects of alpha-adrenoceptor blockade on dopamine-induced changes in renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion, dopamine dose-response curves were performed without and with pre-treatment with the selective postsynaptic alpha-1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin in normal volunteers an

  10. Effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha infusion on the incretin effect in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke;

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, impaired incretin effect, and increased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Whereas TNF-α infusion at a dose that induces systemic inflammation in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated to induce...

  11. The influence of salt aerosol on alpha radiation detection by WIPP continuous air monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) will be used at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to measure airborne transuranic radioactivity that might be present in air exhaust or in work-place areas. WIPP CAMs are important to health and safety because they are used to alert workers to airborne radioactivity, to actuate air-effluent filtration systems, and to detect airborne radioactivity so that the radioactivity can be confined in a limited area. In 1993, the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) reported that CAM operational performance was affected by salt aerosol, and subsequently, the WIPP CAM design and usage were modified. In this report, operational data and current theories on aerosol collection were reviewed to determine CAM quantitative performance limitations. Since 1993, the overall CAM performance appears to have improved, but anomalous alpha spectra are present when sampling-filter salt deposits are at normal to high levels. This report shows that sampling-filter salt deposits directly affect radon-thoron daughter alpha spectra and overall monitor efficiency. Previously it was assumed that aerosol was mechanically collected on the surface of CAM sampling filters, but this review suggests that electrostatic and other particle collection mechanisms are more important than previously thought. The mechanism of sampling-filter particle collection is critical to measurement of acute releases of radioactivity. 41 refs

  12. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  13. Radiation effects after exposure during prenetal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The embryo and fetus are very radiosensitive during the total prenatal development period. The quality and extent of radiation effects depend strongly on the developmental stage at which the exposure occurs. During the preimplantation period radiation exposure can cause death of the embryo after radiation doses of 0.2 Gy and higher. Malformations are only observed in very rare cases when genetic predispositions exist. Macroscopic-anatomical malformations are induced only after irradiation during the major organogenesis. On the basis of experimental data with mammals it is assumed that a radiation dose of about 0.2 Gy doubles the malformation risk. Studies in humans give rise to the assumption that the human embryo is more radioresistant than the embryos of mice and rats. Radiation exposure during the major organogenesis and the early fetal period lead to disturbances in the growth and developmental processes. During early fetogenesis (week 8-15 post coruption) high radiosensitity exists for the development of the central nervous system. Radiation doses of 1 Gy cause severe mental retardation in about 50% of exposed fetuses. Analysis of the dose-effect curves shows that there is probably a dose-effect curve with a threshold for this effect. It must be taken into account that radiation exposure during the fetal period also induces cancer. The studies, however, do not allow quantitative estimate of this radiation risk at present. It is therefore generally assumed that the risk is about the same level as for children. (orig.)

  14. Dose-effect relationship in radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberhausen, E.

    1983-01-01

    As criterion for the evaluation of risk in connection with nuclear accidents the diminishing of life expectance is assumed. This would allow a better weighting of the different detriments. The possible dose-effect relations for the different detriments caused by radiation are discussed. Some models for a realistic evaluation of the different radiation detriments are proposed.

  15. Therapeutic effect of anti-feline TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody for feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Kawagoe, Kohei; Kito, Akihiko; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2016-02-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) replication in macrophages/monocytes induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production, and that the TNF-alpha produced was involved in aggravating the pathology of FIP. We previously reported the preparation of a feline TNF-alpha (fTNF-alpha)-neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody (anti-fTNF-alpha mAb). This anti-fTNF-alpha mAb 2-4 was confirmed to inhibit the following fTNF-alpha-induced conditions in vitro. In the present study, we investigated whether mAb 2-4 improved the FIP symptoms and survival rate of experimentally FIPV-inoculated SPF cats. Progression to FIP was prevented in 2 out of 3 cats treated with mAb 2-4, whereas all 3 cats developed FIP in the placebo control group. Plasma alpha1-glycoprotein and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were improved by the administration of mAb 2-4, and the peripheral lymphocyte count also recovered. These results strongly suggested that the anti-fTNF-alpha antibody is effective for the treatment of FIP.

  16. Physics of radiation effects in crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, RA

    1986-01-01

    ``Physics of Radiation Effects in Crystals'' is presented in two parts. The first part covers the general background and theory of radiation effects in crystals, including the theory describing the generation of crystal lattice defects by radiation, the kinetic approach to the study of the disposition of these defects and the effects of the diffusion of these defects on alloy compositions and phases. Specific problems of current interest are treated in the second part and include anisotropic dimensional changes in x-uranium, zirconium and graphite, acceleration of thermal creep in reactor ma

  17. Radiation Effects on Polymers - XI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghanem, N. A.; El-Awady, N. I.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius;

    1979-01-01

    With the aim of improving properties of cellulose acetate membranes for reverse osmosis desalination, grafting was performed using high energy electrons. In this paper, the grafting parameters (radiation dose and method, monomer concentration, solvents, chain transfer agent and redox system) are ...

  18. Protective effect of poly ({alpha}-L-glutamate) against UV and {gamma}-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Masakazu E-mail: mfuruta@riast.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Huy, Nguyen Quang; Tsuchiya, Akihito; Nakatsuka, Hiroshige; Hayashi, Toshio

    2004-10-01

    We occasionally found that poly ({alpha}-L-glutamate) showed a superior protective effect on enzymes against UV and {sup 60}Co-{gamma} irradiation. We selected papain and {alpha}-amylase as a model enzyme and irradiated the aqueous solution (10 mg/ml) of each enzyme with UV and {sup 60}Co-{gamma} rays in the presence of poly ({alpha}-L-glutamate) ({alpha}-PGA), poly (glucosyl oxyethyl methacrylate (GEMA)), and glucose (1.25% w/v each). The mixture of the three compounds has a significant protective effect on the activity of papain solution showing 40% of remaining activity twice as much as the control containing no additive at the dose of 15 kGy. Among them, {alpha}-PGA showed the highest protecting effect on the both papain and {alpha}-amylase even after 10-kGy irradiation at which 50% of the activity was retained. {alpha}-PGA also showed significant protective activity on {alpha}-amylase against UV both in solution and under dried state.

  19. Profiling Transboundary Aerosols over Taiwan and Assessing Their Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chou, Ming-Dah; Tsay, Si-Chee; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Hsu, N. Christina; Giles, David M.; Liu, Gin-Rong; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A synergistic process was developed to study the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties and their effects on solar heating using data retrieved from ground-based radiation measurements and radiative transfer simulations. Continuous MPLNET and AERONET observations were made at a rural site in northern Taiwan from 2005 to 2007. The aerosol vertical extinction profiles retrieved from ground-based lidar measurements were categorized into near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, representing 76% of all cases. Fine-mode (Angstrom exponent, alpha, approx.1.4) and moderate-absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo approx.0.93, asymmetry factor approx.0.73 at 440 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. The column-integrated aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (tau(sub 500nm)) ranges from 0.1 to 0.6 for the near-surface transport type, but can be doubled in the presence of upper-layer aerosol transport. We utilize aerosol radiative efficiency (ARE; the impact on solar radiation per unit change of tau(sub 500nm)) to quantify the radiative effects due to different vertical distributions of aerosols. Our results show that the ARE at the top-of-atmosphere (-23 W/ sq m) is weakly sensitive to aerosol vertical distributions confined in the lower troposphere. On the other hand, values of the ARE at the surface are -44.3, -40.6 and -39.7 W/sq m 38 for near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, respectively. Further analyses show that the impact of aerosols on the vertical profile of solar heating is larger for the near-surface transport type than that of two-layer transport type. The impacts of aerosol on the surface radiation and the solar heating profiles have implications for the stability and convection in the lower troposphere.

  20. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis

  1. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis.

  2. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels.

  3. Immunomodulatory effects of alpha interferon and thymostimulin in patients with neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munno, I; Marinaro, M; Gesario, A; Cannuscio, B; Michel, Y; Paulling, E

    1995-01-01

    In this report, we have evaluated the immunological effects following administration of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) in combination with thymostimulin (TP-1), as well as of IFN-alpha and TP-1 alone in patients with neoplasias who underwent surgery and were subsequently treated with conventional chemotherapy. Data suggest that the combination of IFN-alpha and TP-1 is the most effective in the up-regulation of some immune parameters such as the CD4(+)-CD8+ cell-dependent antibacterial activity. Since this immune function plays an important role in the host protection against different targets such as invading microorganisms and/or neoplastic cells, the administration of TP-1-IFN-alpha is advisable for patients with neoplasias under chemotherapy. PMID:7583935

  4. Effects of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' F1 were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from Co-60 source at 0,509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2,5; 5,0; 7,5; 10,0; 12,5; 15,0; 20,0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  5. Effects of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiendl, Toni A.; Wiendl, Fritz W.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Franco, Jose G.; Althur, Valter, E-mail: tawiendl@hotmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' F1 were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from Co-60 source at 0,509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2,5; 5,0; 7,5; 10,0; 12,5; 15,0; 20,0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  6. Fast Neutron Radiation Effects on Bacillus Subtili

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaoming; REN Zhenglong; ZHANG Jianguo; ZHENG Chun; TAN Bisheng; YANG Chengde; CHU Shijin

    2009-01-01

    To examine the sterilizing effect and mechanism of neutron radiation, Bacillus sub-tilis vat. niger, strain (ATCC 9372) spores were irradiated with the fast neutron from the Chinese fast burst reactor Ⅱ(CFBR-Ⅱ). The plate-count results indicated that the D10 value was 384.6 Gy with a neutron radiation dose rate of 7.4 Gy/min. The rudimental catalase activity of the spores declined obviously with the increase in the radiation dose. Meanwhile, under the scanning electron microscope, no visible influence of the neutron radiation on the spore configuration was detected even if the dose was increased to 4 kGy. The content and distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by neutron radiation at different doses were measured and quantified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Further analysis of the DNA release percentage (PR), the DNA breakage level (L), and the average molecular weight, indicated that DNA fragments were obvi-ously distributed around the 5 kb regions at different radiation doses, which suggests that some points in the DNA molecule were sensitive to neutron radiation. Both PR and L varied regularly to some extent with the increase in radiation dose. Thus neutron radiation has a high sterilization power, and can induce falling enzyme activity and DNA breakage in Bacillus subtilis spores

  7. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    We update previously published Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 data set. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux data sets. Our results clearly show that the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave, and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles, to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance data sets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  8. Effects of alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists on male sexual function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. van Dijk; J.J.M.C.H. de la Rosette; M.C. Michel

    2006-01-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptor antagonists such as alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin and terazosin are first-line agents for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but are only second-line agents (doxazosin and terazosin only) for the treatment of arter

  9. Special features of photoelectromagnetic effect and properties of recombination centers in germanium single crystals irradiated by. cap alpha. particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babichenko, V.S.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.; Rzhanov, A.E.; Filippov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Results of studies on a spatial distribution of defects arising in Ge crystals following ..cap alpha..-particle (40 MeV) irradiation are given. The distribution of defects playing the role of recombination centres is shown to produce the definite effect on diffusion-recombination processes in semiconductors. The carrier capture cross section on recombination centres is determined to be sigma approximately 10/sup -15/ cm/sup -2/. A representation of recombination wall appearing in the vicinity of radiation defect concentration peak is introduced. The experimental data are compared with the developed theoretical representations. It is shown that studies on the photoelectromagnetic effect can give information both on the pattern of radiation defect spatial distribution and recombination parameters of irradiated semiconductors.

  10. Inverse Faraday Effect driven by Radiation Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Liseykina, T V; Macchi, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of extremely intense ($>10^{23}~\\mbox{W cm}^{-2}$), circularly polarized laser pulses with thick targets, theory and simulations show that a major fraction of the laser energy is converted into incoherent radiation because of collective electron motion during the "hole boring" dynamics. The effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of an axial magnetic field of tens of gigagauss value. This peculiar "inverse Faraday effect" is demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations including radiation friction.

  11. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  12. Effect of dietary alpha-tocopherol supplementation and gamma-irradiation on alpha-tocopherol retention and lipid oxidation in cooked minced chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of dietary alpha-tocopherol supplementation and gamma-irradiation on alpha-tocopherol retention and lipid oxidation in cooked minced chicken during refrigerated storage were studied. Minced breast and thigh meat from broilers fed diets supplemented with 100, 200 or 400 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed was irradiated at 2.5 or 4.0 kGy. Cooked irradiated and unirradiated meat was stored at 4 degrees C for 5 days. alpha-Tocopherol concentrations increased with increasing dietary supplementation. Concentrations decreased during storage, but retention was not affected by irradiation. Lipid stability was determined by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) during storage. TBARS and COPs increased during storage and were reduced by increasing levels of dietary alpha-tocopheryl acetate supplementation. Irradiation accelerated TBARS formation during storage, but this was prevented by supplementation with 200 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed. Irradiation tended to increase COPs during storage, although no consistent effects were observed. In general supplementation with over 400 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed may be required to control cholesterol oxidation in minced chicken. The results suggest that, overall, irradiation had little effect on lipid stability in alpha-tocopherol-supplemented meat following cooking and storage

  13. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO3)4 ⋅ 5H2O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories

  14. The $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Day, J P; Elhanafy, M; Smith, E; Woodhouse, R; Papp, Z

    2011-01-01

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-$\\alpha$ resonance energies, experimental phase shifts and three-$\\alpha$ binding energies. We found that essentially a simple gaussian can provide a good description of two-$\\alpha$ and three-$\\alpha$ experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  15. Scattered Lyman-alpha radiation of comet 2012/S1 (ISON) observed by SUMER/SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curdt, W.; Boehnhardt, H.; Germerott, D.; Schuehle, U.; Solanki, S.; Teriaca, L.; Vincent, J.

    2014-07-01

    During its recent perihelion passage, comet ISON came so close to the Sun that it appeared in the field of view (FOV) of the SUMER spectrometer on SOHO and allowed unique observations at far-UV wavelengths with high spatial and temporal resolution. We report results of these observations completed during the comet's encounter with the Sun on November 28.75, 2013. Our data show the dust tail trailing behind the predicted position of the nucleus seen in Lyman-alpha emission as light from the solar disk that is scattered by micron-sized dust particles. The arrow-shaped tail is offset from the trajectory and not aligned with it. We model the dust emission and dynamics to reproduce the appearance of the tail. We could not detect any signature of cometary gas or plasma around the expected position of the nucleus and conclude that the out-gassing processes must have stopped before the comet entered our FOV. Also the model we used to reproduce the observed dust tail needs a sharp fall-off of the dust production hours before perihelion. We compare the radiance of the dust tail to the Lyman-alpha emission of the disk for an estimate of the dust column density. After observing 18 years mostly solar targets, this was the first time that SUMER completed spectroscopic observations of a comet.

  16. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of the {alpha}{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand [{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001 in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Muneyuki [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Wu, Jin; Toyohara, Jun [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Oda, Keiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Ishikawa, Masatomo [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kenji [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Ishiwata, Kiichi, E-mail: ishiwata@pet.tmig.or.j [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: 4-[{sup 11}C]Methylphenyl 2,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonane-2-carboxylate ([{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001) is a newly developed positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for mapping {alpha}{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We investigated whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001 in humans and compared the results with those obtained in mice. Methods: Dynamic whole-body PET was carried out for three human subjects after administering a bolus injection of [{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001. Emission scans were collected in two-dimensional mode over five bed positions. Regions of interest were placed over 12 organs. Radiation dosimetry was estimated from the residence times of these source organs using the OLINDA program. Biodistribution data from mice were also used for the prediction of radiation dosimetry in humans, and results with and those without accommodation of different proportions of organ-to-total-body mass were compared with the results from the human PET study. Results: In humans, the highest accumulation was observed in the liver, whereas in mice, the highest accumulation was observed in the urinary bladder. The estimated effective dose from the human PET study was 6.9 {mu}Sv/MBq, and that from mice was much underestimated. Conclusion: Effective dose estimates for [{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001 were compatible with those associated with other common nuclear medicine tests. Absorption doses among several organs were considerably different between the human and mouse studies. Human dosimetry studies for the investigation of radiation safety are desirable as one of the first clinical trials of new PET probes before their application in subsequent clinical investigations.

  17. Effect of a grounded object on radon measurement using AlphaGUARD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichitsubo, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yuji

    2004-07-01

    ABSTRACT-: The effects on radon concentration measurement of a grounded object near the opening of a cylindrical ionization chamber were studied using AlphaGUARD. AlphaGUARD comes with a flow measurement adapter that fits on the front of the AlphaGUARD ionization chamber. If the adapter nozzle is grounded, the radon concentration is falsely measured at 0 Bq m. A metal connector for use between the AlphaGUARD and the air duct wall was manufactured in our laboratory. When the connector is grounded, the radon concentration is again falsely measured as 0 Bq m. If the nozzle or connector is ungrounded, the AlphaGUARD measures radon concentration accurately. Health Phys. PMID:15194926

  18. Influence of some exo nucleases in response to the induced genetic damage in Escherichia coli by alpha radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the strategies with those that E. coli counts to overcome to the genetic damage there is the SOS response, a group of genes that participate in repair and/or tolerance that it confers to the bacteria major opportunities of surviving. These genes are repressed and its only are expressed when it happens genetic damage. So that this system is activated it is necessary that DNA of a band exists and in this sense the double ruptures (RDB) its are not able to induce this response unless there is a previous processing. In stumps with defects in certain genes that have to do with repair of RDB (as recO, recJ and xonA) the activity of SOS is smaller than in a wild stump what suggests that these participate in the previous processes to the activation of the response. The ionizing radiation produce among other many lesions, RDB in greater or smaller proportion, depending on the ionization capacity. A parameter to evaluate this capacity is the lineal energy transfer (LET), defined as the average energy given by unit of distance travelled. In general the LET of the corpuscular radiations is a lot but high that of the electromagnetic one, for what produces bigger quantity of ionizations inside a restricted zone and it increases by this way the probability that RDB has been generated. This work has for object to infer the participation of xonA and recJ in this response and to evaluate the damage produced by ionizing radiation of different LET (alpha particles of different energies) in a stump with all the functional repair mechanisms. Its were considered two parameters: the survival and the activity of SOS evaluated by means of the chromo test. The results indicate that the activity of these exo nucleases is necessary for the repair of RDB as well as for the processing of lesions foresaw to the activation of SOS. As for the treatment with alphas of different energies is observed that so much the survival like the activity of SOS vary as the LET of the radiation changes

  19. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  20. Protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress induced-retinal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Su, Tu; Qiu, Xiaorong; Mao, Pingan; Xu, Yidan; Hu, Zizhong; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Xinhua; Xie, Ping; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-01-01

    It is known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. Alpha-mangostin is the main xanthone purified from mangosteen known as anti-oxidative properties. The aim of the study was to test the protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress both in retina of light-damaged mice model and in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-stressed RPE cells. We observed that alpha-mangostin significantly inhibited light-induced degeneration of photoreceptors and 200 μM H2O2-induced apoptosis of RPE cells. 200 μM H2O2-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and light-induced generation of malondialdehyde (MDA) were suppressed by alpha-mangostin. Alpha-mangostin stimulation resulted in an increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and glutathione (GSH) content both in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, the mechanism of retinal protection against oxidative stress by alpha-mangostin involves accumulation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2) along with up-regulation the expression of heme oxygenas-1 (HO-1). Meanwhile, alpha-mangostin can activate the expression of PKC-δ and down-regulate the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including ERK1/2, JNK, P38. The results suggest that alpha-mangostin could be a new approach to suspend the onset and development of AMD. PMID:26888416

  1. Cooperation effect of radiation in Nd:YAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koselja, Michael P.; Kubelka, Jiri; Kvapil, Jiri

    1993-06-01

    Behavior of radiation of Nd:YAP and Nd:YAG in a resonator with extremely low Q-value have been studied. The light pulses of the form discrete spikes around 1.08 micrometers have been observed using a relatively low pumping energies in Nd:YAP. The formation of these pulses has threshold character. Additional measurement such as second harmonic generation, far field distribution and spectral behavior have shown that emitted pulses have a typical laser character. Derived value of threshold gain parameter with material losses (g0 - (alpha) ) for threshold energy is 0.581 cm-1. No similar effect was observed for Nd:YAG, even for four timeshigher value of threshold energy than Nd:YAP. Obtained results demonstrate the cooperative effects of Nd3+ ions in Nd:YAP through a correlation between electromagnetic and crystal field.

  2. Biological effects and hazards of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis form the main risk to health from exposure to low levels of radiation. This risk effects can be at least qualitatively understood by considering the effects of radiation on cell DNA. Whilst exposure to high levels of radiation results in a number of identifiable effects, exposure to low levels of radiation may result in effects which only manifest themselves after many years. Risk estimates for low levels of radiation have been derived on the basis of a number of assumptions. In the case of uranium mine workers a major hazard arises from the inhalation of radon daughters. Whilst the correlation between radon daughter exposure and lung cancer incidence is well established, the numerical value of the risk factor is the subject of controversy. ICRP 50 gives a value of 10 cases per 106 person-years at risk per WLM (range 5-15 x 10-6 PYR-1 WLM-1). The effect of smoking on lung cancer incidence rates amongst miners is also controversial. Nevertheless, smoking by miners should be discouraged

  3. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.; Corrales, L. Rene; Ness, Nancy J.; Williford, Ralph E.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B. Peter; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Song, Jakyoung; Park, Byeongwon; Jiang, Weilin; Begg, Bruce D.; Birtcher, R. B.; Chen, X.; Conradson, Steven D.

    2000-10-02

    Radiation effects from the decay of radionuclides may impact the long-term performance and stability of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. In an effort to address these concerns, the objective of this project was the development of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, particularly on solid-state radiation effects and their influence on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study has employed experimental, theoretical and computer simulation methods to obtain new results and insights into radiation damage processes and to initiate the development of predictive models. Consequently, the research that has been performed under this project has significant implications for the High-Level Waste and Nuclear Materials focus areas within the current DOE/EM mission. In the High-Level Waste (HLW) focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. Ultimately, this research could result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  4. Radiation abuse and its effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper delves into overuse practiced in diagnostic radiography. The conventional attitudes to low-dose irradiation are critically examined, as is the MPD related to individual radiosensitivity. Concern is expressed that a sizeable proportion of radiologists ignore important aspects of the Code of Practice and this attitude is readily emulated in the hospital setting. The author advocates education within the medical profession and the community on the risks involved in radiation abuse and the benefits derived from justified exposures to x rays. (author)

  5. THE Ly{alpha} LINES OF H I AND He II: A DIFFERENTIAL HANLE EFFECT FOR EXPLORING THE MAGNETISM OF THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca, E-mail: jtb@iac.es, E-mail: stepan@iac.es, E-mail: belluzzi@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    The Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 Angstrom-Sign is one of the spectral lines of choice for EUV channels of narrowband imagers on board space telescopes, which provide spectacular intensity images of the outer solar atmosphere. Since the magnetic field information is encoded in the polarization of the spectral line radiation, it is important to investigate whether the He II line radiation from the solar disk can be polarized, along with its magnetic sensitivity. Here we report some theoretical predictions concerning the linear polarization signals produced by scattering processes in this strong emission line of the solar transition region, taking into account radiative transfer and the Hanle effect caused by the presence of organized and random magnetic fields. We find that the fractional polarization amplitudes are significant ({approx}1%), even when considering the wavelength-integrated signals. Interestingly, the scattering polarization of the Ly{alpha} line of He II starts to be sensitive to the Hanle effect for magnetic strengths B {approx}> 100 G (i.e., for magnetic strengths of the order of and larger than the Hanle saturation field of the hydrogen Ly{alpha} line at 1216 Angstrom-Sign ). We therefore propose simultaneous observations of the scattering polarization in both Ly{alpha} lines to facilitate magnetic field measurements in the upper solar chromosphere. Even the development of a narrowband imaging polarimeter for the He II 304 Angstrom-Sign line alone would be already of great diagnostic value for probing the solar transition region.

  6. Haemopoietic effects of 7 alpha, 17 beta dimethyltestosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some haematic parameters were investigated in female COBS mice treated with 7 alpha, 17 beta Dimethyltestosterone (DMT). The drug causes an increase of circulating platelets in normal mice. Bone marrow graft from DMT-treated donors facilitates in irradiated mice repopulation of white blood cells and platelets but lowers % survival. These data are interpreted on the basis of a 'commitment' and a loss of self-maintenance induced by DMT on CFUs compartment. (author)

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antitumor and immunomodulatory effects

    OpenAIRE

    Scheringa, Marcel

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn the first part of this thesis we examined the possibilities of using the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFcx) for the latter aproach. Although multiple studies have been performed regarding the antitumor action of TNFcx, it is still not clear whether TNFcx has sufficient potential to be used as immunotherapeutic agent in vivo. In this part of this thesis an answer to this important question is given Whereas cancer immunotherapy might benefit from immunostimulation with ...

  8. Radiation effects on branched polysilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, K.; Seki, S.; Tagawa, S. [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research; Shibata, H.; Iwai, T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology

    2000-03-01

    We observed crosslinking and scission caused by gamma radiation in linear and branched polysilanes which have from 5% to 33% of the branching points. The crosslinking reactions become predominant for the irradiation with branching density increasing. The cleavage did not take place exclusively at the branching points and branching polysilanes are sensitive to radiation extraordinary as compared with linear polysilane from a careful study of the radiolysis products of a series of polysilanes. This is due to the increasing Si {center_dot} contributing to the crosslinking reaction and that they are not resonance-stabilized by double bonds as the reaction mechanism in the irradiated polysilanes. However, the gelation curve in linear PMPS irradiated by 2 MeV He{sup +} is almost consistent with that in branching PMPS, indicating that the size of chemical track is responsible for the gel fraction. The crosslinking G value for high molecular weight PMPS irradiated by 2 MeV He{sup +} was drastically decreased as compared with that for low molecular weight. It suggests that there are a large number of intramolecular crosslinking points for high molecular weight PMPS. (author)

  9. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells.A wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was chosen as the biological target.As a parameter to quantify the sensibility of the target to radiation, the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 ) was observed. In our experimental condition a value of (60 ± 1) Gy was measured for LD50 with Dose Rate of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy/min. The method employed to show up the adaptive response phenomenon consisted in exposing the sample to low ''conditioning'' doses, which would initiate these mechanisms. Later the samples with and without conditioning were exposed to higher ''challenging'' doses (such as LD50), and the surviving fractions were compared. In order to maximize the differences, the doses and the time between irradiations were varied. The best results were obtained with both a conditioning dose of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy and a waiting time of 2 hs until the application of the challenging dose. Following this procedures the 80% of the conditioned samples has survived, after receiving the application of the LD50. The adaptive response phenomenon was also verified for a wide range of challenging doses

  10. Theoretical and experimental radiation effectiveness of the free radical dosimeter alanine to irradiation with heavy charged particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen-Walther; Olsen, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Dose-response characteristics have been measured for the crystalline amino acid L-.alpha.-alanine irradiated with ion beams of 6 and 16 MeV protons, 20 MeV .alpha. particles, 21 MeV7Li ions, 64 MeV16O ions, and 80 MeV32S ions. The experimental radiation effectiveness (RE) with reference to low-LE...

  11. Effects of Proxima Centauri on Planet Formation in Alpha Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Worth, R

    2016-01-01

    Proxima Centauri is an M dwarf approximately 15,000 AU from the Alpha Centauri binary, comoving and likely in a loosely bound orbit. Dynamic simulations show this configuration can form from a more tightly bound triple system. As our nearest neighbors, these stars command great interest as potential planet hosts, and the dynamics of the stars govern the formation of any planets within the system. Here we present a scenario for the evolution of Alpha Centauri A and B and Proxima Centauri as a triple system. Based on N-body simulations, we determine this pathway to formation is plausible, and we quantify the implications for planet formation in the Alpha Centauri binary. We expect this formation scenario may have truncated the circumstellar disk slightly more than a system that formed in the current configuration, but that it most likely does not prevent terrestrial planet formation. We simulate planet formation in this system and find that in most scenarios, two or more terrestrial planets can be expected arou...

