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Sample records for alpha pparalpha potentiates

  1. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) suppresses postprandial lipidemia through fatty acid oxidation in enterocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Rino [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Takahashi, Nobuyuki, E-mail: nobu@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Murota, Kaeko [Department of Life Science, School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Osaka 770-8503 (Japan); Yamada, Yuko [Laboratory of Physiological Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Niiya, Saori; Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Murakami, Yoko [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Moriyama, Tatsuya [Department of Applied Cell Biology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kinki University, Nara 631-8505 (Japan); Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased oxygen consumption rate and CO{sub 2} production and decreased secretion of triglyceride and ApoB from Caco-2 cells. {yields} Orally administration of bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and CO{sub 2} production in small intestinal epithelial cells. {yields} Treatment with bezafibrate decreased postprandial serum concentration of triglyceride after oral injection of olive oil in mice. {yields} It suggested that intestinal lipid metabolism regulated by PPAR{alpha} activation suppresses postprandial lipidemia. -- Abstract: Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} which regulates lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues such as the liver and skeletal muscle, decreases circulating lipid levels, thus improving hyperlipidemia under fasting conditions. Recently, postprandial serum lipid levels have been found to correlate more closely to cardiovascular diseases than fasting levels, although fasting hyperlipidemia is considered an important risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of PPAR{alpha} activation on postprandial lipidemia has not been clarified. In this study, we examined the effects of PPAR{alpha} activation in enterocytes on lipid secretion and postprandial lipidemia. In Caco-2 enterocytes, bezafibrate, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes, such as acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, and acyl-CoA synthase, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and suppressed secretion levels of both triglycerides and apolipoprotein B into the basolateral side. In vivo experiments revealed that feeding high-fat-diet containing bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and

  2. Statins and PPAR{alpha} agonists induce myotoxicity in differentiated rat skeletal muscle cultures but do not exhibit synergy with co-treatment

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    Johnson, Timothy E [Department of Safety Assessment, Merck Research Laboratories, WP45-319, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Zhang, Xiaohua [Department of Biometrics Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Shi, Shu [Department of Safety Assessment, Merck Research Laboratories, WP45-319, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Umbenhauer, Diane R [Department of Safety Assessment, Merck Research Laboratories, WP45-319, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Statins and fibrates (weak PPAR{alpha} agonists) are prescribed for the treatment of lipid disorders. Both drugs cause myopathy, but with a low incidence, 0.1-0.5%. However, combined statin and fibrate therapy can enhance myopathy risk. We tested the myotoxic potential of PPAR subtype selective agonists alone and in combination with statins in a differentiated rat myotube model. A pharmacologically potent experimental PPAR{alpha} agonist, Compound A, induced myotoxicity as assessed by TUNEL staining at a minimum concentration of 1 nM, while other weaker PPAR{alpha} compounds, for example, WY-14643, Gemfibrozil and Bezafibrate increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the PPAR{gamma} agonist Rosiglitazone caused little or no cell death at up to 10 {mu}M and the PPAR{delta} ligand GW-501516 exhibited comparatively less myotoxicity than that seen with Compound A. An experimental statin (Compound B) and Atorvastatin also increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei and co-treatment with WY-14643, Gemfibrozil or Bezafibrate had less than a full additive effect on statin-induced cell killing. The mechanism of PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced cell death was different from that of statins. Unlike statins, Compound A and WY-14643 did not activate caspase 3/7. In addition, mevalonate and geranylgeraniol reversed the toxicity caused by statins, but did not prevent the cell killing induced by WY-14643. Furthermore, unlike statins, Compound A did not inhibit the isoprenylation of rab4 or rap1a. Interestingly, Compound A and Compound B had differential effects on ATP levels. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that in rat myotube cultures, PPAR{alpha} agonism mediates in part the toxicity response to PPAR{alpha} compounds. Furthermore, PPAR{alpha} agonists and statins cause myotoxicity through distinct and independent pathways.

  3. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  4. PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression possibly through PPAR{gamma} activation in the liver

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    Oishi, Katsutaka, E-mail: k-ooishi@aist.go.jp [Biological Clock Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Uchida, Daisuke [Biological Clock Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohkura, Naoki [Department of Clinical Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Teikyo University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Horie, Shuichi [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Kagawa Nutrition University, Sakado, Saitama (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression. {yields} Hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and PCG-1{alpha} are induced by a ketogenic diet. {yields} PPAR{gamma} antagonist attenuates a ketogenic diet-induced PAI-1 expression. {yields} Ketogenic diet advances the phase of circadian clock in a PPAR{alpha}-independent manner. -- Abstract: An increased level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and PAI-1 gene expression is under the control of molecular circadian clocks in mammals. We recently showed that PAI-1 expression is augmented in a phase-advanced circadian manner in mice fed with a ketogenic diet (KD). To determine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is involved in hypofibrinolytic status induced by a KD, we examined the expression profiles of PAI-1 and circadian clock genes in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice. Chronic administration of bezafibrate induced the PAI-1 gene expression in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Feeding with a KD augmented the circadian expression of PAI-1 mRNA in the hearts and livers of wild-type (WT) mice as previously described. The KD-induced mRNA expression of typical PPAR{alpha} target genes such as Cyp4A10 and FGF21 was damped in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. However, plasma PAI-1 concentrations were significantly more elevated in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice in accordance with hepatic mRNA levels. These observations suggest that PPAR{alpha} activation is dispensable for KD-induced PAI-1 expression. We also found that hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, and the hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and its coactivator PCG-1{alpha} were more effectively induced in PPAR{alpha}-null, than in WT mice on a KD. Furthermore, KD-induced hepatic PAI-1 expression was significantly suppressed by supplementation with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPAR{gamma} antagonist, in both WT and PPAR{alpha

  5. Anti-obesogenic effects of WY14643 (PPAR-alpha agonist): Hepatic mitochondrial enhancement and suppressed lipogenic pathway in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Flavia Maria Silva; Graus-Nunes, Francielle; Rachid, Tamiris Lima; Barreto, Aline Barcellos; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto; Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) presents with growing prevalence worldwide, though its pharmacological treatment remains to be established. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a PPAR-alpha agonist on liver tissue structure, ultrastructure, and metabolism, focusing on gene and protein expression of de novo lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis pathways, in diet-induced obese mice. Male C57BL/6 mice (three months old) received a control diet (C, 10% of lipids, n = 10) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 50% of lipids, n = 10) for ten weeks. These groups were subdivided to receive the treatment (n = 5 per group): C, C-alpha (PPAR-alpha agonist, 2.5 mg/kg/day mixed in the control diet), HFD and HFD-alpha group (PPAR-alpha agonist, 2.5 mg/kg/day mixed in the HFD). The effects were compared with biometrical, biochemical, molecular biology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. HFD showed greater body mass (BM) and insulinemia than C, both of which were tackled by the treatment in the HFD-alpha group. Increased hepatic protein expression of glucose-6-phosphatase, CHREBP and gene expression of PEPCK in HFD points to increased gluconeogenesis. Treatment rescued these parameters in the HFD-alpha group, eliciting a reduced hepatic glucose output, confirmed by the smaller GLUT2 expression in HFD-alpha than in HFD. Conversely, favored de novo lipogenesis was found in the HFD group by the increased expression of PPAR-gamma, and its target gene SREBP-1, FAS and GK when compared to C. The treatment yielded a marked reduction in the expression of all lipogenic factors. TEM analyses showed a greater numerical density of mitochondria per area of tissue in treated than in untreated groups, suggesting an increase in beta-oxidation and the consequent NAFLD control. PPAR-alpha activation reduced BM and treated insulin resistance (IR) and NAFLD by increasing the number of mitochondria and reducing hepatic gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis protein and gene

  6. WY14,643, a PPARalpha ligand, attenuates expression of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, D C; Frkanec, J T; Cromwell, J; Clopton, P; Cunard, R

    2007-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) ligands are medications used to treat hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis. Increasing evidence suggests that these agents are immunosuppressive. In the following studies we demonstrate that WY14,643, a PPARalpha ligand, attenuates expression of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (AGBMD). C57BL/6 mice were fed 0.05% WY14,643 or control food and immunized with the non-collagenous domain of the alpha3 chain of Type IV collagen [alpha3(IV) NC1] in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). WY14,643 reduced proteinuria and greatly improved glomerular and tubulo-interstitial lesions. However, the PPARalpha ligand did not alter the extent of IgG-binding to the GBM. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the prominent tubulo-interstitial infiltrates in the control-fed mice consisted predominately of F4/80(+) macrophages and WY14,643-feeding decreased significantly the number of renal macrophages. The synthetic PPARalpha ligand also reduced significantly expression of the chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2. Sera from mice immunized with AGBMD were also evaluated for antigen-specific IgGs. There was a significant increase in the IgG1 : IgG2c ratio and a decline in the intrarenal and splenocyte interferon (IFN)-gamma mRNA expression in the WY14,643-fed mice, suggesting that the PPARalpha ligand could skew the immune response to a less inflammatory T helper 2-type of response. These studies suggest that PPARalpha ligands may be a novel treatment for inflammatory renal disease.

  7. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

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    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kawada, Teruo, E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) protects against oleate-induced INS-1E beta cell dysfunction by preserving carbohydrate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigerio, F; Brun, T; Bartley, C

    2009-01-01

    and investigated key metabolic pathways and genes responsible for metabolism-secretion coupling during a culture period of 3 days in the presence of 0.4 mmol/l oleate. RESULTS: In INS-1E cells, the secretory dysfunction primarily induced by oleate was aggravated by silencing of PPARalpha. Conversely, PPARalpha...... enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. PPARalpha overproduction increased both beta-oxidation and fatty acid storage in the form of neutral triacylglycerol, revealing overall induction of lipid metabolism. These observations were substantiated by expression levels of associated genes. CONCLUSIONS....../INTERPRETATION: PPARalpha protected INS-1E beta cells from oleate-induced dysfunction, promoting both preservation of glucose metabolic pathways and fatty acid turnover....

  9. Relationships between the functional PPARalpha Leu162Val polymorphism and obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidaemia, and related quantitative traits in studies of 5799 middle-aged white people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparsø, Thomas; Hussain, Meena S; Andersen, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) is a nuclear receptor capable of regulating the expression of genes involved in peroxisomal and mitochondrial beta-oxidation pathways. The common Leu162Val polymorphism in the gene encoding PPARalpha has inconsistently shown association...

  10. Transcriptional activation of PPARalpha by phenobarbital in the absence of CAR and PXR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamasi, Viola; Juvan, Peter; Beer, Markus; Rozman, Damjana; Meyer, Urs A

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear receptors CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) and PXR (pregnane X receptor) mediate the effects of phenobarbital on gene transcription. To investigate the relative contribution of these nuclear receptors to the expression of specific genes we studied the effect of phenobarbital in livers of wild type, CAR(-/-), PXR(-/-) and CAR/PXR(-/-) knockout mice. Spotted Steroltalk v1 cDNA arrays were applied containing probes for genes involved in drug metabolism, sterol biosynthesis, steroid synthesis/transport and heme synthesis. In the absence of CAR and PXR, phenobarbital unexpectedly induced mRNAs of several nuclear receptors, including PPARalpha and its target genes Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14. Interestingly, in primary cultures of hepatocytes isolated from CAR/PXR(-/-) knockout mice, phenobarbital increased HNF-4alpha levels. In further experiments in these hepatocyte cultures we provide evidence that phenobarbital directly induces transcription of the PPARalpha gene via its HNF-4alpha response element, and indirectly by lack of inhibitory crosstalk of AMPK, CAR and PXR with HNF-4alpha. Our results provide further insight into CAR and PXR-independent effects of phenobarbital and the crosstalk between different nuclear receptor signaling pathways.

  11. Catalposide is a natural agonistic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hae; Jun, Hee-jin; Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao [Division of Food Bioscience and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Xiang Hua [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong-Ho [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hak-Ju [Division of Green Business Management, Department of Forest Resources Utilization, Korean Forest Research Institute, Seoul 130-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Bang Yeon, E-mail: byhwang@chungbuk.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Joon, E-mail: junelee@korea.ac.kr [Division of Food Bioscience and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposide is a novel ligand for PPAR{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell stimulated with catalposide improved fatty acid uptake, regulated target genes in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation and synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposdie reduces hepatic triacylglycerides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theses demonstrate catalposide could ameliorate hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes related to cellular lipid uptake and oxidation. Thus, PPAR{alpha} agonists may be important in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. In this study, we demonstrated that catalposide is a novel natural PPAR{alpha} agonist, identified from reporter gene assay-based activity screening with approximately 900 natural plant and seaweed extracts. Results of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses suggested that the compound interacted directly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{alpha}. Cultured hepatocytes stimulated with catalposide exhibited significantly reduced cellular triglyceride concentrations, by 21%, while cellular uptake of fatty acids was increased, by 70% (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the increase in cellular fatty acid uptake was due to upregulation of fatty acid transporter protein-4 (+19% vs. the control) in cells stimulated with catalposide. Additionally, expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation and high-density lipoprotein metabolism were upregulated, while that of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were suppressed. In conclusion, catalposide is hypolipidemic by activation of PPAR{alpha} via a ligand-mediated mechanism that modulates the expression of in lipid metabolism genes in hepatocytes.

  12. Regulation of the human SLC25A20 expression by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in human hepatoblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Keisuke, E-mail: nya@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takeuchi, Kentaro; Inada, Hirohiko [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yamasaki, Daisuke [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishimoto, Kenji [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tanaka, Toshiya; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko [Laboratory for System Biology and Medicine, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Doi, Takefumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-11-20

    Solute carrier family 25, member 20 (SLC25A20) is a key molecule that transfers acylcarnitine esters in exchange for free carnitine across the mitochondrial membrane in the mitochondrial {beta}-oxidation. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays an important role in the regulation of {beta}-oxidation. We previously established tetracycline-regulated human cell line that can be induced to express PPAR{alpha} and found that PPAR{alpha} induces the SLC25A20 expression. In this study, we analyzed the promoter region of the human slc25a20 gene and showed that PPAR{alpha} regulates the expression of human SLC25A20 via the peroxisome proliferator responsive element.

  13. Cow's milk increases the activities of human nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and delta and retinoid X receptor alpha involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, obesity, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhara, W; Koide, H; Okuzawa, T; Hayashi, D; Hashimoto, T; Kojo, H

    2009-09-01

    The nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) have been shown to play crucial roles in regulating energy homeostasis including lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, inflammatory responses, and cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Because PPAR agonists have the potential to prevent or ameliorate diseases such as hyperlipidemia, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and obesity, we have explored new natural agonists for PPAR. For this purpose, cow's milk was tested for agonistic activity toward human PPAR subtypes using a reporter gene assay. Milk increased human PPARalpha activity in a dose-dependent manner with a 3.2-fold increase at 0.5% (vol/vol). It also enhanced human PPARdelta activity in a dose-dependent manner with an 11.5-fold increase at 0.5%. However, it only slightly affected human PPARgamma activity. Ice cream, butter, and yogurt also increased the activities of PPARalpha and PPARdelta, whereas vegetable cream affected activity of PPARdelta but not PPARalpha. Skim milk enhanced the activity of PPAR to a lesser degree than regular milk. Milk and fresh cream increased the activity of human retinoid X receptor (RXR)alpha as well as PPARalpha and PPARdelta, whereas neither affected vitamin D3 receptor, estrogen receptors alpha and beta, or thyroid receptors alpha and beta. Both milk and fresh cream were shown by quantitative real-time PCR to increase the quantity of mRNA for uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), an energy expenditure gene, in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in UCP2 mRNA was found to be reduced by treatment with PPARdelta-short interfering (si)RNA. This study unambiguously clarified at the cellular level that cow's milk increased the activities of human PPARalpha, PPARdelta, and RXRalpha. The possible role in enhancing the activities of PPARalpha, PPARdelta, and RXRalpha, and the health benefits of cow's milk were discussed.

  14. PPARalpha/gamma expression and activity in mouse and human melanocytes and melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, Linda L; Mills, Caroline N; Niles, Richard M

    2008-06-01

    We examined the expression of PPARs and the effects of PPARalpha and PPARgamma agonists on growth of mouse and human melanocytes and melanoma cells. PPARalpha,beta, and PPARgamma mRNA qualitative expression in melan-a mouse melanocytes, B16 mouse melanoma, human melanocytes, and A375 and SK-mel28 human melanoma cells was determined by RT-PCR, while quantitative PPARalpha mRNA levels were determined by QuantiGene assay. PPARalpha and PPARgamma protein was assessed by Western blotting. The effect of natural and synthetic PPAR ligands on cell growth was determined by either hemocytometer counting or crystal violet assay. PPAR transcriptional activity was determined by a PPRE-reporter gene assay, while knockdown of PPARalpha expression was achieved by transient transfection of siRNA. Both mouse and human melanoma cells produced more PPARalpha and PPARgamma protein compared to melanocytes. PPARalpha mRNA levels were elevated in human melanoma cells, but not in mouse melanoma cells relative to melanocytes. Silencing of PPARalpha in human melanoma cells did not alter cell proliferation or morphology. PPARgamma-selective agonists inhibited the growth of both mouse and human melanoma cells, while PPARalpha-selective agonists had limited effects. Increased expression of PPARalpha in melanoma relative to melanocytes may be a common occurrence, however its biologic significance remains to be determined. PPARgamma agonists may be useful for arresting the growth of some melanomas.

  15. Discovery of an Oxybenzylglycine Based Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Alpha Selective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Kennedy, L; Shi, Y; Tao, S; Ye, X; Chen, S; Wang, Y; Hernandez, A; Wang, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    An 1,3-oxybenzylglycine based compound 2 (BMS-687453) was discovered to be a potent and selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, with an EC{sub 50} of 10 nM for human PPAR{alpha} and {approx}410-fold selectivity vs human PPAR{gamma} in PPAR-GAL4 transactivation assays. Similar potencies and selectivity were also observed in the full length receptor co-transfection assays. Compound 2 has negligible cross-reactivity against a panel of human nuclear hormone receptors including PPAR{delta}. Compound 2 demonstrated an excellent pharmacological and safety profile in preclinical studies and thus was chosen as a development candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The X-ray cocrystal structures of the early lead compound 12 and compound 2 in complex with PPAR{alpha} ligand binding domain (LBD) were determined. The role of the crystal structure of compound 12 with PPAR{alpha} in the development of the SAR that ultimately resulted in the discovery of compound 2 is discussed.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonists modulate Th1 and Th2 chemokine secretion in normal thyrocytes and Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Alessandro, E-mail: a.antonelli@med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Silvia Martina, E-mail: sm.ferrari@int.med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Frascerra, Silvia, E-mail: lafrasce@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Corrado, Alda, E-mail: dala_res@hotmail.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Pupilli, Cinzia, E-mail: c.pupilli@dfc.unifi.it [Endocrinology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Careggi and University of Florence, Viale Morgagni 85, I-50134, Florence (Italy); Bernini, Giampaolo, E-mail: g.bernini@int.med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Benvenga, Salvatore, E-mail: s.benvenga@me.nettuno.it [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, University of Messina, Piazza Pugliatti 1, I-98122, Messina (Italy); Ferrannini, Ele, E-mail: eferrannini@med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Fallahi, Poupak, E-mail: poupak@int.med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Until now, no data are present about the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} activation on the prototype Th1 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10] (CXCL10) and Th2 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] (CCL2) chemokines secretion in thyroid cells. The role of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} activation on CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion was tested in Graves' disease (GD) and control primary thyrocytes stimulated with interferon (IFN){gamma} and tumor necrosis factor (TNF){alpha}. IFN{gamma} stimulated both CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion in primary GD and control thyrocytes. TNF{alpha} alone stimulated CCL2 secretion, while had no effect on CXCL10. The combination of IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} had a synergistic effect both on CXCL10 and CCL2 chemokines in GD thyrocytes at levels comparable to those of controls. PPAR{alpha} activators inhibited the secretion of both chemokines (stimulated with IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha}) at a level higher (for CXCL10, about 60-72%) than PPAR{gamma} agonists (about 25-35%), which were confirmed to inhibit CXCL10, but not CCL2. Our data show that CCL2 is modulated by IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} in GD and normal thyrocytes. Furthermore we first show that PPAR{alpha} activators inhibit the secretion of CXCL10 and CCL2 in thyrocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} may be involved in the modulation of the immune response in the thyroid.

  17. Effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activators on tumor necrosis factor expression in mice during endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M R; Clarke, S; Rodgers, K; Thornhill, B; Peters, J M; Gonzalez, F J; Gimble, J M

    1999-07-01

    Inflammatory mediators orchestrate the host immune and metabolic response to acute bacterial infections and mediate the events leading to septic shock. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has long been identified as one of the proximal mediators of endotoxin action. Recent studies have implicated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) as a potential target to modulate regulation of the immune response. Since PPARalpha activators, which are hypolipidemic drugs, are being prescribed for a significant population of older patients, it is important to determine the impact of these drugs on the host response to acute inflammation. Therefore, we examined the role of PPARalpha activators on the regulation of TNF expression in a mouse model of endotoxemia. CD-1 mice treated with dietary fenofibrate or Wy-14,643 had fivefold-higher lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF plasma levels than LPS-treated control-fed animals. Higher LPS-induced TNF levels in drug-fed animals were reflected physiologically in significantly lower glucose levels in plasma and a significantly lower 50% lethal dose than those in LPS-treated control-fed animals. Utilizing PPARalpha wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice, we showed that the effect of fenofibrate on LPS-induced TNF expression was indeed mediated by PPARalpha. PPARalpha WT mice fed fenofibrate also had a fivefold increase in LPS-induced TNF levels in plasma compared to control-fed animals. However, LPS-induced TNF levels were significantly decreased and glucose levels in plasma were significantly increased in PPARalpha KO mice fed fenofibrate compared to those in control-fed animals. Data from peritoneal macrophage studies indicate that Wy-14,643 modestly decreased TNF expression in vitro. Similarly, overexpression of PPARalpha in 293T cells decreased activity of a human TNF promoter-luciferase construct. The results from these studies suggest that any anti-inflammatory activity of PPARalpha in vivo can be masked by other

  18. Effects of L-carnitine against oxidative stress in human hepatocytes: involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jin-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation have been demonstrated to play important roles in the production of liver damage. L-carnitine is a natural substance and acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent beta-oxidation. It is also an antioxidant that reduces metabolic stress in the cells. Recent years L-carnitine has been proposed for treatment of various kinds of disease, including liver injury. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of L-carnitine against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in a normal human hepatocyte cell line, HL7702. Methods We analyzed cytotoxicity using MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release. Antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation were estimated by reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, activities and protein expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA formation. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-alpha and its target genes were evaluated by RT-PCR or western blotting. The role of PPAR-alpha in L-carnitine-enhanced expression of SOD and CAT was also explored. Statistical analysis was performed by a one-way analysis of variance, and its significance was assessed by Dennett's post-hoc test. Results The results showed that L-carnitine protected HL7702 cells against cytotoxity induced by H2O2. This protection was related to the scavenging of ROS, the promotion of SOD and CAT activity and expression, and the prevention of lipid peroxidation in cultured HL7702 cells. The decreased expressions of PPAR-alpha, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1 and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX induced by H2O2 can be attenuated by L-carnitine. Besides, we also found that the promotion of SOD and CAT protein expression induced by L-carnitine was blocked by PPAR-alpha inhibitor MK886. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest that L-carnitine could protect HL

  19. PPARalpha-dependent modulation of hepatic CYP1A by clofibric acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Zein; El-Shazly, Samir; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Kazusaka, Akio; Fujita, Shoichi

    2004-09-01

    Fibrates, hypolipidemic drugs, have been reported to suppress the metabolic activities of cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1A2 in rats but the mechanism has not been elucidated. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the inhibitory effect of fibrates on arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) function may be due to their stimulatory effects on PPARalpha. Sudan III (S.III) treatment induced CYP 1A1 and CYP 1A2 protein expression, mRNA and their metabolic activities, methoxyresorufin-O-demethylase (MROD) and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), in Wistar rats higher than those in the control. Co-treatment of rats with S.III and clofibric acid (CA) caused a 40-50% decrease in the induced levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 protein, mRNA expression and their metabolic activities and reduced AhR protein expression. When we treated HepG2 cells with S.III and/or CA, no suppressive effect on S.III-induced CYP1A1 protein expression due to CA was found. HepG2 cells were transiently transfected with increasing concentrations of PPARalpha mammalian expression vector and exposed to the same treatment. CA co-treatment with S.III decreased AhR protein and S.III-induced CYP1A1 protein expression with increasing dose of PPARalpha transfected into HepG2 cells. Our results demonstrate that the suppressive effect of fibrates on CYP1A is PPARalpha-dependent and suggest that PPARalpha has an inhibitory effect on AhR function.

  20. PPARalpha siRNA-treated expression profiles uncover the causal sufficiency network for compound-induced liver hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Dai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Uncovering pathways underlying drug-induced toxicity is a fundamental objective in the field of toxicogenomics. Developing mechanism-based toxicity biomarkers requires the identification of such novel pathways and the order of their sufficiency in causing a phenotypic response. Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi phenotypic screening has emerged as an effective tool in unveiling the genes essential for specific cellular functions and biological activities. However, eliciting the relative contribution of and sufficiency relationships among the genes identified remains challenging. In the rodent, the most widely used animal model in preclinical studies, it is unrealistic to exhaustively examine all potential interactions by RNAi screening. Application of existing computational approaches to infer regulatory networks with biological outcomes in the rodent is limited by the requirements for a large number of targeted permutations. Therefore, we developed a two-step relay method that requires only one targeted perturbation for genome-wide de novo pathway discovery. Using expression profiles in response to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs against the gene for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (Ppara, our method unveiled the potential causal sufficiency order network for liver hypertrophy in the rodent. The validity of the inferred 16 causal transcripts or 15 known genes for PPARalpha-induced liver hypertrophy is supported by their ability to predict non-PPARalpha-induced liver hypertrophy with 84% sensitivity and 76% specificity. Simulation shows that the probability of achieving such predictive accuracy without the inferred causal relationship is exceedingly small (p < 0.005. Five of the most sufficient causal genes have been previously disrupted in mouse models; the resulting phenotypic changes in the liver support the inferred causal roles in liver hypertrophy. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of defining pathways mediating drug

  1. Fibrates upregulate TRB3 in lymphocytes independent of PPAR alpha by augmenting CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBP beta) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Erin; Frkanec, Julie T; Cunard, Robyn

    2007-02-01

    Fibrates, which function by binding and activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), have been used successfully to treat hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Increasing evidence suggests that in addition to their lipid lowering activities these medications also function as immunosuppressive agents. Tribbles is a Drosophila protein that slows cell cycle progression, and its mammalian homolog, TRB3 interferes with insulin-induced activation of AKT. In these studies we demonstrate that fibrates upregulate TRB3 expression in mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Interestingly, in lymphocytes fibrates augment TRB3 expression in both PPARalpha wildtype and knockout mice, suggesting that upregulation of this protein occurs in a PPARalpha-independent manner. Fibrates activate a proximal TRB3 promoter construct and mutation or partial deletion of a potential PPAR response element does not alter the ability of fibrates to drive TRB3 expression. Subsequent studies reveal that fibrates upregulate C/EBPbeta and CHOP in lymphocytes and mutation of potential C/EBPbeta and CHOP consensus sequences abrogates the ability of fibrates to upregulate TRB3 promoter activity. Accordingly, fibrates enhance the recruitment of C/EBPbeta and CHOP to the proximal TRB3 promoter. Finally, TRB3 expression in lymphocytes induces G2 cell cycle delay and cellular depletion. These studies outline a novel PPARalpha-independent mechanism of action of fibrates and document for the first time the expression of TRB3 in activated lymphocytes.

  2. Discovery of an Oxybenzylglycine Based Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor [alpha] Selective Agonist 2-((3-((2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-5-methyloxazol-4-yl)methoxy)benzyl)(methoxycarbonyl)amino)acetic Acid (BMS-687453)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun; Kennedy, Lawrence J.; Shi, Yan; Tao, Shiwei; Ye, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Stephanie Y.; Wang, Ying; Hernndez, Andrs S.; Wang, Wei; Devasthale, Pratik V.; Chen, Sean; Lai, Zhi; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shung; Smirk, Rebecca A.; Bolton, Scott A.; Ryono, Denis E.; Zhang, Huiping; Lim, Ngiap-Kie; Chen, Bang-Chi; Locke, Kenneth T.; O’Malley, Kevin M.; Zhang, Litao; Srivastava, Rai Ajit; Miao, Bowman; Meyers, Daniel S.; Monshizadegan, Hossain; Search, Debra; Grimm, Denise; Zhang, Rongan; Harrity, Thomas; Kunselman, Lori K.; Cap, Michael; Kadiyala, Pathanjali; Hosagrahara, Vinayak; Zhang, Lisa; Xu, Carrie; Li, Yi-Xin; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Chang, Chiehying; An, Yongmi; Krystek, Stanley R.; Blanar, Michael A.; Zahler, Robert; Mukherjee, Ranjan; Cheng, Peter T.W.; Tino, Joseph A. (BMS)

    2010-04-12

    An 1,3-oxybenzylglycine based compound 2 (BMS-687453) was discovered to be a potent and selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, with an EC{sub 50} of 10 nM for human PPAR{alpha} and 410-fold selectivity vs human PPAR{gamma} in PPAR-GAL4 transactivation assays. Similar potencies and selectivity were also observed in the full length receptor co-transfection assays. Compound 2 has negligible cross-reactivity against a panel of human nuclear hormone receptors including PPAR{delta}. Compound 2 demonstrated an excellent pharmacological and safety profile in preclinical studies and thus was chosen as a development candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The X-ray cocrystal structures of the early lead compound 12 and compound 2 in complex with PPAR{alpha} ligand binding domain (LBD) were determined. The role of the crystal structure of compound 12 with PPAR{alpha} in the development of the SAR that ultimately resulted in the discovery of compound 2 is discussed.

  3. Identification of the human ApoAV gene as a novel ROR{alpha} target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Ulrika [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Nilsson, Tina [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); McPheat, Jane [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Stroemstedt, Per-Erik [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Bamberg, Krister [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Balendran, Clare [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Kang, Daiwu [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden)

    2005-04-29

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-{alpha} (ROR{alpha}) (NR1F1) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a potential role in metabolism. Previous studies have shown that ROR{alpha} regulates transcription of the murine Apolipoprotein AI gene and human Apolipoprotein CIII genes. In the present study, we present evidence that ROR{alpha} also induces transcription of the human Apolipoprotein AV gene, a recently identified apolipoprotein associated with triglyceride levels. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ROR{alpha} increased the endogenous expression of ApoAV in HepG2 cells and ROR{alpha} also enhanced the activity of an ApoAV promoter construct in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Deletion and mutation studies identified three AGGTCA motifs in the ApoAV promoter that mediate ROR{alpha} transactivation, one of which overlaps with a previously identified binding site for PPAR{alpha}. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby ROR{alpha} modulates lipid metabolism and implies ROR{alpha} as a potential target for the treatment of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis.

  4. Evidence for an association between the Leu162Val polymorphism of the PPARalpha gene and decreased fasting serum triglyceride levels in glucose tolerant subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva-Maria D; Hansen, Lars; Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether genetic variation in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) is associated with type 2 diabetes and altered lipid or carbohydrate metabolism in glucose tolerant subjects. Mutation analyses of PPARalpha were performed in 56...... type 2 diabetic patients. Six variants were identified: IVS3 + 76T>C, IVS3-19C>T, IVS4 + 35C>T, Leu162Val, Arg178Gly and Ala268Val. In a case-control study comprising 738 type 2 diabetic patients and 524 glucose tolerant subjects, the three exon variants did not show any significant differences...... in allele frequencies between type 2 diabetic patients and control subjects. The functional Leu162Val polymorphism was further investigated in genotype-phenotype studies involving 340 young, healthy subjects and 502 middle-aged glucose tolerant subjects. The young, healthy subjects who were heterozygous...

  5. Transcriptional regulation of human and rat hepatic lipid metabolism by the grapefruit flavonoid naringenin: role of PPARalpha, PPARgamma and LXRalpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Goldwasser

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of lipid and carbohydrate homeostasis is an important factor in the development of prevalent metabolic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Therefore, small molecules that could reduce insulin dependence and regulate dyslipidemia could have a dramatic effect on public health. The grapefruit flavonoid naringenin has been shown to normalize lipids in diabetes and hypercholesterolemia, as well as inhibit the production of HCV. Here, we demonstrate that naringenin regulates the activity of nuclear receptors PPARalpha, PPARgamma, and LXRalpha. We show it activates the ligand-binding domain of both PPARalpha and PPARgamma, while inhibiting LXRalpha in GAL4-fusion reporters. Using TR-FRET, we show that naringenin is a partial agonist of LXRalpha, inhibiting its association with Trap220 co-activator in the presence of TO901317. In addition, naringenin induces the expression of PPARalpha co-activator, PGC1alpha. The flavonoid activates PPAR response element (PPRE while suppressing LXRalpha response element (LXRE in human hepatocytes, translating into the induction of PPAR-regulated fatty acid oxidation genes such as CYP4A11, ACOX, UCP1 and ApoAI, and inhibition of LXRalpha-regulated lipogenesis genes, such as FAS, ABCA1, ABCG1, and HMGR. This effect results in the induction of a fasted-like state in primary rat hepatocytes in which fatty acid oxidation increases, while cholesterol and bile acid production decreases. Our findings explain the myriad effects of naringenin and support its continued clinical development. Of note, this is the first description of a non-toxic, naturally occurring LXRalpha inhibitor.

  6. Regulation of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha expression but not adiponectin by dietary protein in finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T E; Kerr, B J; Spurlock, M E

    2008-10-01

    Soy protein regulates adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) in some species, but the effect of dietary soy protein on adiponectin and PPARalpha in the pig has not been studied. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether soya bean meal reduction or replacement influences serum adiponectin, adiponectin mRNA, serum metabolites and the expression of PPARalpha and other genes involved in lipid deposition. Thirty-three pigs (11 pigs per treatment) were subjected to one of three dietary treatments: (i) reduced crude protein (CP) diet containing soya bean meal (RCP-Soy), (ii) high CP diet containing soya bean meal (HCP-Soy) or (iii) high CP diet with corn gluten meal replacing soya bean meal (HCP-CGM) for 35 days. Dietary treatment had no effect on overall growth performance, feed intake or measures of body composition. There was no effect of dietary treatment on serum adiponectin or leptin. Dietary treatment did not affect the abundance of the mRNAs for adiponectin, PPARalpha, PPARgamma2, lipoprotein lipase or fatty acid synthase in adipose tissue. The mRNA expression of PPARalpha, PPARgamma2, lipoprotein lipase or fatty acid synthetase in loin muscle was not affected by dietary treatment. In liver tissue, the relative abundance of PPARalpha mRNA was greater (p Soy diets when compared to pigs fed RCP-Soy or HCP-CGM diets. Hepatic mRNA expression of acyl-CoA oxidase or fatty acid synthase was not affected by dietary treatment. Western blot analysis indicated that hepatic PPARalpha protein levels were decreased (p Soy diets when compared to pigs fed the HCP-Soy diets. These data suggest that increasing the soy protein content of swine diets increases hepatic expression of PPARalpha without associated changes in body composition.

  7. Peroxisome proliferation activation receptor alpha modulation of Ca2+-regulated exocytosis via arachidonic acid in guinea-pig antral mucous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawabe, Yukinori; Shimamoto, Chikao; Sakai, Akiko; Kuwabara, Hiroko; Saad, Adel H; Nakano, Takashi; Takitani, Kimitaka; Tamai, Hiroshi; Mori, Hiroshi; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Nakahari, Takashi

    2010-08-01

    Indomethacin (IDM, 10 microm), not aspirin (ASA; 10 microm), enhanced the Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis stimulated by 1 microm acetylcholine (ACh) in guinea-pig antral mucous cells. Indomethacin inhibits prostaglandin G/H (PGG/H) and 15R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (15R-HPETE) production from arachidonic acid (AA), while ASA inhibits PGG/H production but accelerates 15R-HPETE production. This suggests that IDM accumulates AA. Arachidonic acid (2 microm) enhanced Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis in antral mucous cells to a similar extent to IDM. Moreover, a stable analogue of AA, arachidonyltrifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF(3)), also enhanced Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis, indicating that AA, not products from AA, enhances Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis. We hypothesized that AA activates peroxisome proliferation activation receptor alpha (PPARalpha), because AA is a natural ligand for PPARalpha. A PPARalpha agonist (WY14643; 1 microm) enhanced Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis, and a PPARalpha blocker (MK886; 50 microm) abolished the enhancement of Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis induced by AA, IDM, AACOCF(3) and WY14643. Western blotting and immunohistochemical examinations demonstrated that PPARalpha exists in antral mucous cells. Moreover, MK886 decreased the frequency of Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis activated by 1 microm ACh or 2 microm thapsigargin alone by 25-30%. Thus, ACh stimulates AA accumulation via an [Ca(2+)](i) increase, which activates PPARalpha, leading to enhancement of Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis in antral mucous cells. A novel autocrine mechanism mediated via PPARalpha enhances Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis in guinea-pig antral mucous cells.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 2-heteroarylthioalkanoic acid analogues of clofibric acid as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampietro, Letizia; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Giancristofaro, Antonella; Lannutti, Fabio; Bettoni, Giancarlo; De Filippis, Barbara; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Maccallini, Cristina; Petruzzelli, Michele; Morgano, Annalisa; Moschetta, Antonio; Amoroso, Rosa

    2009-10-22

    A series of 2-heteroarylthioalkanoic acids were synthesized through systematic structural modifications of clofibric acid and evaluated for human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) transactivation activity, with the aim of obtaining new hypolipidemic compounds. Some thiophene and benzothiazole derivatives showing a good activation of the receptor alpha were screened for activity against the PPARgamma isoform. The gene induction of selected compounds was also investigated in the human hepatoma cell line.

  9. Pharmacological characterization of hydrolysis-resistant analogs of oleoylethanolamide with potent anorexiant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astarita, Giuseppe; Di Giacomo, Barbara; Gaetani, Silvana; Oveisi, Fariba; Compton, Timothy R; Rivara, Silvia; Tarzia, Giorgio; Mor, Marco; Piomelli, Daniele

    2006-08-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an endogenous lipid mediator that reduces food intake, promotes lipolysis, and decreases body weight gain in rodents by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha). The biological effects of OEA are terminated by two intracellular lipid hydrolase enzymes, fatty-acid amide hydrolase and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase. In the present study, we describe OEA analogs that resist enzymatic hydrolysis, activate PPAR-alpha with high potency in vitro, and persistently reduce feeding when administered in vivo either parenterally or orally. The most potent of these compounds, (Z)-(R)-9-octadecenamide,N-(2-hydroxyethyl,1-methyl) (KDS-5104), stimulates transcriptional activity of PPAR-alpha with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 100 +/- 21 nM (n = 11). Parenteral administration of KDS-5104 in rats produces persistent dose-dependent prolongation of feeding latency and postmeal interval (half-maximal effective dose, ED50 = 2.4 +/- 1.8 mg kg(-1) i.p.; n = 18), as well as increased and protracted tissue exposure compared with OEA. Oral administration of the compound also results in a significant tissue exposure and reduction of food intake in free-feeding rats. These results suggest that the endogenous high-affinity PPAR-alpha agonist OEA may provide a scaffold for the discovery of novel orally active PPAR-alpha ligands.

  10. PPAR-alpha dependent regulation of vanin-1 mediates hepatic lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, van J.A.; Jansen, P.A.; Ballak, D.B.; Hijmans, A.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Rommelaere, S.; Kersten, A.H.; Stienstra, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is a key regulator of hepatic fat oxidation that serves as an energy source during starvation. Vanin-1 has been described as a putative PPARa target gene in liver, but its function in hepatic lipid metabolism is unknown.

  11. The tree-alpha Faddeev calculation on 12C bound states with a Pauli correct alpha-alpha potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Hiroyuki; Oryu, Shinsho

    1986-01-01

    The three-alpha model of 12 C is investigated by the Faddeev formalism with the UIM alpha-alpha potential, in which the Pauli effect between two-alpha system was taken into account adequately. The potential can reproduce the on- and off-shell effects of the alpha-alpha interaction by the rank-4 separable type for the S-wave, the rank-3 one for the D-wave, and the rank-2 one for the G-wave, in which two of the ranks in the S-wave, and one in the D-wave are prepared to eliminate the Pauli forbidden states. We obtained three even states J π = 0 + , 2 + , 4 + , and two odd states 1 - , 3 - , below the alpha- 8 Be(0 + g.s) threshold energy. The even parity states gain larger binding energies than those which have been obtained by former Faddeev calculation with the rank-1 Kukulin and Neudatchin (KN) potential. On the other hand, for the odd parity states, we obtained smaller binding energies than the former one. It is found that our Faddeev calculation with the UIM potential does not miss any important low-lying levels of 12 C, in which any spurious states do not appear. (author)

  12. /sup 58,60,62/Ni (. cap alpha. ,p) three--nucleon transfer reactions and. cap alpha. optical potential ambiguities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuanda, Wang; Xiuming, Bao; Zhiqiang, Mao; Rongfang, Yuan; Keling, Wen; Binyin, Huang; Zhifu, Wang; Shuming, Li; Jianan, Wang; Zuxun, Sun; others, and

    1985-11-01

    The differential cross sections are measured using 26.0 MeV ..cap alpha.. particle for /sup 58,62/Ni(..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha..) /sup 58,62/Ni and /sup 58,62/Ni(..cap alpha..,p) /sup 61,65/Cu reactions as well as 25.4 MeV ..cap alpha.. particle for /sup 60/Ni(..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha..)/sup 69/Ni and /sup 60/Ni(..cap alpha.., p)/sup 63/Cu reactions. Consistent calculations with optical model and ZR DWBA are made for (..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha..) and (..cap alpha.., p) reactions by using of single, two, three and four nucleon optical potential parameters. For elastic scattering due to the ..cap alpha.. optical potential ambiguities, all the above optical potential can reproduce the experimental angular distributions. However, the single, two and three nucleon potential, including the Baird's mass systematics and the Chang's energy systematics of ..cap alpha.. potentials, obviously can not provide a reasonable fitting with the (..cap alpha..,p) reaction experimental data. Only the results from the four nucleon potential is in good agreement with the (..cap alpha..,p) reaction experimental data. This reveals that in the ..cap alpha..-particle induced transfer reactions, the real depth of the ..cap alpha..-nucleus optical potential should be rather deep.

  13. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and -gamma in auricular tissue from heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Garre, Dulcenombre; Herraíz, Marta; González-Rubio, Ma Luisa; Bernal, Rosa; Aragoncillo, Paloma; Carbonell, Amparo; Rufilanchas, Juan José; Fernández-Cruz, Arturo

    2006-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), key transcriptional regulators of lipid and energy metabolism in cardiomyocytes, have recently been proposed to modulate cardiovascular pathophysiological responses in experimental models. However, there is little information about the functional activity of PPARs in human heart failure. To investigate PPAR-alpha and -gamma expression and activity, and the association with ET-1 production and fibrosis, in cardiac biopsies from patients with end-stage heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) in comparison and from non-failing donor hearts. All samples were obtained during cardiac transplantation. Morphological analysis (by Masson trichrome and image analysis) did not detect fibrosis in the left atrium from non-failing donors (NFLA) or from ICM patients (FLA). However, left ventricles from failing hearts (FLV) contained a greater number of fibrotic areas (NFLA: 3.21+/-1.15, FLA: 1.63+/-0.83, FLV: 14.5+/-3.45%; n = 9, PPPAP-gamma mRNA (by RT-PCR) and protein (by Western blot) levels were higher in the ventricles from failing hearts compared with the atrium from failing and non-failing hearts. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that PPAR-alpha and PPAP-gamma were not activated in the ventricles (NFLA: 1.00+/-0.11, FLA: 1.89+/-0.24, FLV: 0.95+/-0.07; n = 9, PPPAP-gamma are selectively activated in the atria from ICM patients and might be functionally important in the maintenance of atrial morphology.

  14. Clofibric acid, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha ligand, inhibits growth of human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Xin, Bing; Shigeto, Tatsuhiko; Umemoto, Mika; Kasai-Sakamoto, Akiko; Futagami, Masayuki; Tsuchida, Shigeki; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Mizunuma, Hideki

    2007-04-01

    Recent reports have shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha ligands reduce growth of some types of malignant tumors and prevent carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of clofibric acid (CA), a ligand for PPARalpha on growth of ovarian malignancy, in in vivo and in vitro experiments using OVCAR-3 and DISS cells derived from human ovarian cancer and aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of its antitumor effect. CA treatment significantly suppressed the growth of OVCAR-3 tumors xenotransplanted s.c. and significantly prolonged the survival of mice with malignant ascites derived from DISS cells as compared with control. CA also dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation of cultured cell lines. CA treatment increased the expression of carbonyl reductase (CR), which promotes the conversion of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) to PGF(2alpha), in implanted OVCAR-3 tumors as well as cultured cells. CA treatment decreased PGE(2) level as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) amount in both of OVCAR-3-tumor and DISS-derived ascites. Reduced microvessel density and induced apoptosis were found in solid OVCAR-3 tumors treated by CA. Transfection of CR expression vector into mouse ovarian cancer cells showed significant reduction of PGE(2) level as well as VEGF expression. These results indicate that CA produces potent antitumor effects against ovarian cancer in conjunction with a reduction of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. We conclude that CA could be an effective agent in ovarian cancer and should be tested alone and in combination with other anticancer drugs.

  15. Alpha decay studies on Po isotopes using different versions of nuclear potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P.; Sukumaran, Indu [Kannur University, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur, Kerala (India)

    2017-12-15

    The alpha decays from {sup 186-224}Po isotopes have been studied using 25 different versions of nuclear potentials so as to select a suitable nuclear potential for alpha decay studies. The computed standard deviation of the calculated half-lives in comparison with the experimental data suggested that proximity 2003-I is the apt form of nuclear potential for alpha decay studies as it possesses the least standard deviation, σ = 0.620. Among the different proximity potentials, proximity 1966 (σ = 0.630) and proximity 1977 (σ = 0.636), are also found to work well in alpha decay studies with low deviation. Among other versions of nuclear potentials (other than proximity potentials), Bass 1980 is suggested to be a significant form of nuclear potential because of its good predictive power. However, while the other forms of potentials are able to reproduce the experimental data to some extent, these potentials cannot be considered as apposite potentials for alpha decay studies in their present form. Since the experimental correlation of the models is noticed to be satisfying, the alpha decay half-lives of certain Po isotopes that are not detected experimentally yet have been predicted. (orig.)

  16. Endogenous fatty acid ethanolamides suppress nicotine-induced activation of mesolimbic dopamine neurons through nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Miriam; Pillolla, Giuliano; Luchicchi, Antonio; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Yasar, Sevil; Goldberg, Steven R; Pistis, Marco

    2008-12-17

    Nicotine stimulates the activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons, which is believed to mediate the rewarding and addictive properties of tobacco use. Accumulating evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system might play a major role in neuronal mechanisms underlying the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. Here, we investigated the modulation of nicotine effects by the endocannabinoid system on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area with electrophysiological techniques in vivo and in vitro. We discovered that pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme that catabolizes fatty acid ethanolamides, among which the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is the best known, suppressed nicotine-induced excitation of dopamine cells. Importantly, this effect was mimicked by the administration of the FAAH substrates oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), but not methanandamide, the hydrolysis resistant analog of AEA. OEA and PEA are naturally occurring lipid signaling molecules structurally related to AEA, but devoid of affinity for cannabinoid receptors. They blocked the effects of nicotine by activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha), a nuclear receptor transcription factor involved in several aspects of lipid metabolism and energy balance. Activation of PPAR-alpha triggered a nongenomic stimulation of tyrosine kinases, which might lead to phosphorylation and negative regulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These data indicate for the first time that the anorexic lipids OEA and PEA possess neuromodulatory properties as endogenous ligands of PPAR-alpha in the brain and provide a potential new target for the treatment of nicotine addiction.

  17. Filling gaps in PPAR-alpha signaling through comparative nutrigenomics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radonjic Marijana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of high-throughput genomic tools in nutrition research is a widespread practice. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the outcome of individual expression studies is insufficient for the comprehensive understanding of such a complex field. Currently, the availability of the large amounts of expression data in public repositories has opened up new challenges on microarray data analyses. We have focused on PPARα, a ligand-activated transcription factor functioning as fatty acid sensor controlling the gene expression regulation of a large set of genes in various metabolic organs such as liver, small intestine or heart. The function of PPARα is strictly connected to the function of its target genes and, although many of these have already been identified, major elements of its physiological function remain to be uncovered. To further investigate the function of PPARα, we have applied a cross-species meta-analysis approach to integrate sixteen microarray datasets studying high fat diet and PPARα signal perturbations in different organisms. Results We identified 164 genes (MDEGs that were differentially expressed in a constant way in response to a high fat diet or to perturbations in PPARs signalling. In particular, we found five genes in yeast which were highly conserved and homologous of PPARα targets in mammals, potential candidates to be used as models for the equivalent mammalian genes. Moreover, a screening of the MDEGs for all known transcription factor binding sites and the comparison with a human genome-wide screening of Peroxisome Proliferating Response Elements (PPRE, enabled us to identify, 20 new potential candidate genes that show, both binding site, both change in expression in the condition studied. Lastly, we found a non random localization of the differentially expressed genes in the genome. Conclusion The results presented are potentially of great interest to resume the currently

  18. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulec, Cagri, E-mail: cagri.gulec@gmail.com; Coban, Neslihan, E-mail: neslic@istanbul.edu.tr; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge, E-mail: ozsaitb@istanbul.edu.tr; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema, E-mail: semasirma@gmail.com; Yildirim, Ozlem, E-mail: ozlm-yildirim@hotmail.com; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan, E-mail: nihanerginel@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses.

  19. Effects of simvastatin on the development of the atrial fibrillation substrate in dogs with congestive heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Brundel, Blanca J. J. M.; Burstein, Brett; Leung, Tack-Ki; Mitamura, Hideo; Ogawa, Satoshi; Nattel, Stanley

    Background: Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a common cause of atrial fibrillation (AF). Oxidative stress and inflammation (profibrotic) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha, antifibrotic) factors may be involved in CHF-related remodeling. We evaluated the effects of

  20. Stochastic resonance in underdamped periodic potential systems with alpha stable Lévy noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruo-Nan; Kang, Yan-Mei

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of alpha stable Lévy noise with alpha stability index α (0 noise (0 noise has a more notable impact on the resonant effect of the asymmetric ratchet potential than that of the symmetric sinusoidal potential because of symmetry breaking.

  1. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist fenofibrate has no effect on insulin sensitivity compared to atorvastatin in type 2 diabetes mellitus; a randomised, double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, R Neil A; Ennis, Cieran N; Young, Ian S; Hunter, Steven J; Atkinson, A Brew; Bell, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Assess insulin sensitivity after treatment with a selective PPAR-alpha agonist compared to an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor in human subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Thirteen subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus were studied in a double-blind crossover design with 4-week placebo run-in and washout and 12-week treatment periods, randomised to micronised fenofibrate 267 mg or atorvastatin 10mg daily followed by the alternate drug in the second period. Insulin resistance was measured using the isoglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp method with isotope dilution. Weight, physical activity and other medications did not change. Total cholesterol (mean +/- standard error) was 4.60+/-0.21 versus 3.9+/-0.22 mmol/L after fenofibrate and atorvastatin respectively, p19 versus 1.95+/-0.23 mmol/L, p1.64+/-0.23 versus 1.84+/-0.26 mmol/L, pInsulin-stimulated whole-body glucose disposal (35.4+/-3.1 versus 33.2+/-3.0 μmol/kg/min) and nadir endogenous glucose production (6.2+/-1.4 versus 7.0+/-1.1 μmol/kg/min) revealed no significant differences in effects of the treatments. In human subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus there were characteristic differences in lipid profile changes but no difference in insulin sensitivity after treatment with micronised fenofibrate compared to atorvastatin. This study finds no evidence of increased insulin sensitivity using this selective PPAR-alpha agonist over a commonly used statin at these doses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular analysis of peroxisome proliferation in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Agharul I; Sims, Helen M; Horley, Neill J; Roberts, Ruth A; Tomlinson, Simon R; Salter, Andrew M; Bruce, Mary; Shaw, P Nicholas; Kendall, David; Barrett, David A; Bell, David R

    2004-05-15

    Three novel P450 members of the cytochrome P450 4A family were cloned as partial cDNAs from hamster liver, characterised as novel members of the CYP4A subfamily, and designated CYP4A17, 18, and 19. Hamsters were treated with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists, methylclofenapate (MCP) or Wy-14,643, and shown to develop hepatomegaly and induction of CYP4A17 RNA, and concomitant induction of lauric acid 12- hydroxylase. This treatment also resulted in hypolipidaemia, which was most pronounced in the VLDL fraction, with up to 50% reduction in VLDL-triglycerides; by contrast, blood cholesterol concentration was unaffected by this treatment. These data show that hamster is highly responsive to induction of CYP4A by peroxisome proliferators. To characterise the molecular basis of peroxisome proliferation, the hamster PPARalpha was cloned and shown to encode a 468-amino-acid protein, which is highly similar to rat and mouse PPARalpha proteins. The level of expression of hamster PPARalpha in liver is intermediate between mouse and guinea pig. These results fail to support the hypothesis that the level of PPARalpha in liver is directly responsible for species differences in peroxisome proliferation.

  3. S-matrix to potential inversion of low-energy. alpha. - sup 12 C phase shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, S.G.; Mackintosh, R.S. (Open Univ., Milton Keynes (UK). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-10-22

    The IP S-matrix to potential inversion procedure is applied to phase shifts for selected partial waves over a range of energies below the inelastic threshold for {alpha}-{sup 12}C scattering. The phase shifts were determined by Plaga et al. Potentials found by Buck and Rubio to fit the low-energy alpha cluster resonances need only an increased attraction in the surface to accurately reproduce the phase-shift behaviour. Substantial differences between the potentials for odd and even partial waves are necessary. The surface tail of the potential is postulated to be a threshold effect. (orig.).

  4. PPAR-alpha agonist treatment increases trefoil factor family-3 expression and attenuates apoptosis in the liver tissue of bile duct-ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakan, Tarkan; Kerem, Mustafa; Cindoruk, Mehmet; Engin, Doruk; Alper, Murat; Akın, Okan

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor alpha activation modulates cholesterol metabolism and suppresses bile acid synthesis. The trefoil factor family comprises mucin-associated proteins that increase the viscosity of mucins and help protect epithelial linings from insults. We evaluated the effect of short-term administration of fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferators activated receptor alpha agonist, on trefoil factor family-3 expression, degree of apoptosis, generation of free radicals, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the liver tissue of bile duct-ligated rats. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: 1 = sham operated, 2 = bile duct ligation, 3 = bile duct-ligated + vehicle (gum Arabic), and 4 = bile duct-ligated + fenofibrate (100 mg/kg/day). All rats were sacrificed on the 7 th day after obtaining blood samples and liver tissue. Liver function tests, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 1 beta in serum, and trefoil factor family-3 mRNA expression, degree of apoptosis (TUNEL) and tissue malondialdehyde (malondialdehyde, end-product of lipid peroxidation by reactive oxygen species) in liver tissue were evaluated. Fenofibrate administration significantly reduced serum total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1β levels. Apoptosis and malondialdehyde were significantly reduced in the fenofibrate group. Trefoil factor family-3 expression increased with fenofibrate treatment in bile duct-ligated rats. The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor alpha agonist fenofibrate significantly increased trefoil factor family-3 expression and decreased apoptosis and lipid peroxidation in the liver and attenuated serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines in bile duct-ligated rats. Further studies are needed to determine the protective role of fenofibrate in human cholestatic disorders.

  5. Analgesic properties of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) in visceral and inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suardíaz, Margarita; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Goicoechea, Carlos; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2007-12-15

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is a natural fatty acid amide that mainly modulates feeding and energy homeostasis by binding to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) [Rodríguez de Fonseca F, Navarro M, Gómez R, Escuredo L, Navas F, Fu J, et al. An anorexic lipid mediator regulated by feeding. Nature 2001;414:209-12; Fu J, Gaetani S, Oveisi F, Lo Verme J, Serrano A, Rodríguez de Fonseca F, et al. Oleoylethanolamide regulates feeding and body weight through activation of the nuclear receptor PPAR-alpha. Nature 2003;425:90-3]. Additionally, it has been proposed that OEA could act via other receptors, including the vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) [Wang X, Miyares RL, Ahern GP. Oleoylethanolamide excites vagal sensory neurones, induces visceral pain and reduces short-term food intake in mice via capsaicin receptor TRPV1. J Physiol 2005;564:541-7.] or the GPR119 receptor [Overton HA, Babbs AJ, Doel SM, Fyfe MC, Gardner LS, Griffin G, et al. Deorphanization of a G protein-coupled receptor for oleoylethanolamide and its use in the discovery of small-molecule hypophagic agents. Cell Metab 2006;3:167-175], suggesting that OEA might subserve other physiological roles, including pain perception. We have evaluated the effect of OEA in two types of nociceptive responses evoked by visceral and inflammatory pain in rodents. Our results suggest that OEA has analgesic properties reducing the nociceptive responses produced by administration of acetic acid and formalin in two experimental animal models. Additional research was performed to investigate the mechanisms underlying this analgesic effect. To this end, we evaluated the actions of OEA in mice null for the PPAR-alpha receptor gene and compared its actions with those of PPAR-alpha receptor wild-type animal. We also compared the effect of MK-801 in order to evaluate the role of NMDA receptor in this analgesia. Our data showed that OEA reduced visceral and inflammatory responses through a PPAR-alpha

  6. Postsynaptic alpha-adrenergic receptors potentiate the beta-adrenergic stimulation of pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, D C; Sugden, D; Weller, J L

    1983-01-01

    The role played by postsynaptic alpha-adrenergic receptors in the stimulation of pineal N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.5) and [3H]melatonin production was investigated in the rat. In vivo studies indicated that phenylephrine, an alpha-adrenergic agonist, potentiated and prolonged the effects of isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic agonist. Similar observations were made in organ culture with glands devoid of functional nerve endings. In addition, a combination of 1 microM prazosin, an alpha 1-adre...

  7. Potential antiradical and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors from Ecklonia maxima (Osbeck) Papenfuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Aderogba, Mutalib A; Amoo, Stephen O; Stirk, Wendy A; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-11-15

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors play a potential role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes by delaying glucose absorption in the small intestine. Ecklonia maxima, a brown alga which grows abundantly on the west coast of South Africa, is used to produce alginate, animal feed, nutritional supplements and fertilizer. The crude aqueous methanol extract, four solvent fractions and three phlorotannins: 1,3,5-trihydroxybenezene (phloroglucinol) (1), dibenzo [1,4] dioxine-2,4,7,9-tetraol (2) and hexahydroxyphenoxydibenzo [1,4] dioxine (eckol) (3) isolated from E. maxima were evaluated for antiradical and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities. All the phlorotannins tested had strong antioxidant activities on DPPH free radicals with EC50 values ranging from 0.008 to 0.128μM. Compounds 2 and 3 demonstrated stronger antioxidant activity and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitory property than positive controls. These results suggest that E. maxima could be a natural source of potent antioxidants and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. This study could facilitate effective utilization of E. maxima as an oral antidiabetic drug or functional food ingredient with a promising role in the formulation of medicines and nutrition supplements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. TENORM wastes and the potential alpha radiation dose to aquatic biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    In the years seventies release-rates and derived limits for releasing radionuclides into the environment were adopted for each particular radionuclide and for a number of pathways. The release-rate limit adopted for alpha emitters was 10 15 Bq.y -1 for a single site, but limited to 10 14 Bq.y -1 for 226 Ra and supported 210 Po. In addition, to meet the requirements of the London Convention, a derived limit should be expressed in terms of concentration, which for alpha emitters was 10 10 Bq.t -1 , but limited to 10 14 Bq.t -1 for 226 Ra and supported 210 Po, assuming an upper limit to the mass dumping rate of 10 5 t per year at a single dumping site. New data on the radioactivity in the marine environment and biota, including plankton, indicated a potential alpha radiation dose to these aquatic organisms due to the release of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) wastes. At the highest accumulation of 239 Pu in the zooplankton Gammarus in Thule, Greenland, due to an accidental release associated with military activities, the dose rate reached about 0.14 μGy.h -1 . Such dose rate was similar to that received by the phytoplankton Chaetoceros and Rhizosolenia from Agulhas current, Africa, due to naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) supposedly enhanced for almost one century of gold mining at first, and subsequently because of heap-leaching uranium extraction from the tailings left behind by earlier gold miners. The paper will discuss the alpha radiation dose to aquatic biota, in general, and to plankton, in particular, due to potential releases of TENORM wastes in the aquatic environment. (author)

  9. Functional characterisation of the human alpha1 glycine receptor in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we have created a stable HEK293 cell line expressing the human homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor (GlyR) and characterised its functional pharmacology in a conventional patch-clamp assay and in the FLIPR Membrane Potential (FMP) assay, a fluorescence-based high throughput scr...... not be suited for sophisticated studies of GlyR pharmacology and kinetics. However, the assay offers several advantages in studies of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, the assay could be highly useful in the search for structurally novel ligands acting at GlyRs.......In the present study, we have created a stable HEK293 cell line expressing the human homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor (GlyR) and characterised its functional pharmacology in a conventional patch-clamp assay and in the FLIPR Membrane Potential (FMP) assay, a fluorescence-based high throughput...... ion did not appear to potentiate GlyR function at lower concentrations. Analogously, whereas pregnenolone sulphate inhibited alpha1 GlyR function, the potentiation of alpha1 GlyR by pregnenolone in electrophysiological studies could not be reproduced in the assay. In conclusion, the FMP assay may...

  10. Alpha2-adrenoceptor modulation of long-term potentiation elicited in vivo in rat occipital cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondaca, Mauricio; Hernández, Alejandro; Pérez, Hernán; Valladares, Luis; Sierralta, Walter; Fernández, Victor; Soto-Moyano, Rubén

    2004-09-24

    Pretreatment with the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine (31.25, 62.5, or 125 microg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced long-term potentiation (LTP) elicited in vivo in the occipital cortex of anesthetized rats, whereas pretreatment with the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (0.133, 0.4, or 1.2 mg/kg, i.p.) increased neocortical LTP in a dose-dependent fashion. These effects could be related to the reported disruptive and facilitatory actions induced on memory formation by pretreatment with alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists, respectively.

  11. [G-protein potentiates the activation of TNF-alpha on calcium-activated potassium channel in ECV304].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L; Zheng, Y; Qu, J; Bao, G

    2000-06-01

    Observe the effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on calcium-activated potassium channel in ECV304 and the possible involvement of G-protein mediation in the action of TNF-alpha. Using the cell-attached configuration of patch clamp technique. (1) the activity of high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BKca) was recorded. Its conductance is (202.54 +/- 16.62) pS; (2) the activity of BKca was potentiated by 200 U/ml TNF-alpha; (3) G-protein would intensify this TNF-alpha activation. TNF-alpha acted on vascular endothelial cell ECV304 could rapidly activate the activity of BKca. Opening of BKca resulted in membrane hyper-polarization which could increase electro-chemical gradient for the resting Ca2+ influx and open leakage calcium channel, thus resting cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration could be elevated. G-protein may exert an important regulation in this process.

  12. Dynamic. cap alpha. -transfer polarisation potentials and the large angle scattering of /sup 16/O + /sup 28/Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, M S; Aleixo, A N; Canto, L F; Carrilho, P; Donangelo, R; Paula, L.S. de

    1987-07-01

    A closed expression is derived for the dynamic ..cap alpha..-transfer polarisation potential for heavy-ion elastic scattering. The back-angle angular distributions for the elastic scattering of /sup 16/O + /sup 28/Si obtained by adding this polarisation potential to the E-18 interaction are shown to be in good agreement with the data if an ..cap alpha..-transfer spectroscopic factor of 0.4 is used.

  13. PPAR-alpha agonists as novel antiepileptic drugs: preclinical findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Puligheddu

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are involved in seizure mechanisms. Hence, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy was the first idiopathic epilepsy linked with specific mutations in α4 or β2 nAChR subunit genes. These mutations confer gain of function to nAChRs by increasing sensitivity toward acetylcholine. Consistently, nicotine elicits seizures through nAChRs and mimics the excessive nAChR activation observed in animal models of the disease. Treatments aimed at reducing nicotinic inputs are sought as therapies for epilepsies where these receptors contribute to neuronal excitation and synchronization. Previous studies demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-α (PPARα, nuclear receptor transcription factors, suppress nicotine-induced behavioral and electrophysiological effects by modulating nAChRs containing β2 subunits. On these bases, we tested whether PPARα agonists were protective against nicotine-induced seizures. To this aim we utilized behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG experiments in C57BL/J6 mice and in vitro patch clamp recordings from mice and rats. Convulsive doses of nicotine evoked severe seizures and bursts of spike-waves discharges in ∼100% of mice. A single dose of the synthetic PPARα agonist WY14643 (WY, 80 mg/kg, i.p. or chronic administration of fenofibrate, clinically available for lipid metabolism disorders, in the diet (0.2% for 14 days significantly reduced or abolished behavioral and EEG expressions of nicotine-induced seizures. Acute WY effects were reverted by the PPARα antagonist MK886 (3 mg/kg, i.p.. Since neocortical networks are crucial in the generation of ictal activity and synchrony, we performed patch clamp recordings of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs from frontal cortex layer II/III pyramidal neurons. We found that both acute and chronic treatment with PPARα agonists abolished nicotine-induced sIPSC increases. PPARα within the CNS are key regulators of neuronal activity through modulation of nAChRs. These effects might be therapeutically exploited for idiopathic or genetically determined forms of epilepsy where nAChRs play a major role.

  14. A new barrier potential and alpha-decay half-lives of even–even nuclei in the 82⩽Z⩽92 regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanabadi, Hasan [Physics Department, Shahrood University of Technology, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Javadimanesh, ELham, E-mail: elham_javadimanesh89@yahoo.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Shahrood Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarrinkamar, Saber [Department of Basic Sciences, Garmsar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Garmsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The alpha-decay half-life in a nuclear reaction is mainly affected by the penetration probability, which itself depends on the choice of the barrier potential. Here, we propose a new barrier potential to investigate the alpha-decay half-lives in the even–even nuclei from {sup 178}Po to {sup 238}U. The obtained results are motivating.

  15. Soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain inhibits FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling and prevents nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Jiang, Yuan; An, Yuan; Zhao, Na; Zhao, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Yu, Chundong, E-mail: cdyu@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain (FGFR4-ECD) was effectively expressed. {yields} FGFR4-ECD inhibited FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling. {yields} FGFR4-ECD reduced palmitic acid-induced steatosis of HepG2 cells. {yields} FGFR4-ECD reduced tetracycline-induced fatty liver in mice. {yields} FGFR4-ECD partially restored tetracycline-repressed PPAR{alpha} expression. -- Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor that plays a crucial role in the regulation of hepatic bile acid and lipid metabolism. FGFR4 underlies high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis, suggesting that inhibition of FGFR4 activation may be an effective way to prevent or treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To determine whether neutralization of FGFR4 ligands by soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain (FGFR4-ECD) can inhibit the activation of FGFR4, we constructed FGFR4-ECD expression vector and showed that FGFR4-ECD was effectively expressed in cells and secreted into culture medium. FGFR4-ECD inhibited FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling and reduced steatosis of HepG2 induced by palmitic acid in vitro. Furthermore, in a tetracycline-induced fatty liver model, expression of FGFR4-ECD in mouse liver reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids and partially restored the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), which promotes the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation but is repressed by tetracycline. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FGFR4-ECD can block FGFR4 signaling and prevent hepatic steatosis, highlighting the potential value of inhibition of FGFR4 signaling as a method for therapeutic intervention against NAFLD.

  16. Contribution to the study of alpha-alpha interaction; Contribution a l'etude de l'interaction alpha - alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darriulai, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-03-01

    Two sets of measurements of the {alpha}-{alpha} elastic scattering differential cross section are presented. The first set - angular distributions from 50 up to 120 MeV - shows two new resonances, 6{sup +} and 8{sup +}, at 25 and 57 MeV. Complex phase shifts are extracted from the data and a phenomenological potential is given. A description of the 3 {alpha}-particle 0{sup +} states in C{sup 12} is made with this interaction potential. The second set - excitation curves between 20 and 50 MeV - allows investigation of the Be{sup 8} level structure within this energy range - It identifies the 16.6 and 16.9 MeV states as 2{sup +}, but the rise of inelastic processes at higher energies makes further identification of spins and parities more and more difficult. (author) [French] Deux series de mesures de la section efficace differentielle de diffusion {alpha}-{alpha} sont presentees. La premiere - distributions angulaires entre 50 et 120 MeV - fait apparaitre deux nouvelles resonances, 6{sup +} et 8{sup +}, a 25 et 57 MeV d'excitation. Des dephasages complexes en sont extraits et un potentiel phenomenologique est presente. Une etude des etats 0{sup +} a parentage (3{alpha}) de {sup 12}C est faite a partir de ce potentiel. La seconde - courbes d'excitation s'etendant de 20 a 50 MeV - met en evidence la structure de {sup 8}Be dans cette region. Elle montre que les niveaux a 16,6 et 16,9 MeV sont des 2{sup +} mais l'importance des processus inelastiques rend difficile l'identification des niveaux d'excitation plus elevee. (auteur)

  17. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Felicity EB, E-mail: F.E.B.May@ncl.ac.uk [Northern Institute for Cancer Research and Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-23

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  18. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  19. C595 antibody: A potential vector for targeted alpha therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Allen, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    experimental studies have concentrated on the targeted therapy of carcinoma of the prostate, pancreas and ovary. On 120 paraffin embedded specimens from patients who underwent radical retro-pubic prostatectomy or trans-urethralresection of the prostate for primary untreated carcinoma of the pancreas MUC1 expression was detected in 58% primary Ca prostate tissues and 90% lymph node metastases but not in normal prostates or benign tissues. The 213 Bi-C595 conjugate demonstrated cell killing in PC-3 and DU 145 cell lines isolated from human prostatic adenocarcinoma. Other results indicate that 213 Bi-C595 targeting efficacy is in accordance with the expression of MUC1 in three pancreatic cancer cell clusters CFPAC-1, PANC-1 and CAPAN-1 and demonstrated effective toxicity of tumour spheroids of up to 100 m in diameter. When administered to tumour bearing mice at 333 MBq/kg the c595 alpha conjugate caused significant tumour growth delay, compared with the non-specific control at after 16 weeks. Similar results have been obtained in monolayers and cell clusters of the ovarian OVCAR-3 cell line. We believe this antibody conjugate offers great potential for targeted alpha therapy of prostatic, pancreatic and ovarian tumours. (author)

  20. The heavy quarkonium spectrum at order $m\\alpha_{s}^{5}\\ln\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Brambilla, Nora; Soto, Joan; Vairo, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We compute the complete leading-log terms of the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order corrections to potential NRQCD. As a by-product we obtain the leading logs at $O(m\\alpha_s^5)$ in the heavy quarkonium spectrum. These leading logs, when $\\Lambda_{QCD} \\ll m\\alpha_s^2$, give the complete $O(m\\alpha_s^5 \\ln \\alpha_s)$ corrections to the heavy quarkonium spectrum.

  1. Effects of lipid-lowering pharmaceuticals bezafibrate and clofibric acid on lipid metabolism in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Anna; Caminada, Daniel; Galicia, Hector; Fent, Karl

    2009-12-01

    The lipid-lowering agents bezafibrate and clofibric acid, which occur at concentrations up to 3.1 and 1.6 microg/L, respectively, are among the most frequently found human pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. In contrast to knowledge about their environmental occurrence, little is known about their effects in the environment. The aim of the present study was to analyze effects of these lipid-lowering agents in fish by focusing on their modes of action, lipid metabolism. Fathead minnows were exposed in aquaria to measured concentrations of 0.1, 1.27, 10.18, 101.56, and 106.7 mg/L bezafibrate and to 1.07, 10.75, and 108.91 mg/L clofibric acid for 14 and 21 d, respectively. After exposure, fish liver was analyzed for expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the PPAR-regulated enzyme fatty acyl-coenzyme-A oxidase (FAO) involved in fatty acid oxidation. Bezafibrate had no effect, either on PPARalpha expression or on FAO activity, at all concentrations. In contrast, clofibric acid induced FAO activity in male fathead minnows at 108.91 mg/L. No increase in expression of PPARalpha messenger ribonucleic acid was observed. Egg production was apparently decreased after 21 d of exposure to 108.91 mg/L clofibric acid. The present study demonstrates that bezafibrate has very little or no effect on PPARalpha expression and FAO activity, but clofibric acid affects FAO activity.

  2. Phytanic acid-an overlooked bioactive fatty acid in dairy fat?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    dissipation in skeletal muscles. Phytanic acid levels in serum are associated with an increased risk of developing prostate cancer, but the available data do not support a general causal link between circulating phytanic acid and prostate cancer risk. However, certain individuals, with specific single......Phytanic acid is a multibranched fatty acid with reported retinoid X receptor (RXR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) agonist activity, which have been suggested to have preventive effects on metabolic dysfunctions. Serum level in man is strongly correlated...

  3. Modulation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid channel TRPV4 by 4alpha-phorbol esters: a structure-activity study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Pagani, Alberto; Minassi, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channel by 4alpha-phorbol esters was investigated by combining information from chemical modification of 4alpha-phorbol-didecanoate (4alpha-PDD, 2a), site-directed mutagenesis, Ca(2+) imaging, and electrophysiology....... Binding of 4alpha-phorbol esters occurs in a loop in the TM3-TM4 domain of TRPV4 that is analogous to the capsaicin binding site of TRPV1, and the ester decoration of ring C and the A,B ring junction are critical for activity. The lipophilic ester groups on ring C serve mainly as a steering element...

  4. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  5. Nuclear structure approach to the calculation of the imaginary alpha-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermawan, H.; Osterfeld, F.; Madsen, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    A microscopic calculation of the second-order imaginary optical potential for 40 (Ca(α,α) is made for incident energies of 31 and 100 MeV using RPA transition densities for intermediate excited states. The projectile is treated as an elementary particle, and the alpha-nucleon interaction is normalized by fitting 3 - inelastic cross sections with a folded M3Y potential. The use of an optical Green's function for the intermediate propagator is found to be important. Equivalent local potentials are obtained and used to calculate elastic scattering cross sections. Agreement with low-angle experimental data is fair at 31 MeV, but at 100 MeV the calculated cross sections indicate much too little absorption. 9 figures, 1 table

  6. Targeted Alpha Therapy: From Alpha to Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Barry J; Clarke, Raymond; Huang Chenyu

    2013-01-01

    This review covers the broad spectrum of Targeted Alpha Therapy (TAT) research in Australia; from in vitro and in vivo studies to clinical trials. The principle of tumour anti-vascular alpha therapy (TAVAT) is discussed in terms of its validation by Monte Carlo calculations of vascular models and the potential role of biological dosimetry is examined. Summmary of this review is as follows: 1. The essence of TAT 2. Therapeutic objectives 3. TAVAT and Monte Carlo microdosimetry 4. Biological dosimetry 5. Preclinical studies 6. Clinical trials 7. What next? 8. Obstacles. (author)

  7. Potential late-onset Alzheimer's disease-associated mutations in the ADAM10 gene attenuate {alpha}-secretase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Suh, Jaehong; Romano, Donna; Truong, Mimy H; Mullin, Kristina; Hooli, Basavaraj; Norton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Elliott, Kathy; Wagner, Steven L; Moir, Robert D; Becker, K David; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2009-10-15

    ADAM10, a member of a disintegrin and metalloprotease family, is an alpha-secretase capable of anti-amyloidogenic proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein. Here, we present evidence for genetic association of ADAM10 with Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as two rare potentially disease-associated non-synonymous mutations, Q170H and R181G, in the ADAM10 prodomain. These mutations were found in 11 of 16 affected individuals (average onset age 69.5 years) from seven late-onset AD families. Each mutation was also found in one unaffected subject implying incomplete penetrance. Functionally, both mutations significantly attenuated alpha-secretase activity of ADAM10 (>70% decrease), and elevated Abeta levels (1.5-3.5-fold) in cell-based studies. In summary, we provide the first evidence of ADAM10 as a candidate AD susceptibility gene, and report two potentially pathogenic mutations with incomplete penetrance for late-onset familial AD.

  8. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ( 211 At) and natural bismuth-212 ( 212 Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ( 223 Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs

  9. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  10. Use of studies with laboratory animals to assess the potential early health effects of combined internal alpha and beta irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Guilmette, R.A.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Boecker, B.B.; McClellan, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    The potential health impacts of radionuclides released in nuclear accidents are of major concern to the public and to regulatory and other governmental agencies. One mode of potential exposure is by inhalation of airborne radionuclides, which could lead to combined internal irradiation by high (alpha) and low (beta) linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. Epidemiological data for health effects of human inhalation exposure are too limited to derive reliable estimates of risks of potential health effects. However, results of studies in which beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to insoluble radioactive aerosols can be used to estimate expected effects in humans. Data for mortality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis caused by internal irradiation of dog lungs by alpha or beta radiations are used to derive the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha irradiation compared to beta irradiation; predict the expected combined effects of alpha and beta irradiation of dog lungs; and extrapolate the results to humans. The extrapolation to humans assumed that, for similar ages at exposure, dog and human lungs have similar sensitivities to lung irradiation. Results of theoretical calculations related to mortality from early effects indicated that the synergistic effects of high- and low-LET radiations should depend on the percentages of the total dose contributed by high- and low-LET radiations, and for very low or very high doses, synergistic effects should be negligible. 23 refs., 8 figs

  11. Chemical synthesis of a dual branched malto-decaose: A potential substrate for alpha-amylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damager, Iben; Jensen, Morten; Olsen, Carl Erik

    2005-01-01

    A convergent block strategy for general use in efficient synthesis of complex alpha-(1 -> 4)- and alpha-(1 -> 6)-malto-oligosaccharides is demonstrated with the first chemical synthesis of a malto-oligosaccharide, the decasoccharide 6,6""-bis(alpha-maltosyl)-maltohexaose, with two branch points....... Using this chemically defined branched oligosaccharide as a substrate, the cleavage pattern of seven different alpha-amylases were investigated. alpha-Amylases from human saliva, porcine pancreas, barley alpha-amylose 2 and recombinant barley alpha-amylase 1 all hydrolysed the decasaccharide selectively....... This resulted in a branched hexasaccharide and a branched tetrasoccharide. alpha-Amylases from Asperagillus oryzae, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus sp. cleaved the decasoccharide at two distinct sites, either producing two branched pentasoccharides, or a branched hexasoccharide and a branched...

  12. Expression of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin by squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas: possible relation to invasive potential?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, K; Dahlstrøm, K K; Mercurio, A M

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the expression of alpha 6 beta 4 integrin, a carcinoma laminin receptor in ten squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and ten basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) of the skin in order to examine whether changes in alpha 6 beta 4 integrin expression may be related to invasive and metastatic...... potential. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each subunit were applied on cryosections, using a three step indirect peroxidase technique. In normal epidermis the basal cells expressed both the alpha 6 and the beta 4 subunits, and the expression was polarized against the basement membrane. In SCCs...

  13. Analyses of Alpha-Alpha Elastic Scattering Data in the Energy Range 140 - 280 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehadeh, Zuhair F. [Taif University, Taif (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    The differential and the reaction cross-sections for 4He-4He elastic scattering data have been nicely obtained at four energies ranging from 140 MeV to 280 MeV (lab system), namely, 140, 160, 198 and 280 MeV, by using a new optical potential with a short-range repulsive core. The treatment has been handled relativistically as υ/c > 0.25 for the two lower energies and υ/c > 0.31 for the two higher ones. In addition to explaining the elastic angular distributions, the adopted potentials accounted for the structure that may exist at angles close to 90◦ , especially for the 198 and the 280-MeV incident energies. No renormalization has been used, and all our potential parameters are new. The necessity of including a short-range repulsive potential term in our real nuclear potential part has been demonstrated. Our results contribute to solving a long-standing problem concerning the nature of the alpha-alpha potential. This is very beneficial in explaining unknown alpha-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus relativistic reactions by using the cluster formalism.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-alpha and gamma are targets to treat offspring from maternal diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Angelo Carlo Magliano

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARalpha and PPARgamma by Bezafibrate (BZ could attenuate hepatic and white adipose tissue (WAT abnormalities in male offspring from diet-induced obese dams. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C57BL/6 female mice were fed a standard chow (SC; 10% lipids diet or a high-fat (HF; 49% lipids diet for 8 weeks before mating and during gestation and lactation periods. Male offspring received SC diet at weaning and were subdivided into four groups: SC, SC/BZ, HF and HF/BZ. Treatment with BZ (100 mg/Kg diet started at 12 weeks of age and was maintained for three weeks. RESULTS: The HF diet resulted in an overweight phenotype and an increase in oral glucose intolerance and fasting glucose of dams. The HF offspring showed increased body mass, higher levels of plasmatic and hepatic triglycerides, higher levels of pro-inflammatory and lower levels of anti-inflammatory adipokines, impairment of glucose metabolism, abnormal fat pad mass distribution, higher number of larger adipocytes, hepatic steatosis, higher expression of lipogenic proteins concomitant to decreased expression of PPARalpha and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1 in liver, and diminished expression of PPARgamma and adiponectin in WAT. Treatment with BZ ameliorated the hepatic and WAT abnormalities generated by diet-induced maternal obesity, with improvements observed in the structural, biochemical and molecular characteristics of the animals' livers and epididymal fat. CONCLUSION: Diet-induced maternal obesity lead to alterations in metabolism, hepatic lipotoxicity and adverse liver and WAT remodeling in the offspring. Targeting PPAR with Bezafibrate has beneficial effects reducing the alterations, mainly through reduction of WAT inflammatory state through PPARgamma activation and enhanced hepatic beta-oxidation due to increased PPARalpha/PPARgamma ratio in liver.

  15. Alpha clustering in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nucleon clustering in nuclei are described, with reference to both nuclear structure and nuclear reactions, and the advantages of using the cluster formalism to describe a range of phenomena are discussed. It is shown that bound and scattering alpha-particle states can be described in a unified way using an energy-dependent alpha-nucleus potential. (author)

  16. Dynamical chaos in a linear 3. alpha. system. Dinamicheskij khaos v linejnoj 3. alpha. -sisteme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotin, Yu L; Gonchar, V Yu; Chekanov, N A [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov (Ukrainian SSR). Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.; Vinitskij, S I [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR)

    1989-01-01

    Classical dynamics of the motion of a molecular model of the carbon nucleus, which is a linear 3{alpha} system with realistic {alpha}{alpha} interaction is studied. Transition from a regular to a chaos motion in the nuclear molecule is shown to occur with growing energy more rapidly than in model problems with polynomial potentials. It is found that in a small region of the phase space the motion remains regular at energies higher than the 3{alpha}-system dissociation threshold. This is probably related to the C{sub 3v}-symmetry violation. Formulas for the quasiclassical spectrum of the 3{alpha} system are obtained with the use of the Birkhoff normal form.

  17. High-fat feeding in cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARdelta knockout mice leads to cardiac overexpression of lipid metabolic genes but fails to rescue cardiac phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuquan; Cheng, Lihong; Qin, Qianhong; Liu, Jian; Lo, Woo-kuen; Brako, Lowrence A; Yang, Qinglin

    2009-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta) is an essential determinant of basal myocardial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and bioenergetics. We wished to determine whether increased lipid loading affects the PPARdelta deficient heart in transcriptional regulation of FAO and in the development of cardiac pathology. Cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARdelta knockout (CR-PPARdelta(-/-)) and control (alpha-MyHC-Cre) mice were subjected to 48 h of fasting and to a long-term maintenance on a (28 weeks) high-fat diet (HFD). The expression of key FAO proteins in heart was examined. Serum lipid profiles, cardiac pathology, and changes of various transduction signaling pathways were also examined. Mice subjected to fasting exhibited upregulated transcript expression of FAO genes in the CR-PPARdelta(-/-) hearts. Moreover, long-term HFD in CR-PPARdelta(-/-) mice induced a strikingly greater transcriptional response. After HFD, genes encoding key FAO enzymes were expressed remarkably more in CR-PPARdelta(-/-) hearts than in those of control mice. Despite the marked rise of FAO gene expression, corresponding protein expression remained low in the CR-PPARdelta(-/-) heart, accompanied by abnormalities in sarcomere structures and mitochondria that were similar to those of CR-PPARdelta(-/-) hearts with regular chow feeding. The CR-PPARdelta(-/-) mice displayed increased expression of PPARgamma co-activator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and PPARalpha in the heart with deactivated Akt and p42/44 MAPK signaling in response to HFD. We conclude that PPARdelta is an essential determinant of myocardial FAO. Increased lipid intake activates cardiac expression of FAO genes via PPARalpha/PGC-1alpha pathway, albeit it is not sufficient to improve cardiac pathology due to PPARdelta deficiency.

  18. Alpha-decay within Feshbach theory of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandulescu, A.; Silisteanu, I.; Wunsch, R.

    1977-01-01

    In the frame of Feshbach theory of nuclear reactions the alpha-decay widths are determined by the alpha-daughter nucleus optical potential and by the formation factors. It is shown that the calculated absolute values of the alpha widths for Po light isotopes are in good agreement with experimental data, if the real part of the optical potential with the parameters fitted by the low energy α-scattering is used

  19. Alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line; Stensland, Hilde Monica Frostad Riise; Olsen, Klaus Juul

    2015-01-01

    of the three subgroups of genotype/subcellular localisation and the clinical and biochemical data were done to investigate the potential relationship between genotype and phenotype in alpha-mannosidosis. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS software. Analyses of covariance were performed...

  20. A survey of the alpha-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.; Ahmad, A.A.Z.; Ferdous, N.

    1984-10-01

    A survey of the alpha-nucleon interaction is made. The experimental work on angular distributions of differential scattering cross-sections and polarizations in proton-alpha and neutron-alpha scattering is described. The phenomenological approach which includes the study of both local and non-local potentials reproducing the experimental alpha-nucleon scattering data, is discussed. Basic studies of the alpha-nucleon interaction attempting to build an interaction between an alpha particle and a nucleon from first principles are then described. A critical discussion of the results with some concluding remarks suggesting the direction for further investigation is made. (author)

  1. Efficacy of gemfibrozil in the primary prevention of atrial fibrillation in a large randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabag, A Selcuk; Mithani, Salima; Al Aloul, Basel; Collins, Dorothea; Bertog, Stefan; Bloomfield, Hanna E

    2009-05-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) activators reduce inflammation and oxidative stress. Inflammation plays an important role in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). It has been suggested that PPARalpha activators may have antiarrhythmic properties, but no clinical data exist. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the PPARalpha activator gemfibrozil prevents or delays the development of AF in patients with coronary heart disease. We retrospectively analyzed the electrocardiograms (ECGs) performed in the Veterans Affairs High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Intervention Trial, a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, secondary prevention trial of gemfibrozil and matching placebo. The ECGs were performed annually or biannually and when clinically indicated. Participants who were in AF on baseline ECG were excluded from the present analysis. Relative risk for AF was calculated from Cox regression with death as a competing risk factor. A total of 12,605 ECGs from 2,130 participants were interpreted (5.9 +/- 2.1 ECGs per participant, range 2-20). At baseline, the gemfibrozil (n = 1,070) and placebo (n = 1,060) groups were well matched. Mean age was 64.1 +/- 7.1 years. Over 4.4 +/- 1.5 years of follow-up, 123 (5.8%) participants developed new AF. There was no difference in AF incidence between the gemfibrozil and placebo groups (64/1,070 vs 59/1,060, respectively; P = .33). In Cox regression, the risk of AF was similar between the 2 study groups (hazard ratio 1.04, 95% CI 0.73-1.49, P = .82). In this post hoc analysis of a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial, the PPARalpha activator gemfibrozil did not reduce the 4-year incidence of AF among men with coronary heart disease.

  2. Radial-velocity variations in Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco, and Alpha Her

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.A.; Patten, B.M.; Goldberg, L.

    1989-01-01

    Radial-velocity observations of Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco A, and Alpha Her A are used to study radial-velocity periodicities in M supergiants. The data refer to several metallic lines in the H-alpha region and to H-alpha itself. It is shown that Alpha Ori and Alpha Sco A have cycle lengths of about 1 yr and semiamplitudes of 2 km/s. It is suggested that many semiregular red supergiant varibles such as Alpha Ori may be heading toward chaos. All three stars show short-term stochastic flucutations with an amplitude of 1-2 km/s. It is found that the long-term variability of H-alpha velocities may be a consequence of intermittent failed ejections. 58 refs

  3. Long-range alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Historically, alpha-particle and alpha-contamination detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity even if the particles are intercepted. Alpha detectors have had to be operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. Alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of ∼30,000 ion pairs per mega-electron-volt of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) offers several advantages over more traditional alpha detectors. First and foremost, it can operate efficiently even if the contamination is not easily accessible. Second, ions generated by contamination in crevices and other unmonitorable locations can be detected if the airflow penetrates those areas. Third, all of the contamination on a large surface will generate ions that can be detected in a single detector; hence, the detector's sensitivity to distributed sources is not limited by the size of the probe. Finally, a simple ion chamber can detect very small electric currents, making this technique potentially quite sensitive

  4. A GH57 4-alpha-glucanotransferase of hyperthermophilic origin with potential for alkyl glycoside production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Catherine J.; Leemhuis, Hans; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Grey, Carl; Onnby, Linda; van Leeuwen, Sander S.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    4-alpha-Glucanotransferase (GTase) enzymes (EC 2.4.1.25) modulate the size of alpha-glucans by cleaving and reforming alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds in alpha-glucans, an essential process in starch and glycogen metabolism in plants and microorganisms. The glycoside hydrolase family 57 enzyme (GTase57)

  5. The alpha channeling effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  6. Calculation of subLAMBDA sup 9 Be in an alpha-alpha-LAMBDA three-body model using the Faddeev equations

    CERN Document Server

    Oryu, S; Yamashita, H; Nakazawa, M; Kamada, H

    2000-01-01

    The hypernucleus subLAMBDA sup 9 Be is investigated in an alpha-alpha-LAMBDA three-body model using the Faddeev formalism. We use an alpha-alpha interaction in which the Pauli-forbidden states are correctly taken into account and we employ some phenomenological potentials between the alpha and LAMBDA particles. We obtained two bound states for J suppi = 1/2 sup + and 3/2 sup + , and three resonance states of (3/2) sub 1 sup - , (3/2) sub 2 sup - , (3/2) sub 3 sup -. We studied the properties of these states by calculating the components and the expectation values of the potential for each partial wave. It is found that a few channels dominate in the 1/2 sup + and 3/2 sup + states, so that the alpha-clusters or the sup 8 Be core are still alive in the nucleus. In a case were the two alpha particles are fixed on an axis the contour plots of the distribution of the LAMBDA particle are shown. With the assistence of these plots one can visually understand that some of them are shell-model-like states while others ...

  7. Leptin potentiates Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of TNF-alpha in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jo

    2010-06-01

    In addition to regulating body weight, leptin is also recognized for its role in the regulation of immune function and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of leptin on Prevotella (P.) intermedia lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production in differentiated THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line. LPS from P. intermedia ATCC 25611 was prepared by the standard hot phenol-water method. THP-1 cells were incubated in the medium supplemented with phorbol myristate acetate to induce differentiation into macrophage-like cells. The amount of TNF-alpha and interleukin-8 secreted into the culture medium was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). TNF-alpha and Ob-R mRNA expression levels were determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Leptin enhanced P. intermedia LPS-induced TNF-alpha production in a dose-dependent manner. Leptin modulated P. intermedia LPS-induced TNF-alpha expression predominantly at the transcriptional level. Effect of leptin on P. intermedia LPS-induced TNF-alpha production was not mediated by the leptin receptor. The ability of leptin to enhance P. intermedia LPS-induced TNF-alpha production may be important in the establishment of chronic lesion accompanied by osseous tissue destruction observed in inflammatory periodontal disease.

  8. Alpha heating in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    Ignition (or near-ignition) by alpha heating is a key objective for the achievement of economic fusion reactors. While good confinement of high-energy alphas appears possible in larger reactors, near-term tokamak-type ignition experiments as well as some concepts for small reactors (e.g., the Field-Reversed Mirror or FRM) potentially face marginal situations. Consequently, there is a strong motivation to develop methods to evaluate alpha losses and heating profiles in some detail. Such studies for a TFTR-size tokamak and for a small FRM are described here

  9. Alpha-1 antitrypsin: a potent anti-inflammatory and potential novel therapeutic agent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2012-04-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) has long been thought of as an important anti-protease in the lung where it is known to decrease the destructive effects of major proteases such as neutrophil elastase. In recent years, the perception of this protein in this simple one dimensional capacity as an anti-protease has evolved and it is now recognised that AAT has significant anti-inflammatory properties affecting a wide range of inflammatory cells, leading to its potential therapeutic use in a number of important diseases. This present review aims to discuss the described anti-inflammatory actions of AAT in modulating key immune cell functions, delineate known signalling pathways and specifically to identify the models of disease in which AAT has been shown to be effective as a therapy.

  10. Generation, characterization and therapeutic potential of anti-feline TNF-alpha MAbs for feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Nishiyama, Yuri; Nakamura, Michiyo; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2013-12-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a lethal infectious disease affecting domestic and wild cats. Several reports suggested that TNF-alpha is related to the progression of FIP. Thus, the administration of a feline TNF-alpha-neutralizing antibody to cats with FIP may reduce the disease progression. In this study, we have prepared nine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize feline TNF-alpha. All MAbs neutralized recombinant TNF-alpha. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of the MAbs for the cytotoxicity of recombinant TNF-alpha were 5-684 ng/ml. MAb 2-4 exhibited high neutralizing activity against natural TNF-alpha derived from FIPV-infected macrophages, and was confirmed to inhibit the following feline TNF-alpha-induced conditions in vitro: (i) an increase in the survival rate of neutrophils from cats with FIP, (ii) aminopeptidase N (APN) mRNA expression in macrophages, and (iii) apoptosis of a feline T-lymphocyte cell line. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alpha-induced instabilities in tandem thermal barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammash, T.; Galbraith, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    A major premise in the operation of Tandem Mirror reactors is that the fusion reactions take place in the central cell only. The alpha particles generated by the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) fusions, along with other ions, will however pass from the central cell to the thermal barriers and return to the central cell as a result of reflection by the potential hills that exist by the plugs' side of these barriers. This streaming motion gives rise to electrostatic and electomagnetic instabilities which could detract from the barrier's function as a thermal insulator. The number density and streaming velocity of these passing particles are dictated by the electrostatic potential variation and the magnetic field structure in these regions. It is shown that, in the absence of alphas, barriers with deep potential depression are less susceptible to electrostatic instabilities while particularly vulnerable to unstable electromagnetic modes. In the presence of alphas, especially the fast alphas whose mean energy is significantly larger than the barrier potentials they see, (which is twice as high as that seen by the ions) both types of modes become unstable.

  12. Metabolic adaptation to intermittent fasting is independent of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolin Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA is a major regulator of fatty acid oxidation and severe hepatic steatosis occurs during acute fasting in Ppara-null mice. Thus, PPARA is considered an important mediator of the fasting response; however, its role in other fasting regiments such as every-other-day fasting (EODF has not been investigated. Methods: Mice were pre-conditioned using either a diet containing the potent PPARA agonist Wy-14643 or an EODF regimen prior to acute fasting. Ppara-null mice were used to assess the contribution of PPARA activation during the metabolic response to EODF. Livers were collected for histological, biochemical, qRT-PCR, and Western blot analysis. Results: Acute fasting activated PPARA and led to steatosis, whereas EODF protected against fasting-induced hepatic steatosis without affecting PPARA signaling. In contrast, pretreatment with Wy-14,643 did activate PPARA signaling but did not ameliorate acute fasting-induced steatosis and unexpectedly promoted liver injury. Ppara ablation exacerbated acute fasting-induced hypoglycemia, hepatic steatosis, and liver injury in mice, whereas these detrimental effects were absent in response to EODF, which promoted PPARA-independent fatty acid metabolism and normalized serum lipids. Conclusions: These findings indicate that PPARA activation prior to acute fasting cannot ameliorate fasting-induced hepatic steatosis, whereas EODF induced metabolic adaptations to protect against fasting-induced steatosis without altering PPARA signaling. Therefore, PPARA activation does not mediate the metabolic adaptation to fasting, at least in preventing acute fasting-induced steatosis. Keywords: PPARA, PPARalpha, Intermittent fasting, Every-other-day fasting, Steatosis, Adaptive fasting response

  13. Comprehensive analysis of PPARa-dependent regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism by expression profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Sanderson-Kjellberg, L.M.; Matilainen, Merja; Stienstra, Rinke; Carlberg, Carsten; Groot, de Philip; Muller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2007-01-01

    PPARalpha is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of nutrient metabolism and inflammation. Although much is already known about the function of PPARalpha in hepatic lipid metabolism, many PPARalpha-dependent pathways and genes have yet to be discovered. In order to

  14. E-PERM alpha surface monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, V.

    1999-01-01

    Innovative Technology Summary Reports are designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They are also designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users. Each report describes a technology, system, or process that has been developed and tested with funding from DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST). The E-PERMreg s ign Alpha Surface Monitor is an integrating electret ion chamber innovative technology used to measure alpha radiation on surfaces of materials. The technology is best used on surfaces with low contamination levels such as areas with potential for free release, but can also be used in areas with higher levels of contamination. Measurement accuracy and production of the E-PERM reg s ign Alpha Surface Monitor compared favorably with the baseline technology. The innovative technology cost is approximately 28% higher than the baseline with an average unit cost per reading costing %6.04 vs. $4.36; however, the flexibility of the E-PERMreg s ign Alpha Surface Monitor may offer advantages in ALARA, reduction of operator error, waste minimization, and measurement accuracy

  15. Treatment of alpha bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report deals with the current state of the art of alpha waste treatment, which is an integral part of the overall nuclear waste management system. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) defines alpha bearing waste as 'waste containing one or more alpha emitting radionuclides, usually actinides, in quantities above acceptable limits'. The limits are established by national regulatory bodies. The limits above which wastes are considered as alpha contaminated refer to the concentrations of alpha emitters that need special consideration for occupational exposures and/or potential safety, health, or environmental impact during one or more steps from generation through disposal. Owing to the widespread use of waste segregation by source - that is, based upon the 'suspect origin' of the material - significant volumes of waste are being handled as alpha contaminated which, in fact, do not require such consideration by reason of risk or environmental concern. The quantification of de minimis concepts by national regulatory bodies could largely contribute to the safe reduction of waste volumes and associated costs. Other factors which could significantly contribute to the reduction of alpha waste arisings are an increased application of assaying and sorting, instrumentation and the use of feedback mechanisms to control or modify the processes which generate these wastes. Alpha bearing wastes are generated during fabrication and reprocessing of nuclear fuels, decommissioning of alpha contaminated facilities, and other activities. Most alpha wastes are contact handled, but a small portion may require shielding or remote handling because of high levels of neutron (n), beta (β), or gamma (γ) emissions associated with the waste material. This report describes the sources and characteristics of alpha wastes and strategies for alpha waste management. General descriptions of treatment processes for solid and liquid alpha wastes are included. 71 refs, 14 figs, 9 tabs

  16. New developments in JET neutron, alpha particle and fuel mixture diagnostics with potential relevance to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murari, A.; Bertalot, L.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Ericsson, G.; Conroy, S.; Kaellne, J.; Kiptily, V.; Popovichev, S.; Adams, J.M.; Stork, D.; Afanasyiev, V.; Mironov, M.; Bonheure, G.

    2005-01-01

    Some recent JET campaigns, with the introduction of trace amount (n T /n D 4 He, provided unique opportunities to test new diagnostic approaches and technologies for the detection of neutrons, alpha particles and fuel mixture. With regard to neutron detection, the recent activity covered all the most essential aspects: calibration and cross validation of the diagnostics, measurement of the spatial distribution of the neutrons, particle transport and finally neutron spectrometry. The first tests of some new neutron detection technologies were also undertaken successfully during the TTE campaign. To improve JET diagnostic capability in the field of alpha particles, a strong development program was devoted to the measurement of their slowing down and imaging with gamma ray spectroscopy. A new approach for the fusion community to measure the fast ion losses, based on the activation technique, was also successfully attempted for the first time on JET. A careful assessment of the NPA potential to determine the fuel mixture and the particle transport coefficients is under way. (author)

  17. DT results of TFTR's alpha collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, H.W.; Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Timberlake, J.R.; Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase to complement the results of the lost alpha scintillator detectors which have been operating on TFTR since 1988. Measurements of the energy distribution of escaping alphas have been made by measuring the range of alphas implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Exposed samples have been analyzed for 4 DT plasma discharges at plasma currents of 1.0 and 1.8 MA. The results at 1.0 MA are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss at 3.5 MeV. The 1.8 MA results, however, indicate a large anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas at an energy ∼30% below the birth energy and at a total fluence nearly an order of magnitude above expected first orbit loss. This anomalous loss is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. Several potential explanations for this loss process are examined. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations

  18. In vitro anti-proliferative effect of interferon alpha in solid tumors: A potential predicative test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchsberger, N.; Kubes, M.; Kontsek, P.; Borecky, L.; Hornak, M.; Silvanova; Godal, A.; Svec, J.

    1993-01-01

    An in vitro test for the anti-proliferative effect of human leukocyte interferon (IFN-alpha) was performed in primary cultures of tumor cells obtained from 32 patients with either malignant melanoma (13), renal carcinoma (4) or bladder carcinoma (15). Our results demonstrated activity of IFN in all three groups of solid tumors. However, appreciable differences in sensitivity to anti-proliferative effect of IFN between individual tumors of the same type were found. The potential of this anti-proliferative test for prediction of treatment response in IFN-therapy is discussed. (author)

  19. Alpha decay and nuclear deformation: the case for favoured alpha transitions of even-even emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, F.; Goncalves, M.; Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.

    2000-02-01

    Alpha-decay half-life for ground-state transitions of 174 even-even alpha emitters has been calculated from a simple, Gamow-like model in which the quadrupole deformation of the product nucleus (assumed to have an ellipsoidal shape) is taken into account. The assumption made is that before tunneling through a purely Coulomb potential barrier the two-body system oscillates isotropically, thus giving rise to an equivalent, average polar direction θ (referred to the symmetry axis of the ellipsoid) for alpha emission. It is shown that the experimental half-life data are much better reproduced by the present description than in the spherical-shaped approximation for the daughter nucleus. (author)

  20. Alpha decay and nuclear deformation: the case for favoured alpha transitions of even-even emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Rodriguez, O.; Guzman, F. [Instituto Superior de Ciencias y Tecnologia Nucleares (ISCTN), La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E-mail: sbd@cbpf.br

    2000-02-01

    Alpha-decay half-life for ground-state transitions of 174 even-even alpha emitters has been calculated from a simple, Gamow-like model in which the quadrupole deformation of the product nucleus (assumed to have an ellipsoidal shape) is taken into account. The assumption made is that before tunneling through a purely Coulomb potential barrier the two-body system oscillates isotropically, thus giving rise to an equivalent, average polar direction {theta} (referred to the symmetry axis of the ellipsoid) for alpha emission. It is shown that the experimental half-life data are much better reproduced by the present description than in the spherical-shaped approximation for the daughter nucleus. (author)

  1. [Anti-TNF alpha in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahe, E; Descamps, V

    2002-12-01

    The discovery of the major role of TNF alpha in the physiopathology of certain inflammatory diseases and notably in rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease has led to the development of anti-TNF alpha drugs. These new therapeutic arms issued from bio-technology have rapidly demonstrated their efficacy in the treatment of these two diseases. The anti-TNF alpha arsenal is currently dominated by etanercept, a fusion protein composed of a soluble TNF alpha receptor, and infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody. However, new molecules will soon enrich this arsenal. TNF alpha is a major cytokine of inflammatory diseases of the skin. Many dermatological diseases will probably benefit from these new treatments. Two studies have already demonstrated their interest in cutaneous and articular psoriasis. Encouraging sporadic results suggest other potential indications (Behcet's disease, bullous dermatitis, neutrophilic dermatitis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, systemic vascularitis,.). These promising new treatments, although expensive, and with yet unknown long term side effects, justify rigorous assessment of their efficacy and tolerance in each indication. Here again the dermatologist has a major role to play in post-marketing pharmacovigilance.

  2. Development of methodology for detection of long lived alpha emitters in air based on simultaneous alpha and beta activity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Vivek; Rath, D.P.; Vinayagami, Bhakti; Ashokkumar, P.; Umashankar, C.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Kulkarni, M.S.

    2018-01-01

    Interference of the radon and thoron progeny co-deposited on the filtration media is the long-standing problem related to prompt analyses in continuous air sampling or monitoring of any potential suspect radionuclides. The solutions to this problem have been quite diverse, and included, for example, simple gross-alpha counting, the use of beta-to-alpha ratios, and the use of alpha spectrum analyses. The techniques based on beta to alpha disintegration ratios make use of the naturally occurring alpha to beta disintegration ratios and departures therefrom. This ratio is found empirically to be relatively constant. With the help of the solution of differential equation, which govern the deposition of radionuclide on filter paper, one can easily estimate theoretically the behavior of the radon progeny alpha to beta disintegration (or count) rate ratio

  3. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha blockers: potential limitations in the management of advanced endometriosis? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, Khashayar; Falcone, Tommaso

    2006-09-01

    Several studies have shown that tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels are increased in the peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis, with correlation between TNF-alpha concentrations and the degree of disease. It is also likely that elevation of peritoneal fluids' TNF-alpha levels may play a role in the pathogenesis of infertility associated with endometriosis. Use of drugs such as etanercept, a TNF-alpha receptor immunoglobulin fusion protein which inhibits TNF-alpha activity, showed in an animal study to reduce the severity of the disease, and the size of endometriotic foci. TNF-alpha blockers were recommended as a possible new line of therapy for endometriosis. Our case involved a 35-year-old Para 0, with rheumatic arthritis and stage 4 endometriosis. After 6 years of constant use of etanercept, she showed no improvement of endometriosis as demonstrated at laparoscopy. However, she underwent a successful IVF after the first attempt. TNF-alpha-blocker medications might not be beneficial for patients with advanced endometriosis. However, we cannot exclude the possible effect of these medications on early-stage endometriosis, and further study is required. Some of the immunologic abnormalities in the pelvis of patients with endometriosis could be the consequence of the disease and not the cause, and possibly suppression of immune cells and their products may not have a major effect on endometriotic lesions at an advanced stage. This also could explain why suppression of TNF-alpha showed no effect on infertility. However, use of TNF-alpha-blockers before IVF might increase the success rate in advanced endometriosis.

  4. Exercise promotes BCAA catabolism: effects of BCAA supplementation on skeletal muscle during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Murakami, Taro; Nakai, Naoya; Nagasaki, Masaru; Harris, Robert A

    2004-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are essential amino acids that can be oxidized in skeletal muscle. It is known that BCAA oxidation is promoted by exercise. The mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is attributed to activation of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex, which catalyzes the second-step reaction of the BCAA catabolic pathway and is the rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway. This enzyme complex is regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. The BCKDH kinase is responsible for inactivation of the complex by phosphorylation, and the activity of the kinase is inversely correlated with the activity state of the BCKDH complex, which suggests that the kinase is the primary regulator of the complex. We found recently that administration of ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) in rats caused activation of the hepatic BCKDH complex in association with a decrease in the kinase activity, which suggests that promotion of fatty acid oxidation upregulates the BCAA catabolism. Long-chain fatty acids are ligands for PPARalpha, and the fatty acid oxidation is promoted by several physiological conditions including exercise. These findings suggest that fatty acids may be one of the regulators of BCAA catabolism and that the BCAA requirement is increased by exercise. Furthermore, BCAA supplementation before and after exercise has beneficial effects for decreasing exercise-induced muscle damage and promoting muscle-protein synthesis; this suggests the possibility that BCAAs are a useful supplement in relation to exercise and sports.

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta) activation protects H9c2 cardiomyoblasts from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesant, Matthieu; Sueur, Stéphanie; Dutartre, Patrick; Tallandier, Mireille; Grimaldi, Paul A; Rochette, Luc; Connat, Jean-Louis

    2006-02-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and PPARgamma plays beneficial roles in cardiovascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and heart reperfusion. Although PPARalpha and gamma have been documented to reduce oxidative stress in the vasculature and the heart, the role of PPARdelta remains poorly studied. We focused on PPARdelta function in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2. Using semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we showed that PPARdelta is the predominantly expressed isotype whereas PPARalpha was weakly detected. By performing cell viability assays, we also showed that the selective PPARdelta agonist GW501516 protected cells from H(2)O(2)-induced cell death. The protective effect of GW501516 was due to an inhibition of H(2)O(2)-triggered apoptosis as shown by annexin-V labeling, DNA fragmentation analysis, and caspase-3 activity measurement. We demonstrated by transient transfection of a dominant negative mutant of PPARdelta that the protection induced by GW501516 was totally dependent on PPARdelta. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis demonstrated that GW501516 treatment upregulated catalase. Moreover, forced overexpression of catalase inhibited H(2)O(2)-triggered apoptosis, as evidenced by annexin-V labeling. Taken together, our results account for an important role of PPARdelta in inhibiting the onset of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. PPARdelta appears to be a new therapeutic target for the regulation of heart reperfusion-associated oxidative stress and stimulation of enzymatic antioxidative defences.

  6. Discovery of Azetidinone Acids as Conformationally-Constrained Dual PPARalpha/gamma Agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Devasthale, P; Farrelly, D; Gu, L; Harrity, T; Cap, M; Chu, C; Kunselman, L; Morgan, N; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    A novel class of azetidinone acid-derived dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists has been synthesized for the treatment of diabetes and dyslipidemia. The preferred stereochemistry in this series for binding and functional agonist activity against both PPARa and PPAR? receptors was shown to be 3S,4S. Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo activities of compounds in this series are described. A high-yielding method for N-arylation of azetidinone esters is also described.

  7. Mechanisms of the p(He 6,He 5)d, p(He 6,{alpha})t and p(He 6,t){alpha} reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiberg-Andersen, Henning

    2002-07-01

    This work was devoted to nucleon induced transfer reactions having the potential to probe the sub-cluster structures of the benchmark halo nucleus He 6, without the question marks the necessarily omitted exchange effects tend to put behind the CRC results when both collision partners are composite systems. Still, the exchange complications entered the analysis in an ironic way: The high Q-value of the p(He 6,{alpha})t and p(He 6, t){alpha} reactions caused sensitivity to the t - {alpha} optical potential at small radii, where the one-nucleon exchange effects are strongest. Since the attempt to throw them out of the extracted tau - {alpha} potential failed, it was necessary to extend the model space to avoid a too difficult modelling of the local equivalent t - {alpha} potential. By this step, all the complications originating from antisymmetrization within a larger model space entered the analysis. However, the persistent failures of the two-channel calculations of this and previous works can hardly be due to incorrect treatment of exchange effects only, so the loss of simplicity is probably illusory. Even at small angles, where the surface processes dominate, none of the two-channel calculations with various choices of t - {alpha} optical potentials managed to reproduce the p(He 6, {alpha})t (p(He 6,t){alpha}) data. This motivated inclusion of sequential transfers through the d + He 5 channel, where the sequential triton transfer process, included just for consistency in the coupling scheme of the four-channel calculation, turned out to be more influent than expected. The satisfactory reproduction of both the p(He 6, He 5)d and the p(He 6,{alpha})t (p(He 6,t){alpha}) data by the four-channel approach and the required re-normalization the real part of the p - He 6 optical potential are strong indications of substantial contributions from sequential transfer of the halo neutrons at this energy. The conclusions that can be drawn from this work are limited by the

  8. Distribution of alpha3, alpha5 and alpha(v) integrin subunits in mature and immature human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, G; Mart, M; Santaló, J; Bolton, V N

    1998-10-01

    The distribution of three integrin subunits, alpha3, alpha5 and alpha(v), in immature and mature human oocytes has been examined using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The results demonstrate that both alpha5 and alpha(v) are present at the germinal vesicle stage, while alpha3 was only detected in oocytes after germinal vesicle breakdown, in metaphase I and II stage oocytes. The cortical concentration of integrin subunits alpha3 and alpha5 is consistent with their localization in the oolemma. In contrast, the homogeneous distribution of alpha(v) throughout the oocyte suggests the existence of cytoplasmic reservoirs of this protein in the oocyte.

  9. Low dose radiation and ALARA: the potential risks to patients and staff from alpha-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priest, N.D.

    2014-01-01

    This year a new drug containing radium-223, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, was approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration for the palliative treatment of advanced prostate cancer metastases. Other drugs containing short-lived alpha-emitters are on clinical trial in Europe. Commonly, these employ a radionuclide attached to an antibody that specifically targets tumor cells to produce a highly localized radio-therapeutic dose to the tumor. However, normal tissues within the body will also be irradiated, albeit sometimes at low dose, and the question arises as to whether this presents a significant additional risk to the patient. Similarly, medical staff that handle these radionuclides could receive intakes of the radionuclides. What is the risk to staff? To assess the risk resulting from small tissue alpha-doses the toxicological, both human and animal, database was re-examined. The results of 20 epidemiological and toxicological studies with alpha-emitting radionuclides were analysed. In all cases a polynomial function provided a better fit to the data than a linear, no thresholds function. Also, in 19 cases a threshold dose below which no cancer is seen was indicated. The position of this threshold varied according to cancer type, but was typically in the range 0.1 to 1.0Gy of tissue dose - with a mean of 0.5Gy. It is concluded that alpha-radiation induced tumorogenesis is a threshold response and that as long as tissue doses are kept below these thresholds no additional cancers would be seen in either patients receiving alpha-therapy or in staff exposed to 'spilt' radionuclide. The presence of thresholds questions the appropriateness of current ALARA practices that are mostly used to drive occupational alpha-radiation exposures to as close to zero as possible. (author)

  10. Low dose radiation and ALARA: the potential risks to patients and staff from alpha-therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, N.D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This year a new drug containing radium-223, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, was approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration for the palliative treatment of advanced prostate cancer metastases. Other drugs containing short-lived alpha-emitters are on clinical trial in Europe. Commonly, these employ a radionuclide attached to an antibody that specifically targets tumor cells to produce a highly localized radio-therapeutic dose to the tumor. However, normal tissues within the body will also be irradiated, albeit sometimes at low dose, and the question arises as to whether this presents a significant additional risk to the patient. Similarly, medical staff that handle these radionuclides could receive intakes of the radionuclides. What is the risk to staff? To assess the risk resulting from small tissue alpha-doses the toxicological, both human and animal, database was re-examined. The results of 20 epidemiological and toxicological studies with alpha-emitting radionuclides were analysed. In all cases a polynomial function provided a better fit to the data than a linear, no thresholds function. Also, in 19 cases a threshold dose below which no cancer is seen was indicated. The position of this threshold varied according to cancer type, but was typically in the range 0.1 to 1.0Gy of tissue dose - with a mean of 0.5Gy. It is concluded that alpha-radiation induced tumorogenesis is a threshold response and that as long as tissue doses are kept below these thresholds no additional cancers would be seen in either patients receiving alpha-therapy or in staff exposed to 'spilt' radionuclide. The presence of thresholds questions the appropriateness of current ALARA practices that are mostly used to drive occupational alpha-radiation exposures to as close to zero as possible. (author)

  11. Karyopherin alpha7 (KPNA7), a divergent member of the importin alpha family of nuclear import receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joshua B; Talley, Ashley M; Spencer, Adam; Gioeli, Daniel; Paschal, Bryce M

    2010-08-11

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) dependent nuclear import is carried out by a heterodimer of importin alpha and importin beta. NLS cargo is recognized by importin alpha, which is bound by importin beta. Importin beta mediates translocation of the complex through the central channel of the nuclear pore, and upon reaching the nucleus, RanGTP binding to importin beta triggers disassembly of the complex. To date, six importin alpha family members, encoded by separate genes, have been described in humans. We sequenced and characterized a seventh member of the importin alpha family of transport factors, karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), which is most closely related to KPNA2. The domain of KPNA7 that binds Importin beta (IBB) is divergent, and shows stronger binding to importin beta than the IBB domains from of other importin alpha family members. With regard to NLS recognition, KPNA7 binds to the retinoblastoma (RB) NLS to a similar degree as KPNA2, but it fails to bind the SV40-NLS and the human nucleoplasmin (NPM) NLS. KPNA7 shows a predominantly nuclear distribution under steady state conditions, which contrasts with KPNA2 which is primarily cytoplasmic. KPNA7 is a novel importin alpha family member in humans that belongs to the importin alpha2 subfamily. KPNA7 shows different subcellular localization and NLS binding characteristics compared to other members of the importin alpha family. These properties suggest that KPNA7 could be specialized for interactions with select NLS-containing proteins, potentially impacting developmental regulation.