  12. The shear-induced alpha-effect and long-term variations in solar dynamo

    OpenAIRE

    Pipin, V. V.

    2007-01-01

    The consequences of the shear-induced alpha effect to the long-term modulation of magnetic activity are examined with the help of the axisymmetric numerical dynamo model that includes the self-consistent description of the angular momentum balance, heat transport and magnetic field generation in the spherical shell. We find that the shear contributions to alpha effect can complicate the long-term behaviour of the large-scale magnetic activity and differential rotation in nonlinear dynamo. Add...

  13. Effect of oilseed cakes on alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305.

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, T.; Chandra, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of oilseed cakes on extracellular thermostable alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305 was investigated. Each oilseed cake was made of groundnut, mustard, sesame, linseed, coconut copra, madhuca, or cotton. alpha-Amylase production was considerably improved in all instances and varied with the oilseed cake concentration in basal medium containing peptone and beef extract. Maximum increases were effected by a low concentration (0.5 to 1.0%) of groundnut or coconu...

  14. The effect of infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against TNF-alpha, on disc herniation resorption - A randomized controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Autio, Reijo A.; Karppinen, Jaro; Niinimaki, Jaakko; Ojala, Risto; Veeger, Nic; Korhonen, Timo; Hurri, Heikki; Tervonen, Osmo

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Randomized, controlled study. Objective. To evaluate the effect of infliximab on herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) resorption. Summary of Background Data. Although the effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) on HNP resorption are not fully understood, TNF-alpha appears to be

  15. The radioprotective effect and mechanism of captopril on radiation induced lung damage in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mi Hee; Lee, Kyung Ja; Koo, Hea Soo; Oh, Won Young [College of Medicine, Ewha Women Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    It was reported that Captopril (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor) had an effect to reduce the pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis induced by radiation in rat. We performed this study to investigate the radioprotective effect and mechanism of Captopril. The comparison was made between the radiation only group and the combined Captopril and radiation group by examining histopathologic findings and immunohistochemical stains (TNF {alpha} and TGF {beta}1) at 2 and 8 weeks after irradiation. Each group has 8 to 10 rats (Sprague-Dawley). 12.5 Gy of X-ray was irradiated to the left hemithorax in a single fraction. Captopril (50 mg/kg/d) mixed with water was given per oral and continuously from 1 week prior to irradiation up to 8th week of the experiment. In the combined Captopril and radiation group, the histopathologic changes which were hemorrhage into alveolar space, changes of alveolar epithelium, bronchial epithelium and blood vessels, and perivascular edema were less severe than in the radiation only group at 2 weeks. At 8 weeks, the alveolar epithelial changes and perivascular edema were less prominent in the combined Captopril and radiation group. At 2 weeks, the TNF {alpha} expression of the combined Captopril and radiation group was markedly decreased at the alveolar epithelium (p<0.01), lymphoid tissue (p=0.06) and the macrophage of alveolar space (p<0.01) compared with the radiation only group. Furthermore the TGF {beta}1 expression was significantly prominent at the alveolar epithelium (p<0.02) and the macrophage in alveolar space (p< 0.02). At 8 weeks, the expression of TNF {alpha} and TGF {beta} 1 of most sites, except TGF {beta}1 of the macrophage of alveolar space (p=0.09), showed no significant difference between 2 groups. This study revealed that early lung damage induced by irradiation was reduced with the addition of Captopril in the latent and early pneumonitis phase. The expression of TNF {alpha} and TGF {beta} 1 at 2 weeks and TGF {beta} 1 at

  16. Fallout radiation effects analysis methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-03-31

    Fallout radiation is viewed by the weapons effects community as a potentially serious impediment to maintaining or restoring critical National Security Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) telecommunication capabilities in a nuclear environment. The OMNCS' Electromagnetic Pulse Mitigation Program is designed, in part, to identify the survival probability (survivability) of the nation's NSEP telecommunications infrastructure against fallout radiation effects. The OMNCS (Office of the Manager National Communications System) is developing a balanced approach consisting of fallout radiation stress tests on the electronic piece-parts and the use of estimated performance measures of telecommunication network elements in network simulation models to predict user connectivity levels. It is concluded that, given limited available data, the proposed method can predict fallout radiation effects on network telecommunication equipment. The effects of fallout radiation are small at low dosage levels (bin 1 and bin 2). More pronounced variations in equipment performance were exhibited for radiation dosage in the 1k-5k Rads(Si) bin. Finally, the results indicate that by increasing the sample size to approximately 200 samples, the statistical quality of survivability predictions can be significantly improved.

  17. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references.

  18. Measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new method for measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers on a nanosecond timescale. The method, which incorporates a streak camera, allows more precise time resolution than other methods and has the advantage of measuring the radiation-induced attenuation as a function of wavelength and time simultaneously. By choosing different light sources and sweep speeds, radiation-induced attenuation may be measured under a variety of experimental configurations. Examples of the type of output obtained with our method are given

  19. Ionizing radiation effects in MOS oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Oldham, Timothy R

    1999-01-01

    This volume is intended to serve as an updated critical guide to the extensive literature on the basic physical mechanisms controlling the radiation and reliability responses of MOS oxides. The last such guide was Ionizing Radiation Effects in MOS Devices and Circuits, edited by Ma and Dressendorfer and published in 1989. While that book remains an authoritative reference in many areas, there has been a significant amount of more recent work on the nature of the electrically active defects in MOS oxides which are generated by exposure to ionizing radiation. These same defects are also critical

  20. The 27-day versus 13.5-day variations in the solar Lyman-alpha radiation and the radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamorena, B. A.; Lastovicka, Jan; Rapoport, Z. TS.; Alberca, L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the question of solar periods in absorption, the pattern was studied of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation (the principal ionizing agent of the lower ionosphere) and of the radio wave absorption at five widely spaced places in Europe. When the solar Lyman-alpha flux variability is very well developed, then it dominates in the lower ionospheric variability. The most pronounced Lyman-alpha variation on time scale day-month is the solar rotation variation (about 27 days). When the Lyman-alpha variability is developed rather poorly, as it is typical for periods dominated by the 13.5 day variability, then the lower ionospheric variability appears to be dominated by variations of meteorological origin. The conclusions hold for all five widely spaced placed in Europe.

  1. Accelerated alpha-decay of 232U isotope achieved by exposure of its aqueous solution with gold nanoparticles to laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Simakin, A V

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on laser-induced accelerated alpha-decay of Uranium-232 nuclei under laser exposure of Au nanoparticles in aqueous solutions of its salt. It is demonstrated that the decrease of alpha-activity strongly depends on the peak intensity of the laser radiation in the liquid and is highest at several terawatt per square centimeter. The decrease of alpha-activity of the exposed solutions is accompanied by the deviation of gamma-activities of daughter nuclides of Uranium-232 from their equilibrium values. Possible mechanisms of the laser influence on the alpha-activity are discussed on the basis of the amplification of the electric field of laser wave on metallic nanoparticles.

  2. Effect of gamma radiation on Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, J.D.; Maxcy, R.B.

    Radiation resistance of Campylobacter jejuni in broth, ground beef, and ground turkey meat was determined using dose levels from 0-200 Krad at -30 +/- 10/sup 0/C, at 0-5/sup 0/C, and at 30 +/- 10/sup 0/C. Irradiation at -30/sup 0/C increased radiation resistance of cultures in ground meats; broth cultures were not greatly influenced by temperature. The effect of culture age on radiation resistance was also evaluated using cells in various physiological phases. Age did not have a pronounced effect on radiation resistance. The largest D/sub 10/ value for C. jejuni was 32 Krad, which was less than D/sub 10/ values commonly reported for salmonellae. 20 references, 4 figures.

  3. The effects of (+)-amphetamine, alpha-methyltyrosine, and alpha-methylphenylalanine on the concentrations of m-tyramine and alpha-methyl-m-tyramine in rat striatum.

    OpenAIRE

    Dougan, D. F.; Duffield, A. M.; Duffield, P. H.; Wade, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration in rat striatum of the meta and para isomers of tyramine and alpha-methyltyramine, after the administration of (+)-amphetamine, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) and alpha-methylphenylalanine (AMPA) has been determined using chemical ionization gas chromatography mass spectrometry (c.i.g.c.m.s.). Twenty hours after the last of 7 daily injections of (+)-amphetamine (5 mg kg-1 i.p.) the concentration of alpha-methyl-p-tyramine in striatal tissue increased twofold compared to the ...

  4. Radiation effects on DNA methylation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of ionizing radiation on DNA methylation in liver, brain and spleen were examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total methylated cytosine level in the genome was reduced within 8 hours after 3.8 Gy of irradiation in liver of adult mice. But no appreciable effect was observed in brain and spleen. When mice were irradiated at newborn, liver DNA revealed no change in methylated cytosine level. Even though slight effects of radiation were detected in he methylation of the c-myc and c-fos genes, they were only temporary and no long-term effects were observed. These data suggest that the effect of radiation on DNA methylation in vivo is not prevailing a DNA damage, but rather influenced much through biological parameters. (author)

  5. The radiation effects on the living cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is a presentation of particular points discussed during the colloquium of the 15-18 june 1999, for which scientific researches are performed at the CEA/CNRS. They deal with the radiobiology, for the radiation effects on living matter; with the DNA, for the knowledge and repair mechanisms on cells submitted to ionizing radiations; with the exposition to UV in correlation with neoplasms; with the P53 gene which is a tumour suppressor. (A.L.B.)

  6. Characteristics of the photelectromagnetic effect and properties of recombination centers in germanium single crystals irradiated with. cap alpha. particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babichenko, V.S.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.; Rzhanov, A.E.; Filippov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial distribution of defects created in Ge crystals by irradiation with 40-MeV ..cap alpha.. particles was investigated. The distribution of the defects acting as recombination centers had a decisive influence on the diffusion-recombination processes in this semiconductor. The carrier-capture cross section of the recombination centers (sigmaapprox.10/sup -15/ cm/sup 2/) was determined. A concept of a recombination wall, which appeared in the region of a maximum of the radiation defect concentration, was introduced. The experimental data were compared with theoretical representations. This comparison demonstrated that an investigation of the photoelectromagnetic effect could give information both on the nature of the spatial distribution of radiation defects and on the recombination parameters of an irradiated semiconductor.

  7. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is utilized as a model system for studying dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the DNA of the epidermis, including strand breaks and thymine dimers, are measured and compared to the temporal and dose related aspects of tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molecular lesions are compared to split dose recovery as modified by sensitizers and type of radition of oncogenic damage.

  8. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skin is utilized as a model system for studying dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the DNA of the epidermis, including strand breaks and thymine dimers, are measured and compared to the temporal and dose related aspects of tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molecular lesions are compared to split dose recovery as modified by sensitizers and type of radition of oncogenic damage

  9. Comparison of the effect of alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on muscle contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnus, Jan; Rusiecka, Agnieszka; Czerski, Albert; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Hauzer, Willy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effect of selected agonists and antagonists of alpha-adrenergic receptors on muscle contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta in vitro with particular emphasis on alpha2-adrenergic receptor subtypes. The study was conducted on 30 New Zealand breed rabbits from which specimens of the abdominal aorta were collected. The sections were set up in an automatic water bath in a Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 37 degrees C. The experiments showed that alpha1-adrenergic receptors played the main role in the contractile response ofthe rabbit abdominal aorta. Stimulation of alpha1-adrenergic receptor by administration ofphenylephrine resulted in an increase in smooth muscle tonus ofthe rabbit abdominal aorta by an average of 4.75 mN. The reaction after stimulation of alpha2-adrenergic receptors by similar doses of their agonists was much weaker. Prolonged tissue response time and time needed to reach maximum tonus for alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists were observed. The obtained results confirm the thesis that the alpha1-adrenergic receptor is the most important factor controlling the contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta, but the alpha2-adrenergic receptor is also involved in maintaining muscle tissue tonus. PMID:23767297

  10. Biological effect of radiation on human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved

  11. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  12. Predicting decay in free-radical concentration in L-. alpha. -alanine following high-LET radiation exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J.W. (Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)); Olsen, K.J. (University Hospital of Copenhagen, Herlev (Denmark))

    1989-01-01

    Efforts have been made to develop a model that will predict time-dependent decay in radiation-induced free-radical concentration in L-{alpha}-alanine following heavy-charged-particle exposures. The decay rate depends on radiation quality, dose and dose-rate. For low doses, the decay-rate is approx. 0.5 and 1.5% per year following {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray exposures and Linac-produced X-ray or electron exposures. Decay rates, however, have been found to increase as measured from low average doses, sparse single tracks, of heavy charged particles. We have compared measured decay after exposures to low average doses from high-LET particles with predicted decay calculated as function of particle velocity and charge and detector parameters. The predicted decay is obtained by folding measured decay after Linac-produced electron exposures of very high doses into the calculated dose distribution around the heavy ion's path. Preliminary results show agreement between the experimental data and results obtained from this model, within the experimental uncertainty. (author).

  13. Medical exposure and the effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation gives cracks to genes. The influence is divided into deterministic effect with a threshold value, and the stochastic effect (tumor and genetic effect) which increases according to the exposure amount. Although we are put to various non-artificial radiations, which we cannot be avoided, on the earth, the contamination by artificial radiation can be defended. Artificial radioactive exposure includes medical exposure and non-medical exposure for example by nuclear power plant. As to medical examinations using radiation, the inquiry about the radiation exposure is increasing after the occurrence of the first nuclear power plant disaster of Fukushima. While concern about non-medical radioactive exposure increases, the uneasiness to medical irradiation is also increasing. The dose limit by artificial radioactive exposure other than medical exposure is set up in order to prevent the influence on the health. While the dose limit of the public exposure is set to the lower value than the total dose of non-artificial exposure concerning of a safety margin for all people, the dose limit of medical exposure is not defined, since it is thought that medical irradiation has a benefit for those who receive irradiation. Making an effort to decrease the radiation dose in performing the best medical treatment is the responsibility with which we are burdened. (author)

  14. Combined effects of alpha particles and depleted uranium on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Candy Y.P.; Pereira, Sandrine; Cheng, Shuk Han; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of low-dose or high-dose alpha particles and depleted uranium (DU) in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were studied. Three schemes were examined—(i) [ILUL]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure, (ii) [IHUH]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure and (iii) [IHUL]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure—in which Zebrafish embryos were irradiated with alpha particles at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) and/or exposed to uranium at 5–6 hpf. The results were also compared with our previous work, which studied the effects of [ILUH]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure. When the Zebrafish embryos developed to 24 hpf, the apoptotic signals in the entire embryos, used as the biological endpoint for this study, were quantified. Our results showed that [ILUL] and [IHUL] led to antagonistic effects, whereas [IHUH] led to an additive effect. The effect found for the previously studied case of [ILUH] was difficult to define because it was synergistic with reference to the 100 µg/l DU exposure, but it was antagonistic with reference to the 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose. All the findings regarding the four different schemes showed that the combined effects critically depended on the dose response to each individual stressor. We also qualitatively explained these findings in terms of promotion of early death of cells predisposed to spontaneous transformation by alpha particles, interacting with the delay in cell death resulting from various concentrations of DU exposure. PMID:26937024

  15. Phase I evaluation of radiation combined with recombinant interferon alpha-2A and BCNU for patients with high-grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine the safety, toxicity, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of carmustine (BCNU) and interferon alpha-2a (IFN-a) when combined with radiation as initial therapy in high-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed Grade 3 or 4 astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, or gliosarcoma were enrolled after surgery. All received radiation therapy to the brain (64.8 Gy/36 fractions), combined with a single dose of BCNU (200 mg/m2) at the start of radiation. Chemotherapy after completing radiation consisted of BCNU 150 mg/m2 once every 7 weeks, and IFN-a 12 x 106 units/m2 subcutaneously Days 1-3 each week of a 7-week cycle. Subsequent dose modification was based on constitutional symptoms for IFN-a and on myelosuppression for BCNU. Results: Fifteen patients were entered on the study. Four were excluded because they did not receive IFN-a (3 refused treatment and 1 patient left the study due to multiple medical problems). Eleven were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Nonhematological toxicity, mainly lethargy and flu-like symptoms, were dose-limiting for IFN-a. After the first 6 patients were treated per the initial protocol, the frequency of IFN-a administration was decreased to Days 1-3 on weeks 1, 3, and 5 of the 7-week cycle for 5 additional patients. Lethargy, fever, chills, myalgias, alopecia, and anorexia occurred in all patients. Other toxicities included nausea and vomiting (91%), central-nervous-system depression or mood changes (64%), headaches (55%), and elevation of liver enzymes (36%). Grade 3-4 leukopenia occurred in 4 (45%) of 11 patients, and Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia in 3 (27%) of 11 patients. Due to myelosuppressive effects, BCNU dose was not escalated. Median survival of the cohort was 44 months. Objective responses occurred in 5 (56%) of 9 patients and median duration of response was 33 months. The MTD of this combination after radiation therapy is IFN-a 12 x 106 units/m2 Days 1-3, on Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of

  16. Radiation effects in the orthophosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Alkiviathes

    Monazite-structure orthophosphates, including LaPOsb4,\\ PrPOsb4,\\ NdPOsb4,\\ SmPOsb4,\\ EuPOsb4,\\ GdPOsb4, and natural monazite, and their zircon-structure analogues, including, ScPOsb4,\\ YPOsb4,\\ TbPOsb4,\\ TmPOsb4,\\ YbPOsb4, and LuPOsb4 were irradiated by 800 KeV Kr ions over the temperature range of 20 to 600 K. The critical amorphization dose was determined in-situ in the electron microscope using selected-area electron diffraction. The monazite-structure compounds, in general, had lower critical amorphization temperatures. Within each structure, the critical amorphization temperature, Tsb{c}, increased with the atomic number of the A-site cation. Structural topology models were insufficient to explain all of the observed differences, however, the ratio of the electronic-to-nuclear stopping powers showed good correlation with the susceptibility to amorphization at elevated temperatures. The variation in the Tsb{c} because of thermal annealing in geologic samples was calculated for the case of uranium in zircon. Equations used to calculate the critical amorphization temperatures were combined with the standard radioactive decay equation to calculate the alpha-decay event dose required for amorphization in terms of a "critical radioelement concentration", Nsb{c}. This allows the prediction of whether or not a mineral will be metamict given the age, radioelement concentration, and ambient temperature. Calculated values of Nsb{c} show good agreement with the previously estimated values for a suite of zircons from Sri Lanka. Ion-beam-amorphized orthophosphates, including fluorapatite, were irradiated by an 80 to 300 keV electron beam in the transmission electron microscope at temperatures between 100 and 800 K. Bright field imaging and selected-area electron diffraction were used to monitor the microstructural evolution. Amorphous LaPOsb4 and ScPOsb4 crystallized to form a randomly oriented polycrystalline assemblage of the same composition as the original

  17. The alpha effectiveness for formation of SO3- in barite: an essential factor for ESR dating of submarine hydrothermal barite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isono, Y.; Toyoda, S.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.

    2013-12-01

    While Kasuya et al. (1991) first pointed out that ESR (electron spin resonance) dating of barite (BaSO4) is possible, the method was first practically applied by Okumura et al. (2010) to a sample formed by the submarine hydrothermal activity. A subsequent study by Sato et al. (2011) studied the thermal stability of the signal and concluded that the dating signal due to SO3- is stable so that dating method is applicable up to at least several thousand years. Barite crystals formed by submarine hydrothermal activities contains large amount of Ra which replaces Ba in the crystal lattice where all dose rate is due to radiation from Ra. Okumura et al. (2010) reported a concentration of 7.7 Bq/g of Ra in a hydrothermal sulfide including barite where the internal alpha dose rate in barite contributes 40 to 60 % of total dose rate. Determination of alpha effectiveness is thus the one of the essential factors for improving the precision of dating of barite by ESR. Toyoda et al. (2012) investigated the alpha effectiveness for the ESR signal due to SO3- in barite by comparing the dose responses of the signal for gamma irradiation and for He ion implantation with an energy of 4 MeV. A value 0.043 ×0.018 was obtained for a sample from Morocco. However, the dose response was far from 'good', where the number of points is not sufficient. The experiments of He ion implantation was repeated in the present study for several samples to determine the precise alpha effectiveness. A value of 0.019 ×0.0096 and 0.0062 ×0.0036 were obtained for the samples from Morocco and from Funaoka Mine, Japan, respectively. The results of further repeated analysis will be presented.

  18. Effects of radiation on aquatic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the onset of nuclear age, nuclear fuel cycle products, nuclear medicine techniques, disposal of radio active wastes on land or in water, fall out of testing nuclear weapons has contributed large amount of radio nuclides to the water bodies. Radio nuclides can imbalance aquatic ecosystem resulting in danger to natural life. The biological effects of radiation on aquatic life are mortality, pathophysiological, reproductive, developmental and genetic changes. A broad review of the results obtained about the aquatic organisms related to different phyla indicates that the lower or less developed or more primitive organisms are more resistant than the higher or more advanced, developed and complex organisms to ionizing radiation. The algae, protozoa are more resistant than the insects, crustaceans, molluscs and fishes. The changes in sensitivity between different stages of development have also been noted. A review of the results of exposing salmonoid gametes, eggs, fingerlings and adults to X-rays supports the concepts that radio sensitivity decreases with age. This paper presents a selective review on effects of radiation and radio nuclides on the aquatic life. It include uses and sources of radiation, effective quantity of radiation, lethal and sub lethal effect, effects on survival, growth, reproduction, behaviour, metabolism, carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. (author)

  19. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Team, JET [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK

    2016-02-09

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass < A> weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher < A >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with < A > were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion–electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  20. Effect of oilseed cakes on alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, T; Chandra, A K

    1982-08-01

    The effects of oilseed cakes on extracellular thermostable alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305 was investigated. Each oilseed cake was made of groundnut, mustard, sesame, linseed, coconut copra, madhuca, or cotton. alpha-Amylase production was considerably improved in all instances and varied with the oilseed cake concentration in basal medium containing peptone and beef extract. Maximum increases were effected by a low concentration (0.5 to 1.0%) of groundnut or coconut, a high concentration (3%) of linseed or mustard, and an Rintermediate concentration (2%) of cotton, madhuca, or sesame. The oilseed cakes made of groundnut or mustard could completely replace the conventional peptone-beef extract medium as the fermentation base for the production of alpha-amylase by B. licheniformis. The addition of corn steep liquor to cotton, linseed, sesame, or madhuca cake in the medium improved alpha-amylase production. PMID:6181738

  1. Effects of q(r) on the Alpha Particle Ripple Loss in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.S. Darrow; M. Diesso; R.V. Budny; S. Batha; S.J. Zweben; et al.

    1997-09-01

    An experiment was done with TFTR DT plasmas to determine the effect of the q(r) profile on the alpha particle ripple loss to the outer midplane. The alpha particle loss measurements were made using a radially movable scintillator detector 20 degrees below the outer midplane. The experimental results were compared with TF ripple loss calculations done using a Monte Carlo guiding center orbit following code, ORBIT. Although some of the experimental results are consistent with the ORBIT code modeling, the variation of the alpha loss with the q(r) profiles is not well explained by this code. Quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires a careful analysis of the limiter shadowing effect, which strongly determines the diffusion of alphas into the detector aperture.

  2. Hot accretion disks with pairs: Effects of magnetic field and thermal cyclocsynchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    1994-01-01

    We show the effects of thermal cyclosynchrotron radiation and magnetic viscosity on the structure of hot, two-temperature accretion disks. Magnetic field, B, is assumed to be randomly oriented and the ratio of magnetic pressure to either gas pressure, alpha = P(sub mag)/P(sub gas), or the sum of the gas and radiation pressures, alpha = (P(sub mag)/P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)), is fixed. We find those effects do not change the qualitative properties of the disks, i.e., there are still two critical accretion rates related to production of e(sup +/-) pairs, (M dot)((sup U)(sub cr)) and (M dot)((sup L)(sub cr)), that affect the number of local and global disk solutions, as recently found by Bjoernsson and Svensson for the case with B = 0. However, a critical value of the alpha-viscosity parameter above which those critical accretion rates disappear becomes smaller than alpha(sub cr) = 1 found in the case of B = 0, for P(sub mag) = alpha(P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)). If P(sub mag) = alpha P(sub gas), on the other hand, alpha(sub cr) is still about unity. Moreover, when Comptonized cyclosynchrotron radiation dominates Comptonized bremsstrahlung, radiation from the disk obeys a power law with the energy spectral index of approximately 0.5, in a qualitative agreement with X-ray observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNS) and Galactic black hole candidates. We also extend the hot disk solutions for P(sub mag) = alpha(P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)) to the effectively optically thick region, where they merge with the standard cold disk solutions. We find that the mapping method by Bjoernsson and Svensson gives a good approximation to the disk structure in the hot region and show where it breaks in the transition region. Finally, we find a region in the disk parameter space with no solutions due to the inability of Coulomb heating to supply enough energy to electrons.

  3. Scattered Lyman-alpha radiation of comet 2012/S1 (ISON) observed by SUMER/SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Curdt, W; Vincent, J -B; Solanki, S K; Schühle, U; Teriaca, L

    2014-01-01

    During its sungrazing perihelion passage, comet ISON appeared in the field of view of the SUMER spectrometer and allowed unique observations at far-ultraviolet wavelengths with high spatial and temporal resolution. We report results of these observations completed on November 28, 2013, when the comet was only 2.82 R_Sun away from the Sun. Our data show the arrow-shaped dust tail in Ly-$\\alpha$ emission trailing behind the predicted position of the nucleus, but offset from the trajectory. We interpret the emission as sunlight that is scattered at micron-sized dust particles. We modeled the dust emission and dynamics to reproduce the appearance of the tail. We were unable to detect any signature of cometary gas or plasma around the expected position of the nucleus and conclude that the outgassing processes must have stopped before the observation started. Moreover, the model we used to reproduce the observed dust tail needs a sharp fall-off of the dust production hours before perihelion transit. We compare the ...

  4. Gene expression profiling of alpha-radiation-induced rat osteosarcomas: Identification of dys-regulated genes involved in radiation-induced tumorigenesis of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daino, K.; Ugolin, N.; Altmeyer-Morel, S.; Guilly, M.N.; Chevillard, S. [Laboratoire de Cancerologie Experimentale, iRCM, DSV, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2009-07-01

    To better understand the molecular basis of radiation-induced osteosarcoma (OS), we performed global gene expression profiling of rat OS tumors induced by the bone-seeking alpha emitter {sup 238}Pu, and the expression profiles were compared with those of normal osteoblasts (OB). The expressions of 72 genes were significantly differentially expressed in the tumors related to OB. These included genes involved in the cell adhesion (e.g., Podxl, Col18a1, Cd93, Emcn and Vcl), differentiation, developmental processes (e.g., Hhex, Gata2, P2ry6, P2rx5, Cited2, Osmr and Igsf10), tumor suppressor function (e.g., Nme3, Blcap and Rrm1), Src tyrosine kinase signaling (e.g., Hck, Shf, Arhgap29, Cttn and Akap12), and Wnt/b-catenin signaling (e.g., Fzd6, Lzic, Dkk3 and Ctnna1) pathways. Expression changes of several genes were validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis. Notably, all of the identified genes involved in the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway were known or proposed to be negative regulators of this pathway and were down-regulated in the tumors, suggesting the activation of {beta}-catenin in radiation-induced OS. By using immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses, constitutive activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in the tumors was confirmed by observing nuclear and/or cytoplasmic localization of {beta}-catenin and a decrease in its inactive (phosphorylated) form. Furthermore, we found a significant reduction in the levels of glycogen synthase kinase 3b (GSK-3b) protein in the tumors relative to OB. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the molecular basis of radiation-induced OS. (authors)

  5. Effect of water alpha radiolysis on the spent nuclear fuel UO2 matrix alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching experiments with solution renewal were carried out on UO2 pellets doped with alpha emitters (238/239Pu) to quantify the impact of alpha irradiation on UO2 matrix alteration. Three batches of doped UO2 pellets with different alpha flux levels were studied as well as spent fuel fragments. Interim storage in air of UO2 pellets doped with alpha emitters results in variations of the UO2 surface reactivity, which depends on the alpha particle flux at the interface and on the interim storage duration. The variation in the surface reactivity and the greater uranium release following interim storage cannot be attributed to the effect of alpha radiolysis in aerated media since the uranium release tends toward the same value after several leaching cycles for the doped UO2 pellet batches and spent fuel. However, leaching experiments performed in deaerated media after annealing the samples and pre-leaching the surface suggest that alpha radiolysis does indeed affect the dissolution, which varies with the flux at the UO2/water interface. (authors)

  6. Thorotrast and in vivo thorium dioxide: numerical simulation of 30 years of alpha radiation absorption by the tissues near a large compact source

    CERN Document Server

    Bianconi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background: The epidemiology of the slightly radioactive contrast agent named Thorotrast presents a very long latency period between the injection and the development of the related pathologies. It is an example of the more general problem posed by a radioactive internal contaminant whose effects are not noteworthy in the short term but become dramatic in the long period. A point that is still to be explored is fluctuations (in space and time) in the localized absorption of radiation by the tissues. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation code has been developed to study over a 30 year period the daily absorption of alpha radiation by micrometer sized portions of tissue placed at a distance of 0-100 micrometers from a model source, that approximates a compact thorium dioxide source in liver or spleen whose size is larger or equal to 20 micrometers. The biological depletion of the daughter nuclei of the thorium series is taken into account. The initial condition assumes chemically purified natural thorium. Results: ...