  12. Effects of alpha particles on zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, E.H.W.; Choi, V.W.Y.; Yu, K.N.; Li, V.W.T.; Cheng, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Ionizing radiation such as X-ray and alpha particles can damage cellular macromolecules, which can lead to DNA single- and double-strand breaks. In the present work, we studied the effects of alpha particles on dechorionated zebrafish embryos. Thin polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) films with a thickness of 16 μm were prepared from commercially available PADC films (with thickness of 100 μm) by chemical etching and used as support substrates for holding zebrafish embryos for alpha-particle irradiation. These films recorded alpha-particle hit positions, quantified the number and energy of alpha particles actually incident on the embryo cells, and thus enabled the calculation of the dose absorbed by the embryo cells. Irradiation was made at 1.25 hours post fertilization (hpf) with various absorbed dose. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed on the embryos at different time stages after irradiation. Marked apoptosis was detected only in embryos at earlier time stages. The results showed that DNA double-strand break during zebrafish embryogenesis can be induced by alpha-particle irradiation, which suggests that zebrafish is a potential model for assessing the effects of alpha-particle radiation

  13. Cancer therapy with alpha-emitters labeled peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2010-05-01

    Actively targeted alpha-particles offer specific tumor cell killing action with less collateral damage to surrounding normal tissues than beta-emitters. During the last decade, radiolabeled peptides that bind to different receptors on the tumors have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents both in the preclinical and clinical settings. Advantages of radiolabeled peptides over antibodies include relatively straightforward chemical synthesis, versatility, easier radiolabeling, rapid clearance from the circulation, faster penetration and more uniform distribution into tissues, and less immunogenicity. Rapid internalization of the radiolabeled peptides with equally rapid re-expression of the cell surface target is a highly desirable property that enhances the total delivery of these radionuclides into malignant sites. Peptides, such as octreotide, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogues, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing peptides, bombesin derivatives, and others may all be feasible for use with alpha-emitters. The on-going preclinical work has primarily concentrated on octreotide and octreotate analogues labeled with Bismuth-213 and Astatine-211. In addition, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogue has been labeled with Lead-212/Bismuth-212 in vivo generator and demonstrated the encouraging therapeutic efficacy in treatment of experimental melanoma. Obstacles that continue to obstruct widespread acceptance of alpha-emitter-labeled peptides are primarily the supply of these radionuclides and concerns about potential kidney toxicity. New sources and methods for production of these medically valuable radionuclides and better understanding of mechanisms related to the peptide renal uptake and clearance should speed up the introduction of alpha-emitter-labeled peptides into the clinic. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of secondary structure on the potential of mean force for poly-L-lysine in the alpha-Helix and beta-sheet conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigsby, J.J.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    2001-10-30

    Because poly-L-lysine (PLL) can exist in the {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet conformation depending on solution preparation and solution conditions, PLL is a suitable candidate to probe the dependence of protein interactions on secondary structure. The osmotic second virial coefficient and weight-average molecular weight are reported from low-angle laser-light scattering measurements for PLL as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet content. Interactions between PLL molecules become more attractive as salt concentration increases due to screening of PLL charge by salt ions and at low salt concentration become more attractive as pH increases due to decreased net charge on PLL. The experimental results show that interactions are stronger for the {beta}-sheet conformation than for the {alpha}-helix conformation. A spherically-symmetric model for the potential of mean force is used to account for specific interactions not described by DLVO theory and to show how differences in secondary structure affect PLL interactions.

  15. Mechanisms of the anti-obesity effects of oxytocin in diet-induced obese rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Deblon

    Full Text Available Apart from its role during labor and lactation, oxytocin is involved in several other functions. Interestingly, oxytocin- and oxytocin receptor-deficient mice develop late-onset obesity with normal food intake, suggesting that the hormone might exert a series of beneficial metabolic effects. This was recently confirmed by data showing that central oxytocin infusion causes weight loss in diet-induced obese mice. The aim of the present study was to unravel the mechanisms underlying such beneficial effects of oxytocin. Chronic central oxytocin infusion was carried out in high fat diet-induced obese rats. Its impact on body weight, lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity was determined. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in body weight gain, increased adipose tissue lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation, as well as reduced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The additional observation that plasma oxytocin levels increased upon central infusion suggested that the hormone might affect adipose tissue metabolism by direct action. This was demonstrated using in vitro, ex vivo, as well as in vivo experiments. With regard to its mechanism of action in adipose tissue, oxytocin increased the expression of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1, as well as the tissue content of the phospholipid precursor, N-oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, the biosynthetic precursor of the oleic acid-derived PPAR-alpha activator, oleoylethanolamide. Because PPAR-alpha regulates fatty acid β-oxidation, we hypothesized that this transcription factor might mediate the oxytocin effects. This was substantiated by the observation that, in contrast to its effects in wild-type mice, oxytocin infusion failed to induce weight loss and fat oxidation in PPAR-alpha-deficient animals. Altogether, these results suggest that oxytocin administration could represent a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of human obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  16. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    A workshop on ''Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy'' was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference

  17. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  18. The determination of $\\alpha_s$ by the ALPHA collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    We review the ALPHA collaboration strategy for obtaining the QCD coupling at high scale. In the three-flavor effective theory it avoids the use of perturbation theory at $\\alpha > 0.2$ and at the same time has the physical scales small compared to the cutoff $1/a$ in all stages of the computation. The result $\\Lambda_\\overline{MS}^{(3)}=332(14)$~MeV is translated to $\\alpha_\\overline{MS}(m_Z)=0.1179(10)(2)$ by use of (high order) perturbative relations between the effective theory couplings at the charm and beauty quark "thresholds". The error of this perturbative step is discussed and estimated as $0.0002$.

  19. EEG alpha rhythm, ocular activity and basal skin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbaten, M.N.; Beaujon, J.N.R.; Sjouw, W.

    Most hypotheses about the origin of the occipital alpha rhythm stress the specific influence of ocular activity. In this study, the influence of eye-movement frequency and extreme upward deviation of the eyeballs (enlarging the corneo-retinal potential) on occipital alpha activity and basal skin

  20. Therapeutic potential of alpha-ketoglutarate against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalita Mehra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG is a cellular intermediary metabolite of Krebs cycle, involved in energy metabolism, amino acid synthesis, and nitrogen transport. It is available over-the-counter and marketed as a nutritional supplement. There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that dietary α-KG has the potential to maintain cellular redox status and thus can protect various oxidative stress induced disease states. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hepatoprotective role of α-KG in acetaminophen (APAP induced toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into three groups of six animals each. Group I (Vehicle control: Normal Saline, Group II (APAP: A single intraperitoneal injection of 0.6 g/kg, Group III (APAP + α-KG: APAP as in Group II with α-KG treatment at a dose of 2 g/kg, orally for 5 days. Then the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP with oxidative stress markers including malondialdehyde (MDA, reduced glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and histopathology were analyzed. Results: The results indicate that APAP caused significant elevations in ALT, AST, ALP, and MDA levels, while GSH, SOD, and CAT were significantly depleted while co-administration of α-KG showed a significant (P < 0.05 reduction in the severity of these damages. Histologically, the liver showed inflammation and necrosis after APAP treatment, which were significantly restored with co-administration of α-KG. Conclusion: These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of α-KG in protecting liver damage by APAP in rats.

  1. Therapeutics: Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntman, Alisha M; Flotte, Terence R

    2017-01-01

    This review seeks to give an overview of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including the different disease phenotypes that it encompasses. We then describe the different therapeutic endeavors that have been undertaken to address these different phenotypes. Lastly we discuss future potential therapeutics, such as genome editing, and how they may play a role in treating alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha regulates a male-specific cytochrome P450 in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Brett; Choudhury, Agharul I; Horley, Neill; Bruce, Mary; Tomlinson, Simon R; Roberts, Ruth A; Gray, Tim J B; Barrett, David A; Shaw, P Nicholas; Kendall, David; Bell, David R

    2004-09-15

    We set out to find if the strain-specific, male-specific hepatic expression of Cyp4a protein in mouse was due to expression of Cyp4a12 and to understand the genetic basis for reported differences in expression. 12-Lauric acid hydroxylase (LAH) activity was found to show higher levels in male ddY, but not C57Bl/6, mouse liver microsomes. The expression of Cyp4a12 mRNA was studied using RNAase protection assays in male and female liver and kidney of nine mouse strains. Cyp4a12 was found to be highly expressed in male liver and kidney, but at much lower levels in female liver and kidney, in all strains studied. Western blotting with an antibody specific for Cyp4a12 confirmed that Cyp4a12 was expressed in a male specific fashion in C57Bl/6 mouse liver. RNAase protection analysis for Cyp4a10 and 14 in ddY mice revealed that neither of these genes showed male-specific expression. To further investigate genetic factors that control male-specific Cyp4a12 expression, PPARalpha+/+ and -/- mice were studied, showing that total P450 and 12-LAH activity was male-specific in +/+, but not -/- mice. RNAase protection assays were used to confirm that Cyp4a12 was lower in -/- mice. However, the male-specific Slp and MUP-1 genes retained hepatic male-specific levels of expression in +/+ and -/- mice, showing that the decrease in Cyp4a12 was not a general effect on male-specific expression. Thus, PPARalpha has a specific effect on constitutive expression of Cyp4a12.

  3. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  4. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wasilenko, L; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y; Fujiwara, M C

    2008-01-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  5. Differentiation of the mRNA transcripts originating from the alpha 1- and alpha 2-globin loci in normals and alpha-thalassemics.

    OpenAIRE

    Liebhaber, S A; Kan, Y W

    1981-01-01

    The alpha-globin polypeptide is encoded by two adjacent genes, alpha 1 and alpha 2. In the normal diploid state (alpha alpha/alpha alpha) all four alpha-globin genes are expressed. Loss or dysfunction of one or more of these genes leads to deficient alpha-globin production and results in alpha-thalassemia. We present a technique to differentially assess the steady-state levels of the alpha 1- and alpha-2-globin messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts and thus delineate the relative level of expressi...

  6. Mapping of HNF4alpha target genes in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Bressendorff, Simon; Moller, Jette

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of HNF4alpha has been extensively studied in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, and HNF4alpha is also regarded as key regulator of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation as well. The aim of the present work is to identify novel HNF4alpha target genes....... The HNF4alpha ChIP-chip data was matched with gene expression and histone H3 acetylation status of the promoters in order to identify HNF4alpha binding to actively transcribed genes with an open chromatin structure. RESULTS: 1,541 genes were identified as potential HNF4alpha targets, many of which have...

  7. Evaluation of GABAergic neuroactive steroid 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnane-20-one as a neurobiological substrate for the anti-anxiety effect of ethanol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Khemraj; Sharma, Ajay N; Jain, Nishant S; Ugale, Rajesh R; Chopde, Chandrabhan T

    2005-07-01

    Acute systemic ethanol administration is known to elevate plasma and cerebral levels of neuroactive steroid 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnane-20-one (3alpha, 5alpha-THP; allopregnanolone) to a concentration sufficient to potentiate GABA(A) receptors. We have earlier demonstrated that 3alpha, 5alpha-THP mediates the antidepressant-like effect of ethanol in Porsolt forced swim test. The aim of the present study is to explain the relationship between endogenous GABAergic neurosteroids and anxiolytic effect of ethanol in Sprague-Dawley rats. The mediation of 3alpha, 5alpha-THP in the anti-anxiety effect of ethanol was assessed by pharmacological interactions of ethanol with various endogenous neurosteroidal modulators and using simulated physiological conditions of altered neurosteroid content in elevated plus maze (EPM) test. Pretreatment of 3alpha, 5alpha-THP (0.5-2.5 mug/rat, i.c.v.) or neurosteroidogenic agents such as 3alpha, 5alpha-THP precursor progesterone (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), 11-beta hydroxylase inhibitor metyrapone (50 or 100 mg/kg, i.p.) or the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (25 ng/rat, i.c.v.) significantly potentiated the anti-anxiety effect of ethanol (1 g/kg, i.p.). On the other hand, the GABAergic antagonistic neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) (1 mg/kg, i.p.), the GABA(A) receptor blocker bicuculline (1 mg/kg, i.p.), the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride (50 x 2 mg/kg, s.c.) or the mitochondrial diazepam binding inhibitory receptor antagonist PK11195 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced ethanol-induced preference of time spent and number of entries into open arms. Anti-anxiety effect of ethanol was abolished in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats as compared to sham-operated control. This ADX-induced blockade was restored by prior systemic injection of progesterone, signifying the contribution of peripheral steroidogenesis in ethanol anxiolysis. Socially isolated animals known to exhibit decreased brain 3alpha, 5alpha-THP and GABA(A) receptor

  8. Low Cost silicon photodiodes for alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, H.; Lopes, A.; Hazin, C.; Lira, C.B.; Silva, E. da

    1998-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the suitability of using commercially available photodiodes for alpha spectrometry, since the principle on which both operate are similar. Photodiodes are low priced compared to the commonly used semiconductor detectors making them potentially useful for research and teaching purposes. Very thin calibrated alpha sources of 2 41 A m, 2 44 C m and 2 35 U , produced at the Metrology Laboratory of IRD/CNEN, were used to test the performance of three photodiodes. The results showed that the responses of the photodiodes were linear with the alpha particle energy and that the energy resolution varied between 0,79% and 0,45%, with an efficiency of 8%. The resolution and efficiency presented by the photodiodes tested are similar to those obtained with other semiconductor detectors, evidencing that they can be used successfully as alpha detectors

  9. High-intensity interval training (swimming) significantly improves the adverse metabolism and comorbidities in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Victor F; Aguila, Marcia B; Mandarim-DE-Lacerda, Carlos A

    2016-05-01

    Controlling obesity and other comorbidities in the population is a challenge in modern society. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) combines short periods of high-intensity exercise with long recovery periods or a low-intensity exercise. The aim was to assess the impact of HIIT in the context of diet-induced obesity in the animal model. C57BL/6 mice were fed one of the two diets: standard chow (lean group [LE]) or a high-fat diet (obese group [OB]). After twelve weeks, the animals were divided into non-trained groups (LE-NT and OB-NT) and trained groups (LE-T and OB-T), and began an exercise protocol. For biochemical analysis of inflammatory and lipid profile, we used a colorimetric enzymatic method and an automatic spectrophotometer. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis of the experimental groups with Holm-Sidak post-hoc Test. Two-way ANOVA analyzed the interactions between diet and HIIT protocol. HIIT leads to significant reductions in body mass, blood glucose, glucose tolerance and hepatic lipid profile in T-groups compared to NT-groups. HIIT was able to reduce plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, HIIT improves the insulin immunodensity in the islets, reduces the adiposity and the hepatic steatosis in the T-groups. HIIT improves beta-oxidation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha and reduces lipogenesis and PPAR-gamma levels in the liver. In skeletal muscle, HIIT improves PPAR-alpha and glucose transporter-4 and reduces PPAR-gamma levels. HIIT leads to attenuate the adverse effects caused by a chronic ingestion of a high-fat diet.

  10. Anisotropy of favoured alpha transitions producing even-even deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, O.A.P.

    1997-05-01

    The anisotropy in favoured alpha transitions which produce even-even deformed nuclei is discussed. A simple, Gamow's-like model which takes into account the quadrupole deformation of the product nucleus has been formulated to calculate the alpha decay half-life. It is assumed that before tunneling into a purely Coulomb potential barrier the two-body system oscillated isotropically, thus giving rise to an equivalent, average preferential polar direction θ 0 (referred to the symmetry axis of the ellipsoidal shape of the product nucleus) for alpha emission in favoured alpha transitions of even-even nuclei. (author)

  11. Alternative splicing of T cell receptor (TCR) alpha chain transcripts containing V alpha 1 or V alpha 14 elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahotka, C; Hansen-Hagge, T E; Bartram, C R

    1995-10-01

    Human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines represent valuable tools to investigate distinct steps of the complex regulatory pathways underlying T cell receptor recombination and expression. A case in point are V delta 2D delta 3 and subsequent V delta 2D delta 3J alpha rearrangements observed in human leukemic pre-B cells as well as in normal lymphopoiesis. The functional expression of these unusual (VD) delta (JC) alpha hybrids is almost exclusively prevented by alternative splicing events. In this report we show that alternative splicing at cryptic splice donor sites within V elements is not a unique feature of hybrid TCR delta/alpha transcripts. Among seven V alpha families analyzed by RT-PCR, alternatively spliced products were observed in TCR alpha recombinations containing V alpha 1 or V alpha 14 elements. In contrast to normal peripheral blood cells and thymocytes, the leukemia cell line JM expressing functional V alpha 1J alpha 3C alpha transcripts lacked evidence of aberrant TCR alpha RNA species.

  12. Alpha Channeling in Open-System Magnetic Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    The Grant DE-SC0000736, Alpha Channeling in Open-System Magnetic Devices, is a continuation of the Grant DE-FG02-06ER54851, Alpha Channeling in Mirror Machines. In publications funded by DE-SC0000736, the grant DE-FG02-06ER54851 was actually credited. The key results obtained under Grant DE-SC0000736, Alpha Channeling in Open-System Magnetic Devices, appear in a series of publications. The earlier effort under DE-FG02- 06ER54851 was the subject of a previous Final Report. The theme of this later effort has been unusual confinement effects, or de-confinement effects, in open-field magnetic confinement devices. First, the possibilities in losing axisymmetry were explored. Then a number of issues in rotating plasma were addressed. Most importantly, a spinoff application to plasma separations was recognized, which also resulted in a provisional patent application. (That provisional patent application, however, was not pursued further.) Alpha channeling entails injecting waves into magnetically confined plasma to release energy from one particular ion while ejecting that ion. The ejection of the ion is actually a concomitant effect in releasing energy from the ion to the wave. In rotating plasma, there is the opportunity to store the energy in a radial electric field rather than in waves. In other words, the ejected alpha particle loses its energy to the radial potential, which in turn produces plasma rotation. This is a very useful effect, since producing radial electric fields by other means are technologically more difficult. In fact, one can heat ions, and then eject them, to produce the desired radial field. In each case, there is a separation effect of different ions, which generalizes the original alpha-channeling concept of separating alpha ash from hydrogen. In a further generalization of the separation concept, a double-well filter represents a new way to produce high-throughput separations of ions, potentially useful for nuclear waste remediation.

  13. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to rely on the activated conformation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition of PPAR-α and -γ may allow for short-term processes to increase energy generation before the cells devote resources to increasing their capacity for fatty acid oxidation.

  14. ALPHA/AMPU, Radionuclide Radioactivity from Alpha Spectrometer Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sill, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The two computer programs, ALPHA and AMPU, take raw data obtained from alpha spectrometry and from these calculate activities and uncertainties of the radionuclides present in the sample. ALPHA determines activities of any alpha emitter in a sample that has been directly precipitated with NdF 3 . AMPU determines the Pu-239, Pu-238,and Am-241 activities using Pu-236 and Am-243 tracers. 2 - Method of solution: These programs propagate all random and systematic uncertainties, found anywhere in the experimental process, to the final result. The result is rounded and is in decimal agreement with the uncertainty. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: In ALPHA, a chemical yield of 98% is assumed

  15. Resting alpha activity predicts learning ability in alpha neurofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenya eNan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals differ in their ability to learn how to regulate the alpha activity by neurofeedback. This study aimed to investigate whether the resting alpha activity is related to the learning ability of alpha enhancement in neurofeedback and could be used as a predictor. A total of 25 subjects performed 20 sessions of individualized alpha neurofeedback in order to learn how to enhance activity in the alpha frequency band. The learning ability was assessed by three indices respectively: the training parameter changes between two periods, within a short period and across the whole training time. It was found that the resting alpha amplitude measured before training had significant positive correlations with all learning indices and could be used as a predictor for the learning ability prediction. This finding would help the researchers in not only predicting the training efficacy in individuals but also gaining further insight into the mechanisms of alpha neurofeedback.

  16. Liver alpha-amylase gene expression as an early obesity biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojbafan, Marzieh; Afsartala, Zohreh; Amoli, Mahsa M; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Larijani, Bagher; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is a major health problem worldwide, for which preventive and therapeutic means are still needed. Alpha-amylase is a digestive enzyme whose inhibition has been targeted as a potential anti-obesity strategy. However, alpha-amylase gene expression has not been particularly attended to, and in contrast with pancreatic and salivary amylases, fewer studies have focused on liver alpha-amylase. The present study aimed at investigating the expression of alpha-amylase gene in obese and normal mice at RNA and protein level as well as acarbose effect on this gene expression in hepatocyte cell culture. Control and case groups were fed by normal mouse pellet and high-fat diet respectively, during 8 weeks. After this period, serum biochemical parameters including glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, AST, ALT and alpha-amylase were assayed. Liver alpha-amylase gene was analyzed by real time PCR, and liver enzyme was assayed with Bernfeld and ELISA methods Hepatocyte cell culture derived from both group were also treated by acarbose and alpha-amylase activity and gene expression was analyzed by above mentioned methods. All biochemical factors showed an increase in obese mice, but the increase in ALT and AST were not statistically significant. Alpha-amylase levels were also increased in obese mice, both at RNA and protein level, while a decrease was seen in obese mice derived hepatocytes after acarbose treatment. Elevated liver alpha-amylase levels may be indicative of initial stages of obesity and the use of acarbose could be considered as a treatment of obesity which could be potentially effective at multiple levels. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  17. Sox17 regulates liver lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Rommelaere

    Full Text Available Liver is a major regulator of lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting, a process involving PPARalpha activation. We recently showed that the Vnn1 gene is a PPARalpha target gene in liver and that release of the Vanin-1 pantetheinase in serum is a biomarker of PPARalpha activation. Here we set up a screen to identify new regulators of adaptation to fasting using the serum Vanin-1 as a marker of PPARalpha activation. Mutagenized mice were screened for low serum Vanin-1 expression. Functional interactions with PPARalpha were investigated by combining transcriptomic, biochemical and metabolic approaches. We characterized a new mutant mouse in which hepatic and serum expression of Vanin-1 is depressed. This mouse carries a mutation in the HMG domain of the Sox17 transcription factor. Mutant mice display a metabolic phenotype featuring lipid abnormalities and inefficient adaptation to fasting. Upon fasting, a fraction of the PPARα-driven transcriptional program is no longer induced and associated with impaired fatty acid oxidation. The transcriptional phenotype is partially observed in heterozygous Sox17+/- mice. In mutant mice, the fasting phenotype but not all transcriptomic signature is rescued by the administration of the PPARalpha agonist fenofibrate. These results identify a novel role for Sox17 in adult liver as a modulator of the metabolic adaptation to fasting.

  18. Alpha radiation detection using silicon memory chips - preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, R.; Paix, D.; Haskard, M.

    1993-01-01

    Alpha radiation dosage is an important occupational health factor in the mining of uranium and mineral sands. Alpha radiation induced errors in the data of silicon based memory chips provide the foundation for a new type of sensor, with the potential for affordable and prompt measurement of personal alpha doses. With particular reference to Dynamic Random Access Memories (DRAM) this paper introduces the operating principle of a memory based radiation sensor, which is the error mechanism in silicon integrated circuits. 14 refs., 3 figs

  19. Combined adjuvant radiation and interferon-alpha 2B therapy in high-risk melanoma patients: the potential for increased radiation toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazard, Lisa J.; Sause, William T.; Noyes, R. Dirk

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Surgically resected melanoma patients with high-risk features commonly receive adjuvant therapy with interferon-alpha 2b combined with radiation therapy; the purpose of our study was to evaluate the potential enhancement of radiation toxicity by interferon. Methods and Materials: Patients at LDS Hospital and the University of Utah Medical Center in Salt Lake City treated with interferon during radiotherapy or within 1 month of its completion were retrospectively identified, and their charts were reviewed. If possible, the patients were asked to return to the LDS Hospital radiation therapy department for follow-up. Results: Five of 10 patients receiving interferon-alpha 2b therapy during radiation therapy or within 1 month of its completion experienced severe subacute/late complications of therapy. Severe subacute/late complications included two patients with peripheral neuropathy, one patient with radiation necrosis in the brain, and two patients with radiation necrosis in the s.c. tissue. One patient with peripheral neuropathy and one patient with radiation necrosis also developed lymphedema. Conclusions: In vitro studies have identified a radiosensitizing effect by interferon-alpha on certain cell lines, which suggests the possibility that patients treated with interferon and radiation therapy may experience more severe radiation toxicities. We have observed severe subacute/late complications in five of 10 patients treated with interferon-alpha 2b during radiation therapy or within 1 month of its completion. Although an observational study of 10 patients lacks the statistic power to reach conclusions regarding the safety and complication rates of combined interferon and radiation therapy, it is sufficient to raise concerns and suggest the need for prospective studies

  20. Molecular basis for nondeletion alpha-thalassemia in American blacks. Alpha 2(116GAG----UAG).

    OpenAIRE

    Liebhaber, S A; Coleman, M B; Adams, J G; Cash, F E; Steinberg, M H

    1987-01-01

    An American black woman was found to have the phenotype of moderately severe alpha-thalassemia normally associated with the loss of two to three alpha-globin genes despite an alpha-globin gene map that demonstrated the loss of only a single alpha-globin gene (-alpha/alpha alpha). Several individuals in her kindred with normal alpha-globin gene mapping studies (alpha alpha/alpha alpha) had mild alpha-thalassemia hematologic values consistent with the loss of one to two alpha-globin genes. Thes...

  1. Anti-pp,. cap alpha cap alpha. and p. cap alpha. elastic scattering at high energies and Chou-Yang conjecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-e-Aleem; Rifique, M.

    1987-03-01

    The recent experimental measurements for anti-pp and ..cap alpha cap alpha.. elastic scattering at high energies have shown that the Chou-Yang conjecture regarding the relationship between the electromagnetic and the hadronic form factor of a particle is only an approximation. A new ansatz has been proposed to obtain hadronic form factors of proton and the ..cap alpha..-particle. These form factors have been used to explain the various characteristics of anti-pp, ..cap alpha cap alpha.. and p..cap alpha.. elastic scattering at high energies.

  2. Investigation of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in (alpha, alpha 'gamma) coincidence experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savran, D.; Babilon, M.; van den Berg, A. M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hasper, J.; Wortche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on first results from experiments using the (alpha, alpha'gamma) reaction at E alpha = 136 MeV to investigate bound electric dipole (El) excitations building the so-called Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) in the semi-magic nucleus Ce-140. The method of (alpha, alpha'gamma) allows the

  3. Coefficient alpha and interculture test selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Steven; Kishi, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The internal consistency reliability of a measure can be a focal point in an evaluation of the potential adequacy of an instrument for adaptation to another cultural setting. Cronbach's alpha (α) coefficient is often used as the statistical index for such a determination. However, alpha presumes a tau-equivalent test and may constitute an inaccurate population estimate for multidimensional tests. These notions are expanded and examined with a Japanese version of a questionnaire on nursing attitudes toward suicidal patients, originally constructed in Sweden using the English language. The English measure was reported to have acceptable internal consistency (α) albeit the dimensionality of the questionnaire was not addressed. The Japanese scale was found to lack tau-equivalence. An alternative to alpha, "composite reliability," was computed and found to be below acceptable standards in magnitude and precision. Implications for research application of the Japanese instrument are discussed. © The Author(s) 2012.

  4. Increased virulence and competitive advantage of a/alpha over a/a or alpha/alpha offspring conserves the mating system of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Wu, Wei; Radke, Joshua B; Zhao, Rui; Soll, David R

    2005-04-01

    The majority of Candida albicans strains in nature are a/alpha and must undergo homozygosis to a/a or alpha/alpha to mate. Here we have used a mouse model for systemic infection to test the hypothesis that a/alpha strains predominate in nature because they have a competitive advantage over a/a and alpha/alpha offspring in colonizing hosts. Single-strain injection experiments revealed that a/alpha strains were far more virulent than either their a/a or alpha/alpha offspring. When equal numbers of parent a/alpha and offspring a/a or alpha/alpha cells were co-injected, a/alpha always exhibited a competitive advantage at the time of extreme host morbidity or death. When equal numbers of an engineered a/a/alpha2 strain and its isogenic a/a parent strain were co-injected, the a/a/alpha2 strain exhibited a competitive advantage at the time of host morbidity or death, suggesting that the genotype of the mating-type (MTL) locus, not associated genes on chromosome 5, provides a competitive advantage. We therefore propose that heterozygosity at the MTL locus not only represses white-opaque switching and genes involved in the mating process, but also affects virulence, providing a competitive advantage to the a/alpha genotype that conserves the mating system of C. albicans in nature.

  5. Nutrient Content, Phytonutrient Composition, Alpha Amylase, Alpha Glucosidase Inhibition Activity and Antioxidant Activity of the Stoechospermum Marginatum Collected in Pre Monsoon Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reka Palanivel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the nutrient content, phytonutrient composition, physicochemical properties, alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibition activity and antioxidant activity of the brown algae Stoechospermum marginatum collected from Gulf of Mannar, Tamil Nadu, India in pre monsoon season (June- September, 2015. Six and eight hours of ethanol and aqueous extract of Stoechospermum marginatum were used for phytonutrient screening, alpha amylase, alpha glucosidase inhibition activity and antioxidant activity. From the results of the study it is understood that Stoechospermum marginatum contain a high amount of carbohydrate, protein, crude fiber and phytonutrients like tannin, flavonoid, saponin, alkaloid, terpenoids, steroid and total phenolic content. The physicochemical properties namely Water absorption and Swelling power were very promising. Alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibition activity was recorded to be high in both aqueous and ethanol extracts of eight hour extraction than in extracts taken from six hours extraction. Antioxidant activity was detected using DPPH, FRAP, beta carotene scavenging and H2O2 assay and found to have a high radical scavenging activity. Stoechospermum marginatum possess a valuable amount of total phenolic content and other phytonutrients and physicochemical properties, it may the reason for the potential inhibition of alpha amylase, alpha glucosidase and antioxidant activity. It is concluded from the study that the brown algae may be incorporated into foods to enhance their nutritional and therapeutic value.

  6. Seven-Disk Manifold, alpha-attractors and B-modes

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological alpha-attractor models in \\cN=1 supergravity are based on hyperbolic geometry of a Poincar\\'e disk with the radius square {\\cal R}^2=3\\alpha. The predictions for the B-modes, r\\approx 3\\alpha {4\\over N^2}, depend on moduli space geometry and are robust for a rather general class of potentials. Here we notice that starting with M-theory compactified on a 7-manifold with G_2 holonomy, with a special choice of Betti numbers, one can obtain d=4 \\cN=1 supergravity with rank 7 scalar coset \\Big[{SL(2)\\over SO(2)}\\Big]^7. In a model where these 7 unit size Poincar\\'e disks have identified moduli one finds that 3 alpha =7. Assuming that the moduli space geometry of the phenomenological models is inherited from this version of M-theory, one would predict r \\approx 10^{-2} for 53 e-foldings. We also describe the related maximal supergravity and M/string theory models leading to preferred values 3 alpha =1,2,3,4,5,6,7.

  7. Choline kinase-alpha by regulating cell aggressiveness and drug sensitivity is a potential druggable target for ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Granata, A; Nicoletti, R; Tinaglia, V; De Cecco, L; Pisanu, M E; Ricci, A; Podo, F; Canevari, S; Iorio, E; Bagnoli, M; Mezzanzanica, D

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aberrant choline metabolism has been proposed as a novel cancer hallmark. We recently showed that epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) possesses an altered MRS-choline profile, characterised by increased phosphocholine (PCho) content to which mainly contribute over-expression and activation of choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-alpha). Methods: To assess its biological relevance, ChoK-alpha expression was downmodulated by transient RNA interference in EOC in vitro models. Gene expression profi...

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of the flavonol anti-oxidants, alpha-glycosyl isoquercitrin and isoquercitrin, for genotoxic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Cheryl A; Koyanagi, Mihoko; Swartz, Carol; Davis, Jeffrey; Kasamoto, Sawako; Maronpot, Robert; Recio, Leslie; Hayashi, Shim-Mo

    2018-03-01

    Quercetin and its glycosides possess potential benefits to human health. Several flavonols are available to consumers as dietary supplements, promoted as anti-oxidants; however, incorporation of natural quercetin glycosides into food and beverage products has been limited by poor miscibility in water. Enzymatic conjugation of multiple glucose moieties to isoquercitrin to produce alpha-glycosyl isoquercitrin (AGIQ) enhances solubility and bioavailability. AGIQ is used in Japan as a food additive and has been granted generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status. However, although substantial genotoxicity data exist for quercetin, there is very little available data for AGIQ and isoquercitrin. To support expanded global marketing of food products containing AGIQ, comprehensive testing of genotoxic potential of AGIQ and isoquercitrin was conducted according to current regulatory test guidelines. Both chemicals tested positive in bacterial reverse mutation assays, and exposure to isoquercitrin resulted in chromosomal aberrations in CHO-WBL cells. All other in vitro mammalian micronucleus and chromosomal aberration assays, micronucleus and comet assays in male and female B6C3F1 mice and Sprague Dawley rats, and Muta™ Mouse mutation assays evaluating multiple potential target tissues, were negative for both chemicals. These results supplement existing toxicity data to further support the safe use of AGIQ in food and beverage products. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. THE LYMAN ALPHA REFERENCE SAMPLE: EXTENDED LYMAN ALPHA HALOS PRODUCED AT LOW DUST CONTENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Matthew [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Oestlin, Goeran; Duval, Florent; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Sandberg, Andreas [Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Schaerer, Daniel [CNRS, IRAP, 14, avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Verhamme, Anne; Orlitova, Ivana [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Oti-Floranes, Hector [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Departamento de Astrofisica, POB 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada (Spain); Adamo, Angela [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Atek, Hakim [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatoire, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Herenz, E. Christian [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Kunth, Daniel [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Laursen, Peter, E-mail: matthew@astro.su.se [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-03-10

    We report on new imaging observations of the Lyman alpha emission line (Ly{alpha}), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028 < z < 0.18 in continuum-subtracted Ly{alpha}, H{alpha}, and the far ultraviolet continuum. We show that Ly{alpha} is emitted on scales that systematically exceed those of the massive stellar population and recombination nebulae: as measured by the Petrosian 20% radius, R{sub P20}, Ly{alpha} radii are larger than those of H{alpha} by factors ranging from 1 to 3.6, with an average of 2.4. The average ratio of Ly{alpha}-to-FUV radii is 2.9. This suggests that much of the Ly{alpha} light is pushed to large radii by resonance scattering. Defining the Relative Petrosian Extension of Ly{alpha} compared to H{alpha}, {xi}{sub Ly{alpha}} = R {sup Ly{alpha}}{sub P20}/R {sup H{alpha}}{sub P20}, we find {xi}{sub Ly{alpha}} to be uncorrelated with total Ly{alpha} luminosity. However, {xi}{sub Ly{alpha}} is strongly correlated with quantities that scale with dust content, in the sense that a low dust abundance is a necessary requirement (although not the only one) in order to spread Ly{alpha} photons throughout the interstellar medium and drive a large extended Ly{alpha} halo.

  10. Real-time monitoring for alpha emitters in high-airflow environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.E.; MacArthur, D.W.; Bounds, J.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.; Whitley, C.R.; Conaway, J.G.; Steadman, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Key problems in detecting alpha contamination for site characterization and decontamination and decommissioning that remain to be solved include measurement of airborne contamination, material holdup within pipes, and leakage of material containers. These problems are very difficult using traditional alpha detectors and systems. The ionization detection method (long-range alpha detection of LRAD) offers a number of specific advantages for these environmental measurements. An LRAD system detects the air molecules ionized by alpha-emitting contamination rather than the alpha particles. Thus, LRAD-based detectors are not limited by the short range of alpha particles and can be used to detect contamination anywhere that air can penetrate. Extending this technology to large enclosures of long pipes requires a system optimized for large airflows. In this paper we will present designs and preliminary results for high-volume flow-through air monitors based on the LRAD technique. In addition, we will discuss the behavior of the monitors and their potential applications

  11. Evidence for Alpha Receptors in the Human Ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeb, Ralph; Knopf, Joy; Golijanin, Dragan; Bourne, Patricia; Erturk, Erdal

    2007-04-01

    An immunohistochemical and western blot expression analysis of human ureters was performed in order to characterize the alpha-1-adrenergic receptor distribution along the length of the human ureteral wall. Mapping the distribution will assist in understanding the potential role alpha -1-adrenergic receptors and their subtype density might have in the pathophysiology of ureteral colic and stone passage. Patients diagnosed with renal cancer or bladder cancer undergoing nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy, or cystectomy had ureteral specimens taken from the proximal, mid, distal and tunneled ureter. Tissues were processed for fresh frozen examination and fixed in formalin. None of the ureteral specimens were involved with cancer. Serial histologic sections and immunohistochemical studies were performed using antibodies specific for alpha-1-adrenergic receptor subtypes (alpha 1a, alpha 1b, alpha 1d). The sections were examined under a light microscope and scored as positive or negative. In order to validate and quantify the alpha receptor subtypes along the human ureter. Western blotting techniques were applied. Human ureter stained positively for alpha -1-adrenergic receptors. Immunostaining appeared red, with intense reaction in the smooth muscle of the ureter and endothelium of the neighboring blood vessels. There was differential expression between all the receptors with the highest staining for alpha-1D subtype. The highest protein expression for all three subtypes was in the renal pelvis and decreased with advancement along the ureter to the distal ureter. At the distal ureter, there was marked increase in expression as one progressed towards the ureteral orifice. The same pattern of protein expression was exhibited for all three alpha -1-adrenergic receptor subtypes. We provide preliminary evidence for the ability to detect and quantify the alpha-1-receptor subtypes along the human ureter which to the best of our knowledge has never been done with

  12. Contributions to the study of heavy and superheavy nuclei stability in alpha-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silisteanu, I.

    1978-01-01

    Alpha-decay is treated in this work on the complete analogy of transfer reactions by means of nuclear shell models with continuous spectrum nucleons. Certain phenomenologically obtained or microscope evaluated data on low energy interactions between alpha-particles and nuclei, when related to nuclear structure data within the unified theory of nuclear reactions, allow of an improved accuracy in determining the alpha-particle wave function as well as of an estimation of alpha-probabilities in good keeping with experimental ones. The problem of alpha lifetimes thus narrows to the resolution of some homogeneous and inhomogeneous differential equations systems including the optic potential and the alpha formfactors. (author)

  13. Alpha amylase and Alpha glucosidase inhibitory effects of aqueous stem extract of Salacia oblonga and its GC-MS analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladis Raja Malar Chelladurai

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Our present investigation deals with the phytochemical screening, estimation of total flavonoids, terpenoids and tannin contents to evaluate the anti-diabetic activities of Salacia oblonga stem followed by GC-MS analysis. It explores the natural compounds and the potential α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory actions of stem extracts. The aqueous stem extract was selected from other extracts (ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether and chloroform for the in vitro study of anti-diabetic activity by alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibitory assays. The stem extract was also analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to identify the natural chemical components. Phytochemical analysis of aqueous stem extract showed major classes of secondary metabolites such as phenols, flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, tannins, saponins. The total flavonoid, terpenoid, and tannin contents were quantified as 19.82±0.06 mg QE/g, 96.2±0.20 mg/g and 11.25±0.03 mg TAE/g respectively. The percentage inhibition of assays showed maximum inhibitory effects (59.46±0.04% and 68.51±0.01% at a concentration of 100 mg/mL. The IC50 values of stem extract was found to be 73.56 mg/mL and 80.90 mg/mL for alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibition. Fifteen chemical constituents were found by GC-MS analysis. This study suggest the aqueous stem extract of Salacia oblonga might be considered as potential source of bio active constituents with excellent antidiabetic activity.

  14. Synthesis and antimicrobial evaluation of new 3-alkyl/aryl-2-[((alpha,alpha-diphenyl-alpha-hydroxy)acetyl)hydrazono]-5-methyl-4-thiazolidinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzeldemirci, Nuray Ulusoy; Ilhan, Eser; Küçükbasmaci, Omer; Satana, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    New 4-thiazolidinone derivatives of benzilic acid (alpha,alpha-diphenyl-alpha-hydroxyacetic acid) have been synthesized and evaluated for antibacterial and antifungal activities. The reaction of 1- (alpha,alpha-diphenyl-alpha-hydroxy)acetyl-4-alkyl/arylthiosemicarbazides with ethyl 2-bromopropionate gave 3-alkyl/aryl-2-[((alpha,alpha-diphenyl-alpha-hydroxy)acetyl)hydrazono]-5-methyl-4-thiazolidinone derivatives. Their antibacterial and antifungal activities were evaluated against S. aureus ATCC 29213, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, E. coli ATCC 25922, C. albicans ATCC 10231, C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019, C. krusei ATCC 6258, T. mentagrophytes var. erinacei NCPF 375, M. gypseum NCPF 580 and T. tonsurans NCPF 245. 3e, 3f, 3g and 3h showed the highest antibacterial activity. Particularly 3a and 3e showed the highest antifungal activities against C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019, T. tonsurans NCPF 245 and M. gypseum NCPF 580.

  15. Prevention of diet-induced obesity by safflower oil: insights at the levels of PPARalpha, orexin, and ghrelin gene expression of adipocytes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Fengchen; Sun, Yuqian; Zhang, Jinchao

    2010-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevention of diet-induced obesity by a high safflower oil diet and adipocytic gene expression in mice. Forty 3-week-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups: control group (CON, 5% lard + 5% safflower oil), high lard group (LAR, 45% lard + 5% safflower oil), and high safflower oil group (SAF, 45% safflower oil + 5% lard). After 10 weeks, 10 mice of the LAR group were switched to high safflower oil diet (LAR-SAF). Ten weeks later, glucose tolerance tests were performed by intraperitoneal injection of glucose. Circulating levels of lipid and insulin were measured and white adipose tissues were taken for gene chip and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The LAR group showed higher body weight, adiposity index, insulin, and lipids than the CON group (P<0.05). The body weight in the LAR-SAF group decreased after dietary reversal. The plasma biochemical profiles decreased in the LAR-SAF and SAF groups (P<0.05) compared with those of the LAR group. The blood glucose level of the LAR-SAF group was reduced during intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test compared with that of the LAR group. The LAR-SAF group had lower levels of Orexin and Ghrelin gene expression, whereas the level of PPARalpha gene expression was significantly enhanced compared with that of the LAR group. So, the SAF diet can alter adipocytic adiposity-related gene expression and result in effective amelioration of diet-induced obesity.

  16. Lyman Alpha Control

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Daniel Stefaniak

    2015-01-01

    This document gives an overview of how to operate the Lyman Alpha Control application written in LabVIEW along with things to watch out for. Overview of the LabVIEW code itself as well as the physical wiring of and connections from/to the NI PCI-6229 DAQ box is also included. The Lyman Alpha Control application is the interface between the ALPHA sequencer and the HighFinesse Wavelength Meter as well as the Lyman Alpha laser setup. The application measures the wavelength of the output light from the Lyman Alpha cavity through the Wavelength Meter. The application can use the Wavelength Meter’s PID capabilities to stabilize the Lyman Alpha laser output as well as switch between up to three frequencies.

  17. Optical potentials and isoscalar transition rates from 104 MeV alpha-particle scattering by the N=28 isotopes 48Ca, 50Ti and 52Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, E.; Pesl, R.; Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.; Buschmann, J.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Zagromski, S.

    1983-02-01

    Precisely measured differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering from 104 MeV alpha-particles by 48 Ca, 50 Ti and 52 Cr are reported. The analyses aim primarily at the determination of strength, radial shapes and deformation of the scattering potentials, looking for isotonic differences of N = 28 isotones. The mean square radii of the (real) potentials are discussed in terms of mean square radius differences of the matter distributions. The isoscalar transition rates derived by coupled channel analyses of the measured cross sections are compared with electromagnetic rates. In addition to the analyses on the basis of a slightly generalized extended optical model a semi-microscopic deformed folding model has been applied, using a density-dependent effective alpha-bound nucleon interaction. Though an excellent description of the data over the full angular range is obtained the resulting values of the deformation parameters appear to be not consistent with results from various different methods. (orig.) [de

  18. Alpha - Skew Pi - Armendariz Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej M Abduldaim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce a new concept called Alpha-skew Pi-Armendariz rings (Alpha - S Pi - ARas a generalization of the notion of Alpha-skew Armendariz rings.Another important goal behind studying this class of rings is to employ it in order to design a modern algorithm of an identification scheme according to the evolution of using modern algebra in the applications of the field of cryptography.We investigate general properties of this concept and give examples for illustration. Furthermore, this paperstudy the relationship between this concept and some previous notions related to Alpha-skew Armendariz rings. It clearly presents that every weak Alpha-skew Armendariz ring is Alpha-skew Pi-Armendariz (Alpha-S Pi-AR. Also, thisarticle showsthat the concepts of Alpha-skew Armendariz rings and Alpha-skew Pi- Armendariz rings are equivalent in case R is 2-primal and semiprime ring.Moreover, this paper proves for a semicommutative Alpha-compatible ringR that if R[x;Alpha] is nil-Armendariz, thenR is an Alpha-S Pi-AR. In addition, if R is an Alpha - S Pi -AR, 2-primal and semiprime ring, then N(R[x;Alpha]=N(R[x;Alpha]. Finally, we look forwardthat Alpha-skew Pi-Armendariz rings (Alpha-S Pi-ARbe more effect (due to their properties in the field of cryptography than Pi-Armendariz rings, weak Armendariz rings and others.For these properties and characterizations of the introduced concept Alpha-S Pi-AR, we aspire to design a novel algorithm of an identification scheme.

  19. Influence of dietary fatty acids on endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain, liver and small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Andreas; Petersen, Gitte; Hellgren, Lars

    2008-01-01

    and docosahexaenoylethanolamide) with similar changes in precursor lipids. The AA-diet and FO-diet had no effect on N-acylethanolamines, endocannabinoids or precursor lipids in brain. All N-acylethanolamines activated PPAR-alpha. In conclusion, short-term feeding of diets resembling human diets (Mediterranean diet high...... (AA)) on tissue levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide, stearoylethanolamide, linoleoylethanolamide, eicosapentaenoylethanolamide, docosahexaenoylethanolamide and tissue fatty acid composition. The LA-diet increased linoleoylethanolamide and linoleic...... acid in brain, jejunum and liver. The OA-diet increased brain levels of anandamide and oleoylethanolamide (not 2-arachidonoylglycerol) without changing tissue fatty acid composition. The same diet increased oleoylethanolamide in liver. All five dietary fats decreased oleoylethanolamide in jejunum...

  20. Development of Bioorthogonally Degradable Linkers and Polymers Using alpha-Azidoethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Chandrasekhar Ramasubramanian

    Degradable polymers have gained a lot of attention in recent years for applications in biotechnology and medicine. External control over polymer degradation can be obtained by incorporating functional groups that cleave in the presence of triggers that would normally be absent in biological environments, i.e. are bioorthogonal. This thesis explores the use of chemically cleavable alpha-azidoethers as a new method to obtain external control over the degradation behavior of polymers. My first goal is to illustrate the potential of alpha-azidoethers toward developing cleavable linkers. We have studied the relationship between alpha-azidoether structure and hydrolytic stability, to prepare linkers that withstand background hydrolytic cleavage until they are exposed to the cleaving trigger. The cleavage kinetics of the alpha-azidoether functional group was quantified. In addition to the conventionally used tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP), dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), a previously unexplored, biocompatible reducing agent, was also evaluated as a cleaving trigger. Based on these results, we have proposed design rules for utilizing alpha-azidoethers as cleavable linkers in applications that require bioorthogonal control over linker cleavage. Secondly, the alpha-azidoether cleavable linker chemistry was implemented into the development of polymeric materials. Two different types of polymers were developed. Polyamides incorporating alpha-azidoethers along the backbone were synthesized, and their physical properties and chemically triggered degradation behavior were characterized. The degradation timescale of these polymers can be tuned simply by manipulating the concentration of the externally applied chemical trigger. The alpha-azidoether functional group was then utilized to develop a unique triggered-release polymeric adhesive for potential applications in dental adhesive formulations. A methacrylamide-phosphonate adhesive monomer incorporating an alpha

  1. Synthesis of tritiated 1-alpha-methadol and 1-alpha-acetylmethadol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thang, D.C.; Nam, N.H.; Pontikis, R. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital Fernand Widal, 75 - Paris (France)); Pichat, L. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service des Molecules Marquees)

    1982-04-01

    dl-Methadone was resolved by crystallization of its ammonium d- ..cap alpha.. -bromocamphor-..pi..-sulfonate salt to give d-methadone. The latter in ethyl acetate solution was reduced with tritium gas to 1-..cap alpha..-methadol /sup 3/H in presence of Adams platinum oxide at normal temperature and pressure. Acetylation of 1-..cap alpha..-carbinol hydrochloride by means of acetyl chloride afforded 1-..cap alpha..-acetylmethadol /sup 3/H, specific activity: 20 Ci/mMole. The positions and extent of tritium labelling were determined by /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy.

  2. Nanoparticles with entrapped {alpha}-tocopherol: synthesis, characterization, and controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zigoneanu, Imola Gabriela [101 E B Doran Building, BAE Department, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Astete, Carlos Ernesto [110 E B Doran Building, BAE Department, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Sabliov, Cristina Mirela [141 E B Doran Building, BAE Department, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)], E-mail: csabliov@lsu.edu

    2008-03-12

    An emulsion evaporation method was used to synthesize spherical poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles with entrapped {alpha}-tocopherol. Two different surfactants were used: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). For SDS nanoparticles, the size of the nanoparticles decreased significantly with the entrapment of {alpha}-tocopherol in the PLGA matrix, while the size of PVA nanoparticles remained unchanged. The polydispersity index after synthesis was under 0.100 for PVA nanoparticles and around 0.150 for SDS nanoparticles. The zeta potential was negative for all PVA nanoparticles. The entrapment efficiency of {alpha}-tocopherol in the polymeric matrix was approximately 89% and 95% for nanoparticles with 8% and 16% {alpha}-tocopherol theoretical loading, respectively. The residual PVA associated with the nanoparticles after purification was approximately 6% ( w/w relative to the nanoparticles). The release profile showed an initial burst followed by a slower release of the {alpha}-tocopherol entrapped inside the PLGA matrix. The release for nanoparticles with 8% {alpha}-tocopherol theoretical loading (86% released in the first hour) was faster than the release for the nanoparticles with 16% {alpha}-tocopherol theoretical loading (34% released in the first hour)

  3. Whole-body irradiation transiently diminishes the adrenocorticotropin response to recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlstein, R.S.; Mehta, N.R.; Neta, R.; Whitnall, M.H. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mougey, E.H. [Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha} (rhIL-1{alpha}) has significant potential as a radioprotector and/or treatment for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Both IL-1 and whole-body ionizing irradiation acutely stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We therefore assessed the interaction of whole-body irradiation and rhIL-1{alpha} in altering the functioning of the axis in mice. Specifically, we determined the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to rhIL-1{alpha} administered just before and hours to days after whole-body or sham irradiation. Our results indicate that whole-body irradiation does not potentiate the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in ACTH levels at the doses used. In fact, the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in plasma ACTH is transiently impaired when the cytokine is administered 5 h after, but not 1 h before, exposure to whole-body irradiation. The ACTH response may be inhibited by elevated corticosterone levels after whole-body irradiation, or by other radiation-induced effects on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  4. DB-1900 low-background measuring device of alpha and beta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongquan; Gan Jinbang; Chen Qi; Zhao Yunqing

    1997-08-01

    The device is a box-type detector used to measure the emissivity of Alpha and Beta from dry samples under 2π geometry in radionuclide metrology. It is composed of a high efficiency αβ detector with electrostatic screen of zero potential [patent ZL92111938.0 (in China)] and anticoincidence detector in lead chamber, and has been reasonably combined with double anticoincidence technique to form integral equipment. The characteristics of the device are as follows: It can stably measure the emissivity of Alpha and Beta from dry samples with less surface conductivity (the surface resistance of the samples: 13 Ω) in detector. It can measure Beta emissivity from samples in which Alpha coexist with Beta, and discrimination between Alpha and Beta emissivities can be made simultaneously by two paths. It is a good quantitative means for measuring Alpha and Beta radiation in radiometry, radiation protection and environmental protection. It could be used to measure weak radiativity of Alpha and Beta samples from scientific research, minerals, building materials, plastics, medicinal materials, seas and oceans biology, et al. (7 refs., 8 tabs., 17 figs.)

  5. Systematics of alpha Q-values. Potential dependence of the alpha decay life time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    It has been considered that the life time of α decay can be explained by calculating the probability of α getting out through the composite field of nuclear force and Coulomb force, that alpha and remaining nuclei make, by tunnel effect. However, when the detailed theoretical calculation was performed, the large difference from the experimental values was found. The researches which, have been carried out before are introduced. In this report, it is shown that when the treatment of Arima and Yoshida's way is carried out by using the realistic field of nuclear force and Coulomb force, the half life of α decay in considerably wide range can be calculated by considering the results of Tonozuka and Arima. The systematics of α Q-values is explained. The method of determining the life time of α decay is examined. The comparison of the calculated values and the experimental values of the α decay of 20 Ne and 212 Po is shown. This method of calculating the half life of α decay can reproduce the experimental values well. The application is considered to the estimation of the life of unstable nuclei, the new approach to heavy particle decay and others. (K.I.)

  6. Temporal dynamics of attention during encoding vs. maintenance of working memory: complementary views from event-related potentials and alpha-band oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Nicholas E.; Walther, Lena; Wallis, George; Stokes, Mark G.; Nobre, Anna C.

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is strongly influenced by attention. In visual working-memory tasks, recall performance can be improved by an attention-guiding cue presented before encoding (precue) or during maintenance (retrocue). Although precues and retrocues recruit a similar fronto-parietal control network, the two are likely to exhibit some processing differences, since precues invite anticipation of upcoming information, while retrocues may guide prioritisation, protection, and selection of information already in mind. Here we explored the behavioral and electrophysiological differences between precueing and retrocueing in a new visual working-memory task designed to permit a direct comparison between cueing conditions. We found marked differences in event-related potential (ERP) profiles between the precue and retrocue conditions. In line with precues primarily generating an anticipatory shift of attention toward the location of an upcoming item, we found a robust lateralization in late cue-evoked potentials associated with target anticipation. Retrocues elicited a different pattern of ERPs that was compatible with an early selection mechanism, but not with stimulus anticipation. In contrast to the distinct ERP patterns, alpha band (8-14 Hz) lateralization was indistinguishable between cue types (reflecting, in both conditions, the location of the cued item). We speculate that whereas alpha-band lateralization after a precue is likely to enable anticipatory attention, lateralization after a retrocue may instead enable the controlled spatiotopic access to recently encoded visual information. PMID:25244118

  7. Hippocampal 3alpha,5alpha-THP may alter depressive behavior of pregnant and lactating rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Cheryl A; Walf, Alicia A

    2004-07-01

    The 5alpha-reduced metabolite of progesterone (P), 5alpha-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP), may mediate progestins' effects to reduce depressive behavior of female rats in part through actions in the hippocampus. To investigate, forced swim test behavior and plasma and hippocampal progestin levels were assessed in groups of rats expected to differ in their 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels due to endogenous differences (pregnant and postpartum), administration of a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor (finasteride; 50 mg/kg sc), and/or gestational stress [prenatal stress (PNS)], an animal model of depression. Pregnant rats had higher plasma and hippocampal 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels and less depressive behavior (decreased immobility, increased struggling and swimming) in the forced swim test than did postpartum rats. Finasteride, compared to vehicle-administration, reduced plasma and hippocampal 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels and increased depressive behavior (increased immobility, decreased struggling and swimming). PNS was associated with lower hippocampal, but not plasma, 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels and increased swimming compared to that observed in control rats. Together, these data suggest that 3alpha,5alpha-THP in the hippocampus may mediate antidepressive behavior of female rats.

  8. Coupled channel folding model description of {alpha} scattering from {sup 9}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S.; Chatterjee, J.M.; Majumdar, H. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700064 (India); Datta, S.K. [Nuclear Science Centre, P.O.10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Banerjee, S.R. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700064 (India); Chintalapudi, S.N. [Inter-University Consortium, Department of Atomic Energy Facilities, Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700064 (India)

    1995-09-01

    Alpha scattering from {sup 9}Be at {ital E}{sub {alpha}}= 65 MeV is described in the coupled channel framework with phenomenological as well as folded potentials. The multipole components of the deformed density of {sup 9}Be are derived from Nilsson model wave functions. Reasonably good agreements are obtained for the angular distributions of 3/2{sup {minus}}(g.s.) and 5/2{sup {minus}}(2.43 MeV) states of the ground state band with folded potentials. The deformation predicted by the model corroborates with that derived from the phenomenological analysis with potentials of different geometries.

  9. Alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits alpha-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Aulus E A D; Albuquerque, Erika V S; Silva, Maria C M; Souza, Djair S L; Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo B; Valencia, Arnubio; Rocha, Thales L; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2010-06-17

    Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei), is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an alpha-amylase inhibitor gene (alpha-AI1), which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. We transformed C. arabica with the alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (alpha-AI1) from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L). The presence of the alpha-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against alpha-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum alpha-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the alpha-AI1 protein against H. hampei alpha-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee.

  10. Contributions to the theory of alpha disintegration of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnoveanu, G.I.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha disintegration of heavy and super-heavy spherical nuclei is studied. When the new calculation technique for alpha intensities dependent on the shell-model has been applied, a technique which allows the use of a more complex structure of the alpha particle, the detailed calculation of the alpha half-times is performed for both radioactive alpha nuclei in the lead area and for the super-heavy nuclei, by using the R matrix theory of alpha disintegration independent of the channel radius. The relative values of overlap integrals calculated by means of the intrinsic function for the Gauss and Moshinsky type alpha particle are presented, as well as a comparison between them and the experiment values for 8.6, 9.00 and 9.6 fm channel radii in the case of Po, Ra, Rn and Th isotopes. Original contributions to the alpha disintegration theory are represented by the generalization of the Taylor series method expressing the transformations to the centre of mass, and the relative distance from two particles to four particles in the same harmonic oscillator potential, and by the development of the R matrix theory for alpha disintegration independent of the channel radius in the case of complex structured alpha particles. (author)

  11. Crystalline anhydrous {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose (polymorph {beta}) and crystalline dihydrate {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose: A calorimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Susana S. [Centro de Quimica Estrutural, Complexo Interdisciplinar, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: susanapinto@ist.utl.pt; Diogo, Herminio P. [Centro de Quimica Estrutural, Complexo Interdisciplinar, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: hdiogo@ist.utl.pt; Moura-Ramos, Joaquim J. [Centro de Quimica-Fisica Molecular, Complexo Interdisciplinar, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mouraramos@ist.utl.pt

    2006-09-15

    The mean values of the standard massic energy of combustion of crystalline anhydrous {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11}, polymorph {beta}) and crystalline dihydrate {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose (C{sub 12}H{sub 26}O{sub 13}) measured by static-bomb combustion calorimetry in oxygen, at the temperature T=298.15K, are {delta}{sub c}u{sup o}=-(16434.05+/-4.50)J.g{sup -1} and {delta}{sub c}u{sup o}=-(14816.05+/-3.52)J.g{sup -1}, respectively. The standard (p{sup o}=0.1MPa) molar enthalpy of formation of these compounds were derived from the corresponding standard molar enthalpies of combustion, respectively, {delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o} (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11},cr)=-(2240.9+/-3.9)kJ.mol{sup -1}, and {delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o} (C{sub 12}H{sub 26}O{sub 13},cr)=-(2832.6+/-3.6)kJ.mol{sup -1}. The values of the standard enthalpies of formation obtained in this work, together with data on enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution ({delta}{sub sol}H{sup {approx}}) for crystalline dihydrate and amorphous anhydrous trehalose, allow a better insight on the thermodynamic description of the trehalose system which can provide, together with the future research on the subject, a contribution for understanding the metabolism in several organisms, as well as the phase transition between the different polymorphs.

  12. Energy dependence of event shapes and of $\\alpha_s$ at LEP 2

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Masik, J; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    Infrared and collinear safe event shape distributions and their mean values are determined using the data taken at ve di erent centre of mass energies above $M_Z$ with the DELPHI detector at LEP. From the event shapes, the strong coupling $\\alpha_s$ is extracted in $O(\\alpha^2_s)$, NLLA and a combined scheme using hadronisation corrections evaluated with fragmentation model generators as well as using an analytical power ansatz. Comparing these measurements to those obtained at MZ, the energy dependence (running) of $\\alpha_s$ is accessible. The logarithmic energy slope of the inverse strong coupling is measured to be $d\\alpha_{s}^{-1}/d log(E_{cm}) = 1.39 \\pm 0.34(stat) \\pm 0.17(syst)$, in good agreement with the QCD expectation of 1.27.