  7. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  8. On the effect of the ionising background on the Ly{\\alpha} forest autocorrelation function

    OpenAIRE

    Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Busca, Nicolás G.

    2014-01-01

    An analytical framework is presented to understand the effects of a fluctuating intensity of the cosmic ionising background on the correlations of the Ly{\\alpha} forest transmission fraction measured in quasar spectra. In the absence of intensity fluctuations, the Ly{\\alpha} power spectrum should have the expected cold dark matter power spectrum with redshift distortions in the linear regime, with a bias factor b_{\\delta} and a redshift distortion parameter {\\beta} that depend on redshift but...

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Alpha-Mangostin on Adhesion of Candida albicans to Denture Acrylic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Jamdee, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting denture wearers. It is characterized by the presence of yeast biofilm on the denture, primarily associated with C. albicans. The investigation of agents that can reduce C. albicans adhesion may represent a significant advancement in the prevention and treatment of this disease. This study aims to investigate the effect of alpha-mangostin on the in vitro adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic and germ tube formation by C. albicans and to compare its activity with clotrimazole which is a topical antifungal agent commonly used for the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Materials and Methodology: Alpha-mangostin was extracted by thin layer chromatography. The effect of alpha-mangostin on adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic was determined by using a colorimetric tetrazolium assay and germ tube formation by C. albicans was determined by using the counting chamber. Results: A significant reduction of C. albicans adhesion to denture acrylic was evident after exposure to 2,000 µg/ml of alpha-mangostin for only 15 min. In addition, the 2,000 µg/ml of the alpha-mangostin-treated C. albicans had a reduced ability for germ tube formation. These inhibitory effects of alpha-mangostin were as effective as clotrimazole. Conclusion: Alpha-mangostin has antifungal property against C. albicans by inhibiting the adhesion to denture acrylic and germ tube formation in vitro. These results suggest the potential application of alpha-mangostin as a topical medication or a natural oral hygiene product for treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. PMID:26962371

  10. Effect of decoyinine on the regulation of alpha-amylase synthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, W L; Chambliss, G H

    1987-01-01

    Decoyinine, an inhibitor of GMP synthetase, allows sporulation in Bacillus subtilis to initiate and proceed under otherwise catabolite-repressing conditions. The effect of decoyinine on alpha-amylase synthesis in B. subtilis, an event which exhibits regulatory features resembling sporulation initiation, was examined. Decoyinine did not overcome catabolite repression of alpha-amylase synthesis in a wild-type strain of B. subtilis but did cause premature and enhanced synthesis in a mutant strai...

  11. Concurrent sickle cell anemia and alpha-thalassemia. Effect on pathological properties of sickle erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Embury, S H; Clark, M R; Monroy, G; Mohandas, N

    1984-01-01

    The concurrence of sickle cell anemia and alpha-thalassemia results in less severe hemolytic anemia apparently as a result of reduced intraerythrocytic concentration of hemoglobin S and its retarded polymerization. We have evaluated the effect of alpha-globin gene number on several interrelated properties of sickle erythrocytes (RBC) that are expected to correlate with the hemolytic and rheologic consequences of sickle cell disease. The irreversibly sickled cell number, proportion of very den...

  12. The late biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The principal objective of the symposium was to review the current status of understanding of the late biological effects of ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. A second objective was to critically evaluate information obtained from epidemiological studies of human population groups as well as from animal experimentation in order to provide a solid scientific basis upon which problems of current concern, such as radiation protection standards and risk-benefit analysis, could be deliberated. Eighty-one papers were presented in 10 sessions which covered epidemiological studies of late effects in human populations exposed to internal and/or external ionizing radiation; quantitative and qualitative data from animal experimentation of late effects; methodological problems and modern approaches; factors influencing susceptibility or expression of late radiation injury; comparative evaluation of late effects induced by radiation and other environmental pollutants, and problems of risk assessment. In addition, there were two evening sessions for free discussion of problems of interpreting animal data, and of the epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations. Reports on atomic bomb survivors showed that these epidemiological studies are providing dependable data, such as dose-related excess infant mortality. The reports also revealed the need for consensus in the method employed in the interpretation of data. That was also the case with studies on occupationally exposed populations at Hanford plant, where disparate results were presented on radiation-induced neoplasia among radiation workers. These data are, however, considered not so significant in relative terms when compared to risks involved in other industries. It was recommended that national registry systems for the dosimetry and medical records of radiation workers be established and co-ordinated internationally in order to facilitate reliable epidemiological

  13. Oide Effect and Radiation in Bending Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, Oscar; Bambade, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Including radiation effects during lattice design optimization is crucial in high energy accelerators. Oide effect and radiation in bending magnets are reviewed aiming to include them in the optical design process to minimize the IP beam size. The Oide double integral is expressed in simpler terms in order to speed up calculations, concluding in how longer quadrupoles with lower gradients may help reducing the Oide effect. Radiation in bending magnets is reviewed for linear lattices, generalizing to the case when the final dispersion is different from zero and making comparisons with theoretical results and particle tracking. An agreement between the theory, the implemented approximation included in MAPCLASS2 and the six-dimensional tracking in PLACET has been found.

  14. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  15. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hamilton, Allister B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  16. Effects of recombinant human interleukin-6 alone and in combination with recombinant interleukin-1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha on antibacterial resistance in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Czuprynski, C J; Haak-Frendscho, M; Maroushek, N; Brown, J F

    1992-01-01

    In this study, recombinant human interleukin-6 (rIL-6) was tested for its ability to alter the resistance of mice to experimental Listeria monocytogenes infection. Single bolus or repeated injections of rIL-6 by itself did not increase antilisteria resistance. When rIL-6 was injected in combination with suboptimal concentrations of rIL-1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha (rTNF-alpha), it did not augment their abilities to mediate protection in the spleen and had a marginal effect on the l...

  17. Radiation Effect Mechanisms in Electronic Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the electronics industry worldwide achieved great advances from the 70s, with studies on oxidation process in field effect silicon transistors. Thus, there was a need for knowledge of the mechanisms that are present in oxides and interfaces between silicon and silicon oxides, as well as other compound semiconductors due to critical differences between the properties of silicon. Against this background, many studies have been performed to understand reliability and ionization radiation effects on electronic devices. Reliability problems and effects of ionizing radiation on electronic devices are critical, depending on the environment in which the devices are exposed. This is the case of space, avionics, particle accelerators, nuclear reactors. This research area is strategic for space and defense areas. Thus, it is of fundamental importance to conduct tests to qualify electronic devices submitted to irradiation, based on Total Ionizing Dose (Tid), Single Event Effects (SEE) and Displacement Damage (D D). This work shows tests using X-ray and ion beams to test commercial MOS(Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor). The integrated circuits, CD4007, were exposed to 60 MeV 35Cl ion beams using the Sao Paulo 8UD Pelletron Accelerator and 10 keV X-ray radiation using a Shimadzu XRD-7000. The total dose effects due to ionizing radiation in MOSFET devices can lead to trapping of charges in the oxide and at the interface Si/SiO2, which increases or decreases the transistors off-current and leakage currents, and shifts the threshold voltage. Characteristic curves of current as a function of gate voltage, in different irradiation conditions, for p and n-MOSFET transistors, which compose the commercial device, were studied. In Figure it is possible to note different behaviors of the devices as a function of radiation dose due to X-ray radiation and the incidence a 60 MeV 35Cl ion beam

  18. Dominant-negative CK2alpha induces potent effects on circadian rhythmicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks organize the precise timing of cellular and behavioral events. In Drosophila, circadian clocks consist of negative feedback loops in which the clock component PERIOD (PER represses its own transcription. PER phosphorylation is a critical step in timing the onset and termination of this feedback. The protein kinase CK2 has been linked to circadian timing, but the importance of this contribution is unclear; it is not certain where and when CK2 acts to regulate circadian rhythms. To determine its temporal and spatial functions, a dominant negative mutant of the catalytic alpha subunit, CK2alpha(Tik, was targeted to circadian neurons. Behaviorally, CK2alpha(Tik induces severe period lengthening (approximately 33 h, greater than nearly all known circadian mutant alleles, and abolishes detectable free-running behavioral rhythmicity at high levels of expression. CK2alpha(Tik, when targeted to a subset of pacemaker neurons, generates period splitting, resulting in flies exhibiting both long and near 24-h periods. These behavioral effects are evident even when CK2alpha(Tik expression is induced only during adulthood, implicating an acute role for CK2alpha function in circadian rhythms. CK2alpha(Tik expression results in reduced PER phosphorylation, delayed nuclear entry, and dampened cycling with elevated trough levels of PER. Heightened trough levels of per transcript accompany increased protein levels, suggesting that CK2alpha(Tik disturbs negative feedback of PER on its own transcription. Taken together, these in vivo data implicate a central role of CK2alpha function in timing PER negative feedback in adult circadian neurons.

  19. Yields of Gamma- and X-Ray Radiation of Alpha-Decays of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise knowledge of gamma- and X-rays emission probabilities of uranium isotopes is vital for accurate gamma-spectrometric determination of the isotopic composition and quantity of uranium. The peak intensity ratio methods employing high resolution gammaspectrometry and intrinsic efficiency calibration approach are known to provide most accurate and reliable isotopic information. When applied to unshielded and moderately shielded material, these methods largely benefit from de-convolution of the 90-100 keV narrow spectral interval, which contains intense gamma- and X-ray lines of major uranium isotopes 235U and 238U. These are the 92.37 keV and 92.79 keV gamma-rays of 238U/234Th, and the 93.35 keV ThKα1 X-rays from alpha-decay of 235U. Although the emission probability ratios of these lines were accurately established, their absolute yields are still lacking accuracy. For instance, as resulted from recent study, the yields of 234Th lines become corrected by 30%, compared with their previous values. This consequently raised a question regarding validity of the yield data for the 93.35 keV line of 235U and triggered the present experimental study. This study was later extended to the reexamination of emission probabilities of other 235U gamma-lines with energies above 205 keV. The experimental data used in the current work was collected using SRM 969 and CRM 146 reference uranium samples. (author)

  20. The effects of ionizing radiation and review of the Young-Woollard document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of a document entitled 'The Health Dangers of Uranium Mining and Jurisdictional Questions' has been prepared. E.R. Young and R.F. Woollard submitted, in 1980, this document to the British Columbia Royal Commission of Inquiry, Health and Environmental Protection - Uranium Mining (INIS-mf--7757). When we reviewed the document it became clear that the views concerning effects of low-level radiation including alpha irradiation do not have scientific consensus. For this reason we have included a brief summary of conclusions produced by various international and national bodies on the effects of radiation on humans

  1. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Naoki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kubota, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kubota-cbu@umin.ac.jp [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kosaka, Kentarou; Akita, Shinsuke; Sasahara, Yoshitarou; Kira, Tomoe [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kuroda, Masayuki [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Bujo, Hideaki [Department of Clinical-Laboratory and Experimental-Research Medicine, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura-shi, Chiba, #285-8741 (Japan); Satoh, Kaneshige [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings.

  2. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings

  3. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

  4. Alpha-particle-induced bystander effects between zebrafish embryos in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yum, E.H.W.; Choi, V.W.Y.; Nikezic, D. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Li, V.W.T.; Cheng, S.H. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    Dechorionaed embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, at 1.5 h post-fertilization (hpf) were irradiated with alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source. Thin polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) films with a thickness of 16 mum were used as support substrates for holding the embryos and recorded alpha-particle hit positions, and thus enabled calculation of the dose absorbed by the embryos. The irradiated embryos were subsequently incubated with naive (unirradiated) embryos in such a way that the irradiated and naive embryos were spatially separated but the medium was shared. Acridine orange was used to perform in vital staining to show cell deaths in the naive embryos at 24 hpf. Our results gave evidence in supporting the existence of alpha-particle-induced bystander effects between zebrafish embryos in vivo, and a general positive correlation between the cell death signals in the naive embryos and the alpha-particle dose absorbed by the irradiated embryos.

  5. Bi-phasic effect of interferon (IFN)-alpha: IFN-alpha up- and down-regulates interleukin-4 signaling in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten Wessel; Sommer, Viveca Horst; Woetmann, Anders;

    2003-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta is produced by virally infected cells and is believed to play an important role in early phases of the innate immune response. In addition, IFN-alpha/beta inhibits interleukin (IL)-4 signaling in B cells and monocytes, suggesting that IFN-alpha/beta (like IFN-gamma) is......Interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta is produced by virally infected cells and is believed to play an important role in early phases of the innate immune response. In addition, IFN-alpha/beta inhibits interleukin (IL)-4 signaling in B cells and monocytes, suggesting that IFN-alpha/beta (like IFN......-4-mediated STAT6 activation in both CD4+ and CD8+ human T cells. The effect is specific because (i) another interferon, IFN-gamma, does not enhance IL-4-mediated STAT6 activation, (ii) IFN-alpha-mediated STAT1 and STAT2 activation is not modulated by IL-4, and (iii) activation of Janus kinases...

  6. The Gunn-Peterson effect and the Lyman $\\alpha$ forest

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A

    1997-01-01

    We show that spatial correlations in a stochastic large scale velocity field in an otherwise smooth intergalactic medium (homogeneous comoving density) superposed on the general Hubble flow, may cause a `line-like' structure in QSO spectra similar to the population of unsaturated Ly-alpha forest lines which usually are attributed to individual clouds with 10^{11} <= N(HI) <= 5*10^{13} cm^{-2}. Therefore there is no clear observational distinction between a diffuse intergalactic medium and discrete intergalactic clouds. It follows that the HI-density in the diffuse intergalactic medium might be substantially underestimated if it is determined from the observed intensity distribution near the apparent continuum in high resolution spectra of QSOs. Our tentative estimate implies a diffuse neutral hydrogen opacity tau_{GP} = 0.3 at z = 3 and a current baryon density Omega_{IGM} = 0.08$, assuming a Hubble constant H = 70 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}.

  7. Effect of alpha particles on the stability of Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The macroscopic stability of an ignited EBT reactor is investigated by studying the effects of the alpha particles generated by the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion reaction on the background interchange mode, the interacting interchange mode, and the high-frequency compressional Alfven and coupled modes. A fluid description is used for the background plasma while a kinetic treatment is utilized for the hot electron species and the alpha particles. It is shown that the alphas tend to mildly destabilize the interacting interchange while stabilizing the background interchange due to their sizable Larmor radii. The destabilization is most pronounced when the beta of the alpha particles in highest, i.e., at birth, and recovery of stabilization takes place as these particles slow down toward thermalization. It is also shown that the alphas completely stabilize the high frequency modes so that it can safely be concluded that fusion alphas present no detrimental effects on the stability of an EBT reactor that possesses an appropriate hot electron ring for macroscopic stability

  8. a/alpha-specific effect on the mms3 mutation on ultraviolet mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1981-05-01

    A new gene involved in error-prone repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage has been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the mms3-1 mutation. UV-induced reversion is reduced in diploids that are homozygous for mms3-1, only if they are also heterozygous (MATa/MAT alpha) at the mating type locus. The mms3-1 mutation has no effect on UV-induced reversion either in haploids or MATa/MATa or MAT alpha/MAT alpha diploids. The mutation confers sensitivity to UV and methyl methane sulfonate in both haploids and diploids. Even though mutation induction by UV is restored to wild-type levels in MATa/MATa mms3-1/mms3-1 or MAT alpha/MAT alpha mms3-1/mms3-1 diploids, such strains still retain sensitivity to the lethal effects of UV. Survival after UV irradiation in mms3-1 rad double mutant combinations indicates that mms3-1 is epistatic to rad6-1 whereas non-epistatic interactions are observed with rad3 and rad52 mutants. When present in the homozygous state in MATa/MAT alpha his1-1/his1-315 heteroallelic diploids, mms3-1 was found to lower UV-induced mitotic recombination.

  9. Significance of radiation effects in solid radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Permar, P H; McDonell, W R

    1980-01-01

    Proposed NRC criteria for disposal of high-level nuclear waste require development of waste packages to contain radionuclide for at least 1000 years, and design of repositories to prevent radionuclide release at an annual rate greater than 1 part in 100,000 of the total activity. The high-level wastes that are now temporarily stored as aqueous salts, sludges, and calcines must be converted to high-integrity solid forms that resist deterioration from radiation and other effects of long-term storage. Spent fuel may be encapsulated for similar long-term storage. Candidate waste forms beside the spent fuel elements themselves, include borosilicate and related glasses, mineral-like crystalline ceramics, concrete formulations, and metal-matrix glass or ceramic composites. these waste forms will sustain damage produced by beta-gamma radiation up to 10/sup 12/ rads, by alpha radiation up to 10/sup 19/ particles/g, by internal helium generation greater than about 0.1 atom percent, and by the atom transmutations accompanying radioactive decay. Current data indicate that under these conditions the glass forms suffer only minor volume changes, stored energy deposition, and leachability effects. The crystalline ceramics appear susceptible to the potentially more severe alterations accompanying metamictization and natural analogs of candidate materials are being examined to establish their suitability as waste forms. Helium concentrations in the waste forms are generally below thresholds for severe damage in either glass or crystalline ceramics at low temperatures, but microstructural effects are not well characterized. Transmutation effects remain to be established.

  10. Prevention and Treatment of Functional and Structural Radiation Injury in the Rat Heart by Pentoxifylline and Alpha-Tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a severe side effect of thoracic radiotherapy. This study examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) and α-tocopherol on cardiac injury in a rat model of RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received fractionated local heart irradiation with a daily dose of 9 Gy for 5 days and were observed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated with a combination of PTX, 100 mg/kg/day, and α-tocopherol (20 IU/kg/day) and received these compounds either from 1 week before until 6 months after irradiation or starting 3 months after irradiation, a time point at which histopathologic changes become apparent in our model of RIHD. Results: Radiation-induced increases in left ventricular diastolic pressure (in mm Hg: 35 ± 6 after sham-irradiation, 82 ± 11 after irradiation) were significantly reduced by PTX and α-tocopherol (early treatment: 48 ± 7; late treatment: 53 ± 6). PTX and α-tocopherol significantly reduced deposition of collagen types I (radiation only: 3.5 ± 0.2 μm2 per 100 μm2; early treatment: 2.7 ± 0.8; late treatment: 2.2 ± 0.2) and III (radiation only: 13.9 ± 0.8; early treatment: 11.0 ± 1.2; late treatment: 10.6 ± 0.8). On the other hand, radiation-induced alterations in heart/body weight ratios, myocardial degeneration, left ventricular mast cell densities, and most echocardiographic parameters were not significantly altered by PTX and α-tocopherol. Conclusions: Treatment with PTX and α-tocopherol may have beneficial effects on radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function, both when started before irradiation and when started later during the process of RIHD

  11. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, P.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Siemann, D.W.; Shapiro, D.L.; Van Houtte, P.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve.

  12. Effects of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Jose Gilmar; Franco, Suely Salumita Haddad; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula Bergamin, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio Haddad [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (LNBio/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia, E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Soya dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.245 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. Five treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 25; 50; 75 and 100 Gy. Seed germination and harvest of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were doses of 25, 50 and 75 Gy. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  13. Effects of gamma radiation in annatto seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annatto bixin has emerged as a major source of natural dyes used in the world notably by the substitution of synthetics harmful to human health and ecologic tendency in obtaining industrial products free of additives with applications in industries textiles; cosmetics; pharmaceutical and food mainly. The aim of this research was to obtain increased of germination rate and dormancy breaking on annatto seeds by gamma radiation. Annatto dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.456 kGy/hour dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination rate and dormancy breaking in the seeds. Five treatments with gamma radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 100; 125; 150 and 175 Gy. After irradiation the annatto seeds were planted as for usual seed production. According to the results obtained in this experiment we can conclude that the low doses of gamma radiation utilized on the annatto seeds did not presented significantly effect on the germination of plants. But the best dose to increase the germination of seeds was 150 Gy. (author)

  14. Effects of gamma radiation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Soya dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.245 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. Five treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 25; 50; 75 and 100 Gy. Seed germination and harvest of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were doses of 25, 50 and 75 Gy. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  15. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve

  16. Effects of gamma radiation in annatto seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Camilo F. de Oliveira, E-mail: camilo.urucum@hotmail.com [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA/EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Harder, Marcia N.C., E-mail: marcia.harder@fatec.sp.gov.br [Centro Paula Souza, Curso Superior de Tecnologia em Bicombustiveis (FATEC), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Filho, Jose C.; Neto, Miguel B., E-mail: jorgecazefilho@yahoo.com.br [Empresa Estadual de Pesquisa Agropecuaria da Paraiba (EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The annatto bixin has emerged as a major source of natural dyes used in the world notably by the substitution of synthetics harmful to human health and ecologic tendency in obtaining industrial products free of additives with applications in industries textiles; cosmetics; pharmaceutical and food mainly. The aim of this research was to obtain increased of germination rate and dormancy breaking on annatto seeds by gamma radiation. Annatto dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.456 kGy/hour dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination rate and dormancy breaking in the seeds. Five treatments with gamma radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 100; 125; 150 and 175 Gy. After irradiation the annatto seeds were planted as for usual seed production. According to the results obtained in this experiment we can conclude that the low doses of gamma radiation utilized on the annatto seeds did not presented significantly effect on the germination of plants. But the best dose to increase the germination of seeds was 150 Gy. (author)

  17. Effects of the neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcober, V. (Junta de Energia Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)); Martinez Ruis, F.; Manuzi, M.A. (Dpto. de Traumatologia Centro Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain))

    1984-01-01

    An introduction to the cortical bone neutron irradiation subject and to the effect of the irradiation on the mechanical properties of bone considered as a composite material is presented. Only the special case of the simple flexion has been treated. The evolution of the load-deflection curve as a function of the epithermal neutron dose has been studied. Some hypotheses on the role performed by the organic and mineral phases are introduced.

  18. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  19. The effects and control of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Written for the layman, this booklet describes the effects of ionising radiation on people, and discusses the somatic hereditary risk estimates, and the measures taken to ensure the safe operation of the nuclear industry. New edition based on the sievert. (U.K.)

  20. Effects of Low Dose Radiation on Mammals 1

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Yutaka; Mine, Mariko; Kishikawa, Masao

    1991-01-01

    Radiation has been applied widely to clinics, researches and industries nowadays. Irradiation by atomic bomb produced many victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Radiation effects on animals and human belings have been reported extensively, especially at a dose range of high amount of radiation. As radiation effects at low dose have not been well studied, it is believed that even a small amount of radiation produces hazardous effects. However, it might not be true. Beneficial effects of a low dos...

  1. Biological effects of synchrotron radiation on crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐掌雄; 董保中; 等

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of germinating seeds of barley,winter wheat and spring one to synchrotron ultraviolet radiation is barley>winter wheat and spring one.But when dry seeds of the three crops are irradiated by 3.5-22keV X-rays,the sequence of their sensitivity to radiation can be changed.for irradiation of 0.6-3keV ultra soft X-rays,0.40-0.90 of the seedlings of the first generation appear mutation of striped chlorophyll defect.This biological effect has never been found for irradiation of other rays.

  2. Oscillator strengths and radiative transition rates for K{sub {alpha}} lines in gold X-ray spectra: 1s-2p transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahar, Sultana N. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: nahar@astronomy.ohio-state.edu; Pradhan, Anil K.; Sur, Chiranjib [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Oscillator strengths (f), line strengths (S) and radiative decay rates (A) are presented for all 1s-2p transitions in gold (Au) ions. X-ray emission from gold is extensively used, such as in fusion experiments, and in medical research for diagnostics and treatment. The K{sub {alpha}} 1s-2p transitions in gold are found to be in the hard X-ray region of 66-73 keV (0.1888-0.1706A) and are limited to from hydrogen-like to fluorine-like ions as the 2p subshell is filled beyond fluorine. While there are two 1s-2p transitions (1s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{sup o} and 1s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2p{sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{sup o}) for hydrogen-like gold, Au{sup +78}, the number varies depending on the number of electrons in the 2p subshell before and after the transition. For example, there are 35 1s-2p transitions giving the same number of K{sub {alpha}} lines for carbon-like Au, Au{sup +73}. The transitions can be of both types, dipole allowed and intercombination, and are in general strong, that is, A{approx}10{sup 16}/s. However, there are also weak transitions in the set. The present results are obtained from configuration interaction atomic structure calculations using the code SUPERSTRUCTURE which includes relativistic effects in Breit-Pauli approximation. The results have been benchmarked for a few ionic states with other detailed relativistic approaches, such as Dirac-Fock and coupled cluster. Comparisons with the very few transitions in the literature as well as those from other approaches indicate reasonable accuracy for the present results.

  3. Effects of XUV radiation on circumbinary planets

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz-Forcada, J; Micela, G

    2014-01-01

    Several circumbinary planets have recently been discovered. The orbit of a planet around a binary stellar system poses several dynamic constraints. The effects that radiation from the host stars may have on the planet atmospheres must be considered. Because of the configuration of a close binary system, these stars have a high rotation rate, which causes a permanent state of high stellar activity and copious XUV radiation. The accumulated effects are stronger than for exoplanets around single stars, and cause a faster evaporation of their atmospheres. We evaluate the effects that stellar radiation has on the evaporation of exoplanets around binary systems and on the survival of these planets. We considered the XUV spectral range to account for the photons that are easily absorbed by a planet atmosphere that is mainly composed of hydrogen. A more complex atmospheric composition is expected to absorb this radiation more efficiently. We used direct X-ray observations to evaluate the energy in the X-rays range an...

  4. Wavelengths, oscillator strengths and radiative transition rates for K{alpha} lines in titanium x-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Feng; Wang Chuangke; Zhao Xuefeng [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang Jiamin; Jiang Gang, E-mail: yjm70018@my-public.sc.cninfo.net [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2011-06-15

    The oscillator strengths, line strengths and wavelengths are presented for all 1s-2p transitions in titanium ions. X-ray emission from titanium is extensively used, for example for diagnosis, in fusion experiments. The K{alpha} 1s-2p transitions are limited to transitions from helium-like to fluorine-like ion as the 2p subshell is filled beyond fluorine. While there are two 1s-2p transitions (1s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 1s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2p{sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) for hydrogen-like titanium, Ti{sup 20+}, the number varies depending on the number of electrons in the 2p subshell before and after the transition. For example, there are 35 1s-2p transitions giving the same number of K{alpha} lines for carbon-like titanium, Ti{sup 16+}. The present results are obtained from configuration interaction atomic structure calculations using the code GRASPVU, which includes relativistic effects in the Dirac-Fock approximation. The results have been benchmarked for a few ionic states. A comparison of our results with the very few transitions in the literature as well as those from other codes shows reasonable accuracy of the present results.

  5. Radiation effects and crystallinity in polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A.; Ungar, G.

    A survey is presented of a series of works on the influence of crystallinity on the radiation induced effects, cross-linking in particular, in polyethylene and paraffins. The principal theme is that the usual conception of random introduction of cross-links into a random assembly of chains needs to be modified in the presence of crystallinity in general and chain folding in particular. A long series of varied investigations on polyethylene have indeed demonstrated through a series of conspicuous effects that not only the ordering intrinsic to crystals and the increased intrachain contacts due to chain folding, but the higher level morphology, the nature and mutual arrangement in particular, have a major influence on the effectivity of the radiation leading to networks. Extension of the works to paraffins identified unsuspected mobility of both the radiation precursor species and the paraffin molecule itself (cross-linked and uncross-linked) within the crystal lattice, leading to phase segregation of the cross-linked species into microscopically identifiable domains together with identifying a trend for the cross-links themselves to form non-randomly in groups. The latter phenomenon, observed also in the molten state, indicates that the departure from randomness in the cross-linking process is much more deep-rooted than originally anticipated, and calls for a general reassessment of our knowledge of cross-linking. Other topics included as part of the general enquiry are the destruction of crystallinity, the promotion of hexagonal phase through radiation, the effect of morphology on chain scission and the general, still unsolved issue of how to assess cross-links by a direct analytical method (involving NMR). The hope is expressed that the bringing together of these varied pieces of work will serve the unification of presently widely diverse areas of experience and might influence developments in the radiation studies of paraffinoid substances.

  6. Effect of pH on subunit association and heat protection of soybean alpha-galactosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J. E.; Sarikaya, A.; Herrmann, K. M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Soybeans contain the enzyme alpha-galactosidase, which hydrolyzes alpha-1, 6 linkages in stachyose and raffinose to give sucrose and galactose. We have found that galactose, a competitive product inhibitor of alpha-galactosidase, strongly promotes the heat stability of the tetrameric form of the enzyme at pH 4.0 and at temperatures of up to 70 degrees C for 60 min. Stachyose and raffinose also protect alpha-galactosidase from denaturation at pH 4.0 although to a lesser extent. Glucose and mannose have little effect. At pH 7.0 the enzyme is a monomer, and galactose has no effect on the heat stability of the enzyme. In the absence of heat protection of the enzyme by added sugars, a series deactivation mechanism was found to describe the deactivation data. In comparison, a unimolecular, non-first order deactivation model applies at pH 4.0, where heat protection effects were observed. At a temperature above 60 degrees C, simple deactivation is a suitable model. The results suggest that alpha-galactosidase conformation and heat stability are directly related.

  7. Effect of alpha-radiolysis on the dissolution of UO2 doped with alpha emitters under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The α emissions constitute almost entirely the radiation field of spent nuclear fuel after 500 years in a geological repository. In this work the effect of α-radiolysis on the fuel dissolution in the near field was studied. Pellets of UO2 doped with 10% wt. and 0.1% wt. of ''238 Pu (α-emitter) were prepared using a solgel method which provides homogenous distribution of the dopant in the UO2 matrix. The sintered materials were extensively characterized. Static leaching tests on these materials were carried out under anoxic conditions in deaerated water at room temperature. The results show that the uranium release from the matrix increase for the higher dopant concentration. Under the experimental conditions used it was difficult to observe a clear radiolysis effect on dissolution of the material containing 0.1% wt. of ''238 Pu. In order to study the radiation damage due to α decay in the fluorite type lattice of the UO2, the variation of the lattice parameter as a function of time was measured. An increase of the lattice parameter of approx 0,2% was observed after 1,5 months of storage in the UO2 doped with 10% wt. of plutonium. In the case of the UO2 doped with 0,1% wt. ''238 Pu, the lattice parameter did not vary significantly during the same time interval. The possible effects of damage accumulation on UO2 dissolution are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  8. Radiation effect on PVC/ENR blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of irradiation on the physical properties of Polyvinyl Chloride / Epoxidised Natural Rubber Blends (PVC/ENR blends) were investigated. The enhancement in tensile strength, elongation at break, hardness and aging properties of the blends have confirmed the positive effect of irradiation on the blends. It is evident from gel fraction and infra red spectroscopic studies that the blends of PVC and ENR cross-linked upon irradiation. The results also revealed that at any blend composition, the enhancement in properties depend on irradiation dose which controls the degree of radiation induced cross-linking. In an attempt to maximize the constructive effect of irradiation, the influence of various additives such as stabilizers, radiation sensitizers, fillers and processing aids on the blend properties were studied. The changes in blend properties upon irradiation with the presents of above additives were also presented in this paper

  9. Working group written presentation: Trapped radiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vampola, Alfred L.; Stuckey, Wayne K.; Coulter, D.; Friebele, E. J.; Hand, K. J.; Hardy, D. A.; Higby, P.; Kolasinski, W. A.; Santoro, R. T.; Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the Trapped Radiation Effects Panel for the Space Environmental Effects on Materials Workshop are presented. The needs of the space community for new data regarding effects of the space environment on materials, including electronics are listed. A series of questions asked of each of the panels at the workshop are addressed. Areas of research which should be pursued to satisfy the requirements for better knowledge of the environment and better understanding of the effects of the energetic charged particle environment on new materials and advanced electronics technology are suggested.

  10. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of δ- and β- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both θ- and α-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author)

  11. Alpha and beta adrenergic effects on metabolism in contracting, perfused muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Galbo, H

    1982-01-01

    The role of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation for the effect of epinephrine on muscle glycogenolysis, glucose- and oxygen uptake and muscle performance was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter at rest and during electrical stimulation (60 contractions/min). Adrenergic stimulation...... was obtained by epinephrine in a physiological concentration (2.4 X 10(-8) M) and alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade by 10(-5) M phentolamine and propranolol, respectively. Epinephrine enhanced net glycogenolysis during contractions most markedly in slow-twitch red fibers. In these fibers the effect...

  12. alpha. sub 2 -mediated effect of dopamine on the motility of the chicken esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Costa, G.; Benedito, S.; Garcia-Sacristan, L.R.A.; Orensanz, L. M. (Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain))

    1990-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), apomorphine and B-HT 933 produced dose related contractions on isolated longitudinal strips of chicken esophagus, whereas phenylephrine elicited no effect. DA induced contractions of myogenic origin, these contractions were insensitive to DA antagonists and were partially suppressed by yohimbine, which suggested an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic implication in this DA effect. This hypothesis was further investigated by performing binding experiments, in which B-HT 933 displaced the binding of ({sup 3}H) DA to esophageal homogenates. The results suggest the participation of an {alpha}{sub 2} - adrenergic receptor in the contractile response elicited by DA in the isolated chicken esophagus.

  13. Literature survey: health effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was originally written as a chapter of a report entitled 'Air pollution effects of electric power generation, a literature survey', written jointly by the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) and the Institutt for Atomenergi (IFA). (INIS RN242406). A survey is presented of the health effects of radiation. It has not, however, been the intention of the authors to make a complete list of all the literature relevant to this subject. The NILU/IFA report was meant as a first step towards a method of comparing the health effects of electric power generation by fission, gas and oil. Consequently information relevant to quantification of the health effects on humans has been selected. It is pointed out that quantitative information on the health effects of low radiation and dose rates, as are relevant to routine releases, does not exist for humans. The convention of linear extrapolation from higher doses and dose rates is used worldwide, but it is felt by most that the estimates are conservative. As an example of the use of the current best estimates, a calculation of normal release radiation doses is performed. (Auth.)

  14. Adverse Effects and Safety of 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors (Finasteride, Dutasteride): A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshburg, Jason M.; Kelsey, Petra A.; Therrien, Chelsea A.; Gavino, A. Carlo; Reichenberg, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Finasteride and dutasteride, both 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, are considered first-line treatment for androgenetic hair loss in men and used increasingly in women. In each case, patients are expected to take the medications indefinitely despite the lack of research regarding long-term adverse effects. Concerns regarding the adverse effects of these medications has led the United States National Institutes of Health to add a link for post-finasteride syndrome to its Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center. Herein, the authors report the results of a literature search reviewing adverse events of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors as they relate to prostate cancer, psychological effects, sexual health, and use in women. Several large studies found no increase in incidence of prostate cancer, a possible increase of high-grade cancer when detected, and no change in survival rate with 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use. Currently, there is no direct link between 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use and depression; however, several small studies have led to depression being listed as a side effect on the medication packaging. Sexual effects including erectile dysfunction and decreased libido and ejaculate were reported in as many as 3.4 to 15.8 percent of men. To date, there are very few studies evaluating 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use in women. Risks include birth defects in male fetuses if used in pregnancy, decreased libido, headache, gastrointestinal discomfort, and isolated reports of changes in menstruation, acne, and dizziness. Overall, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors were well-tolerated in both men and women, but not without risk, highlighting the importance of patient education prior to treatment. PMID:27672412

  15. Primary intracranial germ cell tumor with abnormal high value of alpha-fetoprotein after the radiation therapy. Report of case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokin, Kiyohiro; Abe, Hiroshi; Aida, Toshimitsu; Mabuchi, Shouji; Tsuru, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Nishio (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-02-01

    A 7-year-old boy was admitted to Hokkaido University Hospital complaining of headache and vomiting. On admission he was slightly confused and presented Parinaud's sign. CT scan revealed abnormal high density mass with contrast enhancement effect at the pineal region and obstructive hydrocephalus. Laboratory studies showed the normal value of human chorionic gonadotropin and no trace of alphafetoprotein. Germinoma was most suspected based on the findings of CT scan and laboratory studies. The radiation therapy was carried out for a month and CT scan taken after the radiation therapy revealed marked reduction of the size of the tumor at the pineal region, and he was discharged. But he was re-admitted 3 months after the discharge complaining of headache and vomitting again. CT scan showed the recurrence of the tumor and laboratory studies showed abnormal high value of A.F.P. After the ventriculoperitoneal shunt, the sub-occipital craniectomy was performed by the Stein's approach, and the tumor was removed. Pathologically the tumor was a typical yolk sac tumor. This case is a very interesting case because it suggests an alternation of the element of the germ cell tumor by the radiation therapy. At first admission, germinoma was the main element of the tumor judging from the effectiveness of the radiation therapy and laboratory studies. But the main element of the tumor seemed to have changed to yolk sac tumor after the radiation therapy. The relation between the tumor markers and the types of the germ cell tumor and histopathological characters of the intracranial germ cell tumor were discussed.

  16. Full $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$ electroweak radiative corrections to $t \\bar{t} \\gamma$ and $e^-e^+\\gamma$ productions at ILC with GRACE-Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Khiem, P H; Fujimoto, J; Igarashi, M; Ishikawa, T; Kaneko, T; Kato, K; Nakazawa, N; Shimizu, Y; Tobimatsu, K; Ueda, T; Vermaseren, J A M; Yasui, Y

    2013-01-01

    The full $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$ electroweak radiative corrections to $t \\bar{t} \\gamma$ and $e^-e^+\\gamma$ productions at the International Linear Collider (ILC) are presented in this paper. The computation is performed with the help of GRACE-Loop system. In the physical results, we discuss on the cross section, electroweak corrections, and the top quark forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) which are the function of the center-of-mass energy.

  17. Remote diagnostic of the hydrogen wall through measurements of the backscattered solar Lyman alpha radiation by Voyager 1/UVS in 1993-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Quémerais, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Sandel, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    We perform a new analysis of the Lyman alpha data obtained by Voyager 1 during the spatial scans in 1993-2003 while Voyager 1 was at 53-88 AU from the Sun. These data are the important source of information on the hydrogen distribution in the outer heliosphere. A sophisticated global kinetic-MHD model of the heliospheric interface and a radiative transfer model are used for the analysis. It is shown for the first time that the ratio of the Lyman alpha intensities detected in the downwind and upwind lines of sight in the outer heliosphere is sensitive to the configuration (peak value and location) of the hydrogen wall. The hydrogen wall is a source of Doppler-shifted backscattered Lyman alpha photons, so it can be seen from inside the heliosphere. Therefore, Voyager 1/ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) Lyman alpha data can be used for remote sensing of the hydrogen wall. We show that our current global model of the outer heliosphere, which is consistent with many other measurements including Lyman alpha data from both Voyager 1 and 2 in 1980-1993, provides a systematically larger downwind to upwind intensity ratio compared with the UVS data in 1993-2003. In order to decrease the ratio, a higher and/or closer hydrogen wall is needed.

  18. Interdependence of the radioprotective effects of human recombinant interleukin 1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and murine recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are molecularly distinct cytokines acting on separate receptors. The release of these cytokines can be concomitantly induced by the same signal and from the same cellular source, suggesting that they may cooperate. Administered alone, human recombinant (hr)IL-1 alpha and hrTNF alpha protect lethally irradiated mice from death, whereas murine recombinant GM-CSF and hrG-CSF do not confer similar protection. On a dose basis, IL-1 alpha is a more efficient radioprotector than TNF alpha. At optimal doses, IL-1 alpha is a more radioprotective cytokine than TNF alpha in C57BL/6 and B6D2F1 mice and less effective than TNF alpha in C3H/HeN mice, suggesting that the relative effectiveness of TNF alpha and IL-1 alpha depends on the genetic makeup of the host. Administration of the two cytokines in combination results in additive radioprotection in all three strains. This suggests that the two cytokines act through different radioprotective pathways and argues against their apparent redundancy. Suboptimal, nonradioprotective doses of IL-1 alpha also synergize with GM-CSF or G-CSF to confer optimal radioprotection, suggesting that such an interaction may be necessary for radioprotection of hemopoietic progenitor cells

  19. The effects of alpha/theta neurofeedback on personality and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Joshua; Varney, Carolyn; Parkinson, Lesley A; Gruzelier, John H

    2005-05-01

    Alpha/theta neurofeedback has been shown to be successful both in treating addictions and in enhancing artistry in music students. How its effects are mediated are not yet clear. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that alpha/theta neurofeedback works inter alia by normalising extreme personality and raising feelings of well being. 12 participants with high scores for Withdrawal (as measured by the PSQ) were given either alpha/theta neurofeedback or mock feedback and their personality and mood were assessed. Withdrawal scores on the PSQ-80 were not found to change in either group but significant effects were found for the Profile Of Mood States (POMS), with real feedback producing higher overall scores than mock feedback (P = 0.056). Real feedback caused participants to feel significantly more energetic (P < 0.01) than did mock feedback. Sessions of real feedback made participants feel more composed (P < 0.01), agreeable (P < 0.01), elevated (P < 0.01) and confident (P < 0.05), whilst sessions of mock feedback made participants feel more tired (P < 0.05), yet composed (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that, whilst 9 sessions of alpha/theta neurofeedback was insufficient to change personality, improvements in mood may provide a partial explanation for the efficacy of alpha/theta neurofeedback. PMID:15820636

  20. Anti-apoptotic effects of Z alpha1-antitrypsin in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, C M

    2010-05-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency is a genetic disease which manifests as early-onset emphysema or liver disease. Although the majority of alpha(1)-AT is produced by the liver, it is also produced by bronchial epithelial cells, amongst others, in the lung. Herein, we investigate the effects of mutant Z alpha(1)-AT (ZAAT) expression on apoptosis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) and delineate the mechanisms involved. Control, M variant alpha(1)-AT (MAAT)- or ZAAT-expressing cells were assessed for apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, phosphorylation of Bad, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and induced expression of a selection of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Expression of ZAAT in 16HBE14o- cells, like MAAT, inhibited basal and agonist-induced apoptosis. ZAAT expression also inhibited caspase-3 activity by 57% compared with control cells (p = 0.05) and was a more potent inhibitor than MAAT. Whilst ZAAT had no effect on the activity of Bad, its expression activated NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression above control or MAAT-expressing cells. In 16HBE14o- cells but not HEK293 cells, ZAAT upregulated expression of cIAP-1, an upstream regulator of NF-kappaB. cIAP1 expression was increased in ZAAT versus MAAT bronchial biopsies. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which ZAAT may promote human bronchial epithelial cell survival.

  1. Microwave radiation: biological effects and exposure standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, I.R.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal effects of microwave radiation are well recognized and are discussed with particular reference to cataractogenesis; the possibility of an association cannot be questioned. Postulated nonthermal effects comprise an asthenic syndrome, and for the most part the disturbances lie within clinical norms and tolerances, and are reversible. World opinion on safe exposure levels for microwave radiation is varied, and this had led to national standards disparate by three to four orders of magnitude. The US and UK exposure standard of 10 mW/cm/sup 2/ was determined over two decades ago; the possibility of a change to a more restrictive level, in line with other countries, in the near future is examined. It is concluded that such a change, without scientific rationale, is not justified. Some biological implications of the microwave radiation from the solar power satellite are considered in terms of precautions to be taken by personnel working in the vicinity of the rectenna, effects on cardiac pacemakers, and any potential effects on birds. 14 references.

  2. Interaction of radiation damage with strain field around. cap alpha. -precipitates in electron-irradiated. beta. -Nb-Zr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, K.; Kinoshita, C.; Kitajima, S.; Muroo, Y. (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1985-05-01

    The strain field around ..cap alpha..-precipitates (hcp) in the ..beta..-Nb-Zr phase has been evaluated to study its relaxation mechanism during electron irradiation in a high voltage electron microscope. The crystallography of the ..cap alpha..-precipitates is determined to be of Burgers' orientation relationship with the ..beta..-phase. The compressive strain field around the ..cap alpha..-precipitates is detected and determined by use of the strain contrast of electron microscopy and the elastic continuum theory. The relaxation process of the strain field around the ..cap alpha..-precipitates is observed during electron irradiation, and is analyzed in terms of accumulation of vacancies.

  3. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space

  4. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-05-17

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space.

  5. Effect of laser radiation on rat radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laprun, I.B.

    1979-03-01

    Quite a few experimental data have been obtained to date indicating that radioresistance of the organism is enhanced under the influence of electromagnetic emissions in the radiofrequency and optical ranges. But no studies were made of the possible radioprotective properties of coherent laser radiation. At the same time, it was demonstrated that the low-energy emission of optical quantum generators (lasers) in the red band stimulates the protective forces of the organism and accelerates regenerative processes; i.e., it induces effects that are the opposite of that of ionizing radiation. Moreover, it was recently demonstrated that there is activation of catalase, a radiosensitive enzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of peroxide compounds, under the influence of lasers. For this reason, the effect of pre-exposure to laser beams on radiosensitivity of rats was tested.

  6. Radiation effects on algae and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of radiation on algae have been summarized in this article. Today, algae are being considered to have the great potential to fulfill the demand of food, fodder, fuel and various pharmaceutical products. Red algae are particularly rich in the content of polysaccharides present in their cell wall. For isolation of these polysaccharides, separation of cells cemented together by middle lamella is essential. The gamma rays are known to bring about biochemical changes in the cell wall and cause the breakdown of the middle lamella. These rays ate also known to speed up the starch sugar inter-conversion in the cells which is very useful for the tapping the potential of algae to be used as biofuel as well as in pharmaceutical industries. Cyanobacteria, among algae and other plants are more resistant to the radiation. In some cyanobacteria the radiation treatment is known to enhance the resistance against the antibiotics. Radiation treatment is also known to enhance the diameter of cell and size of the nitrogen fixing heterocyst. (author)

  7. Casimir Effect, Hawking Radiation and Trace Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Setare, M R

    2001-01-01

    The Casimir energy for massless scalar field of two parallel conductor, in two dimensional Schwarzchild black hole background, with Dirichlet boundary conditions is calculated by making use of general properties of renormalized stress tensor. We show that vacuum expectation value of stress tensor can be obtain by Casimir effect, trace anomaly and Hawking radiation. Four-dimensional of this problem, by this method, is under progress by this author.

  8. {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boll, R.; Murphy, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  9. 213Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as 90Y/177Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with 213Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with 90Y/177Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of 213Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of 213Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of 213Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  10. Differential effects of UCHL1 modulation on alpha-synuclein in PD-like models of alpha-synucleinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Cartier

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by genetic and environmental factors. Abnormal accumulation and aggregation of alpha-synuclein (a-syn within neurons, and mutations in the a-syn and UCH-L1 genes have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of PD. In light of recent reports suggesting an interaction between a-synuclein and UCH-L1, we investigated the effects of UCH-L1 inhibition on a-syn distribution and expression levels in primary neurons and hippocampal tissues derived from non transgenic (non tg and a-syn over expressing tg mice. We show that suppression of UCH-L1 activity increased a-syn levels in control, non tg neurons, and resulted in a concomitant accumulation of presynaptic a-syn in these neurons. In contrast, blocking UCH-L1 activity in a-syn over expressing neurons decreased a-syn levels, and enhanced its synaptic clearance. In vitro studies verified the LDN-induced inhibition of UCH-L1 had minimal effect on LC3 (a marker of autophagy in control cells, in cells over expressing a-syn UCH-L1 inhibition resulted in increased LC3 activity. These findings suggest a possible differential role of UCH-L1 function under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, in the context of a-syn-induced pathology, modulation of UCH-L1 activity could serve as a therapeutic tool to enhance the autophagy pathway and induce clearance of the observed accumulated/aggregated a-syn species in the PD brain.

  11. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, electron and alpha radiation in rat skin. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Albert, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    The carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiation on rat skin was studied in an attempt to learn more about radiation carcinogenesis, especially how various parameters of the irradiation, such as dose distribution within the tissue and dose rate, affect the yield of tumors. It was found that when the dose was localized to a small region of skin, the tumor yield was reduced and the magnitude of the reduction indicated that the region of reduced response might extend about 150 ..mu.. into the irradiated zone. The proliferative state of the hair follicles at the time of irradiation had relatively little effect on tumor induction although old animals are less susceptible than young or newborn animals. The penetration requirement of at least 0.3 mm for producing tumors suggests that the hair follicle germ cells could be the oncogenic targets. The recovery rate for tumor induction measured by split-dose exposure protocols was 4 hours for electrons. Proton radiation exhibited nearly complete recovery at 24 hours PI. UVL promotion of electron induced tumors did not significantly alter tumor yields. Radioresistance to tumor induction appears to increase with age.

  12. 47 CFR 95.855 - Transmitter effective radiated power limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transmitter effective radiated power limitation. The effective radiated power (ERP) of each CTS and RTU shall... with an ERP exceeding 20 watts. No mobile RTU may transmit with an ERP exceeding 4 watts....

  13. 47 CFR 22.867 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Effective radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of ground and airborne stations... peak ERP of airborne mobile station transmitters must not exceed 12 Watts. (b) The peak ERP of...

  14. Effect of alpha-tocopherol on bone formation during distraction osteogenesis: a rabbit model

    OpenAIRE

    Kurklu, Mustafa; Yildiz, Cemil; Kose, Ozkan; Yurttas, Yuksel; Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Serdar, Muhittin; Deveci, Salih

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of alpha-tocopherol on distraction osteogenesis. Materials and methods Right tibias of 30 New Zealand white rabbits were distracted at a rate of 0.5 mm/day for 20 days with a circular external fixator. Experimental group rabbits (n = 15) were administered i.m. 20 mg/kg/day alpha-tocopherol for 30 days. Radiographic examinations were performed at the 20th, 30th and 40th days. Bone scintigraphy was performed at the 5th and 20th days....

  15. [Effect of adrenal stress on activity of proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhina, L M; Kaliman, P A

    1994-01-01

    The effect of adrenal stress on the proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor activities in blood serum and cytosols of the rat organs were investigated. The reliable change was marked only in the alpha-1-PI level research of lung tissue cytosol. The proteolysis suppression was revealed in the heart and kidney tissue, while the proteolysis activation was revealed in serum and less in the lung tissue cytosol. Changes in proteinase level in the myocardium and kidney tissue play the primary role in respect to those of the other research liquids under study. PMID:7747353

  16. Magnetoconvection and dynamo coefficients Dependence of the alpha-effect on rotation and magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ossendrijver, M; Brandenburg, A

    2001-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of three-dimensional compressible magnetoconvection in a rotating rectangular box that represents a section of the solar convection zone. The box contains a convectively unstable layer, surrounded by stably stratified layers with overshooting convection. The magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, is chosen subcritical, thus excluding spontaneous growth of the magnetic field through dynamo action, and the magnetic energy is maintained by introducing a constant magnetic field into the box, once convection has attained a statistically stationary state. Under the influence of the Coriolis force, the advection of the magnetic field results in a non-vanishing contribution to the mean electric field, given by uxb. From this electric field, we calculate the alpha-effect, separately for the stably and the unstably stratified layers, by averaging over time and over suitably defined volumes. From the variation of alpha we derive an error estimate, and the dependence of alpha on rotation and magne...

  17. Combustion synthesis and effects of processing parameters on physical properties of {alpha}-alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, M.V.; Hirschfeld, D.A.; Shea, L.E.

    2000-01-04

    Fine particle porous {alpha}-alumina has been prepared by a wet chemical method of combustion synthesis using an aqueous precursor containing aluminum nitrate (oxidizer) and carbohydrazide, an organic fuel as starting materials. The aluminum nitrate and carbohydrazide were reacted exothermically at 400--600 C. The synthesis of {alpha}-alumina ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was used as a model for understanding the effects of processing parameters on physical properties such as surface area, average pore size, and residual carbon content. The porous powders were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), BET surface area analysis and elemental analysis. The decomposition of the starting materials was investigated using differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TGA). It has been shown that the furnace temperature, fuel/oxidizer ratio, and precursor water content can be tailored to produce powders with different physical properties.

  18. The synergetic effect of starch and alpha amylase on the biodegradation of n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, M; Biria, D

    2016-06-01

    The impact of adding soluble starch on biodegradation of n-alkanes (C10-C14) by Bacillus subtilis TB1 was investigated. Gas chromatography was employed to measure the residual hydrocarbons in the system. It was observed that the efficiency of biodegradation improved with the presence of starch and the obtained residual hydrocarbons in the system were 53% less than the samples without starch. The produced bacterial enzymes were studied through electrophoresis and reverse zymography for explaining the observations. The results indicated that the produced amylase by the bacteria can degrade hydrocarbons and the same was obtained by the application of a commercial alpha amylase sample. In addition, in silico docking of alpha-amylase with n-alkanes with different molecular weights was studied by Molegro virtual docker which showed high negative binding energies and further substantiated the experimental observations. Overall, the findings confirmed the catalytic effect of alpha amylase on n-alkanes degradation. PMID:26971168

  19. Gamma radiation effects on nestling Tree Swallows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) to the stress of ionizing radiation was investigated with growth analysis. Freshly hatched nestlings were temporarily removed from nests, taken to the laboratory and acutely exposed to 0.9, 2.7, or 4.5 Gy gamma radiation. Some of the unirradiated control nestlings were also taken to the laboratory whereas others were left in the nests. Growth of all the nestlings was measured daily and analyzed by fitting growth models. There was no detectable radiation-induced mortality up to fledgling, approx. = 20 d after irradiation. Radiation exposure did not affect the basic growth pattern; the logistic growth model was most suitable for body mass and foot length, and the von Bertalanffy model for primary-feather length, irrespective of treatment. Parameter values from these models indicated pronounced growth depression in the 2.7-Gy and 4.5-Gy groups, particularly for body mass. Radiation also affected the timing of development. The growth depression of the 2.7-Gy group was similar to that caused by hatching asynchrony in unirradiated nestlings. The 4.5-Cy nestlings grew as well as unexposed nestlings that died from natural causes. Chronic irradiation at approx. = 1.0 Cy/d caused more severe growth effects than acute exposure to 4.5 Gy and may have caused permanent stunting. Growth analysis is a potent tool for assessing man-made environmental stresses. Observed body-mass statistics and model parameters seem to be most sensitive to environmental stresses, but coefficients of variation are not necessarily correlated with sensitivity. 34 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  20. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  1. Radiation and transmutation effects relevant to solid nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation effects in insulating solids are discussed in a general way as an introduction to the quite sparse published work on radiation effects in candidate nuclear waste forms other than glasses. Likely effects of transmutation in crystals and the chemical mitigation strategy are discussed. It seems probable that radiation effects in solidified HLW will not be serious if the actinides can be wholly incorporated in such radiation-resistant phases as monazite or uraninite

  2. Annual report of Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation was established in April, 1975, as a private nonprofit Japanese Foundation supported equally by the Government of Japan through the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the Government of the United States through the National Academy of Sciences under contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. First, the messages from the chairman and the vice-chairman are described. In the annual report, the review of ABCC-RERF studies of atomic bomb survivors, the summary of research activities, the research projects, the technical report abstracts, the research papers published in Japanese and foreign journals, and the oral presentation and lectures, all from April 1, 1978, to March 31, 1979, are reported. Also the report from the Secretariat and the appendixes are given. The surveys and researches carried out in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have offered very valuable informations to the atomic bomb survivors. Many fears were eliminated, medical interests were given to the serious effects of the exposure to atomic bombs, and many things concerning the cancer induced by radiation were elucidated. The knowledges obtained will save many human lives in future by utilizing them for setting up the health and safety standard in the case of handling ionizing radiation. The progress in researches such as life span study, adult health study, pathology study, genetics program, special cancer program and so on is reported. (Kako, I.)