  13. Dosimetry of natural and man-made alpha emitters in plankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Baptista, G.B.; Wrenn, M.E.; Eisenbrid, M.

    1980-11-01

    Comparison between the natural and man-made alpha radiation dose rates to plankton can be important for predicting the potential long-term effects on aquatic biota resulting from the routine or accidental radioactive releases from the nuclear fuel cycle. A contribution is made here towards the goal of comparing natural with man-made alpha radiation dose rates to plankton using the same method of calculation in both cases. (Author) [pt

  14. Alpha Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quickly, but their effects last only a few hours. Long-acting medications take longer to work, but their effects last longer. Which alpha blocker is best for you depends on your health and the condition being treated. Alpha blockers are ...

  15. In vitro and preclinical targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Rizvi, S.; Li, Y.; Tian, Z.; University of Wollongong, NSW; Ranson, M.; Russell, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Targeted Alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The alpha emitting radioisotope Bi-213 is produced by generator and chelated to a cancer affined monoclonal antibody or protein to form the alpha-conjugate (AC) against melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, bladder, breast and prostate cancers. These ACs are tested for stability, specificity and cytotoxicity. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1.5 million cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. The tumour growth is compared between untreated controls, nonspecific RIC and specific RIC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. Results: Stable alpha-ACs can be produced which are highly specific and cytotoxic in vitro. Local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Local TAT can also completely regress (11/12) sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts. These results point to the potential application of local TAT and systemic TAT in the management of these cancers. A phase 1 and 2 clinical trial is planned for local TAT of sc recurrent melanoma. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  16. Stabilization of {alpha}-amylase by using anionic surfactant during the immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Batal, A.I. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Atia, K.S. [Nuclear Research Center, Radioisotopes Applications Division, Abo-Zable, P.O. Box 13759, Cairo (Egypt)]. E-mail: ks_atia@yahoo.com; Eid, M. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2005-10-01

    This work describes the entrapment of {alpha}-amylase into butylacrylate-acrylic acid copolymer (BuA/AAc) using {gamma} irradiation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (AOT), the reuse efficiency, and kinetic behavior of immobilized {alpha}-amylase were studied. Covering of {alpha}-amylase with bis-(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) made the enzyme more stable than the uncovered form. The hydrolytic activity of the pre-coated immobilized {alpha}-amylase was increased below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) (10mmol/L). The results showed an increase in the relative activity with increase in the degree of hydration. The pre-coated immobilized {alpha}-amylase showed a higher k{sub cat}/K{sub m} and lower activation energy compared to the free and uncoated-immobilized preparation, respectively. The results suggest that the immobilization of {alpha}-amylase is a potentially useful approach for commercial starch hydrolysis in two-phase systems.

  17. Particle Physics Aspects of Antihydrogen Studies with ALPHA at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M.C.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P.D.; Bray, C.C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C.L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D.R.; Hangst, J.S.; Hardy, W.N.; Hayano, R.S.; Hayden, M.E.; Humphries, A.J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M.J.; Jorgensen, L.V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lai, W.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D.M.; Storey, J.W.; Thompson, R.I.; van der Werf, D.P.; Wasilenko, L.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  18. Potential antisecretory antidiarrheals. 1. Alpha 2-adrenergic aromatic aminoguanidine hydrazones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzele, B S; Moormann, A E; Gullikson, G W; Albin, D; Bianchi, R G; Palicharla, P; Sanguinetti, E L; Walters, D E

    1988-01-01

    Guanabenz, a centrally acting antihypertensive agent, has been shown to have intestinal antisecretory properties. A series of aromatic aminoguanidine hydrazones was made in an effort to separate the antisecretory and cardiovascular activities. Benzaldehyde, naphthaldehyde, and tetralone derivatives were synthesized. The compounds were evaluated in the cholera toxin treated ligated jejunum of the rat and in the Ussing chamber using a rabbit ileum preparation. A number of compounds, including members of each structural class, were active upon subcutaneous administration in the rat. Active compounds were determined to be alpha 2-adrenergic agonists by yohimbine reversals of their Ussing chamber activities. The compound displaying the best separation of activities was the aminoguanidine hydrazone of 2,6-dimethyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (20).

  19. Uranium analysis in Cypriot groundwaters by total alpha-radiometry and alpha-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathiou, Maria; Kiliari, Tasoula; Pashalidis, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Two different alpha-radiometric methods (e.g. alpha-spectroscopy and alpha-particle counting) have been applied to the determination of uranium in Cypriot groundwater samples after separation of the radionuclides by cation exchange using Chelex-100 and its electrodeposition on stainless steel planchettes. The data obtained were compared to show the advantages and disadvantages of the two radiometric methods, determine the alpha-radioactivity concentration and the radiation dose associated with the use of the studied groundwaters. Calibration of the methods was performed by means of uranium standard solutions and the corresponding data were used to evaluate linear range, detector efficiency, detection limits, value of the information obtained, and time of analysis of the methods. Comparison of the data obtained from calibration and natural sample measurements has shown that alpha-particle counting with a simple alpha-radiometer (equipped with a semiconductor detector) may offer only an activity value and not detailed information about the isotopic composition but it is the fastest method and the method of choice if only a screening method for the alpha-radioactivity measurement is required. Based on the alpha-radioactivity data, the corresponding radiation dose was estimated for situations where the groundwaters are used for drinking water purposes.

  20. X. cap alpha. method with pseudopotentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szasz, L. (Fordham Univ., New York (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1980-06-01

    The X..cap alpha.. method for an atom or molecule is transformed into an all-electron pseudopotential formalism. The equations of the X..cap alpha.. method are exactly transformed into pseudo-orbital equations and the resulting pseudopotentials are replaced by simple density-dependent potentials derived from Thomas-Fermi model. It is shown that the new formalism satisfies the virial theorem. As the first application, it is shown that the model explains the shell-structure of atoms by the property that the pseudo-orbitals for the (ns), (np), (nd), etc. electrons are, in a very good approximation, the solutions of the same equation and have their maxima at the same point thereby creating the peaks in the radial density characterizing the shell structure.

  1. Alpha-synuclein in cutaneous small nerve fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siepmann T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Timo Siepmann,1 Ben Min-Woo Illigens,2 Kristian Barlinn1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 2Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Despite progression in the development of pharmacological therapy, treatment of alpha synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD and some atypical parkinsonism syndromes, is still challenging. To date, our knowledge of the mechanisms whereby the pathological form of alpha-synuclein causes structural and functional damage to the nervous system is limited and, consequently, there is a lack of specific diagnostic tools to evaluate pathology in these patients and differentiate PD from other neurodegenerative proteinopathies. Recent studies indicated that alpha-synuclein deposition in cutaneous small nerve fibers assessed by skin biopsies might be a valid disease marker of PD and facilitate early differentiation of PD from atypical parkinsonism syndromes. This observation is relevant since early diagnosis may enable timely treatment and improve quality of life. However, challenges include the necessity of standardizing immunohistochemical analysis techniques and the identification of potential distinct patterns of intraneural alpha-synuclein deposition among synucleinopathies. In this perspective, we explore the scientific and clinical opportunities arising from alpha-synuclein assessment using skin biopsies. These include elucidation of the peripheral nervous system pathology of PD and other synucleinopathies, identification of novel targets to study response to neuroprotective treatment, and improvement of clinical management. Furthermore, we discuss future challenges in exploring the diagnostic value of skin biopsy assessment for alpha-synuclein deposition and implementing the technique in clinical practice. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, diagnosis, skin

  2. Role of Frontal Alpha Oscillations in Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R.; Foulser, A. Alban; Mellin, Juliann M.; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent EEG data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8 – 12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a fundamental role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking, a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40Hz-tACS was used in instead of 10Hz-tACS to rule out a general “electrical stimulation” effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal gamma stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. PMID:25913062

  3. Alpha Background Discrimination in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszko, Julieta; Majorana Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator (MJD) searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge using arrays of high-purity germanium detectors. If observed, this process would have implications for grand-unification and the predominance of matter over antimatter in the universe. A problematic background in such large granular detector arrays is posed by alpha particles. In MJD, potential background events that are consistent with energy-degraded alphas originating on the passivated detector surface have been observed. We have studied these events by scanning the passivated surface of a P-type point contact detector like those used in MJD with a collimated alpha source. We observe that surface alpha events exhibit high charge-trapping, with a significant fraction of the trapped charge being re-released slowly. This leads to both a reduced prompt signal and a measurable change in slope of the tail of a recorded pulse. In this contribution we discuss the characteristics of these events and the filter developed to identify the occurrence of this delayed charge recovery, allowing for the efficient rejection of passivated surface alpha events while retaining 99.8% of bulk events. We also discuss the impact of this filter on the sensitivity of MJD. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Phys., the Particle Astrophys. and Nuclear Phys. Programs of the NSF, and SURF. Additional support from the NSFGRFP under Grant No. 1256082.

  4. Two Strategies for Microbial Production of an Industrial Enzyme-Alpha-Amylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Garriott, Owen; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments including hot springs, soda lakes and arctic water. This ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered extremophiles to be of interest in astrobiology, evolutionary biology as well as in industrial applications. Of particular interest to the biotechnology industry are the biological catalysts of the extremophiles, the extremozymes, whose unique stabilities at extreme conditions make them potential sources of novel enzymes in industrial applications. There are two major approaches to microbial enzyme production. This entails enzyme isolation directly from the natural host or creating a recombinant expression system whereby the targeted enzyme can be overexpressed in a mesophilic host. We are employing both methods in the effort to produce alpha-amylases from a hyperthermophilic archaeon (Thermococcus) isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Atlantic Ocean, as well as from alkaliphilic bacteria (Bacillus) isolated from a soda lake in Tanzania. Alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of internal alpha-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch to produce smaller sugars. Thermostable alpha-amylases are used in the liquefaction of starch for production of fructose and glucose syrups, whereas alpha-amylases stable at high pH have potential as detergent additives. The alpha-amylase encoding gene from Thermococcus was PCR amplified using carefully designed primers and analyzed using bioinformatics tools such as BLAST and Multiple Sequence Alignment for cloning and expression in E.coli. Four strains of Bacillus were grown in alkaline starch-enriched medium of which the culture supernatant was used as enzyme source. Amylolytic activity was detected using the starch-iodine method.

  5. Regulation of bovine kidney alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex by calcium ion and adenine nucleotides. Effects on S0.5 for alpha-ketoglutarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlis, V B; Roche, T E

    1981-04-28

    Regulation of bovine kidney alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex by energy-linked metabolites was investigated. Ca2+, ADP, or inorganic phosphate markedly enhanced the activity of the complex, and ATP or, to a lesser extent, GTP decreased the activity of the complex. Initial velocity studies with alpha-ketoglutarate as the varied substrate demonstrated that these modulators induced large changes in S0.5 for alpha-ketoglutarate (based on analysis in Hill plots) with no change in the maximum velocity (as determined by double-reciprocal plots). For all conditions studied, the Hill coefficients were significantly less than 1.0 with slopes that were linear over wide ranges of alpha-ketoglutarate concentrations, indicating negative cooperativity that probably resulted from multiple site-site interactions. Ca2+ (maintained at 10 muM by a Ca2+ buffer) decreased the S0.5 for alpha-ketoglutarate 63-fold (from 25 to 0.40 mM); even in the presence of a positive effector, ADP or phosphate, Ca2+ decreased the S0.5 for alpha-ketoglutarate 7.8- or 28-fold, respectively. Consistent with a mechanism of action dependent of Ca2+, ADP (1.60 mM) or phosphate (20 mM) reduced the S0.5 for alpha-ketoglutarate in the presence of Ca2+ (i.e., 4.5- or 1.67-fold, respectively); however, these effectors elicited larger decreases in S0.5 in the absence of Ca2+ (i.e., 37- or 3.7-fold, respectively). ATP (1.6 mM) increased the S0.5 for alpha-ketoglutarate, and Ca2+ appreciably reduced the effect, lowering the S0.5 98-fold from 66 to 0.67 mM. Thus the activity of the kidney alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is poised to increase as the energy potential in mitochondria declines, and Ca2+ has a pronounced modulatory effect. Comparative studies on bovine heart alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and the effects of varying the ADP/ATP ratio in the presence or absence of Ca2+ or phosphate are also described.

  6. Influence of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha buildup on tokamak reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tolliver, J.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha accumulation on the confinement capability of a candidate Engineering Test Reactor plasma (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) in achieving ignition and steady-state driven operation has been assessed using both global and 1-1/2-dimensional transport models. Estimates are made of the threshold for radial diffusion of fast alphas and thermal alpha buildup. It is shown that a relatively low level of radial transport, when combined with large gradients in the fast alpha density, leads to a significant radial flow with a deleterious effect on plasma performance. Similarly, modest levels of thermal alpha concentration significantly influence the ignition and steady-state burn capability

  7. Clofibric acid stimulates branched-chain amino acid catabolism by three mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Rumi; Murakami, Taro; Obayashi, Mariko; Nakai, Naoya; Jaskiewicz, Jerzy; Fujiwara, Yoko; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Harris, Robert A

    2002-11-15

    Clofibrate promotes catabolism of branched-chain amino acids by increasing the activity of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase [BCKDH] complex. Depending upon the sex of the rats, nutritional state, and tissue being studied, clofibrate can affect BCKDH complex activity by three different mechanisms. First, by directly inhibiting BCKDH kinase activity, clofibrate can increase the proportion of the BCKDH complex in the active, dephosphorylated state. This occurs in situations in which the BCKDH complex is largely inactive due to phosphorylation, e.g., in the skeletal muscle of chow-fed rats or in the liver of female rats late in the light cycle. Second, by increasing the levels at which the enzyme components of the BCKDH complex are expressed, clofibrate can increase the total enzymatic activity of the BCKDH complex. This is readily demonstrated in livers of rats fed a low-protein diet, a nutritional condition that induces a decrease in the level of expression of the BCKDH complex. Third, by decreasing the amount of BCKDH kinase expressed and therefore its activity, clofibrate induces an increase in the percentage of the BCKDH complex in the active, dephosphorylated state. This occurs in the livers of rats fed a low-protein diet, a nutritional condition that causes inactivation of the BCKDH complex due to upregulation of the amount of BCKDH kinase. WY-14,643, which, like clofibric acid, is a ligand for the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha [PPARalpha], does not directly inhibit BCKDH kinase but produces the same long-term effects as clofibrate on expression of the BCKDH complex and its kinase. Thus, clofibrate is unique in its capacity to stimulate BCAA oxidation through inhibition of BCKDH kinase activity, whereas PPARalpha activators in general promote BCAA oxidation by increasing expression of components of the BCKDH complex and decreasing expression of the BCKDH kinase.

  8. Myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in Cynomolgus monkey model and its relationship to pharmacokinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiming, Liu; Shuilin, Xie [Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510663 (China); He, Sun [School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gonzalez, Frank J [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Xiaoxiong, Wei [Medpace, Inc., Cincinnati, OH 45212 (United States); Dai Renke [Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510663 (China)], E-mail: dai_renke@gibh.ac.cn

    2009-03-15

    Fibrate drugs are PPAR{alpha} agonists prescribed for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Severe myotoxicity has been reportedly associated with their use albeit at a low frequency, especially for gemfibrozil. Few studies have investigated the mechanism of fibrate-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Considering the apparent species-related differences in PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced hepatotoxicity, we studied the myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in a Cynomolgus monkey model and explored the relationship between myotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Six Cynomolgus monkeys were dosed with gemfibrozil twice daily at 600 mg/kg/day for the first two periods (P1 and P2, 8 days and 9 days respectively) and 300 mg/kg/day for the third period (P3, 14 days). Creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured, together with hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity markers. Behavioral responses were recorded for indication of toxicity. Pharmacokinetics was carried out following the 16th dosage of P1 and 17th dosage of P2 when myotoxicity was identified. Multivariable data analysis was employed to explore the relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters and myotoxicity markers. Consequently, myotoxicity occurred in monkey no. 2 (M2) and M6 in P1, M3 and M4 in P2, M3 and M6 in P3. Data analysis showed T80-150 (sustained time above the given concentration) contributed for myotoxicity discriminance and correlated with myotoxicity risk. This study revealed Cynomolgus monkey may be a good animal model for myotoxicity evaluation with sensitivity, reproducibility and similarities to humans. More interestingly, they exhibited a much higher incidence of myotoxicity than that of humans. Sustained high drug concentration plays an important role for the occurrence of myotoxicity. This may suggest an influence of drug transport and metabolism on myotoxicity.

  9. Alpha?fetoprotein elevation in NUT midline carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    D?Ambrosio, Lorenzo; Palesandro, Erica; Moretti, Marina; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Alessandra; Carnevale Schianca, Fabrizio; Aglietta, Massimo; Grignani, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Background Nuclear protein in testis (NUT) midline carcinoma is a rarely diagnosed and potentially under-recognized type of squamous carcinoma that is considered one of the most aggressive human solid tumors. Alpha-fetoprotein elevation has been associated with chronic liver diseases and a limited number of cancers. In particular, in presence of a mediastinal mass in a young man, alpha-fetoprotein elevation is considered nearly pathognomonic of a non-seminoma germ-cell tumor. Case presentatio...

  10. [Age-related change in the alpha-tocopherolquinone/alpha-tocopherol ratio in the rat erythrocyte membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, K; Takeda, H; Matsumiya, T; Takasaki, M

    1999-05-01

    alpha-Tocopherol (alpha-Toc), a lipophilic phenolic antioxidant that is localized mainly in the biomembrane, protects cells against oxidation-associated cytotoxicity by prevention of membrane lipid peroxidation, maintenance of the redox balance intracellular thiols and stabilization of the membrane structure. We investigated the age-related changes in redox dynamics of alpha-Toc in plasma and erythrocyte membrane of an elderly (66 weeks old) and young group (10 weeks old). Total, alpha-, beta + gamma-, delta-Toc and alpha-tocopherolquinone (alpha-TocQ) in plasma and erythrocyte membrane were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a series of multiple coulometric working electrodes (CWE). Rat venous blood sample was divided into plasma and erythrocyte layers by centrifugation, and then erythrocyte membrane sample was prepared according to the method of Dodge et al. under a stream of nitrogen. In plasma, total and alpha-Toc concentrations were increased, and beta + gamma-, delta-Toc and alpha-TocQ concentrations were decreased age-dependently. In the erythrocyte membrane, total, alpha-TocQ concentrations and three fractions of tocopherols decreased age-dependently. Also, a decrease in the alpha-TocQ/alpha-Toc ratio in erythrocyte membrane was observed in the elderly group. These findings suggest that the alpha-Toc uptake in erythrocyte membrane and utilization rate of alpha-Toc in erythrocyte membrane decline age-dependently. This decline may promote membrane lipid peroxidation. alpha-Toc redox dynamics in erythrocyte membrane were useful to investigate the pathophysiology of aging mechanisms related to oxidative stress.

  11. Modeling of MeV alpha particle energy transfer to lower hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schivell, J.; Monticello, D.A.; Fisch, N.; Rax, J.M.

    1993-10-01

    The interaction between a lower hybrid wave and a fusion alpha particle displaces the alpha particle simultaneously in space and energy. This results in coupled diffusion. Diffusion of alphas down the density gradient could lead to their transferring energy to the wave. This could, in turn, put energy into current drive. An initial analytic study was done by Fisch and Rax. Here the authors calculate numerical solutions for the alpha energy transfer and study a range of conditions that are favorable for wave amplification from alpha energy. They find that it is possible for fusion alpha particles to transfer a large fraction of their energy to the lower hybrid wave. The numerical calculation shows that the net energy transfer is not sensitive to the value of the diffusion coefficient over a wide range of practical values. An extension of this idea, the use of a lossy boundary to enhance the energy transfer, is investigated. This technique is shown to offer a large potential benefit

  12. A CMOS integrated pulse mode alpha-particle counter for application in radon monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Walkey, D.J.; Tarr, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    A custom integrated circuit for detecting alpha particles for application in the monitoring of radon has been designed and tested. The design uses the reverse-biased well to a substrate capacitance of a p-n junction in a conventional CMOS process as a sense capacitor for incident alpha particles. A simple CMOS inverter is used as an analog amplifier to detect the small potential change induced by an alpha-particle strike on the sense capacitor. The design was implemented in a 1.2-microm conventional CMOS process with a sense capacitor area of 110 microm 2 . Tests carried out under vacuum conditions using a calibrated 241 Am alpha-particle source showed an output voltage swing of ≥2.0 V for an alpha event. The detector is also shown to have good immunity to noise and high-quantum efficiency for alpha particles

  13. Choline kinase-alpha by regulating cell aggressiveness and drug sensitivity is a potential druggable target for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, A; Nicoletti, R; Tinaglia, V; De Cecco, L; Pisanu, M E; Ricci, A; Podo, F; Canevari, S; Iorio, E; Bagnoli, M; Mezzanzanica, D

    2014-01-21

    Aberrant choline metabolism has been proposed as a novel cancer hallmark. We recently showed that epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) possesses an altered MRS-choline profile, characterised by increased phosphocholine (PCho) content to which mainly contribute over-expression and activation of choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-alpha). To assess its biological relevance, ChoK-alpha expression was downmodulated by transient RNA interference in EOC in vitro models. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis and functional analysis was performed to identify the pathway/functions perturbed in ChoK-alpha-silenced cells, then validated by in vitro experiments. In silenced cells, compared with control, we observed: (I) a significant reduction of both CHKA transcript and ChoK-alpha protein expression; (II) a dramatic, proportional drop in PCho content ranging from 60 to 71%, as revealed by (1)H-magnetic spectroscopy analysis; (III) a 35-36% of cell growth inhibition, with no evidences of apoptosis or modification of the main cellular survival signalling pathways; (IV) 476 differentially expressed genes, including genes related to lipid metabolism. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified cellular functions related to cell death and cellular proliferation and movement as the most perturbed. Accordingly, CHKA-silenced cells displayed a significant delay in wound repair, a reduced migration and invasion capability were also observed. Furthermore, although CHKA silencing did not directly induce cell death, a significant increase of sensitivity to platinum, paclitaxel and doxorubicin was observed even in a drug-resistant context. We showed for the first time in EOC that CHKA downregulation significantly decreased the aggressive EOC cell behaviour also affecting cells' sensitivity to drug treatment. These observations open the way to further analysis for ChoK-alpha validation as a new EOC therapeutic target to be used alone or in combination with conventional drugs.

  14. Event-related frontal alpha asymmetries: electrophysiological correlates of approach motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, Benjamin; Schomberg, Jessica; Gruber, Thomas; Quirin, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decades, frontal alpha asymmetries observed during resting state periods of several minutes have been used as a marker of affective-motivational states. To date, there is no evidence that alpha asymmetries can be observed in response to brief affective-motivational stimuli, as typically presented in event-related designs. As we argue, frontal alpha asymmetry might indeed be elicited by brief events if they are salient enough. In an event-related design, we used erotic pictures, i.e., highly salient incentives to elicit approach motivation, and contrasted them with pictures of dressed attractive women. As expected, we found significant alpha asymmetries for erotic pictures as compared to control pictures. Our findings suggest that the highly reactive reward system can lead to immediate, phasic changes in frontal alpha asymmetries. We discuss the findings with respect to the notion that high salience of erotic pictures derives from their potential of satisfying an individuals' need by mere visual inspection, which is not the case for pictures showing other types of motivational stimuli such as food.

  15. Identification of a novel bile acid in swans, tree ducks, and geese: 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiyama, Genta; Iida, Takashi; Goto, Takaaki; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi; Nambara, Toshio; Hagey, Lee R; Schteingart, Claudio D; Hofmann, Alan F

    2006-07-01

    By HPLC, a taurine-conjugated bile acid with a retention time different from that of taurocholate was found to be present in the bile of the black-necked swan, Cygnus melanocoryphus. The bile acid was isolated and its structure, established by (1)H and (13)C NMR and mass spectrometry, was that of the taurine N-acyl amidate of 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid. The compound was shown to have chromatographic and spectroscopic properties that were identical to those of the taurine conjugate of authentic 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid, previously synthesized by us from ursodeoxycholic acid. By HPLC, the taurine conjugate of 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid was found to be present in 6 of 6 species in the subfamily Dendrocygninae (tree ducks) and in 10 of 13 species in the subfamily Anserinae (swans and geese) but not in other subfamilies in the Anatidae family. It was also not present in species from the other two families of the order Anseriformes. 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-Trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid is a new primary bile acid that is present in the biliary bile acids of swans, tree ducks, and geese and may be termed 15alpha-hydroxy-chenodeoxycholic acid.

  16. Buffett's Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Kabiller, David; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    Berkshire Hathaway has realized a Sharpe ratio of 0.76, higher than any other stock or mutual fund with a history of more than 30 years, and Berkshire has a significant alpha to traditional risk factors. However, we find that the alpha becomes insignificant when controlling for exposures to Betting...

  17. Sterol synthesis. A novel reductive rearrangement of an alpha,beta-unsaturated steroidal epoxide; a new chemical synthesis of 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta, 15alpha-diol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, E J; Schroepfer, G J

    1977-04-01

    Reduction of 3beta-benzoyloxy-14alpha,15alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholest-7-ene with either lithium triethylboro-hydride or lithium aluminum hydride (4 molar excess) gave 5-alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol in high yield. Reduction of the epoxy ester with lithium triethylborodeuteride or lithium aluminum deuteride (4 molar excess) gave [7alpha-2-H]-5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol. Reduction of 2beta-benzoyloxy-14alpha,15alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholest-7-ene with a large excess (24 molar excess) of lithium aluminum hydride gave, in addition to the expected 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol, a significant yield (33%) of 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta-o1. Reduction of the epoxy ester with a large excess (24 molar excess) of lithium aluminum deuteride gave [7alpha-2H]-5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol and 5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta-o1 which contained two atoms of stably bound deuterium.

  18. Measurement of potential alpha energy concentration in some schools in Shillong city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maibam, Deveshwori; Sharma, Yubaraj; Saxena, Atul; Walia, Devesh; Diengdoh, Evamary; Rapmai, Aibora K.

    2011-01-01

    Radon and its progeny account for more than 50% of total natural radiation exposure to humans and are considered to an important cause of lung cancer (UNSCEAR, 2008). Indoor radon levels are much higher than outdoor levels hence the importance of assessing radon levels in indoor environments, particularly schools which serve as a significant source of radon exposure both for children and the staffs. Children have smaller lung volumes and higher breathing rates therefore an augmented radon concentration results to a higher radiation dose in children. In our study, potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) of 20 schools in Shillong region has been measured using the SSNTD method with LR-115 type 2 detectors. The detectors in bare mode were placed in class rooms at different floors of each school during winter and summer season. The detectors in bare mode were placed in class rooms at diff rent floors of each school during winter and summer season. The PAEC (mWL) at each of the selected schools are calculated and it ranges from 2.56 - 58.2 mWL (Arithmetic mean) and 2.34 - 58.18 mWL (Geometric mean). And the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) ranges from 0.74 - 17.85 mSv.y -1 . This preliminary study shows that the AEDE values of the schools under study are below the prescribed action limit by AERB i.e. 30 mSv.y -1 . (author)

  19. Microdosimetry of monoclonal antibodies labeled with alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The recent discovery of new techniques for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MoAB) has opened up a number of potential new applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Monoclonal antibodies labeled with alpha-emitting radionuclides promise to be particularly effective therapeutic agents due to the efficient cell killing ability of highly ionizing, short-range alpha particle tracks localized at specific antigen sites within the tumor mass. For a radioimmunotherapy treatment plan to be effective, one must be able to estimate the absorbed radiation dose to both tumor cells and normal tissues in the body. However, conventional methods used in nuclear medicine for estimating absorbed doses and specific absorbed fractions for radiopharmaceuticals do not apply to alpha emitters owing to their short range and the large variations in the local distribution of energy at the cellular level that result. Microdosimetric techniques developed for assessment of the radiological effects of internally deposited transuranic radionuclides take into account the statistical aspects of alpha particle track structure, energy distribution patterns, and radionuclide distribution within tissues, and provide a means for determining the number and frequency of cells irradiated, the probability densities in specific energy, and the average dose delivered to cells of interest. These techniques can be applied to the study of radiation absorbed dose from alpha-labeled monoclonal antibodies. 16 references, 6 figures

  20. Cloning of peroxisome proliferators activated receptors in the cobia (Rachycentron canadum) and their expression at different life-cycle stages under cage aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Mei-Ling; Chen, Houng-Yung; Tseng, Mei-Cheuh; Chang, Rey-Chang

    2008-12-01

    We present the cDNA sequences and tissue mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha, beta and gamma isotypes in the cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a warm water pelagic fish that is becoming a fish of choice for offshore cage farming. RT-PCR and real-time PCR showed that PPARalpha mRNA predominated in red muscle, heart and liver whereas PPARbeta was expressed mainly in liver and pyloric caeca. In contrast, PPARgamma transcripts were detected in all of the tissues examined, with the highest level occurring in visceral fat depot. Our 52-wk time-series investigation showed that while the mRNA expression of PPARgamma in the cobia was positively (P cobia.

  1. Immunostimulatory effects of natural human interferon-alpha (huIFN-alpha) on carps Cyprinus carpio L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Hironobu; Chakraborty, Gunimala; Korenaga, Hiroki; Kono, Tomoya; Shivappa, R B; Sakai, Masahiro

    2009-10-15

    Human interferon-alpha (huIFN-alpha) is an important immunomodulatory substance used in the treatment and prevention of numerous infectious and immune-related diseases in animals. However, the immunostimulatory effects of huIFN-alpha in fish remain to be investigated. In the current study, the immune responses of the carp species Cyprinus carpio L. to treatment with huIFN-alpha were analyzed via measurement of superoxide anion production, phagocytic activity and the expression of cytokine genes including interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 10. Low doses of huIFN-alpha were administered orally once a day for 3 days, and sampling was carried out at 1, 3 and 5 days post-treatment. Our results indicate that a low dose of huIFN-alpha significantly increased phagocytic activity and superoxide anion production in the carp kidney. The huIFN-alpha-treated fish also displayed a significant upregulation in cytokine gene expression. The current study demonstrates the stimulatory effects of huIFN-alpha on the carp immune system and highlights the immunomodulatory role of huIFN-alpha in fish.

  2. Drugs interacting with alpha adrenoceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Alpha adrenoceptors should be divided into various subtypes, comprising pre/postsynaptic and alpha 1/alpha 2-subpopulations, respectively. This classification implicates important functional differences between the various alpha-receptor subtypes, including certain differences in signal transduction

  3. Alpha-in-air monitor for continuous monitoring based on alpha to beta ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somayaji, K.S.; Venkataramani, R.; Swaminathan, N.; Pushparaja

    1997-01-01

    Measurement of long-lived alpha activity collected on a filter paper in continuous air monitoring of ambient working environment is difficult due to interference from much larger concentrations of short-lived alpha emitting daughter products of 222 Rn and 220 Rn. However, the ratio between the natural alpha and beta activity is approximately constant and this constancy of the ratio is used to discriminate against short-lived natural radioactivity in continuous air monitoring. Detection system was specially designed for the purpose of simultaneous counting of alpha and beta activity deposited on the filter paper during continuous monitoring. The activity ratios were calculated and plotted against the monitoring duration up to about six hours. Monitoring was carried out in three facilities with different ventilation conditions. Presence of any long-lived alpha contamination on the filter paper results in increase in the alpha to beta ratio. Long-lived 239 Pu contamination of about 16 DAC.h could be detected after about 45 minutes of commencement of the sampling. The experimental results using prototype units have shown that the approach of using alpha to beta activity ratio method to detect long-lived alpha activity in the presence of short-lived natural activity is satisfactory. (author)

  4. Index of alpha/theta ratio of the electroencephalogram: a new marker for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali eSchmidt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated quantitative EEG measures to determine a screening index to discriminate AD patients from normal individuals. Methods: Two groups of individuals older than 50 years, comprising a control group of 57 normal volunteers and a study group of 50 patients with probable AD, were compared. EEG recordings were obtained from subjects in a wake state with eyes closed at rest for 30 min. Logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results: Spectral potentials of the alpha and theta bands were computed for all electrodes and the alpha/theta ratio calculated. Logistic regression of alpha/theta of the mean potential of the C3 and O1 electrodes was carried out. A formula was calculated to aid the diagnosis of AD yielding 76.4 % sensitivity and 84.6 specificity for AD with an area under the ROC curve of 0.92. Conclusions: Logistic regression of alpha/theta of the spectrum of the mean potential of EEG represents a good marker discriminating AD patients from normal controls.

  5. Screening alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors from natural compounds by molecular docking in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhong, Chien-Hung; Riyaphan, Jirawat; Lin, Shih-Hung; Chia, Yi-Chen; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor is a common oral anti-diabetic drug used for controlling carbohydrates normally converted into simple sugars and absorbed by the intestines. However, some adverse clinical effects have been observed. The present study seeks an alternative drug that can regulate the hyperglycemia by down-regulating alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activity by molecular docking approach to screen the hyperglycemia antagonist against alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activities from the 47 natural compounds. The docking data showed that Curcumin, 16-hydroxy-cleroda-3,13-dine-16,15-olide (16-H), Docosanol, Tetracosanol, Antroquinonol, Berberine, Catechin, Quercetin, Actinodaphnine, and Rutin from 47 natural compounds had binding ability towards alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase as well. Curcumin had a better biding ability of alpha-amylase than the other natural compounds. Analyzed alpha-glucosidase activity reveals natural compound inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) are Curcumin, Actinodaphnine, 16-H, Quercetin, Berberine, and Catechin when compared to the commercial drug Acarbose (3 mM). A natural compound with alpha-amylase inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) includes Curcumin, Berberine, Docosanol, 16-H, Actinodaphnine/Tetracosanol, Catechin, and Quercetin when compared to Acarbose (1 mM). When taken together, the implication is that molecular docking is a fast and effective way to screen alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors as lead compounds of natural sources isolated from medicinal plants. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Affective and cognitive effects of global deletion of alpha3-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Roberto; Rudolph, Uwe; Straub, Carolin J; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2008-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors characterized by the presence of the alpha3 subunit are the major GABAA receptor subtype expressed in brain stem monoaminergic nuclei. These alpha3-GABAA receptors are therefore in a unique position to regulate monoaminergic functions. To characterize the functional properties of alpha3-GABAA receptors, we present a preliminary assessment of the expression of affective and cognitive behaviour in male mice with a targeted deletion of the Gabra3 gene encoding the alpha3 subunit [alpha3 knockout (KO) mice] on a C57BL/6Jx129X1/SvJ F1 hybrid genetic background. The alpha3 KO mice did not exhibit any gross change of anxiety-like behaviour or spontaneous locomotor behaviour. In the Porsolt forced swim test for potential antidepressant activity, alpha3 KO mice exhibited reduced floating and enhanced swimming behaviour relative to wild-type controls. Performance on a two-choice sucrose preference test, however, revealed no evidence for an increase in sucrose preference in the alpha3 KO mice that would have substantiated a potential phenotype for depression-related behaviour. In contrast, a suggestion of an enhanced negative contrast effect was revealed in a one-bottle sucrose consumption test across different sucrose concentrations. These affective phenotypes were accompanied by alterations in the balance between conditioned responding to the discrete conditioned stimulus and to the context, and a suggestion of faster extinction, in the Pavlovian conditioned freezing paradigm. Spatial learning in the water maze reference memory test, however, was largely unchanged in the alpha3 KO mice, except for a trend of preservation during reversal learning. The novel phenotypes following global deletion of the GABAA receptor alpha3 subunit identified here provided relevant insights, in addition to our earlier study, into the potential behavioural relevance of this specific receptor subtypes in the modulation of both affective and cognitive

  7. Estimated environmental loads of alpha-amylase from transgenic high-amylase maize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolt, Jeffrey D. [Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Biosafety Institute for Genetically Modified Agricultural Products, 164 Seed Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Karaman, Sule [Biosafety Institute for Genetically Modified Agricultural Products, 164 Seed Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Environmental exposure of plants bioengineered to improve efficiencies of biofuel production is an important consideration for their adoption. High-amylase maize genetically engineered to produce thermostable alpha-amylase in seed endosperm is currently in development, and its successful adoption will entail >1000 km{sup 2} of annual production in the USA. Environmental exposure of thermostable amylase will occur in production fields from preharvest and harvest dropped grain, with minor additional contributions from stover and root biomass. Mass loadings of thermostable alpha-amylase are projected to be 16 kg km{sup -2} and represent a potential source of increased alpha-amylase activity in receiving soils. An understanding of the degradation, persistence, accumulation, and activity of thermostable alpha-amylase introduced from transgenic high-amylase maize will be necessary in order to effectively manage transgenic crop systems intended or biofeedstock production. (author)

  8. Surfactant-assisted electrochemical deposition of {alpha}-cobalt hydroxide for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ting [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Jiang, Hao; Ma, Jan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2011-01-15

    A N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) assisted electrochemical deposition route has been developed to realize the synthesis of a dense {alpha}-Co(OH){sub 2} layered structure, which is composed of nanosheets, each with a thickness of 10 nm. The capacitive characteristics of the as-obtained {alpha}-Co(OH){sub 2} are investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV), charge/discharge characterization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in 1 M KOH electrolyte. The results indicate that {alpha}-Co(OH){sub 2} prepared in the presence of 20 vol.% NMP has denser and thin layered structure which promotes an increased surface area and a shortened ion diffusion path. The as-prepared {alpha}-Co(OH){sub 2} shows better electrochemical performance with specific capacitance of 651 F g{sup -1} in a potential range of -0.1 to 0.45 V. These findings suggest that the surfactant-assisted electrochemical deposition is a promising process for building densely packed material systems with enhanced properties, for application in supercapacitors. (author)

  9. New ALPHA-2 magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 21 June, members of the ALPHA collaboration celebrated the handover of the first solenoid designed for the ALPHA-2 experiment. The magnet has since been successfully installed and is working well.   Khalid Mansoor, Sumera Yamin and Jeffrey Hangst in front of the new ALPHA-2 solenoid. “This was the first of three identical solenoids that will be installed between now and September, as the rest of the ALPHA-2 device is installed and commissioned,” explains ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst. “These magnets are designed to allow us to transfer particles - antiprotons, electrons and positrons - between various parts of the new ALPHA-2 device by controlling the transverse size of the particle bunch that is being transferred.” Sumera Yamin and Khalid Mansoor, two Pakistani scientists from the National Centre for Physics in Islamabad, came to CERN in February specifically to design and manufacture these magnets. “We had the chance to work on act...

  10. ALPHA-2: the sequel

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    While many experiments are methodically planning for intense works over the long shutdown, there is one experiment that is already working at full steam: ALPHA-2. Its final components arrived last month and will completely replace the previous ALPHA set-up. Unlike its predecessor, this next generation experiment has been specifically designed to measure the properties of antimatter.   The ALPHA team lower the new superconducting solenoid magnet into place. The ALPHA collaboration is working at full speed to complete the ALPHA-2 set-up for mid-November – this will give them a few weeks of running before the AD shutdown on 17 December. “We really want to get some experience with this device this year so that, if we need to make any changes, we will have time during the long shutdown in which to make them,” says Jeffrey Hangst, ALPHA spokesperson. “Rather than starting the 2014 run in the commissioning stage, we will be up and running from the get go.&...

  11. Technical Basis for the Use of Alpha Absorption Corrections on RCF Gross Alpha Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceffalo, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the supporting data and rationale for making absorption corrections to gross alpha data to correct alpha data for loss due to absorption in the sample matrix. For some time there has been concern that the gross alpha data produced by the Environmental Restoration Contractor Radiological Counting Facility, particularly gross alpha analysis on soils, has been biased toward low results, as no correction for self-absorption was applied to the counting data. The process was investigated, and a new methodology for alpha self-absorption has been developed

  12. Cloning, expression, and mapping of allergenic determinants of alphaS1-casein, a major cow's milk allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmeister, Ulrike; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Swoboda, Ines; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Geller, Beate; Nystrand, Mats; Härlin, Annika; Thalhamer, Josef; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Keller, Walter; Niggemann, Bodo; Quirce, Santiago; Ebner, Christoph; Mari, Adriano; Pauli, Gabrielle; Herz, Udo; Valenta, Rudolf; Spitzauer, Susanne

    2009-06-01

    Milk is one of the first components introduced into human diet. It also represents one of the first allergen sources, which induces IgE-mediated allergies in childhood ranging from gastrointestinal, skin, and respiratory manifestations to severe life-threatening manifestations, such as anaphylaxis. Here we isolated a cDNA coding for a major cow's milk allergen, alphaS1-casein, from a bovine mammary gland cDNA library with allergic patients' IgE Abs. Recombinant alphaS1-casein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized by circular dichroism as a folded protein. IgE epitopes of alphaS1-casein were determined with recombinant fragments and synthetic peptides spanning the alphaS1-casein sequence using microarrayed components and sera from 66 cow's milk-sensitized patients. The allergenic activity of ralphaS1-casein and the alphaS1-casein-derived peptides was determined using rat basophil leukemia cells transfected with human FcepsilonRI, which had been loaded with the patients' serum IgE. Our results demonstrate that ralphaS1-casein as well as alphaS1-casein-derived peptides exhibit IgE reactivity, but mainly the intact ralphaS1-casein induced strong basophil degranulation. These results suggest that primarily intact alphaS1-casein or larger IgE-reactive portions thereof are responsible for IgE-mediated symptoms of food allergy. Recombinant alphaS1-casein as well as alphaS1-casein-derived peptides may be used in clinical studies to further explore pathomechanisms of food allergy as well as for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for milk allergy.

  13. Alpha-Methyldopa-Induced Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Grigoriadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methyldopa has been demonstrated to be safe for use during pregnancy and is now used to treat gestational hypertension. In pregnancy, alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia does not have typical features and the severity of symptoms ranges from mild fatigue to dyspnea, respiratory failure, and death if left untreated. A case of alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a 36-year-old gravida 2, para 1 woman at 37+6 weeks of gestation is reported herein along with the differential diagnostic procedure and the potential risks to the mother and the fetus.

  14. A polymorphic variant in the human electron transfer flavoprotein alpha-chain (alpha-T171) displays decreased thermal stability and is overrepresented in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient patients with mild childhood presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, P; Pedersen, P; Nyholm, M

    1999-01-01

    The consequences of two amino acid polymorphisms of human electron transfer flavoprotein (alpha-T/I171 in the alpha-subunit and beta-M/T154 in the beta-subunit) on the thermal stability of the enzyme are described. The alpha-T171 variant displayed a significantly decreased thermal stability, wher....... This is compatible with a negative modulating effect of the less-stable alpha-T171 ETF variant in this group of VLCAD patients that harbor missense mutations in at least one allele and therefore potentially display residual levels of VLCAD enzyme activity. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Jun...

  15. Alpha Momentum and Price Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Lea Hühn

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyze a novel alpha momentum strategy that invests in stocks based on three-factor alphas which we estimate using daily returns. The empirical analysis for the U.S. and for Europe shows that (i past alpha has power in predicting the cross-section of stock returns; (ii alpha momentum exhibits less dynamic factor exposures than price momentum and (iii alpha momentum dominates price momentum only in the U.S. Connecting both strategies to behavioral explanations, alpha momentum is more related to an underreaction to firm-specific news while price momentum is primarily driven by price overshooting due to momentum trading.

  16. Alpha-synuclein suppression by targeted small interfering RNA in the primate substantia nigra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L McCormack

    Full Text Available The protein alpha-synuclein is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Its toxic potential appears to be enhanced by increased protein expression, providing a compelling rationale for therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing neuronal alpha-synuclein burden. Here, feasibility and safety of alpha-synuclein suppression were evaluated by treating monkeys with small interfering RNA (siRNA directed against alpha-synuclein. The siRNA molecule was chemically modified to prevent degradation by exo- and endonucleases and directly infused into the left substantia nigra. Results compared levels of alpha-synuclein mRNA and protein in the infused (left vs. untreated (right hemisphere and revealed a significant 40-50% suppression of alpha-synuclein expression. These findings could not be attributable to non-specific effects of siRNA infusion since treatment of a separate set of animals with luciferase-targeting siRNA produced no changes in alpha-synuclein. Infusion with alpha-synuclein siRNA, while lowering alpha-synuclein expression, had no overt adverse consequences. In particular, it did not cause tissue inflammation and did not change (i the number and phenotype of nigral dopaminergic neurons, and (ii the concentrations of striatal dopamine and its metabolites. The data represent the first evidence of successful anti-alpha-synuclein intervention in the primate substantia nigra and support further development of RNA interference-based therapeutics.

  17. Successful Outcome and Biliary Drainage in an Infant with Concurrent Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency and Biliary Atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the rare instance of concomitant biliary atresia and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and the first documented successful portoenterostomy in this scenario. The potential for dual pathology must be recognized and underscores that prompt diagnosis of biliary atresia, despite concomitant alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, is essential to afford potential longstanding native liver function.

  18. Intraethnic variation in steroid-5-alpha-reductase polymorphisms in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... in prostate cancer patients: a potential factor implicated ... reductase alpha polypeptides 1 and 2 in a set of 601 prostate cancer patients from four ..... tion in the key androgen-regulating genes androgen receptor, cytochrome ...

  19. 5alphaDH-DOC (5alpha-dihydro-deoxycorticosterone) activates androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Motohide; Honma, Seijiro; Chung, Suyoun; Takata, Ryo; Furihata, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Kazuo; Nonomura, Norio; Nasu, Yasutomo; Miki, Tsuneharu; Shuin, Taro; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Okuyama, Akihiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2010-08-01

    Prostate cancer often relapses during androgen-depletion therapy, even under the castration condition in which circulating androgens are drastically reduced. High expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and genes involved in androgen metabolism indicate a continued role for AR in castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs). There is increasing evidence that some amounts of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and other androgens are present sufficiently to activate AR within CRPC tissues, and enzymes involved in the androgen and steroid metabolism, such as 5alpha-steroid reductases, are activated in CRPCs. In this report, we screened eight natural 5alphaDH-steroids to search for novel products of 5alpha-steroid reductases, and identified 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) as a novel substrate for 5alpha-steroid reductases in CRPCs. 11-Deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and 5alpha-dihydro-deoxycorticosterone (5alphaDH-DOC) could promote prostate cancer cell proliferation through AR activation, and type 1 5alpha-steroid reductase (SRD5A1) could convert from DOC to 5alphaDH-DOC. Sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis detected 5alphaDH-DOC in some clinical CRPC tissues. These findings implicated that under an extremely low level of DHT, 5alphaDH-DOC and other products of 5alpha-steroid reductases within CRPC tissues might activate the AR pathway for prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival under castration.

  20. Long-term stability of diurnal salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase secretion patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoluda, Nadine; La Marca, Roberto; Gollwitzer, Mario; Müller, Andreas; Limm, Heribert; Marten-Mittag, Birgitt; Gündel, Harald; Angerer, Peter; Nater, Urs M

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate long-term stability and variability of diurnal cortisol and alpha-amylase patterns. Diurnal cortisol and alpha-amylase secretion patterns were assessed on a single workday with three waves of measurement across a total time period of 24months in 189 participants. Separate hierarchical linear models were analyzed, with and without a number of potential predictor variables (age, BMI, smoking, chronic stress, stress reactivity). While low long-term stability was found in diurnal cortisol, the stability of diurnal alpha-amylase was moderate across the time period of 24months. Several predictor variables had a positive impact on diurnal cortisol and alpha-amylase secretion patterns averaged across waves. Our findings underpin the notion that long-term stability is not necessarily warranted in longitudinal studies. It is important to choose an appropriate study design when attempting to disentangle clinically and biologically relevant changes from naturally occurring variations in diurnal cortisol and alpha-amylase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of Makrofol ® DE 1-1 for alpha particle radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghazaly, M.; Aydarous, Abdulkadir; Al-Thomali, Talal A.

    2017-09-01

    Makrofol ® DE 1-1 (bisphenol-A polycarbonate) was investigated for alpha particle radiography. The edge spread function (ESF) was measured by razor-blade's edge. Makrofol ® DE 1-1 detectors were irradiated with perpendicular incident alpha particles of energy 2.5, 4 and 5.4 MeV, thereafter they were etched in 75% 6N KOH+25% C2H5OH at a temperature of 50 °C for different durations. The etched Makrofol®DE 1-1 detectors were imaged with an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera. The results revealed that the green channel of the original RGB image provides the highest contrast comparing with red and blue channel by a factor of 27.6% of the original RGB image. The image contrast of alpha particle-irradiated Makrofol®DE 1-1 detector was found to be inversely related to the etching time since the alpha particle tracks proceed from a conical phase to spherical phase. The spatial resolution of alpha particle-irradiated Makrofol®DE 1-1 detector, in terms of line spread function, was found to deteriorate as the etching time increases for all examined alpha particle energies. The results revealed the potential capability of Makrofol®DE 1-1 detector as an efficient detector for alpha particle radiography such as autoradiography.

  2. alpha7 and non-alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulate dopamine release in vitro and in vivo in the rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Phil D; Srinivasan, Jayaraman; Kew, James N C; Dawson, Lee A; Gotti, Cecilia; Moretti, Milena; Shoaib, Mohammed; Wonnacott, Susan

    2009-02-01

    Nicotine enhances attentional and working memory aspects of executive function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) where dopamine plays a major role. Here, we have determined the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes that can modulate dopamine release in rat PFC using subtype-selective drugs. Nicotine and 5-Iodo-A-85380 (beta2* selective) elicited [(3)H]dopamine release from both PFC and striatal prisms in vitro and dopamine overflow from medial PFC in vivo. Blockade by dihydro-beta-erythroidine supports the participation of beta2* nAChRs. However, insensitivity of nicotine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine release to alpha-conotoxin-MII in PFC prisms suggests no involvement of alpha6beta2* nAChRs, in contrast to the striatum, and this distinction is supported by immunoprecipitation of nAChR subunits from these tissues. The alpha7 nAChR-selective agonists choline and Compound A also promoted dopamine release from PFC in vitro and in vivo, and their effects were enhanced by the alpha7 nAChR-selective allosteric potentiator PNU-120596 and blocked by specific antagonists. DNQX and MK801 inhibited [(3)H]dopamine release evoked by choline and PNU-120596, suggesting crosstalk between alpha7 nAChRs, glutamate and dopamine in the PFC. In vivo, systemic (but not local) administration of PNU-120596, in the absence of agonist, facilitated dopamine overflow in the medial PFC, consistent with the activation of extracortical alpha7 nAChRs by endogenous acetylcholine or choline. These data establish that both beta2* and alpha7 nAChRs can modulate dopamine release in the PFC in vitro and in vivo. Through their distinct actions on dopamine release, these nAChR subtypes could contribute to executive function, making them specific therapeutic targets for conditions such as schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  3. Management of alpha-contaminated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Full text: With the increasing use of nuclear energy throughout the world for the generation of electric power and, especially, the use of the plutonium cycle for fast breeder reactors (FBRs), close attention has to be given to the safe management of alpha-contaminated wastes arising from spent-fuel reprocessing or mixed fuel fabrication Appropriate handling, conditioning and disposal of these wastes is, therefore, an activity of highest importance to ensure adequate protection of man and his environment from the potential hazard they pose over long periods of time. As the generation of alpha-contaminated waste is expected to increase considerably in the 1990s, when FBRs and the associated plutonium recycling will reach an industrial scale, it was felt timely to review the present state of the art in this area. The symposium organized jointly by the IAEA and the Commission of European Communities (CEC) was the first international symposium dealing with this specific topic. Its principle aim was to serve as 'zero-point' stating the present technical knowledge in view of the future needs for the management of alpha-contaminated wastes, before an industrial scale of production will be reached. The programme of the symposium was drawn up in eight sessions and covered the following topics: general policies; general practices; volume reduction techniques (two sessions); conditioning; alpha-monitoring; actinides partitioning; and disposal options. A variety of techniques has been investigated in various countries for several years for managing alpha-contaminated wastes. The first target was to reduce the volume of the wastes and to study matrices for the immobilization of waste radionuclides with a view to final waste disposal. At present, operational experience has been gained at different nuclear laboratories and facilities. At the same time various disposal options have been investigated. Some of the major items discussed at the symposium might be concluded as follows

  4. Compensatory increase in alpha 1-globin gene expression in individuals heterozygous for the alpha-thalassemia-2 deletion.

    OpenAIRE

    Liebhaber, S A; Cash, F E; Main, D M

    1985-01-01

    alpha-Globin is encoded by the two adjacent genes, alpha 1 and alpha 2. Although it is clearly established that both alpha-globin genes are expressed, their relative contributions to alpha-globin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein synthesis are not fully defined. Furthermore, changes that may occur in alpha-globin gene activity secondarily to the loss of function of one or more of these genes (alpha-thalassemia [Thal]) have not been directly investigated. This study further defines the expressi...

  5. Evaluation of pGL1-TNF-alpha therapy in combination with radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Andres, M. L.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-term control of high-grade brain tumors is rarely achieved with current therapeutic regimens. In this study a new plasmid-based human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression vector was synthesized (pGL1-TNF-alpha) and evaluated together with radiation in the aggressive, rapidly growing C6 rat glioma model. pGL1-TNF-alpha was successfully transfected into C6 cells in vitro using a cationic polyamine method. Expression was detected up to 7 days and averaged 0.4 ng of TNF-alpha in the culture medium from 1x10(5) cells. The expressed protein was biologically functional, as evidenced by growth inhibition of L929, a TNF-alpha-susceptible cell line. Using fluorescence-labeled monoclonal antibodies and laser scanning cytometry, we confirmed that both the P55 and P75 receptors for TNF-alpha were present on the C6 cell membrane. However, the receptors were present at low density and P55 was expressed more than the P75 receptor. These findings were in contrast to results obtained with TNF-alpha-susceptible L929 cells. Tests in athymic mice showed that pGL1-TNF-alpha administered intratumorally 16-18 h before radiation (each modality given three times) significantly inhibited C6 tumor progression (Palpha alone did not slow tumor growth and radiation alone had little effect on tumor growth. These results indicate that pGL1-TNF-alpha has potential to augment the antitumor effects of radiation against a tumor type that is virtually incurable.

  6. Resting-State Alpha in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Alpha Associations with Thalamic Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J. Christopher; Heiken, Kory; Chen, Yu-Han; Herrington, John D.; Chow, Vivian; Liu, Song; Bloy, Luke; Huang, Mingxiong; Pandey, Juhi; Cannon, Katelyn M.; Qasmieh, Saba; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha circuits (8-12 Hz), necessary for basic and complex brain processes, are abnormal in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study obtained estimates of resting-state (RS) alpha activity in children with ASD and examined associations between alpha activity, age, and clinical symptoms. Given that the thalamus modulates cortical RS alpha…

  7. Alpha male replacements and delayed dispersal in crested macaques (Macaca nigra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Pascal R; Hodges, Keith; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2017-07-01

    In species with a high male reproductive skew, competition between males for the top dominant position is high and escalated fights are common between competitors. As a consequence, challenges incur potentially high costs. Selection should favor males who time an alpha male challenge to maximize chances of a successful outcome minimizing costs. Despite the importance of alpha male replacements for individual males, we know little about the timing of challenges and the condition of the challenger. We investigated the timing and process of alpha male replacements in a species living in multi-male groups with high male reproductive skew, the crested macaque. We studied four wild groups over 6 years in the Tangkoko Reserve, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, during which 16 alpha male replacements occurred. Although unusual for cercopithecines, male crested macaques delayed their natal dispersal until they attained maximum body mass and therefore fighting ability whereupon they emigrated and challenged the alpha male in another group. Accordingly, all observed alpha male replacements were from outside males. Ours is the first report of such a pattern in a primate species living in multi-male groups. Although the majority of alpha male replacements occurred through direct male-male challenges, many also took place opportunistically (i.e., after the alpha male had already been injured or had left the group). Furthermore, alpha male tenures were very short (averaging ca. 12 months). We hypothesize that this unusual pattern of alpha male replacements in crested macaques is related to the species-specific combination of high male reproductive skew with a large number of males per group. Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22448, 2017. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Primatology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Primatology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Distribution of the alphaGal- and the non-alphaGal T-antigens in the pig kidney: potential targets for rejection in pig-to-man xenotransplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigens, present on pig vascular endothelial cells, seem to be the prime agents responsible for graft rejection, and although genetically modified animals that express less amounts of carbohydrate antigen are available, it is still useful to decide the localization of the reactive...... xenoantigens in organs contemplated for xenotransplantation. Here we compare the distribution in pig kidney of antigens important in xenograft destruction, namely the Galalpha1-3Gal (alphaGal) glycans, with the localization of the T-antigen (Galbeta1-3GalNAc). The alpha-galactose-specific lectin Griffonia...... simplicifolia isolectin 1B4 was used to detect the Galalpha1-3Gal glycans, whereas Arachis hypogaea (PNA) lectin and a monoclonal antibody (3C9) detected T-antigen. In addition, two vascular markers (anti-caveolin-1 and anti-von Willebrand factor) served to identify vascular structures of the kidney. Both...

  9. Cytokine vaccination: neutralising IL-1alpha autoantibodies induced by immunisation with homologous IL-1alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, M; Hansen, M B; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2000-01-01

    with IL-1alpha coupled to purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD). Both unprimed and primed animals developed IgG aAb to IL-1alpha. These aAb persisted at high levels more than 100 days after vaccination and did not cross-react with murine IL-1beta. The induced anti-IL-1alpha aAb inhibited binding...... in mice by vaccination with recombinant murine IL-1alpha conjugated to PPD. Studies of the effects of IL-1alpha aAb in such animals may help clarify the importance of naturally occurring IL-1alpha aAb in humans and permit the evaluation of future therapies with cytokine aAb in patients...

  10. Mild prenatal protein malnutrition increases alpha2C-adrenoceptor density in the cerebral cortex during postnatal life and impairs neocortical long-term potentiation and visuo-spatial performance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Moyano, Rubén; Valladares, Luis; Sierralta, Walter; Pérez, Hernán; Mondaca, Mauricio; Fernández, Victor; Burgos, Héctor; Hernández, Alejandro

    2005-06-01

    Mild reduction in the protein content of the mother's diet from 25 to 8% casein, calorically compensated by carbohydrates, does not alter body and brain weights of rat pups at birth, but leads to significant enhancements in the concentration and release of cortical noradrenaline during early postnatal life. Since central noradrenaline and some of its receptors are critically involved in long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation, this study evaluated the effect of mild prenatal protein malnutrition on the alpha2C-adrenoceptor density in the frontal and occipital cortices, induction of LTP in the same cortical regions and the visuo-spatial memory. Pups born from rats fed a 25% casein diet throughout pregnancy served as controls. At day 8 of postnatal age, prenatally malnourished rats showed a threefold increase in neocortical alpha2C-adrenoceptor density. At 60 days-of-age, alpha2C-adrenoceptor density was still elevated in the neocortex, and the animals were unable to maintain neocortical LTP and presented lower visuo-spatial memory performance. Results suggest that overexpression of neocortical alpha2C-adrenoceptors during postnatal life, subsequent to mild prenatal protein malnutrition, could functionally affect the synaptic networks subserving neocortical LTP and visuo-spatial memory formation.

  11. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Enterria, David [CERN; Skands, Peter Z. [Monash U.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  12. Alpha detection for decontamination and decommissioning: Results and possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.

    1995-01-01

    Alpha detectors based on the long-range alpha detection (LRAD) technology have numerous uses, both potential and demonstrated, in facility D ampersand D. These monitors operate by detecting the ions created by alpha particles interacting with ambient air. Thus, detection is not limited by the short range of the alpha particle and no window is required between the contamination and the detection region. These properties make LRAD-based detectors ideal for operation in field environments where complex objects to be monitored are the norm and reliability is crucial. Three monitors of particular interest in D ampersand D operations are the building surface monitor, the internal volume monitor for use on the inner surfaces of pipes, ducts, and tanks, and the conveyer belt monitor for concrete rubble and structural steel. Surface monitors have been used extensively, both in laboratory and field environments, internal volume monitors have been tested in the laboratory, and the conveyer system is still a conceptual design. These monitors and related applications demonstrate the utility of LRAD-based monitors for D ampersand D operations as well as exploring some of the new ways that fieldable monitoring systems can be used for D ampersand D. Ion collection sensing technology can be used to solve many of the alpha detection problems unique to the D ampersand D field

  13. Angular correlation between short-range. cap alpha. particles and. gamma. quanta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kul' chitskii, L A; Latyshev, G D; Bulyginskii, D G

    1949-01-01

    Chang (Phys. Rev. 69, 60(1946); 70, 632(1946)) has found that the intensities of short-range ..cap alpha.. rays of Po and Ra are considerably higher than the values given by the Geiger-Nuttall law. This can be explained by assuming surface vibrations of ..cap alpha..-radioactive nuclei, which produce deformations and corresponding lowerings of the potential barrier in certain directions. In this case an angular correlation should exist between the short-range ..cap alpha.. ray and the accompanying ..gamma.. quantum. The authors checked this conclusion by applying the coincidence method to the ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. radiations of a mixture of RdTh (/sup 228/Th) and ThC (/sup 212/Bi). Maxima of coincidence numbers occur at angles 45 and 135 deg., with lesser maxima at 0 and 180 deg. Theoretical considerations show that in cases (like the one investigated) where the nuclear spin before and after the ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. emissions is zero, the angular correlations are uniquely determined whatever the deformation caused by the vibration; in other cases, the correlation depends on the kind of deformation. Therefore, it would be interesting to investigate the case of Pa, whose nuclear spin is not zero and the decay exhibits intensive groups of short-range ..cap alpha.. particles.

  14. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha is essential for hippocampal neuronal migration and long-term potentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, Angiola; Battaglia, Fortunato; Wang, Cheng

    2003-01-01

    Despite clear indications of their importance in lower organisms, the contributions of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) to development or function of the mammalian nervous system have been poorly explored. In vitro studies have indicated that receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha...

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is a potential diagnostic biomarker for chronic neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; E, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Huiyong; Li, Feng; Cao, Yanhui; Tian, Jun; Yan, Jinglong

    2015-05-19

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is one of the most common complications after spinal cord injury (SCI), but no protein biomarkers has ever been introduced into clinical diagnosis. Previous studies implicated that toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 played a critical role in the development of NP in animal SCI models. Here, a total of 140 participants were recruited, 70 of them were SCI-NP subject and the rest 70 controls did not show neuropathic symptoms. TLR4 was upregulated significantly in SCI-NP patients compared with SCI-noNP subjects. Furthermore, we measured the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), two TLR4 downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines, to assess their diagnostic values. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis revealed that TNF-α had great potential advantages to predict the progression of neuropathy, the risks of NP were strongly increased in SCI subjects with higher levels of TNF-α (odds ratio: 4.92; 95% confidence interval: 1.89-12.32). These results suggested neuro-immune activation contributed to the development of neuropathic disorder after SCI, and TNF-α could be a potential sensitive diagnostic biomarker for chronic neuropathic pain in SCI patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypothalamic PGC-1 alpha Protects Against High-Fat Diet Exposure by Regulating ER alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Finan, Brian; Kim, Min; Frank, Aaron; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Navas, Carlos Rodriguez; Gordillo, Ruth; Neinast, Michael; Kalainayakan, Sarada P.; Li, Dan L.; Gao, Yuanqing; Yi, Chun-Xia; Hahner, Lisa; Palmer, Biff F.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Clegg, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    High-fat diets (HFDs) lead to obesity and inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Estrogens and estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) protect premenopausal females from the metabolic complications of inflammation and obesity-related disease. Here, we demonstrate that hypothalamic PGC-1 alpha

  17. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  18. Characterization of monocyte-derived dendritic cells maturated with IFN-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, I M; Nikolajsen, K; Walter, M R

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy. These cells can be generated from peripheral blood monocytes cultured with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). In order to obtain full functional capacity, maturation is required......, maturation with IFN-alpha has only a small effect on induction of autologous T-cell stimulatory capacity of the DC. However, an increase in DC allogeneic T-cell stimulatory capacity was observed. These data suggest that IFN-alpha has a potential as a maturation agent used in DC-based cancer vaccine trials...

  19. Combining Alphas via Bounded Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zura Kakushadze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an explicit algorithm and source code for combining alpha streams via bounded regression. In practical applications, typically, there is insufficient history to compute a sample covariance matrix (SCM for a large number of alphas. To compute alpha allocation weights, one then resorts to (weighted regression over SCM principal components. Regression often produces alpha weights with insufficient diversification and/or skewed distribution against, e.g., turnover. This can be rectified by imposing bounds on alpha weights within the regression procedure. Bounded regression can also be applied to stock and other asset portfolio construction. We discuss illustrative examples.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Alpha thalassemia Alpha thalassemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alpha thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  1. Coaching the alpha male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludeman, Kate; Erlandson, Eddie

    2004-05-01

    Highly intelligent, confident, and successful, alpha males represent about 70% of all senior executives. Natural leaders, they willingly take on levels of responsibility most rational people would find overwhelming. But many of their quintessential strengths can also make alphas difficult to work with. Their self-confidence can appear domineering. Their high expectations can make them excessively critical. Their unemotional style can keep them from inspiring their teams. That's why alphas need coaching to broaden their interpersonal tool kits while preserving their strengths. Drawing from their experience coaching more than 1,000 senior executives, the authors outline an approach tailored specifically for the alpha. Coaches get the alpha's attention by inundating him with data from 360-degree feedback presented in ways he will find compelling--both hard-boiled metrics and vivid verbatim comments from colleagues about his strengths and weaknesses. A 360-degree assessment is a wake-up call for most alphas, providing undeniable proof that their behavior doesn't work nearly as well as they think it does. That paves the way for a genuine commitment to change. In order to change, the alpha must venture into unfamiliar--and often uncomfortable--psychological territory. He must admit vulnerability, accept accountability not just for his own work for others', connect with his underlying emotions, learn to motivate through a balance of criticism and validation, and become aware of unproductive behavior patterns. The goal of executive coaching is not simply to treat the alpha as an individual problem but to improve the entire team dynamic. Initial success creates an incentive to persevere, and the virtuous cycle reverberates throughout the entire organization.

  2. Identification and characterization of an alternative promoter of the human PGC-1{alpha} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Toyo; Inagaki, Kenjiro [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Noguchi, Tetsuya, E-mail: noguchi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Sakai, Mashito; Ogawa, Wataru; Hosooka, Tetsuya [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Iguchi, Haruhisa; Watanabe, Eijiro; Matsuki, Yasushi; Hiramatsu, Ryuji [Genomic Science Laboratories, DainipponSumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd., 4-2-1 Takatsukasa, Takarazuka 665-8555 (Japan); Kasuga, Masato [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan, 1-21-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan)

    2009-04-17

    The transcriptional regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) controls mitochondrial biogenesis and energy homeostasis. Although physical exercise induces PGC-1{alpha} expression in muscle, the underlying mechanism of this effect has remained incompletely understood. We recently identified a novel muscle-enriched isoform of PGC-1{alpha} transcript (designated PGC-1{alpha}-b) that is derived from a previously unidentified first exon. We have now cloned and characterized the human PGC-1{alpha}-b promoter. The muscle-specific transcription factors MyoD and MRF4 transactivated this promoter through interaction with a proximal E-box motif. Furthermore, either forced expression of Ca{sup 2+}- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), calcineurin A, or the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) kinase MKK6 or the intracellular accumulation of cAMP activated the PGC-1{alpha}-b promoter in cultured myoblasts through recruitment of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) to a putative CRE located downstream of the E-box. Our results thus reveal a potential molecular basis for isoform-specific regulation of PGC-1{alpha} expression in contracting muscle.

  3. In silico study of curcumol, curcumenol, isocurcumenol, and β-sitosterol as potential inhibitors of estrogen receptor alpha of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resmi Mustarichiei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Based on data from the Hospital Information System (HIS in 2007, breast cancer is the top ranked diagnosed cancer in Indonesia. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα is associated with breast cancer because it is found in high levels in cancer tissues. Curcumol, curcumenol, isocurcumenol of white tumeric rhizomes (Curcuma zedoaria (Christm. Roscoe, and β-sitosterol from seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. have been reported to have inhibitory activity against cancer cells. This study presents the in silico study of these compounds as inhibitors of ERα.Methods: Docking simulations are carried out in this paper to visualize molecular-level interactions between the four compounds with ERα. Docking simulations between estradiol and tamoxifen on ERα are carried out as well.Results: Docking results indicated that curcumol, curcumenol, isocurcumenol, and β-sitosterol showed inhibitory activity againts estrogen receptor alpha (ERα.  The order of potency is shown consecutively by isocurcumenol, curcumol, curcumenol, and β-sitosterol with values 0.584 M, 1.36 M, 1.61 M, and 7.35 M respectively. Curcumenol and estradiol interacts with ERα through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, whereas curcumol, isocurcumenol, β-sitosterol and tamoxifen through hydrophobic interactions in succession. Conclusion: Natural products containing all four compounds have the potential to be used as drugs or adjuvant drugs in breast cancer therapy.Keywords: β-sitosterol, breast cancer, curcumol, curcumenol, estradiol, ERα, isocurcumenol

  4. Modulation of Somatosensory Alpha Rhythm by Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation at Mu-Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Gundlach

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS is emerging as an interventional tool to modulate different functions of the brain, potentially by interacting with intrinsic ongoing neuronal oscillations. Functionally different intrinsic alpha oscillations are found throughout the cortex. Yet it remains unclear whether tACS is capable of specifically modulating the somatosensory mu-rhythm in amplitude.Objectives: We used tACS to modulate mu-alpha oscillations in amplitude. When compared to sham stimulation we expected a modulation of mu-alpha oscillations but not visual alpha oscillations by tACS.Methods: Individual mu-alpha frequencies were determined in 25 participants. Subsequently, blocks of tACS with individual mu-alpha frequency and sham stimulation were applied over primary somatosensory cortex (SI. Electroencephalogram (EEG was recorded before and after either stimulation or sham. Modulations of mu-alpha and, for control, visual alpha amplitudes were then compared between tACS and sham.Results: Somatosensory mu-alpha oscillations decreased in amplitude after tACS was applied at participants’ individual mu-alpha frequency. No changes in amplitude were observed for sham stimulation. Furthermore, visual alpha oscillations were not affected by tACS or sham, respectively.Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the capability of tACS to specifically modulate the targeted somatosensory mu-rhythm when the tACS frequency is tuned to the individual endogenous rhythm and applied over somatosensory areas. Our results are in contrast to previously reported amplitude increases of visual alpha oscillations induced by tACS applied over visual cortex. Our results may point to a specific interaction between our stimulation protocol and the functional architecture of the somatosensory system.

  5. Taraxacum officinale induces cytotoxicity through TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha secretion in Hep G2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Hong, Seung-Heon; Song, Bong-Keun; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Yoo, Young-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-01-16

    Taraxacum officinale (TO) has been frequently used as a remedy for women's disease (e.g. breast and uterus cancer) and disorders of the liver and gallbladder. Several earlier studies have indicated that TO exhibits anti-tumor properties, but its mechanism remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of TO on the cytotoxicity and production of cytokines in human hepatoma cell line, Hep G2. Our results show that TO decreased the cell viability by 26%, and significantly increased the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-1alpha production compared with media control (about 1.6-fold for TNF-alpha, and 2.4-fold for IL-1alpha, P < 0.05). Also, TO strongly induced apoptosis of Hep G2 cells as determined by flow cytometry. Increased amounts of TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha contributed to TO-induced apoptosis. Anti-TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha antibodies almost abolished it. These results suggest that TO induces cytotoxicity through TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha secretion in Hep G2 cells.

  6. Functional role of frontal alpha oscillations in creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Foulser, A Alban; Mellin, Juliann M; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent electroencephalography (EEG) data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a functional role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10 Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40 Hz-tACS was used instead of 10 Hz-tACS to rule out a general "electrical stimulation" effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal 40 Hz stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Method of determining the variation of concentration of the potential alpha energy of radon daughters with time without changing the filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feddersen, C.

    1979-01-01

    Considering the drawbacks of sample measurement of radon daughter concentration or potential alpha energy concentration, a method is described allowing to determine the variation with time of the measuring quantities mentioned. For this purpose, the same filter is exposed in defined time intervals and the decay curve is evaluated using Markov's method. Residual activity of preceding measurements is estimated as a function of the density of measuring points. A practicable technique is given for taking into account residual activity together with the background. An apparatus consisting of commercial devices and special accessories of own manufacture is described. The results obtained with this apparatus are illustrated and discussed using two examples. (author)

  8. Characterization of a series of anabaseine-derived compounds reveals that the 3-(4)-dimethylaminocinnamylidine derivative is a selective agonist at neuronal nicotinic alpha 7/125I-alpha-bungarotoxin receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, C M; Meyer, E M; Henry, J C; Muraskin, S I; Kem, W R; Papke, R L

    1995-01-01

    Investigation of the naturally occurring, nicotinic agonist anabaseine and novel derivatives has shown that these compounds have cytoprotective and memory-enhancing effects. The hypothesis that these arise at least in part through actions on brain nicotinic receptors was evaluated by examining the ability of these compounds to displace the binding of nicotinic ligands and to affect the function of the alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 7 receptor subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The derivative 3-(4)-dimethylaminocinnamylidine anabaseine (DMAC) was found to be a selective alpha 7 receptor agonist; it was more potent than nicotine, acetylcholine, anabaseine, and other derivatives at activating the alpha 7 receptor subtype, while displaying little agonist activity at alpha 4 beta 2 and other receptor subtypes. Compared with anabaseine and the other derivatives, DMAC was the most potent at displacing 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin binding (putative alpha 7) and the least potent at displacing [3H]cytisine binding (putative alpha 4 beta 2) to brain membranes. Independently of agonist activities, all of the novel compounds displayed secondary inhibitory activity at both receptor subtypes. At the alpha 4 beta 2 receptor subtype, inhibition by the 3-(2,4)-dimethoxybenzylidene derivative was enhanced by coapplication of acetylcholine, suggesting a noncompetitive form of inhibition. Anabaseine and nicotine prolonged the time course of activation of alpha 4 beta 2 receptors, compared with acetylcholine, suggesting sequential channel-blocking activity. As selective agonists, anabaseine derivatives such as DMAC may be useful for elucidating the function of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors, including their potential role(s) in the cytoprotective and memory-enhancing effects of nicotinic agents.

  9. Immunodetection of Thyroid Hormone Receptor (Alpha1/Alpha2) in the Rat Uterus and Oviduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Öner, Jale; Öner, Hakan

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the immunolocalization and the existence of thyroid hormone receptors (THR) (alpha1/alpha2) in rat uterus and oviduct. For this purpose 6 female Wistar albino rats found in estrous period were used. Tissue samples fixed in 10% neutral formalin were examined immunohistochemically. Sections were incubated with primary mouse-monoclonal THR (alpha1/alpha2) antibody. In uterus, THR (alpha1/alpha2) immunoreacted strongly with uterine luminal epithelium, endometrial gland epithelium and endometrial stromal cells and, moderately with myometrial smooth muscle. In oviduct, they were observed moderately in the epithelium of the tube and the smooth muscle cells of the muscular layer. In conclusion, the presence of THR in uterus and oviduct suggests that these organs are an active site of thyroid hormones

  10. Four-body problem for four bound alpha particles in 16O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1980-02-01

    The alpha cluster model is used in considering the 16 O nucleus as a bound state of four alpha particles. This problem is represented by integral equations which are exact effective two-particle equations. These equations have the form of two-particle Lippmann-Schwinger equations. The separable expressions are used in approximating the scattering amplitudes in the separable potential model to include also few and small non-separable rest parts of the interactions. The integral equations obtained are manageable and suitable for computations. Numerical calculations are carried out for the 16 O nucleus, with the structure of four bound alpha particles. The obtained binding energy of 16 O with that structure is 16.86 MeV which is in good agreement with the experimental value. (author)

  11. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  12. The role of alpha-rhythm states in perceptual learning: insights from experiments and computational models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigala, Rodrigo; Haufe, Sebastian; Roy, Dipanjan; Dinse, Hubert R.; Ritter, Petra

    2014-01-01

    During the past two decades growing evidence indicates that brain oscillations in the alpha band (~10 Hz) not only reflect an “idle” state of cortical activity, but also take a more active role in the generation of complex cognitive functions. A recent study shows that more than 60% of the observed inter-subject variability in perceptual learning can be ascribed to ongoing alpha activity. This evidence indicates a significant role of alpha oscillations for perceptual learning and hence motivates to explore the potential underlying mechanisms. Hence, it is the purpose of this review to highlight existent evidence that ascribes intrinsic alpha oscillations a role in shaping our ability to learn. In the review, we disentangle the alpha rhythm into different neural signatures that control information processing within individual functional building blocks of perceptual learning. We further highlight computational studies that shed light on potential mechanisms regarding how alpha oscillations may modulate information transfer and connectivity changes relevant for learning. To enable testing of those model based hypotheses, we emphasize the need for multidisciplinary approaches combining assessment of behavior and multi-scale neuronal activity, active modulation of ongoing brain states and computational modeling to reveal the mathematical principles of the complex neuronal interactions. In particular we highlight the relevance of multi-scale modeling frameworks such as the one currently being developed by “The Virtual Brain” project. PMID:24772077

  13. The role of alpha-rhythm states in perceptual learning: insights from experiments and computational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo eSigala

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades growing evidence indicates that brain oscillations in the alpha band (~10 Hz not only reflect an ‘idle’ state of cortical activity, but also take a more active role in the generation of complex cognitive functions. A recent study shows that more than 60% of the observed inter-subject variability in perceptual learning can be ascribed to ongoing alpha activity. This evidence indicates a significant role of alpha oscillations for perceptual learning and hence motivates to explore the potential underlying mechanisms. Hence, it is the purpose of this review to highlight existent evidence that ascribes intrinsic alpha oscillations a role in shaping our ability to learn. In the review, we disentangle the alpha rhythm into different neural signatures that control information processing within individual functional building blocks of perceptual learning. We further highlight computational studies that shed light on potential mechanisms regarding how alpha oscillations may modulate information transfer and connectivity changes relevant for learning. To enable testing of those model based hypotheses, we emphasize the need for multidisciplinary approaches combining assessment of behavior and multi-scale neuronal activity, active modulation of ongoing brain states and computational modeling to reveal the mathematical principles of the complex neuronal interactions. In particular we highlight the relevance of multi-scale modeling frameworks such as the one currently being developed by The Virtual Brain project.

  14. Monte Carlo alpha calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockway, D.; Soran, P.; Whalen, P.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo algorithm to efficiently calculate static alpha eigenvalues, N = ne/sup ..cap alpha..t/, for supercritical systems has been developed and tested. A direct Monte Carlo approach to calculating a static alpha is to simply follow the buildup in time of neutrons in a supercritical system and evaluate the logarithmic derivative of the neutron population with respect to time. This procedure is expensive, and the solution is very noisy and almost useless for a system near critical. The modified approach is to convert the time-dependent problem to a static ..cap alpha../sup -/eigenvalue problem and regress ..cap alpha.. on solutions of a/sup -/ k/sup -/eigenvalue problem. In practice, this procedure is much more efficient than the direct calculation, and produces much more accurate results. Because the Monte Carlo codes are intrinsically three-dimensional and use elaborate continuous-energy cross sections, this technique is now used as a standard for evaluating other calculational techniques in odd geometries or with group cross sections.

  15. Antihydrogen detection in ALPHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hydomako, Richard, E-mail: rhydomako@phas.ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Bruun Andresen, Gorm [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Ashkezari, Mohammad Dehghani [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, William [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Butler, Eoin [CERN, European Laboratory for Particle Physics (Switzerland); Bowe, Paul David [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Cesar, Claudo Lenz [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fsica (Brazil); Chapman, Steve [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Charlton, Michael [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Fajans, Joel [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Gill, David Russell [TRIUMF (Canada); Hangst, Jeffrey Scott [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, Walter Newbold [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayano, Ryugo S. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Hayden, Michael Edward [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Humphries, Andrew James [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Jonsell, Svante [Stockholm University, Fysikum (Sweden); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    The ALPHA project is an international collaboration, based at CERN, with the experimental goal of performing precision spectroscopic measurements on antihydrogen. As part of this endeavor, the ALPHA experiment includes a silicon tracking detector. This detector consists of a three-layer array of silicon modules surrounding the antihydrogen trapping region of the ALPHA apparatus. Using this device, the antihydrogen annihilation position can be determined with a spatial resolution of better than 5 mm. Knowledge of the annihilation distribution was a critical component in the recently successful antihydrogen trapping effort. This paper will describe the methods used to reconstruct annihilation events in the ALPHA detector. Particular attention will be given to the description of the background rejection criteria.

  16. Attention Modulates TMS-Locked Alpha Oscillations in the Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Jim D; Thut, Gregor; Jensen, Ole; Bergmann, Til O

    2015-10-28

    Cortical oscillations, such as 8-12 Hz alpha-band activity, are thought to subserve gating of information processing in the human brain. While most of the supporting evidence is correlational, causal evidence comes from attempts to externally drive ("entrain") these oscillations by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Indeed, the frequency profile of TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) closely resembles that of oscillations spontaneously emerging in the same brain region. However, it is unclear whether TMS-locked and spontaneous oscillations are produced by the same neuronal mechanisms. If so, they should react in a similar manner to top-down modulation by endogenous attention. To test this prediction, we assessed the alpha-like EEG response to TMS of the visual cortex during periods of high and low visual attention while participants attended to either the visual or auditory modality in a cross-modal attention task. We observed a TMS-locked local oscillatory alpha response lasting several cycles after TMS (but not after sham stimulation). Importantly, TMS-locked alpha power was suppressed during deployment of visual relative to auditory attention, mirroring spontaneous alpha amplitudes. In addition, the early N40 TEP component, located at the stimulation site, was amplified by visual attention. The extent of attentional modulation for both TMS-locked alpha power and N40 amplitude did depend, with opposite sign, on the individual ability to modulate spontaneous alpha power at the stimulation site. We therefore argue that TMS-locked and spontaneous oscillations are of common neurophysiological origin, whereas the N40 TEP component may serve as an index of current cortical excitability at the time of stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Herring et al.

  17. Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steadman, P.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure is disclosed. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. 4 figs

  18. Buffett’s Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Kabiller, David; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    Berkshire Hathaway has realized a Sharpe ratio of 0.76, higher than any other stock or mutual fund with a history of more than 30 years, and Berkshire has a significant alpha to traditional risk factors. However, we find that the alpha becomes insignificant when controlling for exposures to Betting...

  19. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  20. Zinc oxide nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhobale, Sandip; Thite, Trupti; Laware, S. L.; Rode, C. V.; Koppikar, Soumya J.; Ghanekar, Ruchika-Kaul; Kale, S. N.

    2008-11-01

    Amylase inhibitors, also known as starch blockers, contain substances that prevent dietary starches from being absorbed by the body via inhibiting breakdown of complex sugars to simpler ones. In this sense, these materials are projected as having potential applications in diabetes control. In this context, we report on zinc oxide nanoparticles as possible alpha-amylase inhibitors. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized using soft-chemistry approach and 1-thioglycerol was used as a surfactant to yield polycrystalline nanoparticles of size ˜18 nm, stabilized in wurtzite structure. Conjugation study and structural characterization have been done using x-ray diffraction technique, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity studies on human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) and skin carcinoma (A-431) cell lines as well as mouse primary fibroblast cells demonstrate that up to a dose of 20 μg/ml, ZnO nanoparticles are nontoxic to the cells. We report for the first time the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of ZnO nanoparticles wherein an optimum dose of 20 μg/ml was sufficient to exhibit 49% glucose inhibition at neutral pH and 35 °C temperature. This inhibitory activity was similar to that obtained with acarbose (a standard alpha-amylase inhibitor), thereby projecting ZnO nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors.

  1. Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$ using Jet Rates at LEP with the OPAL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Hadronic events produced in e+e- collisions by the LEP collider and recorded by the OPAL detector were used to form distributions based on the number of reconstructed jets. The data were collected between 1995 and 2000 and correspond to energies of 91 GeV, 130-136 GeV and 161-209 GeV. The jet rates were determined using four different jet-finding algorithms (Cone, JADE, Durham and Cambridge). The differential two-jet rate and the average jet rate with the Durham and Cambridge algorithms were used to measure alpha(s) in the LEP energy range by fitting an expression in which order alpah_2s calculations were matched to a NLLA prediction and fitted to the data. Combining the measurements at different centre-of-mass energies, the value of alpha_s (Mz) was determined to be alpha(s)(Mz)=0.1177+-0.0006(stat.)+-0.0012$(expt.)+-0.0010(had.)+-0.0032

  2. Coincidence study of alpha particle fragmentation at E/sub alpha/ = 140 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the interaction of 140 MeV alpha particles with 90 Zr nuclei resulting in fragmentation of the alpha particle are reported. The experimental observations of the study are analyzed and are found to show that alpha particle breakup reactions leading to at least 4-body final states, composed of two charged alpha particle fragments, contribute significantly to the singles yield of charged fragments observed at a fixed forward angle. The conclusions are based on coincidence measurements where one charged fragment is detected at a small forward angle which remains fixed, while the second charged fragment is detected at a series of coplanar secondary angles. The largest coincidence charged particle yield for the multiparticle final state events results from 90 Zr(α,pp)X reactions, where both of the measured protons have energy distributions similar to the proton singles energy distributions. The second largest observed coincidence yield involving two charged fragments arises from 90 Zr(α,pd)X reactions, where the p and d fragments, as in the 90 Zr(α,pp)X reactions also have energy distribution similar to the singles energy distributions. Analysis of additional measurements, where alpha particle fragments at the fixed angle are detected in coincidence with evaporation and nonequilibrium particles at many coplanar angles, show that the alpha particle fragmentation reactions are also generally associated with large energy transfer to the target nucleus. A multiple scattering model of the fragmentation reaction is employed, in conjunction with the experimental observations, to estimate the cross sections for alpha particle fragmentation into multi-particle final states resulting in n, 2n, p, pp, d, dn, dp, t and 3 He fragments. The estimated total cross section for all fragmentation reactions is 755 mb or approximately 38% of the total reaction cross section for 140 MeV alpha particle interactions with 90 Zr

  3. alpha-MSH and its receptors in regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by human monocyte/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherzadeh, S; Sharma, S; Chhajlani, V; Gantz, I; Rajora, N; Demitri, M T; Kelly, L; Zhao, H; Ichiyama, T; Catania, A; Lipton, J M

    1999-05-01

    The hypothesis that macrophages contain an autocrine circuit based on melanocortin [ACTH and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)] peptides has major implications for neuroimmunomodulation research and inflammation therapy. To test this hypothesis, cells of the THP-1 human monocyte/macrophage line were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence and absence of alpha-MSH. The inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was inhibited in relation to alpha-MSH concentration. Similar inhibitory effects on TNF-alpha were observed with ACTH peptides that contain the alpha-MSH amino acid sequence and act on melanocortin receptors. Nuclease protection assays indicated that expression of the human melanocortin-1 receptor subtype (hMC-1R) occurs in THP-1 cells; Southern blots of RT-PCR product revealed that additional subtypes, hMC-3R and hMC-5R, also occur. Incubation of resting macrophages with antibody to hMC-1R increased TNF-alpha concentration; the antibody also markedly reduced the inhibitory influence of alpha-MSH on TNF-alpha in macrophages treated with LPS. These results in cells known to produce alpha-MSH at rest and to increase secretion of the peptide when challenged are consistent with an endogenous regulatory circuit based on melanocortin peptides and their receptors. Targeting of this neuroimmunomodulatory circuit in inflammatory diseases in which myelomonocytic cells are prominent should be beneficial.

  4. Characterizations of Anti-Alpha-Fetoprotein-Conjugated Magnetic Nanoparticles Associated with Alpha-Fetoprotein for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu-Hsien; Huang, Han-Sheng; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Su, Yu-Kai; Tong, Yuan-Fu; Huang, Kai-Wen

    2017-09-03

    In this work, we report characterizations of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNPs) associated with alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) for biomedical applications. The example BMNP in this study is anti-alpha-fetoprotein (anti-AFP) conjugated onto dextran-coated Fe₃O₄ labeled as Fe₃O₄-anti-AFP, and the target is AFP. We characterize magnetic properties, such as increments of magnetization ΔM H and effective relaxation time Δτ eff in the reaction process. It is found that both ΔM H and Δτ eff are enhanced when the concentration of AFP, Ф AFP , increases. The enhancements are due to magnetic interactions among BMNPs in magnetic clusters, which contribute extra M H after the association with M H and in turn enhance τ eff . The screening of patients carrying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is verified via ΔM H /M H . The proposed method can be applied to detect a wide variety of analytes. The scaling characteristics of ΔM H /M H show the potential to develop a vibrating sample magnetometer system with low field strength for clinic applications.

  5. Identification and expression analysis of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors cDNA in a reptile, the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Keisuke; Oka, Yoshitaka; Park, Min Kyun

    2008-05-01

    Despite the physiological and evolutionary significance of lipid metabolism in amniotes, the molecular mechanisms involved have been unclear in reptiles. To elucidate this, we investigated peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors (PPARs) in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius). PPARs belong to a nuclear hormone-receptor family mainly involved in lipid metabolism. Although PPARs have been widely studied in mammals, little information about them is yet available from reptiles. We identified in the leopard gecko partial cDNA sequences of PPARalpha and beta, and full sequences of two isoforms of PPARgamma. This is the first report of reptilian PPARgamma mRNA isoforms. We also evaluated the organ distribution of expression of these genes by using RT-PCR and competitive PCR. The expression level of PPARalpha mRNA was highest in the large intestine, and moderate in the liver and kidney. The expression level of PPARbeta mRNA was highest in the kidney and large intestine, and moderate in the liver. Similarly to the expression of human PPARgamma isoforms, PPARgammaa was expressed ubiquitously, whereas the expression of PPARgammab was restricted. The highest levels of their expression, however, were observed in the large intestine, rather than in the adipose tissue as in mammals. Taken together, these results showed that the profile of PPARbeta mRNA expression in the leopard gecko is similar to that in mammals, and that those of PPAR alpha and gamma are species specific. This may reflect adaptation to annual changes in lipid storage due to seasonal food availability.

  6. Functional discrepancies between tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin alpha explained by trimer stability and distinct receptor interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuchmann, M; Hess, S; Bufler, P

    1995-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and lymphotoxin alpha (LT alpha) are closely related cytokines which bind with nearly identical affinities to the same pair of cell surface receptors, p55 and p75TNFR. Therefore it is assumed that TNF and LT alpha are redundant cytokines. This study, however......, demonstrates that TNF and LT alpha differ significantly with regard to their mitogenic and cytotoxic potentials. LT alpha's superior mitogenic effect could be explained by its formation of a more stable trimer. In contrast to the TNF trimer, which disintegrated under physiological conditions into biologically...... inactive monomers, the LT alpha trimer remained stable for several days. Accordingly, LT alpha more effectively induced fibroblast growth which demands long-term presence of the cytokine. TNF's superior cytotoxicity, which requires only short-term impact of the cytokine, could be attributed to a distinct...

  7. Test of the Flavour Independence of $\\alpha_{s}$ using Next-to-Leading Order Calculations for Heavy Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    We present a test of the flavour independence of the strong coupling constant for charm and bottom quarks with respect to light (uds) quarks, based on a hadronic event sample obtained with the OPAL detector at LEP. Five observables related to global event shapes were used to measure alpha_s in three flavour tagged samples (uds, c and b). The event shape distributions were fitted by Order(alpha_s**2) calculations of jet production taking into account mass effects for the c and b quarks. We find: = 0.997 +- 0.038(stat.) +- 0.030(syst.) +- 0.012(theory) and = 0.993 +- 0.008(stat.) +- 0.006(syst.) +- 0.011(theory) for the ratios alpha_s(charm)/alpha_s(uds) and alpha_s(b)/alpha_s(uds) respectively.

  8. Classification of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Kenny, B.; Schwinn, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Two alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes (alpha 1A and alpha 1B) have been detected in various tissues by pharmacological techniques, and three distinct cDNAs encoding alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes have been cloned. The profile of an increasing number of subtype-selective compounds at cloned and endogenous

  9. Study of the solubility of a modified Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase around the isoelectric point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Cornilius; Hobley, Timothy John; Mollerup, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    The solubility of a modified recombinant Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase (mBLA) has been studied by batch crystallization. A semi-pure preparation was chosen containing five isoforms with pI values from 6 to 7.3 (weighted average of 6.6). Small amounts (... sodium sulfate at all pH values and increased with 0.5 mol.L-1 sodium thiocyanate at pH 7 and pH 8. The effect of anions on alpha-amylase solubility followed the Hofmeister series, and only weak evidence of reversal was seen below the isoelectric point. Cations had little effect on solubility. The sign...... and magnitude of the alpha-amylase zeta potential was determined in the presence and absence of 0.1 mol.L-1 salt. Qualitatively, zeta potential correctly predicted the different salts influence on mBLA solubility....

  10. Liquid scintillation alpha spectrometry techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKlveen, J.W.; McDowell, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate, quantitative determinations of alpha emitting nuclides by conventional plate counting methods are difficult, because of sample self-absorption problems in counting and because of non-reproducible losses in conventional sample separation methods. Liquid scintillation alpha spectrometry offers an attractive alternative with no sample self-absorption or geometry problems and with 100% counting efficiency. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillation counting medium. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination, to yield alpha spectra without beta and gamma background interference. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium and colonium assay. Possibilities for a large number of other applications exist. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 1% range. Backgrounds of the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. The paper will present an overview of liquid scintillation alpha counting techniques and some of the results achieved for specific applications. (orig.)

  11. Loss of tumorigenic potential by human lung tumor cells in the presence of antisense RNA specific to the ectopically synthesized alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, R T; Pasion, S G; Wong, D T; Fei, Y B; Biswas, D K

    1989-06-01

    A clonal strain of human lung tumor cells in culture (ChaGo), derived from a bronchogenic carcinoma, synthesizes and secretes large amounts of alpha (alpha) and a comparatively lower level of beta (beta) subunit of the glycoprotein hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). ChaGo cells lost their characteristic anchorage-independent growth phenotype in the presence of anti-alpha-HCG antibody. The effect of the antibody was partially reversed by addition of alpha-HCG to the culture medium. ChaGo cells were transfected with an expression vector (pRSV-anti-alpha-HCG), that directs synthesis of RNA complementary to alpha-HCG mRNA. The transfectants produced alpha-HCG antisense RNA which was associated with the reduced level of alpha-HCG. Transfectants also displayed several altered phenotypic properties, including altered morphology, less mitosis, reduced growth rate, loss of anchorage-independent growth, and loss of tumorigenicity in nude mice. Treatment of transfectants with 8,bromo-cAMP resulted in increased accumulation of alpha-HCG mRNA, no change in the level of alpha-HCG antisense RNA, release of the inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation, and restoration of anchorage-independent growth phenotype. The overexpression of c-myc, observed in ChaGo cells, was unaffected by the reduced level of alpha-HCG. These results suggest that ectopic synthesis of the alpha subunit of HCG plays a functional role in the transformation of these human lung cells.

  12. UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE binds to alpha-actinin 1: novel pathways in skeletal muscle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Amsili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in GNE, the key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of sialic acid. While the mechanism leading from GNE mutations to the HIBM phenotype is not yet understood, we searched for proteins potentially interacting with GNE, which could give some insights about novel putative biological functions of GNE in muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR-Biosensor based assay to search for potential GNE interactors in anion exchanged fractions of human skeletal muscle primary culture cell lysate. Analysis of the positive fractions by in vitro binding assay revealed alpha-actinin 1 as a potential interactor of GNE. The direct interaction of the two proteins was assessed in vitro by SPR-Biosensor based kinetics analysis and in a cellular environment by a co-immunoprecipitation assay in GNE overexpressing 293T cells. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry on stretched mouse muscle suggest that both GNE and alpha-actinin 1 localize to an overlapping but not identical region of the myofibrillar apparatus centered on the Z line. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The interaction of GNE with alpha-actinin 1 might point to its involvement in alpha-actinin mediated processes. In addition these studies illustrate for the first time the expression of the non-muscle form of alpha-actinin, alpha-actinin 1, in mature skeletal muscle tissue, opening novel avenues for its specific function in the sarcomere. Although no significant difference could be detected in the binding kinetics of alpha-actinin 1 with either wild type or mutant GNE in our SPR biosensor based analysis, further investigation is needed to determine whether and how the interaction of GNE with alpha-actinin 1 in skeletal muscle is relevant to the putative muscle-specific function of alpha-actinin 1, and to the muscle-restricted pathology of HIBM.

  13. Intercomparison of alpha particle spectrometry software packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Software has reached an important level as the 'logical controller' at different levels, from a single instrument to an entire computer-controlled experiment. This is also the case for software packages in nuclear instruments and experiments. In particular, because of the range of applications of alpha-particle spectrometry, software packages in this field are often used. It is the aim of this intercomparison to test and describe the abilities of four such software packages. The main objectives of the intercomparison were the ability of the programs to determine the peak areas and the peak area uncertainties, and the statistical control and stability of reported results. In this report, the task, methods and results of the intercomparison are presented in order to asist the potential users of such software and to stimulate the development of even better alpha-particle spectrum analysis software

  14. Alpha contamination assessment for D ampersand D activities: Monitoring pipe interiors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.; Conaway, J.G.; MacArthur, D.W.; Vaccarella, J.

    1996-02-01

    We have developed a prototype instrument capable of assessing alpha-emitting contamination on interior surfaces of ducts, pipes, tanks, and other enclosed volumes without inserting a probe. Air is drawn through the potentially contaminated volume and then through a detection grid, where ions created in the air by alpha particles are collected and the resulting charge measured with a sensitive electrometer. A filter at the intake end of the contaminated volume excludes externally created ions, so only ions generated inside the volume are detected. We have studied the response of this prototype in initial experiments using calibrated alpha sources with various pipe diameters and configurations, air flows, and source locations in the pipes. The results of these experiments indicate that this method can be an effective approach to assessing internal contamination

  15. Alpha detection on moving surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.; Orr, C.; Luff, C.

    1998-01-01

    Both environmental restoration (ER) and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) require characterization of large surface areas (walls, floors, in situ soil, soil and rubble on a conveyor belt, etc.) for radioactive contamination. Many facilities which have processed alpha active material such as plutonium or uranium require effective and efficient characterization for alpha contamination. Traditional methods for alpha surface characterization are limited by the short range and poor penetration of alpha particles. These probes are only sensitive to contamination located directly under the probe. Furthermore, the probe must be held close to the surface to be monitored in order to avoid excessive losses in the ambient air. The combination of proximity and thin detector windows can easily cause instrument damage unless extreme care is taken. The long-range alpha detection (LRAD) system addresses these problems by detecting the ions generated by alpha particles interacting with ambient air rather than the alpha particle directly. Thus, detectors based on LRAD overcome the limitations due to alpha particle range (the ions can travel many meters as opposed to the several-centimeter alpha particle range) and penetrating ability (an LRAD-based detector has no window). Unfortunately, all LRAD-based detectors described previously are static devices, i.e., these detectors cannot be used over surfaces which are continuously moving. In this paper, the authors report on the first tests of two techniques (the electrostatic ion seal and the gridded electrostatic LRAD detector) which extend the capabilities of LRAD surface monitors to use over moving surfaces. This dynamic surface monitoring system was developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and at BNFL Instruments. All testing was performed at the BNFL Instruments facility in the UK

  16. Mirrors in the PDB: left-handed alpha-turns guide design with D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annavarapu, Srinivas; Nanda, Vikas

    2009-09-22

    Incorporating variable amino acid stereochemistry in molecular design has the potential to improve existing protein stability and create new topologies inaccessible to homochiral molecules. The Protein Data Bank has been a reliable, rich source of information on molecular interactions and their role in protein stability and structure. D-amino acids rarely occur naturally, making it difficult to infer general rules for how they would be tolerated in proteins through an analysis of existing protein structures. However, protein elements containing short left-handed turns and helices turn out to contain useful information. Molecular mechanisms used in proteins to stabilize left-handed elements by L-amino acids are structurally enantiomeric to potential synthetic strategies for stabilizing right-handed elements with D-amino acids. Propensities for amino acids to occur in contiguous alpha(L) helices correlate with published thermodynamic scales for incorporation of D-amino acids into alpha(R) helices. Two backbone rules for terminating a left-handed helix are found: an alpha(R) conformation is disfavored at the amino terminus, and a beta(R) conformation is disfavored at the carboxy terminus. Helix capping sidechain-backbone interactions are found which are unique to alpha(L) helices including an elevated propensity for L-Asn, and L-Thr at the amino terminus and L-Gln, L-Thr and L-Ser at the carboxy terminus. By examining left-handed alpha-turns containing L-amino acids, new interaction motifs for incorporating D-amino acids into right-handed alpha-helices are identified. These will provide a basis for de novo design of novel heterochiral protein folds.

  17. Absence of integrin alpha 7 causes a novel form of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, U; Saher, G; Fässler, R; Bornemann, A; Echtermeyer, F; von der Mark, H; Miosge, N; Pöschl, E; von der Mark, K

    1997-11-01

    Integrin alpha 7 beta 1 is a specific cellular receptor for the basement membrane protein laminin-1 (refs 1,2), as well as for the laminin isoforms -2 and -4 (ref. 3). The alpha 7 subunit is expressed mainly in skeletal and cardiac muscle and has been suggested to be involved in differentiation and migration processes during myogenesis. Three cytoplasmic and two extracellular splice variants that have been described are developmentally regulated and expressed in different sites in the muscle. In adult muscle, the alpha 7A and alpha 7B subunits are concentrated in myotendinous junctions but can also be detected in neuromuscular junctions and along the sarcolemmal membrane. To study the potential involvement of alpha 7 integrin, during myogenesis and its role in muscle integrity and function, we generated a null allele of the alpha 7 gene (Itga7) in the germline of mice by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Surprisingly, mice homozygous for the mutation are viable and fertile, indicating that the alpha 7 beta 1 integrin is not essential for myogenesis. However, histological analysis of skeletal muscle revealed typical symptoms of a progressive muscular dystrophy starting soon after birth, but with a distinct variability in different muscle types. The observed histopathological changes strongly indicate an impairment of function of the myotendinous junctions. These findings demonstrate that alpha 7 beta 1 integrin represents an indispensable linkage between the muscle fibre and the extracellular matrix that is independent of the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex-mediated interaction of the cytoskeleton with the muscle basement membrane.

  18. Study of ({alpha}, {sup 3}He) and ({alpha}, t) reactions on {sup 28}Si at 45 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darshan, V.P.; Sathyavathiamma, M.P.; Ramaswamy, C.R.; Raja Rao, M.; Puttaswamy, N.G.; Banerjee, S.R.; Chintalapudi, S.N. [Dept. of Phys., Bangalore Univ. (India)

    1995-03-01

    The {sup 28}Si({alpha}, {sup 3}He){sup 29}Si, {sup 28}Si({alpha}, t){sup 29}P and Si({alpha}, {alpha})Si reactions were studied at E{sub {alpha}} = 45 MeV. Exact finite-range (EFR) DWBA analysis was carried out for the transitions to the ground state and to five excited states in {sup 29}Si and {sup 29}P. Spectroscopic strengths G were extracted for all the states and were compared with the predictions from shell-model and quasi-particle core-coupling calculations. Similar EFR-DWBA analyses were carried out from available (unpublished) data for the {sup 28}Si({alpha}, {sup 3}He){sup 29}Si reaction at E{sub {alpha}} = 64.9 and 120 MeV, and for the {sup 28}Si({alpha}, t){sup 29}P reaction at E{sub {alpha}} = 50 and 64.9 MeV. The comparison of experimental and theoretical values of G are provided. (author)

  19. alpha AD alpha hybrids of Cryptococcus neoformans: evidence of same-sex mating in nature and hybrid fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Lin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a ubiquitous human fungal pathogen that causes meningoencephalitis in predominantly immunocompromised hosts. The fungus is typically haploid, and sexual reproduction involves two individuals with opposite mating types/sexes, alpha and a. However, the overwhelming predominance of mating type (MAT alpha over a in C. neoformans populations limits alpha-a mating in nature. Recently it was discovered that C. neoformans can undergo same-sex mating under laboratory conditions, especially between alpha isolates. Whether same-sex mating occurs in nature and contributes to the current population structure was unknown. In this study, natural alpha AD alpha hybrids that arose by fusion between two alpha cells of different serotypes (A and D were identified and characterized, providing definitive evidence that same-sex mating occurs naturally. A novel truncated allele of the mating-type-specific cell identity determinant SXI1 alpha was also identified as a genetic factor likely involved in this process. In addition, laboratory-constructed alpha AD alpha strains exhibited hybrid vigor both in vitro and in vivo, providing a plausible explanation for their relative abundance in nature despite the fact that AD hybrids are inefficient in meiosis/sporulation and are trapped in the diploid state. These findings provide insights on the origins, genetic mechanisms, and fitness impact of unisexual hybridization in the Cryptococcus population.

  20. Single particle level scheme for alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirea, M.

    1998-01-01

    The fine structure phenomenon in alpha decay was evidenced by Rosenblum. In this process the kinetic energy of the emitted particle has several determined values related to the structure of the parent and the daughter nucleus. The probability to find the daughter in a low lying state was considered strongly dependent on the spectroscopic factor defined as the square of overlap between the wave function of the parent in the ground state and the wave functions of the specific excited states of the daughter. This treatment provides a qualitative agreement with the experimental results if the variations of the penetrability between different excited states are neglected. Based on single particle structure during fission, a new formalism explained quantitatively the fine structure of the cluster decay. It was suggested that this formalism can be applied also to alpha decay. For this purpose, the first step is to construct the level scheme of this type of decay. Such a scheme, obtained with the super-asymmetric two-center potential, is plotted for the alpha decay of 223 Ra. It is interesting to note that, diabatically, the level with spin 3/2 emerging from 1i 11/2 (ground state of the parent) reaches an excited state of the daughter in agreement with the experiment. (author)

  1. Biochemical characterization of CK2alpha and alpha' paralogues and their derived holoenzymes: evidence for the existence of a heterotrimeric CK2alpha'-holoenzyme forming trimeric complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Birgitte; Rasmussen, Tine; Niefind, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Altogether 2 holoenzymes and 4 catalytic CK2 constructs were expressed and characterized i.e. CK2alpha (2) (1-335) beta(2); CK2alpha'-derived holoenzyme; CK2alpha(1-335); MBP-CK2alpha'; His-tagged CK2alpha and His-tagged CK2alpha'. The two His-tagged catalytic subunits were expressed in insect...... cells, all others in Escherichia coli. IC(50) studies involving the established CK2 inhibitors DMAT, TBBt, TBBz, apigenin and emodin were carried out and the K(i) values calculated. Although the differences in the K(i) values found were modest, there was a general tendency showing that the CK2...... holoenzymes were more sensitive towards the inhibitors than the free catalytic subunits. Thermal inactivation experiments involving the individual catalytic subunits showed an almost complete loss of activity after only 2 min at 45 degrees C. In the case of the two holoenzymes, the CK2alpha...

  2. Flavonoids-induced accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha/2alpha is mediated through chelation of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Soo; Bae, Insoo; Lee, Yong J

    2008-04-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) is the regulatory subunit of the heterodimeric transcription factor HIF-1 that is the key regulator of cellular response to low oxygen tension. Under normoxic conditions, HIF-1alpha is continuously degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway through pVHL (von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein). Under hypoxic conditions, HIF-1alpha is stabilized and induces the transcription of HIF-1 target genes. Quercetin, a flavonoid with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and kinase modulating properties, has been found to induce HIF-1alpha accumulation and VEGF secretion in normoxia. In this study, the molecular mechanisms of quercetin-mediated HIF-1alpha accumulation were investigated. Previous studies have shown that, in addition to being induced by hypoxia, HIF-1alpha can be induced through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and p53 signaling pathways. But our study revealed, through p53 mutant-type as well as p53 null cell lines, that neither the PI3K/Akt nor the p53 signaling pathway is required for quercetin-induced HIF-1alpha accumulation. And we observed that HIF-1alpha accumulated by quercetin is not ubiquitinated and the interaction of HIF-1alpha with pVHL is reduced, compared with HIF-1alpha accumulated by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. The use of quercetin's analogues showed that only quercetin and galangin induce HIF-1/2alpha accumulation and this effect is completely reversed by additional iron ions. This is because quercetin and galangin are able to chelate cellular iron ions that are cofactors of HIF-1/2alpha proline hydroxylase (PHD). These data suggest that quercetin inhibits the ubiquitination of HIF-1/2alpha in normoxia by hindering PHD through chelating iron ions.

  3. HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha are differentially activated in distinct cell populations in retinal ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya M Mowat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia plays a key role in ischaemic and neovascular disorders of the retina. Cellular responses to oxygen are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs that are stabilised in hypoxia and induce the expression of a diverse range of genes. The purpose of this study was to define the cellular specificities of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha in retinal ischaemia, and to determine their correlation with the pattern of retinal hypoxia and the expression profiles of induced molecular mediators.We investigated the tissue distribution of retinal hypoxia during oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR in mice using the bio-reductive drug pimonidazole. We measured the levels of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha proteins by Western blotting and determined their cellular distribution by immunohistochemistry during the development of OIR. We measured the temporal expression profiles of two downstream mediators, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and erythropoietin (Epo by ELISA. Pimonidazole labelling was evident specifically in the inner retina. Labelling peaked at 2 hours after the onset of hypoxia and gradually declined thereafter. Marked binding to Müller glia was evident during the early hypoxic stages of OIR. Both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha protein levels were significantly increased during retinal hypoxia but were evident in distinct cellular distributions; HIF-1alpha stabilisation was evident in neuronal cells throughout the inner retinal layers whereas HIF-2alpha was restricted to Müller glia and astrocytes. Hypoxia and HIF-alpha stabilisation in the retina were closely followed by upregulated expression of the downstream mediators VEGF and EPO.Both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha are activated in close correlation with retinal hypoxia but have contrasting cell specificities, consistent with differential roles in retinal ischaemia. Our findings suggest that HIF-2alpha activation plays a key role in regulating the response of Müller glia to hypoxia.

  4. Application of four anti-human interferon-alpha monoclonal antibodies for immunoassay and comparative analysis of natural interferon-alpha mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, G.; Lundgren, E.; Ekre, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    Four different mouse monoclonal antibodies to human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) were evaluated for application in quantitative and comparative analysis of natural IFN-alpha mixtures. Binding to IFN-alpha subtypes in solution revealed individual reactivity patterns. These patterns changed if the IFN-alpha molecules were immobilized either passively to a surface or bound by another antibody. Also, substitution of a single amino acid in IFN-alpha 2 affected the binding, apparently by altering the conformation. Isoelectric focusing of three natural IFN-alpha preparations from different sources, followed by immunoblotting, resulted in individual patterns with each of the four mAbs and also demonstrated variation in the composition of the IFN-alpha preparations. None of the mAbs was subtype specific, but by combining the different mAbs, and also applying polyclonal anti-human IFN-alpha antibodies, it was possible to design sensitive sandwich ELISAs with broad or more limited IFN-alpha subtype specificity

  5. Alpha and beta detection and spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saro, S.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of alpha and beta radioactive decay, the interaction of alpha and beta particles with matter, and their detection and spectrometry are dealt with in seven chapters: 1. Alpha transformation of atomic nuclei; 2. Basic properties of detectors and statistics of detection; 3. Alpha detectors and spectrometers; 4. Applications of alpha detection and spectrometry; 5. Beta transformation of atomic nuclei; 6. Beta particle detectors and spectrometers; 7. Detection of low energy beta particles. Chapter 8 is devoted to sampling and preparation of samples for radiometry. (E.F.)

  6. Capillary electrophoresis as a screening tool for alpha amylase inhibitors in plant extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdan, Imad I.; Afifi, Fatima U.

    2010-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for screening plant extract for potential alpha amylase (AA) inhibitory activity. The method was validated against a well established UV method. Overall, the proposed method was shown able to detect plants with significant alpha amylase inhibitory activity but not those with rather clinically insignificant activities. Fifty plant species were screened using both the proposed CE method and the UV method and seven plant species were found to p...

  7. Human alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NAGA) deficiency: no association with neuroaxonal dystrophy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, H. D.; de Sonnaville, M. L.; Vreken, P.; Abeling, N. G.; Groener, J. E.; Keulemans, J. L.; van Diggelen, O. P.

    2001-01-01

    Two new individuals with alpha-NAGA deficiency are presented. The index patient, 3 years old, has congenital cataract, slight motor retardation and secondary demyelinisation. Screening of his sibs revealed an alpha-NAGA deficiency in his 7-year-old healthy brother who had no clinical or neurological

  8. Applying alpha-channeling to mirror machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhmoginov, A. I.; Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The {alpha}-channeling effect entails the use of radio-frequency waves to expel and cool high-energetic {alpha} particles born in a fusion reactor; the device reactivity can then be increased even further by redirecting the extracted energy to fuel ions. Originally proposed for tokamaks, this technique has also been shown to benefit open-ended fusion devices. Here, the fundamental theory and practical aspects of {alpha} channeling in mirror machines are reviewed, including the influence of magnetic field inhomogeneity and the effect of a finite wave region on the {alpha}-channeling mechanism. For practical implementation of the {alpha}-channeling effect in mirror geometry, suitable contained weakly damped modes are identified. In addition, the parameter space of candidate waves for implementing the {alpha}-channeling effect can be significantly extended through the introduction of a suitable minority ion species that has the catalytic effect of moderating the transfer of power from the {alpha}-channeling wave to the fuel ions.

  9. A rational approach to predict and modulate stereolability of chiral alpha substituted ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirilli, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto; Gasparrini, Francesco; La Torre, Francesco; Pierini, Marco; Siani, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    An effective strategy to assess and modulate the stereolability of chiral alpha substituted ketones (C alpha SKs) is presented. The tendency of C alpha SKs to retain or change their configuration in water is analyzed as a function of thermodynamic proton-release attitude of alpha asymmetric atoms inside the structures by linear Brønsted correlations. A molecular modeling procedure was developed to analyze and suggest chemical modifications of C alpha SKs in view to obtain the desired grade of stereochemical stability. The approach was employed to predict the tendency to enantiomerize in water of two ketones (1 and 2) endowed with inhibitory activity against monoamine oxidases (MAOs) and the results were confirmed by experimental kinetics measurements performed in organic medium. As a demonstration of practical potentialities of the approach, four new structures, conceived as simple chemical modifications of 1 and 2, were designed to improve/reduce the stereostability grade of the starting anti-MAO ketones. The possibility to extend easily the procedure to other classes of C-H acids appears of interest.

  10. Alpha Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Alpha Thalassemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Alpha Thalassemia What's in this ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Print en español Alfa talasemia Thalassemias Thalassemias are a group of blood disorders that ...

  11. Combinations of ERK and p38 MAPK inhibitors ablate tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha ) mRNA induction. Evidence for selective destabilization of TNF-alpha transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutault, K; Hazzalin, C A; Mahadevan, L C

    2001-03-02

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine whose synthesis and secretion are implicated in diverse pathologies. Hence, inhibition of TNF-alpha transcription or translation and neutralization of its protein product represent major pharmaceutical strategies to control inflammation. We have studied the role of ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in controlling TNF-alpha mRNA levels in differentiated THP-1 cells and in freshly purified human monocytes. We show here that it is possible to produce virtually complete inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated TNF-alpha mRNA accumulation by using a combination of ERK and p38 MAP kinase inhibitors. Furthermore, substantial inhibition is achievable using combinations of 1 microm of each inhibitor, whereas inhibitors used individually are incapable of producing complete inhibition even at high concentrations. Finally, addressing mechanisms involved, we show that inhibition of p38 MAP kinase selectively destabilizes TNF-alpha transcripts but does not affect degradation of c-jun transcripts. These results impinge on the controversy in the literature surrounding the mode of action of MAP kinase inhibitors on TNF-alpha mRNA and suggest the use of combinations of MAP kinase inhibitors as an effective anti-inflammatory strategy.

  12. Development of thermal conditioning technology for Alpha-containment wastes: Alpha-contaminated waste incineration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joon Hyung; Kim, Jeong Guk; Yang, Hee Chul; Choi, Byung Seon; Jeong, Myeong Soo

    1999-03-01

    As the first step of a 3-year project named 'development of alpha-contaminated waste incineration technology', the basic information and data were reviewed, while focusing on establishment of R and D direction to develop the final goal, self-supporting treatment of {alpha}- wastes that would be generated from domestic nuclear industries. The status on {alpha} waste incineration technology of advanced states was reviewed. A conceptual design for {alpha} waste incineration process was suggested. Besides, removal characteristics of volatile metals and radionuclides in a low-temperature dry off-gas system were investigated. Radiation dose assessments and some modification for the Demonstration-scale Incineration Plant (DSIP) at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) were also done.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-independent downregulation of hepatic cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene in mice treated with lead nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Misaki; Sekikawa, Kenji; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Degawa, Masakuni

    2005-10-01

    We previously reported that lead nitrate (LN), an inducer of hepatic tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), downregulated gene expression of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase. Herein, to clarify the role of TNF-alpha in LN-induced downregulation of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, effects of LN on gene expression of hepatic cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) in TNF-alpha-knockout (KO) and TNF-alpha-wild-type (WT) mice were comparatively examined. Gene expression of hepatic Cyp7a1 in both WT and KO mice decreased to less than 5% of the corresponding controls at 6-12 h after treatment with LN (100 mumol/kg body weight, iv). Levels of hepatic TNF-alpha protein in either WT or KO mice were below the detection limit, although expression levels of the TNF-alpha gene markedly increased at 6 h in WT mice by LN treatment, but not in KO mice. In contrast, in both WT and KO mice, levels of hepatic IL-1beta protein, which is known to be a suppressor of the cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene in hamsters, were significantly increased 3-6 h after LN treatment. Furthermore, LN-induced downregulation of the Cyp7a1 gene did not necessarily result from altered gene expression of hepatic transcription factors, including positive regulators (liver X receptor alpha, retinoid X receptor alpha, fetoprotein transcription factor, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha) and a negative regulator small heterodimer partner responsible for expression of the Cyp7a1 gene. The present findings indicated that LN-induced downregulation of the Cyp7a1 gene in mice did not necessarily occur through a TNF-alpha-dependent pathway and might occur mainly through an IL-1beta-dependent pathway.