  3. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi I.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

  4. Effect of Gamma radiation on mycotoxins solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Calado, Thalita; António, Amilcar L.; Rodrigues, Paula; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Abrunhosa, Luís; Venâncio, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high toxicity of mycotoxins, many methods have been used to reduce or eliminate them from food and feed. Gamma radiation is one technique that has been investigated with some promising results in degradation of some mycotoxins from food. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of gamma irradiation on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2), ochatoxin A (OTA) and zearelone (ZEA). The effect of the presence of moisture during the i...

  5. Effect of gamma radiation on mycotoxins solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Calado, Thalita; Antonio, Amilcar L.; Rodrigues, Paula; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Venâncio, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high toxicity of mycotoxins, many methods have been used to reduce or eliminate them from food and feed. Gamma radiation is one technique that has been investigated with some promising results in degradation of some mycotoxins from food. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of gamma irradiation on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2), ochatoxin A (OTA) and zearelone (ZEA). The effect of the presence of moisture during the i...

  6. Nonlocal Effects in Black Body Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremm, G N

    2016-01-01

    Nonlocal electrodynamics is a formalism developed to include nonlocal effects in the measurement process caused by the non-inertial state of the observers. This theory modifies Maxwell's electrodynamics by eliminating the hypothesis of locality that assumes an accelerated observer simultaneously equivalent to a comoving inertial frame of reference. In this scenario, the transformation between an inertial and accelerated observer is generalized which affects the properties of physical fields. In particular, we analyze how an uniformly accelerated observer perceives a homogeneous and isotropic blackbody radiation. We show that all nonlocal effects are transient and most relevant in the first period of acceleration.

  7. Radiation effects on active pixel sensors (APS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active pixel sensor (APS) is a new generation of image sensors which presents several advantages relatively to charge coupled devices (CCDs) particularly for space applications (APS requires only 1 voltage to operate which reduces considerably current consumption). Irradiation was performed using 60Co gamma radiation at room temperature and at a dose rate of 150 Gy(Si)/h. 2 types of APS have been tested: photodiode-APS and photoMOS-APS. The results show that photoMOS-APS is more sensitive to radiation effects than photodiode-APS. Important parameters of image sensors like dark currents increase sharply with dose levels. Nevertheless photodiode-APS sensitivity is one hundred time lower than photoMOS-APS sensitivity

  8. Effect of radiation on hydrotalcites with chromates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays the generation of radioactive wastes is matter of several studies. In this work anion material, chromates, in hydrotalcite are retained which are anion exchangers. It was proposed to heat the hydrotalcite until temperature of 1200 C with the purpose to form the (MgAl2O4) spinel is very stable and in this way to immobilize strongly the anions. The effect of radiation on this compound and in particular the chromium lixiviation with solution 1N NaCl. It was found that in all case, the anions are strongly retained in the spinel formed. The radiation dose used for this was 100 Mrad, the samples were treated with NaCl 1N for studying the Cr lixiviation. The results show that for the calcined samples at 1200 C and irradiated there are not chromium escapes, which indicates that it is strongly retained in the spinel that is the formed structure after of the material calcination. (Author)

  9. Reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Allan

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors, which have evolved rapidly during the last 15 years. Johnston's perspective in the book focuses on high-reliability applications in space, but his discussion of reliability is applicable to high reliability terrestrial applications as well. The book is important because there are new reliability mechanisms present in compound semiconductors that have produced a great deal of confusion. They are complex, and appear to be major stumbling blocks in the application of these types of devices. Many of the reliability problems that were prominent research topics five to ten years ago have been solved, and the reliability of many of these devices has been improved to the level where they can be used for ten years or more with low failure rates. There is also considerable confusion about the way that space radiation affects compound semiconductors. Some optoelectronic devices are so sensitive to damage in space that they are very difficu...

  10. Modulated cycles in an illustrative solar dynamo model with competing alpha effects

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The large-scale magnetic field in the Sun varies with a period of approximately 22 years, although the amplitude of the cycle is subject to long-term modulation with recurrent phases of significantly reduced magnetic activity. It is believed that a hydromagnetic dynamo is responsible for producing this large-scale field, although this dynamo process is not well understood. Within the framework of mean-field dynamo theory, our aim is to investigate how competing mechanisms for poloidal field regeneration (namely a time delayed Babcock-Leighton surface alpha-effect and an interface-type alpha-effect), can lead to the modulation of magnetic activity in a deep-seated solar dynamo model. We solve the standard alpha-omega dynamo equations in one spatial dimension, including source terms corresponding to both of the the competing alpha-effects in the evolution equation for the poloidal field. This system is solved using two different methods. In addition to solving the one-dimensional partial differential equations ...

  11. The indirect effect of radiation reduces the repair fidelity of NHEJ as verified in repair deficient CHO cell lines exposed to different radiation qualities and potassium bromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajinskis, Ainars, E-mail: ainars.bajinskis@gmt.su.se [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Olsson, Gunilla; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-03-01

    The complexity of DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation is mainly dependent on radiation quality, where the indirect action of radiation may contribute to different extent depending on the type of radiation under study. The effect of indirect action of radiation can be investigated by using agents that induce oxidative DNA damage or by applying free radical scavengers. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the indirect effect of radiation for the repair fidelity of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and base excision repair (BER) when DNA damage of different complexity was induced by gamma radiation, alpha particles or from base damages (8-oxo-dG) induced by potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}). CHO cells lines deficient in XRCC3 (HRR) irs1SF, XRCC7 (NHEJ) V3-3 and XRCC1 (BER) EM9 were irradiated in the absence or presence of the free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The endpoints investigated included rate of cell proliferation by the DRAG assay, clonogenic cell survival and the level of primary DNA damage by the comet assay. The results revealed that the indirect effect of low-LET radiation significantly reduced the repair fidelity of both NHEJ and HRR pathways. For high-LET radiation the indirect effect of radiation also significantly reduced the repair fidelity for the repair deficient cell lines. The results suggest further that the repair fidelity of the error prone NHEJ repair pathway is more impaired by the indirect effect of high-LET radiation relative to the other repair pathways studied. The response to bromate observed for the two DSB repair deficient cell lines strongly support earlier studies that bromate induces complex DNA damages. The significantly reduced repair fidelity of irs1SF and V3-3 suggests that NHEJ as well as HRR are needed for the repair, and that complex DSBs are formed after bromate exposure.

  12. Effect of electron beam radiations on anxiety in experimental animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposures to ionizing radiation have been an inevitable part of the environment. This type of radiation can disrupt atoms, creating positive and negative charged particles, and cause biological harm. Ionizing radiation includes X-rays, gamma rays, alpha particles, beta particles and neutrons. They have the potential to cause both beneficial and harmful effects. There are concerns about these radiations as they are widely used in hospitals for treatment and diagnosis of various diseases. The present work was designed to test the effect of whole body electron beam radiation on anxiety in mice using the Elevated plus maze and Light dark arena, the commonly used models for assessing anxiety in rodents. Mice were irradiated with three different doses (2 Gy, 4 Gy and 6 Gy) of electron beam radiations. Statistical analysis revealed that whole body irradiation of the moderate dose range (2-6 Gy) of electron beam leads to a significant (p<0.001) anxiogenic activity in irradiated mice. Electron beam induced anxiety can be due to radiation induced reactive oxygen species in brain. (author)

  13. Radiation Effects on DC-DC Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Xin; AbdulMazid, M. D.; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, several DC-DC converters were designed and built. The converters are Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, Flyback, and full-bridge zero-voltage switched. The total ionizing dose radiation and single event effects on the converters were investigated. The experimental results for the TID effects tests show that the voltages of the Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, and Flyback converters increase as total dose increased when using power MOSFET IRF250 as a switching transistor. The change in output voltage with total dose is highest for the Buck converter and the lowest for Flyback converter. The trend of increase in output voltages with total dose in the present work agrees with those of the literature. The trends of the experimental results also agree with those obtained from PSPICE simulation. For the full-bridge zero-voltage switch converter, it was observed that the dc-dc converter with IRF250 power MOSFET did not show a significant change of output voltage with total dose. In addition, for the dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation-hardened power MOSFET, the output voltage did not change significantly with total dose. The experimental results were confirmed by PSPICE simulation that showed that FB-ZVS converter with IRF250 power MOSFET's was not affected with the increase in total ionizing dose. Single Event Effects (SEE) radiation tests were performed on FB-ZVS converters. It was observed that the FB-ZVS converter with the IRF250 power MOSFET, when the device was irradiated with Krypton ion with ion-energy of 150 MeV and LET of 41.3 MeV-square cm/mg, the output voltage increased with the increase in fluence. However, for Krypton with ion-energy of 600 MeV and LET of 33.65 MeV-square cm/mg, and two out of four transistors of the converter were permanently damaged. The dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation hardened power MOSFET's did not show significant change at the output voltage with fluence while being irradiated by Krypton with ion energy of 1.20 GeV and LET of 25

  14. Phase III trial of postoperative cisplatin, interferon alpha-2b, and 5-FU combined with external radiation treatment versus 5-FU alone for patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma – CapRI: study protocol [ISRCTN62866759

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz-Winnenthal H

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After surgical intervention with curative intention in specialised centres the five-year survival of patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas is only 15%. The ESPAC-1 trial showed an increased five-year survival of 21% achieved with adjuvant chemotherapy. Investigators from the Virginia Mason Clinic have reported a 5-year survival rate of 55% in a phase II trial evaluating adjuvant chemotherapy, immunotherapy and external-beam radiation. Design The CapRI study is an open, controlled, prospective, randomised multi-centre phase III trial. Patients in study arm A will be treated as outpatients with 5-Fluorouracil; Cisplatin and 3 million units Interferon alpha-2b for 5 1/2 weeks combined with external beam radiation. After chemo-radiation the patients receive continuous 5-FU infusions for two more cycles. Patients in study arm B will be treated as outpatients with intravenous bolus injections of folinic acid, followed by intravenous bolus injections of 5-FU given on 5 consecutive days every 28 days for 6 cycles. A total of 110 patients with specimen-proven R0 or R1 resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma will be enrolled. An interim analysis for patient safety reasons will be done one year after start of recruitment. Evaluation of the primary endpoint will be performed two years after the last patients' enrolment. Discussion The aim of this study is to evaluate the overall survival period attained by chemo-radiotherapy including interferon alpha 2b administration with adjuvant chemotherapy. The influence of interferon alpha on the effectiveness of the patients' chemoradiation regimen, the toxicity, the disease-free interval and the quality of life are analysed. Different factors are tested in terms of their potential role as predictive markers.

  15. EFFECT OF CARBON SOURCES ON FORMATION OF ALPHA-AMYLASE BY BACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELKER, N E; CAMPBELL, L L

    1963-10-01

    Welker, N. E. (Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio) and L. Leon Campbell. Effect of carbon sources on formation of alpha-amylase by Bacillus stearothermophilus. J. Bacteriol. 86:681-686. 1963.-A chemically defined medium was devised for use in alpha-amylase induction studies. The addition of 0.1% casein hydrolysate to the chemically defined medium permitted growth on fructose, and with glucose, sucrose, maltose, starch, and glycerol it shortened the lag period and increased both the growth rate and the total enzyme produced. Growth did not occur when gluconate, acetate, or succinate were used as carbon sources. alpha-Amylase was produced during the logarithmic phase of growth; the amount produced was inversely proportional to the rate of growth. The poorer the carbon source for growth (glycerol, k = 0.24; glucose, k = 0.26; sucrose, k = 0.42), the higher was the amount of enzyme produced (glycerol, 109 units/ml; glucose, 103 units/ml; sucrose, 45 units/ml). Cells grown on technical-grade maltose (k = 0.26) or starch (k = 0.42) did not conform to this relationship in that unusually large amounts of alpha-amylase were produced (362 and 225 units/ml, respectively). Cells grown on fructose or sucrose had the same growth rate (k = 0.42), but smaller amounts of alpha-amylase were produced on fructose (fructose, 0 to 4 units/ml; sucrose, 45 units/ml). An intracellular alpha-amylase was not detected in Bacillus stearothermophilus.

  16. Basic radiation effects in nuclear power electronics technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the effects of radiation in microelectronics technology. The approach taken throughout these notes is to review microscopic phenomena associated with radiation effects and to show how these lead to macroscopic effects in semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. Bipolar integrated circuits technology is reviewed in Appendix A. Appendix B gives present and future applications of radiation-tolerant microelectronics in nuclear power applications as well as the radiation tolerance requirements of these applications

  17. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Costa de Camargo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ. Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h, measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  18. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  19. Effects of alpha-tocopherol associated with lovastatin on brain tissue and memory function in SHRSPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Marcela Rodrigues Moreira; Murad, Leonardo Borges; Paganelli, Aline; de Oliveira, Carlos Alberto Basílio; Vianna, Lucia Marques Alves

    2015-10-01

    Strokes are preceded by oxidative stress and inflammation, two processes linked to atherosclerosis and hypertension. Statins have been widely employed to control atherosclerosis; however, there could be neurological implications to its use—including cognitive impairment. Thus,we aimed to determine whether alpha-tocopherol is capable of reversing the neurological side effects of statins and enhancing its anti-inflammatory properties. To assess these effects, 15-week-old stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSPs) were divided into four groups (n = 6, each): alpha-tocopherol (AT), lovastatin (LoV), alpha-tocopherol + lovastatin (AT + LoV), and control (C).We administered 120 IU of alpha-tocopherol diluted in 0.1 ml of coconut oil,whereas the dose of lovastatin was administered at a ratio of 1 mg/kg of rat body weight. The control group received 0.1 ml coconut oil. All animals received the treatments via orogastric gavage.We assessed body weight, diuresis, food and water intake, oxidative stress (malondialdehyde levels), the total cellular injury marker (lactate dehydrogenase), short and long-term memory, cognition, and histopathological changes in the hippocampus. The results demonstrated that lovastatin treatment did not negatively affect the memory of our animal model. In fact, the animals treated with AT and LoV showed improvement in memory and cognition. Additionally, both treatments decrease lactate dehydrogenase and oxidative stress levels. Furthermore, our study also demonstrated hippocampal tissue preservation in the treated groups.

  20. Comparing the Effects of Isoflurane and Alpha Chloralose upon Mouse Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lucie A; Bauer, Lucy C; Klaunberg, Brenda A

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mice requires that the physiology of the mouse (body temperature, respiration and heart rates, blood pH level) be maintained in order to prevent changes affecting the outcomes of functional scanning, namely blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) measures and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The anesthetic used to sedate mice for scanning can have major effects on physiology. While alpha chloralose has been commonly used for functional imaging of rats, its effects on physiology are not well characterized in the literature for any species. In this study, we anesthetized or sedated mice with isoflurane or alpha chloralose for up to two hours, and monitored physiological parameters and arterial blood gasses. We found that, when normal body temperature is maintained, breathing rates for both drugs decrease over the course of two hours. In addition, alpha chloralose causes a substantial drop in heart rate and blood pH with severe hypercapnia (elevated blood CO2) that is not seen in isoflurane-treated animals. We suggest that alpha chloralose does not maintain normal mouse physiology adequately for functional brain imaging outcome measures. PMID:27148970

  1. Comparing the Effects of Isoflurane and Alpha Chloralose upon Mouse Physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie A Low

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mice requires that the physiology of the mouse (body temperature, respiration and heart rates, blood pH level be maintained in order to prevent changes affecting the outcomes of functional scanning, namely blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD measures and cerebral blood flow (CBF. The anesthetic used to sedate mice for scanning can have major effects on physiology. While alpha chloralose has been commonly used for functional imaging of rats, its effects on physiology are not well characterized in the literature for any species. In this study, we anesthetized or sedated mice with isoflurane or alpha chloralose for up to two hours, and monitored physiological parameters and arterial blood gasses. We found that, when normal body temperature is maintained, breathing rates for both drugs decrease over the course of two hours. In addition, alpha chloralose causes a substantial drop in heart rate and blood pH with severe hypercapnia (elevated blood CO2 that is not seen in isoflurane-treated animals. We suggest that alpha chloralose does not maintain normal mouse physiology adequately for functional brain imaging outcome measures.

  2. The in vitro genotoxic effects of a commercial formulation of alpha-cypermethrin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Ayşe Yavuz; Topaktaş, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    alpha-Cypermethrin, a highly active pyrethroid insecticide, is effective against a wide range of insects encountered in agriculture and animal husbandry. The potential genotoxicity of a commercial formulation of alpha-cypermethrin (Fastac 100 EC, containing 10% alpha-cypermethrin as the active ingredient) on human peripheral lymphocytes was examined in vitro by sister chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosomal aberrations (CAs), and micronucleus (MN) tests. The human lymphocytes were treated with 5, 10, 15, and 20 microg/ml of alpha-cypermethrin for 24- and 48-hr. alpha-Cypermethrin induced SCEs and CAs significantly at all concentrations and treatment times and MN formation was significantly induced at 5 and 10 microg/ml of alpha-cypermethrin when compared with both the control and solvent control. Binuclear cells could not be detected sufficiently in the highest two concentration of alpha-cypermethrin (15 and 20 microg/ml) for both the 24- and 48-hr treatment times. alpha-Cypermethrin decreased the proliferation index (PI) at three high concentrations (10, 15, and 20 microg/ml) for both treatment periods as compared with the control groups. In addition, alpha-cypermethrin reduced both the mitotic index (MI) and nuclear division index (NDI) significantly at all concentrations for two treatment periods. The PI and MI were reduced by alpha-cypermethrin in a concentration-dependent manner during both treatment times. In general, alpha-cypermethrin showed higher cytotoxic and cytostatic effects than positive control (MMC) at the two highest concentrations for the 24- and 48-hr treatment periods. The present study is the first to report the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of commercial formulation of alpha-cypermethrin in peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  3. OXIDATIVE STRESS IN SHEEP INDUCED BY CADMIUM CHLORIDE TOXICITY, WITH THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF ALPHA LIPOIC ACID

    OpenAIRE

    Hussien Ali NAJI; Mohammad Mushgil ZENAD

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy toxic metal, with harmful effects on animals and public health. Recently the risk of cadmium toxicity is substantially regarded; the environmental pollution is increased due to multi- uses of this element in various industries. This study was performed to clarify the effects of acute cadmium toxicity in sheep with trail of using alpha lipoic acid as an antioxidant therapeutic substance. Fifteen male lambs aged from 5-to-7 months were divided equally in to three groups,...

  4. The effects of solar radiation and black body re-radiation on thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Simon; Parsons, Ken

    2008-04-01

    When the sun shines on people in enclosed spaces, such as in buildings or vehicles, it directly affects thermal comfort. There is also an indirect effect as surrounding surfaces are heated exposing a person to re-radiation. This laboratory study investigated the effects of long wave re-radiation on thermal comfort, individually and when combined with direct solar radiation. Nine male participants (26.0 +/- 4.7 years) took part in three experimental sessions where they were exposed to radiation from a hot black panel heated to 100 degrees C; direct simulated solar radiation of 600 Wm(-2) and the combined simulated solar radiation and black panel radiation. Exposures were for 30 min, during which subjective responses and mean skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that, at a surface temperature of 100 degrees C (close to maximum in practice), radiation from the flat black panel provided thermal discomfort but that this was relatively small when compared with the effects of direct solar radiation. It was concluded that re-radiation, from a dashboard in a vehicle, for example, will not have a major direct influence on thermal comfort and that existing models of thermal comfort do not require a specific modification. These results showed that, for the conditions investigated, the addition of re-radiation from internal components has an effect on thermal sensation when combined with direct solar radiation. However, it is not considered that it will be a major factor in a real world situation. This is because, in practice, dashboards are unlikely to maintain very high surface temperatures in vehicles without an unacceptably high air temperature. This study quantifies the contribution of short- and long-wave radiation to thermal comfort. The results will aid vehicle designers to have a better understanding of the complex radiation environment. These include direct radiation from the sun as well as re-radiation from the dashboard and other internal surfaces.

  5. Space storms and radiation causes and effects

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2010-01-01

    Heliophysics is a fast-developing scientific discipline that integrates studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and the environment and climate of planets. The Sun is a magnetically variable star and for planets with intrinsic magnetic fields, planets with atmospheres, or planets like Earth with both, there are profound consequences. This 2010 volume, the second in this series of three heliophysics texts, integrates the many aspects of space storms and the energetic radiation associated with them - from causes on the Sun to effects in planetary environments. It reviews t

  6. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d’Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Solange Guidolin CANNIATTI-BRAZACA

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to...

  7. [Endogenous opioid system in the realization of the analgesic effect of alpha-tocopherol in reference to algomenorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanovskiĭ, G N; Bakuleva, L P; Luzina, N L; Vinogradov, V A; Iarygin, K N

    1988-02-01

    Beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity was studied in 7 patients with algomenorrhea during pain attack and 15 minutes after alpha-tocopherol administration with a therapeutic aim (till the analgetic effect was reached). There was an increase in beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity after alpha-tocopherol administration. Naloxone administration to 9 patients with algomenorrhea of various etiology resumed the pain. The effect of alpha-tocopherol application for pain relief depended on the pathogenesis of algomenorrhea. At the same time naloxone administration failed to resume the pain in patients, in whom alpha-tocopherol had a strong analgetic effect. It is assumed that the endogenous opioid system participates in alpha-tocopherol effect on pain relief in patients with algomenorrhea. PMID:2964879

  8. Effects of ionizing radiations on insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most traditional effects caused by irradiation are development and morphogenesis disorders since on the whole the sensitivity of the developing organism to ionizing radiations is all the greater as the growth rate is faster. During the development of higher insects two categories of cell divide: larval cells on the one hand, which differentiate immediately after segmentation and give rise to larval organisms, and embryonic cells on the other which divide actively to form various islets or imaginal discs destined, each to its own extent, to provide the organs of the adult. Two cell categories thus coexist in the larva, one undergoing differentiation and the other multiplication, the radiosensitivity of which will be quite different for this very reason and will account at least partly, where the lethal effect of ionizing radiations is concerned, for the results observed. Three chapters deal in turn with effects on longevity, on regeneration and restoration and on morphogenesis and development. Strong doses give rise beyond a certain threshold to the appearance of acute radiodermatitis; their clinical signs and different degrees of seriousness liken them to burns of a special type

  9. Late effects of ionizing radiation on testis; Effets tardifs des radiations ionisantes sur le testicules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardet, E. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1997-12-01

    Most of the basic data regarding the effect of radiation on the testis are issued from animal studies. They demonstrate the extreme radiosensitivity on the germ cell lineage but little is known about the reversible or definitive aspects of these radiation induced effects. In man, the late non stochastic effects of radiation to the testicle are mainly related to persisting spermatogenesis disturbances or/and hormone related problems. Morphological, physiological, radiobiological specificities of the human testis along with numerous parameters depending on radiation conditions make it difficult to evaluate the late effects and radiation tolerance doses. Evaluation of such effects based on a common scale for therapeutic radiation schedules would improve the present understanding and possibility prevent the occurrence of these delayed effects, for the benefit of patients. (author)

  10. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human mission to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  11. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    and SRIM calculations. Preliminary studies regarding the biological endpoints DSB (cluster) and chromosomal aberrations have been performed for selected light ions up to neon. Validation with experimental data as well as further calculations are underway and final results will be presented at the meeting. Mitochondrial alterations have been implicated in radiation-induced cardiovascular effects. To extend the applicability of PARTRAC biophysical tool towards effects on mitochondria, the nuclear DNA and chromatin as the primary target of radiation has been complemented by a model of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to mimic a coronary cell with thousand mitochondria contained in the cytoplasm. Induced mtDNA damage (SSB, DSB) has been scored for 60Co photons and 5 MeV alpha-particle irradiation, assuming alternative radical scavenging capacities within the mitochondria. While direct radiation effects in mtDNA are identical to nuclear DNA, indirect effects in mtDNA are in general larger due to lower scavenging and the lack of DNA-protecting histones. These simulations complement the scarce experimental data on radiation-induced mtDNA damage and help elucidate the relative roles of initial mtDNA versus nuclear DNA damage and of pathways that amplify their respective effects. Ongoing and planned developments of PARTRAC include coupling with a radiation transport code and track-structure based calculations of cell killing for RBE studies on macroscopic scales within a mixed ion field. [1] Friedland, Dingfelder et al. (2011): "Track structures, DNA targets and radiation effects in the biophysical Monte Carlo simulation code PARTRAC", Mutat. Res. 711, 28-40 [2] Friedland et al. (2013): "Track structure based modelling of chromosome aberrations after photon and alpha-particle irradiation", Mutat. Res. 756, 213-223 [3] Schmid, Friedland et al. (2015): "Sub-micrometer 20 MeV protons or 45 MeV lithium spot irradiation enhances yields of dicentric chromosomes due to clustering of DNA

  12. Calculus of radiolytic products generation in water due to alpha radiation. Determination of the spent nuclear fuels matrix alteration rate Determination of velocity of spent fuel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of radiolytic products as a result of alpha radiation in the surface of the spent fuel is a key process in order to understand how the it becomes degraded in repository conditions. The present work has established a radiolytic model based on a set of reactions involving fuel oxidation-dissolution and radiolytic products recombination. It also includes the decrease of the dose rates as the main alpha emitters decay away. Four cases, with varying parameters of the system, have been assessed. The results show a decrease in both the concentration of the radiolytic products in the gap water and the degradation of the fuel matrix. It has been estimated that in the period of the evaluation (10''6 years) up to 52% of the pellet is altered in the conservative cases, whereas only 11% is altered in the realistic cases. No significant differences were observed when the carbonates reactions were included in the system. (Author)

  13. Radiative Effects in the Standard Model Extension

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovskii, V C; Murchikova, E M

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of radiative effects induced by the Lorentz and CPT non-invariant interaction term for fermions in the Standard Model Extension is investigated. In particular, electron-positron photo-production and photon emission by electrons and positrons were studied. The rates of these processes were calculated in the Furry picture. It was demonstrated that the rates obtained in the framework of the model adopted strongly depend on the polarization states of the particles involved. Indeed, ultra-relativistic particles should occupy states with a preferred spin orientation, i.e., photons have the sign of polarization opposite to the sign of the effective potential, while charged particle are preferably in the state with the helicity coinciding with the sign of the effective potential. This leads to evident spatial asymmetries which may have certain consequences observable in astrophysical and cosmological studies.

  14. Conditions for effects of radiation pulsing

    CERN Document Server

    Trinkaus, H

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of pulsing effects on radiation damage is due to differences in the delay times of relevant defect reactions and/or to the non-linear dependence of such reactions on defect production rates. Thus, significant pulsing effects require (1) proper relationships of the internal time scales of defect production and reaction to the time scales of pulsing and (2) sufficiently large pulsing induced fluctuations in relevant microstructural variables. We show that the first condition, which we quantify by a 'relative dynamic bias', is indeed fulfilled in wide ranges of the main irradiation parameters. The second condition, quantified by an 'absolute dynamic bias', is, however, found to restrict the parameter ranges of possible pulsing effects substantially. For planned spallation neutron sources and similar accelerator driven systems facilities we find, for instance, that, in the temperature range of interest, the defect yield of one pulse (controlling the absolute dynamic bias) is much too small to allo...

  15. Effect of extracellular pH on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Pytel, Maria; Cherubini, Enrico; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-08-01

    Recently, we have reported that extracellular protons allosterically modulated neuronal GABA(A) receptors [Mozrzymas, J.W., Zarnowska, E.D., Pytel, M., Mercik, K., 2003a. Modulation of GABA(A) receptors by hydrogen ions reveals synaptic GABA transient and a crucial role of desensitiztion process. Journal of Neuroscience 23, 7981-7992]. However, GABAARs in neurons are heterogeneous and the effect of hydrogen ions depends on the receptor subtype. In particular, gamma2 subunit sets the receptor sensibility to several modulators including protons. However, the mechanisms whereby protons modulate gamma2-containing and gamma2-free GABAARs have not been fully elucidated. To this end, current responses to ultrafast GABA applications were recorded for alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 receptors at different pH values. For both receptor types, increase in pH induced a decrease in amplitudes of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] but this effect was stronger for alpha1beta2 receptors. In the case of alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, protons strongly affected the current time course due to a down regulation of binding and desensitization rates. This effect was qualitatively similar to that described in neurons. Protons strongly influenced the amplitude of alpha1beta2 receptor-mediated currents but the effect on their kinetics was weak suggesting a predominant direct non-competitive inhibition with a minor allosteric modulation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that extracellular protons strongly affect GABAA receptors and that, depending on the presence of the gamma2 subunit, the modulatory mechanisms show profound quantitative and qualitative differences.

  16. Effects of microstructural parameters and back stress on damage mechanisms in {alpha}/{beta} titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helbert, A.L.; Feaugas, X.; Clavel, M. [Univ. de Technologie de Compiegne (France)

    1998-01-23

    Damage initiation and kinetics in four {alpha}/{beta} titanium alloys have been experimentally and numerically investigated. Efforts were focused on triaxiality, {chi} = {Sigma}{sub m}/{Sigma}{sub eq} and internal stresses effects. The study of void nucleation has provided nucleation criteria corresponding to voids at the {alpha}/{beta} interface. This macroscopic nucleation criterion, written as {Sigma}{sub m} = f({var_epsilon}{sub peq}), was explained with the help of microscopic observations. Microscopic parameters such as plastic strain in the {alpha}-phase or local hydrostatic stress {sigma}{sub m}{sup loc} at the {alpha}/{beta} interface have been linked to the damage initiation. Also, the influence of the different heterogeneity levels on the macroscopic nucleation criterion was demonstrated. It has also been shown that internal stresses increased both nucleation and growth kinetics. Damage mechanisms are well described by a Gurson-Tvergaard model modified to take into account internal stresses. In particular, the existence of a material physical property, f{sub c} (void volume fraction at fracture) was shown.

  17. Effect of heating rate on temperature of titanium alloy (. cap alpha. +. beta. ). -->. beta. transformaton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gridnev, V.N.; Ivasishin, O.M.; Markovskij, P.E. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Metallofiziki)

    1985-01-01

    The effect of doping of two-phase titaniums alloys and morphology of initial structure on the Tsub(t) temperature shift value of (..cap alpha..+..beta..)..--> beta.. transformation depending on heating rate is investigated. It has been found that the Tsub(t) shift occurs in the strictly determined temperature range depending on chemical alloy composition. The Tsub(t) shift is directly proportional to the Ksub(..beta..) coefficient applied as a quantitative alloying characteristic as well as a dimensional factor equal either to the plate thickness or the ..cap alpha..-phase globule diameter depending on the type of initial structure. In the limits of this temperature range the (..cap alpha..+..beta..)..--> beta..-transformation occurs completely according to the diffusion mechanism. The critical heating rate at which maximum permissible Tsub(t) value is attained and above which its stabilization is observed is determined by the same parameters - the alloy doping degree characterized by the Ksub(..beta..) coefficient and the ..cap alpha..-phase crystal dimensions in the initial structure.

  18. Ovarian response markers lead to appropriate and effective use of corifollitropin alpha in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Antonio; D'Ippolito, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Corifollitropin alpha is a highly effective gonadotrophin, which maintains multifollicular growth for a week. The advantages of its administration include ease of use of the drug, making the treatment more patient friendly, resulting in a lower level of distress for the patient. At the same time, the pregnancy rate resulting from its use in IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles is similar to that found when daily recombinant FSH is administered. The ovarian response to corifollitropin alpha is dependent on clinically established predictors such as baseline FSH, antral follicle count (AFC) and age. There is a general trend towards a higher ovarian response with an increasing AFC and the number of oocytes per attempt decreased with increasing baseline FSH and age. Even if the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome following corifollitropin alpha is very similar to the rate reported in literature for young women undergoing IVF, the risk of overstimulation may be reduced by avoiding maximal ovarian stimulation in women anticipated to be hyperresponders. High basal anti-Müllerian hormone and/or AFC can identify women with enhanced functional ovarian reserve at risk of overstimulation, and the risk is even higher if maximally stimulated with corifollitropin alpha or high dose of daily recombinant FSH. Corifollitropin alpha is a highly effective gonadotrophin which maintains multifollicular growth for a week. The ovarian response to corifollitropin was demonstrated to be dependent on clinically established predictors such as baseline FSH, antral follicle count (AFC) and age. There was a general trend toward a higher ovarian response with an increasing AFC and the mean number of oocytes per attempt decreased with increasing baseline FSH and age. Even if the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) following corifollitropin alpha is very similar to the rate of OHSS reported in literature for young women undergoing IVF, the risk of overstimulation may be

  19. Radiation Effects on Materials in the Near-Field of a Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Site restoration activities at US DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste generated at DOE facilities require working with and within various types and levels of radiation fields. Once the nuclear waste is incorporated into a final form, radioactive decay will decrease the radiation field over geologic time scales, but the alpha-decay dose for these solids will still reach values as high as 1018 alpha-decay events/gm in periods as short as 1,000 years. This dose is well within the range for which important chemical (e.g., increased leach rate) and physical (e.g., volume expansion) changes may occur in crystalline ceramics. Release and sorption of long-lived actinides can also provide a radiation exposure to backfill materials, and changes in important retardation properties (e.g., cation exchange capacity) may occur. The objective of this research program has been to evaluate the long-term radiation effects in materials used in processing high-level nuclear waste or materials in the near-field of a nuclear waste repository

  20. Solar dynamo models with alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local 3D convection calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Tuominen, I

    2006-01-01

    (abridged) Results from kinematic solar dynamo models employing alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local convection calculations are presented. We estimate the magnitude of these effects to be around 2-3 m/s. The rotation profile of the Sun as obtained from helioseismology is applied. We obtain an estimate of the ratio of the two induction effects, C_alpha/C_Omega \\approx 10^-3, which we keep fixed in all models. We also include a one-cell meridional circulation pattern having a magnitude of 10-20 m/s near the surface and 1-2 m/s at the bottom of the convection zone. The model essentially represents a distributed turbulent dynamo, as the alpha-effect is nonzero throughout the convection zone, although it concentrates near the bottom of the convection zone obtaining a maximum around 30 degrees of latitude. Turbulent pumping of the mean fields is predominantly down- and equatorward. We find that, when all these effects are included in the model, it is possible to correctly reproduce many features of the so...

  1. Modification of certain pharmacological effects of ethanol by lipophilic alpha-1 adrenergic agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, M.K.; Dinovo, E.C.; Haddox, V.G.

    1987-09-28

    The influence of four centrally-acting alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonists, namely, 2(2-chloro-5-trifluoromethylphenylimino) imidazolidine (St 587), cirazoline, (-) 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-8-methoxy-5-methylthio-2-naphthalenamine ((-)SKF 89748A) and 2-(2-methylindazol-4-imino)imidazolidine (Sgd 101/75) on the pharmacological effects of ethanol was investigated. All four drugs reduced the duration of ethanol-induced hypnosis in C57B1/6 mice, this effect being proportional to their relative potencies to exert central alpha-1 agonism. In prazosin-pretreated mice, St 587 failed to reduce the hypnotic effect of ethanol, which provided strong evidence for the role of alpha-1 agonism for the hypnosis reducing effect of St 587. Hyperactivity induced in C57B1/6 mice by a subhypnotic dose of ethanol and St 587 was reported earlier. In the present study, St 587, cirazoline and (-)SKF 89748A produced similar response, but no correlation between this effect and ethanol hypnosis blockade could be established. 19 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Radiative transfer effects during primordial helium recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens; Switzer, Eric R

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we refine the calculation of primordial helium recombination, accounting for several additional effects that were neglected or treated more approximately in previous studies. These include consideration of (i) time-dependent radiative transfer interaction between the 2^1 P_1 - 1^1 S_0 and 2^3 P_1 - 1^1 S_0 resonances; (ii) time-dependent radiative transfer for the partially overlapping n^1 P_1 - 1^1 S_0, n^1 D_2 - 1^1 S_0 and n^3 P_1 - 1^1 S_0 series with 3 \\leq n \\leq 10; (iii) electron scattering within a kernel approach. We also briefly discuss the effect of electron scattering and HI quadrupole lines on the recombination of hydrogen. Although the physics of all the considered processes is interesting and subtle, for the standard cosmology the overall correction to the ionization history during helium recombination with respect to the previous treatment remains smaller than |DeltaNe/Ne| \\sim 0.05%. For models with a large helium fraction Y_p \\sim 0.4, the difference can reach |\\DeltaNe/Ne| \\s...

  3. MEDICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF UV RADIATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Organisms living on the earth are exposed to solar radiation, including its ultraviolet (UV) components (for general reviews, the reader is referred to Smith [1] and Young et al. [2]). UV wavelength regions present in sunlight are frequently designated as UVB (290-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). In today's solar spectrum, UVA is the principal UV component, with UVB present at much lower levels. Ozone depletion will increase the levels of UVB reaching the biosphere, but the levels of UVA will not be changed significantly [3]. Because of the high efficiency of UVB in producing damage in biological organisms in the laboratory experiments, it has sometimes been assumed that UVA has little or no adverse biological effects. However, accumulating data [4, 5], including action spectra (efficiency of biological damage as a function of wavelength of radiation; see Section 5) for DNA damage in alfalfa seedlings [6], in human skin [7], and for a variety of plant damages (Caldwell, this volume) indicate that UVA can induce damage in DNA in higher organisms. Thus, understanding the differential effects of UVA and UVB wavebands is essential for estimating the biological consequences of stratospheric ozone depletion.

  4. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  5. Deterministic effects of the ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The deterministic effect is the somatic damage that appears when radiation dose is superior to the minimum value or 'threshold dose'. Over this threshold dose, the frequency and seriousness of the damage increases with the amount given. Sixteen percent of patients younger than 15 years of age with the diagnosis of cancer have the possibility of a cure. The consequences of cancer treatment in children are very serious, as they are physically and emotionally developing. The seriousness of the delayed effects of radiation therapy depends on three factors: a)- The treatment ( dose of radiation, schedule of treatment, time of treatment, beam energy, treatment volume, distribution of the dose, simultaneous chemotherapy, etc.); b)- The patient (state of development, patient predisposition, inherent sensitivity of tissue, the present of other alterations, etc.); c)- The tumor (degree of extension or infiltration, mechanical effects, etc.). The effect of radiation on normal tissue is related to cellular activity and the maturity of the tissue irradiated. Children have a mosaic of tissues in different stages of maturity at different moments in time. On the other hand, each tissue has a different pattern of development, so that sequelae are different in different irradiated tissues of the same patient. We should keep in mind that all the tissues are affected in some degree. Bone tissue evidences damage with growth delay and degree of calcification. Damage is small at 10 Gy; between 10 and 20 Gy growth arrest is partial, whereas at doses larger than 20 Gy growth arrest is complete. The central nervous system is the most affected because the radiation injuries produce demyelination with or without focal or diffuse areas of necrosis in the white matter causing character alterations, lower IQ and functional level, neuro cognitive impairment,etc. The skin is also affected, showing different degrees of erythema such as ulceration and necrosis, different degrees of

  6. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  7. Effect of Disturbance Regime on Alpha and Beta Diversity of Rock Pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Séguin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Measures of alpha diversity are more frequently used to detect environmental changes and subsequent impacts on biodiversity, while measures based on variability (beta diversity are said to be more appropriate for detecting those impacts. Theory predicts that beta diversity should increase with disturbance frequency in patchy communities. Our objective in this study was to experimentally determine the effect of high and low disturbance regimes, frequency and intensity combined, on marine benthic alpha and beta diversity. The experiment was conducted in a rock pool system of the St. Lawrence estuary, Canada. Rock pools were disturbed by (1 nutrient enrichment and (2 draining according to three disturbance regimes (none, low, high. Disturbance regimes had little or no effect on alpha diversity of benthic algae and sessile animals. However, the low regime of nutrient enrichment induced greater within-group beta diversity than the reference rock pools, while the high disturbance regime induced equal or even smaller within-group beta diversity compared to the reference. Draining had an opposite effect on benthic beta diversity, with a greater variability of the community structure under the high regime of disturbance. Taking into account the effect of disturbance regimes on beta diversity could provide a useful diagnostic for disturbed benthic communities.

  8. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  9. The Ly-alpha Lines of H I and He II: A Differential Hanle Effect for Exploring the Magnetism of the Solar Transition Region

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, Javier Trujillo; Belluzzi, Luca

    2011-01-01

    The Ly-alpha line of He II at 304 \\AA\\ is one of the spectral lines of choice for EUV channels of narrow-band imagers on board space telescopes, which provide spectacular intensity images of the outer solar atmosphere. Since the magnetic field information is encoded in the polarization of the spectral line radiation, it is important to investigate whether the He II line radiation from the solar disk can be polarized, along with its magnetic sensitivity. Here we report some theoretical predictions concerning the linear polarization signals produced by scattering processes in this strong emission line of the solar transition region, taking into account radiative transfer and the Hanle effect caused by the presence of organized and random magnetic fields. We find that the fractional polarization amplitudes are significant (${\\sim}1%$), even when considering the wavelength-integrated signals. Interestingly, the scattering polarization of the Ly-alpha line of He II starts to be sensitive to the Hanle effect for ma...

  10. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a 60Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  11. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Adriano Costa de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d' Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia, E-mail: sgcbraza@usp.b, E-mail: tvieira@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: mabra@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: macdomin@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2011-07-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a {sup 60}Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  12. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  13. Ambient radiation exposure: measurements and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of the available literature, data and reports of various radiation exposure and protection studies and various measurements techniques are presented. A linear quadratic model has been given illustrating the validity of radiation hormesis

  14. The Effect of Radiation on Phaseolus vulgaris growth and Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Derek; Durham, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    Radiation affects human life in disparately subtle and dramatic ways. For instance, nuclear reactions in the Sun produce light and heat that are essential for human existence, while recent research implies that the flux of cosmic ray particles may also have an impact on humans' daily lives. According to the EPA the average American receives 310 mrems of radiation per year, well under a total dose of 50,000 mrems and higher doses that cause symptoms ranging from nausea to death. However, scientists hypothesize that exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (beta, and gamma radiation (12 doses ranging from 0.04 mrems of alpha radiation to 17 mrems of gamma radiation) on Phaseolus vulgaris was tested. The same radiation was also tested on the performance of aerogel, a material used in particle detectors. Aerogel will be used in experiments at the 12 GeV Jefferson Laboratory and has been previously observed to change its optical characteristics after being used in experiments. To determine the level of cosmic ray flux and possible contribution to our experiments a detector was created using scintillator material and 2-inch phototubes. Results from our experiments will be presented. Supported in part by NSF grant 1019521 and 1039446.

  15. The Effect of Radiation on Phaseolus vulgaris and Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Stephanie; Boylan, Derek

    2013-10-01

    Radiation affects human life in disparately subtle and dramatic ways. For instance, nuclear reactions in the Sun produce light and heat that are essential for human existence, while recent research implies that the flux of cosmic ray particles may also have an impact on humans' daily lives. According to the EPA the average American receives 310 mrems of radiation per year, well under a total dose of 50,000 mrems and higher doses that cause symptoms ranging from nausea to death. However, scientists hypothesize that exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (beta, and gamma radiation (12 doses ranging from 0.04 mrems of alpha radiation to 17 mrems of gamma radiation) on Phaseolus vulgaris was tested. The same radiation was also tested on the performance of aerogel, a material used in particle detectors. Aerogel will be used in experiments at the 12 GeV Jefferson Laboratory and has been previously observed to change its optical characteristics after being used in experiments. To determine the level of cosmic ray flux and possible contribution to our experiments a detector was created using scintillator material and 2-inch phototubes. Results from our experiments will be presented. Supported in part by NSF grant 1019521 and 1039446.

  16. Effect of grain size on the elastic properties of nanocrystalline {alpha}-iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latapie, A.; Farkas, D

    2003-03-03

    The effect of grain size on the elastic properties of nanocrystalline {alpha}-iron is reported using atomistic simulations. A softening of the elastic properties is observed for grain sizes ranging from 12 nm down to 6 nm. The decrease in the Young's and shear moduli with decreasing grain size is in agreement with experimental data and matches an analytical model based on the rule of mixtures for composite materials.

  17. Effects of alpha-amylase on in vitro growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Bortner, C A; Miller, R D; Arnold, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    Sterile parotid saliva inhibited growth of Legionella pneumophila on solid media, and the salivary component involved in this inhibition has been shown to be amylase. Disk diffusion and well plate assays were used to study possible mechanisms for this effect. The amylolytic activity of saliva copurified with inhibitory activity, and both activities were sensitive to proteinase K digestion and heat treatment. In addition, purified alpha-amylase from several sources (bacteria, fungi, porcine pa...

  18. E. Biological effects of radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report firstly summarises information on the biological hazards of radiation and their relation to radiation dose, and hence estimates the biological risks associated with nuclear power production. Secondly, it describes the basis and present status of radiation protection standards in the nuclear power industry

  19. Radiation physical chemistry effects on organic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, C.H.; Duarte, C.L.; Hamada, M.M. E-mail: mmhamada@net.ipen.br

    2003-06-01

    The radiation damage effect on a liquid scintillating system was evaluated in the PPO and POPOP solutes. Samples containing PPO (1%w/v) and POPOP (0.2%w/v) diluted in toluene were irradiated at different doses, using a {sup 60}Co irradiator at 1.8 Gy/s. The transmittance and the chemical degradation of those solutes were evaluated as a function of dose. The PPO transmittance at 360 nm decayed exponentially with the dose, while the POPOP transmittance at 420 nm decayed linearly. The chemical degradation on the PPO and POPOP was fitted to a bi-exponential mathematical model as a function of dose. The first exponential (fast slope) was interpreted as damage produced by toluene radiolytics whereas the second exponential (slow slope) was interpreted as the damage caused by primary interaction of the {gamma}-radiation with targets, i.e., {gamma} photons that hit PPO and POPOP directly. The w (eV/damage molecule) and G (damaged molecules/100 eV) parameters were estimated in this paper.

  20. Health effects of atomic-bomb radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review described carcinogenic and genetic effects of A-bomb radiation. Effects have been investigated on 120,000 exposed people for their life span, 20,000 for health examinations, 3,000 people exposed in the womb and 80,000 second-generations of the exposed people. Epidemiological data revealed the presence of carcinogenic effects: Cancer death amounted to 9% from 1950 to 1990. However, carcinogenic mechanism is unknown yet. Genetic effects have been studied from the points of lesion at birth, sex ratio, chromosome aberration, biochemical test and mortality rate of children of exposed people and, although the effects have been experimentally shown in animals, are not observed in those children. This may be derived from the fact that there are few people who were exposed to such a high dose as used experimentally (0.2 Sv exposure to people within 2.5 km diameter-area from the explosion point vs >3 Sv in animals). Data are presented in Research Foundation home page. (K.H.)

  1. The Hanle effect of Ly$\\alpha$ in an MHD model of the Solar Transition Region

    CERN Document Server

    Stepan, Jiri; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the heating of the solar corona it is crucial to obtain empirical information on the magnetic field in its lower boundary (the transition region). To this end, we need to measure and model the linear polarization produced by scattering processes in strong UV lines, such as the hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ line. The interpretation of the observed Stokes profiles will require taking into account that the outer solar atmosphere is highly structured and dynamic, and that the height of the transition region may well vary from one place in the atmosphere to another. Here we report on the Ly$\\alpha$ scattering polarization signals we have calculated in a realistic model of an enhanced network region, resulting from a state-of-the-art radiation MHD simulation. This model is characterized by spatially complex variations of the physical quantities at transition region heights. The results of our investigation lead us to emphasize that scattering processes in the upper solar chromosphere should indeed prod...

  2. Effects of radiation and chemical substances on cells and organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book treats the radiation chemistry part of biophysics and applied biophysics in the sphere of ionizing radiation. Discussed are the concepts of radiation units and radioactivity units and the relative biological efficiency. The effects of ionizing and UV radiations are analyzed at the level of macromolecular changes. Chapters dealing with genetic radiation effects discuss the effects at the cellular level with respect to cell proliferation. All these problems are used to illustrate the effect on the organism as a whole. The chapters on applied biophysics deal with the indications of radiation and chemical damage, sensitivity of cells and the organism, and the study and influencing of growth at the cellular level. The concluding chapter is devoted to the environmental impact of radiation. (J.P.)

  3. Effects of radiation on MOS structures and silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive view of radiation effects on MOS structures and silicon devices is given. In the introduction, the interaction of radiation with semiconductor material is presented. In the next section, the electrical degradation of semiconductor devices due to this interaction is discussed. The commonly used hardening techniques are shown. The last section deals with testing of radiation hardness of devices. (orig.)

  4. Statistical issues in modelling radiation effects on disease incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author attempts to outline an overview of some models which have proven useful in recent work with radiation effects data. Topics addressed are mathematical models for radiation effects on disease incidence, modelling of background rates, relative versus excess risk models, dose-response effects, dose effect modification (sex and age at exposure), temporal variation in risks. (Author)

  5. Faddeev calculation of 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems using alpha alpha resonating-group method kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M; Suzuki, Y; Baye, D; Sparenberg, J M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out Faddeev calculations of three-alpha (3 alpha) and two-alpha plus Lambda (alpha alpha Lambda) systems, using two-cluster resonating-group method kernels. The input includes an effective two-nucleon force for the alpha alpha resonating-group method and a new effective Lambda N force for the Lambda alpha interaction. The latter force is a simple two-range Gaussian potential for each spin-singlet and triplet state, generated from the phase-shift behavior of the quark-model hyperon-nucleon interaction, fss2, by using an inversion method based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Owing to the exact treatment of the Pauli-forbidden states between the clusters, the present three-cluster Faddeev formalism can describe the mutually related, alpha alpha, 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems, in terms of a unique set of the baryon-baryon interactions. For the three-range Minnesota force which describes the alpha alpha phase shifts quite accurately, the ground-state and excitation energies of 9Be Lambda are...

  6. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses, yet few of these studies meet the required standard. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high. Since no adequate experimental studies have been performed nothing is known about the mechanisms of these therapeutic radiation

  7. Gamma radiation effects on silicon photonic waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillanda, Stefano; Singh, Vivek; Raghunathan, Vivek; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea; Kimerling, Lionel; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2016-07-01

    To support the use of integrated photonics in harsh environments, such as outer space, the hardness threshold to high-energy radiation must be established. Here, we investigate the effects of gamma (γ) rays, with energy in the MeV-range, on silicon photonic waveguides. By irradiation of high-quality factor amorphous silicon core resonators, we measure the impact of γ rays on the materials incorporated in our waveguide system, namely amorphous silicon, silicon dioxide, and polymer. While we show the robustness of amorphous silicon and silicon dioxide up to an absorbed dose of 15 Mrad, more than 100× higher than previous reports on crystalline silicon, polymer materials exhibit changes with doses as low as 1 Mrad. PMID:27367099

  8. Stimulating effects of low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different ionizing radiations cause biochemical and biophysical changes in the cells of the genotypes according to the application of the doses applied to different organs of the plants, and the manner of their application (acute, chronic, or acute and chronic). The sensitivity of different genotypes, and their tissues, depends on the stage at which their tissues were irradiated as well as on the environmental conditions under which the irradiation was made. Relatively strong doses usually cause some genetic changes in the somatic and generative cells. Small doses can, in some genotypes, stimulate the growth of some tissues to some extent. The stimulating effect on the growth of seedlings of the M2 generation, developed from acute seed irradiation of some genotypes of wheat, barley, and inbred lines of maize and their hybrids is described here. 3 refs, 5 tabs

  9. Actinide Waste Forms and Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.; Weber, W. J.

    Over the past few decades, many studies of actinides in glasses and ceramics have been conducted that have contributed substantially to the increased understanding of actinide incorporation in solids and radiation effects due to actinide decay. These studies have included fundamental research on actinides in solids and applied research and development related to the immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex, and the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities. Thus, the immobilization of actinides has become a pressing issue for the twenty-first century (Ewing, 1999), and plutonium immobilization, in particular, has received considerable attention in the USA (Muller et al., 2002; Muller and Weber, 2001). The investigation of actinides and

  10. X-radiation /E greater than 10 keV/, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorpahl, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation in hard (E greater than 10 keV) X-radiation, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Analysis shows that the rise-time in the 20-30-keV X-ray spike depends on the electron hardness. The impulsive phase is also marked by an abrupt, very intense increase in H-alpha emission in one or more knots of the flare. Properties of these H-alpha kernels include: (1) a luminosity several times greater than the surrounding flare, (2) an intensity rise starting about 20-30 sec before, peaking about 20-25 sec after, and lasting about twice as long as the hard spike, (3) a location lower in the chromosphere than the remaining flare, (4) essentially no expansion prior to the hard spike, and (5) a position within 6000 km of the boundary separating polarities, usually forming on both sides of the neutral line near both feet of the same tube of force. Correspondingly, impulsive microwave events are characterized by: (1) great similarity in burst structure with 20-32 keV X-rays but only above 5000 MHz, (2) typical low frequency burst cutoff between 1400-3800 MHz, and (3) maximum emission above 7500 MHz.

  11. Numerical analysis of radiation effects in a metallic foam by means of the radiative conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the radiation contribution to the steady-state heat transfer in metallic foams by means of the radiative conductivity model. Because of the complexity of the structure, reference is made to a simplified physical radiative model, where the elementary cell of the foams is treated as a cubic cell. The contribution of the radiation heat transfer is investigated on a local basis. The local radiative conductivity has been used to evaluate the influence of radiative heat transfer in a two dimensional conductive-convective-radiative problem involving a forced fluid flow within a heated channel filled with a metallic foam. The effect of the solid emissivity and the foam porosity is pointed out for different foams.

  12. Light-Cone Effect of Radiation Fields in Cosmological Radiative Transfer Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel method to implement time-delayed propagation of radiation fields in cosmological radiative transfer simulations. Time-delayed propagation of radiation fields requires construction of retarded-time fields by tracking the location and lifetime of radiation sources along the corresponding light-cones. Cosmological radiative transfer simulations have, until now, ignored this "light-cone effect" or implemented ray-tracing methods that are computationally demanding. We show that radiative transfer calculation of the time-delayed fields can be easily achieved in numerical simulations when periodic boundary conditions are used, by calculating the time-discretized retarded-time Green's function using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and convolving it with the source distribution. We also present a direct application of this method to the long-range radiation field of Lyman-Werner band photons, which is important in the high-redshift astrophysics with first stars.