  14. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of human alpha crystallin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, M S; Abraham, E C

    1991-03-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) method was used to separate crystallin subunits from human alpha crystallin. Three distinct peaks were separated; by electrophoretic and immunological analyses the first and second peaks were identified as alpha B and alpha A respectively. On the other hand, peak 3 appeared to be a modified form of alpha crystallin. The ratio of alpha A and alpha B proteins was 3:1 in 1 day old lenses which gradually changed to 2:1 in 17 year old lenses and to 1:1 in the 50 and 82 year old whole lenses and 82 year old lens cortex, with a concomitant increase in the modified alpha, suggesting that alpha A subunits are relatively more involved in aggregation. Analysis of the 82 year old lens nucleus also supported this conclusion. The RP-HPLC analysis of the HMW aggregate fraction showed substantial enrichment of the modified alpha. The alpha A and alpha B subunits independently reassociated to form polymeric alpha crystallin whereas the modified alpha reassociated to form HMW aggregates as shown by molecular sieve HPLC. Hence it appears that the HMW aggregate peak was constituted by modified alpha crystallin. Only in the peak 3 material the 280 nm absorbance was about 2-fold higher than what was expected from the actual protein content. The data suggest that the changes induced by post-translational modifications may have some role in the formation of modified alpha. The present RP-HPLC method is useful in separating these modified alpha from the unmodified alpha A and alpha B subunits.

  15. Proteinaceous alpha-araylase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    -amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha...

  16. Resolution of G(s)alpha and G(q)alpha/G(11)alpha proteins in membrane domains by two-dimensional electrophoresis: the effect of long-term agonist stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matousek, P; Novotný, J; Svoboda, P

    2004-01-01

    Low-density membrane-domain fractions were prepared from S49 lymphoma cells and clone e2m11 of HEK293 cells expressing a large number of thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRH-R) and G(11)alpha by flotation on sucrose density gradients. The intact cell structure was broken by detergent-extraction, alkaline-treatment or drastic homogenization. Three types of low-density membranes were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis and analyzed for G(s)alpha (S49) or G(q)alpha/G11) (e2m11) content. Four individual immunoblot signals of Gsalpha protein were identified in S49 lymphoma cells indicating complete resolution of the long G(s)alpha L+/-ser and short G(s)alpha S+/-ser variants of G(s)alpha. All these were diminished by prolonged agonist (isoprenaline) stimulation. In e2m11-HEK cells, five different immunoblot signals were detected indicating post-translational modification of G proteins of G(q)alpha/G(11)alpha family. The two major spots corresponding to exogenously (over)expressed G(11)alpha and endogenous G(q)alpha were reduced; the minor spots diminished by hormonal stimulation. Parallel analysis by silver staining of the total protein content indicated that no major changes in protein composition occurred under these conditions. Our data thus indicate that agonist-stimulation of target cells results in down-regulation of all different members of G(s) and G(q)/G(11) families. This agonist-specific effect may be demonstrated in crude membrane as well as domain/raft preparations and it is not accompanied by changes in overall protein composition.

  17. Alpha 1A and alpha 1B-adrenoceptors enhance inositol phosphate generation in rat renal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Büscher, R.; Philipp, T.; Brodde, O. E.

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the role of alpha 1A- and alpha 1B-adrenoceptors in noradrenaline- and methoxamine-stimulated inositol phosphate accumulation in rat renal cortical slices. [3H]Prazosin binding studies with and without inactivation of alpha 1B-adrenoceptors by chloroethylclonidine treatment suggested

  18. Alpha-particle emission probabilities of ²³⁶U obtained by alpha spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouli, M; Pommé, S; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H; Benedik, L

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry was performed with an ion-implanted silicon detector in vacuum on a homogeneously electrodeposited (236)U source. The source was measured at different solid angles subtended by the detector, varying between 0.8% and 2.4% of 4π sr, to assess the influence of coincidental detection of alpha-particles and conversion electrons on the measured alpha-particle emission probabilities. Additional measurements were performed using a bending magnet to eliminate conversion electrons, the results of which coincide with normal measurements extrapolated to an infinitely small solid angle. The measured alpha emission probabilities for the three main peaks - 74.20 (5)%, 25.68 (5)% and 0.123 (5)%, respectively - are consistent with literature data, but their precision has been improved by at least one order of magnitude in this work. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Alpha 1-blockers vs 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia. A comparative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T

    1995-01-01

    During recent years, pharmacological treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become the primary treatment choice for an increasing number of patients. The 2 principal drug classes employed are alpha 1-blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Current information from...... of patients who will respond well to alpha 1-blockers have yet to be identified, and data concerning the long term effects of these drugs are not yet available. 5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors have a slow onset of effect, but treatment leads to improvement in symptoms, reduction of the size of the prostate gland...... and improvement in objective parameters for bladder outflow obstruction. Approximately 30 to 50% of patients will respond to treatment with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. The definitive role of pharmacological treatment in symptomatic BPH remains to be established, although it seems that patients unfit...

  20. Interactions of foot-and-mouth disease virus with soluble bovine alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6 integrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Hernando; LaRocco, Michael; Golde, William T; Baxt, Barry

    2004-09-01

    At least four members of the integrin family of receptors, alphaVbeta1, alphaVbeta3, alphaVbeta6, and alphaVbeta8, have been identified as receptors for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in vitro. Our investigators have recently shown that the efficiency of receptor usage appears to be related to the viral serotype and may be influenced by structural differences on the viral surface (H. Duque and B. Baxt, J. Virol. 77:2500-2511, 2003). To further examine these differences, we generated soluble alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6 integrins. cDNA plasmids encoding the individual complete integrin alphaV, beta3, and beta6 subunits were used to amplify sequences encoding the subunits' signal peptide and ectodomain, resulting in subunits lacking transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. COS-1 cells were transfected with plasmids encoding the soluble alphaV subunit and either the soluble beta3 or beta6 subunit and labeled with [35S]methionine-cysteine. Complete subunit heterodimeric integrins were secreted into the medium, as determined by radioimmunoprecipitation with specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. For the examination of the integrins' biological activities, stable cell lines producing the soluble integrins were generated in HEK 293A cells. In the presence of divalent cations, soluble alphaVbeta6 bound to representatives of type A or O viruses, immobilized on plastic dishes, and significantly inhibited viral replication, as determined by plaque reduction assays. In contrast, soluble alphaVbeta3 was unable to bind to immobilized virus of either serotype; however, virus bound to the immobilized integrin, suggesting that FMDV binding to alphaVbeta3 is a low-affinity interaction. In addition, soluble alphaVbeta3 did not neutralize virus infectivity. Incubation of soluble alphaVbeta6 with labeled type A12 or O1 resulted in a significant inhibition of virus adsorption to BHK cells, while soluble alphaVbeta3 caused a low (20 to 30%), but consistent, inhibition of virus

  1. Serum concentrations of interleukin-1 alpha, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in neonatal sepsis and meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fida, Nadia M.; Fadelallah, Mohamed F.; Al-Mughales, Jamil A.

    2006-01-01

    To investigate whether serum levels of interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), C-reactive protein (CRP) are useful in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and meningitis and differentiate them. Blood samples were collected from 35 full term neonates with suspected infection who admitted to the Neonatology Unit, Pediatric Department, King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia during January 2002 - June 2003. On the basis of laboratory and bacteriological results, newborns were classified into: sepsis (n=28), meningitis (n=7), and healthy controls (n=16). Sepsis groups were further subdivided according to culture results into: group 1 = proven sepsis (n=6), group 2 = clinical sepsis (n=14), and group 3 = possible-infected (n=8). Serum levels of IL-1alpha, IL-6, TNF-alpha were measured using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay while CRP by nephelometer: In sepsis and meningitis patients, serum levels of CRP (p<0.01, p<0.05,) and IL-1alpha (p<0.001, p<0.05) were elevated than controls. C-reactive protein levels elevated in proven sepsis (p<0.001) and IL-1alpha elevated in all subgroups of sepsis (groups 1, 2, 3) compared with (p<0.05, p<0.001, p<0.01) controls. Interleukin-6, TNF-alpha showed no significant differences between studied groups. In sepsis and meningitis, IL-1alpha had a highest sensitivity (89%, 86%), and negative predictive values (89% and 93%). Interleukin-1alpha and CRP increased in neonatal sepsis and meningitis, but cannot differentiate between them. Interleukin-1alpha had a highest sensitivity in prediction of neonatal infection and its assessment may improve accuracy of diagnosis. (author)

  2. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha One International Registry (AIR), a multinational research program focused on alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, was formed in response to a World Health Organization recommendation. Each of the nearly 20 participating countries maintains a national registry of patients with AAT defic...

  3. 15 beta-hydroxysteroids (Part IV). Steroids of the human perinatal period: the synthesis of 3 alpha,15 beta,17 alpha-trihydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one and its A/B-ring configurational isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, A Y; Joannou, G E

    1995-12-01

    In recent years several 15 beta-hydroxysteroids have emerged pathognomonic of adrenal disorders in human neonates of which 3 alpha,15 beta,17 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-pregnan-20-one (2) was the first to be identified in the urine of newborn infants affected with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this investigation we report the synthesis of the three remaining 3 xi,5 xi-isomers, namely 3 alpha,15 beta,17 alpha-trihydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one (3), 3 beta,15 beta,17 alpha-trihydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one (7) and 3 beta,15 beta,17 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-pregnan-20-one (8) for their definitive identification in pathological conditions in human neonates. 3 beta,15 beta-Diacetoxy-17 alpha-hydroxy-5-pregnen-20-one (11), a product of chemical synthesis was converted to the isomeric 3 and 7, while conversion of 15 beta,17 alpha-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3,20-dione (4), a product of microbiological transformation, resulted in the preparation of 8. In brief, selective acetate hydrolysis of 11 gave 15 beta-acetoxy-3 beta,17 alpha-dihydroxy-5-pregnen-20-one (12) which on catalytic hydrogenation gave 15 beta-acetoxy-3 beta,17 alpha-dihydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one (13) a common intermediate for the synthesis of the 3 beta(and alpha),5 alpha-isomers. Hydrolysis of the 15 beta-acetate gave 7, whereas oxidation with pyridinium chlorochromate gave 15 beta-acetoxy-17 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-3,20-dione (14) which on reduction with L-Selectride and hydrolysis of the 15 beta-acetate gave 3. Finally, hydrogenation of 4 gave 15 beta, 17 alpha-dihydroxy-5 beta-pregnan-3,20-dione (10) which on reduction with L-Selectride gave 8.

  4. Enzyme replacement therapy for alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Dali, Christine I.; Fogh, J

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis (OMIM 248500) is a rare lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by alpha-mannosidase deficiency. Manifestations include intellectual disabilities, facial characteristics and hearing impairment. A recombinant human alpha-mannosidase (rhLAMAN) has been developed for weekly...

  5. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2...

  6. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2a...

  7. Increased Alpha-Rhythm Dynamic Range Promotes Recovery from Visuospatial Neglect: A Neurofeedback Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Ros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent attempts to use electroencephalogram (EEG neurofeedback (NFB as a tool for rehabilitation of motor stroke, its potential for improving neurological impairments of attention—such as visuospatial neglect—remains underexplored. It is also unclear to what extent changes in cortical oscillations contribute to the pathophysiology of neglect, or its recovery. Utilizing EEG-NFB, we sought to causally manipulate alpha oscillations in 5 right-hemisphere stroke patients in order to explore their role in visuospatial neglect. Patients trained to reduce alpha oscillations from their right posterior parietal cortex (rPPC for 20 minutes daily, over 6 days. Patients demonstrated successful NFB learning between training sessions, denoted by improved regulation of alpha oscillations from rPPC. We observed a significant negative correlation between visuospatial search deficits (i.e., cancellation test and reestablishment of spontaneous alpha-rhythm dynamic range (i.e., its amplitude variability. Our findings support the use of NFB as a tool for investigating neuroplastic recovery after stroke and suggest reinstatement of intact parietal alpha oscillations as a promising target for reversing attentional deficits. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of EEG-NFB in neglect patients and provide evidence that targeting alpha amplitude variability might constitute a valuable marker for clinical symptoms and self-regulation.

  8. Alpha-amino acid derivatives and alpha-fluoro ketones by enantioselective decarboxylation

    OpenAIRE

    Baur, Markus A.

    2003-01-01

    Die Methode der enantioselektiven Decarboxylierung wurde angewendet, um Enantiomeren-angereicherte alpha-Aminosäurederivate und alpha-Fluorketone zu erhalten. Als Substrate wurden 2-N-Acetylamino-2-alkylmalonsäuremonoethylester beziehungsweise beta-Keto-benzylester verwendet. China-Alkaloide und Derivate davon wurden als Katalysatoren eingesetzt. Die besten erhaltenen Ergebnisse waren N-Acetyl-L-phenylalaninethylester mit 70% Enantiomerenüberschuß unter Verwendung der katalytisch aktiven Base...

  9. Complete primary structure of rainbow trout type I collagen consisting of alpha1(I)alpha2(I)alpha3(I) heterotrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, M; Takenouchi, Y; Kunisaki, N; Kimura, S

    2001-05-01

    The subunit compositions of skin and muscle type I collagens from rainbow trout were found to be alpha1(I)alpha2(I)alpha3(I) and [alpha1(I)](2)alpha2(I), respectively. The occurrence of alpha3(I) has been observed only for bonyfish. The skin collagen exhibited more susceptibility to both heat denaturation and MMP-13 digestion than the muscle counterpart; the former had a lower denaturation temperature by about 0.5 degrees C than the latter. The lower stability of skin collagen, however, is not due to the low levels of imino acids because the contents of Pro and Hyp were almost constant in both collagens. On the other hand, some cDNAs coding for the N-terminal and/or a part of triple-helical domains of proalpha(I) chains were cloned from the cDNA library of rainbow trout fibroblasts. These cDNAs together with the previously cloned collagen cDNAs gave information about the complete primary structure of type I procollagen. The main triple-helical domain of each proalpha(I) chain had 338 uninterrupted Gly-X-Y triplets consisting of 1014 amino acids and was unique in its high content of Gly-Gly doublets. In particular, the bonyfish-specific alpha(I) chain, proalpha3(I) was characterized by the small number of Gly-Pro-Pro triplets, 19, and the large number of Gly-Gly doublets, 38, in the triple-helical domain, compared to 23 and 22, respectively, for proalpha1(I). The small number of Gly-Pro-Pro and the large number of Gly-Gly in proalpha3(I) was assumed to partially loosen the triple-helical structure of skin collagen, leading to the lower stability of skin collagen mentioned above. Finally, phylogenetic analyses revealed that proalpha3(I) had diverged from proalpha1(I). This study is the first report of the complete primary structure of fish type I procollagen.

  10. TFTR alpha extraction and measurement: Development and testing of advanced alpha detectors: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehring, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced alpha-particle detectors made of heavy elements were investigated as alternatives to silicon surface-barrier detectors for the ''foil-neutralization technique'' of alpha-particle diagnostics in fusion reactors with high neutron backgrounds. From an extensive literature review, it was decided that HgI 2 would make a more suitable detector for alpha-particle diagnostics than other heavy element detectors such as CdTe. Thus, HgI 2 detectors were designed and fabricated. Experimental tests were performed to determine detector characteristics and detector responses to alpha particles. Radiation noise measurements were also performed using the North Carolina State University PULSTAR nuclear reactor for both the HgI 2 detectors and commercial Si(Au) surface barrier detectors. 15 refs., 1 fig

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of phytotoxic activity of {alpha}-Santonin derivatives; Sintese e avaliacao da atividade fitotoxica de derivados da {alpha}-Santonina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga, Elson S.; Barbosa, Luiz C.A.; Saliba, William A.; Arantes, Francisco F.P.; Demuner, Antonio J. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: elson@ufv.br; Silva, Antonio A. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fitotecnia

    2009-07-01

    Mixtures of {alpha}-Santonin and various solvents were irradiated by either high or low pressure mercury lamps. The photochemical reactions afforded lumisantonin (11) (76% in acetonitrile), (3 S,3a S,9{beta}S)-3,6,6-trimethyl-3,3a,4,5-tetrahydronafto[1,2-b]furan-2,7({eta}6,9{beta}{eta}) dione (12) (100% in acetonitrile), 10{alpha}-acetoxy-3-oxo-1,7{alpha}H{eta},6,11{alpha}a{eta}-guaia-4-en-6,12-oli= de (8) (26% in acetic acid), 10{alpha}-hydroxy-3-oxo-1,7{alpha}a{eta},6,11{alpha}{eta}-guaia-4-en-6,12-olid= e (10) (32%) and (E)-3-((3 S,3a S,7{alpha}S)-3-methyl-2-oxo-6-(propan-2-ylidene)hexahydrobenzofuran- 7 - (7{alpha}{eta})-ylidene)propanoic acid (9) (44%) (in water/ acetic acid 1:1, v/v). Lactone 12 was also prepared by irradiation of lumisantonin in diethyl ether. Lactones 8 and 10 were converted, respectively, into the 10 {alpha}-acetoxy-3{alpha}-hydroxy-1,7{alpha}H,6,11{alpha}H-guaia-4-en-6,12-olid= e (13) (87%) and 3a,10a-dihydroxy-1,7{alpha}H,6,11{alpha}H-guaia-4-en-6,12-olide (14) (75%) by sodium borohydride reduction. The effects of the compounds on the development of radicle of Sorghum bicolor and Cucumis sativus were evaluated. (author)

  12. Remarks on tilde g_{alpha}-irresolute maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Rebecca Paul

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Only a few of the class of generalized closed sets form a topology. The class of tilde g_{alpha}-closed sets is one among them. The aim of this paper is to introduce the different notions of irresolute function using tilde g_{alpha}-closed sets and study some of their basic properties.We also study the relation between strongly tilde g_{alpha}- continuous and perfectly eg-continuous functions. We also introduce tilde g_{alpha}-compact and ilde g_{alpha}-connectedspaces and study their properties using tilde g_{alpha}-continuous and eg-irresolute functions.

  13. Long-range alpha detector (LRAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Historically, alpha detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity, even if the particles are intercepted. Of necessity, these detectors are operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. In our new long-range alpha detector (LRAD), alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of about 30,000 ion pairs per MeV of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The LRAD-based monitor is more sensitive and more thorough than conventional monitors. We present current LRAD sensitivity limits and results, practical monitor designs, and proposed uses for LRAD monitors. 4 refs., 7 figs

  14. Beta/alpha continuous air monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G.K.; Martz, D.E.

    1988-06-27

    A single deep layer silicon detector in combination with a microcomputer, recording both alpha and beta activity and the energy of each pulse, distinquishing energy peaks using a novel curve fitting technique to reduce the natural alpha counts in the energy region where plutonium and other transuranic alpha emitters are present, and using a novel algorithm to strip out radon daughter contribution to actual beta counts. 7 figs.

  15. Transgenic up-regulation of alpha-CaMKII in forebrain leads to increased anxiety-like behaviors and aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa Shunsuke

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated essential roles for alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII in learning, memory and long-term potentiation (LTP. However, previous studies have also shown that alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice display a dramatic decrease in anxiety-like and fearful behaviors, and an increase in defensive aggression. These findings indicated that alpha-CaMKII is important not only for learning and memory but also for emotional behaviors. In this study, to understand the roles of alpha-CaMKII in emotional behavior, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing alpha-CaMKII in the forebrain and analyzed their behavioral phenotypes. Results We generated transgenic mice overexpressing alpha-CaMKII in the forebrain under the control of the alpha-CaMKII promoter. In contrast to alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in anxiety-like behaviors in open field, elevated zero maze, light-dark transition and social interaction tests, and a decrease in locomotor activity in their home cages and novel environments; these phenotypes were the opposite to those observed in alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice. In addition, similarly with alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in aggression. However, in contrast to the increase in defensive aggression observed in alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in offensive aggression. Conclusion Up-regulation of alpha-CaMKII expression in the forebrain leads to an increase in anxiety-like behaviors and offensive aggression. From the comparisons with previous findings, we suggest that the expression levels of alpha-CaMKII are associated with the state of emotion; the expression level of alpha-CaMKII positively correlates with the anxiety state and strongly affects

  16. Novel P2 promoter-derived HNF4{alpha} isoforms with different N-terminus generated by alternate exon insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jianmin, E-mail: jmhuang@partners.org [Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, 02114-2696 (United States); Levitsky, Lynne L. [Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, 02114-2696 (United States); Rhoads, David B., E-mail: rhoads@helix.mgh.harvard.edu [Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, 02114-2696 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a critical transcription factor for pancreas and liver development and functions in islet {beta} cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Mutations in the human HNF4A gene lead to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY1) and polymorphisms are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Expression of six HNF4{alpha} variants, three each from two developmentally regulated promoters, has been firmly established. We have now detected a new set of HNF4{alpha} variants designated HNF4{alpha}10-12 expressed from distal promoter P2. These variants, generated by inclusion of previously undetected exon 1E (human = 222 nt, rodent = 136 nt) following exon 1D have an altered N-terminus but identical remaining reading frame. HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 are expressed in pancreatic islets (and liver) and exhibit transactivation potentials similar to the corresponding {alpha}7-{alpha}9 isoforms. DNA-binding analyses implied much higher protein levels of HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 in liver than expected from the RT-PCR data. Our results provide evidence for a more complex expression pattern of HNF4{alpha} than previously appreciated. We recommend inclusion of exon 1E and nearby DNA sequences in screening for HNF4{alpha} mutations and polymorphisms in genetic analyses of MODY1 and T2DM.

  17. ALPHA experiment facility and Prof. Jeffrey Hangst.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Picture 01-07: General views of the ALPHA experiment Picture 5: Andrea Gutierrez, a PhD student from UBC, transfers liquid helium from a storage dewar into the cryostat containing the superconducting magnetic trap used by the ALPHA experiment.Picture 08-11: Jeffery Hangst, spokesperson for ALPHA Picture 12: The ALPHA silicon detector, which surrounds the trapping resion and is used for imaging antiproton annihilations (Credit University of Liverpool) Picture 13: Untrapped antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the inner surface of the ALPHA trap. These are measured by the ALPHA annihilation detector. The events are concentrated at the electrode radius of about 22.3 mm. The coordinates are defined in the Nature article, Figure 1b. Picture 14: The electrodes (gold) for the ALPHA Penning trap being inserted into the vacuum chamber and cryostat assembly. This is the trap used to combine or "mix" positrons and antiprotons to make antihydrogen. (Credit: Niels Madsen ALPHA/Swansea.) Picture 15: Top, a diagram of the...

  18. Damage radiation alpha effects in sintered waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messi de Bernasconi, Norma B.; Prado, Miguel O.; Bevilacqua, Arturo M.; Arribere, Maria; Heredia, Arturo D.; Sanfilippo, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    We have subjected the borosilicate glass to thermal neutron irradiation in a reactor, with an accumulated fluence equivalent to approximately E3, E4, E5, y E6 years of waste disposal. We considered the following potential effects of accumulated alpha decay: a) Changes in the density; b) Changes in the dissolution rates; c) Changes in the microstructure of the sintered glass. (author)

  19. Generation of tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha-specific affibody molecules capable of blocking receptor binding in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Andreas; Wållberg, Helena; Herne, Nina; Ståhl, Stefan; Frejd, Fredrik Y

    2009-08-17

    Affibody molecules specific for human TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) were selected by phage-display technology from a library based on the 58-residue Protein A-derived Z domain. TNF-alpha is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in several inflammatory diseases and, to this day, four TNF-alpha-blocking protein pharmaceuticals have been approved for clinical use. The phage selection generated 18 unique cysteine-free affibody sequences of which 12 were chosen, after sequence cluster analysis, for characterization as proteins. Biosensor binding studies of the 12 Escherichia coli-produced and IMAC (immobilized-metal-ion affinity chromatography)-purified affibody molecules revealed three variants that demonstrated the strongest binding to human TNF-alpha. These three affibody molecules were subjected to kinetic binding analysis and also tested for their binding to mouse, rat and pig TNF-alpha. For ZTNF-alpha:185, subnanomolar affinity (KD=0.1-0.5 nM) for human TNF-alpha was demonstrated, as well as significant binding to TNF-alpha from the other species. Furthermore, the binding site was found to overlap with the binding site for the TNF-alpha receptor, since this interaction could be efficiently blocked by the ZTNF-alpha:185 affibody. When investigating six dimeric affibody constructs with different linker lengths, and one trimeric construct, it was found that the inhibition of the TNF-alpha binding to its receptor could be further improved by using dimers with extended linkers and/or a trimeric affibody construct. The potential implication of the results for the future design of affibody-based reagents for the diagnosis of inflammation is discussed.

  20. Alpha-Driven MHD and MHD-Induced Alpha Loss in TFTR DT Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zuoyang

    1996-11-01

    Theoretical calculation and numerical simulation indicate that there can be interesting interactions between alpha particles and MHD activity which can adversely affect the performance of a tokamak reactor (e.g., ITER). These interactions include alpha-driven MHD, like the toroidicity-induced-Alfven-eigenmode (TAE) and MHD induced alpha particle losses or redistribution. Both phenomena have been observed in recent TFTR DT experiments. Weak alpha-driven TAE activity was observed in a NBI-heated DT experiment characterized by high q0 ( >= 2) and low core magnetic shear. The TAE mode appears at ~30-100 ms after the neutral beam turning off approximately as predicted by theory. The mode has an amplitude measured by magnetic coils at the edge tildeB_p ~1 mG, frequency ~150-190 kHz and toroidal mode number ~2-3. It lasts only ~ 30-70 ms and has been seen only in DT discharges with fusion power level about 1.5-2.0 MW. Numerical calculation using NOVA-K code shows that this type of plasma has a big TAE gap. The calculated TAE frequency and mode number are close to the observation. (2) KBM-induced alpha particle loss^1. In some high-β, high fusion power DT experiments, enhanced alpha particle losses were observed to be correlated to the high frequency MHD modes with f ~100-200 kHz (the TAE frequency would be two-times higher) and n ~5-10. These modes are localized around the peak plasma pressure gradient and have ballooning characteristics. Alpha loss increases by 30-100% during the modes. Particle orbit simulations show the added loss results from wave-particle resonance. Linear instability analysis indicates that the plasma is unstable to the kinetic MHD ballooning modes (KBM) driven primarily by strong local pressure gradients. ----------------- ^1Z. Chang, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 1071. In collaberation with R. Nazikian, G.-Y. Fu, S. Batha, R. Budny, L. Chen, D. Darrow, E. Fredrickson, R. Majeski, D. Mansfield, K. McGuire, G. Rewoldt, G. Taylor, R. White, K

  1. Evidence for a Field-induced Quantum Spin Liquid in $\\alpha$-RuCl$_3$

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, S. -H.; Do, S. -H.; Choi, K. -Y.; Kwon, Y. S.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Nishimoto, S.; Brink, Jeroen van den; Büchner, B.

    2017-01-01

    We report a $^{35}$Cl nuclear magnetic resonance study in the honeycomb lattice, $\\alpha$-RuCl$_3$, a material that has been suggested to potentially realize a Kitaev quantum spin liquid (QSL) ground state. Our results provide direct evidence that $\\alpha$-RuCl$_3$ exhibits a magnetic field-induced QSL. For fields larger than $\\sim 10$ T a spin-gap opens up while resonance lines remain sharp, evidencing that spins are quantum disordered and locally fluctuating. The spin gap increases linearly...

  2. Alpha decay and various problems related to it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katori, Kenji

    1992-01-01

    On the proton-excessive nucleus side of lanthanide and actinide, alpha decay is the main decay mode. In lanthanide region, alpha decay has been measured to the drip line for most even-even nuclei. In the measurement of alpha decay, emitted energy and life are measured, but the measurement of converted alpha width remains in the limited range. In order to obtain the converted alpha width of high accuracy, the nucleus formation in larger quantity on the drip line and the simultaneous measurement with a multiple detector system including gamma ray and beta ray are required. In this paper, three topics related to alpha cluster and alpha decay and the problems that confront at present are discussed. The continuation to exist of alpha cluster structure to heavy nuclei, the analysis of lanthanide nucleus region by the alpha giant resonance model, and the new data on the alpha ray decaying from the mass of 175, 176 and 177 are reported. In lanthanide nucleus region, remarkable interference was not observed between beta-2 and beta-3 modes in the converted alpha width measured between the ground states. The present problems in alpha decay are enumerated. (K.I.)

  3. Cortical Alpha Activity in Schizoaffective Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeini, Mahdi; Khaleghi, Ali; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Zarafshan, Hadi; Fazio, Rachel L; Majidi, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Electrophysiological studies have identified abnormal oscillatory activities in the cerebral cortex in schizophrenia and mood disorders. Biological and pathophysiological evidence suggests specific deficits in serotonin (5-HT) receptor function in schizoaffective disorder (SA), a clinical syndrome with characteristics of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This study investigated alpha oscillations in patients with SA. Method: Electroencephalography was used to measure ongoing and evoked alpha oscillations in 38 adults meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for SA, and in 39 healthy controls. Results: Spontaneous alpha power of the participants with SA was significantly lower than that of healthy participants [F (1, 75) = 8.81, P < 0.01]. Evoked alpha activity was also decreased in SA compared to controls [F (1, 75) = 5.67, P = 0.025]. Conclusion : A strong reduction of alpha power in the posterior regions may reflect abnormality in the thalamocortical circuits. It is shown that hypoxia and reduced cerebral blood flow is associated with reduced alpha activity among different regions of the brain. Therefore, it can be concluded that greatly decreased alpha activity, particularly in centro-parietal and occipital regions, is related to SA symptoms such as hallucinations.

  4. Alpha 1 B- but not alpha 1 A-adrenoceptors mediate inositol phosphate generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Hanft, G.; Gross, G.

    1990-01-01

    We used novel highly subtype-selective antagonists to study whether alpha 1A- and/or alpha 1B-adrenoceptors mediate the stimulation of inositol phosphate generation by noradrenaline in rat cerebral cortex. Phentolamine (10 microM) and prazosin (100 nM) completely abolished the stimulated inositol

  5. Fasting induces basolateral uptake transporters of the SLC family in the liver via HNF4alpha and PGC1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Martin, Ina V; Porn, Anne C; Voigt, Sebastian; Gartung, Carsten; Trautwein, Christian; Geier, Andreas

    2007-09-01

    Fasting induces numerous adaptive changes in metabolism by several central signaling pathways, the most important represented by the HNF4alpha/PGC-1alpha-pathway. Because HNF4alpha has been identified as central regulator of basolateral bile acid transporters and a previous study reports increased basolateral bile acid uptake into the liver during fasting, we hypothesized that HNF4alpha is involved in fasting-induced bile acid uptake via upregulation of basolateral bile acid transporters. In rats, mRNA of Ntcp, Oatp1, and Oatp2 were significantly increased after 48 h of fasting. Protein expression as determined by Western blot showed significant increases for all three transporters 72 h after the onset of fasting. Whereas binding activity of HNF1alpha in electrophoretic mobility shift assays remained unchanged, HNF4alpha binding activity to the Ntcp promoter was increased significantly. In line with this result, we found significantly increased mRNA expression of HNF4alpha and PGC-1alpha. Functional studies in HepG2 cells revealed an increased endogenous NTCP mRNA expression upon cotransfection with either HNF4alpha, PGC-1alpha, or a combination of both. We conclude that upregulation of the basolateral bile acid transporters Ntcp, Oatp1, and Oatp2 in fasted rats is mediated via the HNF4alpha/PGC-1alpha pathway.

  6. A cluster expansion for bound three-alpha particles as a three-body problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1981-08-01

    A three-body model is proposed to study the nuclear bound states. The nucleus is described as a bound state of three clusters. A cluster expansion is introduced for the three cluster bound state problem. The present integral equations are treated by simple approximate solutions, which lead to effective potentials by using the present cluster expansion. The 12 C nucleus is described as a three-alpha particle bound state. The binding energy of 12 C is calculated numerically using the present cluster expansion as bound three-alpha clusters. The present three-body cluster expansion calculations are very near to the exact three-body calculations using separable potentials. The present theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. (author)

  7. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baer, R.; Boehm, T.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; Rabbitts, T. H.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one

  8. The thermal structural transition of alpha-crystallin modulates subunit interactions and increases protein solubility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maulucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha crystallin is an oligomer composed of two types of subunits, alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin, and is the major constituent of human lens. The temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin, the main cause for eye lens opacification (cataract, is a two step-process, a nucleation followed by an aggregation phase, and a protective effect towards the aggregation is exhibited over the alpha crystallin phase transition temperature (Tc = 318.16 K. METHODS/RESULTS: To investigate if a modulation of the subunit interactions over Tc could trigger the protective mechanism towards the aggregation, we followed, by using simultaneously static and dynamic light scattering, the temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin. By developing a mathematical model able to uncouple the nucleation and aggregation processes, we find a previously unobserved transition in the nucleation rate constant. Its temperature dependence allows to determine fundamental structural parameters, the chemical potential (Δμ and the interfacial tension (γ of the aggregating phase, that characterize subunit interactions. CONCLUSIONS/GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: The decrease of both Δμ and γ at Tc, and a relative increase in solubility, reveal a significative decrease in the strenght of alpha-crystallin subunits interactions, which protects from supramolecolar condensation in hypertermic conditions. On the whole, we suggest a general approach able to understand the structural and kinetic mechanisms involved in aggregation-related diseases and in drugs development and testing.

  9. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and "flow"-possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Jelena; Milosevic, Vuk; Zivkovic, Miroslava; Stojanov, Dragan; Milojkovic, Olga; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS). The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8), and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6) electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG), the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure), the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs). Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann-Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman's correlation. We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency ( α AVG) in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered "alpha flow", indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions. Although the stroke induced slower alpha was a

  10. First Results of Using a UVTron Flame Sensor to Detect Alpha-Induced Air Fluorescence in the UVC Wavelength Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita J. Crompton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a robust stand-off alpha detection method using the secondary effects of alpha radiation has been sought. Alpha particles ionise the surrounding atmosphere as they travel. Fluorescence photons produced as a consequence of this can be used to detect the source of the alpha emissions. This paper details experiments carried out to detect this fluorescence, with the focus on photons in the ultraviolet C (UVC wavelength range (180–280 nm. A detector, UVTron R9533 (Hamamatsu, 325-6, Sunayama-cho, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Pref., 430-8587, Japan, designed to detect the UVC emissions from flames for fire alarm purposes, was tested in various gas atmospheres with a 210Po alpha source to determine if this could provide an avenue for stand-off alpha detection. The results of the experiments show that this detector is capable of detecting alpha-induced air fluorescence in normal indoor lighting conditions, as the interference from daylight and artificial lighting is less influential on this detection system which operates below the UVA and UVB wavelength ranges (280–315 nm and 315–380 nm respectively. Assuming a standard 1 r 2 drop off in signal, the limit of detection in this configuration can be calculated to be approximately 240 mm, well beyond the range of alpha-particles in air, which indicates that this approach could have potential for stand-off alpha detection. The gas atmospheres tested produced an increase in the detector count, with xenon having the greatest effect with a measured 52% increase in the detector response in comparison to the detector response in an air atmosphere. This type of alpha detection system could be operated at a distance, where it would potentially provide a more cost effective, safer, and faster solution in comparison with traditional alpha detection methods to detect and characterise alpha contamination in nuclear decommissioning and security applications.

  11. Genetic evidence that HNF-1alpha-dependent transcriptional control of HNF-4alpha is essential for human pancreatic beta cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara K; Párrizas, Marcelina; Jensen, Maria L

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF-4alpha) and HNF-1alpha impair insulin secretion and cause maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). HNF-4alpha is known to be an essential positive regulator of HNF-1alpha. More recent data demonstrates that HNF-4alpha...... in human islets and exocrine cells is primarily mediated by the P2 promoter. Furthermore, we describe a G --> A mutation in a conserved nucleotide position of the HNF-1alpha binding site of the P2 promoter, which cosegregates with MODY. The mutation results in decreased affinity for HNF-1alpha...

  12. The alpha3 laminin subunit, alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1 integrin coordinately regulate wound healing in cultured epithelial cells and in the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldfinger, L E; Hopkinson, S B; deHart, G W

    1999-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that proteolytic processing within the globular domain of the alpha3 subunit of laminin-5 (LN5) converts LN5 from a cell motility-inducing factor to a protein complex that can trigger the formation of hemidesmosomes, certain cell-matrix attachment sites found in epithe......-inhibiting antibodies, we provide evidence that LN5 and its two integrin receptors (alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1) appear necessary for wound healing to occur in MCF-10A cell culture wounds. We propose a model for healing of wounded epithelial tissues based on these results....... in epithelial cells. We have prepared a monoclonal antibody (12C4) whose epitope is located toward the carboxy terminus of the globular domain of the alpha3 laminin subunit. This epitope is lost from the alpha3 subunit as a consequence of proteolytic processing. Antibody 12C4 stains throughout the matrix...... the wound site. A similar phenomenon is observed in human skin wounds, since we also detect expression of the unprocessed alpha3 laminin subunit at the leading tip of the sheet of epidermal cells that epithelializes skin wounds in vivo. In addition, using alpha3 laminin subunit and integrin function...

  13. Anticipatory alpha phase influences visual working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanto, Theodore P; Chadick, James Z; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-01-15

    Alpha band (8-12 Hz) phase dynamics in the visual cortex are thought to reflect fluctuations in cortical excitability that influences perceptual processing. As such, visual stimuli are better detected when their onset is concurrent with specific phases of the alpha cycle. However, it is unclear whether alpha phase differentially influences cognitive performance at specific times relative to stimulus onset (i.e., is the influence of phase maximal before, at, or after stimulus onset?). To address this, participants performed a delayed-recognition, working memory (WM) task for visual motion direction during two separate visits. The first visit utilized functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging to identify neural regions associated with task performance. Replicating previous studies, fMRI data showed engagement of visual cortical area V5, as well as a prefrontal cortical region, the inferior frontal junction (IFJ). During the second visit, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied separately to both the right IFJ and right V5 (with the vertex as a control region) while electroencephalography (EEG) was simultaneously recorded. During each trial, a single pulse of TMS (spTMS) was applied at one of six time points (-200, -100, -50, 0, 80, 160 ms) relative to the encoded stimulus onset. Results demonstrated a relationship between the phase of the posterior alpha signal prior to stimulus encoding and subsequent response times to the memory probe two seconds later. Specifically, spTMS to V5, and not the IFJ or vertex, yielded faster response times, indicating improved WM performance, when delivered during the peak, compared to the trough, of the alpha cycle, but only when spTMS was applied 100 ms prior to stimulus onset. These faster responses to the probe correlated with decreased early event related potential (ERP) amplitudes (i.e., P1) to the probe stimuli. Moreover, participants that were least affected by spTMS exhibited greater functional connectivity

  14. Remote Optical Detection of Alpha Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, J.; Hannuksela, V.; Toivonen, J.; Ihantola, S.; Peraejaervi, K.; Toivonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha emitting radiation sources are typically hard to detect with conventional detectors due to the short range of alpha particles in the air. However, previous studies have shown that remote detection of alpha radiation is possible by measuring the ionization-induced fluorescence of air molecules. The alpha-induced ultraviolet (UV) light is mainly emitted by molecular nitrogen and its fluorescence properties are well known. The benefit of this method is the long range of UV photons in the air. Secondly, the detection is possible also under a strong beta and gamma radiation backgrounds as they do not cause localized molecular excitation. In this work, the optical detection was studied using two different detection schemes; spectral separation of fluorescence from the background lighting and coincidence detection of UV photons originating from a single radiative decay event. Our spectrally integrated measurements have shown that one alpha decay event yields up to 400 fluorescence photons in the air and all these UV photons are induced in a 5 ns time-window. On the other hand, the probability of a background coincidence event in 5 ns scale is very rare compared to the number of background photons. This information can be applied in fluorescence coincidence filtering to discriminate the alpha radiation initiated fluorescence signal from much more intense background lighting. A device called HAUVA (Handheld Alpha UV Application) was built during this work for demonstration purposes. HAUVA utilizes spectral filtering and it is designed to detect alpha emitters from a distance of about 40 cm. Using specially selected room lighting, the device is able to separate 1 kBq alpha emitter from the background lighting with 1 second integration time. (author)

  15. Reduced fat mass in rats fed a high oleic acid-rich safflower oil diet is associated with changes in expression of hepatic PPARalpha and adipose SREBP-1c-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shan-Ching; Huang, Ching-Jang

    2006-07-01

    PPARs and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREPB-1c) are fatty acid-regulated transcription factors that control lipid metabolism at the level of gene expression. This study compared a high oleic acid-rich safflower oil (ORSO) diet and a high-butter diet for their effect on adipose mass and expressions of genes regulated by PPAR and SREPB-1c in rats. Four groups of Wistar rats were fed 30S (30% ORSO), 5S (5% ORSO), 30B (29% butter + 1% ORSO), or 5B (4% butter plus 1% ORSO) diets for 15 wk. Compared with the 30B group, the 30S group had less retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RWAT) mass and lower mRNA expressions of lipoprotein lipase, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein, fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, and SREBP-1c in the RWAT, higher mRNA expressions of acyl CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1A, fatty acid binding protein, and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase in the liver (P 2 fold those of the 30B group (P < 0.05). These results suggested that the smaller RWAT mass in rats fed the high-ORSO diet might be related to the higher tissue 18:2(n-6) and 20:4(n-6). This in turn could upregulate the expressions of fatty acid catabolic genes through the activation of PPARalpha in the liver and downregulate the expressions of lipid storage and lipogenic gene through the suppression of SREBP-1c in the RWAT.

  16. Monitor for alpha beta contamination of hands; Moniteur de contamination alpha beta des mains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guitton, J

    1958-07-01

    The following specifications of hands alpha beta contamination monitor are presented: the position of the hands, the detection and separation of alpha and beta, the information processing, the programming, the results presentation and general characteristics. (A.L.B.)

  17. Alpha Emitting Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Today, cancer treatments mainly rely on surgery or external beam radiation to remove or destroy bulky tumors. Chemotherapy is given when tumours cannot be removed or when dissemination is suspected. However, these approaches cannot permanently treat all cancers and relapse occurs in up to 50% of the patients’ population. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) are effective against some disseminated and metastatic diseases, although they are rarely curative. Most preclinical and clinical developments in this field have involved electron-emitting radionuclides, particularly iodine-131, yttrium-90 and lutetium-177. The large range of the electrons emitted by these radionuclides reduces their efficacy against very small tumour cell clusters or isolated tumour cells present in residual disease and in many haematological tumours (leukaemia, myeloma). The range of alpha particles in biological tissues is very short, less than 0.1 mm, which makes alpha emitters theoretically ideal for treatment of such isolated tumour cells or micro-clusters of malignant cells. Thus, over the last decade, a growing interest for the use of alpha-emitting radionuclides has emerged. Research on targeted alpha therapy (TAT) began years ago in Nantes through cooperation between Subatech, a nuclear physics laboratory, CRCNA, a cancer research centre with a nuclear oncology team and ITU (Karlsruhe, Germany). CD138 was demonstrated as a potential target antigen for Multiple Myeloma, which is a target of huge clinical interest particularly suited for TAT because of the disseminated nature of the disease consisting primarily of isolated cells and small clusters of tumour cells mainly localized in the bone marrow. Thus anti-CD138 antibodies were labelled with bismuth-213 from actinium-225/bismuth-213 generators provided by ITU and used to target multiple myeloma cells. In vitro studies showed cell cycle arrest, synergism with chemotherapy and very little induction

  18. D-Glucosamine down-regulates HIF-1{alpha} through inhibition of protein translation in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee-Young; Park, Jong-Wook; Suh, Seong-Il [Chronic Disease Research Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-Gu, Daegu 700-712 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Won-Ki, E-mail: wonki@dsmc.or.kr [Chronic Disease Research Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-Gu, Daegu 700-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-24

    D-Glucosamine has been reported to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in culture and in vivo. In this study we report a novel response to D-glucosamine involving the translation regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1{alpha} expression. D-Glucosamine caused a decreased expression of HIF-1{alpha} under normoxic and hypoxic conditions without affecting HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells. D-Glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} accumulation induced by proteasome inhibitor MG132 and prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor DMOG suggesting D-glucosamine reduces HIF-1{alpha} protein expression through proteasome-independent pathway. Metabolic labeling assays indicated that D-glucosamine inhibits translation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. In addition, D-glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} expression induced by serum stimulation in parallel with inhibition of p70S6K suggesting D-glucosamine inhibits growth factor-induced HIF-1{alpha} expression, at least in part, through p70S6K inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that D-glucosamine inhibits HIF-1{alpha} expression through inhibiting protein translation and provide new insight into a potential mechanism of the anticancer properties of D-glucosamine.

  19. Human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptors. I. Functional exploration and pharmacological definition with selected alpha-2 agonists and antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galitzky, J.; Mauriege, P.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate more fully the pharmacological characteristics of the human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Biological assays were performed on intact isolated fat cells while radioligand binding studies were carried out with [ 3 H]yohimbine in membranes. These pharmacological studies brought: (1) a critical definition of the limits of the experimental conditions required for the exploration of alpha-2 adrenergic responsiveness on human fat cells and membranes; (2) an improvement in the pharmacological definition of the human fat cell postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Among alpha-2 agonists, UK-14,304 was the most potent and the relative order of potency was: UK-14,304 greater than p-aminoclonidine greater than clonidine = B-HT 920 greater than rilmenidine. For alpha-2 antagonists, the potency order was: yohimbine greater than idazoxan greater than SK ampersand F-86,466 much greater than benextramine; (3) a description of the impact of benextramine (irreversible alpha-1/alpha-2 antagonist) on human fat cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and on human fat cell function; the drug inactivates the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors with a minor impact on beta adrenergic receptors and without noticeable alterations of fat cell function as assessed by preservation of beta adrenergic and Al-adenosine receptor-mediated lipolytic responses; and (4) a definition of the relationship existing between alpha-2 adrenergic receptor occupancy, inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and antilipolysis with full and partial agonists. The existence of a receptor reserve must be taken into account when evaluating alpha-2 adrenergic receptor distribution and regulation of human fat cells

  20. PLE CATALYZED HYDROLYZES OF ALPHA-SUBSTITUTED ALPHA-HYDROXY ESTERS - THE INFLUENCE OF THE SUBSTITUENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOORLAG, H; KELLOGG, RM

    1991-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolyses of a variety of alpha-substituted mandelic and lactic esters using pig liver esterase (PLE) have been investigated. High to moderate enantioselectivity was found for various alpha-substituted mandelic esters, whereas PLE showed low to no enantioselectivity for

  1. Alpha particle studies during JET DT experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The 1997 DT experiment (DTE1) at the Joint European Torus included studies of the behaviour of alpha particles in high temperature plasmas. Clear alpha particle heating was observed in a series of otherwise similar 10MW hot-ion H-modes by scanning the DT mixture from 0%T to 93%T. Maxima in central temperature and energy content were obtained which corresponded with the maximum in fusion yield. Alfven Eigenmodes (AEs) have been detected in JET, driven by NBI or ICRH fast ions. However, in agreement with theory, no AE activity was observed in DT plasmas which could be attributed to alpha particle drive, except in the afterglow of some Optimised Shear pulses. Ion Cyclotron Emission (ICE) was detected at harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency at the outer edge of the plasma. The ICE is interpreted as being close to magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, driven by inverted alpha distributions at the plasma edge. The high-energy neutral particle spectra showed features, which are ascribed to a mixture of alphas, neutralised by helium-like impurities, and deuterons, born from elastic collisions with alpha particles and neutralised by hydrogen-like impurities. The results of all these studies are consistent with classical alpha particle trapping and slowing-down. Future DT experiments will aim to increase alpha particle pressure, so interactions with plasma instabilities can be studied. The measurement of knock-on neutral triton spectra offers a clean way to determine confined alpha densities in these future experiments. (author)

  2. Alpha particle studies during JET DT experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The 1997 DT experiment (DTE1) at the Joint European Torus included studies of the behaviour of alpha particles in high temperature plasmas. Clear alpha particle heating was observed in a series of otherwise similar 10MW hot-ion H-modes by scanning the DT mixture from 0%T to 93%T. Maxima in central temperature and energy content were obtained which corresponded with the maximum in fusion yield. Alfven Eigenmodes (AEs) have been detected in JET, driven by NBI or ICRH fast ions. However, in agreement with theory, no AE activity was observed in DT plasmas which could be attributed to alpha particle drive, except in the afterglow of some Optimised Shear pulses. Ion Cyclotron Emission (ICE) was detected at harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency at the outer edge of the plasma. The ICE is interpreted as being close to magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, driven by inverted alpha distributions at the plasma edge. The high-energy neutral particle spectra showed features, which are ascribed to a mixture of alphas, neutralised by helium-like impurities, and deuterons, born from elastic collisions with alpha particles and neutralised by hydrogen-like impurities. The results of all these studies are consistent with classical alpha particle trapping and slowing-down. Future DT experiments will aim to increase alpha particle pressure, so interactions with plasma instabilities can be studied. The measurement of knock-on neutral triton spectra offers a clean way to determine confined alpha densities in these future experiments. (author)

  3. Alpha-driven magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and MHD-induced alpha loss in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Z.; Nazikian, R.; Fu, G.Y.

    1997-02-01

    Alpha-driven toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) are observed as predicted by theory in the post neutral beam phase in high central q (safety factor) deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The mode location, poloidal structure and the importance of q profile for TAE instability are discussed. So far no alpha particle loss due to these modes was detected due to the small mode amplitude. However, alpha loss induced by kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs) was observed in high confinement D-T discharges. Particle orbit simulation demonstrates that the wave-particle resonant interaction can explain the observed correlation between the increase in alpha loss and appearance of multiple high-n (n ≥ 6, n is the toroidal mode number) modes

  4. Summary of alpha-neutron sources in GADRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Dean James; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Harding, Lee T.

    2012-01-01

    A common source of neutrons for calibration and testing is alpha-neutron material, named for the alpha-neutron nuclear reaction that occurs within. This material contains a long-lived alpha-emitter and a lighter target element. When the alpha particle from the emitter is absorbed by the target, neutrons and gamma rays are released. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) includes built-in alpha-neutron source definitions for AcC, AmB, AmBe, AmF, AmLi, CmC, and PuC. In addition, GADRAS users may create their own alpha-neutron sources by placing valid alpha-emitters and target elements in materials within their one-dimensional models (1DModel). GADRAS has the ability to use pre-built alpha-neutron sources for plotting or as trace-sources in 1D models. In addition, if any material (existing or user-defined) specified in a 1D model contains both an alpha emitter in conjunction with a target nuclide, or there is an interface between such materials, then the appropriate neutron-emission rate from the alpha-neutron reaction will be computed. The gamma-emissions from these sources are also computed, but are limited to a subset of nine target nuclides. If a user has experimental data to contribute to the alpha-neutron gamma emission database, it may be added directly or submitted to the GADRAS developers for inclusion. The gadras.exe.config file will be replaced when GADRAS updates are installed, so sending the information to the GADRAS developers is the preferred method for updating the database. This is also preferable because it enables other users to benefit from your efforts.

  5. Nitric oxide production and monoamine oxidase activity in cancer patients during interferon-alpha therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekkes, Durk; Van Gool, Arthur R; Bannink, Marjolein; Sleijfer, Stefan; Kruit, Wim H J; van der Holt, Bronno; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Hengeveld, Michiel W; Stoter, Gerrit

    2009-10-01

    Both increased and decreased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis have been reported in patients treated with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). Animal studies showed that IFN-alpha administration results in increased levels of biogenic amines, subsequent activation of monoamine oxidases (MAOs), and finally in a change in NO production due to the H(2)O(2) generated by MAOs. We examined the potential relationship between NO production in plasma and MAO-B activity in platelets of 43 cancer patients during 8 weeks of treatment with IFN-alpha. NO synthesis was quantitated by measuring both the ratio of citrulline and arginine (CIT/ARG-ratio) and total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels. Compared to baseline, MAO activity and NOx increased, while the CIT/ARG-ratio decreased. No associations were found between NOx, MAO and CIT/ARG-ratio. Only few associations were observed between changes in the biochemical parameters and changes in psychopathology induced by IFN-alpha, of which the association between changes in CIT and lassitude was the most consistent. The results suggest that peripheral NO production and MAO activity are unrelated to each other, and that peripheral changes in these biochemical parameters induced by IFN-alpha are unlikely to contribute to definite psychiatric disturbance.

  6. Exhaustive Weakly Wandering Sequences and Alpha-type Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Eigen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An increasing sequence of integers, $\\mathbb{B}$, is given for which there exists a family of ergodic, infinite measure preserving transformations $T_\\alpha$, $0 \\leq \\alpha \\leq 1$ so that (1 $T_\\alpha$ is of $\\alpha$-type and (2 $\\mathbb{B}$ is an exhaustive weakly wandering sequence for each $T_\\alpha$.

  7. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-01-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150 km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days. - Highlights: • SRIM was used to study the alpha particle penetration depth and efficiency. • Correlation between thickness of decayable foil and propulsion force was established. • With the hypothesis of SAND, the travel time to Mars may be shortened to <20 days.

  8. Expression of alpha-amylase in Bacillus licheniformis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothstein, D M; Devlin, P E; Cate, R L

    1986-01-01

    In Bacillus licheniformis, alpha-amylase production varied more than 100-fold depending on the presence or absence of a catabolite-repressing carbon source in the growth medium. alpha-Amylase was produced during the growth phase and not at the onset of the stationary phase. Induction of alpha-amylase correlated with synthesis of mRNA initiating at the promoter of the alpha-amylase gene.

  9. Increased voluntary exercise in mice deficient for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and lymphotoxin-alpha.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, M.G.; Kullberg, B.J.; Vonk, A.G.; Verschueren, I.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The endogenous mediators playing a role in the sensing of fatigue and cessation of exercise are yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that proinflammatory cytokines, in particular tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and lymphotoxin-alpha (LT) transmit signals leading to fatigue.

  10. Measurement and analysis of $\\alpha$ particle induced reactions on yttrium

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, N L; Chintalapudi, S N

    2000-01-01

    Excitation functions for /sup 89/Y[( alpha ,3n); ( alpha ,4n); ( alpha , p3n); ( alpha , alpha n); ( alpha , alpha 2n)] reactions were measured up to 50 MeV using stacked foil activation technique and HPGe gamma ray spectroscopy method. The experimental data were compared with calculations considering equilibrium as well as preequilibrium reactions according to the hybrid model of Blann (ALICE/90). For ( alpha , xnyp) type of reactions, the precompound contributions are described by the model. There seems to be indications of direct inelastic scattering effects in ( alpha , alpha xn) type of reactions. To the best of our knowledge, the excitation functions for ( alpha ,4n), ( alpha , p3n), ( alpha , alpha n) and ( alpha , alpha 2n) reactions were measured for the first time. (23 refs).

  11. Measurement and analysis of alpha particle induced reactions on yttrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, N.L.; Gadkari, M.S. [Baroda Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics; Chintalapudi, S.N. [IUC-DAEF Calcutta Centre, Calcutta (India)

    2000-05-01

    Excitation functions for {sup 89}Y[({alpha},3n);({alpha},4n);({alpha},p3n);({alpha},{alpha}n);({alpha},{alpha}2n)] reactions were measured up to 50 MeV using stacked foil activation technique and HPGe gamma ray spectroscopy method. The experimental data were compared with calculations considering equilibrium as well as preequilibrium reactions according to the hybrid model of Blann (ALICE/90). For ({alpha},xnyp) type of reactions, the precompound contributions are described by the model. There seems to be indications of direct inelastic scattering effects in ({alpha},{alpha}xn) type of reactions. To the best of our knowledge, the excitation functions for ({alpha},4n), ({alpha},p3n), ({alpha},{alpha}n) and ({alpha},{alpha}2n) reactions were measured for the first time. (orig.)

  12. Alpha particle analysis using PEARLS spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W.; McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha particle assay by conventional plate-counting methods is difficult because chemical separation, tracer techniques, and/or self-absorption losses in the final sample may cause either non-reproducible results or create unacceptable errors. PEARLS (Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) Spectrometry is an attractive alternative since radionuclides may be extracted into a scintillator in which there would be no self-absorption or geometry problems and in which up to 100% chemical recovery and counting efficiency is possible. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic-phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillator. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination to provide discrete alpha spectra and virtual absence of beta and gamma backgrounds. Backgrounds on the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 100 +-1% range. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium, and polonium assay. This paper will review liquid scintillation alpha counting methods and reference some of the specific applications. 8 refs., 1 fig

  13. [Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. From bench to bedside].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, M; Luger, T A

    2010-06-01

    Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is a tridecapeptide that is produced by the skin itself from the precursor proopiomelanocortin. It crucially mediates ultraviolet light-induced tanning after binding to melanocortin-1 receptors (MC-1R) expressed on the surface of epidermal melanocytes. The potent pigment-inducing and also cytoprotective actions of alpha-MSH are the rationale for the performance of first phase II clinical trials with Nle4-D-Phe7-alpha-MSH (NDP-alpha-MSH), a subcutaneously administered synthetic and superpotent alpha-MSH analogue, in patients with photodermatoses such as erythropoietic protoporphyria. Since alpha-MSH has shown promising anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic properties in numerous preclinical studies, it will be most interesting to evaluate these effects in further clinical pilot studies with NDP-alpha-MSH. In addition to alpha-MSH analogues, truncated tripeptides such as KDPT which do not bind to MC-1R but have sustained anti-inflammatory properties are currently emerging as another novel therapeutic strategy in dermatology.

  14. Far-Infrared and Millimeter Continuum Studies of K-Giants: Alpha Boo and Alpha Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Martin; Carbon, Duane F.; Welch, William J.; Lim, Tanya; Forster, James R.; Goorvitch, David; Thigpen, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have imaged two normal, non-coronal, infrared-bright K-giants, alpha Boo and alpha Tau, in the 1.4-millimeter and 2.8-millimeter continuum using BIMA. These stars have been used as important absolute calibrators for several infrared satellites. Our goals are: (1) to probe the structure of their upper photospheres; (2) to establish whether these stars radiate as simple photospheres or possess long-wavelength chromospheres; and (3) to make a connection between millimeter-wave and far-infrared absolute flux calibrations. To accomplish these goals we also present ISO Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) measurements of both these K-giants. The far-infrared and millimeter continuum radiation is produced in the vicinity of the temperature minimum in a Boo and a Tau, offering a direct test of the model photospheres and chromospheres for these two cool giants. We find that current photospheric models predict fluxes in reasonable agreement with those observed for those wavelengths which sample the upper photosphere, namely less than or equal to 170 micrometers in alpha Tau and less than or equal to 125 micrometers in alpha Boo. It is possible that alpha Tau is still radiative as far as 0.9 - 1.4 millimeters. We detect chromospheric radiation from both stars by 2.8 millimeters (by 1.4 millimeters in alpha Boo), and are able to establish useful bounds on the location of the temperature minimum. An attempt to interpret the chromospheric fluxes using the two-component "bifurcation model" proposed by Wiedemann et al. (1994) appears to lead to a significant contradiction.