  13. Disparate effects of p24alpha and p24delta on secretory protein transport and processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen R P M Strating

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The p24 family is thought to be somehow involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER-to-Golgi protein transport. A subset of the p24 proteins (p24alpha(3, -beta(1, -gamma(3 and -delta(2 is upregulated when Xenopus laevis intermediate pituitary melanotrope cells are physiologically activated to produce vast amounts of their major secretory cargo, the prohormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we find that transgene expression of p24alpha(3 or p24delta(2 specifically in the Xenopus melanotrope cells in both cases causes an effective displacement of the endogenous p24 proteins, resulting in severely distorted p24 systems and disparate melanotrope cell phenotypes. Transgene expression of p24alpha(3 greatly reduces POMC transport and leads to accumulation of the prohormone in large, ER-localized electron-dense structures, whereas p24delta(2-transgenesis does not influence the overall ultrastructure of the cells nor POMC transport and cleavage, but affects the Golgi-based processes of POMC glycomaturation and sulfation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Transgenic expression of two distinct p24 family members has disparate effects on secretory pathway functioning, illustrating the specificity and non-redundancy of our transgenic approach. We conclude that members of the p24 family furnish subcompartments of the secretory pathway with specific sets of machinery cargo to provide the proper microenvironments for efficient and correct secretory protein transport and processing.

  14. PGC-1alpha and PGC-1beta have both similar and distinct effects on myofiber switching toward an oxidative phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Frandsen, Lis; Schjerling, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    of myotubes, as seen by mRNA downregulation of the immature embryonal and perinatal myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoforms. PGC-1alpha or PGC-1beta overexpression enhanced mRNA of the slow oxidative-associated MHC isoform MHCIb and downregulated mRNA levels of the fast glycolytic-associated MHC isoforms MHCIIX...... and MHCIIB. Only PGC-1beta overexpression caused an increase in mRNA of the intermediary fast oxidative-associated MHC isoform MHCIIA. PGC-1alpha or PGC-1beta overexpression upregulated GLUT4 mRNA and downregulated myocyte enhancer factor 2C transcription factor mRNA; only PGC-1alpha overexpression caused......Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha and -1beta (PGC-1alpha and PGC-1beta) were overexpressed by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in cultures of primary rat skeletal muscle cells derived from neonatal myoblasts. Effects on muscle fiber type transition and metabolism...

  15. Determination of uranium isotopes in urine samples from radiation workers using 232U tracer, anion-exchange resin and alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on the excretion rate of body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha-spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This paper deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of U-isotopes in urine samples using anion-exchange resin and 232U tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of uranium along with calcium phosphate. Separation of U was carried out by Amberlite, IRA-400, anion-exchange resin. U-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha-spectrometer. Eight routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range of 51% to 67% with a mean and standard deviation of 60% and 5.4%, respectively. (author)

  16. Golden Rule of Radiation Hardness: a Study of Strain Effect on Controlled Radiation Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing; Ji, Wei; de, Suvranu

    2012-02-01

    Stain is widely presented in microstructures. Strain effect to radiation hardness is critical in understanding and engineering nano-materials. Here we studied the strain effect on the controlled radiation damage in monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) through ab initio density functional theory calculations. We observed a general behavior of reduction in the radiation hardness by the strain, for both B-vacancy and N-vacancy configurations, in both compressive and tensive strain states, at the directions of zigzag, armchair and bi-axial. We proposed a golden rule of the radiation hardness states that any effort adding energy to the system will reduce the radiation hardness. Such golden rule of radiation hardness could be widely applied to material design and engineering for those devices working in irradiation-enrich environments, for example, electronic and optoelectronic devices in outer space.

  17. Radiation effects on impurity diffusion in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherently combined experiments have been made in order to investigate certain parameters of the problem of diffusion under hydrogen irradiation. The physical basis of the problem (diffusion in semiconductors, particle irradiation, defect creation) is reviewed and the characterisation methods are then presented whilst laying emphasis on the way they restrict those experiments that are possible. The role of the parameters which are made to vary (temperature, current of the irradiation beam, irradiation time) is shown, using boron, arsenic or phosphorus as doping agent. The limitations of the single two-impurity model (one slow, one fast) is shown. It is also shown that with this model it is not possible to account integrally for the profiles obtained by ionic analysis. To complete the model, it was necessary to introduce defect precipitation as well as its effect on the diffusion length of the impurities. It was also possible to show the fundamental importance of the irradiation current parameter (and not of the total dose) and its interconnexion with the irradiation temperature parameter. With electric measurements an endeavour was also made to show the effect of residual defects on the conductivity and mobility of irradiated layers. The balancing of these layers led to studying the annealing of the defects and the experiments enabled the radiation enhanced to be oberved. The effect of the Fermi level position on the exo-diffusion of fast impurities was also shown, interpreted in terms of the formation and fast diffusion of a vacancy-impurity complex

  18. Radiation and Thermal Effects on Used Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2016-09-20

    This is the final report of the NEUP project “Radiation and Thermal Effects on Used Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Waste Forms.” This project started on July 1, 2012 and was successfully completed on June 30, 2016. This report provides an overview of the main achievements, results and findings through the duration of the project. Additional details can be found in the main body of this report and in the individual Quarterly Reports and associated Deliverables of this project, which have been uploaded in PICS-NE. The objective of this research was to advance understanding and develop validated models on the effects of self-radiation from beta and alpha decay on the response of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste forms during high-temperature interim storage and long-term permanent disposition. To achieve this objective, model used-fuel materials and model waste form materials were identified, fabricated, and studied.

  19. Effect of TNF{alpha} on activities of different promoters of human apolipoprotein A-I gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, Sergey V., E-mail: serge@iem.sp.ru [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Embryology, St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mogilenko, Denis A. [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Embryology, St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shavva, Vladimir S. [Department of Embryology, St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Dizhe, Ella B.; Ignatovich, Irina A. [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Perevozchikov, Andrej P., E-mail: app@iem.sp.ru [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Embryology, St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF{alpha} stimulates the distal alternative promoter of human apoA-I gene. {yields} TNF{alpha} acts by weakening of promoter competition within apoA-I gene (promoter switching). {yields} MEK1/2 and nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha} and LXRs take part in apoA-I promoter switching. -- Abstract: Human apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is a major structural and functional protein component of high-density lipoproteins. The expression of the apolipoprotein A-I gene (apoA-I) in hepatocytes is repressed by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1{beta} and TNF{alpha}. Recently, two novel additional (alternative) promoters for human apoA-I gene have been identified. Nothing is known about the role of alternative promoters in TNF{alpha}-mediated downregulation of apoA-I gene. In this article we report for the first time about the different effects of TNF{alpha} on two alternative promoters of human apoA-I gene. Stimulation of HepG2 cells by TNF{alpha} leads to activation of the distal alternative apoA-I promoter and downregulation of the proximal alternative and the canonical apoA-I promoters. This effect is mediated by weakening of the promoter competition within human apoA-I 5'-regulatory region (apoA-I promoter switching) in the cells treated by TNF{alpha}. The MEK1/2-ERK1/2 cascade and nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha} and LXRs are important for TNF{alpha}-mediated apoA-I promoter switching.

  20. The relevance of radiation induced bystander effects for low dose radiation carcinogenic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Where epidemiology studies lack the ability to prescribe radiation doses, customise sample sizes and replicate findings, radiobiology experiments provide greater flexibility to control experimental conditions. This control simplifies the process of answering questions concerning carcinogenic risk after low dose radiation exposures. However, the flexibility requires critical evaluation of radiobiology findings to ensure that the right questions are being asked, the experimental conditions are relevant to human exposure scenarios and that the data are cautiously interpreted in the context of the experimental model. In particular, low dose radiobiology phenomena such as adaptive responses, genomic instability and bystander effects need to be investigated thoroughly, with continual reference to the way these phenomena might occur in the real world. Low dose radiation induced bystander effects are of interest since their occurrence in vivo could complicate the shape of the radiation dose-response curve in the low dose range for a number of biological endpoints with subsequent effects on radiation-induced cancer risk. Conversely, radiation-induced abscopal effects implicate biological consequences of radiation exposure outside irradiated volumes, and complicate the notion of effective dose calculations. Achieving a consensus on the boundaries that distinguish the radiobiology phenomena of bystander and abscopal effects will aid progress towards understanding their relevance to in vivo radiation exposures. A proposed framework for discussing bystander effects and abscopal effects in their appropriate context will be outlined, with a discussion on the future investigation of radiation-induced bystander effects. Such frameworks can assist the integration of results from experimental radiobiology to risk evaluation and management practice. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, BioI. and Environ. Research, US Dept. of Energy, Grant DE

  1. Radiative Effect on Particle Acceleration via Relativistic Electromagnetic Expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Noguchi, K

    2005-01-01

    The radiation damping effect on the diamagnetic relativistic pulse accelerator (DRPA) is studied in two-and-half dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation with magnetized electron-positron plasmas. Self-consistently solved radiation damping force converts particle energy to radiation energy. The DRPA is still robust with radiation, and the Lorentz factor of the most high energy particles reach more than two thousand before they decouple from the electromagnetic pulse. Resulted emitted power from the pulse front is lower in the radiative case than the estimation from the non-radiative case due to the radiation damping. The emitted radiation is strongly linearly polarized and peaked within few degrees from the direction of Poynting flux.

  2. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Cyclotron and Synchrotron Radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrov, V G; Levin, A; Tlyachev, V B

    2000-01-01

    We study the impact of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid on the radiation of a charged particle moving in a constant uniform magnetic field. With this aim in view, exact solutions of Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are found in the magnetic-solenoid field. Using such solutions, we calculate exactly all the characteristics of one-photon spontaneous radiation both for spinless and spinning particle. Considering non-relativistic and relativistic approximations, we analyze cyclotron and synchrotron radiations in detail. Radiation peculiarities caused by the presence of the solenoid may be considered as a manifestation of Aharonov-Bohm effect in the radiation. In particular, it is shown that new spectral lines appear in the radiation spectrum. Due to angular distribution peculiarities of the radiation intensity, these lines can in principle be isolated from basic cyclotron and synchrotron radiation spectra

  3. 2001 international symposium on radiation and health (2001 ISRH): low dose radiation effects on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The symposium was co-organised by the Radiation Health Research Institute (RHRI) of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co Ltd (KHNP) and the Institute of Radiation Medicine of Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and supported by the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. The main topic of the meeting was the health effects of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation and this was presented and discussed in two sessions dealing with epidemiological and molecular studies

  4. Aerosol radiative effects over BIMSTEC regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumit; Kar, S. C.; Mupparthy, Raghavendra S.

    Aerosols can have variety of shapes, composition, sizes and other properties that influence their optical characteristics and thus the radiative impact. The visible impact of aerosol is the formation of haze, a layer of particles from vehicular, industrial emissions and biomass burning. The characterization of these fine particles is important for regulators and researchers because of their potential impact on human health, their ability to travel thousands of kilometers crossing international borders, and their influence on climate forcing and global warming. The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) with Member Countries Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand has emerged as an important regional group for technical and economic Cooperation. Continuing the quest for a deeper understanding of BIMSTEC countries weather and climate, in this paper we focused on aerosols and their direct radiative effects. Because of various contrasts like geophysical, agricultural practices, heterogeneous land/ocean surface, population etc these regions present an excellent natural laboratory for studying aerosol-meteorology interactions in tropical to sub-tropical environments. We exploited data available on multiple platforms (such as MISR, MODIS etc) and models (OPAC, SBDART etc) to compute the results. Ten regions were selected with different surface characteristics, also having considerable differences in the long-term trends and seasonal distribution of aerosols. In a preliminary analysis pertaining to pre-monsoon (March-April-May) of 2013, AOD _{555nm} is found to be maximum over Bangladesh (>0.52) and minimum over Bhutan (0.22), whereas other regions have intermediate values. Concurrent to these variability of AOD we found a strong reduction in incoming flux at surface of all the regions (> -25 Wm (-2) ), except Bhutan and Sri Lanka (< -18Wm (-2) ). The top of the atmosphere (TOA) forcing values are

  5. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.H. Bakkal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg. Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  6. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage

  7. The effect of alpha-ketoglutarate on a piscine skin model: a molecular and morphological study

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Dissertação mest., Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade do Algarve, 2009 Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) is a key intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle with important functions in glutamate and glutamine metabolism. Its effect after oral administration was studied in adult sea bream Sparus aurata skin and scales in order to evaluate the effect on collagen synthesis. Scales were removed from one side of the body and allowed to regenerate for 14 days; the control group received unt...

  8. Effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on macrophage enzyme levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierangeli, Silvia S.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Measurements of changes in acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase levels were made as an indication of activation by cytokine treatment. IFN-gamma or TNF-gamma treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both enzymes measured in the cell lysates. This increase was observable after 6 h of incubation, but reached its maximum level after 24 h of incubation. The effect of the treatment of the cell with both cytokines together was additive. No synergistic effect of addition of both cytokines on the enzyme levels was observed.

  9. Quenching of the alpha effect in the Sun -- what observations are telling us

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R H

    2011-01-01

    The Babcock-Leighton type of dynamo has received recent support in terms of the discovery in the observational records of systematic cycle-to-cycle variations in the tilt angle of sunspot groups. It has been proposed that these variations might be the consequence of the observed inflow into the active region belt. Furthermore simulations have shown that such inflows restrict the creation of net poloidal flux, in effect acting to quench the alpha effect associated with the Coriolis force acting on rising flux tubes. In this paper we expand on these ideas.

  10. Effect of alpha 1-adrenergic blockade on myocardial blood flow during exercise after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, C A; Dai, X Z; Bache, R J

    1991-08-01

    The effect of alpha 1-adrenergic blockade with prazosin on myocardial blood flow at rest and during two levels of treadmill exercise was assessed in 16 chronically instrumented dogs 9-14 days after myocardial infarction had been produced by occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. During resting conditions prazosin did not alter mean myocardial blood flow or the subendocardial-to-subepicardial flow ratio in either normally perfused or collateral-dependent myocardium. However, during exercise at comparable external work loads and comparable rate-pressure products, prazosin significantly increased blood flow to normally perfused (27% increase at the second level of exercise, P less than 0.001) and collateral-dependent myocardium (35% increase at the second level of exercise, P less than 0.001) compared with control. In addition, prazosin caused a small but significant decrease in the subendocardial-to-subepicardial flow ratio in both normal (1.27 +/- 0.04 to 1.19 +/- 0.04; P less than 0.01) and collateral-dependent myocardium (0.57 +/- 0.11 to 0.52 +/- 0.11; P less than 0.01) compared with control, reflecting a disproportionally greater increase in subepicardial flow in response to alpha 1-adrenergic blockade. These data demonstrate that alpha 1-adrenergic vasoconstriction inhibits coronary vasodilation during exercise, even in areas of collateral-dependent myocardium relatively early after coronary artery occlusion. PMID:1678929

  11. [Cardiovascular effect of 15(S)-15-methyl-prostaglandin F2alpha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retzke, U; Schwarz, R

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of the cardiovascular system on one intramuscular injection of 250 microgram 15-methyl-prostaglandin F2alpha was examined in 14 normotensive healthy pregnant women between 7th and 11th weeks of gestation with the method of quantitative sphygmometry with unbloody graphic recording of arterial blood pressure and direct electronic determination of velocity of aortic pulse wave. The tests were done in 10 patients in intervals of 5 minutes for one hour and in 4 subjects for 12 hours in intervals of one hour. Systolic blood pressure remains nearly constant, but diastolic blood pressure increases and then decreases significantly. Heart rate decreases significantly. Aortic pulse wave velocity decreases in a characteristic manner. Analogous to the biphasic behaviour of blood pressure cardiac output decreases significantly, but then increases insignificantly. The inverse changes of total peripheral resistance are insignificant. Comparing these reactions with the cardiovascular effects of prostaglandin F2alpha or E2, 15-methyl-prostaglandin F2alpha shows the smallest circulatory alterations.

  12. Lyman-alpha emission properties of simulated galaxies: interstellar medium structure and inclination effects

    CERN Document Server

    Verhamme, Anne; Blaizot, Jeremy; Garel, Thibault; Bacon, Roland; Devriendt, Julien; Guiderdoni, Bruno; Slyz, Adrianne

    2012-01-01

    [abridged] Aims. The aim of this paper is to assess the impact of the interstellar medium (ISM) physics on Lyman-alpha (Lya) radiation transfer and to quantify how galaxy orientation with respect to the line of sight alters observational signatures. Methods. We compare the results of Lya radiation transfer calculations through the ISM of a couple of idealized galaxy simulations with different ISM models. Results. First, the small-scale structuration of the ISM plays a determinant role in shaping a galaxys Lya properties.The artificially warm, and hence smooth, ISM of G1 yields an escape fraction of 50 percent at the Lya line center, and produces symmetrical double-peak profiles. On the contrary, in G2, most young stars are embedded in thick star-forming clouds, and the result is a 10 times lower escape fraction. G2 also displays a stronger outflowing velocity field, which favors the escape of red-shifted photons, resulting in an asymmetric Lya line. Second, the Lya properties of G2 strongly depend on the incl...

  13. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Mercer, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly-formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous, and (ii) episodic. We find that: (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilises the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, th...

  14. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 104 rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 105 rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects

  15. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, M B; Davis, M V

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10/sup 4/ rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10/sup 5/ rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects.

  16. Radiation effects on electronic devices in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duzellier, S. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA/DESP), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2005-01-01

    The natural space environment is responsible for many disturbances on electronics systems on-board spacecraft. This paper focuses on the Single Event Effects (SEE) at the origin of most observed in-flight anomalies. SEE are probabilistic failures induced by single high-energy ionising particles (protons, heavy ions and electrons) in any kind of devices. Insight on the underlying physical mechanisms and criticality of such events is provided through actual examples. The methodologies to assess the devices sensitivities (testing and modelling) and to predict the mission operation are described with emphasis on the critical parameters to deal with. The trend towards higher integration of devices may lead to abnormal response of devices to radiation. The inappropriateness of standard models when dealing with modern devices lies in the size reduction to the point that dimensions of sensitive volume are now of the order of the particle track size. During the past 20 years, SEE rates of devices dropped by several order of magnitude. In fact, the critical charge to trigger an event got fainter leading to an enhanced sensibility but this effect was compensated by a strong decrease in the cross-section due to the reduction of dimensions. However, as on-board electronics is developing, it concerns now computation and storage and as it uses advanced and high-performance devices (mainly COTS), the criticality remains and new failure modes can be observed. (A.C.)

  17. Genetic effects of radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on the genetic material of cells are considered very important since damage to the DNA of somatic cells can be linked to cancer development or cell death whereas damage to germ cells can lead to genetic damage in next and subsequent generations. This is why the scientific literature reports many investigations on the subject. According to a number of review papers, the conclusion so far is that there is little evidence that RFR is directly mutagenic and that adverse effects that were reported in some of the papers are predominantly the result of hyperthermia. Yet, some subtle indirect effects on DNA replication and/or transcription of genes under relatively restricted exposure conditions cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, the possibility of combined effects of RFR with environmental carcinogens/mutagens merits further attention. The present paper takes into account more recent investigations but the conclusion remains the same. A majority of studies report no increased (cyto)genetic damage but yet, a considerable number of investigations do. However, many studies were not sufficiently characterized, are therefore difficult to replicate and cannot be compared to others. Experimental protocols were very different from one study to another and investigations from a single laboratory were very often limited in the sample size or number of cells investigated, preventing a robust statistical analysis. Subtle, but significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed cells cannot be found in such conditions. For the above reasons, it was concluded at a workshop in Loewenstein (November 2002) that further investigations by individual laboratories most probably will not add much to the discussion of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) genotoxicity. Large, well coordinated, international collaborative studies involving participation of several experienced scientists are considered an alternative of uttermost importance

  18. Effective education in radiation safety for nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish an efficient training program of radiation safety for nurses, studies have been carried out on the basis of questionnaires. Collaboration of nurses, who are usually standing closest to the patient, is necessary in order to offer safe radiological diagnostics/treatment. The authors distributed the questionnaire to 134 nurses in five polyclinic hospitals in Japan. Important questions were: fear of radiation exposure, knowledge on the radiation treatment, understanding the impact on pregnancy, and so on. Most of the nurses feel themselves uneasy against exposure to radiation. They do not have enough knowledge of radiological treatment. They do not know exactly what is the impact of the radiation on pregnant women. Such tendency is more pronounced, when nurses spend less time working in the radiological department. Nurses play important roles in radiological diagnostics/treatment. Therefore, a well-developed education system for radiation safety is essential. The training for the radiation safety in medicine should be done in the context of general safety in medicine. Education programs in undergraduate school and at the working place should be coordinated efficiently in order to ensure that both nurses and patients are informed about the meaning of radiation safety. (authors)

  19. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomaa, S. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  20. The protective and therapeutic effects of alpha-solanine on mice breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenikia, Maryam; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Saeed; Khodayari, Hamid; Kouhpayeh, Seyed Amin; Karimi, Aliasghar; Zamani, Mina; Azizian, Saleh; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali

    2013-10-15

    Alpha-solanine, a naturally steroidal glycoalkaloid, is found in leaves and fruits of plants as a defensive agent against fungi, bacteria and insects. Herein, we investigated solanine toxicity in vitro and in vivo, and assessed its protective and the therapeutic effects on a typical animal model of breast cancer. The study conducted in three series of experiments to obtain (i) solanine effects on cell viability of mammary carcinoma cells, (ii) in vivo toxicity of solanine, and (iv) the protective and therapeutic effects of solanine on animal model of breast cancer. Alpha-solanine significantly suppressed proliferation of mouse mammary carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo (Psolanine has been chosen for assessing its protective and therapeutic effects in mice breast cancer. Tumor take rate in the solanine-treated group was zero compared with a 75% rate in its respective control group (Psolanine-treated animals than its respective control ones (Psolanine compared with its respective control group (Psolanine-treated animals (Psolanine-treated mice (Psolanine exerts a significant chemoprotective and chemotherapeutic effects on an animal model of breast cancer through apoptosis induction, cell proliferation and angiogenesis inhibition. These findings reveal a new therapeutic potential for solanine in cancer.

  1. Experimental aspects of the adiabatic approach in estimating the effect of electron screening on alpha decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpeshin, F. F., E-mail: fkarpeshin@gmail.com [D.I. Mendeleev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM) (Russian Federation); Trzhaskovskaya, M. B. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Special features of the effect of the electron shell on alpha decay that have important experimental implications are studied within the adiabatic approach. The magnitude of the effect is about several tenths of a percent or smaller, depending on the transition energy and on the atomic number. A dominant role of inner shells is shown: more than 80% of the effect is saturated by 1s electrons. This circumstance plays a crucial role for experiments, making it possible to measure this small effect by a difference method in the same storage rings via a comparison of, for example, decay probabilities in bare nuclei and heliumlike ions. The reasons behind the relative success and the applicability limits of the frozen-shell model, which has been used to calculate the effect in question for more than half a century, are analyzed. An interesting experiment aimed at studying charged alpha-particle states is proposed. This experiment will furnish unique information for testing our ideas of the interplay of nonadiabatic and adiabatic processes.

  2. Effect of salivary gland adenocarcinoma cell-derived alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase on the bioactivity of macrophage activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takashi; Uematsu, Takashi; Yamaoka, Minoru; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) produced by human salivary gland adenocarcinoma (SGA) cells on the bioactivity of macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF). High exo-alpha-NaGalase activity was detected in the SGA cell line HSG. HSG alpha-NaGalase had both exo- and endo-enzyme activities, cleaving the Gal-GalNAc and GalNAc residues linked to Thr/Ser but not releasing the [NeuAc2-6]GalNac residue. Furthermore, GcMAF enzymatically prepared from the Gc protein enhanced the superoxide-generation capacity and phagocytic activity of monocytes/macrophages. However, GcMAF treated with purified alpha-NaGalase did not exhibit these effects. Thus, HSG possesses the capacity to produce larger quantities of alpha-NaGalase, which inactivates GcMAF produced from Gc protein, resulting in reduced phagocytic activity and superoxide-generation capacity of monocytes/macrophages. The present data strongly suggest that HSG alpha-NaGalase acts as an immunodeficiency factor in cancer patients. PMID:14767536

  3. Microenvironmental effects in the excited state properties of p-dimethylaminobenzonitrile complexed to alpha- and beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Sandra; Bortolus, Pietro; Manoli, Francesco; Marconi, Giancarlo; Grabner, Gottfried; Köhler, Gottfried; Mayer, Bernd; Boszczyk, Wojciech; Rotkiewicz, Krystyna

    2003-03-01

    The steady state and time resolved fluorescence and the triplet-triplet absorption of p-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN) in presence of alpha- and beta-cyclodextrin (CD) were investigated at various host and guest concentrations and temperatures. The formation of 1:1 and 1:2 DMABN:alpha-CD and 1:1 and 2:2 complexes DMABN:beta-CD complexes was ascertained by applying global analysis methods. The "pure" fluorescence spectra as well as the emission quantum yields and lifetimes and the triplet properties of the various associates were determined. The role of environmental features in the radiative and non-radiative deactivation of the LE and ICT excited states of the complexed DMABN was elucidated. PMID:12713218

  4. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-01-01

    Processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei comprise a major part of stellar nucleosynthesis and hypothesized mechanisms for thermonuclear supernovae. In an effort towards understanding alpha processes from first principles, we describe in this letter the first ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of nucleons and apply a technique called the adiabatic projection method to reduce the eight-body system to an effective two-cluster system. We find good agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for S-wave and D-wave scattering. The computational scaling with particle number suggests that alpha processes involving heavier nuclei are also within reach in the near future.

  5. In vitro protective effect of bacteria-derived bovine alpha interferon I1 against selected bovine viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Gillespie, J H; Robson, D. S.; Scott, F. W.; Schiff, E I

    1985-01-01

    We used bacteria-derived bovine alpha-interferon I1 (Bo IFN-alpha I1) to study its antiviral effect in a bovine turbinate cell line on bovine diarrhea virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parainfluenza 3 virus, and pseudorabies virus. We based our study upon replicate tests for each strain by using a block titration system with various concentrations of Bo IFN-alpha I1 against various concentrations of virus. The data were compiled in two-axis tables (replicate X concentration) and...

  6. Secondary. cap alpha. -deuterium kinetic isotope effects in solvolyses of ferrocenylmethyl acetate and benzoate in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutic, D. (Univ. of Zagreb, Yugoslavia); Asperger, S.; Borcic, S.

    1982-12-17

    Secondary ..cap alpha..-deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) in solvolyses of ferrocenyldideuteriomethyl acetate and benzoate were determined in 96% (v/v) ethanol, at 25/sup 0/C, as k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.24 and 1.26, respectively. The KIEs were also determined in the presence of 0.1 mol dm/sup -3/ lithium perchlorate: the k/sub H//k/ sub D/ values were 1.23 and 1.22 for acetate and benzoate complexes, respectively. The maximum KIE for the C-O bond cleavage of a primary substrate is as large as, or larger than, that of secondary derivatives, which is estimated to be 1.23 per deuterium. The measured KIE of about 12% per D therefore represents a strongly reduced effect relative to its maximum. The solvolyses exhibit ''a special salt effect''. This effect indicates the presence of solvent-separated ion pairs and the return to tight pairs. As the maximum KIE is expected in solvolyses involving transformation of one type of ion pair into another, the strongly reduced ..cap alpha..-D KIE supports the structure involving direct participation of electrons that in the ground state are localized at the iron atom. The alkyl-oxygen cleavage is accompanied by 10-15% acyl-oxygen cleavage.

  7. Combined effects of radiation and trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerschmidt, Otfried

    Injuries, caused by both whole-body irradiation and wounds or burns, have been relatively little studied. Possibly because many investigators think that these injuries are just modified radiation-induced diseases for which the same treatment principles are valid. Other authors had the impression that, for instance, the radiation burn trauma is a new kind of disease which differs significantly from either radiation syndrome alone or from burn disease. There are many experimental data on animals which suggest that the pathology of combined injuries differs significantly from that of radiation-induced disease or of thermal or mechanical traumas. Wounds or burns which, in general, do not cause septicaemia could become entrance ports for bacteria when animals are exposed to whole-body irradiation. Thrombocytopenia is the reason for hemorrhages in wounds. The susceptibility to shock is increased considerably in combined injuries and the formation of callus in the bone fractures is significantly delayed. The healing of wounds and burns in the initial phase of the radiation syndrome does not always differ from healing in the non-irradiated organism. However, a few days or weeks later very serious wound infections and hemorrhages can occur. The additional injuries almost always worsen the development and prognosis of radiation-induced disease. The recommended treatment for combined injuries will differ in many respects from the treatment of wounds and burns or the radiation syndrome.

  8. ANNUAL REPORT. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study will provide the underpinning science to develop improved gl...

  9. Field-ion-microscope observations of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article briefly reviews the unique advantages and capabilities of the field-ion microscope (FIM) and atom-probe FIM for the study of the effects of particle radiation on metals, discusses some contrast effects caused by radiation-induced defects, and gives a number of problems that have been studied using these techniques

  10. Electronic effects in radiation damage simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for including electronic effects in classical radiation damage simulations is presented. The method is used to calculate the number of residual defects for low energy (10 keV) cascades in Fe, as a function of the electron-phonon coupling strength. It was found that strong electron-phonon coupling reduced the number of residual defects by rapidly removing energy from the cascade and reducing the thermal spike. Intermediate coupling increased the number of defects by quenching the thermal spike and reducing defect recombination. Thermostatting the cascade with the local, time dependent electronic temperature, rather than the ambient temperature, reduced the number of residual defects by enhancing defect recombination. Swift heavy ion irradiation in tungsten was modeled using the same methodology. In this case we found that the number of residual defects created by a given electronic stopping power was strongly dependent on the temperature variation of the electronic heat capacity. In contrast to cascade simulations, the interstitials were located closer to the core of the ion track than the vacancies.

  11. Effect of texture on the cold rolling behavior of an alpha-two titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the texture on the cold rolling behavior of an alpha-2 titanium aluminide, Ti-14AL-21Nb (wt pct), was investigated by measuring pole figures, Knoop hardness yield loci, tensile ductility, and the starting microstructure of a number of lots of the cold-rolled material. Results showed that measurements of tensile ductility do not necessarily correlate with the cold rolling performance. On the other hand, the Knoop hardness yield locus provides a convenient quality control tool to assess lot-to-lot variations in texture and plastic anisotropy, and hence to estimate the rollability of sheet and foil specimens. 8 refs

  12. Effect of Magnetohydrodynamic Perturbations on the Orbit Loss of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬良能; 俞国扬

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the orbit loss of alpha particles under helical magnetic perturbation in a tokamak. The results show that low-frequency andlow-mode number magnetic perturbation can cause stochastic loss ofalpha particles.This effect is significant for those particles close to the boundary between the transit zone and the trapped zone.The particle loss is sensitive to the phase of the magnetic perturbation, indicating the modulation of the particle loss with respect to magnetic perturbation. It is also found that the precession of the particle banana orbit can even further enhance the particle loss.

  13. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to radiation and chronically inhaled cigarette smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, G.L.; Nikula, K.J.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear workers may be exposed to radiation in various forms, such as low-LET {gamma}-irradiation or {alpha}-irradiation from inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles. These workers may then have increased risk for lung cancer compared to the general population. Of additional concern is the possibility that interactions between radiation and other carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer induction, compared to the risks from either type of agent alone. An important and common lung carcinogen is cigarette smoke. The purpose of this project is to better determine the combined effects of chronically inhaled cigarette smoke and either inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} or external, thoracic X-irradiation on the induction of lung cancer in rats. Histologic and dosimetric evaluations of rats in the CS + {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} study continue, and the study of CS + X rays is beginning.

  14. Radiation effect studies on anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin for radiation sterilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, L. E-mail: lalitv@magnum.barc.ernet.in; Dodke, P.B

    2004-12-01

    Two anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide (CPH) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOXO), in powder form were exposed to a range of doses of {sup 60}Co gamma and electron beam radiation to study the effects of ionizing radiation. Pharmacopoeia tests, discolouration, degradation products, effect of irradiation temperature and dose rate were investigated. CPH undergoes less than 2% degradation at 30 kGy. Chromatographic studies revealed formation of several trace level degradation products, discolouration and free radicals in the irradiated CPH. N,N-bis (2-chloroethyl) group in the molecule is particularly sensitive to radiation degradation. Irradiation to 5 kGy at low temperature (77 K) did not result in significant changes. DOXO was observed to be quite radiation resistant and did not undergo significant changes in its physico-chemical properties and degradation product profile. It can be radiation sterilized at normal sterilization dose of 25 kGy.

  15. Current issues in carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publications dealing with study of radiation sources and biological evaluation of increasing doses of people irradiation under occupational and usual living conditions is presented. The existing natural and artifial irradiation sources are considered. It is noted that all types of ionizing radiations are characterized by high carcinogenic efficiency and can induce benign and malignant tumors practically in all organs. Statistically reliable data in experimental and epidemiological investigations were recorded under the effect of large and mean doses. Minor radiation doses not responsible for visible functional and morphological changes in early periods can cause pathological changes in delayed periods. The data on carcinogenic effect of relatively small radiation doses are available

  16. Studies on EB radiation effect on PA610

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Kebin; Zhang Huaming; Li Xiurong; Xiong Ruilin [Sichuan Forever Group Co. Ltd., China Academy of Engineering Physics, Miangany (China)

    2000-03-01

    Radiation effect of PA610 with polyfunctional monomer trially isocyanurate (TAIC) was studied, the results show that crosslinking effect of EB radiation on PA610 is obvious. After the PA610 samples were radiated by EB with dosage 75KGY, the physical characters of PA610 materials were greatly improved, especially their tensile strength being increased about 18% and their impact strength about 50%, but their water and oil absorption were decreased. So, EB radiation can enhance PA610 materials physical strength, resistance to solvents and water and increase their thermal-deformation temperature. (author)

  17. EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON ESTABLISHED FORENSIC EVIDENCE CONTAINMENT METHODS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, C.; Duff, M.; Clark, E.; Chapman, G.

    2010-11-29

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory is currently exploring needs and protocols for the storage of evidentiary items contaminated with radioactive material. While a large body of knowledge on the behavior of storage polymers in radiation fields exists, this knowledge has not been applied to the field of forensics and maintaining evidentiary integrity. The focus of this research was to evaluate the behavior of several traditional evidentiary containment polymers when exposed to significant alpha, beta, gamma, neutron and mixed radiation sources. Doses were designed to simulate exposures possible during storage of materials. Several products were found to be poorly suited for use in this specific application based on standardized mechanical testing results. Remaining products were determined to warrant further investigation for the storage of radiologically contaminated evidence.

  18. A Rare Side Effect due to TNF-Alpha Blocking Agent: Acute Pleuropericarditis with Adalimumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Ozkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism is an important treatment strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, vasculitis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Adalimumab is one of the well-known tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocking agents. There are several side effects reported in patients with adalimumab therapy. Cardiac side effects of adalimumab are rare. Only a few cardiac side effects were reported. A 61-year-old man treated with adalimumab for the last 6 months due to psoriatic arthritis presented with typically acute pleuropericarditis. Chest X-ray and echocardiography demonstrated marked pericardial effusion. Patient was successfully evaluated for the etiology of acute pleuro-pericarditis. Every etiology was excluded except the usage of adalimumab. Adalimumab was discontinued, and patient was treated with 1200 mg of ibuprofen daily. Control chest X-ray and echocardiography after three weeks demonstrated complete resolution of both pleural and pericardial effusions. This case clearly demonstrated the acute onset of pericarditis with adalimumab usage. Acute pericarditis and pericardial effusion should be kept in mind in patients with adalimumab treatment.

  19. Substituent effects in the 13C NMR chemical shifts of alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Adriana K C A; Rittner, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    13C chemical shifts empirical calculations, through a very simple additivity relationship, for the alpha-methylene carbon of some alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles, Y-CH(2)-CN (Y=H, F, Cl, Br, I, OMe, OEt, SMe, SEt, NMe(2), NEt(2), Me and Et), lead to similar, or even better, results in comparison to the reported values obtained through Quantum Mechanics methods. The observed deviations, for some substituents, are very similar for both approaches. This divergence between experimental and calculated, either empirically or theoretically, values are smaller than for the corresponding acetones, amides, acetic acids and methyl esters, which had been named non-additivity effects (or intramolecular interaction chemical shifts, ICS) and attributed to some orbital interactions. Here, these orbital interactions do not seem to be the main reason for the non-additivity effects in the empirical calculations, which must be due solely to the magnetic anisotropy of the heavy atom present in the substituent. These deviations, which were also observed in the theoretical calculations, were attributed in that case to the non-inclusion of relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling in the Hamiltonian. Some divergence is also observed for the cyano carbon chemical shifts, probably due to the same reasons.

  20. Radiative budget and cloud radiative effect over the Atlantic from ship-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kalisch

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine cloud-type resolved cloud radiative budgets and cloud radiative effects from surface measurements of broadband radiative fluxes over the Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, based on simultaneous observations of the state of the cloudy atmosphere, a radiative closure study has been performed by means of the ECHAM5 single column model in order to identify the model's ability to realistically reproduce the effects of clouds on the climate system.

    An extensive database of radiative and atmospheric measurements has been established along five meridional cruises of the German research icebreaker Polarstern. Besides pyranometer and pyrgeometer for downward broadband solar and thermal radiative fluxes, a sky imager and a microwave radiometer have been utilized to determine cloud fraction and cloud type on the one hand and temperature and humidity profiles as well as liquid water path for warm non-precipitating clouds on the other hand.

    Averaged over all cruise tracks, we obtain a total net (solar + thermal radiative flux of 144 W m−2 that is dominated by the solar component. In general, the solar contribution is large for cirrus clouds and small for stratus clouds. No significant meridional dependencies were found for the surface radiation budgets and cloud effects. The strongest surface longwave cloud effects were shown in the presence of low level clouds. Clouds with a high optical density induce strong negative solar radiative effects under high solar altitudes. The mean surface net cloud radiative effect is −33 W m−2.

    For the purpose of quickly estimating the mean surface longwave, shortwave and net cloud effects in moderate, subtropical and tropical climate regimes, a new parameterisation was created, considering the total cloud amount and the solar zenith angle.

    The ECHAM5 single column model provides a surface net cloud effect that is more

  1. Radiative budget and cloud radiative effect over the Atlantic from ship based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kalisch

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine cloud-type resolved cloud radiative budgets and cloud radiative effects from surface measurements of broadband radiative fluxes over the Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, based on simultaneous observations of the state of the cloudy atmosphere a radiative closure study has been performed by means of the ECHAM5 single column model in order to identify the models ability to realistically reproduce the effects of clouds on the climate system.

    An extensive data base of radiative and atmospheric measurements has been established along five meridional cruises of the German research icebreaker POLARSTERN. Besides pyranometer and pyrgeometer for downward broadband solar and thermal radiative fluxes, a sky imager and a microwave radiometer have been utilized to determine cloud fraction and cloud type on the one hand and temperature and humidity profiles as well as liquid water path for warm non-precipitating clouds on the other hand.

    Averaged over all cruise tracks we obtain a total net (solar + thermal radiative flux of 144 W m−2 that is dominated by the solar component. In general, the solar contribution is large for cirrus clouds and small for stratus clouds. No significant meridional dependencies were found for the surface radiation budgets and cloud effects. The strongest surface longwave cloud effects were shown in the presence of low level clouds. Clouds with a high optical density induce strong negative solar radiative effects under high solar altitudes. The mean surface net cloud radiative effect is −34 W m−2.

    For the purpose of quickly estimating the mean surface longwave, shortwave and net cloud effects in moderate, subtropical and tropical climate regimes a new parameterisation was created, considering the total cloud amount and the solar zenith angle.

    The ECHAM5 single column model provides a surface net cloud effect that is more cooling by 16 W

  2. Alpha particle effects in burning tokamak plasmas: overview and specific examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the total power balance of an ignited tokamak plasma as a guideline, a range of alpha driven effects is surveyed regarding their impact on achieving and maintaining fusion burn. Specific examples of MHD and kinetic modes and multi species transport dynamics are discussed, including the possible interaction of these categories of effects. This power balance approach rather than a straightforward enumeration of possible effects serves to reveal their non-linear dependence and the ensuing fragility of our understanding of the approach to and maintenance of ignition. Specific examples are given of the interaction between α-power driven sawtoothing and ideal MHD stability, and direct α-effects on MHD modes including kinetic corrections. Anomalous ion heat transport and central impurity peaking mechanisms and anomalous and collisional α-transport including the ambipolar electric field are discussed

  3. Effect of dislocation blocking on fracture behavior of Al and {alpha}-Fe: a multiscale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noronha, S.J.; Farkas, D

    2004-01-25

    We use a multiscale approach in which results from atomistic simulations are combined with discrete dislocation (DD) dynamics simulations of crack-tip plasticity. The method is used to study the effects of dislocation blocking on the fracture behavior of {alpha}-iron and aluminum. We studied the effects of blocking for distances ranging from 5 nm to 1 mm and find that the fracture resistance is increased with increasing blocking distance. The atomistic and dislocation dynamics simulations show that the blocking of dislocations causes a net decrease in the shear stress projected on the slip plane, preventing further dislocation emission. Semi-brittle cleavage occurs after a certain number of dislocations are emitted, explicitly demonstrating the embrittling effects of dislocation blocking. This effect can contribute to the brittle behavior observed in some nanocrystalline metals.

  4. The effects of small doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were discussed in outline at a two day conference organized by I.B.C. Technical Services Ltd, February 1989, in London: radiation carcinogenesis mechanisms, environmental exposure, occupational exposure trends and comparisons, ICRP risk assessment and use of data including that of A-Bomb survivors, the ankylosing spondylitis study, UKAEA and AWE mortality studies, Sellafield, leukemia clusters and radiation hormesis. (UK)

  5. Radiation irradiation effects: knowledge and doubts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    People are ever submitted to natural ionizing radiations. But nuclear power plant workers have this natural exposure and one complementary irradiation, in case of nuclear installation serious accident. In normal running, people, people, particularly those in neighbourhood of the installation, are exposed permanently to liquid and gaseous disposal. In case of accident, exposure increases mainly according to usual state. Only the accident states may induce for people or one worker exposure to high dose ionizing radiations. 1 tab

  6. Studies of the hemolytic effect of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, S.; Katz, E.; Porter, L.M.; Jacobson, L.O.; Watson, C.J.

    1945-07-10

    These studies were aimed at elucidating affects of radiation in inducing hemolysis independent of inhibition of erythropoiesis. Research studies were conducted both on human patients and dogs. Phosphorus-32 in mc amounts were administered either intravenously or orally to patients suffering Polycythemia rubra vera. Dogs were treated with either P-32 or x-radiation. Hemoglobin metabolism was monitored in all test subjects by hematology, blood chemistry, and fecal excretion of hemoglobin catabolites.

  7. Indirect role of alpha2-adrenoreceptors in anti-ulcer effect mechanism of nimesulide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleyman, Halis; Halici, Zekai; Cadirci, Elif; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet; Keles, Sait; Gocer, Fatma

    2007-05-01

    Nimesulide, a non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drug, produces ulcerogenic effects in adrenalectomized rats but is gastro-protective in intact rats. The objective of this study was to determine whether adrenal gland hormones are involved in the anti-ulcer effects of nimesulide. The results revealed that 100 mg/kg nimesulide produces gastric ulceration in adrenalectomized rats, which is prevented by prednisolone and adrenaline. The anti-ulcer effects of adrenaline and prednisolone in adrenalectomized rats were in turn antagonized by yohimbine, a selective alpha(2)-receptor blocker, but not by doxazosine (alpha(1)-receptor blocker) or propranolol (beta-blocker). Adrenaline prevented the formation of indomethacin-induced ulcers in both adrenalectomized and intact rats, but prednisolone increased the indomethacin-induced ulcerous area in intact rats, whereas it decreased the size of the ulcers in adrenalectomized rats. In addition, prednisolone prevented ulcer formation in intact rats in which the adrenaline concentration had been decreased by metyrosine. These results suggest that glucocorticoids are anti-ulcerogenic in not only adrenalectomized rats but also in intact rats with diminished circulating levels of adrenaline. In the light of these data, the effect of nimesulide on plasma adrenaline concentrations was studied. In comparison to the adrenaline levels found in intact control rats, the administration of nimesulide at doses of 10, 20, 40 and 100 mg/kg decreased adrenaline concentrations by 12.8, 22.6, 30.4, and 58.2%, respectively, without affecting blood corticosterone concentrations. The anti-ulcer effect of nimesulide was observed to be dose-dependent, and the strength of this effect was directly correlated the decreasing concentration of adrenaline. The concentration of adrenaline was decreased by 60.9% in rats treated with 300 mg/kg metyrosine in which prednisolone produced anti-ulcer effects. In summary, we have shown that nimesulide produces its anti

  8. Space radiation effects on plant and mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Macaeva, E.; Quintens, R.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the effects of ionizing radiation on organisms is related to different research aims. The current review emphasizes the studies on the effects of different doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation on living organisms, with the final purpose of highlighting specific and common effects of space radiation in mammals and plants. This topic is extremely relevant in the context of radiation protection from space environment. The response of different organisms to ionizing radiation depends on the radiation quality/dose and/or the intrinsic characteristics of the living system. Macromolecules, in particular DNA, are the critical targets of radiation, even if there is a strong difference between damages encountered by plant and mammalian cells. The differences in structure and metabolism between the two cell types are responsible for the higher resistance of the plant cell compared with its animal counterpart. In this review, we report some recent findings from studies performed in Space or on Earth, simulating space-like levels of radiation with ground-based facilities, to understand the effect of ionizing radiation on mammalian and plant cells. In particular, our attention is focused on genetic alterations and repair mechanisms in mammalian cells and on structures and mechanisms conferring radioresistance to plant cells.

  9. Health Effects of Exposure to Low Dose of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human beings are exposed to natural radiation from external sources include radionuclides in the earth and cosmic radiation, and by internal radiation from radionuclides, mainly uranium and thorium series, incorporated into the body. Living systems have adapted to the natural levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources enhance these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are the outcomes of physical and chemical processes that occur immediately after the exposure, then followed by biological process in the body. These processes will involve successive changes in the molecular, cellular, tissue and whole organism levels. Any dose of radiation, no matter how small, may produce health effects since even a single ionizing event can result in DNA damage. The damage to DNA in the nucleus is considered to be the main initiating event by which radiation causes damage to cells that results in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. It has also been indicated that cytogenetic damage can occur in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure, known as bystander effects. This paper reviews health risks of low dose radiation exposure to human body causing stochastic effects, i.e. cancer induction in somatic cells and hereditary disease in genetic cells. (author)

  10. Radiation effects on the drosophila melanogaster genoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When DNA of living beings has been damaged, the cells show different responses depending on their physiological state. Repair mechanisms can be classified into two groups: constitutive which are always present in the cells and inductible, which must be stimulated to show themselves. It is suggested that a repair mechanism exists in the drosophila ovules which act upon the damage present in mature spermatozoids. Our aim is to verify whether or not a radiation dosis applied to the female drosophila will modify the frequency of individuals which have lost the paternal sex chromosomes. YW/YW virgin females and XEZ males and fbb-/bS Y y+ y were mated for two days in order to collect radiation treated spermatozoids. The results were consistent as to the parameters being evaluated and lead one to suppose that the radiation applied to the female drosophila produced some changes in the ovule metabolism which reduced the frequency of individuals with lost chromosomes. It is believed that ionizing radiation interferes with the repair mechanisms that are existent and constitutive, retarding and hindering the restoration of chromosome fragments and this brings about death of the zygote or death of the eggs which lessens the frequencies of individuals carriers of chromosomic aberrations. Ionizing radiations applied to the female drosophila modifies the frequency of loss of patternal chromosomes and comes about when the radiation dose to the female is 700 rad. (Author)

  11. Basic mechanisms of radiation effects in the natural space radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwank, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    Four general topics are covered in respect to the natural space radiation environment: (1) particles trapped by the earth`s magnetic field, (2) cosmic rays, (3) radiation environment inside a spacecraft, (4) laboratory radiation sources. The interaction of radiation with materials is described by ionization effects and displacement effects. Total-dose effects on MOS devices is discussed with respect to: measurement techniques, electron-hole yield, hole transport, oxide traps, interface traps, border traps, device properties, case studies and special concerns for commercial devices. Other device types considered for total-dose effects are SOI devices and nitrided oxide devices. Lastly, single event phenomena are discussed with respect to charge collection mechanisms and hard errors. (GHH)

  12. Review of radiation effects in solid-nuclear-waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Radiation effects on the stability of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) forms are an important consideration in the development of technology to immobilize high-level radioactive waste because such effects may significantly affect the containment of the radioactive waste. Since the required containment times are long (10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 6/ years), an understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of radiation damage on the waste forms is essential. Radiation damage of nuclear waste forms can result in changes in volume, leach rate, stored energy, structure/microstructure, and mechanical properties. Any one or combination of these changes might significantly affect the long-term stability of the nuclear waste forms. This report defines the general radiation damage problem in nuclear waste forms, describes the simulation techniques currently available for accelerated testing of nuclear waste forms, and reviews the available data on radiation effects in both glass and ceramic (primarily crystalline) waste forms. 76 references.

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation; Effecten van ioniserende straling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M.; Hardeman, F.; Holmstock, L.; Hurtgen, C.; Mahieu, L.; Sohier, A.; Vandecasteele, C.; Vanhavere, F.; Vanmaercke, H.; Zeevaert, T

    1998-12-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on.

  14. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  15. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  16. Effect of. gamma. radiation on sorption properties of polymethylphenylsiloxane films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremina, N.S.; Minakova, T.S.; Komissarova, V.N.

    1988-11-01

    The effect of ..gamma.. radiation in the 0.01-1 MGy dose range on the capacity of polymethylphenylsiloxane films to sorb water vapors was studied. It was shown that the character of the change in the sorption capacity of the polymer films is a function of the dose of radiation. The results of measurements of the IR spectra were used in discussing the causes of the change in the sorption properties of the films on exposure to ..gamma.. radiation.

  17. Effect of Low Electric Fields on Alpha Scintillation Light Yield in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Agnes, P; Alexander, T; Alton, A K; Asner, D M; Back, H O; Baldin, B; Biery, K; Bocci, V; Bonfini, G; Bonivento, W; Bossa, M; Bottino, B; Brigatti, A; Brodsky, J; Budano, F; Bussino, S; Cadeddu, M; Cadoni, M; Calaprice, F; Canci, N; Candela, A; Caravati, M; Cariello, M; Carlini, M; Catalanotti, S; Cavalcante, P; Chepurnov, A; Cicalò, C; Cocco, A G; Covone, G; D'Angelo, D; D'Incecco, M; Davini, S; De Cecco, S; De Deo, M; De Vincenzi, M; Derbin, A; Devoto, A; Di Eusanio, F; Di Pietro, G; Dionisi, C; Edkins, E; Empl, A; Fan, A; Fiorillo, G; Fomenko, K; Forster, G; Franco, D; Gabriele, F; Galbiati, C; Giagu, S; Giganti, C; Giovanetti, G K; Goretti, A M; Granato, F; Gromov, M; Guan, M; Guardincerri, Y; Hackett, B R; Herner, K; Hughes, D; Humble, P; Hungerford, E V; Ianni, A; James, I; Johnson, T N; Jollet, C; Keeter, K; Kendziora, C L; Koh, G; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kubankin, A; Li, X; Lissia, M; Loer, B; Lombardi, P; Longo, G; Ma, Y; Machulin, I N; Mandarano, A; Mari, S M; Maricic, J; Marini, L; Martoff, C J; Meregaglia, A; Meyers, P D; Milincic, R; Miller, J D; Montanari, D; Monte, A; Mount, B J; Muratova, V N; Musico, P; Napolitano, J; Agasson, A Navrer; Odrowski, S; Oleinik, A; Orsini, M; Ortica, F; Pagani, L; Pallavicini, M; Pantic, E; Parmeggiano, S; Pelczar, K; Pelliccia, N; Pocar, A; Pordes, S; Pugachev, D A; Qian, H; Randle, K; Ranucci, G; Razeti, M; Razeto, A; Reinhold, B; Renshaw, A L; Rescigno, M; Riffard, Q; Romani, A; Rossi, B; Rossi, N; Rountree, D; Sablone, D; Saggese, P; Sands, W; Savarese, C; Schlitzer, B; Segreto, E; Semenov, D A; Shields, E; Singh, P N; Skorokhvatov, M D; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Stanford, C; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Tatarowicz, J; Testera, G; Tonazzo, A; Trinchese, P; Unzhakov, E V; Verducci, M; Vishneva, A; Vogelaar, B; Wada, M; Walker, S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Wilhelmi, J; Wojcik, M M; Xiang, X; Xiao, X; Xu, J; Yang, C; Zhong, W; Zhu, C; Zuzel, G

    2016-01-01

    Measurements were made of scintillation light yield of alpha particles from the $^{222}$Rn decay chain within the DarkSide-50 liquid argon time projection chamber. The light yield was found to increase as the applied electric field increased, with alphas in a 200 V/cm electric field exhibiting a $\\sim$2% increase in light yield compared to alphas in no field.

  18. Searching for the signature of radiative line driving: On the absence of Ly-alpha-N V line-locking features in a large sample of BALQSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Cottis, Chris; Knigge, Christian; Scaringi, Simone

    2010-01-01

    We have searched the hybrid BALQSO catalogue of Scaringi et al. derived from DR5 of the SDSS in order to compile the largest sample of objects displaying spectral signatures which may be indicative of radiative line driving. The feature in question is the "ghost of Ly-alpha", a line-locking feature previously identified in the broad C IV and Si IV absorption lines of a small fraction of BALQSOs, and formed via the interaction of Ly-alpha photons with N V ions. We test, where possible the criteria required to produce an observable ghost feature and find that these criteria are not met significantly more often in ghost-candidates than in a comparison sample chosen to exhibit relatively featureless broad absorption troughs. Indeed, the only significant differences we find between our ghost-candidate and comparison samples, is that on average, our ghost-candidate sample displays (i) significantly stronger N V absorption, and (ii) the onset of absorption occurs at lower velocities in our ghost-candidate objects. S...

  19. Study of the radiation effects on nucleic acids and related compounds. Annual progress report, August 15, 1974--August 14, 1975. [X radiation, hamster cells, Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.Y.

    1975-01-01

    Interest is being centered on the chemical and physical nature of radiation-induced lesions to nucleic acids and their components. These investigations have revealed the enormous complexity of chemical events in these systems and the possible degradation of nucleic acids by strand breakage. Therefore, work in the ionizing radiation of DNA and its components has proceeded along a dual course. For chemical studies, our prime concern is the stepwise isolation and identification of the radiation products of derivatives of pyrimidines and the study of the actual mechanisms of their formation. For biological studies, H. influenzae cells, the Chinese hamster V79B-1 cell line, and the Dunn osteosarcoma lung colony system were used. During the last year, the method of synthesis of 5-hydroperoxymethyluracil (T/sub ..cap alpha../OOH) was greatly improved. Large-scale preparation of 5-hydroxy-6-hydroperoxy-5,6-dihydrothymine (T/sup 6/OOH) were carried out in order to study the action of T/sup 6/OOH on neighboring bases, glycosidic bond-breakage, cell mutagenesis, chromosomal aberrations, and possible synergistic effects on x radiation. These results allow one to relate radiobiological effects with radiation chemical changes in DNA.

  20. Magnetoconvection and dynamo coefficients III: alpha-effect and magnetic pumping in the rapid rotation regime

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Ossendrijver, M; Stix, M

    2006-01-01

    Aims. The convective alpha- and gamma-effects, which are responsible for the generation and turbulent pumping of large scale magnetic fields, respectively, are determined in the rapid rotation regime corresponding to the deep layers of the solar convection zone. Methods. A 3D rectangular local model is used for solving the full set of MHD equations in order to compute the electromotive force (emf), E = , generated by the interaction of imposed weak gradient-free magnetic fields and turbulent convection with varying rotational influence and latitude. By expanding the emf in terms of the mean magnetic field, E_i = a_ij , all nine components of a_ij are computed. The diagonal elements of a_ij describe the alpha-effect, whereas the off-diagonals represent magnetic pumping. The latter is essentially the advection of magnetic fields by means other than the underlying large-scale velocity field. Comparisons are made to analytical expressions of the coefficients derived under the first-order smoothing approximation (...