  15. LaaA, a novel high-active alkalophilic alpha-amylase from deep-sea bacterium Luteimonas abyssi XH031(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qinghao; Wang, Yan; Yin, Chong; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-amylase is a kind of broadly used industrial enzymes, most of which have been exploited from terrestrial organism. Comparatively, alpha-amylase from marine environment was largely undeveloped. In this study, a novel alkalophilic alpha-amylase with high activity, Luteimonas abyssi alpha-amylase (LaaA), was cloned from deep-sea bacterium L. abyssi XH031(T) and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The gene has a length of 1428bp and encodes 475 amino acids with a 35-residue signal peptide. The specific activity of LaaA reached 8881U/mg at the optimum pH 9.0, which is obvious higher than other reported alpha-amylase. This enzyme can remain active at pH levels ranging from 6.0 to 11.0 and temperatures below 45°C, retaining high activity even at low temperatures (almost 38% residual activity at 10°C). In addition, 1mM Na(+), K(+), and Mn(2+) enhanced the activity of LaaA. To investigate the function of potential active sites, R227G, D229K, E256Q/H, H327V and D328V mutants were generated, and the results suggested that Arg227, Asp229, Glu256 and Asp328 were total conserved and essential for the activity of alpha-amylase LaaA. This study shows that the alpha-amylase LaaA is an alkali-tolerant and high-active amylase with strong potential for use in detergent industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stage IV in electrical resistivity return to alpha-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poltavtseva, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    alpha-iron electrical resistivity increment return within this stage temperature range is related to migration of vacancies. Good agreement of the results obtained for the 99.8 % purity degree alpha-iron with the published data, speaks in favor of an idea about existence of a stage of potential dissociation of monovacancy complexes with carbon atoms instead of the vacancy annealing stage. The effect of carbon atoms on annealing within this temperature range is supported by occurrence of a stage at 377 K, which is identified definitely as the carbon atom migration stage

  17. A new gene deletion in the alpha-like globin gene cluster as the molecular basis for the rare alpha-thalassemia-1(--/alpha alpha) in blacks: HbH disease in sickle cell trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, M H; Coleman, M B; Adams, J G; Hartmann, R C; Saba, H; Anagnou, N P

    1986-02-01

    A novel deletion of at least 26 kilobase of DNA, including both alpha-globin genes, the psi alpha- and psi zeta-globin genes, but sparing the functional zeta-gene was found in a 10-year-old black boy with HbH disease and sickle cell trait. This particular deletion has not previously been described in blacks. Its existence makes it likely that the absence of Hb Barts hydrops fetalis in blacks is due to the rarity of the chromosome lacking two alpha-globin genes rather than a result of early embryonic death due to the failure to synthesize embryonic hemoglobins because of deletion of functional zeta-globin genes.

  18. The development of an innovative, real-time monitor for airborne alpha emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritzo, R.; Fowler, M.; Wouters, J.

    1994-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is developing a technology for on-line, real-time monitoring of incinerator stacks for low levels of airborne alpha activity. Referred to as the Large-Volume Flow Thru Detector System (LVFTDS), this technology uses a unique design for sensitive, real-time measurements of alpha particle emissions. Scintillating plates are stacked close together so that alpha-particle emissions in the flowing gas stream strike a plate. The light pulses produced when the alpha particle strikes the plate are registered by photomultiplier tubes and processed to determine the concentration of alpha emitting radionuclides present in the air. This technology directly addresses the public's demand for fast responding, high sensitivity effluent monitoring systems. With Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 funding LANL has fabricated a beach-top proof of concept detector system and is conducting tests to evaluate its performance. A second generation prototype is being designed, based on requirements driven by potential field test sites. An industrial partner is being solicited to license the technology. Field trials of a full-scale detector system are planned for fiscal year 1995. In this paper the LVFTDS technology is explained, including the measured performance of a prototype detector. The advantages, disadvantages, and other ramifications of applying this technology to incinerator effluent monitoring are also discussed. An overview of the development effort is also provided

  19. Color image enhancement of medical images using alpha-rooting and zonal alpha-rooting methods on 2D QDFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; John, Aparna; Agaian, Sos S.

    2017-03-01

    2-D quaternion discrete Fourier transform (2-D QDFT) is the Fourier transform applied to color images when the color images are considered in the quaternion space. The quaternion numbers are four dimensional hyper-complex numbers. Quaternion representation of color image allows us to see the color of the image as a single unit. In quaternion approach of color image enhancement, each color is seen as a vector. This permits us to see the merging effect of the color due to the combination of the primary colors. The color images are used to be processed by applying the respective algorithm onto each channels separately, and then, composing the color image from the processed channels. In this article, the alpha-rooting and zonal alpha-rooting methods are used with the 2-D QDFT. In the alpha-rooting method, the alpha-root of the transformed frequency values of the 2-D QDFT are determined before taking the inverse transform. In the zonal alpha-rooting method, the frequency spectrum of the 2-D QDFT is divided by different zones and the alpha-rooting is applied with different alpha values for different zones. The optimization of the choice of alpha values is done with the genetic algorithm. The visual perception of 3-D medical images is increased by changing the reference gray line.

  20. Case Study - Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Leybourne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study was developed from an actual scenario by Dr. Steve Leybourne of Boston University.  The case documents the historical evolution of an organization, and has been used successfully in courses dealing with organizational and cultural change, and the utilization of ‘soft skills’ in project-based management. This is a short case, ideal for classroom use and discussion.  The issues are easily accessible to students, and there is a single wide ranging question that allows for the inclusion of many issues surrounding strategic decision-making, and behavioural and cultural change. Alpha was one of the earlier companies in the USA to invest in large, edge-of-town superstores, with plentiful free vehicle parking, selling food and related household products. Alpha was created in the 1950s as a subsidiary of a major publicly quoted retail group.  It started business by opening a string of very large discount stores in converted industrial and warehouse premises in the south of the United States. In the early days shoppers were offered a limited range of very competitively priced products. When Alpha went public in 1981 it was the fourth largest food retailer in the US, selling an ever-widening range of food and non-food products.  Its success continued to be based on high volume, low margins and good value for money, under the slogan of ‘Alpha Price.’

  1. Ultrastructural studies of human and rabbit alpha-M-globulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloth, B; Chesebro, B; Svehag, S E

    1968-04-01

    Electron micrographs of isolated human alpha(2)M-molecules, obtained by the negative contrast technique, revealed morphologically homogenous structures resembling a graceful monogram of the two letters H and I. The modal values for the length and width of the alpha(2)M particles were 170 A and 100 A, respectively. Purified rabbit alphamacroglobulins contained about 80% alpha(1)M- and 20% alpha(2)M-globulins. The isolated rabbit alpha(1)M- and alpha(2)M-molecules were morphologically indistinguishable from one another and from human alpha(2)M-molecules. Preliminary immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that the two rabbit alphaM-globulins were antigenically different. Sedimentation constant determinations gave s(20, w) values of 18.8 and 18.2 for rabbit alpha(1)M and alpha(2)M, respectively.

  2. Influence of the dispersive and dissipative scales alpha and beta on the energy spectrum of the Navier-Stokes alphabeta equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Fried, Eliot

    2008-10-01

    Lundgren's vortex model for the intermittent fine structure of high-Reynolds-number turbulence is applied to the Navier-Stokes alphabeta equations and specialized to the Navier-Stokes alpha equations. The Navier-Stokes alphabeta equations involve dispersive and dissipative length scales alpha and beta, respectively. Setting beta equal to alpha reduces the Navier-Stokes alphabeta equations to the Navier-Stokes alpha equations. For the Navier-Stokes alpha equations, the energy spectrum is found to obey Kolmogorov's -5/3 law in a range of wave numbers identical to that determined by Lundgren for the Navier-Stokes equations. For the Navier-Stokes alphabeta equations, Kolmogorov's -5/3 law is also recovered. However, granted that beta Navier-Stokes alphabeta equations may have the potential to resolve features smaller than those obtainable using the Navier-Stokes alpha equations.

  3. A case of alpha-fetoprotein-producing esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Yu; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Hu, Huang-Ming; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2013-02-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein is a well-known tumor marker in the screening and follow-up of hepatocellular carcinoma. In Taiwanese society, a high prevalence of hepatitis and hepatoma and elevation of alpha-fetoprotein associated with liver function impairment usually suggested clinics undertake further examination for liver or genital tumor. We report the case of 45-year-old man who was found to have an alpha-fetoprotein-producing esophageal adenocarcinoma with an initial presentation of liver function impairment and rapid elevation of alpha-fetoprotein. Esophageal cancer was diagnosed via endoscope and a biopsy proved the presence of adenocarcinoma. A small endoscopic biopsy specimen failed to identify the alpha-fetoprotein positive tumor cell. Esophagectomy was performed and histopathological study of surgical specimen revealed grade II adenocarcinoma with regional metastatic lymphadenopathy. Immunohistochemical study was focal positive for alpha-fetoprotein. Serum alpha-fetoprotein declined transiently after esophagectomy and fluctuation of alpha-fetoprotein level was noted during the treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy. Finally, 19 months after the operation, the patient died due to multiple organ metastases with multiple organ failure. Thus, a small specimen for upper endoscopy may not be sufficient in the presence of alpha-fetoprotein-producing adenocarcinoma. Monitoring of serum alpha-fetoprotein may be useful in the evaluation and follow-up of esophageal alpha-fetoprotein-producing adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  5. Molecular Mechanism of AHSP-Mediated Stabilization of Alpha-Hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng,L.; Gell, D.; Zhou, S.; Gu, L.; Kong, Y.; Li, J.; Hu, M.; Yan, N.; Lee, C.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobin A (HbA), the oxygen delivery system in humans, comprises two alpha and two beta subunits. Free alpha-hemoglobin (alphaHb) is unstable, and its precipitation contributes to the pathophysiology of beta thalassemia. In erythrocytes, the alpha-hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) binds alphaHb and inhibits its precipitation. The crystal structure of AHSP bound to Fe(II)-alphaHb reveals that AHSP specifically recognizes the G and H helices of alphaHb through a hydrophobic interface that largely recapitulates the alpha1-beta1 interface of hemoglobin. The AHSP-alphaHb interactions are extensive but suboptimal, explaining why beta-hemoglobin can competitively displace AHSP to form HbA. Remarkably, the Fe(II)-heme group in AHSP bound alphaHb is coordinated by the distal but not the proximal histidine. Importantly, binding to AHSP facilitates the conversion of oxy-alphaHb to a deoxygenated, oxidized [Fe(III)], nonreactive form in which all six coordinate positions are occupied. These observations reveal the molecular mechanisms by which AHSP stabilizes free alphaHb.

  6. Expression and secretion of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase by using the yeast pheromone alpha-factor promoter and leader sequence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Southgate, V J; Steyn, A J; Pretorius, I S; Van Vuuren, H J

    1993-01-01

    Replacement of the regulatory and secretory signals of the alpha-amylase gene (AMY) from Bacillus amylolique-faciens with the complete yeast pheromone alpha-factor prepro region (MF alpha 1p) resulted in increased levels of extracellular alpha-amylase production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the removal of the (Glu-Ala)2 peptide from the MF alpha 1 spacer region (Lys-Arg-Glu-Ala-Glu-Ala) yielded decreased levels of extracellular alpha-amylase.

  7. The alpha(2a)-adrenergic receptor plays a protective role in mouse behavioral models of depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, N L; McDonald, M P; Limbird, L E

    2001-07-01

    The noradrenergic system is involved in the regulation of many physiological and psychological processes, including the modulation of mood. The alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(2)-ARs) modulate norepinephrine release, as well as the release of serotonin and other neurotransmitters, and are therefore potential targets for antidepressant and anxiolytic drug development. The current studies were undertaken to examine the role of the alpha(2A) subtype of alpha(2)-AR in mouse behavioral models of depression and anxiety. We have observed that the genetic knock-out of the alpha(2A)-AR makes mice less active in a modified version of Porsolt's forced swim test and insensitive to the antidepressant effects of the tricyclic drug imipramine in this paradigm. Furthermore, alpha(2A)-AR knock-out mice appear more anxious than wild-type C57 Bl/6 mice in the rearing and light-dark models of anxiety after injection stress. These findings suggest that the alpha(2A)-AR may play a protective role in some forms of depression and anxiety and that the antidepressant effects of imipramine may be mediated by the alpha(2A)-AR.

  8. Metabolism and biological effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, W. J.

    1979-05-01

    The emphasis of much of the current and planned research on the toxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides is directed toward the complexities of actual and potential conditions of occupational environmental exposures of human beings. These, as well as the more limited studies on mechanisms of biological transport and effects, should increase our ability to predict health risks more accurately and to deal more confidently with human exposures, if and when they occur.

  9. Interactions between an alpha-helix and a beta-sheet. Energetics of alpha/beta packing in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K C; Némethy, G; Rumsey, S; Tuttle, R W; Scheraga, H A

    1985-12-05

    Conformational energy computations have been carried out to determine the favorable ways of packing a right-handed alpha-helix on a right-twisted antiparallel or parallel beta-sheet. Co-ordinate transformations have been developed to relate the position and orientation of the alpha-helix to the beta-sheet. The packing was investigated for a CH3CO-(L-Ala)16-NHCH3 alpha-helix interacting with five-stranded beta-sheets composed of CH3CO-(L-Val)6-NHCH3 chains. All internal and external variables for both the alpha-helix and the beta-sheet were allowed to change during energy minimization. Four distinct classes of low-energy packing arrangements were found for the alpha-helix interacting with both the parallel and the anti-parallel beta-sheet. The classes differ in the orientation of the axis of the alpha-helix relative to the direction of the strands of the right-twisted beta-sheet. In the class with the most favorable arrangement, the alpha-helix is oriented along the strands of the beta-sheet, as a result of attractive non-bonded side-chain-side-chain interactions along the entire length of the alpha-helix. A class with nearly perpendicular orientation of the helix axis to the strands is also of low energy, because it allows similarly extensive attractive interactions. In the other two classes, the helix is oriented diagonally relative to the strands of the beta-sheet. In one of them, it interacts with the convex surface near the middle of the saddle-shaped twisted beta-sheet. In the other, it is oriented along the concave diagonal of the beta-sheet and, therefore, it interacts only with the corner regions of the sheet, so that this packing is energetically less favorable. The packing arrangements involving an antiparallel and a parallel beta-sheet are generally similar, although the antiparallel beta-sheet has been found to be more flexible. The major features of 163 observed alpha/beta packing arrangements in 37 proteins are accounted for in terms of the computed

  10. Testing hypotheses involving Cronbach's alpha using marginal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, R.E.; van der Ark, L.A.; Croon, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the statistical testing of three relevant hypotheses involving Cronbach's alpha: one where alpha equals a particular criterion; a second testing the equality of two alpha coefficients for independent samples; and a third testing the equality of two alpha coefficients for dependent

  11. Alpha-emitting radionuclides in cigarette tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neton, James W.; Ibrahim, Shawki Amin

    1978-01-01

    As part of general studies of the concentration of 239/240 Pu, 238 Pu and 228,230,232 Th in the tissues of non-occupationally exposed individuals, it became evident that there was little or no information on their content in cigarette tobacco. To better understand this possible route of intake and its potential for lung exposure we have measured these nuclides in tobacco samples, from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), which have a well-known growing history, and in brand name cigarettes purchased commercially. The concentration of 239/240 Pu in both USDA and brand name tobacco has a range of 0.4-0.7 pCi/kg of tobacco while the 238 Pu concentration was ≤ 0.05 pCi/kg. The 228 Th concentration for USDA tobacco was 200 pCi/kg tobacco while the 232 Th was only 14 pCi/kg. The high 228/232 Th ratio may result from a lower uptake of 232 Th compared to that of 228 Ra. By comparing the concentration of these measured nuclides to other alpha emitters in tobacco that have been reported in the literature, i.e. 210 Po (400 pCi/kg) and 226 Ra (150 pCi/kg), it is apparent that 228 Th represents a significant fraction of the total alpha activity. It is also evident there is a much greater potential for exposure of the lung to radiation from 228 Th than from 239/240 Pu as a result of cigarette smoking. (author)

  12. A variational calculation of 12C in the alpha-particle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portilho, O.

    1973-01-01

    Some physical properties of three structureless alpha particles interacting through two-body potentials were discussed. Comparison between them and the corresponding experimental observations for the 12 C nucleus is done. The wave function is expanded in terms of translationally invariant harmonic-oscillator states, the coefficients being variational parameters

  13. Alpha/beta separation in liquid scintillation gel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    1994-01-01

    The pulse shape analysis commonly used in liquid scintillation alpha/beta separations is satisfactory for moderate quench levels. However, for gel samples, the alpha particle counting efficiency is never greater than 10%, and an optimum separation of the alpha component cannot be achieved when beta to alpha counting rate ratios are greater than 100. In such cases, it is better to use a spectrum analysis method for alpha/beta separation. ((orig.))

  14. Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high n θ can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

  15. Reggeon field theory for alpha (0)>1

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, Daniele; Le Bellac, M; Marchesini, G

    1976-01-01

    The asymptotic behaviour of the scattering amplitude is obtained when the pomeron has intercept alpha (0) larger than one. The reggeon field theory is studied by introducing a lattice in impact parameter space. Use is made of a previous result showing that asymptotically the dynamics is controlled at each lattice site ( alpha '=0 case) by a two-level structure. This leads to a non-Hermitean Hamiltonian expressed in terms of spin operators in which the intersite interaction term is proportional to the pomeron slope alpha '. The spectrum of such a system shows a degenerate ground state for alpha (0)> alpha /sub c/>or approximately=1 and a continuum with vanishing excitation gap at alpha (0)= alpha /sub c/. The vacuum does not change structure at the critical value. The criticality is shown by an order parameter which is given by the matrix element of a field operator between the vacuum and its degenerate companion. The nature of this critical phenomenon is better understood by continuously transforming the Hami...

  16. Negative feedback regulation of human platelets via autocrine activation of the platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassbotn, F S; Havnen, O K; Heldin, C H; Holmsen, H

    1994-05-13

    Human platelets contain platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in their alpha-granules which is released during platelet exocytosis. We show by immunoprecipitation and 125I-PDGF binding experiments that human platelets have functionally active PDGF alpha-receptors, but not beta-receptors. The PDGF alpha-receptor (PDGFR-alpha) was identified as a 170-kDa glycosylated protein-tyrosine kinase as found in other cell types. Stimulation of platelets with 0.1 unit/ml thrombin resulted in a significant increase (2-5-fold) of the tyrosine phosphorylation of the PDGFR-alpha, as determined by immunoprecipitation with phosphotyrosine antiserum as well as with PDGFR-alpha antiserum. The observed thrombin-induced autophosphorylation of the PDGFR-alpha was inhibited by the addition of a neutralizing monoclonal PDGF antibody. Thus, our results suggest that the platelet PDGFR-alpha is stimulated in an autocrine manner by PDGF secreted during platelet activation. Preincubation of platelets with PDGF inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation and secretion of ATP + ADP and beta-hexosaminidase. Thrombin-induced platelet aggregation was also reversed when PDGF was added 30 s after thrombin stimulation. Inhibition of the autocrine PDGF pathway during platelet activation by the PDGF antibody led to a potentiation of thrombin-induced beta-hexosaminidase secretion. Thus, the PDGFR-alpha takes part in a negative feedback regulation during platelet activation. Our demonstration of PDGF alpha-receptors on human platelets and its inhibitory function during platelet activation identifies a new possible role of PDGF in the regulation of thrombosis.

  17. A novel GABA(A) alpha 5 receptor inhibitor with therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, István; Mihalik, Balázs; Etherington, Lori-An; Kapus, Gábor; Pálvölgyi, Adrienn; Gigler, Gábor; Kertész, Szabolcs; Gaál, Attila; Pallagi, Katalin; Kiricsi, Péter; Szabó, Éva; Szénási, Gábor; Papp, Lilla; Hársing, László G; Lévay, György; Spedding, Michael; Lambert, Jeremy J; Belelli, Delia; Barkóczy, József; Volk, Balázs; Simig, Gyula; Gacsályi, István; Antoni, Ferenc A

    2015-10-05

    Novel 2,3-benzodiazepine and related isoquinoline derivatives, substituted at position 1 with a 2-benzothiophenyl moiety, were synthesized to produce compounds that potently inhibited the action of GABA on heterologously expressed GABAA receptors containing the alpha 5 subunit (GABAA α5), with no apparent affinity for the benzodiazepine site. Substitutions of the benzothiophene moiety at position 4 led to compounds with drug-like properties that were putative inhibitors of extra-synaptic GABAA α5 receptors and had substantial blood-brain barrier permeability. Initial characterization in vivo showed that 8-methyl-5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-1-benzothiophen-2-yl]-1,9-dihydro-2H-[1,3]oxazolo[4,5-h][2,3]benzodiazepin-2-one was devoid of sedative, pro-convulsive or motor side-effects, and enhanced the performance of rats in the object recognition test. In summary, we have discovered a first-in-class GABA-site inhibitor of extra-synaptic GABAA α5 receptors that has promising drug-like properties and warrants further development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Innovations in Los Alamos alpha box design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, J.M.; Dowler, K.E.; Cook, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Destructive examinations of irradiated fuel pins containing plutonium fuel must be performed in shielded hot cells with strict provisions for containing the plutonium. Alpha boxes provide containment for the plutonium, toxic fission products, and other hazardous highly radioactive materials. The alpha box contains windows for viewing and a variety of transfer systems specially designed to allow transfers in and out of the alpha box without spread of the hazardous materials that are contained in the box. Alpha boxes have been in use in the Wing 9 hot cells at Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than 20 years. Features of the newly designed alpha boxes are presented

  19. Elastic and inelastic scattering of alpha particles from sup 46 Ti at E sub. alpha. = 35 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunatha Rao, V.; Sudarshan, M.; Sarma, A.; Singh, R. (North-Eastern Hill Univ., Shillong (India). Dept. of Physics); Banerjee, S.R.; Chintalapudi, S.N. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Variable Energy Cyclotron Project)

    1991-12-01

    Differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering of 35 MeV alpha particles have been measured from {theta}{sub lab} =10{sup o} to 100{sup o} in 1{sup o}-2{sup o} steps. An optical model analysis of the elastic scattering data has been carried out using Woods-Saxon and Woods-Saxon squared radial dependences for real as well as imaginary parts of the potential. The most sensitive region of the potential in predicting the elastic scattering cross sections has been determined using a notch perturbation test. The problem of discrete family ambiguity in the optical model analysis of elastic data has also been investigated. The inelastic scattering data have been analysed in terms of the collective model using the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), where the distorted waves are generated by the optical potential obtained from the elastic scattering data. (author).

  20. Training detector as simulator of alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirosh, D.; Duvniz, E.; Assido, H.; Barak, D.; Paran, J.

    1997-01-01

    Alpha contamination is a common phenomena in radiation research laboratories and other sites. Training staff to properly detect and control alpha contamination, present special problems. In order to train health physics personnel, while using alpha sources, both the trainers and the trainees are inevitably exposed to alpha contamination. This fact of course, comes in conflict with safety principles. In order to overcome these difficulties, a training detector was developed, built and successfully tested. (authors)

  1. Report of a Technical Meeting on ''Alpha emitting radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for therapy''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Considering the high potential of α-emitters for future development of radionuclide therapy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a Technical Meeting on ‘Alpha Emitting Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy’, from June 24 to 28, 2013, at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna with the purpose of gathering eminent Experts in the field and discuss with them the status and future perspectives of the field. Sixteen Experts and two External Observers from ten different countries, and four IAEA Technical Officers attended this meeting. Outstanding lectures have been presented covering all relevant aspects of α-therapy, which were followed by extensive discussions and analysis. Selected arguments encompassed production methods and availability of alpha-emitting radionuclides, labelling chemistry of alpha-emittting radioelements, design and development of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals, physical principles of alpha-particle dosimetry and advanced dosimetric models, biological effects of alpha radiation at the cellular level, on-going preclinical and clinical studies with new radiopharmaceuticals, results of clinical trials on the use of radium-223 chloride solutions for the treatment of metastatic bone cancer. The broad scientific background of invited components of the Experts’ panel conferred a strong interdisciplinary trait to the overall discussion and stimulated a critical analysis of this emerging unexplored field. Results of this comprehensive overview on alpha therapy, including recommendations to the Agency on suitable initiatives that may help to promote and spread the knowledge to Members States on this emerging therapeutic modality, are summarized in the present Report

  2. (Alpha-) quenching temperature dependence in liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Arnd; Lozza, Valentina; Krosigk, Belina von; Zuber, Kai [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Liquid scintillator (LS) is an effective and promising detector material, which is and will be used by many small and large scale experiments. In order to perform correct signal identification and background suppression, a very good knowledge of LS properties is crucial. One of those is the light yield from alpha particles in liquid scintillator. This light output strongly quenched, approx. 10 times compared to that of electrons, and has been precisely studied at room temperature for various LS. Big scintillator experiments, such as SNO+ and maybe future large scale detectors, will operate at different temperatures. While a strong temperature dependence is well known for solid state scintillators, due to the different scintillation process, a quenching temperature dependence in LS is usually assumed negligible. On the other hand, inconsistencies in between measurements are often explained by potential temperature effects. This study investigates LAB based liquid scintillator with an intrinsic, dissolved alpha emitter and its behaviour with temperature change. In a small, cooled and heated setup, a stabilized read-out with two PMTs is realised. First results are presented.

  3. Grindability of alpha-case formed on cast titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Marie; Jacobson, David; Chan, Kwai S; Okabe, Toru

    2009-09-01

    The hardened alpha-case (alpha-case) layer inevitably forms on the surface of titanium castings when prepared by investment casting. Because the hardness of the alpha-case is incomparable to that of the interior structure, the perception exists that the alpha-case is difficult to remove during cutting, grinding and polishing. Grindability (ease of grinding) of cast cpTi and cast Ti-6Al-4V was evaluated by grinding cast specimens incrementally using a SiC abrasive wheel. The present study revealed that the presence of the brittle alpha-case with lower fracture toughness is beneficial in grinding titanium. The alpha-case on the ductile cpTi can be ground much easier than its bulk interior structure. In less ductile Ti-6Al-4V, the grinding rate is much higher than that of cpTi, and the alpha-case and its interior structure are at similar levels since the fracture toughness of its alpha-case and the bulk material is not large enough.

  4. Quercetin suppresses hypoxia-induced accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) through inhibiting protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Yong J

    2008-10-01

    Quercetin, a ubiquitous bioactive plant flavonoid, has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and induce the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) in normoxia. In this study, under hypoxic conditions (1% O(2)), we examined the effect of quercetin on the intracellular level of HIF-1alpha and extracellular level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a variety of human cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, we observed that quercetin suppressed the HIF-1alpha accumulation during hypoxia in human prostate cancer LNCaP, colon cancer CX-1, and breast cancer SkBr3 cells. Quercetin treatment also significantly reduced hypoxia-induced secretion of VEGF. Suppression of HIF-1alpha accumulation during treatment with quercetin in hypoxia was not prevented by treatment with 26S proteasome inhibitor MG132 or PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Interestingly, hypoxia (1% O(2)) in the presence of 100 microM quercetin inhibited protein synthesis by 94% during incubation for 8 h. Significant quercetin concentration-dependent inhibition of protein synthesis and suppression of HIF-1alpha accumulation were observed under hypoxic conditions. Treatment with 100 microM cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, replicated the effect of quercetin by inhibiting HIF-1alpha accumulation during hypoxia. These results suggest that suppression of HIF-1alpha accumulation during treatment with quercetin under hypoxic conditions is due to inhibition of protein synthesis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Functional and genomic analyses of alpha-solenoid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, David; Palidwor, Gareth A; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Szengel, Angelika; Schaefer, Martin H; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-solenoids are flexible protein structural domains formed by ensembles of alpha-helical repeats (Armadillo and HEAT repeats among others). While homology can be used to detect many of these repeats, some alpha-solenoids have very little sequence homology to proteins of known structure and we expect that many remain undetected. We previously developed a method for detection of alpha-helical repeats based on a neural network trained on a dataset of protein structures. Here we improved the detection algorithm and updated the training dataset using recently solved structures of alpha-solenoids. Unexpectedly, we identified occurrences of alpha-solenoids in solved protein structures that escaped attention, for example within the core of the catalytic subunit of PI3KC. Our results expand the current set of known alpha-solenoids. Application of our tool to the protein universe allowed us to detect their significant enrichment in proteins interacting with many proteins, confirming that alpha-solenoids are generally involved in protein-protein interactions. We then studied the taxonomic distribution of alpha-solenoids to discuss an evolutionary scenario for the emergence of this type of domain, speculating that alpha-solenoids have emerged in multiple taxa in independent events by convergent evolution. We observe a higher rate of alpha-solenoids in eukaryotic genomes and in some prokaryotic families, such as Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes, which could be associated to increased cellular complexity. The method is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/~ard2/.

  6. Murine elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is posttranslationally modified by novel amide-linked ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol moieties. Addition of ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol to specific glutamic acid residues on EF-1 alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteheart, S.W.; Shenbagamurthi, P.; Chen, L.; Cotter, R.J.; Hart, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Elongation Factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha), an important eukaryotic translation factor, transports charged aminoacyl-tRNA from the cytosol to the ribosomes during poly-peptide synthesis. Metabolic radiolabeling with [ 3 H] ethanolamine shows that, in all cells examined, EF-1 alpha is the major radiolabeled protein. Radiolabeled EF-1 alpha has an apparent Mr = 53,000 and a basic isoelectric point. It is cytosolic and does not contain N-linked oligosaccharides. Trypsin digestion of murine EF-1 alpha generated two major [ 3 H]ethanolamine-labeled peptides. Three peptides were sequenced and were identical to two distinct regions of the human EF-1 alpha protein. Blank sequencing cycles coinciding with glutamic acid in the human cDNA-derived sequence were also found to release [ 3 H]ethanolamine, and compositional analysis of these peptides confirmed the presence of glutamic acid. Dansylation analysis demonstrates that the amine group of the ethanolamine is blocked. These results indicate that EF-1 alpha is posttranslationally modified by the covalent attachment of ethanolamine via an amide bond to at least two specific glutamic acid residues (Glu-301 and Glu-374). The hydroxyl group of the attached ethanolamine was shown by mass spectrometry and compositional analysis, to be further modified by the addition of a phosphoglycerol unit. This novel posttranslational modification may represent an important alteration of EF-1 alpha, comparable to the regulatory effects of posttranslational methylation of EF-1 alpha lysine residues

  7. Expression and functional importance of collagen-binding integrins, alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1, on virus-activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Susanne Ø; Thomsen, Allan R; Koteliansky, Victor E

    2003-01-01

    decreased responses were seen upon transfer of alpha(1)-deficient activated/memory T cells. Thus, expression of alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) integrins on activated T cells is directly functionally important for generation of inflammatory responses within tissues. Finally, the inhibitory effect......Adhesive interactions are crucial to cell migration into inflammatory sites. Using murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as an Ag model system, we have investigated expression and function of collagen-binding integrins, alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1), on activated and memory T cells. Using...... this system and MHC tetramers to define Ag-specific T cells, we demonstrate that contrary to being VLAs, expression of alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) can be rapidly induced on acutely activated T cells, that expression of alpha(1)beta(1) remains elevated on memory T cells, and that expression of alpha(1...

  8. Psychiatric Symptoms in Alpha-Mannosidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, D.; Pantel, J.; Linaker, O. M.

    2005-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis is characterized by mild to moderate intellectual disability (ID), moderate to severe neurosensory hearing loss, frequent infections, psychomotor disturbances and skeletal dysmorphism. For the first time, a panel of nine alpha-mannosidosis patients with psychiatric symptoms is presented. The clinical picture has several…

  9. Lactobacillus casei secreting alpha-MSH induces the therapeutic effect on DSS-induced acute colitis in Balb/c Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sun-Woo; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jeong-Yoon; Kim, Jie-Youn; Sung, Moon-Hee; Poo, Haryoung

    2008-12-01

    The neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha- MSH) has anti-inflammatory property by downregulating the expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Because alpha-MSH elicits the anti-inflammatory effect in various inflammatory disease models, we examined the therapeutic effect of oral administration of recombinant Lactobacillus casei, which secretes alpha-MSH (L. casei-alpha-MSH), on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in Balb/c mice. Thus, we constructed the alpha-MSH-secreting Lactobacillus casei by the basic plasmid, pLUAT-ss, which was composed of a PldhUTLS promoter and alpha-amylase signal sequence from Streptococcus bovis strain. Acute colitis was induced by oral administration of 5% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. To investigate the effect of L. casei-alpha-MSH on the colitis, L. casei or L. casei-alpha-MSH was orally administered for 7 days and their effects on body weight, mortality rate, cytokine production, and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were observed. Administration of L. casei-alpha-MSH reduced the symptom of acute colitis as assessed by body weight loss (DSS alone: 14.45+/-0. 2 g; L. casei-alpha- MSH: 18.2+/-0.12 g), colitis score (DSS alone: 3.6+/-0.4; L. casei-alpha-MSH: 1.4+/-0.6), MPO activity (DSS alone: 42.7+/-4.5 U/g; L. casei-alpha-MSH: 10.25+/-0.5 U/g), survival rate, and histological damage compared with the DSS alone mice. L. casei-alpha-MSH-administered entire colon showed reduced in vitro production of proinflammatory cytokines and NF-kappaB activation. The alpha-MSH-secreting recombinant L. casei showed significant anti-inflammatory effects in the murine model of acute colitis and suggests a potential therapeutic role for this agent in clinical inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. Correlation of repressed transcription of alpha-tocopherol transfer protein with serum alpha-tocopherol during hepatocarcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, C. G.; Hoek, F. J.; Groenink, M.; Reitsma, P. H.; van Deventer, S. J.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Using a subtraction-enhanced display technique, we identified a rodent alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (alpha-TTP) cDNA which exhibited markedly lower messenger RNA (mRNA) amounts in rat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) than in healthy controls. Several lines of evidence have substantiated that

  11. A novel nicotinic agonist facilitates induction of long-term potentiation in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, B E; de Fiebre, C M; Papke, R L; Kem, W R; Meyer, E M

    1994-02-28

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) can be modulated by a number of neurotransmitter receptors including muscarinic and GABAergic receptor types. We have found that a novel nicotinic agonist, 2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene anabaseine (DMXB), facilitated the induction of LTP in the hippocampus in a dose-dependent and mecamylamine-sensitive manner. DMXB displaced high affinity nicotinic [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin and [3H]acetylcholine binding in rat brain. Xenopus oocyte studies demonstrated that DMXB has agonist activity at alpha 7 but not alpha 4/beta 2 nicotinic receptor subtypes. These results indicated that DMXB is a novel nicotinic agonist with apparent specificity for the alpha 7/alpha-bungarotoxin nicotinic receptor subtype and indicate that nicotinic receptor activation is capable of modulating the induction of long-term potentiation.

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Shuang; Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Xia; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Bin; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zhang, Chunni; Ba, Yi

    2017-04-01

    suppressor in the formation and development of hepatocellular carcinoma and that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha may be a potential therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Retinal neuroprotection by hypoxic preconditioning is independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha expression in photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiersch, Markus; Lange, Christina; Joly, Sandrine; Heynen, Severin; Le, Yun Zheng; Samardzija, Marijana; Grimm, Christian

    2009-06-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1 alpha in the retina and protects photoreceptors against light-induced cell death. HIF-1 alpha is one of the major transcription factors responding to low oxygen tension and can differentially regulate a large number of target genes. To analyse whether photoreceptor-specific expression of HIF-1 alpha is essential to protect photoreceptors by hypoxic preconditioning, we knocked down expression of HIF-1 alpha specifically in photoreceptor cells, using the cyclization recombinase (Cre)-lox system. The Cre-mediated knockdown caused a 20-fold reduced expression of Hif-1 alpha in the photoreceptor cell layer. In the total retina, RNA expression was reduced by 65%, and hypoxic preconditioning led to only a small increase in HIF-1 alpha protein levels. Accordingly, HIF-1 target gene expression after hypoxia was significantly diminished. Retinas of Hif-1 alpha knockdown animals did not show any pathological alterations, and tolerated hypoxic exposure in a comparable way to wild-type retinas. Importantly, the strong neuroprotective effect of hypoxic preconditioning against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration persisted in knockdown mice, suggesting that hypoxia-mediated survival of light exposure does not depend on an autocrine action of HIF-1 alpha in photoreceptor cells. Hypoxia-mediated stabilization of HIF-2 alpha and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT 3) were not affected in the retinas of Hif-1 alpha knockdown mice. Thus, these factors are candidates for regulating the resistance of photoreceptors to light damage after hypoxic preconditioning, along with several potentially neuroprotective genes that were similarly induced in hypoxic knockdown and control mice.

  14. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor turnover in adipose tissue and kidney: irreversible blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by benextramine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taouis, M.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The recovery of post- and extrasynaptic alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-binding sites was studied in vivo in male golden hamsters after treatment with an irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist benextramine, a tetramine disulfide that possesses a high affinity for alpha 2-binding sites. The kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptor number was measured with [ 3 H]yohimbine, whereas [ 3 H]clonidine was used for fat cell and brain membrane alpha 2-binding site identification. Benextramine treatment of fat cell, kidney, and brain membranes reduced or completely suppressed, in an irreversible manner, [ 3 H] clonidine and [ 3 H]yohimbine binding without modifying adenosine (A1-receptor) and beta-adrenergic receptor sites. This irreversible binding was also found 1 and 2 hr after intraperitoneal administration of benextramine to the hamsters. Although it bound irreversibly to peripheral and central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors on isolated membranes, benextramine was unable to cross the blood-brain barrier of the hamster at the concentrations used (10-20 mg/kg). After the irreversible blockade, alpha 2-binding sites reappeared in kidney and adipose tissue following a monoexponential time course. Recovery of binding sites was more rapid in kidney than in adipose tissue; the half-lives of the receptor were 31 and 46 hr, respectively in the tissues. The rates of receptor production were 1.5 and 1.8 fmol/mg of protein/hr in kidney and adipose tissue. Reappearance of alpha 2-binding sites was associated with a rapid recovery of function (antilipolytic potencies of alpha 2-agonists) in fat cells inasmuch as occupancy of 15% of [ 3 H]clonidine-binding sites was sufficient to promote 40% inhibition of lipolysis. Benextramine is a useful tool to estimate turnover of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors under normal and pathological situations

  15. Alpha-Concave Hull, a Generalization of Convex Hull

    OpenAIRE

    Asaeedi, Saeed; Didehvar, Farzad; Mohades, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Bounding hull, such as convex hull, concave hull, alpha shapes etc. has vast applications in different areas especially in computational geometry. Alpha shape and concave hull are generalizations of convex hull. Unlike the convex hull, they construct non-convex enclosure on a set of points. In this paper, we introduce another generalization of convex hull, named alpha-concave hull, and compare this concept with convex hull and alpha shape. We show that the alpha-concave hull is also a general...

  16. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene and (+/-)-7 beta,8 alpha-dihydroxy-9 alpha, 10 alpha-epoxy-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene to histones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sculley, T.B.; Zytkovicz, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    AKR-2B mouse embryo cells were incubated for 24 hr with [3H]benzo(a)pyrene, and the histones were isolated and analyzed using one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The results revealed that (a) histones H1, H2A, and H3 incorporated significant amounts of label whereas little or no label was associated with histones H2B and H4 and (b) electrophoresis of the histones in the Triton: acid: urea gel system caused labeled histones to have a slower migration than did the corresponding unlabeled histones. Additional studies such as incubation of (+/-)-7 beta,8 alpha-[3H]dihydroxy-9 alpha,10 alpha-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene with nuclei resulted in radioactive labeling of histones H1, H2A, H2B, and H3 and of high-mobility-group proteins HMG1 and HMG2. The low levels of label associated with histone H4 in the whole-cell and nuclear studies were further investigated by incubating isolated histones with (+/-)-7 beta,8 alpha-[3H]dihydroxy-9 alpha,10 alpha-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene. Under these conditions, negligible amounts of radioactivity were associated with H4, while significant labeling of H1, H2A, H2B, and H3 and other nuclear proteins was observed. The results suggest that factors other than the presence of suitable nucleophilic acceptor sites on the histones may be necessary for carcinogen binding

  17. Different slopes for different folks: alpha and delta EEG power predict subsequent video game learning rate and improvements in cognitive control tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Kyle E; Basak, Chandramallika; Maclin, Edward L; Low, Kathy A; Boot, Walter R; Kramer, Arthur F; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2012-12-01

    We hypothesized that control processes, as measured using electrophysiological (EEG) variables, influence the rate of learning of complex tasks. Specifically, we measured alpha power, event-related spectral perturbations (ERSPs), and event-related brain potentials during early training of the Space Fortress task, and correlated these measures with subsequent learning rate and performance in transfer tasks. Once initial score was partialled out, the best predictors were frontal alpha power and alpha and delta ERSPs, but not P300. By combining these predictors, we could explain about 50% of the learning rate variance and 10%-20% of the variance in transfer to other tasks using only pretraining EEG measures. Thus, control processes, as indexed by alpha and delta EEG oscillations, can predict learning and skill improvements. The results are of potential use to optimize training regimes. Copyright © 2012 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  18. The effect of alpha amylase enzyme on quality of sweet sorghum juice for chrystal sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwati, T.; Cahyaningrum, N.; Widodo, S.; Astiati, U. T.; Budiyanto, A.; Wahyudiono; Arif, A. B.; Richana, N.

    2018-01-01

    Sweet sorghum juice (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) has characteristics similar to sugar cane juice and potentially used for sugar substitutes that can support food security. Nevertheless the sweet sorghum juicecontain starch which impede sorghum sugar crystallization. Therefore, research on the enzymatic process is needed to convert starch into reducing sugar. The experimental design used was the Factorial Randomized Design with the first factor was alpha amylase enzyme concentration (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120 μL/100 mL) and second factor was incubation time (0, 30, 60, 90 minute) at temperature 100°C. The experiment was conducted on fresh sweet sorghum. The results showed that the addition of the alpha amylase enzyme increased the content of reducing sugar and decreased levels of starch. Elevating concentration of alpha amylase enzyme will increase the reducing sugar content in sweet sorghum juice. The optimum alpha amylase enzyme concentration to produce the highest total sugar was 80 μL/100 mL of sweet sorghum juice with the optimum incubation time was 90 minutes. The results of this study are expected to create a new sweetener for sugar substitution. From the economic prospective aspect, sorghum is a potential crop and can be relied upon to support the success of the food diversification program which further leads to the world food security

  19. Modulator effects of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on AMPA-induced excitotoxicity in mouse organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardino, Liliana; Xapelli, Sara; Silva, Ana P

    2005-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been identified as mediators of several forms of neurodegeneration in the brain. However, they can produce either deleterious or beneficial effects on neuronal function. We investigated the effects...... of mouse recombinant TNF-alpha (10 ng/ml) enhanced excitotoxicity when the cultures were simultaneously exposed to AMPA and to this cytokine. Decreasing the concentration of TNF-alpha to 1 ng/ml resulted in neuroprotection against AMPA-induced neuronal death independently on the application protocol....... By using TNF-alpha receptor (TNFR) knock-out mice, we demonstrated that the potentiation of AMPA-induced toxicity by TNF-alpha involves TNF receptor-1, whereas the neuroprotective effect is mediated by TNF receptor-2. AMPA exposure was associated with activation and proliferation of microglia as assessed...

  20. Alpha neurofeedback training improves SSVEP-based BCI performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Feng; Nuno da Cruz, Janir; Nan, Wenya; Wong, Chi Man; Vai, Mang I.; Rosa, Agostinho

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can provide relatively easy, reliable and high speed communication. However, the performance is still not satisfactory, especially in some users who are not able to generate strong enough SSVEP signals. This work aims to strengthen a user’s SSVEP by alpha down-regulating neurofeedback training (NFT) and consequently improve the performance of the user in using SSVEP-based BCIs. Approach. An experiment with two steps was designed and conducted. The first step was to investigate the relationship between the resting alpha activity and the SSVEP-based BCI performance, in order to determine the training parameter for the NFT. Then in the second step, half of the subjects with ‘low’ performance (i.e. BCI classification accuracy <80%) were randomly assigned to a NFT group to perform a real-time NFT, and the rest half to a non-NFT control group for comparison. Main results. The first step revealed a significant negative correlation between the BCI performance and the individual alpha band (IAB) amplitudes in the eyes-open resting condition in a total of 33 subjects. In the second step, it was found that during the IAB down-regulating NFT, on average the subjects were able to successfully decrease their IAB amplitude over training sessions. More importantly, the NFT group showed an average increase of 16.5% in the SSVEP signal SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and an average increase of 20.3% in the BCI classification accuracy, which was significant compared to the non-NFT control group. Significance. These findings indicate that the alpha down-regulating NFT can be used to improve the SSVEP signal quality and the subjects’ performance in using SSVEP-based BCIs. It could be helpful to the SSVEP related studies and would contribute to more effective SSVEP-based BCI applications.

  1. Which radionuclide, carrier molecule and clinical indication for alpha-immunotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerard, F.; Barbet, J.; Cherel, M.; Chatal, J.-F.; Haddad, F.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.

    2015-01-01

    Beta-emitting radionuclides are not able to kill isolated tumor cells disseminated in the body, even if a high density of radiolabeled molecules can be targeted at the surface of these cells because the vast majority of emitted electrons deliver their energy outside the targeted cells. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides may overcome this limitation. It is thus of primary importance to test and validate the radionuclide of choice, the most appropriate carrier molecule and the most promising clinical indication. Four α-particle emitting radionuclides have been or are clinically tested in phase I studies namely 213 Bi, 225 Ac, 212 Pb and 211 At. Clinical safety has been documented and encouraging efficacy has been shown for some of them ( 213 Bi and 211 At). 211 At has been the most studied and could be the most promising radionuclide but 225 Ac and 212 Pb are also of potential great interest. Any carrier molecule that has been labeled with β-emitting radionuclides could be labeled with alpha particle-emitting radionuclide using, for some of them, the same chelating agents. However, the physical half-life of the radionuclide should match the biological half-life of the radioconjugate or its catabolites. Finally everybody agrees, based on the quite short range of alpha particles, on the fact that the clinical indications for alpha-immunotherapy should be limited to the situation of disseminated minimal residual diseases made of small clusters of malignant cells or isolated tumor cells.

  2. Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Michael C.; Maeda, Yukiko

    2006-01-01

    The meta-analysis of coefficient alpha across many studies is becoming more common in psychology by a methodology labeled reliability generalization. Existing reliability generalization studies have not used the sampling distribution of coefficient alpha for precision weighting and other common meta-analytic procedures. A framework is provided for…

  3. Experimental investigation of the reactions {sup 25}Mg({alpha},n){sup 28}Si, {sup 26}Mg({alpha},n){sup 29}Si, {sup 18}O({alpha},n){sup 21}Ne and their impact on stellar nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falahat, Sascha

    2010-06-10

    In the present dissertation, the nuclear reactions {sup 25}Mg({alpha},n){sup 28}Si, {sup 26}Mg({alpha},n){sup 29}Si, {sup 18}O({alpha},n){sup 21}Ne are investigated in the astrophysically interesting energy region from E{sub {alpha}}=1000 keV to E{sub {alpha}}=2450 keV. The experiments were performed at the Nuclear Structure Laboratory of the University of Notre Dame (USA) with the Van-de-Graaff accelerator KN. Solid state targets with evaporated magnesium or anodized oxygen were bombarded with {alpha}-particles and the released neutrons detected. For the detection of the released neutrons, computational simulations were used to construct a neutron detector based on {sup 3}He counters. Because of the strong occurrence of background reactions, different methods of data analysis were employed. Finally, the impact of the reactions {sup 25}Mg({alpha},n){sup 28}Si, {sup 26}Mg({alpha},n){sup 29}Si, {sup 18}O({alpha},n){sup 21}Ne on stellar nucleosynthesis is investigated by means of network calculations. (orig.)

  4. Optical properties of alpha spodumene: Orientation of its principal optical axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, S O; Lima, A F [Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Departamento de Fisica, PO Box 353, 49100-000 Sao Cristovao - SE (Brazil); Lalic, M V, E-mail: mlalic@fisica.ufs.b

    2009-05-01

    We studied the orientation of the three orthogonal principal optical axes of the alpha spodumene crystal. This orientation is determined relative to the crystallographic axes, and expressed as function of the incident radiation wavelength in ultraviolent region. The calculations were performed by density functional theory based, full potential augmented plane wave method.

  5. Sex change strategy and the aromatase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, L; Anderson, T; Place, A R; Dixon, B; Elizur, A

    2005-04-01

    Sequential hermaphroditism is a common reproductive strategy in many teleosts. Steroid production is known to mediate both the natural and induced sex change, yet beyond this the physiology directing this process has received little attention. Cytochrome P450 aromatase is a key enzyme in the hormonal pathway catalysing the conversion of sex steroids, androgens to oestrogens, and thus is highly relevant to the process of sex change. This study reports the isolation of cDNA sequences for aromatase isoforms CYP19A1 and CYP19A2 from teleost species representing three forms of sexual hermaphroditism: Lates calcarifer (protandry), Cromileptes altivelis (protogyny), and Gobiodon histrio (bi-directional). Deduced amino acid analysis of these isoforms with other reported isoforms from gonochoristic (single sex) teleosts revealed 56-95% identity within the same isoform while only 48-65% identity between isoforms irrespective of species and sexual strategy. Phylogenetic analysis supported this result separating sequences into isoform exclusive clades in spite of species apparent evolutionary distance. Furthermore, this study isolates 5' flanking regions of all above genes and describes putative cis-acting elements therein. Elements identified include steroidogenic factor 1 binding site (SF-1), oestrogen response element (ERE), progesterone response element (PRE), androgen response element (ARE), glucocorticoid response elements (GRE), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/retinoid X receptor alpha heterodimer responsive element (PPARalpha/RXRalpha), nuclear factor kappabeta (NF-kappabeta), SOX 5, SOX 9, and Wilms tumor suppressor (WTI). A hypothetical in vivo model was constructed for both isoforms highlighting potential roles of these putative cis-acting elements with reference to normal function and sexual hermaphroditism.

  6. Measurement of event shape distributions and moments in $e^{+}e^{-} \\to$ hadrons at 91-209 GeV and a determination of $\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Roeck, A.De; Wolf, E.A.De; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; Krogh, J.von; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    We have studied hadronic events from e+e- annihilation data at centre-of-mass energies from 91 to 209 GeV. We present distributions of event shape observables and their moments at each energy and compare with QCD Monte Carlo models. From the event shape distributions we extract the strong coupling alpha_s and test its evolution with energy scale. The results are consistent with the running of alpha_s expected from QCD. Combining all data, the value of alpha_s (M_z) is determined to be alpha_s(Mz)=0.1191+-0.0005(stat.)+-0.0010 (expt.)+-0.0011(hadr.)+-0.0044(theo.) The energy evolution of the moments is also used to determine a value of alpha_ with slightly larger errors: alpha_s(Mz)=0.1223+-0.0005(stat.) +-0.0014(expt.) +-0.0016(hadr.) +0.0054 -0.0036 (theo).

  7. Enantioselective conjugate radical addition to alpha'-hydroxy enones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunggi; Lim, Chae Jo; Kim, Sunggak; Subramaniam, Rajesh; Zimmerman, Jake; Sibi, Mukund P

    2006-09-14

    Enantioselective conjugate radical addition to alpha'-hydroxy alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones, compounds containing bidentate donors, has been investigated. It has been found that radical additions to alpha'-hydroxy alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones in the presence of Mg(NTf2)2 and bisoxazoline ligand 5a proceeded cleanly, yielding the addition products in high chemical yields and good enantiomeric excesses.

  8. Potentiation of contraction of rabbit airway smooth muscle by some cyclooxygenase products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, C L; Johnson, P R; Black, J L

    1988-06-01

    An alteration in smooth muscle sensitivity may be one of the mechanisms of the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in asthma. Indomethacin inhibits experimentally induced airway hyperresponsiveness. We thus examined the effects of the cyclooxygenase products PGD2, PGF2 alpha and a thromboxane A2 analogue U46619 on contractile responses of rabbit airway smooth muscle to histamine, carbachol and electrical field stimulation (EFS). PGD2 did not potentiate any contractile responses. When PGF2 alpha (1 microM) was administered 30 min before cumulative concentration-response curves to histamine and carbachol, no potentiation was observed. However, PGF2 alpha (1 microM) added immediately before EFS and bolus doses of histamine potentiated the contractile responses. U46619 increased the cumulative concentration-responses to both histamine and carbachol. The fact that we could alter smooth muscle sensitivity in vitro with PGF2 alpha and a thromboxane analogue suggests that these mediators may be involved in the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in asthma.

  9. Coordinated balancing of muscle oxidative metabolism through PGC-1{alpha} increases metabolic flexibility and preserves insulin sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summermatter, Serge [Biozentrum, Division of Pharmacology/Neurobiology, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50-70, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Troxler, Heinz [Division of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Department of Pediatrics, University Children' s Hospital, University of Zurich, Steinwiesstrasse 75, CH-8032 Zurich (Switzerland); Santos, Gesa [Biozentrum, Division of Pharmacology/Neurobiology, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50-70, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Handschin, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.handschin@unibas.ch [Biozentrum, Division of Pharmacology/Neurobiology, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50-70, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} PGC-1{alpha} enhances muscle oxidative capacity. {yields} PGC-1{alpha} promotes concomitantly positive and negative regulators of lipid oxidation. {yields} Regulator abundance enhances metabolic flexibility and balances oxidative metabolism. {yields} Balanced oxidation prevents detrimental acylcarnitine and ROS generation. {yields} Absence of detrimental metabolites preserves insulin sensitivity -- Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) enhances oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Excessive lipid oxidation and electron transport chain activity can, however, lead to the accumulation of harmful metabolites and impair glucose homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effect of over-expression of PGC-1{alpha} on metabolic control and generation of insulin desensitizing agents in extensor digitorum longus (EDL), a muscle that exhibits low levels of PGC-1{alpha} in the untrained state and minimally relies on oxidative metabolism. We demonstrate that PGC-1{alpha} induces a strictly balanced substrate oxidation in EDL by concomitantly promoting the transcription of activators and inhibitors of lipid oxidation. Moreover, we show that PGC-1{alpha} enhances the potential to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation. Thereby, PGC-1{alpha} boosts elevated, yet tightly regulated oxidative metabolism devoid of side products that are detrimental for glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, PI3K activity, an early phase marker for insulin resistance, is preserved in EDL muscle. Our findings suggest that PGC-1{alpha} coordinately coactivates the simultaneous transcription of gene clusters implicated in the positive and negative regulation of oxidative metabolism and thereby increases metabolic flexibility. Thus, in mice fed a normal chow diet, over-expression of PGC-1{alpha} does not alter insulin sensitivity and the metabolic adaptations elicited by PGC-1{alpha} mimic the beneficial effects of endurance training

  10. Reflection on design and testing of pancreatic alpha-amylase inhibitors: an in silico comparison between rat and rabbit enzyme models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil-Moghaddam Shiva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitors of pancreatic alpha-amylase are potential drugs to treat diabetes and obesity. In order to find compounds that would be effective amylase inhibitors, in vitro and in vivo models are usually used. The accuracy of models is limited, but these tools are nonetheless valuable. In vitro models could be used in large screenings involving thousands of chemicals that are tested to find potential lead compounds. In vivo models are still used as preliminary mean of testing compounds behavior in the whole organism. In the case of alpha-amylase inhibitors, both rats and rabbits could be chosen as in vivo models. The question was which animal could present more accuracy with regard to its pancreatic alpha-amylase. Results As there is no crystal structure of these enzymes, a molecular modeling study was done in order to compare the rabbit and rat enzymes with the human one. The overall result is that rabbit enzyme could probably be a better choice in this regard, but in the case of large ligands, which could make putative interactions with the −4 subsite of pancreatic alpha-amylase, interpretation of results should be made cautiously. Conclusion Molecular modeling tools could be used to choose the most suitable model enzyme that would help to identify new enzyme inhibitors. In the case of alpha-amylase, three-dimensional structures of animal enzymes show differences with the human one which should be taken into account when testing potential new drugs.

  11. Identification of 4,5-didemethyl-4-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosylsimmondsin and pinitol alpha-D-galactosides in jojoba seed meal (Simmondsia chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Boven, M; Leyssen, T; Busson, R; Holser, R; Cokelaere, M; Flo, G; Decuypere, E

    2001-09-01

    The isolation and identification of two pinitol alpha-D-galactosides from jojoba meal are described. The products were isolated by a combination of preparative HPLC on silica gel and TLC on amino silica gel and were identified by MS, NMR spectroscopy, and chemical derivatization as 5-O-(alpha-D-galactopyranosyl)-3-O-methyl-D-chiro-inositol or 5-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-D-pinitol and 2-O-(alpha-D-galactopyranosyl)-3-O-methyl-D-chiro-inositol or 2-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-D-pinitol. The same preparative HPLC method on silica gel allowed a new simmondsin derivative to be isolated and identified as 4,5-didemethyl-4-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosylsimmondsin mainly by NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

  12. Integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} effectors p130Cas, Src and talin regulate carcinoma invasion and chemoresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansing, Hope A. [Department of Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, LA (United States); Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R. [Department of Chemical Physiology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J. Silvio [Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Berrier, Allison L., E-mail: allison.berrier@gmail.com [Department of Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomics of clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinoma. {yields} p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin regulate oral carcinoma invasion. {yields} p130Cas, talin, Src and zyxin regulate oral carcinoma resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Ligand engagement by integrins induces receptor clustering and formation of complexes at the integrin cytoplasmic face that controls cell signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics critical for adhesion-dependent processes. This study searches for a subset of integrin effectors that coordinates both tumor cell invasion and resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin in oral carcinomas. Candidate integrin effectors were identified in a proteomics screen of proteins recruited to clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta} or {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinomas. Proteins with diverse functions including microtubule and actin binding proteins, and factors involved in trafficking, transcription and translation were identified in oral carcinoma integrin complexes. Knockdown of effectors in the oral carcinoma HN12 cells revealed that p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin were required for invasion through Matrigel. Disruption of talin or p130Cas by RNA interference increased resistance to cisplatin, whereas targeting Dek, Src or zyxin reduced HN12 resistance to cisplatin. Analysis of the spreading of HN12 cells on collagen I and laminin I revealed that a decrease in p130Cas or talin expression inhibited spreading on both matrices. Interestingly, a reduction in zyxin expression enhanced spreading on laminin I and inhibited spreading on collagen I. Reduction of Dek, Src, talin or zyxin expression reduced HN12 proliferation by 30%. Proliferation was not affected by a reduction in p130Cas expression. We conclude that p130Cas, Src and talin function in both oral carcinoma invasion and resistance to cisplatin.

  13. Abnormal late visual responses and alpha oscillations in neurofibromatosis type 1: a link to visual and attention deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) affects several areas of cognitive function including visual processing and attention. We investigated the neural mechanisms underlying the visual deficits of children and adolescents with NF1 by studying visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brain oscillations during visual stimulation and rest periods. Methods Electroencephalogram/event-related potential (EEG/ERP) responses were measured during visual processing (NF1 n = 17; controls n = 19) and idle periods with eyes closed and eyes open (NF1 n = 12; controls n = 14). Visual stimulation was chosen to bias activation of the three detection mechanisms: achromatic, red-green and blue-yellow. Results We found significant differences between the groups for late chromatic VEPs and a specific enhancement in the amplitude of the parieto-occipital alpha amplitude both during visual stimulation and idle periods. Alpha modulation and the negative influence of alpha oscillations in visual performance were found in both groups. Conclusions Our findings suggest abnormal later stages of visual processing and enhanced amplitude of alpha oscillations supporting the existence of deficits in basic sensory processing in NF1. Given the link between alpha oscillations, visual perception and attention, these results indicate a neural mechanism that might underlie the visual sensitivity deficits and increased lapses of attention observed in individuals with NF1. PMID:24559228

  14. Reduced Fragment Diversity for Alpha and Alpha-Beta Protein Structure Prediction using Rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbass, Jad; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is considered a main challenge in computational biology. The biannual international competition, Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP), has shown in its eleventh experiment that free modelling target predictions are still beyond reliable accuracy, therefore, much effort should be made to improve ab initio methods. Arguably, Rosetta is considered as the most competitive method when it comes to targets with no homologues. Relying on fragments of length 9 and 3 from known structures, Rosetta creates putative structures by assembling candidate fragments. Generally, the structure with the lowest energy score, also known as first model, is chosen to be the "predicted one". A thorough study has been conducted on the role and diversity of 3-mers involved in Rosetta's model "refinement" phase. Usage of the standard number of 3-mers - i.e. 200 - has been shown to degrade alpha and alpha-beta protein conformations initially achieved by assembling 9-mers. Therefore, a new prediction pipeline is proposed for Rosetta where the "refinement" phase is customised according to a target's structural class prediction. Over 8% improvement in terms of first model structure accuracy is reported for alpha and alpha-beta classes when decreasing the number of 3- mers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Activity monitoring of alpha-bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhoff, G.; Bondar, L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper aims at the survey on the actual situation in activity monitoring of alpha-bearing wastes. Homogeneous materials such as liquid-, gaseous- and homogeneous solid wastes are amenable to destructive analyses of representative samples. Available destructive analyses methods are sensitive and precise enough to cope with all requirements in alpha-waste monitoring. The more difficult problems are encountered with alpha-contaminated solids, when representative sampling is not practicable. Non-destructive analysis techniques are applied for monitoring this category of solid wastes. The techniques for nondestructive analysis of alpha-bearing wastes are based on the detection of gamma and/or neutron-emission of actinides. Principles and a theory of non-destructive radiometric assay of plutonium contaminated solid waste streams are explained. Guidelines for the calibration of instruments and interpretation of experimental data are given. Current theoretical and experimental development work in this problem area is reviewed. Evaluations concerning capabilities and limitations of monitoring systems for alpha-bearing solid wastes are very complex and out of the scope of this paper

  16. Effect of dietary alpha-tocopherol supplementation and gamma-irradiation on alpha-tocopherol retention and lipid oxidation in cooked minced chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvin, K.; Morrissey, P.A.; Buckley, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of dietary alpha-tocopherol supplementation and gamma-irradiation on alpha-tocopherol retention and lipid oxidation in cooked minced chicken during refrigerated storage were studied. Minced breast and thigh meat from broilers fed diets supplemented with 100, 200 or 400 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed was irradiated at 2.5 or 4.0 kGy. Cooked irradiated and unirradiated meat was stored at 4 degrees C for 5 days. alpha-Tocopherol concentrations increased with increasing dietary supplementation. Concentrations decreased during storage, but retention was not affected by irradiation. Lipid stability was determined by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) during storage. TBARS and COPs increased during storage and were reduced by increasing levels of dietary alpha-tocopheryl acetate supplementation. Irradiation accelerated TBARS formation during storage, but this was prevented by supplementation with 200 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed. Irradiation tended to increase COPs during storage, although no consistent effects were observed. In general supplementation with over 400 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg feed may be required to control cholesterol oxidation in minced chicken. The results suggest that, overall, irradiation had little effect on lipid stability in alpha-tocopherol-supplemented meat following cooking and storage

  17. Synthesis of tritium or deuterium labelled 19-nor-3. cap alpha. -hydroxy-5. cap alpha. -androstan-17-one from nortestosterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protiva, J; Klinotova, E [Karlova Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia). Prirodovedecka Fakulta; Filip, J [Ustav pro Vyzkum, Vyrobu a Vyuziti Radioisotopu, Prague (Czechoslovakia); Hampl, R [Research Inst. of Endocrinology, Praha (Czechoslovakia)

    1982-10-20

    Tritium and/or deuterium (5-H) labelled 19-nor-3..cap alpha..-hydroxy-5..cap alpha..-androstan-17-one (norandrosterone) was prepared from nortestosterone in view to use it as a radioligand for radioimmunoassay of the main nortestosterone metabolites. Based upon model experiments using testosterone and deuterium labelling, the following four step procedure was established: nortestosterone was oxidized with pyridine chlorochromate and the resulting 19-nor-4-androsten-3,17-dione was tritiated with tritium gas under catalysis with tris(triphenylphosphine)rhodium chloride to give (4,5..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H)19-nor-5..cap alpha..-androstan-3,17-dione. A selective reduction of the latter compound yielded (5-/sup 3/H)19-nor-3..cap alpha..-hydroxy-5..cap alpha..-androstan-17-one of the molar radioactivity 0.3 TBq (8.15 Ci)/mmol.

  18. alpha-MSH in systemic inflammation. Central and peripheral actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, A; Delgado, R; Airaghi, L; Cutuli, M; Garofalo, L; Carlin, A; Demitri, M T; Lipton, J M

    1999-10-20

    Until recently, inflammation was believed to arise from events taking place exclusively in the periphery. However, it is now clear that central neurogenic influences can either enhance or modulate peripheral inflammation. Therefore, it should be possible to improve treatment of inflammation by use of antiinflammatory agents that reduce peripheral host responses and inhibit proinflammatory signals in the central nervous system (CNS). One such strategy could be based on alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH). Increases in circulating TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO), induced by intraperitoneal administration of endotoxin in mice, were modulated by central injection of a small concentration of alpha-MSH. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and iNOS mRNA in lungs and liver were likewise modulated by central alpha-MSH. Increase in lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was significantly less in lungs of mice treated with central alpha-MSH. Proinflammatory agents induced by endotoxin were significantly greater after blockade of central alpha-MSH. The results suggest that antiinflammatory influences of neural origin that are triggered by alpha-MSH could be used to treat systemic inflammation. In addition to its central influences, alpha-MSH has inhibitory effects on peripheral host cells, in which it reduces release of proinflammatory mediators. alpha-MSH reduces chemotaxis of human neutrophils and production of TNF-alpha, neopterin, and NO by monocytes. In research on septic patients, alpha-MSH inhibited release of TNF-alpha, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in whole blood samples in vitro. Combined central and peripheral influences can be beneficial in treatment of sepsis.

  19. The Lyman alpha reference sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, M.; Östlin, G.; Schaerer, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on new imaging observations of the Lyman alpha emission line (Lyα), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028

  20. ALPHA-SYNUCLEIN STRUCTURE, AGGREGATION AND MODULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinakin K. Makwana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-synuclein is an intrinsically unstructured protein, involved in various neurodegenerative disorders. In vitro/in vivo experiments, as well as genetic mutation studies establish a direct link between alphasynuclein and synucleinopathies. Due to its natively unfolded state, alpha synuclein can adopt numerous conformations upon interaction with its partners and cellular factors, offering explanation for its diverse interactions. Aggregated form of alpha-synuclein has been observed in the brain of patients with synucleinopathies, a hallmark of neurodegeneration, and cell death has been attributed to aggregation induced toxicity. The process of aggregation involves nucleation, followed by intermediate oligomeric states, and finally the fibrillar amyloids. Of the various conformations/species that alpha-synuclein assumes before it transforms into mature amyloid fibrils, the oligomeric species is the most toxic. Thus, an effective way to limit disease progression is by modifying/slowing down protein aggregation/deposition in the brain. Various small natural products, synthetic chemicals, peptides and antibodies specific to alpha-synuclein have been designed/identified to reduce its rate of aggregation. Unfortunately, not even a handful of the molecules have cleared the clinical trials. Even today, medications available for Parkinson’s patients are mostly the drugs that adjust for loss of dopamine in the brain, and hence do not stop the progression of the disease or cure the symptoms. Thus, more molecular level studies are warranted to fully elucidate the process of alpha-synuclein aggregation, which in turn could help in identifying novel therapeutics and preventives. The present review summarizes the insights gained into the structure, in vitro aggregation and inhibitors/modulators of alpha-synuclein aggregation, that can be used to design better and effective inhibitors against the diseases.

  1. Some applications of Photon/Electron-Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) spectrometry to the assay of alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    The combination of certain solvent extraction separations and a special kind of liquid scintillation detector and electronics designed for alpha spectrometry allows some highly accurate, yet simple determinations of alpha-emitting nuclides. Counting efficiency is 99.68% with backgrounds of 99.95%. The Photon/Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) equipment is described and procedures for the separation and determination of uranium, thorium, plutonium, polonium, radium, and trivalent actinides are outlined. 25 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  2. Breakout from the hot CNO cycle: the {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}) and {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p) reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradfield-Smith, W; Laird, A M; Davinson, T; Pietro, A di; Ostrowski, A N; Shotter, A C; Woods, P J [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cherubini, S; Galster, W; Graulich, J S; Leleux, P; Michel, L; Ninane, A; Vervier, J [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, UCL, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Aliotta, M; Cali, D; Cappussello, F; Cunsolo, A; Spitaleri, C [INFN, Catania (Italy); Gorres, J; Wiescher, M [Notre Dame Univ. (United States); Rahighi, J [Van de Graaf Lab., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hinnefeld, J [Indiana Univ., South Bend (United States)

    1998-06-01

    One of the most important reactions which determines the rate of breakout from the hot CNO cycle is the {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}Ne. The reaction {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na may also provide an alternative breakout route. Experiments are being undertaken at Louvain-La-Neuve using the radioactive {sup 18}Ne beam to study these reactions by measurement of {alpha}({sup 18}Ne,p){sup 21}Na and d({sup 18}Ne,p){sup 19}Ne{sup *} {yields} {sup 15}O + {alpha} (orig.)

  3. Inhibitory effect on hepatitis B virus in vitro by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} ligand, rosiglitazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakui, Yuta; Inoue, Jun [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan); Ueno, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yueno@mail.tains.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan); Fukushima, Koji; Kondo, Yasuteru; Kakazu, Eiji; Obara, Noriyuki; Kimura, Osamu; Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan)

    2010-05-28

    Although chronic infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is currently managed with nucleot(s)ide analogues or interferon-{alpha}, the control of HBV infection still remains a clinical challenge. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor, that plays a role in glucose and lipid metabolism, immune reactions, and inflammation. In this study, the suppressive effect of PPAR ligands on HBV replication was examined in vitro using a PPAR{alpha} ligand, bezafibrate, and a PPAR{gamma} ligand, rosiglitazone. The effects were examined in HepG2 cells transfected with a plasmid containing 1.3-fold HBV genome. Whereas bezafibrate showed no effect against HBV replication, rosiglitazone reduced the amount of HBV DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen, and hepatitis B e antigen in the culture supernatant. Southern blot analysis showed that the replicative intermediates of HBV in the cells were also inhibited. It was confirmed that GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR{gamma}, reduced the suppressive effect of rosiglitazone on HBV. Moreover, rosiglitazone showed a synergistic effect on HBV replication with lamivudine or interferon-{alpha}-2b. In conclusion, this study showed that rosiglitazone inhibited the replication of HBV in vitro, and suggested that the combination therapy of rosiglitazone and nucleot(s)ide analogues or interferon could be a therapeutic option for chronic HBV infection.

  4. A reduction in hippocampal GABAA receptor alpha5 subunits disrupts the memory for location of objects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prut, L; Prenosil, G; Willadt, S; Vogt, K; Fritschy, J-M; Crestani, F

    2010-07-01

    The memory for location of objects, which binds information about objects to discrete positions or spatial contexts of occurrence, is a form of episodic memory particularly sensitive to hippocampal damage. Its early decline is symptomatic for elderly dementia. Substances that selectively reduce alpha5-GABA(A) receptor function are currently developed as potential cognition enhancers for Alzheimer's syndrome and other dementia, consistent with genetic studies implicating these receptors that are highly expressed in hippocampus in learning performance. Here we explored the consequences of reduced GABA(A)alpha5-subunit contents, as occurring in alpha5(H105R) knock-in mice, on the memory for location of objects. This required the behavioral characterization of alpha5(H105R) and wild-type animals in various tasks examining learning and memory retrieval strategies for objects, locations, contexts and their combinations. In mutants, decreased amounts of alpha5-subunits and retained long-term potentiation in hippocampus were confirmed. They exhibited hyperactivity with conserved circadian rhythm in familiar actimeters, and normal exploration and emotional reactivity in novel places, allocentric spatial guidance, and motor pattern learning acquisition, inhibition and flexibility in T- and eight-arm mazes. Processing of object, position and context memories and object-guided response learning were spared. Genotype difference in object-in-place memory retrieval and in encoding and response learning strategies for object-location combinations manifested as a bias favoring object-based recognition and guidance strategies over spatial processing of objects in the mutants. These findings identify in alpha5(H105R) mice a behavioral-cognitive phenotype affecting basal locomotion and the memory for location of objects indicative of hippocampal dysfunction resulting from moderately decreased alpha5-subunit contents.

  5. Excitation functions for alpha-particle-induced reactions with natural antimony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, N. L.; Shah, D. J.; Mukherjee, S.; Chintalapudi, S. N. [Vadodara, M. S. Univ. of Baroda (India). Fac. of Science. Dept. of Physics

    1997-07-01

    Stacked-foil activation technique and {gamma} - rays spectroscopy were used for the determination of the excitation functions of the {sup 121}Sb [({alpha}, n); ({alpha}, 2n); ({alpha},4 n); ({alpha}, p3n); ({alpha}, {alpha}n)]; and Sb [({alpha}, 3n); ({alpha}, 4n); ({alpha}, {alpha}3n)] reactions. The excitation functions for the production of {sup 124}I, {sup 123}I, {sup 121}I, {sup 121}Te and {sup 120}Sb were reported up to 50 MeV. The reactions {sup 121} Sb ({alpha}, {alpha}n) + {sup 123} Sb ({alpha}, {alpha}3n) are measured for the first time. Since natural antimony used as the target has two odd mass stable isotopes of abundances 57.3 % ({sup 121}Sb), their activation in some cases gives the same product nucleus through different reaction channels but with very different Q-values. In such cases, the individual reaction cross-sections are separated with the help of theoretical cross-sections. The experimental cross-sections were compared with the predictions based on hybrid model of Blann. The high-energy part of the excitation functions are dominated by the pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism and the initial exciton number n{sub 0} = 4 (4 p 0 h) gives fairly good agreement with presently measured results.

  6. 4 Birds 1 Stone to Inhibit 5androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol Conversion to DHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0409 TITLE: 4 Birds 1 Stone to Inhibit 5androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol Conversion to DHT PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-04094 Birds 1 Stone to Inhibit 5androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol Conversion to DHT 5c...testicular androgens, testosterone or dihydrotestosterone ( DHT ). Men diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer or failure potentially curative therapy are

  7. Conditioning of alpha bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Alpha bearing wastes are generated during the reprocessing of spent fuel, mixed oxide fuel fabrication, decommissioning and other activities. The safe and effective management of these wastes is of particular importance owing to the radiotoxicity and long lived characteristics of certain transuranic (TRU) elements. The management of alpha bearing wastes involves a number of stages which include collection, characterization, segregation, treatment, conditioning, transport, storage and disposal. This report describes the currently available matrices and technologies for the conditioning of alpha wastes and relates them to their compatibility with the other stages of the waste management process. The selection of a specific immobilization process is dependent on the waste treatment state and the subsequent handling, transport, storage and disposal requirements. The overall objectives of immobilization are similar for all waste producers and processors, which are to produce: (a) Waste forms with sufficient mechanical, physical and chemical stability to satisfy all stages of handling, transport and storage (referred to as the short term requirements), and (b) Waste forms which will satisfy disposal requirements and inhibit the release of radionuclides to the biosphere (referred to as the long term requirements). Cement and bitumen processes have already been successfully applied to alpha waste conditioning on the industrial scale in many of the IAEA Member States. Cement systems based on BFS and pozzolanic cements have emerged as the principal encapsulation matrices for the full range of alpha bearing wastes. Alternative technologies, such as polymers and ceramics, are being developed for specific waste streams but are unlikely to meet widespread application owing to cost and process complexity. The merits of alpha waste conditioning are improved performance in transport, storage and disposal combined with enhanced public perception of waste management operations. These

  8. Mind Your p's and Alphas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, William M.

    In the educational research literature alpha, the a priori level of significance, and p, the a posteriori probability of obtaining a test statistic of at least a certain value when the null hypothesis is true, are often confused. Explanations for this confusion are offered. Paradoxically, alpha retains a prominent place in textbook discussions of…

  9. Removal characteristics and kinetic analysis of an aerobic vapor-phase bioreactor for hydrophobic alpha-pinene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yifeng; Li, Shanshan; Cheng, Zhuowei; Zhu, Runye; Chen, Jianmeng

    2012-01-01

    Biofiltration is considered an effective method to control volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollution. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential use of a bacterial biofilter packed with wood chips and peat for the removal of hydrophobic alpha-pinene. When inoculated with two pure degraders and adapted activated sludge, a removal efficiency (RE) of more than 95% was achieved after a startup period of 11 days. The maximum elimination capacity (EC) of 50 g/(m3 x hr) with RE of 94% was obtained at empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 102 sec. When higher alpha-pinene concentrations and shorter EBRTs were applied, the REs and ECs decreased significantly due to mass-transfer and biological reaction limitations. As deduced from the experimental results, approximately 74% of alpha-pinene were completely mineralized by the consortiums and the biomass yield was 0.60 g biomass/g alpha-pinene. Sequence analysis of the selected bands excised from denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that the inoculated pure cultures could be present during the whole operation, and others were closely related to bacteria being able to degrade hydrocarbons. The kinetic results demonstrated that the whole biofiltration for alpha-pinene was diffusion-limit controlled owing to its hydrophobic characteristics. These findings indicated that this bacterial biofiltration is a promising technology for the remediation of hydrophobic industrial waste gases containing alpha-pinene.

  10. Actions of alpha2 adrenoceptor ligands at alpha2A and 5-HT1A receptors: the antagonist, atipamezole, and the agonist, dexmedetomidine, are highly selective for alpha2A adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Tancredi, A; Nicolas, J P; Audinot, V; Gavaudan, S; Verrièle, L; Touzard, M; Chaput, C; Richard, N; Millan, M J

    1998-08-01

    This study examined the activity of chemically diverse alpha2 adrenoceptor ligands at recombinant human (h) and native rat (r) alpha2A adrenoceptors compared with 5-HT1A receptors. First, in competition binding experiments at h alpha2A and h5-HT1A receptors expressed in CHO cells, several compounds, including the antagonists 1-(2-pyrimidinyl)piperazine (1-PP), (+/-)-idazoxan, benalfocin (SKF 86466), yohimbine and RX 821,002, displayed preference for h alpha2A versus h5-HT1A receptors of only 1.4-, 3.6-, 4-, 10- and 11-fold, respectively (based on differences in pKi values). Clonidine, brimonidine (UK 14304), the benzopyrrolidine fluparoxan and the guanidines guanfacine and guanabenz exhibited intermediate selectivity (22- to 31-fold) for h alpha2A receptors. Only the antagonist atipamezole and the agonist dexmedetomidine (DMT) displayed high preference for alpha2 adrenoceptors (1290- and 91-fold, respectively). Second, the compounds were tested for their ability to induce h5-HT1A receptor-mediated G-protein activation, as indicated by the stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding. All except atipamezole and RX 821,002 exhibited agonist activity, with potencies which correlated with their affinity for h5-HT1A receptors. Relative efficacies (Emax values) were 25-35% for guanabenz, guanfacine, WB 4101 and benalfocin, 50-65% for 1-PP, (+/-)-idazoxan and clonidine, and over 70% for fluparoxan, oxymetazoline and yohimbine (relative to 5-HT = 100%). Yohimbine-induced [35S]GTPgammaS binding was inhibited by the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100,635. In contrast, RX 821,002 was the only ligand which exhibited antagonist activity at h5-HT1A receptors, inhibiting 5-HT-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Atipamezole, which exhibited negligeable affinity for 5-HT1A receptors, was inactive. Third, the affinities for r alpha2A differed considerably from the affinities for h alpha2A receptors whereas the affinities for r5-HT1A differed much less from the affinities for h5-HT

  11. 4-(ALPHA, ALPHA-DIMETHYLBENZYL)PHENYL METHACRYLATE .3. SYNTHESIS, TACTICITY AND GLASS-TRANSITION TEMPERATURES OF ITS POLYMERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANEKENSTEIN, GORA; TAN, YY

    Depending on the kind of initiator, anionic Polymerization of 4-(alpha,alpha-dimethylbenzyl)phenyl methacrylate in toluene at -78-degrees-C led either to highly isotactic or predominantly syndiotactic polymers as determined by C-13 NMR spectro copy. The glass transition temperature difference

  12. Digital readout alpha survey instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, M.E.

    1976-01-01

    A prototype solid-state digital readout alpha particle survey instrument has been designed and constructed. The meter incorporates a Ludlum alpha scintillator as a detector, digital logic circuits for control and timing, and a Digilin counting module with reflective liquid crystal display. The device is used to monitor alpha radiation from a surface. Sample counts are totalized over 10-second intervals and displayed digitally in counts per minute up to 19,999. Tests over source samples with counts to 15,600 cpm have shown the device to be rapid, versatile and accurate. The instrument can be fabricated in one man-week and requires about $835 in material costs. A complete set of drawings is included

  13. A comparison of the ruggedized ZnS(Ag)/EPOXY and mylar-based alpha detectors for wastewater streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElhaney, S.A.; Salaymeh, S.R.; Moore, F.S.

    1992-01-01

    A low-level alpha radiation sensor has been designed and developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for monitoring process wastewater streams at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (SRS). This new Ruggedized Contamination Detector (RCD) is intended to replace the fragile, mylar-based scintillators and has improved sensitivity and reliability for detecting alpha contamination. The unique entrance window invented for this sensor has considerably less mass per unit area than conventional Mylar windows currently used in wastewater streams. The thin layer deposited between the radiation detection medium and potentially contaminated wastewater makes it much easier to detect short-range alpha particles. Compared to the conventional Mylar-based detectors, the new design allows for eight times the number of 238 U alphas to penetrate the entrance window and reach the scintillation material and eliminates the need for routine replacement of the Mylar entrance window

  14. Evidence that 17alpha-estradiol is biologically active in the uterine tissue: Antiuterotonic and antiuterotrophic action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarrete Erika

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 17alpha-Estradiol has been considered as the hormonally inactive isomer of 17beta-estradiol. Recently, nongenomic (smooth muscle relaxation and genomic (light estrogenic activity effects of 17alpha-estradiol have been reported, but no reports have yet determined its possible antiestrogenic activity. Therefore, this study investigated: the nongenomic action of 17alpha-estradiol on uterine contractile activity and its potential agonist-antagonist activity on uterine growth. Methods Uterine rings from rats were isometrically recorded. Different concentrations (0.2–200 microM of 17alpha-estradiol were tested on spontaneous contraction and equimolarly compared with 17beta-estradiol. To examine the mechanism of 17alpha-estradiol action, its effect was studied in presence of beta2-antagonist (propranolol, antiestrogens (tamoxifen and ICI 182,780 or inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide and transcription (actinomycin D. Moreover, contractions induced by high potassium (KCl solution or calcium in depolarized tissues by KCl-calcium free solution were exposed to 17alpha-estradiol. Collaterally, we performed an uterotrophic assay in adult ovariectomized rats measuring the uterine wet weight. The administration for three days of 0.3 microM/day/Kg 17beta-estradiol was equimolarly compared with the response produced by 17alpha-estradiol. Antiuterotrophic activity was assayed by administration of 0.3 microM/day/Kg 17beta-estradiol and various doses ratios (1:1, 1:3, 1:5, and 1:100 of 17alpha-estradiol. Results The estradiol isomers elicited an immediate relaxation, concentration-dependent and reversible on spontaneous contraction. 17alpha-Estradiol presented lower potency than 17beta-estradiol although it did not antagonize 17beta-estradiol-induced relaxation. Relaxation to 17alpha-estradiol was not inhibited by propranolol, tamoxifen, ICI 182,780, cycloheximide or actinomycin D. The KCl contractions were also sensitive to 17alpha

  15. QCD analyses and determinations of $\\alpha_{s}$ in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation at energies between 35 and 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeifenschneider, P.; Movilla Fernandez, P.A.; Abbiendi, G.; Ackerstaff, K.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.; Jade, The

    2000-01-01

    We employ data taken by the JADE and OPAL experiments for an integrated QCD study in hadronic e+e- annihilations at c.m.s. energies ranging from 35 GeV through 189 GeV. The study is based on jet-multiplicity related observables. The observables are obtained to high jet resolution scales with the JADE, Durham, Cambridge and cone jet finders, and compared with the predictions of various QCD and Monte Carlo models. The strong coupling strength, alpha_s, is determined at each energy by fits of O(alpha_s^2) calculations, as well as matched O(alpha_s^2) and NLLA predictions, to the data. Matching schemes are compared, and the dependence of the results on the choice of the renormalization scale is investigated. The combination of the results using matched predictions gives alpha_s(MZ)=0.1187+{0.0034}-{0.0019}. The strong coupling is also obtained, at lower precision, from O(alpha_s^2) fits of the c.m.s. energy evolution of some of the observables. A qualitative comparison is made between the data and a recent MLLA p...

  16. 6-Mercaptopurine, an activator of Nur77, enhances transcriptional activity of HIF-1alpha resulting in new vessel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y-G; Na, T-Y; Yang, W-K; Kim, H-J; Lee, I-K; Kong, G; Chung, J-H; Lee, M-O

    2007-05-31

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) plays a central role in oxygen homeostasis. Previously, we reported that the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 functions in stabilizing HIF-1alpha. Here, we demonstrate that 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), an activator of the NR4A family members, enhances transcriptional activity of HIF-1. 6-MP enhanced the protein-level of HIF-1alpha as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The induction of HIF-1alpha was abolished by the transfection of either a dominant-negative Nur77 mutant or si-Nur77, indicating a critical role of Nur77 in the 6-MP action. The HIF-1alpha protein level remained up to 60 min in the presence of 6-MP when de novo protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, suggesting that 6-MP induces stabilization of the HIF-1alpha protein. The fact that 6-MP decreased the association of HIF-1alpha with von Hippel-Lindau protein and the acetylation of HIF-1alpha, may explain how 6-MP induced stability of HIF-1alpha. Further, 6-MP induced the transactivation function of HIF-1alpha by recruiting co-activator cyclic-AMP-response-element-binding protein. Finally, 6-MP enhanced the expression of HIF-1alpha and VEGF, and the formation of capillary tubes in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Together, our results provide a new insight for 6-MP action in the stabilization of HIF-1alpha and imply a potential application of 6-MP in hypoxia-associated human vascular diseases.

  17. Silicon vertex detector upgrade in the ALPHA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M.D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Burrows, C; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C.L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M.C; Gill, D.R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J.S; Hardy, W.N; Hayden, M.E; Humphries, A.J; Isaac, C.A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J.T.K; Menary, S; Napoli, S.C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C.Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R.L; Sampson, J.A; Sarid, E; Seddon, D; Silveira, D.M; So, C; Stracka, S; Tharp, T; Thompson, R.I; Thornhill, J; Tooley, M.P; Van Der Werf, D.P; Wells, D

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is the main diagnostic tool in the ALPHA-experiment. It provides precise spatial and timing information of antiproton (antihydrogen) annihilation events (vertices), and most importantly, the SVD is capable of directly identifying and analysing single annihilation events, thereby forming the basis of ALPHA ' s analysis. This paper describes the ALPHA SVD and its upgrade, installed in the ALPHA ' s new neutral atom trap.

  18. Silicon vertex detector upgrade in the ALPHA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Laboratory, WA4 4AD Warrington (United Kingdom); Burrows, C. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2013-12-21

    The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is the main diagnostic tool in the ALPHA-experiment. It provides precise spatial and timing information of antiproton (antihydrogen) annihilation events (vertices), and most importantly, the SVD is capable of directly identifying and analysing single annihilation events, thereby forming the basis of ALPHA's analysis. This paper describes the ALPHA SVD and its upgrade, installed in the ALPHA's new neutral atom trap.

  19. An alpha-glucose-1-phosphate phosphodiesterase is present in rat liver cytosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srisomsap, C.; Richardson, K.L.; Jay, J.C.; Marchase, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucose-1-phosphotransferase (Glc-phosphotransferase) catalyzes the transfer of alpha-Glc-1-P from UDP-Glc to mannose residues on acceptor glycoproteins. The predominant acceptor for this transfer in both mammalian cells and Paramecium is a cytoplasmic glycoprotein of 62-63 kDa. When cytoplasmic proteins from rat liver were fractionated by preparative isoelectric focusing following incubation of a liver homogenate with the 35S-labeled phosphorothioate analogue of UDP-Glc ([beta-35S]UDP-Glc), the acceptor was found to have a pI of about 6.0. This fraction, when not labeled prior to the focusing, became very heavily labeled when mixed with [beta-35S]. UDP-Glc and intact liver microsomes, a rich source of the Glc-phosphotransferase. In addition, it was observed that the isoelectric fractions of the cytosol having pI values of 2-3.2 contained a degradative activity, alpha-Glc-1-P phosphodiesterase, that was capable of removing alpha-Glc-1-P, monitored through radioactive labeling both in the sugar and the phosphate, as an intact unit from the 62-kDa acceptor. Identification of the product of this cleavage was substantiated by its partial transformation to UDP-Glc in the presence of UTP and UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase. The alpha-Glc-1-P phosphodiesterase had a pH optimum of 7.5 and was not effectively inhibited by any of the potential biochemical inhibitors that were tested. Specificity for the Glc-alpha-1-P-6-Man diester was suggested by the diesterase's inability to degrade UDP-Glc or glucosylphosphoryldolichol. This enzyme may be important in the regulation of secretion since the alpha-Glc-1-P present on the 62-kDa phosphoglycoprotein appears to be removed and then rapidly replaced in response to secretagogue

  20. Improved synthesis with high yield and increased molecular weight of poly(alpha,beta-malic acid) by direct polycondensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiyama, Tetsuto; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Tanaka, Junzo

    2004-01-01

    The development of synthetic biodegradable polymers, such as poly(alpha-hydroxy acid), is particularly important for constructing medical devices, including scaffolds and sutures, and has attracted growing interest in the biomedical field. Here, we report a novel approach to preparing high molecular weight poly(malic acid) (HMW--PMA) as a biodegradable and bioabsorbable water-soluble polymer. We investigated in detail the reaction conditions for the simple direct polycondensation of l-malic acid, including the reaction times, temperatures, and catalysts. The molecular weight of synthesized alpha,beta-PMA is dependent on both the reaction temperature and time. The optimum reaction condition to obtain alpha,beta-PMA by direct polycondensation using tin(II) chloride as a catalyst was thus determined to be 110 degrees C for 45 h with a molecular weight of 5300. The method for alpha,beta-PMA synthesis established here will facilitate production of alpha,beta-PMA of various molecular weights, which may have a potential utility as biomaterials.

  1. Role of Human Na,K-ATPase alpha 4 in Sperm Function, Derived from Studies in Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Jeffrey; Sánchez, Gladis; Nangia, Ajay K.; Blanco, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Most of our knowledge on the biological role of the testis-specific Na,K-ATPase alpha 4 isoform derives from studies performed in non-human species. Here, we studied the function of human Na,K-ATPase alpha 4 after its expression in transgenic mice. Using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) construct, containing the human ATP1A4 gene locus, we obtained expression of the human α4 transgene specifically in mouse sperm, enriched in the sperm flagellum. The expressed, human alpha 4 was active, and compared to wild-type sperm, those from transgenic mice displayed higher Na,K-ATPase alpha 4 activity and greater binding of fluorescently labeled ouabain, which is typical of the alpha 4 isoform. The expression and activity of endogenous alpha 4 and the other Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform present in sperm, alpha 1, remained unchanged. Male mice expressing the human ATP1A4 transgene exhibited similar testis size and morphology, normal sperm number and shape, and no changes in overall fertility compared to wild-type mice. Sperm carrying the human transgene exhibited enhanced total motility and an increase in multiple parameters of sperm movement, including higher sperm hyperactive motility. In contrast, no statistically significant changes in sperm membrane potential, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, or spontaneous acrosome reaction were found between wild-type and transgenic mice. Altogether, these results provide new genetic evidence for an important role of human Na,K-ATPase alpha 4 in sperm motility and hyperactivation, and establishes a new animal model for future studies of this isoform. PMID:25640246

  2. Contribution to the study of the diffusion {alpha}-proton for {alpha} particles of 3,1 and 5,3 MeV; Contribution a l'etude de la diffusion {alpha}-proton pour des particules {alpha} d'energie comprise entre 3,1 et 5,3 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhla, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1953-07-01

    The diffusion of the particles has by the light cores that present a weak gate of potential, must permit the survey of the nuclear strengths. Some authors, studying the distribution in energy of the protons given out by a hydrogenated target submitted to a bombardment has variable energy, signal that this distribution has a structure of groups. We tried to reproduce experiences of diffusion {alpha}-proton, in order to verify the existence of the groups of signaled protons in the previous works. However in spite of finer experimental conditions, we had recovered any group structures in the distribution of the protons. This work permits to conclude that there is not a resonance in the {alpha}-proton diffusion for included energies between 3,1 and 5,3 MeV. The absence of resonances confirms the existence of the fundamental level of {sup 5}Li above in the neighborhood of 1,8 MeV {sup 4}He + {sup 1}H. (M.B.) [French] La diffusion des particules a par les noyaux legers qui presentent une faible barriere de potentiel, doit permettre l'etude des forces nucleaires. certains auteurs, etudiant la distribution en energie des protons emis par une cible hydrogenee soumise a un bombardement a d'energie variable, signalent que cette distribution a une structure de groupes. Nous avons essaye de reproduire les experiences du type diffusion {alpha}-proton, afin de verifier l'existence des groupes de protons signales dans les travaux anterieurs. Cependant malgre des conditions experimentales plus fines, nous n'avons retrouve aucunce structure de groupe dans la distribution des protons. Ce travail permet de conclure qu'il n'y a pas de resonance dans la diffusion {alpha}-proton pour des energies comprises entre 3,1 et 5,3 MeV. L'absence de resonances confirme l'existence du niveau fondamental de {sup 5}Li au voisinage de 1,8 MeV au-dessus de {sup 4}He + {sup 1}H. (M.B.)

  3. Increased 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity (5..cap alpha..-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5..cap alpha..-RA. In vitro 5..cap alpha..-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with /sup 14/C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5..cap alpha..-androstane 3..cap alpha..-17..beta..-estradiol (3..cap alpha..-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3..cap alpha..-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3..cap alpha..-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5..cap alpha..-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5..cap alpha..-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5..cap alpha..-RA.

  4. Skeletal dosimetry models for alpha-particles for use in molecular radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchman, Christopher J.

    Molecular radiotherapy is a cancer treatment methodology whereby a radionuclide is combined with a biologically active molecule to preferentially target cancer cells. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides show significant potential for use in molecular radiotherapy due to the short range of the alpha-particles in tissue and their high rates of energy deposition. Current radiation dosimetry models used to assess alpha emitter dose in the skeleton were developed originally for occupational applications. In medical dosimetry, individual variability in uptake, translocation and other biological factors can result in poor correlation of clinical outcome with marrow dose estimates determined using existing skeletal models. Methods presented in this work were developed in response to the need for dosimetry models which account for these biological and patient-specific factors. Dosimetry models are presented for trabecular bone alpha particle dosimetry as well as a model for cortical bone dosimetry. These radiation transport models are the 3D chord-based infinite spongiosa transport model (3D-CBIST) and the chord-based infinite cortical transport model (CBICT), respectively. Absorbed fraction data for several skeletal tissues for several subjects are presented. Each modeling strategy accounts for biological parameters, such as bone marrow cellularity, not previously incorporated into alpha-particle skeletal dosimetry models used in radiation protection. Using these data a study investigating the variability in alpha-particle absorbed fractions in the human skeleton is also presented. Data is also offered relating skeletal tissue masses in individual bone sites for a range of ages. These data are necessary for dose calculations and have previously only been available as whole body tissue masses. A revised 3D-CBIST model is also presented which allows for changes in endosteum thickness to account for revised target cell location of tissues involved in the radiological

  5. Alpha-mannosidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilssen Øivind

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alpha-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder characterized by immune deficiency, facial and skeletal abnormalities, hearing impairment, and intellectual disability. It occurs in approximately 1 of 500,000 live births. The children are often born apparently normal, and their condition worsens progressively. Some children are born with ankle equinus or develop hydrocephalus in the first year of life. Main features are immune deficiency (manifested by recurrent infections, especially in the first decade of life, skeletal abnormalities (mild-to-moderate dysostosis multiplex, scoliosis and deformation of the sternum, hearing impairment (moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss, gradual impairment of mental functions and speech, and often, periods of psychosis. Associated motor function disturbances include muscular weakness, joint abnormalities and ataxia. The facial trait include large head with prominent forehead, rounded eyebrows, flattened nasal bridge, macroglossia, widely spaced teeth, and prognathism. Slight strabismus is common. The clinical variability is significant, representing a continuum in severity. The disorder is caused by lysosomal alpha-mannosidase deficiency. Alpha-mannosidosis is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and is caused by mutations in the MAN2B1 gene located on chromosome 19 (19 p13.2-q12. Diagnosis is made by measuring acid alpha-mannosidase activity in leukocytes or other nucleated cells and can be confirmed by genetic testing. Elevated urinary secretion of mannose-rich oligosaccharides is suggestive, but not diagnostic. Differential diagnoses are mainly the other lysosomal storage diseases like the mucopolysaccharidoses. Genetic counseling should be given to explain the nature of the disease and to detect carriers. Antenatal diagnosis is possible, based on both biochemical and genetic methods. The management should be pro-active, preventing complications and treating

  6. alpha-Globin genes: thalassemic and structural alterations in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R.S.C. Wenning

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Seven unrelated patients with hemoglobin (Hb H disease and 27 individuals with alpha-chain structural alterations were studied to identify the alpha-globin gene mutations present in the population of Southeast Brazil. The -alpha3.7, --MED and -(alpha20.5 deletions were investigated by PCR, whereas non-deletional alpha-thalassemia (alphaHphalpha, alphaNcoIalpha, aaNcoI, alphaIcalpha and alphaTSaudialpha was screened with restriction enzymes and by nested PCR. Structural alterations were identified by direct DNA sequencing. Of the seven patients with Hb H disease, all of Italian descent, two had the -(alpha20.5/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/alphaHphalpha genotype and three showed interaction of the -alpha3.7 deletion with an unusual, unidentified form of non-deletional alpha-thalassemia [-alpha3.7/(aaT]. Among the 27 patients with structural alterations, 15 (of Italian descent had Hb Hasharon (alpha47Asp->His associated with the -alpha3.7 deletion, 4 (of Italian descent were heterozygous for Hb J-Rovigo (alpha53Ala->Asp, 4 (3 Blacks and 1 Caucasian were heterozygous for Hb Stanleyville-II (alpha78Asn->Lys associated with the alpha+-thalassemia, 1 (Black was heterozygous for Hb G-Pest (alpha74Asp->Asn, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Kurosaki (alpha7Lys->Glu, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Westmead (alpha122His->Gln, and 1 (Caucasian was the carrier of a novel silent variant (Hb Campinas, alpha26Ala->Val. Most of the mutations found reflected the Mediterranean and African origins of the population. Hbs G-Pest and Kurosaki, very rare, and Hb Westmead, common in southern China, were initially described in individuals of ethnic origin differing from those of the carriers reported in the present study and are the first cases to be reported in the Brazilian population.

  7. Endocytosis of GPI-linked membrane folate receptor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnboutt, S; Jansen, G; Posthuma, G; Hynes, J B; Schornagel, J H; Strous, G J

    1996-01-01

    GPI-linked membrane folate receptors (MFRs) have been implicated in the receptor-mediated uptake of reduced folate cofactors and folate-based chemotherapeutic drugs. We have studied the biosynthetic transport to and internalization of MFR isoform alpha in KB-cells. MFR-alpha was synthesized as a 32-kD protein and converted in a maturely glycosylated 36-38-kD protein 1 h after synthesis. 32-kD MFR-alpha was completely soluble in Triton X-100 at 0 degree C. In contrast, only 33% of the 36-38-kD species could be solubilized at these conditions whereas complete solubilization was obtained in Triton X-100 at 37 degrees C or in the presence of saponin at 0 degree C. Similar solubilization characteristics were found when MFR-alpha at the plasma membrane was labeled with a crosslinkable 125I-labeled photoaffinity-analog of folic acid as a ligand. Triton X-100-insoluble membrane domains containing MFR-alpha could be separated from soluble MFR-alpha on sucrose flotation gradients. Only Triton X-100 soluble MFR-alpha was internalized from the plasma membrane. The reduced-folate-carrier, an integral membrane protein capable of translocating (anti-)folates across membranes, was completely excluded from the Triton X-100-resistant membrane domains. Internalized MFR-alpha recycled slowly to the cell surface during which it remained soluble in Triton X-100 at 0 degree C. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found MFR-alpha along the entire endocytic pathway: in clathrin-coated buds and vesicles, and in small and large endosomal vacuoles. In conclusion, our data indicate that a large fraction, if not all, of internalizing MFR-alpha bypasses caveolae.

  8. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and “flow”—possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Petrovic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. Methods We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS. The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8, and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6 electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG, the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure, the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs. Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann–Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman’s correlation. Results We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency (αAVG in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered “alpha flow”, indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions

  9. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  10. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of {sup 241}Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  11. Localization of alpha emitters by damage production in a thin film. Application to the study of alpha emitter diffusion in irradiated samples; Localisation des emetteurs alpha par creation de dommages dans un film mince. Application a l'etude de la diffusion des emetteurs alpha dans des echantillons irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houdaille, B; Perrot, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The process of recording {alpha} particles on cellulose nitrate films, called alpha-graphy, is applied to the study of the diffusion of {alpha}-emitting elements in irradiated alloys. The existence of diffusion is shown by attacking the film with concentrated caustic soda after exposition. The insensitivity of the recorder to {beta} {gamma} radiation emitted by the sample after passing in the reactor makes it possible to operate with long exposure times and to detect small diffusions. The concentration-penetration curves are drawn up after carrying out a densitometric analysis of the alpha-graphies. - As the cellulose nitrate is affected only by {alpha} particles of energies of between 0.5 and 4 MeV, it was first necessary to determine the yield of the recorder for {alpha} particles emitted by a thick source, i.e. whose energy varies between 0 and E{sub 0}, E{sub 0} being the energy of the alpha emitter. - The concentration C of the {alpha}-emitter, as a function of the optical density D of the alpha-graphy, and of the exposure time t is given by a simple relationship: C = D/at where a is an experimental constant determined by calibration. It depends on the nature of the cellulose nitrate, of the {alpha}-emitting element and of the alloy studied. (authors) [French] Le procede d'enregistrement des particules alpha sur film de nitrate de cellulose, ou alphagraphie, est applique a l'etude de la diffusion d'elements emetteurs alpha dans des alliages irradies. La diffusion est mise en evidence par une attaque du film de nitrate, apres exposition, dans de la soude concentree. L'insensibilite de l'enregistreur au rayonnement {beta} {gamma}, emis par l'echantillon apres son sejour en pile, permet d'operer sur de longs temps de pose et de detecter des diffusions faibles. Les courbes concentration - penetration sont etablies par exploitation densitometrique des alphagraphies. - Comme le nitrate de cellulose n'est impressionne que par des particules alpha dont l'energie est

  12. Microwave-plasma interactions studied via mode diagnostics in ALPHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, T., E-mail: tim.friesen@cern.ch [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Andresen, G. B. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Bowe, P. D. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Butler, E. [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Chapman, S. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Fujiwara, M. C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayano, R. S. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Humphries, A. J. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    The goal of the ALPHA experiment is the production, trapping and spectroscopy of antihydrogen. A direct comparison of the ground state hyperfine spectra in hydrogen and antihydrogen has the potential to be a high-precision test of CPT symmetry. We present a novel method for measuring the strength of a microwave field for hyperfine spectroscopy in a Penning trap. This method incorporates a non-destructive plasma diagnostic system based on electrostatic modes within an electron plasma. We also show how this technique can be used to measure the cyclotron resonance of the electron plasma, which can potentially serve as a non-destructive measurement of plasma temperature.

  13. The regulatory mechanism of Hsp90{alpha} secretion from endothelial cells and its role in angiogenesis during wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiaomin [National Engineering Laboratory for Anti-tumor Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Yongzhang, E-mail: yluo@tsinghua.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Anti-tumor Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Growth factors such as bFGF, VEGF, PDGF and SDF-1 stimulate Hsp90{alpha} secretion from endothelial cells. {yields} Secreted Hsp90{alpha} localizes on the leading edge of activated endothelial cells. {yields} Secreted Hsp90{alpha} promotes angiogenesis in wound healing. -- Abstract: Heat shock protein 90{alpha} (Hsp90{alpha}) is a ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperone, which is essential for the maintenance of eukaryote homeostasis. Hsp90{alpha} can also be secreted extracellularly and is associated with several physiological and pathological processes including wound healing, cancer, infectious diseases and diabetes. Angiogenesis, defined as the sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing capillaries via endothelial cell proliferation and migration, commonly occurs in and contributes to the above mentioned processes. However, the secretion of Hsp90{alpha} from endothelial cells and also its function in angiogenesis are still unclear. Here we investigated the role of extracellular Hsp90{alpha} in angiogenesis using dermal endothelial cells in vitro and a wound healing model in vivo. We find that the secretion of Hsp90{alpha} but not Hsp90{beta} is increased in activated endothelial cells with the induction of angiogenic factors and matrix proteins. Secreted Hsp90{alpha} localizes on the leading edge of endothelial cells and promotes their angiogenic activities, whereas Hsp90{alpha} neutralizing antibodies reverse the effect. Furthermore, using a mouse skin wound healing model in vivo, we demonstrate that extracellular Hsp90{alpha} localizes on blood vessels in granulation tissues of wounded skin and promotes angiogenesis during wound healing. Taken together, our study reveals that Hsp90{alpha} can be secreted by activated endothelial cells and is a positive regulator of angiogenesis, suggesting the potential application of Hsp90{alpha} as a stimulator for wound repair.

  14. About the reactions sup 3 H(alpha,gamma) sup 7 Li and sup 3 He(alpha,gamma) sup 7 Be

    CERN Document Server

    Loeffler, W

    1993-01-01

    In this article the current experimental and theoretical status of the radiative alpha capture reactions sup 3 H(alpha,gamma) sup 7 Li and sup 3 He(alpha,gamma) sup 7 Be and their relations to primordial nucleosynthesis and the solar neutrino problem are reviewed. (author)

  15. Alpha oscillations and early stages of visual encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eKlimesch

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available For a long time alpha oscillations have been functionally linked to the processing of visual information. Here we propose an new theory about the functional meaning of alpha. The central idea is that synchronized alpha reflects a basic processing mode that controls access to information stored in a complex long-term memory system, which we term knowledge system (KS in order to emphasize that it comprises not only declarative memories but any kind of knowledge comprising also procedural information. Based on this theoretical background, we assume that during early stages of perception, alpha ‘directs the flow of information’ to those neural structures which represent information that is relevant for encoding. The physiological function of alpha is interpreted in terms of inhibition. We assume that alpha enables access to stored information by inhibiting task irrelevant neuronal structures and by timing cortical activity in task relevant neuronal structures. We discuss a variety findings showing that evoked alpha and phase locking reflect successful encoding of global stimulus features in an early poststimulus interval of about 0 - 150 ms.

  16. Partitioning diversity into independent alpha and beta components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Lou

    2007-10-01

    Existing general definitions of beta diversity often produce a beta with a hidden dependence on alpha. Such a beta cannot be used to compare regions that differ in alpha diversity. To avoid misinterpretation, existing definitions of alpha and beta must be replaced by a definition that partitions diversity into independent alpha and beta components. Such a unique definition is derived here. When these new alpha and beta components are transformed into their numbers equivalents (effective numbers of elements), Whittaker's multiplicative law (alpha x beta = gamma) is necessarily true for all indices. The new beta gives the effective number of distinct communities. The most popular similarity and overlap measures of ecology (Jaccard, Sorensen, Horn, and Morisita-Horn indices) are monotonic transformations of the new beta diversity. Shannon measures follow deductively from this formalism and do not need to be borrowed from information theory; they are shown to be the only standard diversity measures which can be decomposed into meaningful independent alpha and beta components when community weights are unequal.

  17. Alpha-tocopheryl phosphate: a novel, natural form of vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianello, Robert; Libinaki, Roksan; Azzi, Angelo; Gavin, Paul D; Negis, Yesim; Zingg, Jean-Marc; Holt, Phillip; Keah, Hooi-Hong; Griffey, Annike; Smallridge, Andrew; West, Simon M; Ogru, Esra

    2005-10-01

    We have detected alpha-tocopheryl phosphate in biological tissues including liver and adipose tissue, as well as in a variety of foods, suggesting a ubiquitous presence in animal and plant tissue. Alpha-tocopheryl phosphate is a water-soluble molecule that is resistant to both acid and alkaline hydrolysis, making it undetectable using standard assays for vitamin E. A new method was therefore developed to allow the extraction of both alpha-tocopheryl phosphate and alpha-tocopherol from a single specimen. We used ESMS to detect endogenous alpha-tocopheryl phosphate in biological samples that also contained alpha-tocopherol. Due to the significance of these findings, further proof was required to unequivocally demonstrate the presence of endogenous alpha-tocopheryl phosphate in biological samples. Four independent methods of analysis were examined: HPLC, LCMS, LCMS/MS, and GCMS. Alpha-tocopherol phosphate was identified in all instances by comparison between standard alpha-tocopheryl phosphate and extracts of biological tissues. The results show that alpha-tocopheryl phosphate is a natural form of vitamin E. The discovery of endogenous alpha-tocopheryl phosphate has implications for the expanding knowledge of the roles of alpha-tocopherol in biological systems.

  18. Secondary reduction of alpha7B integrin in laminin alpha2 deficient congenital muscular dystrophy supports an additional transmembrane link in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, R D; Mayer, U; Saher, G; Herrmann, R; van der Flier, A; Sonnenberg, A; Sorokin, L; Voit, T

    1999-03-01

    The integrins are a large family of heterodimeric transmembrane cellular receptors which mediate the association between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cytoskeletal proteins. The alpha7beta1 integrin is a major laminin binding integrin in skeletal and cardiac muscle and is thought to be involved in myogenic differentiation and migration processes. The main binding partners of the alpha7 integrin are laminin-1 (alpha1-beta1-gamma1), laminin-2 (alpha2-beta1-gamma1) and laminin-4 (alpha2-beta2-gamma1). Targeted deletion of the gene for the alpha7 integrin subunit (ITGA7) in mice leads to a novel form of muscular dystrophy. In the present study we have investigated the expression of two alternative splice variants, the alpha7B and beta1D integrin subunits, in normal human skeletal muscle, as well as in various forms of muscular dystrophy. In normal human skeletal muscle the expression of the alpha7 integrin subunit appeared to be developmentally regulated: it was first detected at 2 years of age. In contrast, the beta1D integrin could be detected in immature and mature muscle in the sarcolemma of normal fetal skeletal muscle at 18 weeks gestation. The expression of alpha7B integrin was significantly reduced at the sarcolemma in six patients with laminin alpha2 chain deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) (age >2 years). However, this reduction was not correlated with the amount of laminin alpha2 chain expressed. In contrast, the expression of the laminin alpha2 chain was not altered in the skeletal muscle of the alpha7 knock-out mice. These data argue in favor that there is not a tight correlation between the expression of the alpha7 integrin subunit and that of the laminin alpha2 chain in either human or murine dystrophic muscle. Interestingly, in dystrophinopathies (Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy; DMD/BMD) expression of alpha7B was upregulated irrespective of the level of dystrophin expression as shown by a strong sarcolemmal staining pattern even

  19. NEW APPROACHES TO CONFINED ALPHA DIAGNOSTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISHER,R.K

    2004-04-01

    Three new approaches to obtain information on the confined fast alphas in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are proposed. The first technique measures the energetic charge exchange (CX) neutrals that result from the alpha collision-induced knock-on fuel ion tails undergoing electron capture on the MeV D neutral beams planned for heating and current drive. The second technique measures the energetic knock-on neutron tail due to alphas using the lengths of the proton recoil tracks produced by neutron collisions in nuclear emulsions. The range of the 14 to 20 MeV recoil protons increases by {approx}140 microns per MeV. The third approach would measure the CX helium neutrals resulting from confined alphas capturing two electrons in the ablation cloud surrounding a dense gas jet that has been proposed for disruption mitigation in ITER.

  20. NEW APPROACHES TO CONFINED ALPHA DIAGNOSTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISHER, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    Three new approaches to obtain information on the confined fast alphas in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are proposed. The first technique measures the energetic charge exchange (CX) neutrals that result from the alpha collision-induced knock-on fuel ion tails undergoing electron capture on the MeV D neutral beams planned for heating and current drive. The second technique measures the energetic knock-on neutron tail due to alphas using the lengths of the proton recoil tracks produced by neutron collisions in nuclear emulsions. The range of the 14 to 20 MeV recoil protons increases by ∼140 microns per MeV. The third approach would measure the CX helium neutrals resulting from confined alphas capturing two electrons in the ablation cloud surrounding a dense gas jet that has been proposed for disruption mitigation in ITER

  1. Patterns of alpha, beta and gamma diversity of the herpetofauna in Mexico’s Pacific lowlands and adjacent interior valleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The latitudinal distribution patterns of alpha, beta and gamma diversity of reptiles, amphibians and herpetofauna were analyzed using individual binary models of potential distribution for 301 species predicted by ecological modelling for a grid of 9,932 quadrants of ~25 km2 each. We arranged quadrants in 312 latitudinal bands in which alpha, beta and gamma values were determined. Latitudinal trends of all scales of diversity were similar in all groups. Alpha and gamma responded inversely to latitude whereas beta showed a high latitudinal fluctuation due to the high number of endemic species. Alpha and gamma showed a strong correlation in all groups. Beta diversity is an important component of the herpetofauna distribution patterns as a continuous source of species diversity throughout the region.

  2. Requirement of radiochemical recovery determination for gross alpha and gross beta estimation in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveendran, Nanda; Rao, D.D.; Hegde, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Presence of radionuclides in drinking water which emits Alpha and Beta particles are the potential sources of internal exposure in drinking water. Gross alpha and gross beta determination in drinking water and packaged drinking water (PDW) as per BIS (Bureau of Indian standards) standards is discussed here. The methods have been tested to account for losses in the radiochemical procedures using radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 239 Pu, 243 Am, 232 U. The methods have also been validated in an IAEA proficiency test conducted during 2009. Monitoring of gross alpha and gross beta activity observed in drinking water/packaged drinking water from various states of India were within the limits set by BIS. Average radiochemical recoveries of 84% and 63% were obtained for gross α and gross β respectively. (author)

  3. Electrodeposition of Zn-doped {alpha}-nickel hydroxide with flower-like nanostructure for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You Zheng [Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen Kui; Wu Zhicheng [Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang Xiaofeng [Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kong Xianghua, E-mail: kongxh@ustb.edu.cn [Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Zn-doped {alpha}-nickel hydroxide materials with flower-like nanostructures are synthesized by electrochemical deposition method. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electrochemical measurements. XRD spectra indicate nickel hydroxide doped with Zn is {alpha}-Ni(OH){sub 2} with excellent crystallization. The SEM observation shows that the formation of Zn-doped Ni(OH){sub 2} includes two steps: a honeycomb-like film forms on the substrate first, then flower-like particles forms on the films. The nickel hydroxide doped with 5% Zn can maintain a maximum specific capacitance of 860 F g{sup -1}, suggesting its potential application in electrochemical capacitors.

  4. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism

  5. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B. (Univ. of Missouri-Columbia (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism.

  6. Enhanced Noradrenergic Activity Potentiates Fear Memory Consolidation and Reconsolidation by Differentially Recruiting alpha1- and beta-Adrenergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazarini, Lucas; Stern, Cristina A. Jark; Carobrez, Antonio P.; Bertoglio, Leandro J.

    2013-01-01

    Consolidation and reconsolidation are phases of memory stabilization that diverge slightly. Noradrenaline is known to influence both processes, but the relative contribution of alpha1- and beta-adrenoceptors is unclear. The present study sought to investigate this matter by comparing their recruitment to consolidate and/or reconsolidate a…

  7. Variable displacement alpha-type Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homutescu, V. M.; Bălănescu, D. T.; Panaite, C. E.; Atanasiu, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    The basic design and construction of an alpha-type Stirling engine with on load variable displacement is presented. The variable displacement is obtained through a planar quadrilateral linkage with one on load movable ground link. The physico-mathematical model used for analyzing the variable displacement alpha-type Stirling engine behavior is an isothermal model that takes into account the real movement of the pistons. Performances and power adjustment capabilities of such alpha-type Stirling engine are calculated and analyzed. An exemplification through the use of the numerical simulation was performed in this regard.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of the alpha-amylolysis of amylopectin potato starch. 2. alpha-amylolysis of amylopectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchal, L.M.; Ulijn, R.V.; Gooijer, de C.D.; Franke, G.T.; Tramper, J.

    2003-01-01

    A model is presented that describes all the saccharides that are produced during the hydrolysis of starch by an alpha-amylase. Potato amylopectin, the substrate of the hydrolysis reaction, was modeled in a computer matrix. The four different subsite maps presented in literature for alpha-amylase

  9. Predictability of depression severity based on posterior alpha oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Popov, T; Jylänki, P; Bi, K; Yao, Z; Lu, Q; Jensen, O; van Gerven, M A J

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to integrate neural data and an advanced machine learning technique to predict individual major depressive disorder (MDD) patient severity. MEG data was acquired from 22 MDD patients and 22 healthy controls (HC) resting awake with eyes closed. Individual power spectra were calculated by a Fourier transform. Sources were reconstructed via beamforming technique. Bayesian linear regression was applied to predict depression severity based on the spatial distribution of oscillatory power. In MDD patients, decreased theta (4-8 Hz) and alpha (8-14 Hz) power was observed in fronto-central and posterior areas respectively, whereas increased beta (14-30 Hz) power was observed in fronto-central regions. In particular, posterior alpha power was negatively related to depression severity. The Bayesian linear regression model showed significant depression severity prediction performance based on the spatial distribution of both alpha (r=0.68, p=0.0005) and beta power (r=0.56, p=0.007) respectively. Our findings point to a specific alteration of oscillatory brain activity in MDD patients during rest as characterized from MEG data in terms of spectral and spatial distribution. The proposed model yielded a quantitative and objective estimation for the depression severity, which in turn has a potential for diagnosis and monitoring of the recovery process. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinic