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Sample records for alpha positive mammary

  1. Proliferation of Estrogen Receptor alpha Positive Mammary Epithelial Cells is Restrained by TGFbeta1 in Adult Mice

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    Ewan, Kenneth B.R.; Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Shyamala, G.; Moses, Harold L.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2005-03-03

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) is a potent inhibitor of mammary epithelial proliferation. In human breast, estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) cells rarely co-localize with markers of proliferation, but their increased frequency correlates with breast cancer risk. To determine whether TGF{beta}1 is necessary for the quiescence of ER{alpha}-positive population, we examined mouse mammary epithelial gland at estrus. Approximately 35% of cells showed TGF{beta}1 activation, which co-localized with nuclear receptor-phosphorylated Smad 2/3, indicating that TGF{beta} signaling is autocrine. Furthermore, nuclear Smad co-localized with nuclear ER{alpha}. To test whether TGF{beta} was functional, we examined genetically engineered mice with different levels of TGF{beta}1. ER{alpha} co-localization with markers of proliferation (i.e. Ki-67 or BrdU) at estrus was significantly increased in the mammary glands of Tgf{beta}1 C57/bl/129SV heterozygote mice. This relationship was maintained following pregnancy, but was absent at puberty. Conversely, mammary epithelial expression of constitutively active TGF{beta}1 via the MMTV promoter suppressed proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells. Thus, TGF{beta}1 activation functionally restrains ER{alpha} positive cells from proliferating in adult mammary gland. Accordingly, we propose that TGF{beta}1 dysregulation may promote proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells associated with breast cancer risk in humans.

  2. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

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    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  3. Chemoprevention of mammary carcinogenesis by 1{alpha}-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 5}, a synthetic analog of Vitamin D

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    Mehta, Rajendra G.; Hussain, Erum A.; Mehta, Rajeshwari R.; Das Gupta, Tapas K

    2003-03-01

    Numerous analogs of Vitamin D have been synthesized in recent years with the hope of generating a compound that retains the anticarcinogenic activity of Vitamin D without causing any toxicity. We synthesized such an analog, 1{alpha}-hydroxy-24-ethylcholecalciferol [1{alpha}-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 5} or 1{alpha}(OH)D{sub 5}], and showed that it was tolerated by rats and mice at a much higher dose than 1{alpha},25 dihydroxy cholecalciferol [1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}]. This property makes it a prime candidate for chemoprevention studies. In the mouse mammary gland organ culture (MMOC), 1{alpha}(OH)D{sub 5} inhibited carcinogen-induced development of both mammary alveolar and ductal lesions. In vivo carcinogenesis study showed statistically significant reduction of tumor incidence and multiplicity in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-treated rats that were fed 25-50 {mu}g 1{alpha}(OH)D{sub 5}/kg diet. There were no adverse effects on plasma calcium concentrations. In order to determine if the effect of 1{alpha}(OH)D{sub 5} would be selective in suppressing proliferation of transformed cells, its effects on cell growth and proliferation were compared between BT474 (cancer) and MCF12F (non-tumorigenic) human breast epithelial cells. Results showed that 1{alpha}(OH)D{sub 5} induced apoptosis and cell cycle G1 phase arrest in BT474 breast cancer cells without having any effects on proliferation of the MCF12F cells. In addition, in MMOC it had no growth inhibitory effects on normal epithelial cell proliferation in the absence of carcinogen. Similarly, non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells in explant culture did not respond to 1{alpha}(OH)D{sub 5}, whereas treatment with 1{alpha}(OH)D{sub 5} induced cell death in the explants of cancer tissue. These results collectively indicate that 1{alpha}(OH)D{sub 5} selectively induced apoptosis only in transformed cells but not in normal breast epithelial cells. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory effects of 1{alpha}(OH)D{sub 5

  4. Myoepithelial cell contraction and milk ejection are impaired in mammary glands of mice lacking smooth muscle alpha-actin.

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    Haaksma, Carol J; Schwartz, Robert J; Tomasek, James J

    2011-07-01

    Mammary myoepithelial cells are specialized smooth musclelike epithelial cells that express the smooth muscle actin isoform: smooth muscle alpha-actin (ACTA2). These cells contract in response to oxytocin to generate the contractile force required for milk ejection during lactation. It is believed that ACTA2 contributes to myoepithelial contractile force generation; however, this hypothesis has not been directly tested. To evaluate the contribution of ACTA2 to mammary myoepithelial cell contraction, Acta2 null mice were utilized and milk ejection and myoepithelial cell contractile force generation were evaluated. Pups suckling on Acta2 null dams had a significant reduction in weight gain starting immediately postbirth. Cross-fostering demonstrated the lactation defect is with the Acta2 null dams. Carmine alum whole mounts and conventional histology revealed no underlying structural defects in Acta2 null mammary glands that could account for the lactation defect. In addition, myoepithelial cell formation and organization appeared normal in Acta2 null lactating mammary glands as evaluated using an Acta2 promoter-GFP transgene or phalloidin staining to visualize myoepithelial cells. However, mammary myoepithelial cell contraction in response to oxytocin was significantly reduced in isolated Acta2 null lactating mammary glands and in in vivo studies using Acta2 null lactating dams. These results demonstrate that lack of ACTA2 expression impairs mammary myoepithelial cell contraction and milk ejection and suggests that ACTA2 expression in mammary myoepithelial cells has the functional consequence of enhancing contractile force generation required for milk ejection.

  5. The MAPKERK-1,2 pathway integrates distinct and antagonistic signals from TGF alpha and FGF7 in morphogenesis of mouse mammary epithelium

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    Fata, Jimmie E; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ewald, Andrew J; Zhang, Hui; Yao, Evelyn; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    2006-10-03

    Transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF7) exhibit distinct expression patterns in the mammary gland. Both factors signal through mitogen-activated kinase/extracellular regulated kinase-1,2 (MAPK{sup ERK1,2}); however, their unique and/or combined contributions to mammary morphogenesis have not been examined. In ex vivo mammary explants, we show that a sustained activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} for 1 h, induced by TGF{alpha}, was necessary and sufficient to initiate branching morphogenesis, whereas a transient activation (15 min) of MAPK{sup ERK1,2}, induced by FGF7, led to growth without branching. Unlike TGF{alpha}, FGF7 promoted sustained proliferation as well as ectopic localization of, and increase in, keratin-6 expressing cells. The response of the explants to FGF10 was similar to that to FGF7. Simultaneous stimulation by FGF7 and TGF{alpha} indicated that the FGF7-induced MAPK{sup ERK1,2} signaling and associated phenotypes were dominant: FGF7 may prevent branching by suppression of two necessary TGF{alpha}-induced morphogenetic effectors, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3/stromelysin-1), and fibronectin. Our findings indicate that expression of morphogenetic effectors, proliferation, and cell-type decisions during mammary organoid morphogenesis are intimately dependent on the duration of activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} activation.

  6. Alpha-ketoglutarate enhances milk protein synthesis by porcine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qian; He, Liuqin; Hou, Yongqing; Chen, Jiashun; Duan, Yehui; Deng, Dun; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong; Yao, Kang

    2016-09-01

    Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG), a key intermediate in the Krebs cycle, has been reported to promote protein synthesis through activating mechanistic targeting of rapamycin (mTOR) in enterocytes. The study tested the hypothesis that AKG may enhance growth and milk protein synthesis in porcine mammary epithelial cells (PMECs). PMECs were cultured for 96 h in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's-F12 Ham medium (DMEM-F12) containing prolactin (2 µg/ml) and AKG (0 or 1.5 mM). At the end of 96-h culture, the abundance of apoptosis-related proteins (caspase-3, caspase-9), milk-specific proteins (α-lactalbumin and β-casein), mTOR signaling proteins (mTOR, p-mTOR, PERK, p-PERK, eIF2a, P70S6K and p-P70S6K), and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-associated proteins (BiP and CHOP) in PMEC were determined. Addition of AKG dose-dependently enhanced cell viability in the absence or presence of prolactin, with optimal concentrations of AKG being at 1.0 and 1.5 mM, respectively. In the presence of prolactin, addition of 1.5 mM AKG: (1) decreased (P < 0.05) the abundance of caspase-3 and caspase-9 by 21 and 39 %; (2) enhanced (P < 0.05) the phosphorylation of p-mTOR and p-P70S6K by 39 and 89 %, respectively; (3) increased (P < 0.05) the production of β-casein and α-lactalbumin by 16 and 20 %, respectively; (4) attenuated (P < 0.05) the expression of CHOP by 34 % but promoted (P < 0.05) the expression of BiP by 46 %; (5) increased (P < 0.05) the secretion of lactose by 15 %, when compared to the 0 mM AKG group. Rapamycin (50 nM; an inhibitor of mTOR) attenuated (P < 0.05) the stimulatory effect of AKG on mTOR signaling and syntheses of milk protein and lactose, while relieving (P < 0.05) an inhibitory effect of AKG on expression of proteins related to ERS. Collectively, our results indicate that AKG enhances milk protein production by modulating mTOR and ERS signaling pathways in PMECs.

  7. Transforming growth factor-alpha abrogates glucocorticoid-stimulated tight junction formation and growth suppression in rat mammary epithelial tumor cells.

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    Buse, P; Woo, P L; Alexander, D B; Cha, H H; Reza, A; Sirota, N D; Firestone, G L

    1995-03-24

    The glucocorticoid and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) regulation of growth and cell-cell contact was investigated in the Con8 mammary epithelial tumor cell line derived from a 7,12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene-induced rat mammary adenocarcinoma. In Con8 cell monolayers cultured on permeable filter supports, the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, coordinately suppressed [3H]thymidine incorporation, stimulated monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and decreased the paracellular leakage of [3H]inulin or [14C]mannitol across the monolayer. These processes dose dependently correlated with glucocorticoid receptor occupancy and function. Constitutive production of TGF-alpha in transfected cells or exogenous treatment with TGF-alpha prevented the glucocorticoid growth suppression response and disrupted tight junction formation without affecting glucocorticoid responsiveness. Treatment with hydroxyurea or araC demonstrated that de novo DNA synthesis is not a requirement for the growth factor disruption of tight junctions. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the ZO-1 tight junction protein is localized exclusively at the cell periphery in dexamethasone-treated cells and that TGF-alpha caused-ZO-1 to relocalize from the cell periphery back to a cytoplasmic compartment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids can coordinately regulate growth inhibition and cell-cell contact of mammary tumor cells and that TGF-alpha, can override both effects of glucocorticoids. These results have uncovered a novel functional "cross-talk" between glucocorticoids and TGF-alpha which potentially regulates the proliferation and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells.

  8. Mammary phenotypic expression induced in epidermal cells by embryonic mammary mesenchyme.

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    Cunha, G R; Young, P; Christov, K; Guzman, R; Nandi, S; Talamantes, F; Thordarson, G

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research was to establish methods for inducing mammary epithelial differentiation from nonmammary epithelium. For this purpose, mid-ventral or dorsal epidermis (skin epithelium; SKE) from 13-day rat or mouse embryos was associated with 13-day embryonic mouse mammary mesenchyme (mammary gland mesenchyme; MGM) (mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE). The resultant MGM+SKE recombinants as well as controls (homotypic mouse mammary recombinants, homotypic mouse skin recombinants and mouse mammary mesenchyme by itself) were grafted under the renal capsule of syngeneic or athymic female nude mouse hosts. Most female hosts were induced to undergo lactogenesis by grafting an adult pituitary which elicited a state of hyperprolactinemia. Tissue recombinants of mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE grown for 1 month in vivo formed a hair-bearing keratinized skin from which mammary ductal structures extended into the mesenchyme. The ducts were composed of columnar luminal epithelial cells as well as basal, actin-positive myoepithelial cells. When grown in pituitary-grafted hosts, the ductal epithelial cells expressed casein and alpha-lactalbumin as judged by immunocytochemistry. The expression of caseins in MGM+SKE recombinants was confirmed by Western blot. The epithelial cells in mouse MGM+rat SKE recombinants expressing milk proteins were shown to be rat cells while the surrounding connective tissue was composed of mouse cells based upon staining with Hoechst dye 33258. Using mammary-specific markers, these studies confirmed the earlier morphological studies of Propper and unequivocally demonstrated for the first time that embryonic mammary mesenchyme can induce morphological and functional mammary differentiation from nonmammary epithelium.

  9. DBCG-IMN: A Population-Based Cohort Study on the Effect of Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Early Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Lise Bech Jellesmark; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Danø, Hella;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is unknown whether irradiation of the internal mammary lymph nodes improves survival in patients with early-stage breast cancer. A possible survival benefit might be offset by radiation-induced heart disease. We assessed the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) in patients...... pronounced in patients at high risk of internal mammary node metastasis. Equal numbers in each group died of ischemic heart disease. CONCLUSION: In this naturally allocated, population-based cohort study, IMNI increased overall survival in patients with early-stage node-positive breast cancer....... with early-stage node-positive breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this nationwide, prospective population-based cohort study, we included patients who underwent operation for unilateral early-stage node-positive breast cancer. Patients with right-sided disease were allocated to IMNI, whereas patients...

  10. CD10 positive recurrent undifferentiated mammary sarcoma in a young female: a rare case report with brief review of literature

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    Kachnar Varma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Undifferentiated mammary sarcoma is extremely rare and the diagnosis is made only after exclusion of metaplastic carcinomas and malignant phyllodes tumor. Mammary sarcomas mostly display specified entities like liposarcomas or angiosarcomas. A 18-year-old female presented in 2010 with a right breast lump for which lumpectomy was done and on histopathological examination benign phyllodes tumor was diagnosed. In 2011, there was a recurrence at site of excised margin and on fine needle aspiration (FNA the diagnosis of benign breast disease was made; a small biopsy was received for which diagnosis of myoepithelial lesion was given. Then, the whole mass was excised, but histopathological examination report could not be followed up. In 2013, she again presented with a mass arising from the previously excised margin; on FNA, it was diagnosed as malignant sarcomatous lesion. Microscopy showed spindle shaped cells in diffuse and fascicular pattern with plump ovoid nuclei; coarse chromatin and eosinophilic cytoplasm were seen. Few round to ovoid cells with eccentric nuclei and showing bi- or multi-nucleation were present. Large area of necrosis and hemorrhage was present, too. No breast glands were found. Later on, diagnosis was confirmed on immunohistochemical examination. The case was considered worth due to the young age of the patient and lack of differentiation of the lesion in any specific type of sarcoma and CD10 positivity.

  11. ROLES OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF-A) IN MEDIATION OF DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED DELAYS IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

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    Roles of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Transforming Growth Factor-alpha (TGF-a) in Mediation of Dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Delays in Development of the Mouse Mammary Gland.Suzanne E. Fenton, Barbara Abbott, Lamont Bryant, and Angela Buckalew. U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Tox...

  12. Autocrine regulation of cell proliferation by estrogen receptor-alpha in estrogen receptor-alpha-positive breast cancer cell lines

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    Pan Zhongzong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen receptor-α (ERα is essential for mammary gland development and is a major oncogene in breast cancer. Since ERα is not colocalized with the cell proliferation marker Ki-67 in the normal mammary glands and the majority of primary breast tumors, it is generally believed that paracrine regulation is involved in ERα mediated cell proliferation. In the paracrine model, ERα-positive cells don't proliferate but will release some paracrine growth factors to stimulate the neighboring cells to proliferate. In a subpopulation of cancer cells in some primary breast tumors, however, ERα does colocalize with the cell proliferation marker Ki-67, suggesting an autocrine regulation by ERα in some primary breast tumors. Methods Colocalization of ERα with Ki-67 in ERα-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and ZR75-1 was evaluated by immunofluorescent staining. Cell cycle phase dependent expression of ERα was determined by co-immunofluorescent staining of ERα and the major cyclins (D, E, A, B, and by flow cytometry analysis of ERαhigh cells. To further confirm the autocrine action of ERα, MCF-7 cells were growth arrested by ICI182780 treatment, followed by treatment with EGFR inhibitor, before estrogen stimulation and analyses for colocalization of Ki-67 and ERα and cell cycle progression. Results Colocalization of ERα with Ki-67 was present in all three ERα-positive breast cancer cell lines. Unlike that in the normal mammary glands and the majority of primary breast tumors, ERα is highly expressed throughout the cell cycle in MCF-7 cells. Without E2 stimulation, MCF-7 cells released from ICI182780 treatment remain at G1 phase. E2 stimulation of ICI182780 treated cells, however, promotes the expression and colocalization of ERα and Ki-67 as well as the cell cycle progressing through the S and G2/M phases. Inhibition of EGFR signaling does not inhibit the autocrine action of ERα. Conclusion Our data indicate

  13. Physiological levels of Pik3ca(H1047R) mutation in the mouse mammary gland results in ductal hyperplasia and formation of ERα-positive tumors.

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    Tikoo, Anjali; Roh, Vincent; Montgomery, Karen G; Ivetac, Ivan; Waring, Paul; Pelzer, Rebecca; Hare, Lauren; Shackleton, Mark; Humbert, Patrick; Phillips, Wayne A

    2012-01-01

    PIK3CA, the gene coding for the p110α subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, is frequently mutated in a variety of human tumors including breast cancers. To better understand the role of mutant PIK3CA in the initiation and/or progression of breast cancer, we have generated mice with a conditional knock-in of the common activating mutation, Pik3ca(H1047R), into one allele of the endogenous gene in the mammary gland. These mice developed a ductal anaplasia and hyperplasia by 6 weeks of age characterized by multi-layering of the epithelial lining of the mammary ducts and expansion of the luminal progenitor (Lin(-); CD29(lo); CD24(+); CD61(+)) cell population. The Pik3ca(H1047R) expressing mice eventually develop mammary tumors with 100% penetrance but with a long latency (>12 months). This is significantly longer than has been reported for transgenic models where expression of the mutant Pik3ca is driven by an exogenous promoter. Histological analysis of the tumors formed revealed predominantly ERα-positive fibroadenomas, carcinosarcomas and sarcomas. In vitro induction of Pik3ca(H1047R) in immortalized mammary epithelial cells also resulted in tumor formation when injected into the mammary fat pad of immunodeficient recipient mice. This novel model, which reproduces the scenario of a heterozygous somatic mutation occurring in the endogenous PIK3CA gene, will thus be a valuable tool for investigating the role of Pik3ca(H1047R) mutation in mammary tumorigenesis both in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Development of an optical lens based alpha-particle imaging system using position sensitive photomultiplier tube

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    Ando, Koki; Oka, Miki; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2017-02-01

    We developed an optical lens based alpha-particle imaging system using position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The alpha-particle imaging system consists of an optical lens, an extension tube and a 1 in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) type PSPMT. After a ZnS(Ag) is attached to subject, the scintillation image of ZnS(Ag) is focused on the photocathode of the PSPMT by the use of the optical lens. With this configuration we could image the alpha particle distribution with energy information without contacting to the subject. The spatial resolution and energy resolution were 0.8 mm FWHM and 50% FWHM at 5 mm from the optical lens, respectively. We could successfully image the alpha particle distribution in uranium ore. The developed alpha-particle imaging system will be a new tool for imaging alpha emitters with energy information without contacting the subject.

  15. Expression of POEM, a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation, is suppressed by TNF-{alpha}

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    Tsukasaki, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Yamada, Atsushi, E-mail: yamadaa@dent.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, Dai [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Aizawa, Ryo [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Miyazono, Agasa [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Miyamoto, Yoichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Morimura, Naoko [Laboratory for Comparative Neurogenesis, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Matsuo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Kamijo, Ryutaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM gene expression. {yields} Inhibition of POEM gene expression is caused by NF-{kappa}B activation by TNF-{alpha}. {yields} Over-expression of POEM recovers inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: POEM, also known as nephronectin, is an extracellular matrix protein considered to be a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we found that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a key regulator of bone matrix properties and composition that also inhibits terminal osteoblast differentiation, strongly inhibited POEM expression in the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. TNF-{alpha}-induced down-regulation of POEM gene expression occurred in both time- and dose-dependent manners through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. In addition, expressions of marker genes in differentiated osteoblasts were down-regulated by TNF-{alpha} in a manner consistent with our findings for POEM, while over-expression of POEM recovered TNF-{alpha}-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggest that TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM expression through the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway and down-regulation of POEM influences the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}.

  16. Pathologic progression of mammary carcinomas in a C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic rat model of human triple-negative and Her2-positive breast cancer.

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    Hoenerhoff, M J; Shibata, M A; Bode, A; Green, J E

    2011-04-01

    The C3(1) component of the rat prostate steroid binding protein has been used to target expression of the SV40 T/t-antigen to the mammary epithelium of mice resulting in pre-neoplastic lesions that progress to invasive and metastatic cancer with molecular features of human basal-type breast cancer. However, there are major differences in the histologic architecture of the stromal and epithelial elements between the mouse and human mammary glands. The rat mammary gland is more enriched with epithelial and stromal components than the mouse and more closely resembles the cellular composition of the human gland. Additionally, existing rat models of mammary cancer are typically estrogen receptor positive and hormone responsive, unlike most genetically engineered mouse mammary cancer models. In an attempt to develop a mammary cancer model that might more closely resemble the pathology of human breast cancer, we generated a novel C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic rat model that developed progressive mammary lesions leading to highly invasive adenocarcinomas. However, aggressive tumor development prevented the establishment of transgenic lines. Characterization of the tumors revealed that they were primarily estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor negative, and either her2/neu positive or negative, resembling human triple-negative or Her2 positive breast cancer. Tumors expressed the basal marker K14, as well as the luminal marker K18, and were negative for smooth muscle actin. The triple negative phenotype has not been previously reported in a rat mammary cancer model. Further development of a C3(1)SV40 T/t-antigen based model could establish valuable transgenic rat lines that develop basal-type mammary tumors.

  17. Electron acceptors based on alpha-position substituted PDI for OPV solar cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Donglin; Wu, Qinghe; Cai, Zhengxu; Zheng, T; Chen, Wei; Lu, Jessica; Yu, L

    2016-02-23

    The ortho-position functionalized perylene diimide derivatives (alphaPPID, alphaPBDT) were synthesized and used as the electron acceptors in nonfullerene organic photovoltaics. Due to the good planarity of ortho-position functionalized PDI, the alphaPPID and alphaPBDT show strong tendency to form aggregate because of their enhanced intermolecular pie-pie interaction. Moreover, they maintain the pure domains and the same packing order as in the pure film if they are blended with PBT7-TH and the SCLC measurement also shows the high electron mobility. The inverted OPVs employing alphaPDI-based compounds as acceptor and PBT7-TH as the donor give the highest PCE of 4.92 % for alphaPBDT based device and 3.61 % for alphaPPID based device, which is 39 % and 4 % higher than that for their counterpart betaPBDT and betaPPID. The charge separation study shows the more efficient exciton dissociation at interfaces between PDI based compounds and PBT7-TH. The results suggest that compared to beta-substituted ones, alpha-substituted PDI derivatives are more promising electron acceptors for OPV.

  18. Immune response signatures of benzo{alpha}pyrene exposure in normal human mammary epithelial cells in the absence or presence of chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kaarthik; Keshava, Channa; Richardson, Diana L; Weston, Ainsley; Nath, Joginder

    2009-01-01

    Carcinogenic polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons can alter immune responses. Changes in immune response gene expression profiles in multiple human mammary cell strains exposed to benzo(alpha)pyrene (BP) (4 microM) in vitro, in the presence or absence of chlorophyllin (5 microM), were observed using Affymetrix gene arrays. Expressions of five immune response genes were altered ~3.0-fold by BP exposure and 24 genes by BP in the presence chlorophyllin. In silico pathway analysis revealed altered immune response genes form interactive gene networks with many cellular processes, suggesting their role in a complex multigenic response to toxins. Additionally, it was suggestive of the possible immunomodulatory potential of chlorophyllin apart from various other well-documented mechanisms of action. Gene expression matrices revealed consistent alteration patterns involving IL1B, SECTM1 and CXCL14 on exposure to BP, and IL1RN, CD86, IF144 and GIP2 in the presence of chlorophyllin and BP, suggesting some of these genes might constitute putative immune response biomarkers of PAH exposure. This study has therefore identified a battery of potential immune response biomarkers of PAH exposure, amidst several genes, for future validation studies.

  19. Antiangiogenic and antitumor activities of berberine derivative NAX014 compound in a transgenic murine model of HER2/neu-positive mammary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierpaoli, Elisa; Damiani, Elisa; Orlando, Fiorenza; Lucarini, Guendalina; Bartozzi, Beatrice; Lombardi, Paolo; Salvatore, Carmela; Geroni, Cristina; Donati, Abele; Provinciali, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural isoquinoline alkaloid with proven antiangiogenic and anticancer activities. We recently demonstrated that BBR and its synthetic derivative 13-(4-chlorophenylethyl)berberine iodide, NAX014, exert antiproliferative activity against HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, inducing apoptosis, modulating the expression of cell cycle checkpoint molecules involved in cell senescence, and reducing both HER2 expression and phosphorylation on tumor cells. In this study, we examined the anticancer properties of BBR and NAX014 in a transgenic mouse model which spontaneously develops HER2-positive mammary tumors. Repeated intraperitoneal injections of a safety dose (2.5mg/kg) of NAX014 delayed the development of tumors, reducing both the number and size of tumor masses. In vivo sidestream dark field videomicroscopy revealed a significant lower vessel density in mammary tumors from NAX014-treated mice in comparison with the control group. Immunohistochemical evaluation using CD34 antibody confirmed the reduced vessel density in NAX014 group. Statistically significant increase of senescence associated β-galactosidase and p16 expression, and reduced expression of heparanase were observed in tumors from NAX014-treated mice than in tumors from control animals. Finally, NAX014 treatment decreased the level of perforine and granzyme mRNA in mammary tumors. Berberine did not show any statistically significant modulation in comparison with control mice. The results of the present study indicate that NAX014 is more effective than BBR in exerting anticancer activity delaying the development of mammary tumors in mice transgenic for the HER-2/neu oncogene. The antitumor efficacy of NAX014 is mainly related to its effect on tumor vascular network and on induction of tumor cell senescence.

  20. ERBB2 in cat mammary neoplasias disclosed a positive correlation between RNA and protein low expression levels: a model for erbB-2 negative human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Santos

    Full Text Available Human ERBB2 is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 epithelial growth factor receptor. In human breast cancer (HBC, erbB-2 protein overexpression has been repeatedly correlated with poor prognosis. In more recent works, underexpression of this gene has been described in HBC. Moreover, it is also recognised that oncogenes that are commonly amplified or deleted encompass point mutations, and some of these are associated with HBC. In cat mammary lesions (CMLs, the overexpression of ERBB2 (27%-59.6% has also been described, mostly at the protein level and although cat mammary neoplasias are considered to be a natural model of HBC, molecular information is still scarce. In the present work, a cat ERBB2 fragment, comprising exons 10 to 15 (ERBB2_10-15 was achieved for the first time. Allelic variants and genomic haplotype analyses were also performed, and differences between normal and CML populations were observed. Three amino acid changes, corresponding to 3 non-synonymous genomic sequence variants that were only detected in CMLs, were proposed to damage the 3D structure of the protein. We analysed the cat ERBB2 gene at the DNA (copy number determination, mRNA (expression levels assessment and protein levels (in extra- and intra protein domains in CML samples and correlated the last two evaluations with clinicopathological features. We found a positive correlation between the expression levels of the ERBB2 RNA and erbB-2 protein, corresponding to the intracellular region. Additionally, we detected a positive correlation between higher mRNA expression and better clinical outcome. Our results suggest that the ERBB2 gene is post-transcriptionally regulated and that proteins with truncations and single point mutations are present in cat mammary neoplastic lesions. We would like to emphasise that the recurrent occurrence of low erbB-2 expression levels in cat mammary tumours, suggests the cat mammary neoplasias as a valuable model for erbB-2

  1. PDGFBB promotes PDGFR{alpha}-positive cell migration into artificial bone in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeyuki [Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Kawana, Hiromasa [Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Miyauchi, Yoshiteru [Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Integrated Bone Metabolism and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Hiroya; Mori, Tomoaki [Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kanagawa, Hiroya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Katsuyama, Eri; Fujie, Atsuhiro [Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hao, Wu [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); and others

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined effects of PDGFBB in PDGFR{alpha} positive cell migration in artificial bones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB was not expressed in osteoblastic cells but was expressed in peripheral blood cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB promoted PDGFR{alpha} positive cell migration into artificial bones but not osteoblast proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB did not inhibit osteoblastogenesis. -- Abstract: Bone defects caused by traumatic bone loss or tumor dissection are now treated with auto- or allo-bone graft, and also occasionally by artificial bone transplantation, particularly in the case of large bone defects. However, artificial bones often exhibit poor affinity to host bones followed by bony union failure. Thus therapies combining artificial bones with growth factors have been sought. Here we report that platelet derived growth factor bb (PDGFBB) promotes a significant increase in migration of PDGF receptor {alpha} (PDGFR{alpha})-positive mesenchymal stem cells/pre-osteoblastic cells into artificial bone in vivo. Growth factors such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF{beta}) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) reportedly inhibit osteoblast differentiation; however, PDGFBB did not exhibit such inhibitory effects and in fact stimulated osteoblast differentiation in vitro, suggesting that combining artificial bones with PDGFBB treatment could promote host cell migration into artificial bones without inhibiting osteoblastogenesis.

  2. Basal cell carcinoma is associated with high TNF-alpha release but nor with TNF-alpha polymorphism at position--308

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Lone; Allen, Michael H; Bang, Bo

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying induction of UVB-induced immunosuppression are not fully understood, but tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is suggested to play a central role. A single base pair polymorphism at position --308 in the promoter region of the TNF-alpha gene associated with an enhance...... with increased TNF-alpha production and BCC and necessary.......The mechanisms underlying induction of UVB-induced immunosuppression are not fully understood, but tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is suggested to play a central role. A single base pair polymorphism at position --308 in the promoter region of the TNF-alpha gene associated with an enhanced...... secretion of TNF-alpha has been identified in humans. We have therefore investigated the association of the --308 polymorphism with the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in humans. The frequency of TNF G and TNF A alleles among Caucasian patients with a previous BCC (n=191) and health adults (n-107) were...

  3. Developmental stage determines estrogen receptor alpha expression and non-genomic mechanisms that control IGF-1 signaling and mammary proliferation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jie; Berton, Thomas R; Shirley, Stephanie H; Lambertz, Isabel; Gimenez-Conti, Irma B; DiGiovanni, John; Korach, Kenneth S; Conti, Claudio J; Fuchs-Young, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulates increased proliferation and survival of mammary epithelial cells and also promotes mammary tumorigenesis. To study the effects of IGF-1 on the mammary gland in vivo, we used BK5.IGF-1 transgenic (Tg) mice. In these mice, IGF-1 overexpression is controlled by the bovine keratin 5 promoter and recapitulates the paracrine exposure of breast epithelium to stromal IGF-1 that is seen in women. Studies have shown that BK5.IGF-1 Tg mice are more susceptible to mammary tumorigenesis than wild-type littermates. Investigation of the mechanisms underlying increased mammary cancer risk, reported here, revealed that IGF-1 preferentially activated the PI3K/Akt pathway in glands from prepubertal Tg mice, resulting in increased cyclin D1 expression and hyperplasia. However, in glands from postpubertal Tg mice, a pathway switch occurred and activation of the Ras/Raf/MAPK pathway predominated, without increased cyclin D1 expression or proliferation. We further showed that in prepubertal Tg glands, signaling was mediated by formation of an ERα/IRS-1 complex, which activated IRS-1 and directed signaling via the PI3K/Akt pathway. Conversely, in postpubertal Tg glands, reduced ERα expression failed to stimulate formation of the ERα/IRS-1 complex, allowing signaling to proceed via the alternate Ras/Raf/MAPK pathway. These in vivo data demonstrate that changes in ERα expression at different stages of development direct IGF-1 signaling and the resulting tissue responses. As ERα levels are elevated during the prepubertal and postmenopausal stages, these may represent windows of susceptibility during which increased IGF-1 exposure maximally enhances breast cancer risk.

  4. Structure of the T cell receptor in a Ti alpha V beta 2, alpha V beta 8-positive T cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, X; Dietrich, J; Kuhlmann, J

    1994-01-01

    alpha V beta 2 in the lysate, and likewise, depleting the lysate of Ti alpha V beta with anti-V beta 2 mAb did not reduce the amount of Ti alpha V beta 8. Comodulation experiments showed that V beta 8 and V beta 2 did not comodulate with each other. Furthermore, functional tests demonstrated that Tc......The T cell receptor (TcR) is composed of at least six different polypeptide chains consisting of the clonotypic Ti heterodimer (Ti alpha beta or Ti gamma delta) and the noncovalently associated CD3 chains (CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta). The exact number of subunits constituting the TcR is still...... not known; however, it has been suggested that each TcR contains two Ti dimers. To gain insight into the structure of the TcR we constructed a Ti alpha V beta 2, alpha V beta 8-positive T cell line which expressed the endogenous human TiV beta 8 and the transfected mouse TiV beta 2 both in association...

  5. Differential HIF-1α and HIF-2α Expression in Mammary Epithelial Cells during Fat Pad Invasion, Lactation, and Involution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Påhlman

    Full Text Available The development and functional cycle of the mammary gland involves a number of processes that are caricatured by breast cancer cells during invasion and metastasis. Expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors HIF-1 and HIF-2 has been associated with metastatic, poor prognosis, and high-grade breast cancers. Since hypoxia affects normal epithelial differentiation, we hypothesise that HIFs are important for normal breast epithelial development and regeneration as well as cancer initiation and progression. Here, we investigated the expression of the oxygen-sensitive HIF-alpha subunits during mouse mammary gland development, lactation, and involution. In breast epithelial cells, HIF-1α was expressed during early development, prior to cell polarisation. In contrast, expression of HIF-2α occurred later and was restricted to a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells in the lactating gland. Mammary gland involution is a developmental stage that involves extensive tissue remodelling with cell death but survival of tissue stem/progenitor cells. At this stage, HIF-2α, but little HIF-1α, was expressed in CK14-positive epithelial cells. The temporal but differential expression of the HIF-alpha subunits during the mammary gland life cycle indicates that their expression is controlled by additional factors to hypoxia. Further functional studies of the roles of these proteins in the mammary gland and breast cancer are warranted.

  6. Estrogen receptor coregulators and pioneer factors: The orchestrators of mammary gland cell fate and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramanandam eManavathi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 17-beta estradiol (E2, a steroid hormone, which play critical role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis, is essential for reproduction and mammary gland development. E2 actions are mediated by two classical nuclear hormone receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ERs. The activity of ERs depends on the coordinate activity of ligand binding, posttranslational modification, and importantly their interaction with their partner proteins called ‘coregulators’. Because majority of breast cancers are ERalpha positive and coregulators are proved to be crucial for ER transcriptional activity, an increased interest in the field has led to the identification of a large number of coregulators. In the last decade, gene knockout studies using mouse models provided impetus to our further understanding of the role of these coregulators in mammary gland development. Several coregulators appear to be critical for terminal end bud formation, ductal branching and alveologenesis during mammary gland development. The emerging studies support that, in addition to these coregulators, the other ER partner proteins ‘pioneering factors’ also seems to contribute significantly to E2 signaling and mammary cell fate. This review discusses emerging themes in coregulator- and pioneering factor-mediated action on ER functions, particularly their role in mammary gland cell fate and development.

  7. Muscle Releases Alpha-Sarcoglycan Positive Extracellular Vesicles Carrying miRNAs in the Bloodstream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Guescini

    Full Text Available In the past few years, skeletal muscle has emerged as an important secretory organ producing soluble factors, called myokines, that exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects. Moreover, recent studies have shown that muscle releases microRNAs into the bloodstream in response to physical exercise. These microRNAs affect target cells, such as hormones and cytokines. The mechanisms underlying microRNA secretion are poorly characterized at present. Here, we investigated whether muscle tissue releases extracellular vesicles (EVs, which carry microRNAs in the bloodstream under physiological conditions such as physical exercise. Using density gradient separation of plasma from sedentary and physically fit young men we found EVs positive for TSG101 and alpha-sarcoglycan (SGCA, and enriched for miR-206. Cytometric analysis showed that the SGCA+ EVs account for 1-5% of the total and that 60-65% of these EVs were also positive for the exosomal marker CD81. Furthermore, the SGCA-immuno captured sub-population of EVs exhibited higher levels of the miR-206/miR16 ratio compared to total plasma EVs. Finally, a significant positive correlation was found between the aerobic fitness and muscle-specific miRNAs and EV miR-133b and -181a-5p were significantly up-regulated after acute exercise. Thus, our study proposes EVs as a novel means of muscle communication potentially involved in muscle remodeling and homeostasis.

  8. Breast calcifications. A standardized mammographic reporting and data system to improve positive predictive value; Calcificazioni mammarie. Utilita' di un sistema standardizzato di descrizione e valutazione dei reperti mammografici ai fini del miglioramento del valore predittivo positivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perugini, G.; Bonzanini, B.; Valentino, C. [Azienda Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo (Italy). Unita' operativa di radiodiagnostica

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the usefulness of a standardized reporting and data system in improving the positive predictive value of mammography in breast calcifications. Using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon developed by the American College of Radiology, it is defined 5 descriptive categories of breast calcifications and classified diagnostic suspicion of malignancy on a 3-grade scale (low, intermediate and high). Two radiologists reviewed 117 mammographic studies selected from those of the patients submitted to surgical biopsy for mammographically detected calcifications from January 1993 to December 1997, and classified them according to the above criteria. The positive predictive value was calculated for all examinations and for the stratified groups. Defining a standardized system for assessing and describing breast calcifications helps improve the diagnostic accuracy of mammography in clinical practice. [Italian] Scopo di questo documento e' verificare l'utilita di un protocollo standardizzato di descrizione e valutazione delle calcificazioni mammarie ai fini di migliorare il valore predittivo positivo dell'indagine mammografica presso il nostro centro. Utilizzando la terminologia proposta dall'American Collge of Radiology, denominata breast imaging reporting and data system, e' stato elaborato un protocollo che individua 5 modalita' di presentazione della calcificazioni mammarie e definisce 3 gradi di sospetto di malignita' (basso, medio, alto). Il protocollo e' stato applicato alla revisione da parte di due radiologi di 117 casi di calcificazione mammarie inviate a biopsia chirurgica presso il nostro centro nel periodo gennaio 1993-dicembre 1997; sono stati quindi calcolati il valore predittivo positivo complessivo della casistica e quello dei gruppi stratificati per grado di sospetto. La formulazione sulla base della propria esperienza di un sistema standardizzato di descrizione e

  9. The methyltransferase EZH2 is not required for mammary cancer development, although high EZH2 and low H3K27me3 correlate with poor prognosis of ER-positive breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Woo Kyun; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Ji Shin; Kim, Young; Chung, Ik-Joo; Park, Min Ho; Yoon, Jung Han; Furth, Priscilla A; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2015-10-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) catalyzes trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) and its demethylation is catalyzed by UTX. EZH2 levels are frequently elevated in breast cancer and have been proposed to control gene expression through regulating repressive H3K27me3 marks. However, it is not fully established whether breast cancers with different levels of H3K27me3, EZH2 and UTX exhibit different biological behaviors. Levels of H3K27me3, EZH2 and UTX and their prognostic significance were evaluated in 146 cases of breast cancer. H3K27me3 levels were higher in HER2-negative samples. EZH2 expression was higher in cancers that were LN+, size > 20mm, and with higher tumor grade and stage. Using a Cox regression model, H3K27me3 levels and EZH2 expression were identified as independent prognostic factors for overall survival for all the breast cancers studied as well as the ER-positive subgroup. The combination of low H3K27me3 and high EZH2 expression levels were significantly associated with shorter survival. UTX expression was not significantly associated with prognosis and there were no correlations between H3K27me3 levels and EZH2/UTX expression. To determine if EZH2 is required to establish H3K27me3 marks in mammary cancer, Brca1 and Ezh2 were deleted in mammary stem cells in mice. Brca1-deficient mammary cancers with unaltered H3K27me3 levels developed in the absence of EZH2, demonstrating that EZH2 is not a mandatory H3K27 methyltransferase in mammary neoplasia and providing genetic evidence for biological independence between H3K27me3 and EZH2 in this tissue.

  10. Differentiation of Boc-protected alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptide positional isomers by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, G; Ramesh, V; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M; Shoban Babu, B

    2010-06-01

    Two new series of Boc-N-alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptides containing repeats of L-Ala-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-L-Ala and beta(3)-Caa-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-beta(3)-Caa (L-Ala = L-alanine, Caa = C-linked carbo amino acid derived from D-xylose) have been differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS(n) spectra of protonated isomeric peptides produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the Boc-group, and the side chain. The dipeptide positional isomers are differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the protonated peptides. The loss of 2-methylprop-1-ene is more pronounced for Boc-NH-L-Ala-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (1), whereas it is totally absent for its positional isomer Boc-NH-delta-Caa-L-Ala-OCH(3) (7), instead it shows significant loss of t-butanol. On the other hand, second isomeric pair shows significant loss of t-butanol and loss of acetone for Boc-NH-delta-Caa-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (18), whereas these are insignificant for its positional isomer Boc-NH-beta-Caa-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (13). The tetra- and hexapeptide positional isomers also show significant differences in MS(2) and MS(3) CID spectra. It is observed that 'b' ions are abundant when oxazolone structures are formed through five-membered cyclic transition state and cyclization process for larger 'b' ions led to its insignificant abundance. However, b(1)(+) ion is formed in case of delta,alpha-dipeptide that may have a six-membered substituted piperidone ion structure. Furthermore, ESI negative ion MS/MS has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids. Thus, the results of MS/MS of pairs of di-, tetra-, and hexapeptide positional isomers provide peptide sequencing information and distinguish the positional isomers.

  11. Effects of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-07-15

    Evidence indicates that microglial activation contributes to the pathophysiology and maintenance of neuroinflammatory pain involving central nervous system alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of 3a,4,5,9b-Tetrahydro-4-(1-naphthalenyl)-3H-cyclopentan[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide (TQS), an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in hippocampus, a neuroinflammatory pain model in mice. In addition, we examined the effects of TQS on microglial activation marker, an ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), in the hippocampus may be associated with neuroinflammatory pain. Pretreatment of TQS (4mg/kg) significantly reduced LPS (1mg/kg)-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, pretreatment of methyllycaconitine (3mg/kg) significantly reversed TQS-induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic responses indicating the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pretreatment of TQS significantly decreased LPS-induced increased in hippocampal Iba-1 expression. Overall, these results suggest that TQS reduces LPS-induced neuroinflammatory pain like symptoms via modulating microglial activation likely in the hippocampus and/or other brain region by targeting alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Therefore, alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PAM such as TQS could be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammatory pain.

  12. Evaluation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and positive allosteric modulators using the parallel oocyte electrophysiology test station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malysz, John; Grønlien, Jens H; Timmermann, Daniel B; Håkerud, Monika; Thorin-Hagene, Kirsten; Ween, Hilde; Trumbull, Jonathan D; Xiong, Yongli; Briggs, Clark A; Ahring, Philip K; Dyhring, Tino; Gopalakrishnan, Murali

    2009-08-01

    Neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of the alpha7 subtype are ligand-gated ion channels that are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system and considered as attractive targets for the treatment of various neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. Both agonists and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) are being developed as means to enhance the function of alpha7 nAChRs. The in vitro characterization of alpha7 ligands, including agonists and PAMs, relies on multiple technologies, but only electrophysiological measurements assess the channel activity directly. Traditional electrophysiological approaches utilizing two-electrode voltage clamp or patch clamp in isolated cells have very low throughput to significantly impact drug discovery. Abbott (Abbott Park, IL) has developed a two-electrode voltage clamp-based system, the Parallel Oocyte Electrophysiology Test Station (POETs()), that allows for the investigation of ligand-gated ion channels such as alpha7 nAChRs in a higher-throughput manner. We describe the utility of this technology in the discovery of selective alpha7 agonists and PAMs. With alpha7 agonists, POETs experiments involved both single- and multiple-point concentration-response testing revealing diverse activation profiles (zero efficacy desensitizing, partial, and full agonists). In the characterization of alpha7 PAMs, POETs testing has served as a reliable primary or secondary screen identifying compounds that fall into distinct functional types depending on the manner in which current potentiation occurred. Type I PAMs (eg, genistein, NS1738, and 5-hydroxyindole) increase predominantly the peak amplitude response, type II PAMs affect the peak current and current decay (eg, PNU-120,596 and 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide), and anothertype slowing the current decay kinetics in the absence of increases in the peak current. In summary, POETs technology allows for significant

  13. GH-producing mammary tumors in two dogs with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsuko; Nishii, Naohito; Morita, Takehito; Yuki, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Two intact female dogs were admitted for growing mammary tumors. They had symptoms of acromegaly including weight gain, enlargement of the head, excessive skin folds, and inspiratory stridor. Serum concentrations of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and insulin were elevated in the two cases. From these findings, both dogs were diagnosed with acromegaly. In case 1, the GH, IGF-I, and insulin levels subsided after removal of the focal benign mammary tumors and ovariohysterectomy. In case 2, those levels subsided after removal of only focal mammary carcinoma. In both cases, immunohistochemical investigations for GH were positive in the mammary tumor cells but not in the normal mammary glands. We concluded that GH-producing mammary tumors caused the present acromegaly.

  14. Mutually positive regulatory feedback loop between interferons and estrogen receptor-alpha in mice: implications for sex bias in autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Panchanathan

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, an autoimmune disease, predominantly affects women of childbearing age. Moreover, increased serum levels of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha are associated with the disease. Although, the female sex hormone estrogen (E2 is implicated in sex bias in SLE through up-regulation of IFN-gamma expression, the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here we report that activation of IFN (alpha or gamma-signaling in immune cells up-regulates expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha; encoded by the Esr1 gene and stimulates expression of target genes.We found that treatment of mouse splenic cells and mouse cell lines with IFN (alpha or gamma increased steady-state levels of ERalpha mRNA and protein. The increase in the ERalpha mRNA levels was primarily due to the transcriptional mechanisms and it was dependent upon the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1 factor by IFN. Moreover, the IFN-treatment of cells also stimulated transcription of a reporter gene, expression of which was driven by the promoter region of the murine Esr1 gene. Notably, splenic cells from pre-autoimmune lupus-prone (NZB x NZWF(1 female mice had relatively higher steady-state levels of mRNAs encoded by the IFN and ERalpha-responsive genes as compared to the age-matched males.Our observations identify a novel mutually positive regulatory feedback loop between IFNs and ERalpha in immune cells in mice and support the idea that activation of this regulatory loop contributes to sex bias in SLE.

  15. Unusual anogenital apocrine tumor resembling mammary-like gland adenoma in male perineum: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshioka Takako

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A rare case of an apocrine tumor in the male perineal region is reported. A dermal cystic lesion developed in the region between the anus and scrotum of a 74-year-old Japanese male. The cystic lesion, measuring 3.5 × 5.0 cm in size, was lined by columnar or flattened epithelium with occasional apocrine features and supported by a basal myoepithelium lining. A mural nodule, measuring 1 × 1.5 cm in size, protruded into the cystic space and consisted of a solid proliferation of tubular glands with prominent apocrine secretion and basal myoepithelial cells. Immunohistochemical examination showed that the luminal cells were partially positive for gross cystic disease fluid protein 15 and human milk fat globulin 1, and the basal myoepithelial cells were positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin and S-100 protein. Estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors were focally and weakly positive for luminal epithelium. Although no mammary-like glands were present in the dermis around the tumor, this unusual apocrine tumor has been suggested to be derived from male anogenital mammary-like glands and mimic a mammary-like gland adenoma in the male perineum.

  16. SOX10-positive salivary gland tumors: a growing list, including mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of the salivary gland, sialoblastoma, low-grade salivary duct carcinoma, basal cell adenoma/adenocarcinoma, and a subgroup of mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Min-Shu; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Chang, Yih-Leong

    2016-10-01

    Transcription factor SRY-related HMG-box 10 (SOX10) is an important marker for melanocytic, schwannian, myoepithelial, and some salivary gland tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate SOX10 expression more thoroughly in the salivary gland neoplasms, including mammary analogue secretory carcinoma and hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma harboring specific genetic rearrangements. A new rabbit monoclonal anti-SOX10 antibody (clone EP268) was used to examine SOX10 expression in 14 different types of salivary gland tumors. We found that acinic cell carcinoma (AciCC), adenoid cystic carcinoma, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC), epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, low-grade salivary duct carcinoma, sialoblastoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, basal cell adenoma, and pleomorphic adenoma were SOX10 positive. Salivary duct carcinoma, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma, and oncocytoma were SOX10 negative. Earlier, mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) was considered a SOX10-negative tumor. This study identified a subgroup of SOX10-positive MEC cases with characteristic polygonal epithelial cells, pale-to-eosinophilic cytoplasm, and colloid-like dense eosinophilic material. Our data show SOX10 expression can be observed in salivary gland tumors with either one of the 4 cell types: acinic cells, cuboidal ductal cells with low-grade cytologic features, basaloid cells, and myoepithelial cells. In this article we thoroughly evaluated SOX10 expression in salivary gland tumors. SOX10 is useful in the differential diagnosis between myoepithelial carcinoma with clear cell features and hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma. It can also be used to discriminate low-grade salivary duct carcinoma from high-grade ones. Pathologists should be cautious with the interpretation of SOX10 positivity in salivary gland tumors, and correlation with histologic feature is mandatory.

  17. Optimization and characterization of an in vitro bovine mammary cell culture system to study regulation of milk protein synthesis and mammary differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talhouk, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A long term bovine mammary cell culture system that maintains normal mammary cell function was established and optimized to study milk protein synthesis and secretion and mammary differentiation. This culture system used bovine mammary acini isolated from developing or lactating mammary gland by enzymatic dissociation, and cryopreserved until thawed and plated for growth in vitro for these studies. Cells in M199 with lactogenic hormones {plus minus} fetal calf serum (FCS) were cultured on plastic, 100ul and 500ul type I collagen, and Matrigel, or embedded within type I collagen. Cell morphology, cell number, and total TCA-precipitable {sup 35}S-labelled proteins were monitored. Milk protein ({alpha}{sub s,1}-casein, lactoferrin (LF), {alpha}-lactalbumin, and {beta}-lactoglobulin) secretion and intracellular levels were determined by an ELISA assay.

  18. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-12-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats.

  19. Vaginal myofibroblastoma with glands expressing mammary and prostatic antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenfels, I; Chlumská, A

    2012-01-01

    A case of unusual vaginal myofibroblastoma containing glands which expressed mammary and prostatic markers is described. The tumor occurred in 70-year-old woman in the proximal third of the vagina. It showed morphology and immunophenotype typical of so-called cervicovaginal myofibroblastoma. The peripheral zone of the lesion contained a few groups of glands suggesting vaginal adenosis or prostatic-type glands on initial examination. The glands showed a surprising simultaneous expression of mammary markers mammaglobin and GCDFP-15 and prostatic markers prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). Immunostains for alpha-smooth muscle actin, p63 and CD10 highlighted the myoepithelial cell layer of the glands. The finding indicates that simultaneous use of both mammary and prostatic markers for examination of unusual glandular lesions in the vulvovaginal location can be helpful for an exact diagnosis, and can contribute to better understanding of prostatic and mammary differentiations in the female lower genital tract.

  20. Mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eBoutinaud

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Milk is produced in the udder by mammary epithelial cells (MEC. Milk contains MEC, which are gradually exfoliated from the epithelium during lactation. Isolation of MEC from milk using immunomagnetic separation may be a useful non-invasive method to investigate transcriptional regulations in ruminants’ udder. This review aims to describe the process of isolating MEC from milk, to provide an overview on the studies that use this method to analyze gene expression by qRT PCR and to evaluate the validity of this method by analysing and comparing the results between studies. In several goat and cow studies, consistent reductions in alpha-lactalbumin mRNA levels during once-daily milking (ODM and in SLC2A1 mRNA level during feed restriction are observed. The effect of ODM on alpha-lactalbumin mRNA level was similarly observed in milk isolated MEC and mammary biopsy. Moreover, we and others showed decreasing alpha-lactalbumin and increasing BAX mRNA levels with advanced stages of lactation in dairy cows and buffalo. The relevance of using the milk-isolated MEC method to analyze mammary gene expression is proven, as the transcript variations were also consistent with milk yield and composition variations under the effect of different factors such as prolactin inhibition or photoperiod. . However, the RNA from milk-isolated MEC is particularly sensitive to degradation. This could explain the differences obtained between milk-isolated MEC and mammary biopsy in two studies where gene expression was compared using qRT-PCR or RNA Sequencing analyses. As a conclusion, when the RNA quality is conserved, MEC isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary mRNA to study various factors that impact milk yield and composition (ODM, feeding level, endocrine status, photoperiod modulation and stage of lactation.

  1. Cellular proliferation rate and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and IGFBP-3 and estradiol receptor alpha expression in the mammary gland of dairy heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, A F; Dallard, B E; Baravalle, C; Licoff, N; Formía, N; Ortega, H H; Becú-Villalobos, D; Mejia, M E; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary ductal morphogenesis during prepuberty occurs mainly in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estradiol stimulation. Dairy heifers infected with gastrointestinal nematodes have reduced IGF-1 levels, accompanied by reduced growth rate, delayed puberty onset, and lower parenchyma-stroma relationship in their mammary glands. Immunohistochemical studies were undertaken to determine variations in cell division rate, IGF-1 system components, and estradiol receptors (ESR) during peripubertal development in the mammary glands of antiparasitic-treated and untreated Holstein heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Mammary biopsies were taken at 20, 30, 40, and 70 wk of age. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunolabeling, evident in nuclei, tended to be higher in the parenchyma of the glands from treated heifers than in those from untreated. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) type 2 and type 3 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic and was evident in stroma and parenchyma. The IGFBP2-labeled area was lower in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, a maximal expression of this protein was seen at 40 wk of age, whereas in the untreated group the labeling remained constant. No differences were observed for IGFBP3 between treatment groups or during development. Immunolabeling for α ESR (ESR1) was evident in parenchymal nuclei and was higher in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, ESR1 peaked at 30 wk of age and then decreased. These results demonstrate that the parasite burden in young heifers negatively influence mammary gland development, affecting cell division rate and parameters related to estradiol and IGF-1 signaling in the gland.

  2. A new reasonable scenario to search for ER-alpha energy-time-position correlated sequences in a real time mode

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Y S

    2015-01-01

    A new real-time PC based algorithm and a compact C++ code to operate in a real-time mode with a 48x128 strip double side position sensitive large area silicon radiation detector Micron Semiconductors (UK) are developed and tested. Namely with this new approach it has become possible to provide the quick extraction of EVR-alpha correlated sequences in heavy ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions. Specific attention is paid to the application of new CAMAC 4 M modules for charge particle position measurement during long- term experiments aimed to the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. Some attention is paid to the different (combined) algorithm scenario to search for ER-alpha and alpha-alpha chains.

  3. A new reasonable scenario to search for ER-alpha energy-time-position correlated sequences in a real time mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2015-07-01

    A new real-time PC based algorithm and a compact C++ code to operate in a real-time mode with a 48 × 128 strip double side position sensitive large area silicon radiation detector Micron Semiconductors (UK) are developed and tested. Namely with this new approach it has become possible to provide the quick extraction of EVR-alpha correlated sequences in heavy ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions. Specific attention is paid to the application of new CAMAC 4 M modules for charge particle position measurement during long-term experiments aimed to the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. Some attention is paid to the different (combined) algorithm scenario to search for ER-alpha and alpha-alpha chains.

  4. [Rapid development of anemia in a HIV-positive patient with alpha-thalassemia after zidovudine therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinbaş, Akif; Ozkaya, Gülşen; Büyükaşik, Yahya; Unal, Serhat

    2007-07-01

    Anemia, which may develop due to direct effect of the virus or indirect effect of zidovudine a widely used antiviral agent for the treatment, is not an uncommon complication in human immundeficiency virus (HIV) infections. In this report, a 26 years old male HIV positive patient who developed rapid anemia in the HAART (Highly active anti-retroviral therapy) protocol including zidovudine, was presented. The patient has been followed since May 2003 without anti-retroviral therapy. He was diagnosed as alpha-thalassemia trait, because of the low mean red blood cell volume (MCV), high red blood cell count and living in an Mediterranian country. However, no treatment for thalassemia had been given in this period, since the other laboratory findings [hemoglobin, hematocrit, red cell distribution width index (RDWI), iron and iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation and ferritin levels] were normal. During the follow-up of patient, HAART protocol with zidovudine, lamivudine and indinavir, was started depending on the findings of low CD4+ T-cell count (443/mm3) and high HIV serum load (1,330,000 copies/ml). In the second month of the therapy the hemoglobin level decreased to 12.9 gr/dL, and then to 9.9 gr/dL in the fourth month, while it was 14.5 gr/dL before anti-retroviral therapy. Although the patient had no hemolysis findings, and his serum folic acid level was normal, folbiol treatment was initiated with the possibility of the presence of folic acid deficiency at cellular level. Anemia resolved with folic acid replacement without discontinuation of zidovudine or a reduction in dosage. It was thought that the presence of alpha-thalassemia co-morbidity has facilitated the development of anti-retroviral-induced anemia in this patient. As a result, it is concluded that thalassemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of anemia in HIV positive patients, especially for the ones from Mediterranian countries.

  5. Phylogenetic distribution of intron positions in alpha-amylase genes of bilateria suggests numerous gains and losses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Da Lage

    Full Text Available Most eukaryotes have at least some genes interrupted by introns. While it is well accepted that introns were already present at moderate density in the last eukaryote common ancestor, the conspicuous diversity of intron density among genomes suggests a complex evolutionary history, with marked differences between phyla. The question of the rates of intron gains and loss in the course of evolution and factors influencing them remains controversial. We have investigated a single gene family, alpha-amylase, in 55 species covering a variety of animal phyla. Comparison of intron positions across phyla suggests a complex history, with a likely ancestral intronless gene undergoing frequent intron loss and gain, leading to extant intron/exon structures that are highly variable, even among species from the same phylum. Because introns are known to play no regulatory role in this gene and there is no alternative splicing, the structural differences may be interpreted more easily: intron positions, sizes, losses or gains may be more likely related to factors linked to splicing mechanisms and requirements, and to recognition of introns and exons, or to more extrinsic factors, such as life cycle and population size. We have shown that intron losses outnumbered gains in recent periods, but that "resets" of intron positions occurred at the origin of several phyla, including vertebrates. Rates of gain and loss appear to be positively correlated. No phase preference was found. We also found evidence for parallel gains and for intron sliding. Presence of introns at given positions was correlated to a strong protosplice consensus sequence AG/G, which was much weaker in the absence of intron. In contrast, recent intron insertions were not associated with a specific sequence. In animal Amy genes, population size and generation time seem to have played only minor roles in shaping gene structures.

  6. Mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Hector; Hinck, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The mammary gland develops through several distinct stages. The first transpires in the embryo as the ectoderm forms a mammary line that resolves into placodes. Regulated by epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, the placodes descend into the underlying mesenchyme and produce the rudimentary ductal structure of the gland present at birth. Subsequent stages of development—pubertal growth, pregnancy, lactation, and involution—occur postnatally under the regulation of hormones. Puberty initiates branching morphogenesis, which requires growth hormone (GH) and estrogen, as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), to create a ductal tree that fills the fat pad. Upon pregnancy, the combined actions of progesterone and prolactin generate alveoli, which secrete milk during lactation. Lack of demand for milk at weaning initiates the process of involution whereby the gland is remodeled back to its prepregnancy state. These processes require numerous signaling pathways that have distinct regulatory functions at different stages of gland development. Signaling pathways also regulate a specialized subpopulation of mammary stem cells that fuel the dramatic changes in the gland occurring with each pregnancy. Our knowledge of mammary gland development and mammary stem cell biology has significantly contributed to our understanding of breast cancer and has advanced the discovery of therapies to treat this disease.

  7. Pathologic progression of mammary carcinomas in a C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic rat model of human triple-negative and Her2-positive breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hoenerhoff, M J; Shibata, M. A.; Bode, A.; Green, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The C3(1) component of the rat prostate steroid binding protein has been used to target expression of the SV40 T/t-antigen to the mammary epithelium of mice resulting in pre-neoplastic lesions that progress to invasive and metastatic cancer with molecular features of human basal-type breast cancer. However, there are major differences in the histologic architecture of the stromal and epithelial elements between the mouse and human mammary glands. The rat mammary gland is more enriched with ep...

  8. Positive allosteric modulators of alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors reverse ketamine-induced schizophrenia-like deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforuk, Agnieszka; Kos, Tomasz; Hołuj, Małgorzata; Potasiewicz, Agnieszka; Popik, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs) have generated great interest as targets of new pharmacological treatments for cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. One promising recent approach is based on the use of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α7-nAChRs, which demonstrate several advantages over direct agonists. Nevertheless, the efficacy of these newly introduced α7-nAChR agents has not been extensively characterised in animal models of schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of type I and II PAMs, N-(5-chloro-2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-N'-(5-methyl-3-isoxazolyl)urea (PNU-120596) and N-(4-chlorophenyl)-[[(4-chlorophenyl)amino]methylene]-3-methyl-5-isoxazoleacet-amide (CCMI), respectively, and galantamine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChE) that also allosterically modulates nAChRs, against ketamine-induced cognitive deficits and social withdrawal in rats. The orthosteric α7-nAChR agonist octahydro-2-methyl-5-(6-phenyl-3-pyridazinyl)-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (A-582941) was used as a positive control. Additionally, the antipsychotic activities of the tested compounds were assessed using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test. PNU-120596, CCMI, galantamine and A-582941 reversed ketamine-induced cognitive inflexibility, as assessed in the attentional set-shifting task (ASST). The tested compounds were also effective against ketamine-induced impairment in the novel object recognition task (NORT). PNU-120596, CCMI, and A-582941 ameliorated ketamine-induced social interaction deficits, whereas galantamine was ineffective. Moreover, all tested compounds selectively suppressed the CAR. The positive allosteric modulation of α7-nAChRs demonstrates preclinical efficacy not only against schizophrenia-like cognition impairments but also positive and negative symptoms. Therefore, the use of α7-nAChR PAMs as a potential treatment strategy in schizophrenia is supported.

  9. Mammary epithelial cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine Terra; Dembo, Micah

    2007-01-01

    a repertoire of transmembrane receptors, of which integrins are the best characterized. Integrins modulate cell fate by reciprocally transducing biochemical and biophysical cues between the cell and the extracellular matrix, facilitating processes such as embryonic branching morphogenesis and lactation...... in the mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal...... responses to regulate processes including branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation. Malignant transformation of the breast is also associated with significant matrix remodeling and a progressive stiffening of the stroma that can enhance mammary epithelial cell growth, perturb breast tissue...

  10. Canine mammary tumors contain cancer stem-like cells and form spheroids with an embryonic stem cell signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferletta, Maria; Grawé, Jan; Hellmén, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the presence of tentative stem-like cells in the canine mammary tumor cell line CMT-U229. This cell line is established from an atypical benign mixed mammary tumor, which has the property of forming duct-like structures in collagen gels. Stem cells in mammary glands are located in the epithelium; therefore we thought that the CMT-U229 cell line would be suitable for detection of tentative cancer stem-like cells. Side population (SP) analyses by flow cytometry were performed with cells that formed spheroids and with cells that did not. Flow cytometric, single sorted cells were expanded and re-cultured as spheroids. The spheroids were paraffin embedded and characterized by immunohistochemistry. SP analyses showed that spheroid forming cells (retenate) as well as single cells (filtrate) contained SP cells. Sca1 positive cells were single cell sorted and thereafter the SP population increased with repeated SP analyses. The SP cells were positively labeled with the cell surface-markers CD44 and CD49f (integrin alpha6); however the expression of CD24 was low or negative. The spheroids expressed the transcription factor and stem cell marker Sox2, as well as Oct4. Interestingly, only peripheral cells of the spheroids and single cells were positive for Oct4 expression. SP cells are suggested to correspond to stem cells and in this study, we have enriched for tentative tumor stem-like cells derived from a canine mammary tumor. All the used markers indicate that the studied CMT-U229 cell line contains SP cells, which in particular have cancer stem-like cell characteristics.

  11. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  12. Immunoglobins in mammary secretions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, W L; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins secreted in colostrum and milk by the lactating mammal are major factors providing immune protection to the newborn. Immunoglobulins in mammary secretions represent the cumulative immune response of the lactating animal to exposure to antigenic stimulation that occurs through inte...

  13. Immunohistochemical characterization of mammary squamous cell carcinoma of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Francesco; Sarli, Giuseppe; Brunetti, Barbara; Morandi, Federico; Benazzi, Cinzia

    2008-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the mammary gland is rare in both veterinary and human medicine. Whereas human metaplastic and squamous variants are known, the objectives of the current study were to ascertain the presence of such entities in canine mammary tumors and to distinguish them from other (epidermal, sweat gland) squamous tumors that may develop in the same area. A panel of antibodies (anti-cytokeratin [CK] 19, CK 14, CK 5/6, pancytokeratin, and vimentin) was used on 18 mammary gland malignancies with squamous features and 16 malignant skin tumors (11 squamous cell carcinomas of the skin and 5 sweat glands). Fifteen of the 18 mammary carcinomas were classified as metaplastic carcinomas, and the remaining 3 were classified as squamous cell carcinomas. The 2 most useful markers to establish the histogenesis of mammary tumors were pancytokeratin and CK 19. All other antibodies were equally expressed (CK 14 and 5/6) in all histotypes. The antibody panel discriminated primary epidermal squamous tumors (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 negative) from gland-derived squamous neoplasms (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 positive) but failed to distinguish primary mammary tumors from other squamous tumors of glandular origin.

  14. Recognition of interaction interface residues in low-resolution structures of protein assemblies solely from the positions of C(alpha atoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupali A Gadkari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of available structures of large multi-protein assemblies is quite small. Such structures provide phenomenal insights on the organization, mechanism of formation and functional properties of the assembly. Hence detailed analysis of such structures is highly rewarding. However, the common problem in such analyses is the low resolution of these structures. In the recent times a number of attempts that combine low resolution cryo-EM data with higher resolution structures determined using X-ray analysis or NMR or generated using comparative modeling have been reported. Even in such attempts the best result one arrives at is the very course idea about the assembly structure in terms of trace of the C(alpha atoms which are modeled with modest accuracy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper first we present an objective approach to identify potentially solvent exposed and buried residues solely from the position of C(alpha atoms and amino acid sequence using residue type-dependent thresholds for accessible surface areas of C(alpha. We extend the method further to recognize potential protein-protein interface residues. CONCLUSION/ SIGNIFICANCE: Our approach to identify buried and exposed residues solely from the positions of C(alpha atoms resulted in an accuracy of 84%, sensitivity of 83-89% and specificity of 67-94% while recognition of interfacial residues corresponded to an accuracy of 94%, sensitivity of 70-96% and specificity of 58-94%. Interestingly, detailed analysis of cases of mismatch between recognition of interface residues from C(alpha positions and all-atom models suggested that, recognition of interfacial residues using C(alpha atoms only correspond better with intuitive notion of what is an interfacial residue. Our method should be useful in the objective analysis of structures of protein assemblies when positions of only (alpha positions are available as, for example, in the cases of integration of cryo

  15. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... and differences between mouse and human gland development with particular emphasis on the identity and localization of stem cells, and the influence of the surrounding microenvironment. It is concluded that while recent advances in the field have contributed immense insight into how the normal mammary gland...... develops and is maintained, significant discrepancies exist between the mouse and human gland which should be taken into consideration in current and future models of mammary stem cell biology....

  16. In vitro production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by human monocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharide is positively correlated with increased blood monocytes after exposure to a swine barn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, P J; Khozani, T Talaei; Juurlink, B H J; Senthilselvan, A; Rennie, D C; Gerdts, V; Gawaziuk, J; Schneberger, D; Burch, Lauranell H; Dosman, J A

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been interest in the air quality in and around intensive livestock production facilities, such as modern swine production barns, where agricultural workers and surrounding residents may be exposed to elevated levels of organic dusts. The health effects of these exposures are not completely understood. The study that is reported here is a component of a larger investigation of the relationships among the acute effects of high-concentration endotoxin exposure (swine barn dust), polymorphisms in the TLR4 gene, and respiratory outcomes following exposure to swine confinement buildings. The relationships among a mediator of acute lung inflammation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and clinical responses to acute swine barn exposure were characterized. Analysis of the results showed that in vitro stimulation of human monocytes with as little as 1 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced a significant increase in the monocytes that produced TNF-alpha. Although the proportion of TNF-alpha-positive monocytes after in vitro stimulation with 1 ng/ml of LPS was not associated with gender or TLR4 genotype, it was positively associated with the concentration of monocytes in blood after barn exposure. Thus, these two responses to different forms of LPS exposure are significantly correlated, and more responsive monocytes in vitro indicate a forthcoming relative monocytosis, post barn exposure, which may initiate a cascade of chronic inflammation.

  17. Seven-years follow-up on trial of Interferon alpha in patients with HCV RNA positive chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Zhang Tang; Lin Zhuarg; Jing You; Hong Bing Zhang; Lu Zhang

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the long-term efficiency of therapy with Interferon alpha (IFN-a) in patients with HCVRNA positive chronic hepatitis C.METHODS Ten patients were enrolled in the study, whose age 31 -62 years (mean 53 years), course 6- 72months (mean 24 months), of whom, 6 patients with mild CHC, 4 moderate CHC. All patients receivedIFN-a 3 MU three times weekly for six to twelve months, and then followed up for seven years after the endof treatment. The results of hepatic functions and HCV RNA at the end of treatment and follow-up period inall patients were observed.RESULTS ( At the end of treatment, clinical symptoms recovered obviously in all patients, virologicalresponse (defined as HCV RNA loss) occurred in 5 of 7 (71.4%) patients (60 years old). At the end of follow-up, the rates of HCV RNA loss were 42.9% (3/7)and 33.3% (1/3), respectively, in these group. Virological sustained response (defined as HCV RNA loss atthe end of treatment and follow-up) occurred in 3 of 6 (50%) patients (6 - 12 month-course) and in 1 of 4(25%) patients (> 12 month-course). A sustained HCV RNA response was observed in 2 of 7 (28.6%)patients with IFN-a therapy for 6m and in 2 of 3 (66.7%) patients with IFN-a therapy for more than 6 m. Ofall patients, 4 patients with sustained HCV RNA response were mild CHC, 4 patients with sustained HCVRNA positive were mild CHC (2 patients), moderate CHC (2 patients), respectively; other 2 patients withHCV RNA loss at the end of treatment but recurred at the end of follow-up, were moderate CHC. ②Biochemically sustained response (defined as ALT normalization at the end of treatment and follow-up) wasobserved in 5 out of 10 (50%) patients, and these 5 patients were mild CHC, of whom, 4 patients with HCVRNA sustained negative, 1 patient with HCV RNA loss and then recurred again. Two patients with ALTnormalization at the end of follow-up were one mild CHC, one moderate CHC, respectively. Other 3patients with no response were moderate CHC, of whom, 2

  18. Interstitial positions of tin ions in alpha-(FerichSn)(2)O-3 solid solutions prepared by mechanical alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Lin, Rong; Nielsen, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    The microstructure of samples of 91, 85, and 71 mol % alpha-Fe-2-O-3-SnO2. prepared by mechanical alloying, has been studied by x-ray diffraction with Rietveld structure refinements, On the basis of the structure refinements to the whole x-ray diffraction patterns for the four as-milled samples......, it is found that tin ions do not substitute iron ions in the solid solution, although this model is generally assumed in the literature. The Sn4+ ions occupy the empty octahedral holes in the lattice of the alpha-Fe2O3 phase....

  19. Tissue proteomics of the human mammary gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Cabezón, Teresa; Gromova, Irina

    2010-01-01

    the phenotypes of the different cell subpopulations present in normal human mammary tissue, partly due to the formidable heterogeneity of mammary tissue, but also due to limitations of the current proteomic technologies. Work in our laboratories has attempted to address in a systematic fashion some...... of these limitations and here we present our efforts to search for biomarkers using normal fresh tissue from non-neoplastic breast samples. From the data generated by the 2D gel-based proteomic profiling we were able to compile a protein database of normal human breast epithelial tissue that was used to support...... human breast epithelial cells and their progenitors in resting acini, lactating alveoli, and large collecting ducts of the nipple. Preliminary results are also presented concerning DRP3 positive usual ductal hyperplasias (UDHs) and on single cell layer columnar cells (CCCs). At least two bona fide...

  20. Results of therapy with interferon alpha and cyclic combination chemotherapy in patients with philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in early chronic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, F J; Kantarjian, H; O'Brien, S; Rios, M B; Cortes, J; Beran, M; Koller, C; Keating, M; Talpaz, M

    2001-04-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of cyclic combination therapy offered to patients with Ph-positive CML having a sub-optimal response to IFN-alpha. Patients in early chronic phase CML were treated with IFN-alpha at 5MU/m(2) daily. Patients who did not achieve cytogenetic response after 6 months of IFN-alpha therapy, or Ph-suppression to less than 35% Ph-positive cells (partial cytogenetic response) after 12 months of therapy were offered cyclic intensive chemotherapy every 6 months, with IFN-alpha maintenance between cycles. The initial 3 cycles included daunorubicin, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) and prednisone (DOAP). Later cycles were given with cyclophosphamide replacing daunorubicin (COAP). Of 74 patients treated, 61 (82%) achieved complete hematologic response (CHR): 51 (69%) had a cytogenetic response, which was major (Ph < 35%) in 31 (42%), and complete in 23 (31%). Fifty-five patients (74%) achieved CHR by 6 months of therapy, 38 (69%; 51% of total) with a cytogenetic response - 13 (24%) had a major cytogenetic response. Seventeen patients received at least 1 course of DOAP therapy. Median survival of the overall cohort of patients was 120 months. With a median follow-up of 145 months (103+ to 155+ months), 40 patients (54%) have died. The median duration of cytogenetic response was 35 months (range 3 to 149+ months) and the estimated 10-year cytogenetic response rate was 37%. A durable complete cytogenetic response was observed in 16 patients (20%) with a median duration of 139+ months (range 12+ to 149+ months), 11 of them (15%) are now off IFN-alpha therapy for a median of 57+ months (range 12+ to 128+ months). The projected 10-year survival was 50% for the study group versus 35% for 208 patients who received other IFN-alpha based regimens at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (p<.01). In conclusion, the addition of intensive chemotherapy may improve survival in patients with CML who have not obtained an

  1. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Federica; Wurth, Roberto [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy); Ratto, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Vito, Guendalina [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle D' Aosta, National Reference Center of Veterinary and Comparative Oncology (CEROVEC), Piazza Borgo Pila, 16129, Genova (Italy); Thellung, Stefano [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy); Daga, Antonio [Laboratory of Translational Oncology, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino - IST- Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, L.go R. Benzi, 10, 16132 Genova Italy (Italy); Cilli, Michele [Animal Facility, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino - IST- Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, L.go R. Benzi, 10, 16132 Genova Italy (Italy); Ferrari, Angelo [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle D' Aosta, National Reference Center of Veterinary and Comparative Oncology (CEROVEC), Piazza Borgo Pila, 16129, Genova (Italy); Florio, Tullio, E-mail: tullio.florio@unige.it [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell-like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-{alpha} and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor Black

  2. Mammary tuberculosis: percutaneous treatment of a mammary tuberculous abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, C.; Carreira, C.; Cereceda, C.; Pinto, J. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo (Spain); Lopez, R.; Bolanos, F. [Servicio de Cirugia, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo (Spain)

    2000-03-01

    It is currently very rare to find mammary involvement in cases of tuberculosis, in either primary or secondary form. Diagnosis is classically clinical and microbiological, and the basic techniques used in imaging diagnosis are mammography and ultrasound. Computed tomography may define the involvement of the thoracic wall in those cases which present as mammary masses adhering to deep levels, and is also able to evaluate accompanying pulmonary disease, if it is present. Traditionally, treatment has consisted of quadrantectomy and specific antibiotic therapy. We present a case of tuberculous mammary abscess secondary to pulmonary disease, which was treated by percutaneous drainage controlled by CT and specific antibiotic therapy. We revise the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of mammary tuberculosis. (orig.)

  3. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  4. Structural Basis of the CD8[alpha beta]/MHC Class I Interaction: Focused Recognition Orients CD8[beta] to a T Cell Proximal Position[superscript 1,2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rui; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.; (NIH)

    2009-09-18

    In the immune system, B cells, dendritic cells, NK cells, and T lymphocytes all respond to signals received via ligand binding to receptors and coreceptors. Although the specificity of T cell recognition is determined by the interaction of T cell receptors with MHC/peptide complexes, the development of T cells in the thymus and their sensitivity to Ag are also dependent on coreceptor molecules CD8 (for MHC class I (MHCI)) and CD4 (for MHCII). The CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer is a potent coreceptor for T cell activation, but efforts to understand its function fully have been hampered by ignorance of the structural details of its interactions with MHCI. In this study we describe the structure of CD8{alpha}{beta} in complex with the murine MHCI molecule H-2D{sup d} at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The focus of the CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction is the acidic loop (residues 222-228) of the {alpha}3 domain of H-2D{sup d}. The {beta} subunit occupies a T cell membrane proximal position, defining the relative positions of the CD8{alpha} and CD8{beta} subunits. Unlike the CD8{alpha}{alpha} homodimer, CD8{alpha}{beta} does not contact the MHCI {alpha}{sub 2}- or {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin domains. Movements of the CD8{alpha} CDR2 and CD8{beta} CDR1 and CDR2 loops as well as the flexibility of the H-2D{sup d} CD loop facilitate the monovalent interaction. The structure resolves inconclusive data on the topology of the CD8{alpha}{beta}/MHCI interaction, indicates that CD8{beta} is crucial in orienting the CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer, provides a framework for understanding the mechanistic role of CD8{alpha}{beta} in lymphoid cell signaling, and offers a tangible context for design of structurally altered coreceptors for tumor and viral immunotherapy.

  5. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making Improve...to determine whether Fetal Mammary Stem Cell (fMaSC) signatures correlate with response to chemotherapy and metastasis in different breast cancer...positioned to achieve its aims. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer Prognosis, Mammary Stem Cells, Embryonic Development, Single Cell Transcriptomics 16

  6. Canine mammary tumors - clinical survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Atanaskova Petrov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammary tumours are the second most frequent neoplasia in dogs, mainly affecting older female patients. Approximately 50% of the mammary tumours are malignant with high percentage of mortality if not treated in time. The aim of this study was to analyze the data of canine patients with mammary tumours, to evaluate the type of tumours, as well as the relationship between tumour incidence and dogs’ age, reproductive cycle and sterilization. The survey was used to retrieve the information in the period of two years from the patient data base of the University Veterinary Hospital at the Faculty of Veterinary medicine in Skopje. Patients included in this survey were subjected to routine clinical investigation and additional laboratory tests (cytological examination, x-rays imaging, CBC and biochemical profile, histopathology of the tumor samples. Aged female patients (12 – 13 years are the most susceptible category for development of mammary tumours. The reproductive history showed that five of the patients with malignant mammary tumourshave never whelped and were not treated with any exogenous hormones. Malignant tumours (adenocarcinoma were diagnosed in 90% of the patients. Three patients died due to lung metastasis. Late diagnosis is one of the major problems that results in lethal outcome due to lung metastases. Since ovarian steroids play an important role in the aetiology, the most effective prevention of mammary tumoursis elective ovariectomy of the bitch at an early age.

  7. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy: abandon or persist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu PF

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peng-Fei Qiu, Yan-Bing Liu, Yong-Sheng Wang Breast Cancer Center, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Although the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer incorporated the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB concept, there has been little change in surgical practice patterns due to the low visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes with the traditional injection technique. Meanwhile, as internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLN metastases are mostly found concomitantly with axillary lymph nodes (ALN metastases, previous IM-SLNB clinical trials fail to evaluate the status of IMLN in patients who are really in need (only in clinically ALN negative patients. Our modified injection technique (periareolar intraparenchymal, high volume, and ultrasonographic guidance significantly improved the visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes, making the routine IM-SLNB possible in daily practice. IM-SLNB could provide individual minimally invasive staging, prognosis, and decision-making for breast cancer patients, especially for patients with clinically positive ALN. Moreover, IMLN radiotherapy should be tailored and balanced between the potential benefit and toxicity, and IM-SLNB-guided IMLN radiotherapy could achieve this goal. In the era of effective adjuvant therapy, within the changing treatment approach – more systemic therapy, less loco-regional therapy – clinicians should deliberate the application of regional IMLN therapy. Keywords: breast cancer, internal mammary lymph node, axillary lymph node, sentinel lymph node biopsy 

  8. Relationships between piglet growth rate and mammary gland size of the sow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Sørensen, Martin Tang

    2001-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study whether piglet growth rate is related to mammary gland size. It involved three primiparous sows and four multiparous sows that were fed ad libitum during the lactation period. The piglets received no creep feed. The weight and teat order of the piglets were...... recorded. The sows were slaughtered after approximately 4 weeks of lactation (25–28 days). The amounts of mammary tissue and mammary DNA were larger in multiparous than in primiparous sows, and the concentrations and amounts of mammary RNA as well as mammary RNA/DNA ratios were highest in the front glands......, intermediate in the middle and lowest in the rear glands. Average daily gain of the piglets was of the same magnitude regardless of gland position in the primiparous sows. In the multiparous sows, the piglets suckling the front teats had the highest gain while those suckling the middle teats had intermediate...

  9. Mammary-type myofibroblastoma with the nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Gates B; Vankawala, Preksha; Kuperman, Michael B; Mennel, Robert G

    2016-07-01

    We describe a 23-year-old white man who presented with anasarca and a new periumbilical mass. He had preserved kidney function and laboratory findings consistent with nephrotic syndrome, including 9.7 g/day albuminuria. Serum serologies were positive for anti-SSa and anti-SSb and low complements but were negative for antinuclear antibody. Pathologic findings of the abdominal mass showed a mammary-type myofibroblastoma. A kidney biopsy revealed a diffuse proliferative and membranous immune-mediated glomerulonephritis with 10% interstitial fibrosis. This is a novel case of mammary-type myofibroblastoma associated with nephrotic syndrome mimicking a proliferative lupus pattern.

  10. Autoradiographic localization of estrogen binding sites in human mammary lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buell, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The biochemical assay of human mammary carcinomas for estrogen receptors is of proven clinical utility, but the cellular localization of estrogen binding sites within these lesions is less certain. The author describes the identification of estrogen binding sites as visualized by thaw-mount autoradiography after in vitro incubation in a series of 17 benign and 40 malignant human female mammary lesions. The results on the in vitro incubation method compared favorably with data from in vivo studies in mouse uterus, a well-characterized estrogen target organ. In noncancerous breast biopsies, a variable proportion of epithelial cells contained specific estrogen binding sites. Histologically identifiable myoepithelial and stromal cells were, in general, unlabeled. In human mammary carcinomas, biochemically estrogen receptor-positive, labeled and unlabeled neoplastic epithelial cells were identified by autoradiography. Quantitative results from the autoradiographic method compared favorably with biochemical data.

  11. Expression and function of leptin and its receptor in mouse mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Leptin is an autocrine and paracrine factor which affects the development of duct, formation of gland alveolus, expression of milk protein gene and onset involution of mammary gland. In order to know the function and mechanism of leptin in mammary gland, the protein expression and localization of leptin and its long form receptor (OB-Rb) were detected by a confocal laser scanning microscope. To study the impacts of leptin on mammary gland and leptin signal transduction pathway in pregnancy-, lactation- and involution-stage mammary gland, explants were cultured and Western blotting was used. The results showed that in the whole development cycle of mammary gland, the expression of leptin and OB-Rb was in positive correlation. In virgin the leptin expression was the highest and then decreased in pregnancy. In lactation the expression of leptin was low and upgraded in involution, and recovered to the original level about virgin on involution 13 d. The localization of leptin and OB-Rb revealed that leptin induced the expression of OB-Rb specifically and controlled the development and physiological function of the mammary gland by binding to OB-Rb. In pregnancy stage, leptin stimulated proliferation and differentiation of ductal epithelial cells by JAK-MAPK signal pathway. In lactation, leptin induced gene expression of β-casein by JAK-STAT5 signal pathway, and in involution leptin induced mammary epithelial cell apoptosis and mammary gland restitution by JAK-STAT3 signal pathway.

  12. Expression of prolactin receptors in normal canine mammary tissue, canine mammary adenomas and mammary adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Erika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary tumors represent the most common neoplastic disease in female dogs. Recently, the promoting role of prolactin (PRL in the development of human breast carcinoma has been shown. Possible proliferative, anti-apoptotic, migratory and angiogenic effects of PRL on human mammary cancer cells in vitro and in vivo were suggested. The effects of PRL are mediated by its receptor, and alterations in receptor expression are likely to play a role in tumor development. Currently, not much data is available about prolactin receptor (PRLR expression in canine mammary tumors. To set the basis for investigations on the role of PRL in mammary tumorigenesis in this species, prolactin receptor expression was evaluated by semi-quantitative real time PCR and immunohistochemistry on 10 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples each of canine non-neoplastic mammary tissue, mammary adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Results The highest PRLR expression levels were found in normal mammary tissue, while adenomas, and to an even higher degree adenocarcinomas, showed a significant decrease in prolactin receptor expression. Compared to normal tissue, PRLR mRNA was reduced 2.4 fold (p = 0.0261 in adenomas and 4.8 fold (p = 0.008 in adenocarcinomas. PRLR mRNA expression was significantly lower in malignant than in benign lesions (p = 0.0165. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated PRLR expression in all three tissue types with signals mostly limited to epithelial cells. Conclusions Malignant transformation of mammary tissue was associated with a decline in prolactin receptor expression. Further studies are warranted to address the functional significance of this finding.

  13. Mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy; Diagnostik und Therapie des Mammakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann (eds.) [Diagnostisches Brustzentrum Goettingen BZG, Goettingen(Germany)

    2014-11-01

    The book on mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy covers the following issues: development, anatomy and physiology of the mammary glands, pathology of benign and malign mammary gland changes, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography; ultrasonic mammography; magnetic resonance tomography of the mammary glands; imaging diagnostics findings; mammary interventions; examination concepts; operative therapy of the mammary carcinoma; chemotherapy of the mammary carcinoma; radio-oncological therapy of the mammary carcinoma; logistics in a medical center for mammary gland diseases; logistics in an interdisciplinary center for mammary diseases; dialogue conduction and psycho-social attendance.

  14. Pathological internal mammary lymph nodes in secondary and tertiary deep inferior epigastric perforator flap breast reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Stefan O P; Rakhorst, Hinne A; Mureau, Marc A M; Moolenburgh, Sanne E; van Huizum, Martine A; van Geel, Albert N

    2005-12-01

    Use of internal mammary vessels during breast reconstruction provides information on part of the internal mammary chain lymph nodes (LNs). It was evaluated whether our current practice of screening should be changed to identify those delayed breast reconstruction patients with tumor-positive internal mammary nodes (IMNs) and whether breast reconstruction should be continued, in case suspicious IMNs were found intraoperatively. From February 2002 to December 2004, 81 patients had received 98 deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps for delayed breast reconstruction. Prospectively collected data for suspicious internal mammary LNs were evaluated. In 13 patients (16%) who had received a delayed breast reconstruction, macroscopically suspicious LNs were detected in the course of the internal mammary chain. Three patients (4%) had a pathologic diagnosis of malignancy, which was found to match their primary tumor. No relationship between positive internal mammary chain LNs and location of the primary tumor, TNM-stage, or previously administered adjuvant therapy was found. Suspicious internal mammary chain LNs found during recipient vessel dissection for breast reconstruction can have important consequences for treatment of malignant disease in individual patients. Presented data do not support changing the current perioperative approach of delayed breast reconstruction.

  15. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bissacot Denise Z

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethroid insecticide was observed in adjacent adipose tissue of canine mammary tumor. High Precision Liquid Chromatography - HPLC was adapted to detect and identify environmental contaminants in adipose tissue adjacent to malignant mammary tumor in nine female dogs, without predilection for breed or age. After surgery, masses were carefully examined for malignant neoplastic lesions. Five grams of adipose tissue adjacent to the tumor were collected to detect of environmental contaminants. The identified pyrethroids were allethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and tetramethrin, with a contamination level of 33.3%. Histopathology demonstrated six female dogs (66.7% as having complex carcinoma and three (33.3% with simple carcinoma. From these tumors, seven (77.8% presented aggressiveness degree III and two (22.2% degree I. Five tumors were positive for estrogen receptors in immunohistochemical analysis. The contamination level was observed in more aggressive tumors. This was the first report in which the level of environmental contaminants could be detected in adipose tissue of female dogs with malignant mammary tumor, by HPLC. Results suggest the possible involvement of pyrethroid in the canine mammary tumor carcinogenesis. Hence, the dog may be used as a sentinel animal for human breast cancer, since human beings share the same environment and basically have the same eating habits.

  16. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Fábio He; Figueiroa, Fernanda C; Bersano, Paulo Ro; Bissacot, Denise Z; Rocha, Noeme S

    2010-06-30

    Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethroid insecticide was observed in adjacent adipose tissue of canine mammary tumor. High Precision Liquid Chromatography - HPLC was adapted to detect and identify environmental contaminants in adipose tissue adjacent to malignant mammary tumor in nine female dogs, without predilection for breed or age. After surgery, masses were carefully examined for malignant neoplastic lesions. Five grams of adipose tissue adjacent to the tumor were collected to detect of environmental contaminants. The identified pyrethroids were allethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and tetramethrin, with a contamination level of 33.3%. Histopathology demonstrated six female dogs (66.7%) as having complex carcinoma and three (33.3%) with simple carcinoma. From these tumors, seven (77.8%) presented aggressiveness degree III and two (22.2%) degree I. Five tumors were positive for estrogen receptors in immunohistochemical analysis. The contamination level was observed in more aggressive tumors. This was the first report in which the level of environmental contaminants could be detected in adipose tissue of female dogs with malignant mammary tumor, by HPLC. Results suggest the possible involvement of pyrethroid in the canine mammary tumor carcinogenesis. Hence, the dog may be used as a sentinel animal for human breast cancer, since human beings share the same environment and basically have the same eating habits.

  17. Genomic organization and differential signature of positive selection in the alpha and beta globin gene clusters in two cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Mariana F; Arroyo, José Ignacio; Opazo, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The hemoglobin of jawed vertebrates is a heterotetramer protein that contains two α- and two β-chains, which are encoded by members of α- and β-globin gene families. Given the hemoglobin role in mediating an adaptive response to chronic hypoxia, it is likely that this molecule may have experienced a selective pressure during the evolution of cetaceans, which have to deal with hypoxia tolerance during prolonged diving. This selective pressure could have generated a complex history of gene turnover in these clusters and/or changes in protein structure themselves. Accordingly, we aimed to characterize the genomic organization of α- and β-globin gene clusters in two cetacean species and to detect a possible role of positive selection on them using a phylogenetic framework. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogeny reconstructions revealed that both cetacean species had retained a similar complement of putatively functional genes. For the α-globin gene cluster, the killer whale presents a complement of genes composed of HBZ, HBK, and two functional copies of HBA and HBQ genes, whereas the dolphin possesses HBZ, HBK, HBA and HBQ genes, and one HBA pseudogene. For the β-globin gene cluster, both species retained a complement of four genes, two early expressed genes-HBE and HBH-and two adult expressed genes-HBD and HBB. Our natural selection analysis detected two positively selected sites in the HBB gene (56 and 62) and four in HBA (15, 21, 49, 120). Interestingly, only the genes that are expressed during the adulthood showed the signature of positive selection.

  18. Repeated administration of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, but not positive allosteric modulators, increases alpha7 nAChR levels in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H;

    2010-01-01

    -induced phosphorylation of Erk2 in the prefrontal cortex occurs following acute, but not repeated administration. Our results demonstrate that repeated agonist administration increases the number of alpha7 nAChRs in the brain, and leads to coupling versus uncoupling of specific intracellular signaling....... Here we investigate the effects of repeated agonism on alpha7 nAChR receptor levels and responsiveness in vivo in rats. Using [(125)I]-alpha-bungarotoxin (BTX) autoradiography we show that acute or repeated administration with the selective alpha7 nAChR agonist A-582941 increases the number of alpha7 n......-120596 and NS1738 do not increase [(125)I]-BTX binding. Furthermore, A-582941-induced increase in Arc and c-fos mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex is enhanced and unaltered, respectively, after repeated administration, demonstrating that the alpha7 nAChRs remain responsive. Contrarily, A-582941...

  19. Extra-mammary findings in breast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, Pierluigi; Costantini, M.; Belli, P.; Giuliani, M.; Bufi, E.; Fubelli, R.; Distefano, D.; Romani, M.; Bonomo, L. [Catholic University - Policlinic A. Gemelli, Department of Bio-Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Incidental extra-mammary findings in breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) may be benign in nature, but may also represent a metastasis or another important lesion. We aimed to analyse the prevalence and clinical relevance of these unexpected findings. A retrospective review of 1535 breast MRIs was conducted. Only axial sequences were reassessed. Confirmation examinations were obtained in all cases. 285 patients had a confirmed incidental finding, which were located in the liver (51.9%), lung (11.2%), bone (7%), mediastinal lymph nodes (4.2%) or consisted of pleural/pericardial effusion (15.4%). 20.4% of incidental findings were confirmed to be malignant. Positive predictive value for MRI to detect a metastatic lesion was high if located within the bone (89%), lymph nodes (83%) and lung (59%), while it was low if located within the liver (9%) or if it consisted of pleural/pericardial effusion (6%). The axial enhanced sequence showed superior sensitivity to unenhanced images in detecting metastatic lesions, especially if only smaller ({<=}10 mm.) lesions were considered. The prevalence of metastatic incidental extra-mammary findings is not negligible. Particular attention should be to incidental findings located within the lung, bone and mediastinal lymph nodes. (orig.)

  20. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Darong [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Ho, E-mail: jonghokim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  1. Immunology of the mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Miodrag

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammary gland is an organ of specific structure whose elementary task is to supply offspring with nutritive and other biologically active substances during the first weeks, or, depending on the species, the first months of life. This prolongs the period of close contact between the mother and her young, which is necessary for their regular growth. Most mammal offspring are born with physiological agammaglobulinaemia, because of the specific structure of the placenta, so that they receive the first specific protection against pathogenic microorganisms through colostrum. Furthermore, this gland is in direct contact with the outer environment through the secretary ducts, so that there are great possibilities for the occurrence of infections. It is therefore necessary to secure protective mechanisms which would prevent such infections. It is clear that there is a distinct connection between the immunological system and the mammary gland, and that link is the central topic of this paper. It presents the basic mechanisms of mammary gland defense which are divided into two categories: nonspecific (innate and specific immune response. The mammary gland secretion contains several types of leukocytes, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophiles, as well as 2% epithelial cells. On the average, there are 0.2 x 106 somatic cells in one mililiter of milk. Macrophages account for most of these (58%, as well as lymphocytes (28%, while a smaller number of somatic cells (12% are polymorphonuclears (PMN. The paper considers the characteristics and main functions of these cell types.

  2. Potential Genes for Regulation of Milk Protein Synthesis in Dairy Goat Mammary Gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Dan; Zhang Na; Nan Xue-mei; Li Qing-zhang; Gao Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    The lactating mammary gland is a prodigious protein-producing factory, but the milk protein synthesis mechanisms are not well understood. The major objective of this paper was to elucidate which genes and pathways were involved in the regulation of milk protein synthesis in the dairy goat mammary gland. Total 36 primiparous Guanzhong dairy goats were allotted in 12 groups according to their mammary development stages: days 90 and 150 of virgin, days 30, 90, and 150 of pregnancy, days 1, 10, 35, and 60 of lactation and days 3, 7, and 21 of involution (three animals per group). Mammary tissue RNA was isolated for quantitative real-time RT-PCR of four casein genes alpha-s1 casein (CSN1S1), alpha-s2 casein (CSN1S2), beta-casein (CSN2) and casein kappa (CSN3), four whey protein genes lactoglobulin (LGB), lactalbumin (LALBA), lactofarrin (LTF), and Whey acidic protein (WAP) and the genes which were potentially to regulate dairy goat milk protein synthesis at the level of transcription or translation [prolactin receptor (PRLR), AKT1, signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5), E74-Like Factor 5 (ELF5), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (EIF4E-BP1), S6kinase (S6K) and caveolin 1]. The results showed that all genes were up-regulated in lactation period. The expressions of PRLR, AKT1, STAT5, ELF5, and S6K were similar to mRNA expressions of milk proteins. Our results indicated that milk protein synthesis in dairy goat mammary gland was possibly regulated by these genes.

  3. From genes to milk: genomic organization and epigenetic regulation of the mammary transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Danielle G; Pollard, Katherine S; Martin, William F; Freeman Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Korf, Ian; German, J Bruce; Rijnkels, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Even in genomes lacking operons, a gene's position in the genome influences its potential for expression. The mechanisms by which adjacent genes are co-expressed are still not completely understood. Using lactation and the mammary gland as a model system, we explore the hypothesis that chromatin state contributes to the co-regulation of gene neighborhoods. The mammary gland represents a unique evolutionary model, due to its recent appearance, in the context of vertebrate genomes. An understanding of how the mammary gland is regulated to produce milk is also of biomedical and agricultural importance for human lactation and dairying. Here, we integrate epigenomic and transcriptomic data to develop a comprehensive regulatory model. Neighborhoods of mammary-expressed genes were determined using expression data derived from pregnant and lactating mice and a neighborhood scoring tool, G-NEST. Regions of open and closed chromatin were identified by ChIP-Seq of histone modifications H3K36me3, H3K4me2, and H3K27me3 in the mouse mammary gland and liver tissue during lactation. We found that neighborhoods of genes in regions of uniquely active chromatin in the lactating mammary gland, compared with liver tissue, were extremely rare. Rather, genes in most neighborhoods were suppressed during lactation as reflected in their expression levels and their location in regions of silenced chromatin. Chromatin silencing was largely shared between the liver and mammary gland during lactation, and what distinguished the mammary gland was mainly a small tissue-specific repertoire of isolated, expressed genes. These findings suggest that an advantage of the neighborhood organization is in the collective repression of groups of genes via a shared mechanism of chromatin repression. Genes essential to the mammary gland's uniqueness are isolated from neighbors, and likely have less tolerance for variation in expression, properties they share with genes responsible for an organism's survival.

  4. RANK Signaling Amplifies WNT-Responsive Mammary Progenitors through R-SPONDIN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purna A. Joshi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local signals must be integrated by mammary stem and progenitor cells to regulate their cyclic growth and turnover in the adult gland. Here, we show RANK-positive luminal progenitors exhibiting WNT pathway activation are selectively expanded in the human breast during the progesterone-high menstrual phase. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we examined mouse models and found that loss of RANK prevents the proliferation of hormone receptor-negative luminal mammary progenitors and basal cells, an accompanying loss of WNT activation, and, hence, a suppression of lobuloalveologenesis. We also show that R-spondin1 is depleted in RANK-null progenitors, and that its exogenous administration rescues key aspects of RANK deficiency by reinstating a WNT response and mammary cell expansion. Our findings point to a novel role of RANK in dictating WNT responsiveness to mediate hormone-induced changes in the growth dynamics of adult mammary cells.

  5. Alpha Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha Thalassemia Physicians often mistake alpha thalassemia trait for iron deficiency anemia and incorrectly prescribe iron supplements that have no effect 1 on the anemia. αα αα Normal alpha ...

  6. Expression and function of heregulin-α and its receptors in the mouse mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Heregulin-α (HRGα) is a cytokine secreted by the mammary mesenchyme, adjacent to lobuloalveolar structures. To understand the role of HRGα and its receptors in mammary glands, and the underlying mechanisms, we performed this study to determine the expression and localization of HRGα and its receptors ErbB2 and ErbB3. We also determined the role of HRGα in the development of mammary glands, β-casein expression and secretion, Rab3A protein expression and the phosphorylation of HRGα signaling molecules using confocal laser scanning microscopy, tissue culture, capillary electrophoresis, Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We found that a peak was on pregnancy day 15. Changes of ErbB2 and ErbB3 expression were positively and linearly correlated with HRGα, indicating that HRGα positively regulates ErbB2 and ErbB3 expression. During pregnancy, HRGα enhanced the phosphorylation of STAT5, p42/p44, p38, PKC and Rab3A protein expression, stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of the ductal epithelial cells of mammary glands, and increased and maintained the expression and secretion of β-casein. During lactation, HRGα enhanced the phosphorylation of STAT5 and p38, inhibited the phosphorylation of PKC and Rab3A protein expression, maintained the morphology of the mammary glands and increased the secretion of lactoprotein to reduce the expression of β-casein in mammary epithelial cells. During involution, HRGα induced the phosphorylation of STAT3 and Rab3A protein expression, and inhibited the phosphorylation of PKC to stimulate the degeneration of mammary epithelial cells. It also inhibited the secretion of β-casein, resulting in increased levels of β-casein in mammary epithelial cells.

  7. Saturated fatty acids stimulate and insulin suppresses CIDE-A expression in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Tomo; Haga, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Katoh, Kazuo; Obara, Yoshiaki

    2009-07-10

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A (CIDE-A) was first identified by its sequence homology with the N-terminal domain of DNA fragmentation factor (DFF). CIDE-A negatively regulates the activity of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue. CIDE-A and UCP1 mRNA were detected by RT-PCR in cloned bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) and lactating bovine mammary glands. Physiological concentrations of saturated fatty acids (stearate and palmitate), but not unsaturated fatty acids (oleate and linoleate) induced up-regulation of CIDE-A mRNA in bMEC. Treatment with insulin (5-10 ng/ml) induced down-regulation of CIDE-A and UCP1. The expression levels of CIDE-A and UCP1 mRNA in bovine mammary glands at various stages of the lactation cycle were determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. CIDE-A mRNA expression at peak lactation (2 months after parturition) was significantly higher than at dry off and non-pregnancy but not late lactation. These results suggest that CIDE-A and UCP1 are regulated by insulin and/or fatty acids in mammary epithelial cells and lactating mammary glands, and thereby play an important role in lipid and energy metabolism.

  8. Embryonic stem cells are redirected to non-tumorigenic epithelial cell fate by interaction with the mammary microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Corinne A; Bruno, Robert D; Mack, David L; Gonzales, Monica; Castro, Nadia P; Salomon, David S; Smith, Gilbert H

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to redirect mouse Embryonic Stem (ES) cells from a tumorigenic phenotype to a normal mammary epithelial phenotype in vivo. Mixing LacZ-labeled ES cells with normal mouse mammary epithelial cells at ratios of 1:5 and 1:50 in phosphate buffered saline and immediately inoculating them into epithelium-divested mammary fat pads of immune-compromised mice accomplished this. Our results indicate that tumorigenesis occurs only when normal mammary ductal growth is not achieved in the inoculated fat pads. When normal mammary gland growth occurs, we find ES cells (LacZ+) progeny interspersed with normal mammary cell progeny in the mammary epithelial structures. We demonstrate that these progeny, marked by LacZ expression, differentiate into multiple epithelial subtypes including steroid receptor positive luminal cells and myoepithelial cells indicating that the ES cells are capable of epithelial multipotency in this context but do not form teratomas. In addition, in secondary transplants, ES cell progeny proliferate, contribute apparently normal mammary progeny, maintain their multipotency and do not produce teratomas.

  9. Embryonic stem cells are redirected to non-tumorigenic epithelial cell fate by interaction with the mammary microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne A Boulanger

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to redirect mouse Embryonic Stem (ES cells from a tumorigenic phenotype to a normal mammary epithelial phenotype in vivo. Mixing LacZ-labeled ES cells with normal mouse mammary epithelial cells at ratios of 1:5 and 1:50 in phosphate buffered saline and immediately inoculating them into epithelium-divested mammary fat pads of immune-compromised mice accomplished this. Our results indicate that tumorigenesis occurs only when normal mammary ductal growth is not achieved in the inoculated fat pads. When normal mammary gland growth occurs, we find ES cells (LacZ+ progeny interspersed with normal mammary cell progeny in the mammary epithelial structures. We demonstrate that these progeny, marked by LacZ expression, differentiate into multiple epithelial subtypes including steroid receptor positive luminal cells and myoepithelial cells indicating that the ES cells are capable of epithelial multipotency in this context but do not form teratomas. In addition, in secondary transplants, ES cell progeny proliferate, contribute apparently normal mammary progeny, maintain their multipotency and do not produce teratomas.

  10. Long-term alpha interferon and lamivudine combination therapy in non-responder patients with anti-HBe-positive chronic hepatitis B: Results of an open, controlled trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Francesca Jaboli; Marco Montagnani; Antonio Colecchia; Davide Festi; Letizia Bacchi Reggiani; Enrico Roda; Giuseppe Mazzella; Carlo Fabbri; Stefania Liva; Francesco Azzaroli; Giovanni Nigro; Silvia Giovanelli; Francesco Ferrara; Anna Miracolo; Sabrina Marchetto

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of long-term combination therapy with alpha interferon and lamivudine in non-responsive patients with anti-HBe-positive chronic hepatitis B.METHODS: 34 patients received combination treatment (1 month lamivudine, 12 month lamivudine+interferon, 6month lamivudine), 24 received lamivudine (12 months),24 received interferon (12 months). Interferon was administered at 6 MU tiw and lamivudine at 100 mg orally once daily. Patients were followed up for 6 months after treatment.RESULTS: At the end of treatment, HBV DNA negativity rates were 88 % with lamivudine+interferon, 99 % with lamivudine and 55 % with interferon, (P=0.004, combination therapy vs. interferon, and P=0.001 lamivudine vs.interferon), and serum transaminase normalization rates were 84 %, 91% and 53 % (P=0.01 combination therapy vs. interferon, and P=0.012 lamivudine vs. interferon). Six months later, HBV DNA negativity rates were 44 % with lamivudine+interferon, 33 % with lamivudine and 25 % with interferon, and serum transaminase normalization rates were 61%, 42 % and 45 %, respectively, without statistical significance. No YMDD variants were observed with lamivudine+interferon (vs. 12 % with lamivudine). The combination therapy appeared to be safe. CONCLUSION: Although viral clearance and transaminase normalization are slower with long-term lamivudine+interferon than that with lamivudine alone, the combination regimen seems to provide more lasting benefits and to protect against the appearance of YMDD variants. Studies with other regimens regarding sequence and duration are needed.

  11. Prevention of Human Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    of HER-2/neu oncogene-transformed human mammary epithelial cells by a green tea polyphenol. Breast Cancer Res Treat 38:100; 1996 8. Telang NT, Katdare...apoptosis and anchorage-dependent colony forming efficiency. Appendix Figure 5 (AF-5): Effect of (-) epigallo catechin gallate (EGCG) on 184- B5/HER cells is... tea polyphenol. Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 768: 215- 222, 1995. Appendix Pubilcation 5 (AP-5): Fishman J, Osborne MP, Telang NT. The role of estrogen in

  12. Phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase alpha catalytic subunit mutation and response to neoadjuvant endocrine therapy for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Matthew J; Lin, Li; Crowder, Robert; Tao, Yu; Hoog, Jeremy; Snider, Jacqueline; Davies, Sherri; DeSchryver, Katherine; Evans, Dean B; Steinseifer, Jutta; Bandaru, Raj; Liu, WeiHua; Gardner, Humphrey; Semiglazov, Vladimir; Watson, Mark; Hunt, Kelly; Olson, John; Baselga, José

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the alpha catalytic subunit of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PIK3CA) occur in ~30% of ER positive breast cancers. We therefore sought to determine the impact of PIK3CA mutation on response to neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Methods Exon 9 (helical domain - HD) and Exon 20 (kinase domain- KD) mutations in PIK3CA were determined samples from four neoadjuvant endocrine therapy trials. Interactions with clinical, pathological and biomarker response parameters were examined. Results A weak negative interaction between PIK3CA mutation status and clinical response to neoadjuvant endocrine treatment was detected (N=235 P=<0.05), but not with treatment-induced changes in Ki67-based proliferation index (N=418). Despite these findings, PIK3CA KD mutation was a favorable prognostic factor for relapse-free survival (RFS log rank P=0.02) in the P024 trial (N=153). The favorable prognostic effect was maintained in a multivariable analysis (N=125) that included the preoperative prognostic index (PEPI), an approach to predicting RFS based on post neoadjuvant endocrine therapy pathological stage, ER and Ki67 levels (HR for no PIK3CA KD mutation, 14, CI 1.9–105 P=0.01). Conclusion PIK3CA mutation status did not strongly interact with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy responsiveness in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Nonetheless, as with other recent studies, a favorable interaction between PIK3CA kinase domain mutation and prognosis was detected. The mechanism for the favorable prognostic impact of PIK3CA mutation status therefore remains unexplained. PMID:19844788

  13. Biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mammary epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Daniel; Kittrell, Frances S.; Shepard, Anne; Stephens, L. Clifton; Jiang, Cheng; Lu, Junxuan; Allred, D. Craig; McCarthy, Maureen; Ullrich, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The absence of the tumor suppressor gene p53 confers an increased tumorigenic risk for mammary epithelial cells. In this report, we describe the biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mouse mammary epithelium in a p53 wild-type environment. Mammary epithelium from p53 null mice was transplanted serially into the cleared mammary fat pads of p53 wild-type BALB/c female to develop stable outgrowth lines. The outgrowth lines were transplanted for 10 generations. The outgrowths were ductal in morphology and progressed through ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ before invasive cancer. The preneoplastic outgrowth lines were immortal and exhibited activated telomerase activity. They are estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive, and aneuploid, and had various levels of tumorigenic potential. The biological and genetic properties of these lines are distinct from those found in most hyperplastic alveolar outgrowth lines, the form of mammary preneoplasia occurring in most traditional models of murine mammary tumorigenesis. These results indicate that the preneoplastic cell populations found in this genetically engineered model are similar in biological properties to a subset of precurser lesions found in human breast cancer and provide a unique model to identify secondary events critical for tumorigenicity and invasiveness.

  14. Elevated Krüppel-like factor 4 transcription factor in canine mammary carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Kun-Tu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Krüppel-like factors (KLFs are critical regulators of biological and physiological systems and have been extensively studied for their roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival in the context of cancer. Among the KLFs, KLF4 is highly expressed in human breast cancers and plays an oncogenic role. The present study examined the expression of KLF4 and assessed its significance in canine mammary carcinoma. Results Immunohistochemistry was employed to investigate the expression of KLF4 in 142 cases of canine mammary tumor. 75 of the 142 (52.8% cases were histologically confirmed as mammary carcinoma. Quantification of immunohistochemistry was carried out using Quick score which multiply the staining intensity by the percentage of positive cells. High KLF4 expression was identified in 44 of the 75 (59% dogs with mammary carcinoma and none in the benign cases. High KLF4 expression occurred only in the tumor cells and not the adjacent normal cells in mammary carcinoma (P Conclusions KLF4 is highly and frequently expressed in canine mammary carcinoma and correlates with a more aggressive phenotype.

  15. Trefoil factor 3 is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Nagarajan; Kang, Jian; Kong, Xiangjun; Tang, Jianzhong; Perry, Jo K; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Miller, Lance D; Liu, Edison T; Mertani, Hichem C; Zhu, Tao; Grandison, Prudence M; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E

    2010-12-01

    We report herein that trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased cell proliferation and survival, enhanced anchorage-independent growth, and promoted migration and invasion. Moreover, forced expression of TFF3 increased tumor size in xenograft models. Conversely, depletion of endogenous TFF3 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased the oncogenicity and invasiveness of mammary carcinoma cells. Neutralization of secreted TFF3 by antibody promoted apoptosis, decreased cell growth in vitro, and arrested mammary carcinoma xenograft growth. TFF3 expression was significantly correlated to decreased survival of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased ER transcriptional activity, promoted estrogen-independent growth, and produced resistance to tamoxifen and fulvestrant in vitro and to tamoxifen in xenograft models. siRNA-mediated depletion or antibody inhibition of TFF3 significantly enhanced the efficacy of antiestrogens. Increased TFF3 expression was observed in tamoxifen-resistant (TAMR) cells and antibody inhibition of TFF3 in TAMR cells improved tamoxifen sensitivity. Functional antagonism of TFF3 therefore warrants consideration as a novel therapeutic strategy for mammary carcinoma.

  16. Substitution of arginine for glycine at position 154 of the {alpha}1 chain of type I collagen in a variant of osteogenesis imperfecta: Comparison to previous cases with the same mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, J.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Castells, S. [Univ. Hospital of Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    1996-01-11

    A substitution of arginine for glycine at amino acid position 154 of the {alpha}1(I) collagen chain was found in a father and his three children. The phenotype of the patients includes manifestations of types I and III/IV osteogenesis imperfecta, but appears to be milder than that of the previously described two unrelated patients that had the identical mutation in the {alpha}1(I) collagen chain. The variability in the phenotype raises the possibility of epistatic loci or environmental effects on expression of the disorder. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Sequence and single-base polymorphisms of the bovine alpha-lactalbumin 5'-flanking region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleck, G T; Bremel, R D

    1993-04-30

    The alpha-lactalbumin (alpha LA)-encoding gene is a potential quantitative trait locus in dairy animals. In cattle, the production of alpha LA is tightly coupled to the onset of lactation and it serves as a regulatory subunit of the enzyme responsible for lactose synthesis. Lactose is the major osmole controlling water movement in the mammary gland. To better understand the control of bovine alpha LA expression, the 5'-flanking region of a Holstein alpha LA gene was cloned and sequenced. The sequenced clone contains 1952 bp of 5'-flanking region and 66-bp of the protein-coding region. Three single-bp polymorphisms were identified within this region. These polymorphisms occur at positions +15, +21 and +54 relative to the mRNA transcription start point (tsp). The +15 and +21 variations occur in the region encoding the 5'-untranslated region of the mRNA-coding sequence. The +54 polymorphism is a silent mutation in the SP-coding region of the gene. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR, Cetus)-based screening method has been employed to analyze the genotype of cattle at the +15 position. A total of 501 randomly selected cattle from seven breeds were screened for this allele. Of these animals, only the Holstein breed of cattle was found to contain the +15 variation and it occurs at a gene frequency of 32%. Sequence comparisons were conducted between the 5'-flanking regions of the bovine-milk-protein encoding genes, alpha LA, beta-casein and alpha S1-casein, which are coordinately expressed. Regions of similarity extending to 350 bp in length were observed between these sequences.

  18. Pleiotropic effects of polymorphism of the gene diacylglycerol-O-transferase 1 (DGAT1) in the mammary gland tissue of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mach Casellas, N.; Blum, Y.; Bannink, A.; Causeur, D.; Houee-Bigot, M.; Lagarrigue, S.; Smits, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Microarray analysis was used to identify genes whose expression in the mammary gland of Holstein-Friesian dairy cows was affected by the nonconservative Ala to Lys amino acid substitution at position 232 in exon VIII of the diacylglycerol-O-transferase 1 (DGAT1) gene. Mammary gland biopsies of 9 hom

  19. Mammary hypertrophy in an ovariohysterectomized cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukay, B P; Stevenson, D A

    1983-05-01

    A four year old ovariohysterectomized domestic short-haired cat under treatment for behavioral urine spraying and idiopathic alopecia developed mammary gland hypertrophy following treatment with megestrol acetate. Withdrawal of the progestin and treatment with androgen failed to cause regression of the hypertrophy. The affected mammary gland was surgically excised and recovery was uneventful.

  20. Positive Emotional Experience: Induced by Vibroacoustic Stimulation Using a Body Monochord in Patients with Psychosomatic Disorders: Is Associated with an Increase in EEG-Theta and a Decrease in EEG-Alpha Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, H; Tamm, S; Fendel, U; Rose, M; Klapp, B F; Bösel, R

    2016-07-01

    Relaxation and meditation techniques are generally characterized by focusing attention, which is associated with an increase of frontal EEG Theta. Some studies on music perception suggest an activation of Frontal Midline Theta during emotionally positive attribution, others display a lateralization of electrocortical processes in the attribution of music induced emotion of different valence. The present study examined the effects of vibroacoustic stimulation using a Body Monochord and the conventional relaxation music from an audio CD on the spontaneous EEG of patients suffering from psychosomatic disorders (N = 60). Each treatment took about 20 min and was presented to the patients in random order. Subjective experience was recorded via self-rating scale. EEG power spectra of the Theta, Alpha-1 and Alpha-2 bands were analysed and compard between the two treatment conditions. There was no lateralization of electrocortical activity in terms of the emotional experience of the musical pieces. A reduction in Alpha-2 power occurred during both treatments. An emotionally positive attribution of the experience of the vibroacoustically induced relaxation state is characterized by a more pronounced release of control. In the context of focused attention this is interpreted as flow experience. The spontaneous EEG showed an increase in Theta power, particularly in the frontal medial and central medial area, and a greater reduction in Alpha-2 power. The intensity of positive emotional feelings during the CD music showed no significant effect on the increase in Theta power.

  1. CLEC4F is an inducible C-type lectin in F4/80-positive cells and is involved in alpha-galactosylceramide presentation in liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ya Yang

    Full Text Available CLEC4F, a member of C-type lectin, was first purified from rat liver extract with high binding affinity to fucose, galactose (Gal, N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc, and un-sialylated glucosphingolipids with GalNAc or Gal terminus. However, the biological functions of CLEC4F have not been elucidated. To address this question, we examined the expression and distribution of murine CLEC4F, determined its binding specificity by glycan array, and investigated its function using CLEC4F knockout (Clec4f-/- mice. We found that CLEC4F is a heavily glycosylated membrane protein co-expressed with F4/80 on Kupffer cells. In contrast to F4/80, CLEC4F is detectable in fetal livers at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5 but not in yolk sac, suggesting the expression of CLEC4F is induced as cells migrate from yolk cells to the liver. Even though CLEC4F is not detectable in tissues outside liver, both residential Kupffer cells and infiltrating mononuclear cells surrounding liver abscesses are CLEC4F-positive upon Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes infection. While CLEC4F has strong binding to Gal and GalNAc, terminal fucosylation inhibits CLEC4F recognition to several glycans such as Fucosyl GM1, Globo H, Bb3∼4 and other fucosyl-glycans. Moreover, CLEC4F interacts with alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer in a calcium-dependent manner and participates in the presentation of α-GalCer to natural killer T (NKT cells. This suggests that CLEC4F is a C-type lectin with diverse binding specificity expressed on residential Kupffer cells and infiltrating monocytes in the liver, and may play an important role to modulate glycolipids presentation on Kupffer cells.

  2. Repeated administration of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, but not positive allosteric modulators, increases alpha7 nAChR levels in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H;

    2010-01-01

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is an important target for treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, the receptor desensitizes rapidly in vitro, which has led to concern regarding its applicability as a clinically relevant drug target...

  3. Treatment of HER2-positive breast carcinomatous meningitis with intrathecal administration of {alpha}-particle-emitting {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boskovitz, Abraham; McLendon, Roger E.; Okamura, Tatsunori [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Sampson, John H. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Bigner, Darell D. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)], E-mail: zalut001@mc.duke.edu

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Carcinomatous meningitis (CM) is a devastating disease characterized by the dissemination of malignant tumor cells into the subarachnoid space along the brain and spine. Systemic treatment with monoclonal antibody (mAb) trastuzumab can be effective against HER2-positive systemic breast carcinoma but, like other therapies, is ineffective against CM. The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of {alpha}-particle emitting {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab following intrathecal administration in a rat model of breast carcinoma CM. Methods: Athymic rats were injected intrathecally with MCF-7/HER2-18 breast carcinoma cells through a surgically implanted indwelling intrathecal catheter. In Experiment 1, animals received 33 or 66 {mu}Ci {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab, cold trastuzumab or saline. In Experiment 2, animals were inoculated with a lower tumor burden and received 46 or 92 {mu}Ci {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab or saline. In Experiment 3, animals received 28 {mu}Ci {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab, 30 {mu}Ci {sup 211}At-labeled TPS3.2 control mAb or saline. Histopathological analysis of the neuroaxis was performed at the end of the study. Results: In Experiment 1, median survival increased from 21 days for the saline and cold trastuzumab groups to 45 and 48 days for 33 and 66 {mu}Ci {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab, respectively. In Experiment 2, median survival increased from 23 days for saline controls to 68 and 92 days for 46 and 92 {mu}Ci {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab, respectively. In Experiment 3, median survival increased from 20 days to 29 and 36 days for animals treated with {sup 211}At-labeled TPS3.2 and {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab, respectively. Long-term survivors were observed exclusively in the {sup 211}At-trastuzumab-treated groups. Conclusion: Intrathecal {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab shows promise as a treatment for patients with HER2-positive breast CM.

  4. Epigenetic Modifications Unlock the Milk Protein Gene Loci during Mouse Mammary Gland Development and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnkels, Monique; Freeman-Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Potluri, Vani; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei; Lemay, Danielle G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organization plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and underlies epigenetic regulation during development and differentiation. However, the role of chromatin organization in mammary gland development and differentiation is less well-defined. Here, we have studied the changes in chromatin organization at the milk protein gene loci (casein, whey acidic protein, and others) in the mouse mammary gland before and after functional differentiation. Methodology/Principal Findings Distal regulatory elements within the casein gene cluster and whey acidic protein gene region have an open chromatin organization after pubertal development, while proximal promoters only gain open-chromatin marks during pregnancy in conjunction with the major induction of their expression. In contrast, other milk protein genes, such as alpha-lactalbumin, already have an open chromatin organization in the mature virgin gland. Changes in chromatin organization in the casein gene cluster region that are present after puberty persisted after lactation has ceased, while the changes which occurred during pregnancy at the gene promoters were not maintained. In general, mammary gland expressed genes and their regulatory elements exhibit developmental stage- and tissue-specific chromatin organization. Conclusions/Significance A progressive gain of epigenetic marks indicative of open/active chromatin on genes marking functional differentiation accompanies the development of the mammary gland. These results support a model in which a chromatin organization is established during pubertal development that is then poised to respond to the systemic hormonal signals of pregnancy and lactation to achieve the

  5. Activation of retinoic acid receptor alpha is sufficient for full induction of retinoid responses in SK-BR-3 and T47D human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S M; Offterdinger, M; Huber, H; Grunt, T W

    2000-10-01

    Retinoid signaling via retinoic acid (RA) and retinoid X receptors (RARs and RXRs) regulates mammary epithelial cell growth and differentiation. Loss of RAR-beta might represent an early event during breast carcinogenesis. Higher differentiated, estrogen-dependent, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (ER+) mammary carcinoma cells have been found to contain relatively high levels of RAR-alpha and to be responsive to retinoids, whereas most undifferentiated, estrogen-independent, ER-negative (ER-) cells are characterized by low RAR-alpha expression and by retinoid resistance. In contrast, RAR-gamma is detectable at equal levels in both ER+ and ER- cells. In the present investigation, we directly examined the relative contribution of the distinct retinoid receptors to the retinoid response of breast cancer cells by comparing the effects of low concentrations of specific retinoids, which selectively activate individual receptor subtypes, on growth, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and on the autoregulation of RAR-alpha and RAR-gamma in ER- SK-BR-3 and ER+ T47D breast cancer cells. In vitro growth activity was determined by using a colorimetric cell viability assay and analysis of cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis was performed by flow cytometry of propidium iodide-stained or fluorescent Annexin V-labeled cells, respectively, whereas expression of RAR-alpha and RAR-gamma was determined by Northern blotting. Both cell lines are retinoid sensitive and express high amounts of RAR-alpha, RAR-gamma, and RXR-alpha. RAR-alpha-selective compounds (AM80 and AM580) inhibit cell growth, induce G1 arrest, stimulate apoptosis, and up-regulate RAR-alpha and RAR-gamma mRNA as efficiently as RAR/RXR-pan-reactive (9-cis RA) and RAR-pan-reactive retinoids (all-trans RA, TTNPB). Remarkably, an RAR-alpha antagonist (Ro 41-5253) not only blocks the RAR-alpha-selective agonists but also the pan-reactive compounds. In contrast, RAR-13-selective (CD417), RAR-gamma-selective (CD437/AHPN

  6. Site of iodination in rat mammary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strum, J.M.

    1978-10-01

    The ability of the mammary gland to take up and organically bind radioiodide was studied in non-pregnant, pregnant, and lactating rats. Autoradiography was used to determine whether duct cells or alveolar cells are responsible for iodination in the rat mammary gland. Iodination was not detected in mammary glands from non-pregnant rats, but occurred late in the twelfth day of gestation and continued throughout pregnancy and lactation. Protein-containing vacuoles in alveolar cells and casein-like proteins in milk were the major sites where iodination occurred within the gland. Milk proteins in the lumens of ductules adjacent to alveoli were also iodinated. In contrast, ducts, myoepithelial cells, fat cells, blood vessels and other histological components of the gland did not show iodinating capability. Cytochemistry was also used to identify endogenous mammary peroxidase activity in the same glands, and it was found that the presence and location of this enzyme were correlated with the ability to iodinate.

  7. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Samantha R; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche where communication between epithelial cells and signals from the systemic hormonal milieu, as well as from extra-cellular matrix, influence cell fate decisions and contribute to tissue homeostasis. We review the discovery, definition and regulation of the mammary cellular hierarchy and we describe the development of the concepts that have guided our investigations. We outline recent advances in in vivo lineage tracing that is now challenging many of our assumptions regarding the behavior of mammary stem cells, and we show how understanding these cellular lineages has altered our view of breast cancer.

  8. Selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim; Grøn, P.; Langhoff, Otto;

    1991-01-01

    /l and TNM stage II 76 +/- 13 micrograms selenium/l), indicating disease-mediated changes. The evaluation of selenium as a risk indicator in human breast cancer was therefore restricted to TNM stage I patients (n = 36). Multiple logistic regression analyses including variables associated with selenium levels...... revealed no association between selenium levels and breast cancer risk.......In a case-referent study on the possible role of selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis, serum selenium was found to be 79 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 66 cases and 81 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 93 referents. An internal trend in serum selenium was observed among cases (TNM stage I 81 +/- 11 micrograms...

  9. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    SV40Tag is transcriptionally activated during pregnancy and lactation , and the mice are predisposed to develop mammary cancer after 3 pregnancies...and lactations . Using this model, populations of marked cells can be collected for integrated analysis of gene expression, promoter usage, and DNA...completed over the first 6 months on the job . Training included mouse husbandry and colony management, mammary cell isolations in preparation for

  10. Regulation of leptin in involution of mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Meng; LI Qingzhang

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, a protein hormone produced and secreted predominantly by white adipose tissue, has a critical role in the regulation and coordination of energy metabolism. Leptin is produced in the mammary gland by the fat tissue or by the mammary epithelium. In vitro study has shown that leptin triggers apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells. Mammary gland involution is characterized by extensive apoptosis of the epithelial cells. At the onset of involution, STAT3 is specifically activated. Various studies show that leptin act as a paracrine and autocrin factor to influence mammary epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. This paper reviewed the function of leptin to the involution of mammary gland.

  11. Internal mammary chain irradiation in breast cancer: State of the art; Radiotherapie de la chaine mammaire interne dans les cancers du sein: etat des lieux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auberdiac, P.; Cartier, L.; Hau Desbat, N.H.; De Laroche, G.; Magne, N. [Unite de curietherapie, departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie de la Loire, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex (France); Chargari, C. [Service d' oncologie radiotherapie, hopital d' instruction des armees du Val-de-Grace, 74, boulevard Port-Royal, 75230 Paris cedex 5 (France); Zioueche, A. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87000 Limoges (France); Melis, A. [Departement d' oncologie medicale, institut de cancerologie de la Loire, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex (France); Kirova, Y.M. [Service de radiotherapie oncologique, institut Curie, 26, rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-04-15

    Radiation therapy has a major role in the management of infiltrative breast cancers. However, there is no consensus for the prophylactic treatment of the internal mammary chain (IMC), with strategies that show strong differences according to centers and physicians. Indications for internal mammary chain radiotherapy are debated, since this treatment significantly increases the dose delivered to the heart and leads to potential technical difficulties. Important prospective data recently suggested that internal mammary chain radiotherapy would not be necessary, even in cases of internal or central tumor locations, or in patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. Although these data warrant confirmation by two other prospective trials, there is evidence that the indications for internal mammary chain radiotherapy should be careful and that high quality techniques should be used for decreasing the dose delivered to the heart. This review of literature presents the state of art on the radiotherapy of internal mammary chain, with special focus on the indications, techniques, and potential toxicity. (authors)

  12. Microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in the bovine mammary gland during lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Mammary glands undergo functional and metabolic changes during virgin,lactation and dry periods.A total of 122 genes were identified as differentially expressed,including 79 up-regulated and 43 down-regulated genes during lactation compared with virgin and dry periods.Gene ontology analysis showed the functional classification of the up-regulated genes in lactation,including transport,biosynthetic process,signal transduction,catalytic activity,immune system process,cell death,and positive regulation of the developmental process.Microarray data clarified molecular events in bovine mammary gland lactation.

  13. The internal mammary vein: an alternate route for central venous access with an implantable port.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime-Solis, E; Anaya-Ortega, M; Moctezuma-Espinosa, J

    1994-10-01

    Central venous catheterization in pediatric patients has, among other risks, flebitis and thrombosis, and finally occlusion of the superior and inferior venae cavae, making long-term catheterization and multiple venous cutdown more difficult. Use of the internal mammary vein might be an alternative procedure to provide sure and easy access to the central venous circulation. The authors report on a patient with multiple venous cutdown and thrombosis of the inferior vena cava, in whom the internal mammary vein was used for placement of a vascular device. The procedure is technically easy, and no special positioning of the patient is required.

  14. Role of miRNA in Mammary Gland Development and Lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qing-zhang; Wang Chun-mei; Gao Xue-jun

    2014-01-01

    miRNA can regulate development and milk yield of the mammary gland through epigenetic mechanism. miRNA can directly and indirectly modulate the activity of the epigenetic machinery, target genes through post-inhibition of translation initiation, mediate miRNA decay, target genes and inhibit the positive regulation, regulate tone modification, and regulate DNA methylation of target genes. Here we reviewed the role of miRNAs in mammary gland development and lactation. Researching miRNA in mammary gland development and lactation process, and understanding the response of the epigenetic mechanisms to external stimuli will be an important necessity to devise new technologies for maximizing their activity and milk production in the dairy cow.

  15. Analysis of EGFR and HER-2 expressions in ductal carcinomas in situ in canine mammary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.L.D. Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecular evidence has shown that ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS may develop into invasive carcinoma of the canine mammary gland, and mutations in proto-oncogenes HER2 and EGFR; two members of the family of epidermal growth factor receptors, may be involved in this process. The purpose of this study was the characterization of the immunohistochemical expression of the EGFR and HER2 proteins in the process of neoplastic transformation, supposedly present in ductal carcinomas in situ in canine mammary glands. Fifteen cases of DCIS were evaluated, with a higher expression of HER2 and EGFR being observed in low-grade carcinomas when compared with high-grade neoplasms, and with a high positive statistical correlation in the latter. Results suggest that aggressive tumors tend to lose the expression of EGFR and HER2 simultaneously. The loss of the expression of these markers may be related to the process of neoplastic progression in canine mammary tumors.

  16. From genes to milk: Genomic organization and epigenetic regulation of the mammary transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even in genomes lacking operons, a gene's position in the genome influences its potential for expression. The mechanisms by which adjacent genes are co-expressed are still not completely understood. Using lactation and the mammary gland as a model system, we explore the hypothesis that chromatin sta...

  17. The gene desert mammary carcinoma susceptibility locus Mcs1a regulates Nr2f1 modifying mammary epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart M G Smits

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have revealed that many low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are located in non-protein coding genomic regions; however, few have been characterized. In a comparative genetics approach to model such loci in a rat breast cancer model, we previously identified the mammary carcinoma susceptibility locus Mcs1a. We now localize Mcs1a to a critical interval (277 Kb within a gene desert. Mcs1a reduces mammary carcinoma multiplicity by 50% and acts in a mammary cell-autonomous manner. We developed a megadeletion mouse model, which lacks 535 Kb of sequence containing the Mcs1a ortholog. Global gene expression analysis by RNA-seq revealed that in the mouse mammary gland, the orphan nuclear receptor gene Nr2f1/Coup-tf1 is regulated by Mcs1a. In resistant Mcs1a congenic rats, as compared with susceptible congenic control rats, we found Nr2f1 transcript levels to be elevated in mammary gland, epithelial cells, and carcinoma samples. Chromatin looping over ∼820 Kb of sequence from the Nr2f1 promoter to a strongly conserved element within the Mcs1a critical interval was identified. This element contains a 14 bp indel polymorphism that affects a human-rat-mouse conserved COUP-TF binding motif and is a functional Mcs1a candidate. In both the rat and mouse models, higher Nr2f1 transcript levels are associated with higher abundance of luminal mammary epithelial cells. In both the mouse mammary gland and a human breast cancer global gene expression data set, we found Nr2f1 transcript levels to be strongly anti-correlated to a gene cluster enriched in cell cycle-related genes. We queried 12 large publicly available human breast cancer gene expression studies and found that the median NR2F1 transcript level is consistently lower in 'triple-negative' (ER-PR-HER2- breast cancers as compared with 'receptor-positive' breast cancers. Our data suggest that the non-protein coding locus Mcs1a regulates Nr2f1, which is a candidate

  18. Effect of bisphenol A on morphology, apoptosis and proliferation in the resting mammary gland of the adult albino rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marwa A A; Elbakry, Reda H; Bayomy, Naglaa A

    2016-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic oestrogen that is extensively used in a wide range of daily used plastic products. This makes it one of the environmental chemicals that may have impact on human health. Due to its oestrogenic effect, BPA might affect the mammary gland. This study aimed to investigate the influence of BPA on the histological structure of the mammary gland of the adult female albino rat and its effect on epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis status, in addition to its possible modulating effect on estrogen receptor expression. Thirty female adult albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups. The rats in the experimental group were gavaged with 5 mg/kg BPA daily for 8 weeks. The mammary glands were dissected and processed for histological and immunohistochemical stains for Ki-67, activated caspase-3 and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α). BPA induced an increase in the number and size of the acini and ducts in the mammary gland of treated rats with hyperplasia of their lining epithelial cells. The collagen fibre content was significantly increased in the connective tissue stroma separating the ducts. Immunohistochemical results showed a significant increase in Ki-67 and caspase-3, but a non-significant increase in ER-α expression. Bisphenol A induced structural changes and affected the proliferation rate of mammary glands, so it might be one of the predisposing factors for breast cancer.

  19. Use of somatic cells from goat milk for dynamic studies of gene expression in the mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutinaud, M; Rulquin, H; Keisler, D H; Djiane, J; Jammes, H

    2002-05-01

    Somatic cells are present in the milk throughout lactation and consist of leukocytes and epithelial cells exfoliated from the mammary epithelium. Our objective was to determine the efficacy of using somatic cells from goat milk for dynamic studies of gene expression in the mammary gland. Over a 4-wk interval, cells were isolated from daily morning milk samples and samples taken 30 min after milking. They were characterized by direct cell counts and by flow cytometry analysis after immunostaining with antibodies directed against cytokeratin and CD45, a common leukocyte antigen. Epithelial cell counts within the morning milk ranged from 15 to 45% of total milk somatic cells. After-milking samples contained twice as many cells as did morning milk samples. The RNA was extracted from the somatic cells of both types of milk samples with equivalent efficiency (a mean of 1.2 microg RNA/mL of milk). Four mRNA variants of the alpha-S1 casein gene were detected by Northern blot analysis and the amount of each mRNA in milk cells was related to protein concentration in milk. The comparison between mRNA from the mammary gland and from congruently collected milk cells showed that relative amounts of mRNA for each milk-protein (alpha-S1 and kappa-casein and alactalbumin) were conserved. In a third experiment, daily milk cell RNA preparations were extracted to assess the effect of growth hormone (GH) on mammary gene expression; four goats were separated into two groups in order to perform a switch-back design consisting of three treatment weeks: Control, GH-Control or GH-Control-GH. In this study, treatment of goats with GH increased milk yields by 5%. Throughout the control and GH treatments, the expression of the three milk-protein genes studied were highly and significantly correlated (r = 0.949 and r = 0.958, P milk-protein mRNA abundances increased with the same pattern. In conclusion, the opportunity to use milk somatic cells for RNA preparation and analysis provides a

  20. Cox-2 levels in canine mammary tumors, including inflammatory mammary carcinoma: clinicopathological features and prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroga, Felisbina Luisa; Perez-Alenza, Maria Dolores; Silvan, Gema; Peña, Laura; Lopes, Carlos; Illera, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (Cox-2) plays an important role in mammary carcinogenesis, nevertheless, its role in canine mammary tumors, and particularly in inflammatory mammary carcinoma (IMC), is unknown. Tumor Cox-2 levels were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay, in post-surgical tumor homogenates of 129 mammary tumors (62 dysplasias and benign tumors, 57 malignant non-IMC and 10 IMC) from 57 female dogs. The highest Cox-2 values were detected in the IMC group. In non-IMC malignant tumors, high values of Cox-2 were related to skin ulceration (p IMC cases could indicate a special role of Cox-2 in the inflammatory phenotype and open the possibility of additional new therapeutic approaches in this special type of mammary cancer in humans and dogs.

  1. Construction of a Mammary-specific Expression Vector of Human α- defensin- 1 ( HNP- 1) Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue YANG; Jing-Ping OU YANG; Bao-Hua WANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Defensins, also called human neutrophil peptides(HNP), are small cationic peptides with broad antimicrobial activity[1]. Human defensins are highly abundant in the cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Alpha-defensin-1 is an important mediator in either innate immunity or anti-infection. It can be developed to be an ideal new type antibiotic and may provide a better solution for the present situation of extensive antibiotics-resistence. It is difficult to achieve amount of antimicrobial peptides from nature sources. Transgenic mammary gland bioreactors offer a safe and cost effective source to produce important proteins. The purpose of this study was to construct a mammary-specific expression plasmid containing beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene promoter and human α-defensin-1 (HNP-1) gene.

  2. Prevalence of Glomerulopathies in Canine Mammary Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of paraneoplastic glomerulopathy, especially associated with carcinoma, are a matter of debate and the causal link between cancer and glomerular diseases remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate renal biopsies of selected bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma. We hypothesized that dogs with mammary carcinomas would show histologic evidence of glomerular pathology. A prospective study was performed in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma that were undergoing tumor resection and ovariohysterectomy. We evaluated renal biopsies of 32 bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma and 11 control dogs without mammary gland neoplasia. Samples were obtained from the left kidney and the biopsy material was divided for light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Light microscopy abnormalities were identified in 78.1% of dogs with mammary carcinoma (n = 25) and in none of the dogs in the control group. Focal glomerular mesangial matrix expansion was the most common alteration (n = 15, 60.0%), but mesangial cell proliferation (n = 9, 36.0%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (n = 9, 36.0%), synechiae (n = 7, 28.0%), and globally sclerotic glomeruli (n = 6, 24.0%) were also frequent in dogs with malignancy. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong IgM staining was demonstrated in 64.3% (n = 18) of carcinoma dogs. Transmission electron microscopy from dogs with carcinoma revealed slight changes, the most frequent of which was faint sub-endothelial and mesangial deposits of electron-dense material (78%). Mesangial cell interpositioning and segmental effacement of podocyte foot processes were identified in some specimens (45%). Changes in the glomerulus and proteinuria are common in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma and this condition appears to provide an excellent large animal model for cancer-associated glomerulopathy in humans. PMID:27764139

  3. Distinct stem cells contribute to mammary gland development and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Ousset, Marielle; Beck, Benjamin; Bouvencourt, Gaëlle; Rock, Jason; Sharma, Neha; Dekoninck, Sophie; Blanpain, Cédric

    2011-10-09

    The mammary epithelium is composed of several cell lineages including luminal, alveolar and myoepithelial cells. Transplantation studies have suggested that the mammary epithelium is maintained by the presence of multipotent mammary stem cells. To define the cellular hierarchy of the mammary gland during physiological conditions, we performed genetic lineage-tracing experiments and clonal analysis of the mouse mammary gland during development, adulthood and pregnancy. We found that in postnatal unperturbed mammary gland, both luminal and myoepithelial lineages contain long-lived unipotent stem cells that display extensive renewing capacities, as demonstrated by their ability to clonally expand during morphogenesis and adult life as well as undergo massive expansion during several cycles of pregnancy. The demonstration that the mammary gland contains different types of long-lived stem cells has profound implications for our understanding of mammary gland physiology and will be instrumental in unravelling the cells at the origin of breast cancers.

  4. Canine Mammary Tumours Are Affected by Frequent Copy Number Aberrations, including Amplification of MYC and Loss of PTEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaja S Borge

    Full Text Available Copy number aberrations frequently occur during the development of many cancers. Such events affect dosage of involved genes and may cause further genomic instability and progression of cancer. In this survey, canine SNP microarrays were used to study 117 canine mammary tumours from 69 dogs.We found a high occurrence of copy number aberrations in canine mammary tumours, losses being more frequent than gains. Increased frequency of aberrations and loss of heterozygosity were positively correlated with increased malignancy in terms of histopathological diagnosis. One of the most highly recurrently amplified regions harbored the MYC gene. PTEN was located to a frequently lost region and also homozygously deleted in five tumours. Thus, deregulation of these genes due to copy number aberrations appears to be an important event in canine mammary tumour development. Other potential contributors to canine mammary tumour pathogenesis are COL9A3, INPP5A, CYP2E1 and RB1. The present study also shows that a more detailed analysis of chromosomal aberrations associated with histopathological parameters may aid in identifying specific genes associated with canine mammary tumour progression.The high frequency of copy number aberrations is a prominent feature of canine mammary tumours as seen in other canine and human cancers. Our findings share several features with corresponding studies in human breast tumours and strengthen the dog as a suitable model organism for this disease.

  5. The T-box transcription factors TBX2 and TBX3 in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Nataki C; Papaioannou, Virginia E

    2013-06-01

    TBX2 and TBX3, closely related members of the T-box family of transcription factor genes, are expressed in mammary tissue in both humans and mice. Ulnar mammary syndrome (UMS), an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in TBX3, underscores the importance of TBX3 in human breast development, while abnormal mammary gland development in Tbx2 or Tbx3 mutant mice provides models for experimental investigation. In addition to their roles in mammary development, aberrant expression of TBX2 and TBX3 is associated with breast cancer. TBX2 is preferentially amplified in BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers and TBX3 overexpression has been associated with advanced stage disease and estrogen-receptor-positive breast tumors. The regulation of Tbx2 and Tbx3 and the downstream targets of these genes in development and disease are not as yet fully elucidated. However, it is clear that the two genes play unique, context-dependent roles both in mammary gland development and in mammary tumorigenesis.

  6. Removing a Cystein Group On Interferon Alpha 2b at Position 2 and 99 does Not Diminish Antitumor Activity of the Protein, Even Better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmawati, Heni; Jessica, Adhitya; Sumirtaputra, Yeyet Cahyati; Retnoningrum, Debbie Sofie; Adlia, Amirah; Ningrum, Ratih Asmana

    2016-01-01

    Interferon alpha 2b is the only standard therapeutic protein for hepatitis virus infections. Further study demonstrated that this protein also posseses antitumor activity in several cancerous organs. One main pathway of this antitumor activity is mediated through antiproliferation as well as proapoptotic effects. Previously, we have successfully developed recombinant human interferon alpha 2b (rhIFNα2b) by using a synthetic gene. In addition, two mutein forms of rhIFNα2b were generated to improve the characteristics of this protein. Two point mutations showed better pharmacokinetic profiles than one point mutation as well as the native form. In the present study, this mutein form was studied for ist antitumor effect in vitro using HepG2 cells. As a comparison, the native form as well as a commercial rIFNα2b were used. Several parameters were investigated including the MTT assay, cell viability test, cell cycle using flow cytometric analysis, and the genes and protein expressions involved in cell growth. The latest was observed to study the mechanism of rhIFNα2b. There was no significant difference in the MTT assay and cell viability after cells were treated with both forms of rhIFNα2b. However, the mutein rhIFNα2b tended to show better proapoptotic activity reflected by flow cytometric data, protein expression of pSTAT1, and DNA expression of caspase 3.

  7. [Galactorrhea after mammary plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguenault, C; Capon-Degardin, N; Martinot-Duquennoy, V; Pellerin, P

    2005-04-01

    Galactorrhoea is a complication rarely observed after mammary plastic surgery. Our experience in the domain extends to three clinical cases - two after prosthetic insertion and one after breast reduction - wich will be presented here. The origin of this complication is uncertain. Nevertheless, it is likely to be multifocal, as surgery alone is not the only cause. Postsurgical galactorrhoea often follows a benign course culminating in spontaneous resolution. However, it may reveal the presence of o prolactin secreting adenoma, as was the case with one of our patients. A detailed history, exploring antecedent factors, is an essential step in guiding subsequent management. When faced with postsurgical galactorrhoea, serum prolactin levels should be measured. If serum prolactin levels exceed 150 ng/ml further investigation by way of an MRI of the sella turcica is advisable to rule out pituitary adenoma. Depending on symptom severity, treatment may be medical with the prescription of dopaminergic agonists, and/or surgical with drainage or removal of prostheses. Increased awareness of galactorrhea as a possible complication of plastic surgery to the breast will improve management.

  8. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, Karen M; Smith, Gilbert H

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts) confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini) were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic) respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  9. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Bussard

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  10. β-Hydroxybutyrate Facilitates Fatty Acids Synthesis Mediated by Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein1 in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In dairy cows, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA is utilized as precursors of de novo synthesized fatty acids in mammary gland. Ketotic cows are characterized by excessive negative energy balance (NEB, which can further increase the blood BHBA concentration. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein1 (SREBP1 and cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector α (Cidea play crucial roles in lipid synthesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that BHBA could stimulate SREBP1/Cidea pathway to increase milk fat synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Methods: Bovine mammary epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of BHBA and transfected with adenovirus to silence SREBP1 expression. The effects of BHBA on the lipid synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells were investigated. Results: The results showed that BHBA could significantly increase the expression of SREBP1, fatty acid synthase (FAS, acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACC-α, Cidea and diacylglycerol transferase-1 (DGAT-1, as well as the triglycerides (TG content in bovine mammary epithelial cells. BHBA treatment also increased the transfer of mature SREBP1 to nucleus compared with control group. However, SREBP1 silencing could significantly down-regulate the overexpression of FAS, ACC-α, Cidea and DGAT-1, as well as TG content induced by BHBA. Conclusion: The present data indicate that BHBA can significantly increase TG secretion mediated by SREBP1 in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

  11. The effect of caffeine on mammary gland development and milk yield in primiparous sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Hacker, R R

    1995-02-01

    Pregnant Yorkshire gilts (n = 42) were fed caffeine (6 g/d) or served as controls from d 60 of pregnancy until d 4 postpartum to test the effect of caffeine on mammary gland development, milk yield, and feed consumption. Caffeine reduced voluntary feed intake (P = .001) and body weight gain (P = .001) of gilts from d 60 to 109 of gestation. Pig birth weight in the treated group was less than (P = .01) that in the control group. However, pig viability score at birth was not affected by maternal caffeine ingestion. For assessing mammary gland DNA, RNA, dry fat-free tissue (DFFT), fat, and protein content, four sows from the caffeine group and three controls were slaughtered on the 1st d of lactation. Immediately after slaughter, mammary systems were removed, separated by gland, and dissected free of skin, muscle, and fatty pad, which had not been invaded by glandular tissue. The DNA and RNA content were evaluated in DFFT. Caffeine increased mammary RNA content (P = .023) and milk yield (P = .001) on d 1 of lactation. However, DNA, DFFT, fat, and protein were not significantly increased, although values were somewhat greater in the treatment group (approximately 82%). On d 21 of lactation, milk yield of treated sows did not differ from that of controls. The increased milk yield on d 1 of lactation was due to increased mammary epithelial cell activity and cell numbers. These results indicate that caffeine feeding can have a positive effect on porcine mammary gland development as well as milk yield.

  12. Prolactin and Other Hormones:Synergistic Action on Regulating Milk ComPosition Synthesis in Mammary Glands%催乳素与其他激素对乳腺内乳成分合成的协同调节作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    生冉; 闫素梅

    2014-01-01

    Prolactin plays clear and established roles in regulating the growth of mammary gland,galactosis, milk secretion and milk component synthesis;in most cases,prolactin regulates mammary gland functions syn-ergistically with other hormones including estrogen,progestogen,glucocorticoid and insulin. This paper re-viewed the progress in regulation of synergistic action between prolactin and other hormones on milk component synthesis in mammary glands,providing advisable references for further study on mechanism of milk compo-nent synthesis in mammary gland.%催乳素在调节乳腺生长、乳汁生成和分泌以及乳成分合成方面有重要的作用;并且,多数情况下,催乳素是与其他激素协同作用调节乳腺的各项功能,这些激素包括雌激素、孕激素、糖皮质激素、胰岛素。本文综述了乳腺内乳成分合成中催乳素与其他激素协同调节作用的研究进展,为进一步研究乳腺内乳成分合成的调控机理提供参考。

  13. Mouse models of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakur Mohibi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Despite advances in genetic and biochemical analyses, the incidence of breast cancer and its associated mortality remain very high. About 60 - 70% of breast cancers are Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α positive and are dependent on estrogen for growth. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs have therefore provided an effective targeted therapy to treat ER-α positive breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, development of resistance to endocrine therapy is frequent and leads to cancer recurrence. Our understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the development of ER-α positive tumors and their resistance to ER antagonists is currently limited due to lack of experimental models of ER-α positive breast cancer. In most mouse models of breast cancer, the tumors that form are typically ER-negative and independent of estrogen for their growth. However, in recent years more attention has been given to develop mouse models that develop different subtypes of breast cancers, including ER-positive tumors. In this review, we discuss the currently available mouse models that develop ER-α positive mammary tumors and their potential use to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of ER-α positive breast cancer development and endocrine resistance.

  14. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Nucleotide Sequences in Canine and Feline Mammary Tumors▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. Fo...

  15. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D; Petit, Valérie; Alasdair Russell, I; Giraddi, Rajshekhar R; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A; Stingl, John

    2014-10-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt actin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using two independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage-tracing approach we follow the progeny of myoepithelial cells that express α-smooth muscle actin and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy.

  16. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  17. Differential gene expression profiling of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing mammary tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Haining Peng; Yingli Zhong; Daiqiang Li; Mi Tang; Xiaofeng Ding; Jian Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is highly expressed in approximately 30% of breast cancer patients,and substantial evidence supports the relationship between HER2 overexpression and poor overall survival. However,the biological function of HER2 signaltransduction pathways is not entirely clear. To investigate gene activation within the pathways, we screened differentially expressed genes in HER2-positive mouse mammary tumor using two-directional suppression subtractive hybridization combined with reverse dot-blotting analysis. Forty genes and expressed sequence tags related to transduction, cell proliferation/growth/apoptosis and secreted/extracellular matrix proteins were differentially expressed in HER2-positive mammary tumor tissue. Among these, 19 were already reported to be differentially expressed in mammary tumor, 11 were first identified to be differentially expressed in mammary tumor in this study but were already reported in other tumors, and 10 correlated with other cancers. These genes can facilitate the understanding of the role of HER2 signaling in breast cancer.

  18. Juvenile mammary papillomatosis; Papilomatosis juvenil mamaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, M.; Jimenez, A. V. [Hospital Reina Sofia. Cordoba (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Juvenile mammary papillomatosis is a benign proliferative disease of young patients, generally under 30 years of age. The most frequent clinical presentation is the existence of an elastic and mobile lymph node of the breast. Anatomopathologically, it is characterized because it presents ductal epithelial hyperplasia, sometimes with marked atypia, and there are numerous cysts having different sizes among the findings. It has been associated with an increase in the incidence of breast cancer, both in the patient herself as well as her family. We review the literature on the subject and present the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings of a 22 year old woman diagnosed of juvenile mammary papillomatosis. (Author) 12 refs.

  19. Mammary tumorigenesis by radiation and its prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Makoto; Suzuki, Keiko; Inano, Hiroshi [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Since the breast cancer in women emerged as an important risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, we have investigated to clarify the relationship between the induction of mammary tumors by irradiation and the developmental stage of the mammary glands that regulated by the action of endocrine hormones. Besides the radiation, epidemiological studies showed that the process of biosynthesis/metabolism of steroid hormones and hyperlipidemia may be associated with an increased risk of mammary carcinogenesis. In this context, we have undertaken investigations to evaluate the anti-carcinogenic activities of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a major secretory steroid of the adrenal glands, bezafibrate (BEZF), an anti-hyperlipidemic drug derived from clofibrate, and simvastatin (SIMV), a prodrug of a specific inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, against diethylstilbestrol (DES)-dependent promotion/progression of rat mammary tumors initiated by {gamma}-rays. Pregnant Wistar-MS rats received whole-body irradiation with 2.6 Gy of {gamma}-rays from a {sup 60}Co source at day-20 of pregnancy. The mother rats were fed a diet containing either 0.6% DHEA, 0.15% BEZF or 0.03% SIMV beginning immediately after weaning. They were then implanted subcutaneously with a pellet of DES (3 mg/pellet) in the interscapular area 30 days after termination of nursing and were observed for 1 year for detection of palpable mammary tumors starting from the time of pellet implantation. The administration of dietary DHEA, BEZF or SIMV together with DES implantation in rats irradiated in late pregnancy significantly decreased the total incidence of mammary tumors to 35%, 27% and 36%, respectively, for the 1 year period, while higher tumor incidence (96%, 90% and 88%) was observed in rats fed controldiet. However, neither the number of mammary tumors per tumor-bearing rat nor the latency period in the drug treated groups was different from that observed in the control group

  20. Alpha fetoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal alpha globulin; AFP ... Greater than normal levels of AFP may be due to: Cancer in testes , ovaries, biliary (liver secretion) tract, stomach, or pancreas Cirrhosis of the liver Liver cancer ...

  1. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize.

  2. Aberrant E-cadherin staining patterns in invasive mammary carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brogi Edi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background E-cadherin, a cell surface protein involved in cell adhesion, is present in normal breast epithelium, benign breast lesions, and in breast carcinoma. Alterations in the gene CDH1 on chromosome 16q22 are associated with changes in E-cadherin protein expression and function. Inactivation of E-cadherin in lobular carcinomas and certain diffuse gastric carcinomas may play a role in the dispersed, discohesive "single cell" growth patterns seen in these tumors. The molecular "signature" of mammary lobular carcinomas is the loss of E-cadherin protein expression as evidenced by immunohistochemistry, whereas ductal carcinomas are typically E-cadherin positive. Patients and methods We report on E-cadherin immunostaining patterns in five cases of invasive mammary carcinoma Results These were five exceptional instances in which the E-cadherin immunophenotype did not correspond to the apparent histologic classification of the lesion. These cases which are exceedingly rare in our experience are the subject of this report. Conclusion Findings such as those illustrated in this study occur in virtually all biologic phenomena and they do not invalidate the very high degree of correlation between the expression of E-cadherin and the classification of breast carcinomas as ductal or lobular type on the basis of conventional histologic criteria.

  3. Research on the Changes of Endocrine Hormones in Mammary Cancer and Hyperplasia of Mammary Glands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chengqi

    2002-01-01

    Objective Based on a comparison of endocrine hormones between patients of mammary cancer and those of hyperplasia of mammary glands, a preliminary analysis of the interaction between endocrine hormones and the immune system was oonducted. Methods The experiment involved 50 cases of mammary cancer and hyperplasia of mammary glands each.Blood samples were taken from pre - menopausal and menopausal patients; six kinds of hypophyseal hommones(PRL, GH, TSH,ACTH, FSH and LH) and three kinds of sex hormones ( E2,P and T) were subjected to RIA tests.Results Wilcoxon matchpaired assay and normal approximation of the experiment indicated that the FSH level before pre - menopause and the ACTH level during menopause in patients with mammary canoer were higher that those of patients suffering hyperplasia of mamary glands. Conclusion Statistics show the the normal rhythm between endocrine hormones and the immune system is disrupted in mammary cancer patients, the feedback mechanism of the hypothalamo- hypophyseal- adrenal system is maladjusted,resulting in inhibition of the immune function. Female hormones induce the gene mutation and the sensitivity of the cells is increased, resulting in a significant acceleration of the hyperplasia of cancer cells.

  4. Dietary genistein stimulates mammary development in gilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The possible role of the phytoestrogen, genistein, on prepubertal development of mammary glands, hormonal status and bone resorption was investigated in gilts. Forty-five gilts were fed a control diet containing soya (CTLS, n = 15), a control diet without soya (CTL0, n = 15) or the CTLS diet supplem...

  5. The expression of intermediate filaments in canine mammary glands and their tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmén, E; Lindgren, A

    1989-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for different types of intermediate filaments (cytokeratin, vimentin, desmin and neurofilaments) were used to study the histogenesis of canine mammary glands and 57 canine mammary tumors by immunocytochemistry. The intra- and interlobular duct epithelium, acinar, and intralobular myoepithelial cells stained positively for cytokeratin. Peripheral ductal and acinar cells, as well as interstitial cells, stained positively for vimentin. A similar staining pattern was seen in adenomas, complex adenomas, benign mixed tumors, ductular carcinomas, and one myoepithelioma-like tumor. Additionally, cytokeratin positive cells were scattered interstitially in one single adenoma, most complex adenomas, some benign mixed tumors, complex carcinomas, and in the malignant mixed tumors. All stromal cells stained positively for vimentin. The fibrosarcomas were positive only for vimentin, while the following expressed both desmin and cytokeratin: epithelial-like cells in one adenoma, three complex adenomas, the myoepithelioma-like tumor, the single comedo carcinoma, two complex carcinomas, the single lobular carcinoma, one malignant mixed tumor, and three osteosarcomas. Epithelial-like cells in one adenoma, six complex adenomas, two benign mixed tumors, two complex carcinomas, the lobular carcinoma, and the malignant schwannoma stained for neurofilaments. Three tumors, one adenoma, one complex adenoma, and the lobular carcinoma expressed both desmin and neurofilaments in addition to cytokeratin and vimentin. The results show the expression of different types of intermediate filaments and indicate that there might be a stem cell origin in most of the canine mammary tumors.

  6. Activation of int-1 and int-2 loci in GRf mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, D A; Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1986-10-30

    The Mtv-2 locus is known to be associated with a high mammary tumor incidence (97%) and early development of mammary tumors (3-13 months) in GR mice. However, it was not previously known whether the provirus which resides at the Mtv-2 locus is tumorigenic in and of itself or whether reintegration of proviruses generated from Mtv-2 is required for tumorigenesis. Foster-nursing GR mice on C57/BL mice eliminates the milk-borne source of GR virus, and allows the study of Mtv-2 derived proviruses alone. Using this approach, we have tested predictions which follow from the "positional" versus "reintegrational" models of tumorigenesis. Specifically, we have examined tumors from primary foster-nursed (GRf) mice to determine if MMTV proviruses derived from Mtv-2 were scattered randomly throughout the genome or were clustered in the vicinity of the int-1 and int-2 loci, which are thought to be associated with mammary tumorigenesis. It was found that the majority of spontaneous GRf mammary tumors that were tested have MMTV proviral integrations in either or both of the int-1 and int-2 loci and have transcription of either or both of the int loci. Tumors induced by Mtv-2, therefore, appear to have arisen via a mechanism similar to the activation of the int loci by exogenous (milk-borne) MMTV proviruses.

  7. Study of internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao XS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-Shan Cao,1,2 Bin-Bin Cong,1,2 Xiao Sun,1 Peng-Fei Qiu,1 Yong-Sheng Wang1 1Breast Cancer Center, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Jinan University-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of ChinaInternal mammary lymph node (IMLN metastasis has a similar prognostic importance as axillary lymph nodal involvement in breast cancer patients.1 Patients with both axillary- and internal mammary-positive nodes have a very poor prognosis.2 Reliable data for internal mammary nodal metastases are reported to be present in 18%–33% (mean 23.4% of patients who have not been treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC mostly concomitant with axillary metastases, and metastases exclusively situated in the internal mammary chain occur in 2%–11% of patients,3 but limited data are available in the context of NAC.

  8. Association of CYP1B1 gene polymorphisms and the positive expression of estrogen alpha and estrogen beta with endometrial cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z Y; Mu, Y Q; Fu, X M; Li, S M; Zhao, F X

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the CYP1B1 L432V polymorphism, ERalpha and ERbeta positivities and the incidence of endometrial cancer. The relationship between CYP1B1 L432V polymorphism, ERalpha and ERbeta positivities and endometrial cancer was investigated using the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method to analyze gene polymorphism in exon 3 codon 432 (C-G) of CYP1B1. Our results are as follows: in endometrial cancer cases the prevalence rates of CYP1B1 L432V genotypes C/C, C/G, and G/G were 47.2%, 36.1%, and 16.7%, respectively, and 68.8%, 23.8% and 7.5% in the control group, respectively. The frequencies of CYP1B1 C and G alleles were 65.3% and 34.7% in endometrial cancer patients and 80.6% and 19.4% in the control group. A significant difference was found in the genotype distributions or allele frequencies of CYP1B1 L432V polymorphism between the two groups (p polymorphism of CYP1B1 L432V increases the risk of endometrial cancer and has a positive correlation with ERalpha expression.

  9. $\\alpha_s$ review (2016)

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2016-01-01

    The current world-average of the strong coupling at the Z pole mass, $\\alpha_s(m^2_{Z}) = 0.1181 \\pm 0.0013$, is obtained from a comparison of perturbative QCD calculations computed, at least, at next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy, to a set of 6 groups of experimental observables: (i) lattice QCD "data", (ii) $\\tau$ hadronic decays, (iii) proton structure functions, (iv) event shapes and jet rates in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (v) Z boson hadronic decays, and (vi) top-quark cross sections in p-p collisions. In addition, at least 8 other $\\alpha_s$ extractions, usually with a lower level of theoretical and/or experimental precision today, have been proposed: pion, $\\Upsilon$, W hadronic decays; soft and hard fragmentation functions; jets cross sections in pp, e-p and $\\gamma$-p collisions; and photon F$_2$ structure function in $\\gamma\\,\\gamma$ collisions. These 14 $\\alpha_s$ determinations are reviewed, and the perspectives of reduction of their present uncertainties are discussed.

  10. Establishment and characterization of a canine xenograft model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, L; Peña, L; González Gil, A; Cáceres, S; Díez, L; Illera, J C

    2013-12-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) and human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) are the most aggressive form of mammary/breast cancer. Both species naturally develop it, sharing epidemiological, clinical and histological characteristics. Thus, IMC has been suggested as a model to study the human disease. We have developed the first IMC xenograft model in SCID mice. Xenografts reproduced the histological features from the primary tumor, were highly aggressive and showed dermal tumor emboli, distinctive hallmarks of IMC/IBC. This model was hormone receptors positive and HER2 negative. Our findings showed that estrogens and androgens are locally produced in tissues. Factors related to tumor vascularization showed positive expression and xenografts with the highest expression of all analyzed vascular factors had the highest rate of tumor proliferation. The role of steroid hormones and the angio/lymphangiogenic properties found in this model, provide additional knowledge for future interventions in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the disease.

  11. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of parotid: Is preoperative cytological diagnosis possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Nikita; Sanghvi, Kintan; Shet, Tanuja; Patil, Asawari; Menon, Santosh; Ramadwar, Mukta; Kane, Shubhada

    2016-06-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma is a recently recognized tumor of salivary gland with characteristic t(12;15)(q13;q25) that results in ETV6-NTRK3 fusion product. Distinguishing mammary analogue secretory carcinoma from other salivary gland tumors is important. Present study highlights cytologic findings in three cases of mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of parotid which facilitate preoperative diagnosis with the aid of ancillary diagnostic techniques. Fine needle aspiration cytology of parotid was performed on three cases after clinical examination. Immunocytochemistry for mammoglobin and S100 were performed. Parotidectomy was done in all cases. The corresponding hematoxylin and eosin stained slides and blocks of all cases were studied. Molecular analysis was done in one of the cases. Cases 1 and 3 revealed uniform atypical epithelial cells arranged in branching papillary pattern with few cells in microcystic pattern. Case 2 showed atypical cells arranged mainly in loose clusters and few singly dissociated. Individual cells revealed round nuclei, vesicular chromatin, prominent nucleoli and abundant finely vacuolated cytoplasm with metachromasia prominent in May-Grunwald-Giemsa smear (case 3). Characteristic hob-nail cells covering papillae were observed in cases 1 and 3. Immunocytochemistry showed strong positivity for mammoglobin and S100 thereby confirming the diagnosis of mammary analogue secretory carcinoma preoperatively. The diagnosis was in concordance with surgical specimen. Also, characteristic ETV6-NTRK3 translocation was confirmed in case 1. Increased awareness and high index of suspicion is necessary for the upfront diagnosis, more so for the papillary variant of mammary analogue secretory carcinoma. Immunocytochemistry aids in confirming this preoperative diagnosis, based on which treatment can be planned. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:519-525. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. PELP1 overexpression in the mouse mammary gland results in the development of hyperplasia and carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Valerie; Samayoa, Cathy; Zamora, Andrea; Martinez, Lizatte; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R; Vadlamudi, Ratna K

    2014-12-15

    Estrogen receptor (ER) coregulator overexpression promotes carcinogenesis and/or progression of endocrine related-cancers in which steroid hormones are powerful mitogenic agents. Recent studies in our laboratory, as well as others, demonstrated that the estrogen receptor coregulator PELP1 is a proto-oncogene. PELP1 interactions with histone demethylase KDM1 play a critical role in its oncogenic functions and PELP1 is a prognostic indicator of decreased survival in patients with breast cancer. However, the in vivo significance of PELP1 deregulation during initiation and progression of breast cancer remains unknown. We generated an inducible, mammary gland-specific PELP1-expressing transgenic (Tg) mouse (MMTVrtTA-TetOPELP1). We found more proliferation, extensive side branching, and precocious differentiation in PELP1-overexpressing mammary glands than in control glands. Aged MMTVrtTA-TetOPELP1 Tg mice had hyperplasia and preneoplastic changes as early as 12 weeks, and ER-positive mammary tumors occurred at a latency of 14 to 16 months. Mechanistic studies revealed that PELP1 deregulation altered expression of a number of known ER target genes involved in cellular proliferation (cyclin D1, CDKs) and morphogenesis (EGFR, MMPs) and such changes facilitated altered mammary gland morphogenesis and tumor progression. Furthermore, PELP1 was hyper-phosphorylated at its CDK phosphorylation site, suggesting an autocrine loop involving the CDK-cyclin D1-PELP1 axis in promoting mammary tumorigenesis. Treatment of PELP1 Tg mice with a KDM1 inhibitor significantly reduced PELP1-driven hyperbranching, reversed alterations in cyclin D1 expression levels, and reduced CDK-driven PELP1 phosphorylation. These results further support the hypothesis that PELP1 deregulation has the potential to promote breast tumorigenesis in vivo and represent a novel model for future investigation into molecular mechanisms of PELP1-mediated tumorigenesis.

  13. Columnar cell lesions of the canine mammary gland: pathological features and immunophenotypic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassali Geovanni D

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that columnar cell lesions indicate an alteration of the human mammary gland involved in the development of breast cancer. They have not previously been described in canine mammary gland. The aim of this paper is describe the morphologic spectrum of columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland specimens and their association with other breast lesions. Methods A total of 126 lesions were subjected to a comprehensive morphological review based upon the human breast classification system for columnar cell lesions. The presence of preinvasive (epithelial hyperplasia and in situ carcinoma and invasive lesions was determined and immunophenotypic analysis (estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PgR, high molecular weight cytokeratin (34βE-12, E-cadherin, Ki-67, HER-2 and P53 was perfomed. Results Columnar cell lesions were identified in 67 (53.1% of the 126 canine mammary glands with intraepithelial alterations. They were observed in the terminal duct lobular units and characterized at dilated acini may be lined by several layers of columnar epithelial cells with elongated nuclei. Of the columnar cell lesions identified, 41 (61.2% were without and 26 (38.8% with atypia. Association with ductal hyperplasia was observed in 45/67 (67.1%. Sixty (89.5% of the columnar cell lesions coexisted with neoplastic lesions (20 in situ carcinomas, 19 invasive carcinomas and 21 benign tumors. The columnar cells were ER, PgR and E-cadherin positive but negative for cytokeratin 34βE-12, HER-2 and P53. The proliferation rate as measured by Ki-67 appeared higher in the lesions analyzed than in normal TDLUs. Conclusions Columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland are pathologically and immunophenotypically similar to those in human breast. This may suggest that dogs are a suitable model for the comparative study of noninvasive breast lesions.

  14. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Molecular Biology and Oncogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R. Ross

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, which was discovered as a milk‑transmitted, infectious cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used since that time as an animal model for the study of human breast cancer. Like other complex retroviruses, MMTV encodes a number of accessory proteins that both facilitate infection and affect host immune response. In vivo, the virus predominantly infects lymphocytes and mammary epithelial cells. High level infection of mammary epithelial cells ensures efficient passage of virus to the next generation. It also results in mammary tumor induction, since the MMTV provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial cell genome during viral replication and activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, mammary tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer.

  15. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Mammary Gland in Domestic Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Filgueira, Kilder Dantas; Reche Junior,Archivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the feline species, 80% to 93% of neoplasias in the mammary gland are malignant, being the majority carcinomas. Among them, there is the mammary squamous cell carcinoma, which amounts to a very rare neoplasm in the domestic cat, with considerable potential for malignancy. This study aimed to report a case of squamous cell mammary carcinoma in the feline species. Case: A female cat, mixed breed, ten years old, presented history of skin lesion. The cat had been spayed two years b...

  16. Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    mammary glands were reflected in mammary histology. (A and E) Thin sections from Fig. 3. E2 induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia similarly in...with E2 5 (33%) exhibited a normal DNA profile where the great for 12 wk induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia in majority of cells displayed...etal. , " terone, or PRL. Hyperprolactinemia has been shown to be sufficient to induce mammary cancer in certain strains of mouse 1 , (29-31) and rat

  17. Development of a RNA extraction method from milk for gene expression study in the mammary gland of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Maria Consuelo; Daga, Cinzia; Bodano, Sara; Paludo, Marta; Luridiana, Sebastiano; Pazzola, Michele; Dettori, Maria Luisa; Vacca, Giuseppe Massimo; Carcangiu, Vincenzo

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a reliable method for the RNA extraction from milk of Sarda sheep breed and to highlight if the extracted RNA can be used for expression study on mammary genes involved in milk fat synthesis using RT-qPCR. The main result is that a sample of 150 ml of milk provides an optimal amount of RNA (73.5 μg/ml). The highest RNA concentration has been found in the samples analysed within 4 h after collection. The RNA extracted was positively correlated to the number of somatic cells (P Ct value, for SREBPF1 gene of 26.8 ± 0.15. This research demonstrated that the high-quality of the RNA obtained is suited to use for studies of mammary genes expression in sheep, avoiding any damage caused by mammary gland biopsy.

  18. Mammary gene expression profiles during an intramammary challenge reveal potential mechanisms linking negative energy balance with impaired immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyes, Kasey; Drackley, J K; Morin, D E;

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles during a Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis) mastitis challenge between lactating cows subjected to dietary-induced negative energy balance (NEB; n = 5) and cows fed ad libitum to maintain positive energy balance (PEB; n = 5......) in order to better understand the mechanisms associated with NEB and risk of mastitis during the transition period. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements for 7 d, and cows assigned to PEB were fed the same diet for ad libitum intake. Five days after...... feed restriction, one rear mammary quarter of each cow was inoculated with 5,000 cfu of S. uberis (O140J). At 20 h post-inoculation, S. uberis-infected mammary quarters from all cows were biopsied for RNA extraction. Energy balance (NEB vs. PEB) resulted in 287 differentially expressed genes (DEG; FDR...

  19. Induction of ErbB-3 expression by alpha6beta4 integrin contributes to tamoxifen resistance in ERbeta1-negative breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Folgiero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tamoxifen is still the most widely used drug in hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer. Its benefits in adjuvant treatment are well documented in controlled and randomized clinical studies, which have demonstrated an increase in disease-free intervals of patients with positive hormonal receptors. However, the mechanisms involved in endocrine resistance are not clear. Laboratory and clinical data now indicate that bi-directional molecular cross-talk between nuclear or membrane ER and growth factor receptor pathways may be involved in endocrine resistance. We recently found a functional interaction between alpha6beta4 integrin and ErbB-3 receptor to maintain the PI3K/Akt survival pathway of mammary tumour cells. We sought to improve understanding of this process in order to provide the involvement of both receptors insight into mechanism of Tamoxifen resistance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using human breast cancer cell lines displaying different levels of alpha6beta4 and ErbB-3 receptors and a series of 232 breast cancer biopsies from patients submitted to adjuvant Tamoxifen monotherapy for five years, we evaluated the functional interaction between both receptors in relationship to Tamoxifen responsiveness. In mammary carcinoma cells, we evidenced that the alpha6beta4 integrin strongly influence Akt phosphorylation through ErbB-3 protein regulation. Moreover, the ErbB-3 inactivation inhibits Akt phosphorylation, induces apoptosis and inhibits in vitro invasion favouring Tamoxifen responsiveness. The analysis of human tumors revealed a significant relationship between alpha6beta4 and ErbB-3 in P-Akt-positive and ERbeta1-negative breast cancers derived from patients with lower disease free survival. CONCLUSIONS: We provided evidence that a strong relationship occurs between alpha6beta4 and ErbB-3 positivity in ERbeta1-negative breast cancers. We also found that the association between ErbB-3 and P-Akt positivity mainly occurs in

  20. Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Causes Long-Term Increase in Serum Estradiol and Activation of PI3K-Akt Signaling Pathway in Mouse Mammary Gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Shubhankar [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Johnson, Michael D. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Fornace, Albert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Datta, Kamal, E-mail: kd257@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Exposure to ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Radiation exposure during infancy, childhood, and adolescence confers the highest risk. Although radiation is a proven mammary carcinogen, it remains unclear where it acts in the complex multistage process of breast cancer development. In this study, we investigated the long-term pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation at a dose (2 Gy) relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Adolescent (6-8 weeks old; n = 10) female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy total body {gamma}-radiation, the mammary glands were surgically removed, and serum and urine samples were collected 2 and 12 months after exposure. Molecular pathways involving estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling were investigated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: Serum estrogen and urinary levels of the oncogenic estrogen metabolite (16{alpha}OHE1) were significantly increased in irradiated animals. Immunostaining for the cellular proliferative marker Ki-67 and cyclin-D1 showed increased nuclear accumulation in sections of mammary glands from irradiated vs. control mice. Marked increase in p85{alpha}, a regulatory sub-unit of the PI3K was associated with increase in Akt, phospho-Akt, phospho-BAD, phospho-mTOR, and c-Myc in irradiated samples. Persistent increase in nuclear ER{alpha} in mammary tissues 2 and 12 months after radiation exposure was also observed. Conclusions: Taken together, our data not only support epidemiologic observations associating radiation and breast cancer but also, specify molecular events that could be involved in radiation-induced breast cancer.

  1. Mammary gland stem cells: More puzzles than explanations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suneesh Kaimala; Suneesh Kaimala; Satish Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Mammary gland stem cells (MaSC) have not been identified in spite of extensive research spanning over several decades. This has been primarily due to the complexity of mammary gland structure and its development, cell heterogeneity in the mammary gland and the insufficient knowledge about MaSC markers. At present, Lin–CD29hiCD49fhiCD24+/modSca-1– cells of the mammary gland have been reported to be enriched with MaSCs. We suggest that the inclusion of stem cell markers like Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and the mammary gland differentiation marker BRCA-1 may further narrow down the search for MaSCs. In addition, we have discussed some of the other unresolved puzzles on the mammary gland stem cells, such as their similarities and/or differences with mammary cancer stem cells, use of milk as source of mammary stem cells and the possibility of in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional mammary gland structures in this review. Nevertheless, it is the lack of identity for a MaSC that is curtailing the advances in some of the above and other related areas.

  2. Keeping abreast of the mammary epithelial hierarchy and breast tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvader, Jane E

    2009-11-15

    The epithelium of the mammary gland exists in a highly dynamic state, undergoing dramatic morphogenetic changes during puberty, pregnancy, lactation, and regression. The recent identification of stem and progenitor populations in mouse and human mammary tissue has provided evidence that the mammary epithelium is organized in a hierarchical manner. Characterization of these normal epithelial subtypes is an important step toward understanding which cells are predisposed to oncogenesis. This review summarizes progress in the field toward defining constituent cells and key molecular regulators of the mammary epithelial hierarchy. Potential relationships between normal epithelial populations and breast tumor subtypes are discussed, with implications for understanding the cellular etiology underpinning breast tumor heterogeneity.

  3. Bovine mammary stem cells: new perspective for dairy science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignani, E; Cravero, D; Miretti, S; Accornero, P; Baratta, M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary stem cells provide opportunities for the cyclic remodelling of the bovine mammary gland. Therefore, understanding the character and regulation of mammary stem cells is important for increasing animal health and productivity. The exciting possibility that stem cell expansion can influence milk production is currently being investigated by several researchers. In fact, appropriate regulation of mammary stem cells could hopefully benefit milk yield, persistency of lactation, dry period management and tissue repair. Accordingly, we and others have attempted to characterize and regulate the function of bovine mammary stem cells. However, research on mammary stem cells requires tissue biopsies, which represents a limitation for the management of animal welfare. Interestingly, different studies recently reported the identification of putative mammary stem cells in human breast milk. The possible identification of primitive cell types within cow's milk may provide a non-invasive source of relevant mammary cells for a wide range of applications. In this review, we have summarized the main achievements in this field for dairy cow science and described the interesting perspectives open to manipulate milk persistency during lactation and to cope with oxidative stress during the transition period by regulating mammary stem cells.

  4. Adipose and mammary epithelial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenting; Nelson, Celeste M

    2013-01-01

    Breast reconstruction is a type of surgery for women who have had a mastectomy, and involves using autologous tissue or prosthetic material to construct a natural-looking breast. Adipose tissue is the major contributor to the volume of the breast, whereas epithelial cells comprise the functional unit of the mammary gland. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can differentiate into both adipocytes and epithelial cells and can be acquired from autologous sources. ASCs are therefore an attractive candidate for clinical applications to repair or regenerate the breast. Here we review the current state of adipose tissue engineering methods, including the biomaterials used for adipose tissue engineering and the application of these techniques for mammary epithelial tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering combined with microfabrication approaches to engineer the epithelium represents a promising avenue to replicate the native structure of the breast.

  5. The evolving role of mammary ductoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokbel, Kefah; Elkak, Abd Elrafea

    2002-01-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) is an emerging technique that allows direct visualisation of the mammary duct system, and that produces sharp and clear video images and ductal washings for cytological analysis. There is a growing body of evidence that MD may have a role in the management of women with pathological nipple discharge, the guiding of breast conserving surgery for cancer, and the screening of high risk women. Further research is required to confirm these potential applications and the feasibility of its use in the rapid intervention and outpatient setting under local anaesthesia. Furthermore, the addition of molecular and genetic analysis of cells obtained by MD and the emergence of newer generations of microendoscopes are likely to enhance the use of this technique.

  6. Fibronectin production by human mammary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, M.R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Vlodavsky, I.; Smith, H.S.; Ford, R.; Becker, F.F.; Riggs, J.

    1981-01-01

    Human mammary cells were examined for the presence of the high-molecular-weight surface glycoprotein fibronectin. Early passage mammary epithelial cell and fibroblast cultures from both carcinomas and normal tissues were tested for the presence of cell-associated fibronectin by immunofluorescence microscopy and for the synthesis and secretion of fibronectin by specific immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled protein. In vivo frozen sections of primary carcinomas and normal tissues were tested for the localization of fibronectin by immunofluorescence microscopy. In contrast to the extensive fibrillar networks of fibronectin found in the fibroblast cultures, the epithelial cell cultures from both tissue sources displayed a pattern of cell-associated fibronectin characterizd by powdery, punctate staining. However, the cultured epithelial cells, as well as the fibroblasts, secreted large quantities of fibronectin into the medium. Putative myoepithelial cells also displayed extensive fibrillar networks of fibronectin. The difference in cell-associated fibronectin distribution between the epithelial cells and the fibroblasts and putative myoepithelial cells provided a simple means of quantitating stromal and myoepithelial cell contamination of the mammary epithelial cells in culture. In vivo, normal tissues showed fibronectin primarily localized in the basement membrane surrounding the epithelial cells and in the stroma. Most primary carcinomas displayed powdery, punctate staining on the epithelial cells in addition to the fibronectin present in the surrounding stroma.

  7. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  8. Mammary ductoscopy: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bernadette; Mokbel, Kefah

    2005-04-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) allows direct visual access to the mammary ducts, using fiberoptic microendoscopes inserted through the ductal opening onto the nipple surface. Therefore it has a potential role in the diagnosis and treatment of intraductal breast disease. This article describes the anatomy of the mammary ductal system, the early beginnings of MD, its ongoing evolution, and the need for further development for its future usage in increasing clinical indications. MD is a useful diagnostic adjunct in patients with pathological nipple discharge (PND) and can guide duct excision surgery. However, its potential use in the early detection of breast cancer, in guiding breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for cancer, and in the therapeutic ablation of intraductal disease, as well as in guiding risk-reducing strategies among high-risk women, requires further research and evaluation. The development of a biopsy kit that obtains adequate microbiopsy samples for histological diagnosis under direct visualization will enhance the use of this technique by breast surgeons and radiologists. Future developments also include combining MD with molecular diagnostic markers and optical biopsy systems for the diagnosis of premalignant and early malignant disease, and combining MD with radiofrequency for curative ablation of intraductal lesions.

  9. Mammary ductoscopy: current issues and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Ken; Fukushima, Hisaki; Toriumi, Yasuo; Kawase, Kazumi; Tabei, Isao; Yamashita, Akinori; Nogi, Hiroko

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, the mammary duct had not been directly observed in vivo. Starting with the success of Teboul et al., studies of mammary ductoscopy (MD) for nipple discharge have been performed in Japan and other East Asian countries. Ductal lavage screening trials for breast cancer started in the 2000s. Concurrently, the number of English-language articles about MD increased. Sixty-nine English-language and 74 Japanese-language papers published in the last 19 years were reviewed. Important reports and studies were analyzed. MD has undergone significant technological development, and studies of MD have taken place in many countries. As a result, endoscopic images of the mammary duct have developed, and the endoscopic diagnosis for nipple discharge has become possible. MD-guided biopsy and surgery have been studied. Findings of MD are useful for diagnosing intraductal lesions with nipple discharge. As a result, MD has reduced the number and extent of microdochectomies. MD is also helpful in guiding breast-conserving surgery. Many pioneers have tried direct biopsy or interventions under MD, but further developments are necessary for its practical use.

  10. c-erbB-2 expression and nuclear pleomorphism in canine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutra A.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to study the expression of c-erbB-2 and MIB-1 and try to associate them with morphological features of the cell such as nuclear pleomorphism, mitotic count and histological grade in a series of 70 canine mammary gland tumors, 22 of them benign and 48 malignant. Tumors were collected at the Veterinary Hospital of UFMG (Brazil and the Veterinary Faculty of Porto University (Portugal. c-erbB-2 expression was determined according to the guidelines provided by the manufacturer of the HercepTest system and nuclear pleomorphism, mitotic count and histological grade according the Elston and Ellis grading system. The HercepTest is the FDA-approved in vitro diagnostic test marketed by Dako. It is a semi-quantitative immunohistochemical assay used to determine overexpression of HER2 protein (human epidermal growth factor receptor in breast cancer tissue. MIB-1 expression was also evaluated in 28 malignant tumors. Seventeen (35.4% of the malignant tumors were positive for c-erbB-2 expression, which was positively associated with nuclear pleomorphism (P < 0.0001, histological grade (P = 0.0017 and mitotic count (P < 0.05. Nuclear pleomorphism also showed a positive association with MIB-1 index (P < 0.0001. These results suggest that some of the biological and morphological characteristics of the tumor are associated in canine mammary gland tumors, as also reported for human breast cancer. It was also possible to show that the immunoexpression of c-erbB-2 can be a factor in mammary carcinogenesis. This fact opens the possibility of using anti-c-erbB-2 antibodies in the treatment of canine mammary tumors.

  11. Modulation of mammary gland development in prepubertal male rats exposed to genistein and methoxychlor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Li; Sar, Madhabananda; Bartolucci, Erika J; McIntyre, Barry S; Sriperumbudur, Rajagopal

    2002-04-01

    The estrogenic isoflavone genistein is a common dietary component that has been shown to affect reproductive development in experimental animals at high doses. The objective of the present study was to examine interactions of genistein and the hormonally active pesticide methoxychlor on mammary gland development in juvenile rats. Timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a soy- and alfalfa-free diet containing different combinations of genistein (300 and 800 ppm) and methoxychlor (800 ppm). Rats were fed these diets starting on gestation day (GD)1 and continuing through pregnancy and lactation until postnatal day (PND) 22, when the pups were killed. Inguinal mammary glands from both female and male pups were processed as whole-mount preparations for morphometric analysis. The total glandular area and the numbers of branch points, lateral buds, and terminal end buds in the male rats were found to be significantly greater in the groups exposed to methoxychlor than those exposed to genistein only. These effects were not observed in the female rats. In the male rats, methoxychlor had the most prominent effect on elongating the glandular ducts, while genistein enhanced the ductile branching. The 2 compounds in combination promoted the development of alveolar-lobular structure, an effect not observed with either compound alone. Immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed a high percentage of immunopositive cells in the mammary epithelia of the males exposed to methoxychlor and genistein (800 ppm) compared to the controls. While no significant changes in serum levels of mammotrophic hormones were detected, increased immunostaining for insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, estrogen receptor alpha, and progesterone receptor in the genistein + methoxychlor group suggested that local factors involved in regulating mammary growth may have played a role in propagating the endocrine effects of these two compounds. These results indicated that the mammary

  12. A novel mouse model for non-invasive single marker tracking of mammary stem cells in vivo reveals stem cell dynamics throughout pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Tiede

    Full Text Available Mammary stem cells (MaSCs play essential roles for the development of the mammary gland and its remodeling during pregnancy. However, the precise localization of MaSCs in the mammary gland and their regulation during pregnancy is unknown. Here we report a transgenic mouse model for luciferase-based single marker detection of MaSCs in vivo that we used to address these issues. Single transgene expressing mammary epithelial cells were shown to reconstitute mammary glands in vivo while immunohistochemical staining identified MaSCs in basal and luminal locations, with preponderance towards the basal position. By quantifying luciferase expression using bioluminescent imaging, we were able to track MaSCs non-invasively in individual mice over time. Using this model to monitor MaSC dynamics throughout pregnancy, we found that MaSCs expand in both total number and percentage during pregnancy and then drop down to or below baseline levels after weaning. However, in a second round of pregnancy, this expansion was not as extensive. These findings validate a powerful system for the analysis of MaSC dynamics in vivo, which will facilitate future characterization of MaSCs during mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  13. CXCR4 expression in feline mammary carcinoma cells: evidence of a proliferative role for the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Angelo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary tumours frequently develop in female domestic cats being highly malignant in a large percentage of cases. Chemokines regulate many physiological and pathological processes including organogenesis, chemotaxis of inflammatory cells, as well as tumour progression and metastasization. In particular, the chemokine/receptor pair SDF-1/CXCR4 has been involved in the regulation of metastatic potential of neoplastic cells, including breast cancer. The aim of this study was the immunohistochemical defininition of the expression profile of CXCR4 in primary and metastatic feline mammary carcinomas and the evaluation of the role of SDF-1 in feline mammary tumour cell proliferation. Results A total of 45 mammary surgical samples, including 33 primary tumours (31 carcinomas and 2 adenomas, 6 metastases, and 4 normal mammary tissues were anlyzed. Tumor samples were collected from a total number of 26 animals, as in some cases concurrent occurrence of neoplasm in more than one mammary gland was observed. Tissues were processed for standard histological examination, and all lesions were classified according to the World Health Organization criteria. CXCR4 expression in neoplastic cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The level of CXCR4 immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively estimated as CXCR4 score evaluating both the number of positive cells and the intensity of staining. Six primary, fibroblast-free primary cultures were obtained from fresh feline mammary carcinomas and characterized by immunofluorescence for CXCR4 and malignant mammary cell marker expression. SDF-1-dependent in vitro proliferative effects were also assayed. CXCR4 expression was observed in 29 out of 31 malignant tissues with a higher CXCR4 score observed in 4 out of 6 metastatic lesions than in the respective primary tumours. In 2 benign lesions analyzed, only the single basaloid adenoma showed a mild positive immunostaining against CXCR4. Normal tissue did

  14. Pericentriolar Targeting of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus GAG Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhi Zhang

    Full Text Available The Gag protein of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is the chief determinant of subcellular targeting. Electron microscopy studies show that MMTV Gag forms capsids within the cytoplasm and assembles as immature particles with MMTV RNA and the Y box binding protein-1, required for centrosome maturation. Other betaretroviruses, such as Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV, assemble adjacent to the pericentriolar region because of a cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the Matrix protein. Previous studies suggest that the MMTV Matrix protein may also harbor a similar cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal. Herein, we show that a substantial fraction of MMTV Gag localizes to the pericentriolar region. This was observed in HEK293T, HeLa human cell lines and the mouse derived NMuMG mammary gland cells. Moreover, MMTV capsids were observed adjacent to centrioles when expressed from plasmids encoding either MMTV Gag alone, Gag-Pro-Pol or full-length virus. We found that the cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the MMTV Matrix protein was sufficient for pericentriolar targeting, whereas mutation of the glutamine to alanine at position 56 (D56/A resulted in plasma membrane localization, similar to previous observations from mutational studies of M-PMV Gag. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy studies showed that MMTV capsids accumulate around centrioles suggesting that, similar to M-PMV, the pericentriolar region may be a site for MMTV assembly. Together, the data imply that MMTV Gag targets the pericentriolar region as a result of the MMTV cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal, possibly aided by the Y box protein-1 required for the assembly of centrosomal microtubules.

  15. Identification of rat mammary tumor-1 gene (RMT-1), which is highly expressed in rat mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, S; Yoo, J; Loh, K C; Guzman, R C; Gopinath, G R; Rajkumar, L; Chou, Y C; Yang, J; Popescu, N C; Nandi, S

    2001-12-10

    Full-term pregnancy early in life results in a permanent reduction in lifetime breast cancer risk in women. Parous rats and mice are also refractory to chemical carcinogenesis. Therefore, investigation of the differences between mammary glands from virgin and parous rats would provide valuable information regarding the protective effects of early full-term pregnancy. In this report, we examined the gene expression patterns in mammary glands from virgin and parous Lewis rats. Using differential display technology, a novel 4.2 kb cDNA, designated rat mammary tumor-1 (RMT-1) was isolated. Northern blot analysis of RMT-1 showed that RMT-1 expression was higher in the pre-pubertal and pubertal stages during rat mammary gland development while it was down-regulated in mammary glands from mature virgin and parous rats. RMT-1 expression was highest in rat mammary cancers compared with either the mammary glands of virgin or parous rats. At the Northern blot sensitivity level, RMT-1 expression was found only in the mammary gland. Northern blot analysis also showed that the expression of this gene was found in 74% of N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary cancers while it was not found in MNU-induced cancers from other organs. The examination of the RMT-1 gene structure revealed that it consists of five exons spanning 5.9 kb. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the gene was localized on rat chromosome 1 band q 43-51. The present data show that there is a correlation between high RMT-1 expression and rat mammary carcinogenesis or decreased RMT-1 expression and parity associated refractoriness to chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis. However, whether or not RMT-1 gene has a functional role in these processes remains to be investigated.

  16. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed without..., swine, and goats shall not be saved for edible purposes. (d) The udders from cows officially designated as “Brucellosis reactors” or as “Mastitis elimination cows” shall be condemned....

  17. Bovine mammary stem cells: Cell biology meets production agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue ...

  18. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Qing Cissy Yu; Verheyen, Esther M.; Yi Arial Zeng

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology.

  19. Bipotent mammary stem cells: now in amazing 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, R.

    2014-01-01

    For many decades, developmental biologists and cancer researchers alike have been trying to understand the relationship between the basal and luminal cell compartments in the mouse mammary epithelium. Delineating the mammary stem and progenitor cell hierarchy will provide fundamental knowledge of ho

  20. Resident macrophages influence stem cell activity in the mammary gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyorki, D.E.; Asselin-Labat, M.L.; Rooijen, van N.; Lindeman, G.J.; Visvader, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages in the mammary gland are essential for morphogenesis of the ductal epithelial tree and have been implicated in promoting breast tumor metastasis. Although it is well established that macrophages influence normal mammopoiesis, the mammary cell types that these accessory cells

  1. P-Cadherin Expression in Feline Mammary Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina Figueira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for molecular markers in the feline mammary gland, namely, the adhesion molecules belonging to the cadherin family, is useful in the understanding of the development of mammary carcinomas in felines and humans. To study P-cadherin expression in the feline mammary gland, 61 samples of normal (n=4, hyperplastic (n=12, and neoplastic (n=45 feline mammary tissues were examined. In both normal and hyperplastic mammary tissues as well as in benign tumours, P-cadherin immunolabelling was restricted to myoepithelial cells. In malignant tumours, however, there was an aberrant epithelial P-cadherin immunoexpression in 64.1% (n=25 of cases, with a membranous and/or cytoplasmic pattern of distribution. A statistically significant relationship was seen between epithelial P-cadherin expression and malignant mammary lesions (P=0.0001. In malignant mammary tumours, there was likewise a statistically significant relationship between aberrant P-cadherin immunoexpression and histological grade (P=0.0132. Aberrant epithelial P-cadherin expression seems to be related to malignancy in the feline mammary gland. To confirm the results of this investigation, further studies with larger samples and follow-up studies are warranted.

  2. Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be identified by a gene expression profile that partly overlaps with human breast cancer profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummel Michael

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similar to human breast cancer mammary tumors of the female dog are commonly associated with a fatal outcome due to the development of distant metastases. However, the molecular defects leading to metastasis are largely unknown and the value of canine mammary carcinoma as a model for human breast cancer is unclear. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression signatures associated with mammary tumor metastasis and asked for parallels with the human equivalent. Methods Messenger RNA expression profiles of twenty-seven lymph node metastasis positive or negative canine mammary carcinomas were established by microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were functionally characterized and associated with molecular pathways. The findings were also correlated with published data on human breast cancer. Results Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas had 1,011 significantly differentially expressed genes when compared to non-metastatic carcinomas. Metastatic carcinomas had a significant up-regulation of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, matrix modulation, protein folding and proteasomal degradation whereas cell differentiation genes, growth factor pathway genes and regulators of actin organization were significantly down-regulated. Interestingly, 265 of the 1,011 differentially expressed canine genes are also related to human breast cancer and, vice versa, parts of a human prognostic gene signature were identified in the expression profiles of the metastatic canine tumors. Conclusions Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be discriminated from non-metastatic carcinomas by their gene expression profiles. More than one third of the differentially expressed genes are also described of relevance for human breast cancer. Many of the differentially expressed genes are linked to functions and pathways which appear to be relevant for the induction and maintenance of metastatic progression and may represent new therapeutic

  3. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Rodilla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  4. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Veronica; Dasti, Alessandro; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Laurent, Cécile; Reyal, Fabien; Fre, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  5. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  6. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  7. Autophagy mitigates metabolic stress and genome damage in mammary tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantza-Wadsworth, Vassiliki; Patel, Shyam; Kravchuk, Olga; Chen, Guanghua; Mathew, Robin; Jin, Shengkan; White, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving self-digestion of cellular organelles during starvation as a means of cell survival; however, if it proceeds to completion, autophagy can lead to cell death. Autophagy is also a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor mechanism for mammary tumorigenesis, as the essential autophagy regulator beclin1 is monoallelically deleted in breast carcinomas. However, the mechanism by which autophagy suppresses breast cancer remains elusive. Here we show that allelic loss of beclin1 and defective autophagy sensitized mammary epithelial cells to metabolic stress and accelerated lumen formation in mammary acini. Autophagy defects also activated the DNA damage response in vitro and in mammary tumors in vivo, promoted gene amplification, and synergized with defective apoptosis to promote mammary tumorigenesis. Therefore, we propose that autophagy limits metabolic stress to protect the genome, and that defective autophagy increases DNA damage and genomic instability that ultimately facilitate breast cancer progression. PMID:17606641

  8. Development of mammary glands of fat sheep submitted to restricted feeding during late pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, J V; Nielsen, M O; Theil, P K;

    2008-01-01

    Mammary gland development in sheep occurs mainly during puberty and pregnancy. We have investigated the effects of a late gestation feed restriction on mammary gland development in sheep.......Mammary gland development in sheep occurs mainly during puberty and pregnancy. We have investigated the effects of a late gestation feed restriction on mammary gland development in sheep....

  9. Alcohol exposure in utero leads to enhanced prepubertal mammary development and alterations in mammary IGF and estradiol systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Tiffany A; Crismale-Gann, Catina; Cohick, Wendie S

    2011-08-01

    Exposure to alcohol during fetal development increases susceptibility to mammary cancer in adult rats. This study determined if early changes in mammary morphology and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/estradiol axis are involved in the mechanisms that underlie this increased susceptibility. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a liquid diet containing 6.7% ethanol (alcohol), an isocaloric liquid diet (pair-fed), or rat chow ad libitum from days 11 to 21 of gestation. At birth, female pups were cross-fostered to ad libitum-fed control dams. Offspring were euthanized at postnatal days (PND) 20, 40, or 80. Animals were injected with BrdU before euthanasia, then mammary glands, serum, and livers were collected. Mammary glands from animals exposed to alcohol in utero displayed increased epithelial cell proliferation and aromatase expression at PND 20 and 40. Mammary IGF-I mRNA was higher in alcohol-exposed animals relative to controls at PND 20, while mammary IGFBP-5 mRNA was lower in this group at PND 40. Hepatic IGF-I mRNA expression was increased at all time points in alcohol-exposed animals, however, circulating IGF-I levels were not altered. These data indicate that alcohol exposure in utero may advance mammary development via the IGF and estradiol systems, which could contribute to increased susceptibility to mammary cancer later in life.

  10. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    derived adipo- cytes and ADS-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (ADS-iPSCs) (19) and primary mouse ES cells to isolated sperm and oocytes (20). We...Mesendoderm 2353 765 051 59 5 92% H9-IMR90 5875 7 669 782 605 58 91% oocyte - ES cell (mouse) 4727 1 204 883 334 25 93% sperm - ES cell (mouse) 4580 4 364 748...engineered mouse model in which a specific mammary cell population is fluorescently marked upon initial transcriptional activation of the SV40 large T

  11. Mammary gland pathologies in the parturient buffalo

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    G N Purohit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Parturition related mammary gland pathologies in the buffalo appear to be low on accord of anatomic (longer teat length, thicker streak canal and physiologic (lower cisternal storage of secreted milk, lower milk production differences with cattle. Hemolactia, udder edema and hypogalactia usually occur in the buffalo due to physiologic changes around parturition however mastitis involves pathologic changes in the udder and teats; the incidence of mastitis is however lower compared to cattle. The incidence and therapy of hemolactia, udder edema and hypogalactia are mentioned and the risk factors, incidence, diagnosis, therapy and prevention for mastitis in buffalo are also described.

  12. Utility of mammaglobin immunohistochemistry as a proxy marker for the ETV6-NTRK3 translocation in the diagnosis of salivary mammary analogue secretory carcinoma.

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    Bishop, Justin A; Yonescu, Raluca; Batista, Denise; Begum, Shahnaz; Eisele, David W; Westra, William H

    2013-10-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma is a recently described salivary gland neoplasm defined by ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma's morphology is not entirely specific and overlaps with other salivary gland tumors. Documenting ETV6 rearrangement is confirmatory, but most laboratories are not equipped to perform this test. As mammary analogue secretory carcinomas are positive for mammaglobin, immunohistochemistry could potentially replace molecular testing as a confirmatory test, but the specificity of mammaglobin has not been evaluated across a large and diverse group of salivary gland tumors. One hundred thirty-one salivary gland neoplasms were evaluated by routine microscopy, mammaglobin immunohistochemistry, and ETV6 break-apart fluorescent in situ hybridization. The cases included 15 mammary analogue secretory carcinomas, 44 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 33 pleomorphic adenomas, 18 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 10 acinic cell carcinomas, 4 adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified, 3 polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas, 3 salivary duct carcinomas, and 1 low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma. All 15 mammary analogue secretory carcinomas harbored the ETV6 translocation and were strongly mammaglobin positive. None of the 116 other tumors carried the ETV6 translocation; however, mammaglobin staining was present in 1 (100%) of 1 low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma, 2 (67%) of 3 polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas, 2 (67%) of 3 salivary duct carcinomas, 2 (11%) of 18 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, and 2 (6%) of 33 pleomorphic adenomas. Mammaglobin is highly sensitive for mammary analogue secretory carcinoma, but immunostaining can occur in a variety of tumors that do not harbor the ETV6 translocation. Strategic use of mammaglobin immunostaining has a role in the differential diagnosis of salivary gland neoplasms, but it should not be indiscriminately used as a confirmatory test for mammary analogue secretory carcinoma.

  13. Reconstitution of mammary epithelial morphogenesis by murine embryonic stem cells undergoing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

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    Shuxian Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammary stem cells are maintained within specific microenvironments and recruited throughout lifetime to reconstitute de novo the mammary gland. Mammary stem cells have been isolated through the identification of specific cell surface markers and in vivo transplantation into cleared mammary fat pads. Accumulating evidence showed that during the reformation of mammary stem cell niches by dispersed epithelial cells in the context of the intact epithelium-free mammary stroma, non-mammary epithelial cells may be sequestered and reprogrammed to perform mammary epithelial cell functions and to adopt mammary epithelial characteristics during reconstruction of mammary epithelium in regenerating mammary tissue in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine whether other types of progenitor cells are able to contribute to mammary branching morphogenesis, we examined the potential of murine embryonic stem (mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to support mammary reconstitution in vivo. We observed that cells from day 14 embryoid bodies (EBs under hematopoietic differentiation condition, but not supernatants derived from these cells, when transplanted into denuded mammary fat pads, were able to contribute to both the luminal and myoepithelial lineages in branching ductal structures resembling the ductal-alveolar architecture of the mammary tree. No teratomas were observed when these cells were transplanted in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide evidence for the dominance of the tissue-specific mammary stem cell niche and its role in directing mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to reprogram into mammary epithelial cells and to promote mammary epithelial morphogenesis. These studies should also provide insights into regeneration of damaged mammary gland and the role of the mammary microenvironment in reprogramming cell fate.

  14. Distinct effects of EGFR ligands on human mammary epithelial cell differentiation.

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    Chandrani Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available Based on gene expression patterns, breast cancers can be divided into subtypes that closely resemble various developmental stages of normal mammary epithelial cells (MECs. Thus, understanding molecular mechanisms of MEC development is expected to provide critical insights into initiation and progression of breast cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and its ligands play essential roles in normal and pathological mammary gland. Signals through EGFR is required for normal mammary gland development. Ligands for EGFR are over-expressed in a significant proportion of breast cancers, and elevated expression of EGFR is associated with poorer clinical outcome. In the present study, we examined the effect of signals through EGFR on MEC differentiation using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-immortalized human stem/progenitor MECs which express cytokeratin 5 but lack cytokeratin 19 (K5(+K19(- hMECs. As reported previously, these cells can be induced to differentiate into luminal and myoepithelial cells under appropriate culture conditions. K5(+K19(- hMECs acquired distinct cell fates in response to EGFR ligands epidermal growth factor (EGF, amphiregulin (AREG and transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα in differentiation-promoting MEGM medium. Specifically, presence of EGF during in vitro differentiation supported development into both luminal and myoepithelial lineages, whereas cells differentiated only towards luminal lineage when EGF was replaced with AREG. In contrast, substitution with TGFα led to differentiation only into myoepithelial lineage. Chemical inhibition of the MEK-Erk pathway, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-AKT pathway, interfered with K5(+K19(- hMEC differentiation. The present data validate the utility of the K5(+K19(- hMEC cells for modeling key features of human MEC differentiation. This system should be useful in studying molecular/biochemical mechanisms of human MEC differentiation.

  15. Characterization of mammary adenocarcinomas in male rats after N-methyl-N-nitrosourea exposure--Potential for human male breast cancer model.

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    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Yuki, Michiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Emoto, Yuko; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Elmore, Susan A; Tsubura, Airo

    2016-05-01

    The frequency of breast cancer in men is extremely rare, reported to be less than 1% and there is currently no available animal model for male mammary tumors. We compared the characteristics of various immunohistochemical markers in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in male and female Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats including: estrogen receptor α (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), androgen receptor (AR), receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2), GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Female mammary adenocarcinomas were strongly positive in the nuclei of tumor cells for PCNA and ER (100%) with only 60% and 53% expressing PgR and GATA3, respectively. 100% of male adenocarcinomas also exhibited strongly positive expression in the nuclei of tumor cells for PCNA, with 25% expressing AR and only 8% showing positivity for ER. Male carcinomas did not express PgR or GATA3 and none of the tumors, male or female, were positive for HER2. Based on the observed ER and PgR positivity and HER2 negativity within these tumors, MNU-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in female rats appear to be hormonally dependent, similar to human luminal A type breast cancer. In contrast, MNU-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in male rats showed no reactivity for ER, PgR, HER2 or GATA3, suggesting no hormonal dependency. Both male and female adenocarcinomas showed high proliferating activity by PCNA immunohistochemistry. Based on our literature review, human male breast cancers are mainly dependent on ER and/or PgR, therefore the biological pathogenesis of MNU-induced male mammary cancer in rats may differ from that of male breast cancer in humans.

  16. A pediatric case of mammary analogue secretory carcinoma within the parotid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattlebaum, S Craig; Roby, Brianne; Dishop, Megan K; Said, M Sherif; Chan, Kenny

    2015-01-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described entity in the differential diagnosis of salivary gland tumors. It is notable for a characteristic t(12;15)(p13;q25) translocation that results in a unique fusion protein, ETV6-NTRK3. While several studies have retrospectively identified this translocation in cases previously diagnosed as a different salivary malignancy, there have been relatively few cases where this translocation was identified on initial pathology results, and fewer still in a pediatric population. We present a case of a 15 year old female with a slowly enlarging, painless, left facial mass. MRI demonstrated a cystic mass extending into the deep lobe of the parotid, and she underwent parotidectomy. The tumor cells stained positive for S100 and CK19. ETV6 translocation was present, confirming the diagnosis. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma is a recently described tumor of the salivary glands, which often masquerades as more common primary salivary gland tumors and cysts. More research is needed to characterize the typical behavior of this neoplasm and the optimal treatment regimen. With identification of its characteristic translocation, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma can be easily differentiated from its more prevalent counterparts, and should therefore remain within the differential of the pathologist and head and neck surgeon.

  17. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jane Q; Mori, Hidetoshi; Cardiff, Robert D; Trott, Josephine F; Hovey, Russell C; Hubbard, Neil E; Engelberg, Jesse A; Tepper, Clifford G; Willis, Brandon J; Khan, Imran H; Ravindran, Resmi K; Chan, Szeman R; Schreiber, Robert D; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1(tm1Rds) homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment.

  18. Evaluation of MCF10A as a Reliable Model for Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells.

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    Ying Qu

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women worldwide. Various cell models have been developed to study breast cancer tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug sensitivity. The MCF10A human mammary epithelial cell line is a widely used in vitro model for studying normal breast cell function and transformation. However, there is limited knowledge about whether MCF10A cells reliably represent normal human mammary cells. MCF10A cells were grown in monolayer, suspension (mammosphere culture, three-dimensional (3D "on-top" Matrigel, 3D "cell-embedded" Matrigel, or mixed Matrigel/collagen I gel. Suspension culture was performed with the MammoCult medium and low-attachment culture plates. Cells grown in 3D culture were fixed and subjected to either immunofluorescence staining or embedding and sectioning followed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Cells or slides were stained for protein markers commonly used to identify mammary progenitor and epithelial cells. MCF10A cells expressed markers representing luminal, basal, and progenitor phenotypes in two-dimensional (2D culture. When grown in suspension culture, MCF10A cells showed low mammosphere-forming ability. Cells in mammospheres and 3D culture expressed both luminal and basal markers. Surprisingly, the acinar structure formed by MCF10A cells in 3D culture was positive for both basal markers and the milk proteins β-casein and α-lactalbumin. MCF10A cells exhibit a unique differentiated phenotype in 3D culture which may not exist or be rare in normal human breast tissue. Our results raise a question as to whether the commonly used MCF10A cell line is a suitable model for human mammary cell studies.

  19. A review of mammary ductoscopy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Tanaka, Kanji

    2004-01-01

    Breast carcinoma and hyperplasia are thought to start in the lining of the breast duct. Mammary ductoscopy is an emerging technique allowing direct visual access of the ductal system of the breast through the nipple. This article reviews and discusses the utility of mammary ductoscopy. Abnormalities can be identified successfully by mammary ductoscopy, and intraductal biopsy can be used when the tumor is a polypoid type. Ductal lavage using microcatheters is effective in identifying malignant cells in high-risk women and this has stimulated interest in exploring the role of mammary ductoscopy in breast cancer screening. Mammary ductoscopy combined with ductal lavage may have a role in the management of patients with nipple discharge, the guiding of breast-conserving surgery for cancer, and in screening for high-risk women. The addition of molecular and genetic analysis of cells obtained by mammary ductoscopy are likely to enhance the use of this technique. Mammary ductoscopy techniques are safe and appear useful for detecting abnormalities in the breast. The additional molecular biologic study or ductal lavage may enhance the ability to direct and limit subsequent surgery when removing the offending lesions.

  20. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-. alpha. in human milk

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    Okada, Masaki; Wakai, Kae; Shizume, Kazuo (Research Institute for Growth Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)); Iwashita, Mitsutoshi (Tokyo Women' s Medical College (Japan)); Ohmura, Eiji; Kamiya, Yoshinobu; Murakami, Hitomi; Onoda, Noritaka; Tsushima, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{alpha} and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were measured in human milk by means of homologous radioimmunoassay. As previously reported, EGF concentration in the colostrum was approximately 200 ng/ml and decreased to 50 ng/ml by day 7 postpartum. The value of immunoreactive (IR)-TGF-{alpha} was 2.2-7.2 ng/ml, much lower than that of EGF. In contrast to EGF, the concentration of IR-TGF-{alpha} was fairly stable during the 7 postpartum days. There was no relationship between the concentrations of IR-TGF-{alpha} and IR-EGF, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism in the release of the two growth factors is different. On gel-chromatography using a Sephadex G-50 column, IR-EGF appeared in the fraction corresponding to that of authentic human EGF, while 70%-80% of the IR-TGF-{alpha} was eluted as a species with a molecular weight greater than that of authentic human TGF-{alpha}. Although the physiological role of TGF-{alpha} in milk is not known, it is possible that it is involved in the development of the mammary gland and/or the growth of newborn infants.

  1. SCA-1 Identifies the Tumor-Initiating Cells in Mammary Tumors of BALB-neuT Transgenic Mice

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    Cristina Grange

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells, initiating and sustaining the tumor process, have been isolated in human and murine breast cancer using different cell markers. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the presence and characteristics of stem/tumor-initiating cells in the model of the mouse mammary neoplasia driven by the activated form of rat Her-2/neu oncogene (BALB-neuT mice. For this purpose, we generated tumor spheres from primary spontaneous BALB-neuT tumors. Tumor sphere cultures were characterized for clonogenicity, self-renewal, and ability to differentiate in epithelial/myoepithelial cells of the mammary gland expressing basal and luminal cytokeratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin. In addition, tumor spheres were more resistant to doxorubicin compared with parental tumor cells. In the attempt to identify a selected marker for the sphere-generating cells, we found that Sca-1+ cells, present in tumors or enriched in mammospheres, and not CD24+ or CD29+ cells, were responsible for the sphere generation in vitro. Moreover, cells from the tumor spheres showed an increased tumor-generating ability in respect to the epithelial tumor cells. Sca-1+ sorted cells or clonal mammospheres derived from a Sca-1+ cell showed a superimposable tumor-initiating ability. The data of the present study indicate that a Sca-1+ population derived from mammary BALB-neuT tumors is responsible for sphere generation in culture and for initiating tumors in vivo.

  2. Pesticide chlorpyrifos acts as an endocrine disruptor in adult rats causing changes in mammary gland and hormonal balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Clara; Nieto, María Rosa Ramos; Bourguignon, Nadia; Lux-Lantos, Victoria; Rodriguez, Horacio; Cao, Gabriel; Randi, Andrea; Cocca, Claudia; Núñez, Mariel

    2016-02-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are compounds that interfere with hormone regulation and influence mammary carcinogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) acts as an ED in vitro, since it induces human breast cancer cells proliferation through estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) pathway. In this work, we studied the effects of CPF at environmental doses (0.01 and 1mg/kg/day) on mammary gland, steroid hormone receptors expression and serum steroid hormone levels. It was carried out using female Sprague-Dawley 40-days-old rats exposed to the pesticide during 100 days. We observed a proliferating ductal network with a higher number of ducts and alveolar structures. We also found an increased number of benign breast diseases, such as hyperplasia and adenosis. CPF enhanced progesterone receptor (PgR) along with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in epithelial ductal cells. On the other hand, the pesticide reduced the expression of co-repressors of estrogen receptor activity REA and SMRT and it decreased serum estradiol (E2), progesterone (Pg) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. Finally, we found a persistent decrease in LH levels among ovariectomized rats exposed to CPF. Therefore, CPF alters the endocrine balance acting as an ED in vivo. These findings warn about the harmful effects that CPF exerts on mammary gland, suggesting that this compound may act as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  3. New insights into the dual recruitment of IgA+ B cells in the developing mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Dorothée; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Chevaleyre, Claire; Zanello, Galliano; Levast, Benoît; Melo, Sandrine; Gerdts, Volker; Salmon, Henri

    2008-07-01

    In monogastric mammals, transfer of passive immunity via milk and colostrum plays an important role in protecting the neonate against mucosal infections. Here we analyzed the hypothesis that during gestation/lactation IgA+ plasmablasts leave the intestinal and respiratory surfaces towards the mammary gland (MG). We compared the recruitment of lymphocytes expressing homing receptors alpha4beta1 and alpha4beta7 to expression of their vascular counter-receptors, VCAM-1 and MAdCAM-1. Furthermore, the expression of the chemokines responsible for the recruitment of IgA+ plasmablasts was analyzed. Data confirmed that expressions of CCL28 and MAdCAM-1 in the MG increased during pregnancy and alpha4beta1+ and alpha4beta7+/IgA+ cell recruitment in lactation correlated with increase of CCL28 expression. Interestingly, VCAM-1 expression was found in small blood vessels of the lactating porcine MG, while in mice VCAM-1 was expressed in large blood vessels within the MG. Thus, our results indicate that the recruitment of IgA+ plasmablasts to MG is mediated by VCAM-1/alpha4beta1 and MAdCAM-1/alpha4beta7 in conjunction with CCL28/CCR10. They support the existence of a functional link between entero- and upper respiratory surfaces and MG, thereby, conferring protection against aero-digestive pathogens in the newborn.

  4. Effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids from plant oils and algae on milk fat yield and composition are associated with mammary lipogenic and SREBF1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, J; Mahecha, L; Nuernberg, K; Nuernberg, G; Dannenberger, D; Olivera, M; Boutinaud, M; Leroux, C; Albrecht, E; Bernard, L

    2012-12-01

    The main aim of the present study was to examine the effects of long-term supplementing diets with saturated or unprotected polyunsaturated fatty acids from two different plant oils rich in either n-3 or n-6 fatty acids (FAs) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich algae on mammary gene expression and milk fat composition in lactating dairy cows. Gene expression was determined from mammary tissue and milk epithelial cells. Eighteen primiparous German Holstein dairy cows in mid-lactation were randomly assigned into three dietary treatments that consist of silage-based diets supplemented with rumen-stable fractionated palm fat (SAT; 3.1% of the basal diet dry matter, DM), or a mixture of linseed oil (2.7% of the basal diet DM) plus DHA-rich algae (LINA; 0.4% of the basal diet DM) or a mixture of sunflower oil (2.7% of the basal diet DM) plus DHA-rich algae (SUNA; 0.4% of the basal diet DM), for a period of 10 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, the cows were slaughtered and mammary tissues were collected to study the gene expression of lipogenic enzymes. During the last week, the milk yield and composition were determined, and milk was collected for FA measurements and the isolation of milk purified mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Supplementation with plant oils and DHA-rich algae resulted in milk fat depression (MFD; yield and percentage). The secretion of de novo FAs in the milk was reduced, whereas the secretion of trans-10,cis-12-CLA and DHA were increased. These changes in FA secretions were associated in mammary tissue with a joint down-regulation of mammary lipogenic enzyme gene expression (stearoyl-CoA desaturase, SCD1; FA synthase, FASN) and expression of the regulatory element binding transcription factor (SREBF1), whereas no effect was observed on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 1, mitochondrial (GPAM). A positive relationship between mammary SCD1 and SREBF1 mRNA abundances was observed, suggesting a similar

  5. Mammary artery harvesting using the Da Vinci Si robotic system

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    Leonardo Secchin Canale

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Internal mammary artery harvesting is an essential part of any coronary artery bypass operation. Totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery has become reality in many centers as a safe and effective alternative to conventional surgery in selected patients. Internal mammary artery harvesting is the initial part of the procedure and should be performed equally safely if one wants to achieve excellence in patency rates for the bypass. We here describe the technique for mammary harvesting with the Da Vinci Si robotic system.

  6. Associated expressions of FGFR-2 and FGFR-3: from mouse mammary gland physiology to human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerliani, Juan P; Vanzulli, Silvia I; Piñero, Cecilia Pérez; Bottino, María C; Sahores, Ana; Nuñez, Myriam; Varchetta, Romina; Martins, Rubén; Zeitlin, Eduardo; Hewitt, Stephen M; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Lanari, Claudia; Lamb, Caroline A

    2012-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are tyrosine kinase receptors which have been implicated in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate FGFR-1, -2, -3, and -4 protein expressions in normal murine mammary gland development, and in murine and human breast carcinomas. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot, we report a hormonal regulation of FGFR during postnatal mammary gland development. Progestin treatment of adult virgin mammary glands resulted in changes in localization of FGFR-3 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, while treatment with 17-β-estradiol induced changes in the expressions and/or localizations of FGFR-2 and -3. In murine mammary carcinomas showing different degrees of hormone dependence, we found progestin-induced increased expressions, mainly of FGFR-2 and -3. These receptors were constitutively activated in hormone-independent variants. We studied three luminal human breast cancer cell lines growing as xenografts, which particularly expressed FGFR-2 and -3, suggesting a correlation between hormonal status and FGFR expression. Most importantly, in breast cancer samples from 58 patients, we found a strong association (P FGFR-2 and -3 expressions and a weaker correlation of each receptor with estrogen receptor expression. FGFR-4 correlated with c-erbB2 over expression. We conclude that FGFR-2 and -3 may be mechanistically linked and can be potential targets for treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients.

  7. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins stimulate mammary fibroblasts to promote mammary carcinoma cell invasion.

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    Philip Owens

    Full Text Available Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs are secreted cytokines that are part of the Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ superfamily. BMPs have been shown to be highly expressed in human breast cancers, and loss of BMP signaling in mammary carcinomas has been shown to accelerate metastases. Interestingly, other work has indicated that stimulation of dermal fibroblasts with BMP can enhance secretion of pro-tumorigenic factors. Furthermore, treatment of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs derived from a mouse prostate carcinoma with BMP4 was shown to stimulate angiogenesis. We sought to determine the effect of BMP treatment on mammary fibroblasts. A large number of secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix-metallo proteases (MMPs were found to be upregulated in response to BMP4 treatment. Fibroblasts that were stimulated with BMP4 were found to enhance mammary carcinoma cell invasion, and these effects were inhibited by a BMP receptor kinase antagonist. Treatment with BMP in turn elevated pro-tumorigenic secreted factors such as IL-6 and MMP-3. These experiments demonstrate that BMP may stimulate tumor progression within the tumor microenvironment.

  8. Notch in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Katerina; Feirt, Nikki; Kitajewski, Jan

    2004-10-01

    Notch signaling has been implicated in many processes including cell fate determination and oncogenesis. In mice, the Notch1 and Notch4 genes are both targets for insertion and rearrangement by the mouse mammary tumor virus and these mutations promote epithelial mammary tumorigenesis. Moreover, expression of a constitutively active form of Notch4 in mammary epithelial cells inhibits epithelial differentiation and leads to tumor formation in this organ. These data implicate the Notch pathway in breast tumorigenesis and provide the foundation for future experiments that will aid in our understanding of the role of Notch in human breast cancer development. Here, we review studies of mammary tumorigenesis induced by Notch in mouse and in vitro culture models providing evidence that Notch activation is a causal factor in human breast cancer.

  9. Modulation of secreted proteins of mouse mammary epithelial cells by the collagenous substrata

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    Lee, E.Y.H.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown previously that cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells retain their characteristic morphology and their ability to produce ..gamma..-casein, a member of the casein gene family, only if they are maintained on floating collagen gels. In this paper we show: (a) Cells on floating collagen gels secrete not only ..gamma..-casein but also ..cap alpha../sub 1/-, ..cap alpha../sub 2/-, and ..beta..-caseins. These are not secreted by cells on plastic and are secreted to only a very limited extent by cells on attached collagen gels. (b) The floating collagen gel regulates at the level of synthesis and/or stabilization of the caseins rather than at the level of secretion alone. Contraction of the floating gel is important in that cells cultured on floating glutaraldehyde cross-linked gels do not secrete any of the caseins. (c) The secretion of an 80,000-mol-wt protein, most probably transferrin, and a 67,000-mol-wt protein, probably butyrophilin, a major protein of the milk fat globule membrane, are partially modulated by substrata. However, in contrast to the caseins, these are always detectable in media from cells cultured on plastic and attached gels. (d) Whey acidic protein, a major whey protein, is actively secreted by freshly isolated cells but is secreted in extremely limited quantities in cultured cells regardless of the nature of the substratum used. Lactalbumin secretion is also decreased significantly in cultured cells. (e) A previously unreported set of proteins, which may be minor milk proteins, are prominently secreted by the mammary cells on all substrata tested. We conclude that while the substratum profoundly influences the secretion of the caseins, it does not regulate the expression of every milk-specific protein in the same way. The mechanistic implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Identification of mammary epithelial cells subject to chronic oxidative stress in mammary epithelium of young women and teenagers living in USA: implication for breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Judith; Shearer, Debra A; Murata, Erin; Patrick, Susan D; Han, Bing; Berg, Arthur; Clawson, Gary A

    2012-01-15

    Current knowledge of changes in the mammary epithelium relevant to breast carcinogenesis is limited to when histological changes are already present because of a lack of biomarkers needed to identify where such molecular changes might be ongoing at earlier during the of decades-long latent stages of breast carcinogenesis. Breast reduction tissues from young women and teenagers, representative of USA's high breast cancer incidence population, were studies using immunocytochemistry and targeted PCR arrays in order to learn whether a marker of chronic oxidative-stress [protein adducts of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE)] can identify where molecular changes relevant to carcinogenesis might be taking place prior to any histological changes. 4HNE-immunopositive (4HNE+) mammary epithelial cell-clusters were identified in breast tissue sections from most women and from many teenagers (ages 14-30 y) and, in tissues from women ages 17-27 y with many vs. few 4HNE+ cells, the expression of 30 of 84 oxidative-stress associated genes was decreased and only one was increased > 2-fold. This is in contrast to increased expression of many of these genes known to be elicited by acute oxidative-stress. The findings validate using 4HNE-adducts to identify where molecular changes of potential relevance to carcinogenesis are taking place in histologically normal mammary epithelium and highlight differences between responses to acute vs. chronic oxidative-stress. We posit that the altered gene expression in 4HNE+ tissues reflect adaptive responses to chronic oxidative-stress that enable some cells to evade mechanisms that have evolved to prevent propagation of cells with oxidatively-damaged DNA and to accrue heritable changes needed to establish a cancer.

  11. Role of p53 Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0509 TITLE: Role of p53 Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Goberdhan P. Dimri, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ...type and However, Mucl , K-18, and ASMA were not expressed in luminal cell type groups [12,68]. Interestingly, a significant cells present in...13,17,27], the has also attracted a great interest in the field of breast cancer candidate mammary stem cells appear to be ESA+, Mucl -, research, and

  12. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants

    OpenAIRE

    Bissacot Denise Z; Bersano Paulo RO; Figueiroa Fernanda C; Andrade Fábio HE; Rocha Noeme S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethr...

  13. Sequencing the transcriptome of milk production: milk trumps mammary tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Lemay, Danielle G; Hovey, Russell C.; Hartono, Stella R; Hinde, Katie; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Ventimiglia, Frank; Schmidt, Kimberli A; Lee, Joyce WS; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Silva, Pedro Ivo; Korf, Ian; Medrano, Juan F.; Barry, Peter A.; German, J. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies of normal human mammary gland development and function have mostly relied on cell culture, limited surgical specimens, and rodent models. Although RNA extracted from human milk has been used to assay the mammary transcriptome non-invasively, this assay has not been adequately validated in primates. Thus, the objectives of the current study were to assess the suitability of lactating rhesus macaques as a model for lactating ...

  14. Targeting the Prometastatic Microenvironment of the Involuting Mammary Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    differentiated glandular epithelium and re- modeling events during mammary involution [37,38]. TGFβ1 has also been the object of intense investigation due...sphincter. Within the mammary gland, Ltbp1L is induced exclusively in the ductal lu- minal epithelium but is silent in alveoli and therefore provides a rare...breast-cancer-research.com/content/15/6/R111induces ductal morphogenesis, differentiation of nipple epithelium and suppression of hair follicles

  15. Integrin Signaling in Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Arthur W.; Sait Ozturk; Sam Thiagalingam

    2012-01-01

    Cells sense and respond to the extracellular matrix (ECM) by way of integrin receptors, which facilitate cell adhesion and intracellular signaling. Advances in understanding the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy are converging with new developments that reveal how integrins regulate the normal mammary gland. But in breast cancer, integrin signaling contributes to the development and progression of tumors. This paper highlights recent studies which examine the role of integrin signaling in mam...

  16. Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peiguo; Feng, Jing; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the Hippo signaling pathway plays crucial roles in mammary gland development and breast cancer. Key components of the Hippo pathway regulate breast epithelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and stemness. Additionally, the Hippo pathway regulates breast tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. It is expected that the Hippo pathway will provide novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review will discuss and summarize the roles of several core components of the Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  17. Differential Acupuncture Treatment of Hyperplasia of Mammary Glands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进才

    2002-01-01

    @@ Hyperplasia of mammary glands is a common disease in the middle-aged women, and it is a precancerous lesion of mammary glands. For many years, the author has used Rugen (ST 18) of the Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming as the main point withcertain auxiliary points chosen on basis of the differentiation types to treat the disease and obtained satisfactory therapeutic effects. A report follows.

  18. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  19. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  20. Comparative activities of p-nonylphenol and diethylstilbestrol in noble rat mammary gland and uterotrophic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, J; Pyrah, I T; Foster, J R; Van Miller, J P; Joiner, R L; Ashby, J

    1999-04-01

    Colerangle and Roy (1996, Endocrine 4, 115-122) have described the apparent ability of both diethylstilbestrol (DES) and p-nonylphenol (NP) to cause extensive cell proliferation and lobular development in the mammary glands of young adult Noble rats. The chemicals were administered over 11 days via subcutaneously implanted minipumps. The dose level of DES used (0.076 mg/kg/day) was about 70 times higher than its minimum detection level in rodent uterotrophic and reproductive toxicology studies. In contrast, the lowest active dose level of NP (0.073 mg/kg/day) in the Noble rat mammary gland study was about 600 times lower than its minimum detection level in rat uterotrophic and multigeneration studies. The apparent enhanced sensitivity of the Noble rat mammary gland to the estrogenic activity of NP was considered worthy of further study. Ovariectomized Noble rat uterotrophic assays with NP (minimum detection level approximately 40 mg/kg/day, 3 or 11 days, oral gavage) revealed similar assay sensitivity to that observed for earlier immature and ovariectomized Alderley Park (AP) rat uterotrophic assays of this chemical. The response of the ovariectomized Noble rat uterotrophic assay to DES and estradiol was also as expected from earlier immature AP rat assays. It is concluded that the general sensitivity to estrogens of the Noble rat and the AP rat is similar. A repeat of the Noble rat mammary gland study with DES (11 x 0.076 mg/kg/day) and NP (11 x either 0.073 or 53.2 mg/kg/day), as originally reported by Colerangle and Roy (1996), revealed a strong positive response to DES and no response to NP. It is concluded that the minimum detection level of NP as a weakly estrogenic material in the rat should be based on the results of rat uterotrophic and multigeneration studies and therefore be set at approximately 40 mg/kg/day. It is also concluded that induced S-phase in the rodent mammary gland is best monitored using BRDU, as opposed to PCNA staining, and that use of

  1. Overexpression of ligase defective E6-associated protein, E6-AP, results in mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Tufail, Rozina; Hokayem, Jimmy El; Jorda, Mercy; Zhao, Wei; Reis, Zizi; Nawaz, Zafar

    2012-02-01

    E6-associated protein (E6-AP) is a dual function protein. It acts as an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase enzyme and coactivator of steroid hormone receptors such as estrogen (ERα) and progesterone (PR) receptors. It promotes the degradation of ERα and PR through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it has been shown that the levels of E6-AP are inversely associated with that of ERα in human breast tumors. But the role of wild-type human E6-AP and its ubiquitin-protein ligase activity in mammary tumorigenesis is still unknown. To investigate this role, the authors utilized transgenic mice lines that specifically overexpress either the wild-type human E6-AP (E6-AP(WT)) or the ubiquitin-protein ligase defective E6-AP that contains C833S mutation (E6-AP(C833S)) in the mammary gland. To further substantiate the role of E6-AP in the development of breast tumorigenesis, it was also examined the expression of E6-AP in a large cohort of human breast cancer samples. The transgenic mice that overexpress wild-type E6-AP (E6-AP(WT)) fail to develop mammary tumors. Unlike the E6-AP(WT) mice, the E6-AP(C833S) mice that overexpress ubiquitin-protein ligase defective E6-AP protein develop mammary hyperplasia with a median latency of 18 months. These observations suggest that the inactivation of the ubiquitin-protein ligase function of E6-AP is sufficient to initiate the process of mammary tumor development. Furthermore, the data also suggests that E6-AP exerts its effects on target cells by modulating the protein levels and functions of ERα and PR. In addition, it was found in human breast cancer patients that the level of E6-AP is decreased in invasive breast tumors compared to normal breast tissue. Moreover, the authors also show that the survival patterns for E6-AP negative patients were worse compared to E6-AP positive patients. Taken together, these data suggests that E6-AP may act as a tumor suppressor in breast.

  2. Mammary hypoplasia: not every breast can produce sufficient milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Megan W; Kessler, Julia Lange

    2013-01-01

    Breast milk is considered the optimal form of nutrition for newborn infants. Current recommendations are to breastfeed for 6 months. Not all women are able to breastfeed. Mammary hypoplasia is a primary cause of failed lactogenesis II, whereby the mother is unable to produce an adequate milk volume. Women with mammary hypoplasia often have normal hormone levels and innervation but lack sufficient glandular tissue to produce an adequate milk supply to sustain their infant. The etiology of this rare condition is unclear, although there are theories that refer to genetic predisposition and estrogenic environmental exposures in select agricultural environments. Women with mammary hypoplasia may not exhibit the typical breast changes associated with pregnancy and may fail to lactate postpartum. Breasts of women with mammary hypoplasia may be widely spaced (1.5 inches or greater), asymmetric, or tuberous in nature. Awareness of the history and clinical signs of mammary hypoplasia during the prenatal period and immediate postpartum increases the likelihood that women will receive the needed education and physical and emotional support and encouragement. Several medications and herbs demonstrate some efficacy in increasing breast milk production in women with mammary hypoplasia.

  3. Dynamics of mammary infections in organic dairy farms in Northern Spain

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the microbiological state and the dynamics of the mammary infections of organic farms in North Spain to discover if the high somatic cell count (SCC) observed in these farms is associated to a high incidence of mastitis. Microbiological cultures and SCC were performed in 8,496 foremilk samples collected from 160 cows in five representative organic farms from February 2006 to January 2008. Even though 79.3% of cultures were positive, only 21.2% of the...

  4. Aberrant Proliferation of Differentiating Alveolar Cells Induces Hyperplasia in Resting Mammary Glands of SV40-TAg Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Quante, Timo; Wegwitz, Florian; Abe, Julia; Rossi, Alessandra; Deppert, Wolfgang; Bohn, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    WAP-T1 transgenic mice express SV40-TAg under control of the whey acidic protein (WAP) promoter, which directs activity of this strong viral oncogene to luminal cells of the mammary gland. Resting uniparous WAP-T1 glands develop hyperplasia composed of TAg positive cells prior to appearance of advanced tumor stages. We show that cells in hyperplasia display markers of alveolar differentiation, suggesting that TAg targets differentiating cells of the alveolar compartment. The glands show signi...

  5. Aberrant proliferation of differentiating alveolar cells induces hyperplasia in resting mammary glands of SV40-TAg transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang eBohn; Timo eQuante

    2014-01-01

    WAP-T1 transgenic mice express SV40-TAg under control of the WAP promoter (Whey Acidic Protein) which directs activity of this strong viral oncogene to luminal cells of the mammary gland. Resting uniparous WAP-T1 glands develop hyperplasia composed of TAg positive cells prior to appearance of advanced tumor stages. We show that cells in hyperplasia display markers of alveolar differentiation, suggesting that TAg targets differentiating cells of the alveolar compartment. The glands show signif...

  6. c-Myc Transforms Human Mammary Epithelial Cells through Repression of the Wnt Inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Victoria H.; D'Cruz, Celina M.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    c-myc is frequently amplified in breast cancer; however, the mechanism of myc-induced mammary epithelial cell transformation has not been defined. We show that c-Myc induces a profound morphological transformation in human mammary epithelial cells and anchorage-independent growth. c-Myc suppresses the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1, and derepression of DKK1 or SFRP1 reduces Myc-dependent transforming activity. Myc-dependent repression of DKK1 and SFRP1 is accompanied by Wnt target gene activation and endogenous T-cell factor activity. Myc-induced mouse mammary tumors have repressed SFRP1 and increased expression of Wnt target genes. DKK1 and SFRP1 inhibit the transformed phenotype of breast cancer cell lines, and DKK1 inhibits tumor formation. We propose a positive feedback loop for activation of the c-myc and Wnt pathways in breast cancer. PMID:17485441

  7. Predisposition of cows to mastitis in non-infected mammary glands: effects of dietary-induced negative energy balance during mid-lactation on immune-related genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyes, Kasey; Drackley, James K; Morin, Dawn E;

    2011-01-01

    Cows experiencing severe postpartal negative energy balance (NEB) are at greater risk of developing mastitis than cows in positive energy balance (PEB). Our objectives were to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles between lactating cows (n = 5/treatment) subjected to feed restriction...... to induce NEB and cows fed ad libitum to maintain PEB in order to identify genes involved in immune response and cellular metabolism that may predispose cows to an intramammary infection in non-infected mammary gland. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation...... requirements, and cows fed PEB cows were fed the same diet ad libitum. At 5 days after feed restriction, one rear mammary gland from all cows was biopsied for RNA extraction and transcript profiling using microarray and quantitative PCR. Energy balance (NEB vs. PEB) resulted in 278 differentially expressed...

  8. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-01-01

    Processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei comprise a major part of stellar nucleosynthesis and hypothesized mechanisms for thermonuclear supernovae. In an effort towards understanding alpha processes from first principles, we describe in this letter the first ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of nucleons and apply a technique called the adiabatic projection method to reduce the eight-body system to an effective two-cluster system. We find good agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for S-wave and D-wave scattering. The computational scaling with particle number suggests that alpha processes involving heavier nuclei are also within reach in the near future.

  9. PTX3 is up-regulated in epithelial mammary cells during S. aureus intramammary infection in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Fernando Soares Filipe

    2015-07-01

    mammary gland epithelial cells, and in macrophages. During S. aureus infection PTX3 was up-regulated by epithelial cells. Macrophages and mammary secretum didn’t show PTX3 modulation, but PMNs recruited during infection were variably intensely positive.PTX3 mRNA expression was low in healthy organs and tissues of goats as has been reported indeed the molecules commonly induced after pro-inflammatory stimulation. As expected, PTX3 was constitutively expressed in bone marrow, rich in PMNs and monocytes, in aorta covered by endothelium and in the skin.PTX3 was up-regulated in epithelial mammary cells and in milk cells after S. aureus infection, demonstrating that it represents a first line of immune defense in goat udder. No modulation was observed in macrophages, in the secretum and in the ductal epithelial cells.Further experiments are needed to elucidate the role of PTX3 in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection.

  10. mTOR Directs Breast Morphogenesis through the PKC-alpha-Rac1 Signaling Axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan M Morrison

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Akt phosphorylation is a major driver of cell survival, motility, and proliferation in development and disease, causing increased interest in upstream regulators of Akt like mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2. We used genetic disruption of Rictor to impair mTORC2 activity in mouse mammary epithelia, which decreased Akt phosphorylation, ductal length, secondary branching, cell motility, and cell survival. These effects were recapitulated with a pharmacological dual inhibitor of mTORC1/mTORC2, but not upon genetic disruption of mTORC1 function via Raptor deletion. Surprisingly, Akt re-activation was not sufficient to rescue cell survival or invasion, and modestly increased branching of mTORC2-impaired mammary epithelial cells (MECs in culture and in vivo. However, another mTORC2 substrate, protein kinase C (PKC-alpha, fully rescued mTORC2-impaired MEC branching, invasion, and survival, as well as branching morphogenesis in vivo. PKC-alpha-mediated signaling through the small GTPase Rac1 was necessary for mTORC2-dependent mammary epithelial development during puberty, revealing a novel role for Rictor/mTORC2 in MEC survival and motility during branching morphogenesis through a PKC-alpha/Rac1-dependent mechanism.

  11. Isolation of Endothelial Cells and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Internal Mammary Artery Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Stephanie C.; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E.; Woods, T. Cooper

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell function through tissue culture techniques are often employed to investigate the underlying mechanisms regulating cardiovascular disease. As diseases such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease increase a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of methods for examining the effects of these diseases on vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells is needed. Commercial sources of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells generally provide minimal donor information and are in limited supply. This study was designed to determine if vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells could be isolated from human internal mammary arteries obtained from donors undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. As coronary artery bypass graft surgery is a commonly performed procedure, this method would provide a new source for these cells that when combined with the donor's medical history will greatly enhance our studies of the effects of complicating diseases on vascular biology. Internal mammary artery tissue was obtained from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Through a simple method employing two separate tissue digestions, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were isolated and characterized. The isolated vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells exhibited the expected morphology and were able to be passaged for further analysis. The vascular smooth muscle cells exhibited positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin and the endothelial cells exhibited positive staining for CD31. The overall purity of the isolations was > 95%. This method allows for the isolation of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells from internal mammary arteries, providing a new tool for investigations into the interplay of vascular diseases and complicating diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease. PMID:21603530

  12. Cd117 and Cd34 Staining Patterns in Childhood Benign Mammary Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayper KAÇAR

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: CD117 and CD34 are markers that have both been implied in cancer progression in adult breast lesions. This study was conducted in order to create a retrospective documentation and to analyze the expression patterns of these markers on childhood benign lesions along with a comparison with adult breast lesions’ staining patterns.Material and Method: Nine fibroadenomas, 2 tubular adenomas, 1 mammary hamartoma, 2 gynecomastias, 1 benign phyllodes tumor were retrieved from pathology archives of two reference centers between 2005-2010.Results: CD117 staining was identified in the epithelium of all cases in fibroadenoma/tubular adenoma group and focally positive in 1 mammary hamartoma, 2 gynecomastias, and 1 benign phyllodes tumor. CD117 staining was detected in the stroma of 8 cases. Three fibroadenomas, 1 mammary hamartoma, 2 gynecomastias and 1 benign phyllodes tumor lacked stromal labelling for this marker. All cases were strongly and diffusely positive for CD34 except the benign phyllodes tumor case. This case presented marked loss of stromal CD34 staining when compared to the surrounding stroma. Additionally, pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia was noted in 2 gynecomastias and in the peritumoral stroma of benign phyllodes tumor case.Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that fibroadenoma was the most commonly encountered breast lesion in childhood and that adolescent fibroadenomas showed similar staining patterns for CD117 and CD34 as for adult counterparts. On the other hand, different expression patterns of CD117 and CD34 between adenoma group and the gynecomastias and benign phyllodes tumor group may implicate different mechanisms of development and tumorigenesis among these groups.

  13. Social isolation induces autophagy in the mouse mammary gland: link to increased mammary cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumis, Allison; Cook, Katherine L; Andrade, Fabia O; Hu, Rong; Kidney, Emma; Zhang, Xiyuan; Kim, Dominic; Carney, Elissa; Nguyen, Nguyen; Yu, Wei; Bouker, Kerrie B; Cruz, Idalia; Clarke, Robert; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena

    2016-10-01

    Social isolation is a strong predictor of early all-cause mortality and consistently increases breast cancer risk in both women and animal models. Because social isolation increases body weight, we compared its effects to those caused by a consumption of obesity-inducing diet (OID) in C57BL/6 mice. Social isolation and OID impaired insulin and glucose sensitivity. In socially isolated, OID-fed mice (I-OID), insulin resistance was linked to reduced Pparg expression and increased neuropeptide Y levels, but in group-housed OID fed mice (G-OID), it was linked to increased leptin and reduced adiponectin levels, indicating that the pathways leading to insulin resistance are different. Carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis was significantly higher in I-OID mice than in the other groups, but cancer risk was also increased in socially isolated, control diet-fed mice (I-C) and G-OID mice compared with that in controls. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling (GRP78; IRE1) was upregulated in the mammary glands of OID-fed mice, but not in control diet-fed, socially isolated I-C mice. In contrast, expression of BECLIN1, ATG7 and LC3II were increased, and p62 was downregulated by social isolation, indicating increased autophagy. In the mammary glands of socially isolated mice, but not in G-OID mice, mRNA expressions of p53 and the p53-regulated autophagy inducer Dram1 were upregulated, and nuclear p53 staining was strong. Our findings further indicated that autophagy and tumorigenesis were not increased in Atg7(+/-) mice kept in social isolation and fed OID. Thus, social isolation may increase breast cancer risk by inducing autophagy, independent of changes in body weight.

  14. Specific posttranslational modification regulates early events in mammary carcinoma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Nagy, Tamas; Blalock, Ryan; Pierce, Michael

    2010-12-07

    The expression of an enzyme, GnT-V, that catalyzes a specific posttranslational modification of a family of glycoproteins, namely a branched N-glycan, is transcriptionally up-regulated during breast carcinoma oncogenesis. To determine the molecular basis of how early events in breast carcinoma formation are regulated by GnT-V, we studied both the early stages of mammary tumor formation by using 3D cell culture and a her-2 transgenic mouse mammary tumor model. Overexpression of GnT-V in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells in 3D culture disrupted acinar morphogenesis with impaired hollow lumen formation, an early characteristic of mammary neoplastic transformation. The disrupted acinar morphogenesis of mammary tumor cells in 3D culture caused by her-2 expression was reversed in tumors that lacked GnT-V expression. Moreover, her-2-induced mammary tumor onset was significantly delayed in the GnT-V null tumors, evidence that the lack of the posttranslational modification catalyzed by GnT-V attenuated tumor formation. Inhibited activation of both PKB and ERK signaling pathways was observed in GnT-V null tumor cells. The proportion of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in the mammary tumors from GnT-V null mice was significantly reduced compared with controls, and GnT-V null TICs displayed a reduced ability to form secondary tumors in NOD/SCID mice. These results demonstrate that GnT-V expression and its branched glycan products effectively modulate her-2-mediated signaling pathways that, in turn, regulate the relative proportion of tumor initiating cells and the latency of her-2-driven tumor onset.

  15. Infusions of 3alpha,5alpha-THP to the VTA enhance exploratory, anti-anxiety, social, and sexual behavior and increase levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP in midbrain, hippocampus, diencephalon, and cortex of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Cheryl A; Rhodes, Madeline E

    2008-02-11

    17beta-Estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) influence the onset and duration of sexual behavior and are also associated with changes in behaviors that may contribute to mating, such as exploration, anxiety, and social behaviors (socio-sexual behaviors). In the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA), the P4 metabolite, 5alpha-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP), modulates lordosis of E2-primed rodents; 3alpha,5alpha-THP can also influence anxiety and social behaviors. To examine if 3alpha,5alpha-THP in the VTA mediates socio-sexual behaviors, we infused 3alpha,5alpha-THP to the VTA of diestrous and proestrous rats. As expected, proestrous, compared to diestrous, rats showed more exploratory (open field), anxiolytic (elevated plus maze), pro-social (partner preference, social interaction), and sexual (paced mating) behavior and had increased E2, P4, dihydroprogesterone (DHP), and 3alpha,5alpha-THP in serum, midbrain, hippocampus, diencephalon, and cortex. Infusions of 3alpha,5alpha-THP to the VTA, but not control sites, such as the substantia nigra (SN) or central grey (CG), of diestrous rats produced behavioral and endocrine effects akin to that of proestrous rats and increased DHP and 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels in midbrain, hippocampus, and diencephalon. Levels of DHP and 3alpha,5alpha-THP, but neither E2 nor P4 concentrations, in midbrain, hippocampus, diencephalon, and/or cortex were positively correlated with socio-sexual behaviors. Thus, 3alpha,5alpha-THP infusions to the VTA, but not SN or CG, can enhance socio-sexual behaviors and increase levels in midbrain, hippocampus, and diencephalon.

  16. Overexpression of Id1 in transgenic mice promotes mammary basal stem cell activity and breast tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Dong-Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Won, Hee-Young; Jang, Ki-Seok; MIN, KYUENG-WHAN; Jang, Si-Hyong; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kong, Gu

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id)1 is a crucial regulator of mammary development and breast cancer progression. However, its effect on stemness and tumorigenesis in mammary epithelial cells remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that Id1 induces mammary tumorigenesis by increasing normal and malignant mammary stem cell (MaSC) activities in transgenic mice. MaSC-enriched basal cell expansion and increased self-renewal and in vivo regenerative capacity of MaSCs are observed in th...

  17. Faddeev calculation of 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems using alpha alpha resonating-group method kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M; Suzuki, Y; Baye, D; Sparenberg, J M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out Faddeev calculations of three-alpha (3 alpha) and two-alpha plus Lambda (alpha alpha Lambda) systems, using two-cluster resonating-group method kernels. The input includes an effective two-nucleon force for the alpha alpha resonating-group method and a new effective Lambda N force for the Lambda alpha interaction. The latter force is a simple two-range Gaussian potential for each spin-singlet and triplet state, generated from the phase-shift behavior of the quark-model hyperon-nucleon interaction, fss2, by using an inversion method based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Owing to the exact treatment of the Pauli-forbidden states between the clusters, the present three-cluster Faddeev formalism can describe the mutually related, alpha alpha, 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems, in terms of a unique set of the baryon-baryon interactions. For the three-range Minnesota force which describes the alpha alpha phase shifts quite accurately, the ground-state and excitation energies of 9Be Lambda are...

  18. What Powers Lyman alpha Blobs?

    CERN Document Server

    Ao, Y; Beelen, A; Henkel, C; Cen, R; De Breuck, C; Francis, P; Kovacs, A; Lagache, G; Lehnert, M; Mao, M; Menten, K M; Norris, R; Omont, A; Tatemastu, K; Weiss, A; Zheng, Z

    2015-01-01

    Lyman alpha blobs (LABs) are spatially extended lyman alpha nebulae seen at high redshift. The origin of Lyman alpha emission in the LABs is still unclear and under debate. To study their heating mechanism(s), we present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of the 20 cm radio emission and Herschel PACS and SPIRE measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) emission towards the four LABs in the protocluster J2143-4423 at z=2.38. Among the four LABs, B6 and B7 are detected in the radio with fluxes of 67+/-17 microJy and 77+/-16 microJy, respectively, and B5 is marginally detected at 3 sigma (51+/-16 microJy). For all detected sources, their radio positions are consistent with the central positions of the LABs. B6 and B7 are obviously also detected in the FIR. By fitting the data with different templates, we obtained redshifts of 2.20$^{+0.30}_{-0.35}$ for B6 and 2.20$^{+0.45}_{-0.30}$ for B7 which are consistent with the redshift of the lyman alpha emission within uncertainties, indicating that both ...

  19. Differentiation of mammary stem cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, R; Rudland, P S

    1989-03-01

    The fully differentiated cells of the rat mammary parenchyma, the ductal epithelial, alveolar, and myoepithelial cells, are distinguished by their ultrastructure and by their accumulation of immunocytochemically detectable marker proteins. The different cell types probably develop from primative ductal structures called terminal end buds, which are present in the developing rat mammary glands, and these structures contain relatively undifferentiated cells. Clonal epithelial stem cell lines, obtained from normal rat mammary glands or benign mammary tumors, differentiate under appropriate conditions along a pathway to droplet-cell/doming cultures of primative alveolarlike cells. Under different culture conditions, the epithelial stem cells differentiate along a separate pathway to myoepitheliallike cells. They accumulate some of the specific marker proteins of myoepithelial cells in vivo, including type IV collagen, laminin, and Thy-1 antigen. In addition, these myoepitheliallike cells in culture contain an abundance of a potential calcium-binding protein, p9Ka, which also occurs in myoepithelial cells of histological sections from mammary glands. The accumulation of type IV collagen, laminin, Thy-1, and p9Ka occurs asynchronously along the pathway to the myoepitheliallike cells in vitro. Furthermore, the steady-state levels of these different marker proteins arise by alterations in the controls at the transcriptional, the posttranscriptional processing, and the translational stages of their production. These results suggest a stepwise control of synthesis of myoepithelial cell marker proteins, and in the case of p9Ka and Thy-1 antigen, this altered control may arise through their possession of novel transcriptional promoters.

  20. Bovine mammary stem cells: Transcriptome profiling and the stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification and transcriptome analysis of mammary stem cells (MaSC) are important steps toward understanding the molecular basis of mammary epithelial growth, homeostasis and tissue repair. Our objective was to evaluate the molecular profiles of four categories of cells within the bovine mammary ...

  1. File list: Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary glands SRX1078976...,SRX1184165,SRX1078977,SRX1078989,SRX1078990 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: InP.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary glands SRX1184165...,SRX1078976,SRX1078977,SRX1078989,SRX1078990 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: InP.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: InP.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary cells SRX187510,SR...X187515,SRX852567,SRX852566 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary cells SRX852566,SR...X187510,SRX852567,SRX187515 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary cells SRX852566,SR...X852567,SRX187510,SRX187515 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_tumor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_tumor [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: InP.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_tumor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: InP.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX187516...,SRX403480,SRX403479 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_tumor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: DNS.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary epithelial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: DNS.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Unc.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells SRX424872,SRX330636,SRX330635 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells SRX424872,SRX330635,SRX330636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  5. Breast cancer detection using mammary ductoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Edward

    2005-06-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) has been used as a tool to evaluate the breast for cancer for over 10 years. MD allows the direct visualization of the duct lumen, providing a more targeted approach to the diagnosis of disease arising in the ductal system, since the lesion can be visualized and samples collected in the area of interest. Initial studies of MD evaluated women with pathologic spontaneous nipple discharge (PND), while more recent reports are also using MD to assess women without PND for the presence of breast cancer. Cytologic assessment of MD is highly specific but less sensitive in the detection of breast cancer. Nonetheless, a MD sample from a breast with PND may rarely undergo cytologic review and be interpreted as consistent with malignancy, only later to undergo surgical resection demonstrating benign pathology. For this reason, PND specimens interpreted as malignant on cytologic review require histopathologic confirmation prior to instituting therapy. Additional sample evaluation using image or molecular analysis may improve the sensitivity and specificity of MD in breast cancer detection.

  6. Quantification of mammary organoid toxicant response and mammary tissue motility using OCT fluctuation spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Blackmon, Richard L.; Carabas-Hernendez, Patricia; Fuller, Ashley; Troester, Melissa A.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mammary epithelial cell (MEC) organoids in 3D culture recapitulate features of breast ducts in vivo. OCT has the ability to monitor the evolution of MEC organoids non-invasively and longitudinally. The anti-cancer drug Doxorubicin (Dox) is able to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells and has been widely used for chemotherapy of breast cancers; while environmental toxins implicated in breast cancer such as estrogen regulates mammary tumor growth and stimulates the proliferation and metastatic potential of breast cancers. Here we propose a quantitative method for measuring motility of breast cells in 3D cultures based upon OCT speckle fluctuation spectroscopy. The metrics of the inverse power-law exponent (α) and fractional modulation amplitude (M) were extracted from speckle fluctuation spectra. These were used to quantify the responses of MEC organoids to Dox, and estrogen. We investigated MEC organoids comprised of two different MEC lines: MCF10DCIS.com exposed to Dox, and MCF7 exposed to estrogen. We found an increase (pbreast cancer development and assessing anti-cancer drugs.

  7. Synthesis of tritiated 1-alpha-methadol and 1-alpha-acetylmethadol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thang, D.C.; Nam, N.H.; Pontikis, R. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital Fernand Widal, 75 - Paris (France)); Pichat, L. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service des Molecules Marquees)

    1982-04-01

    dl-Methadone was resolved by crystallization of its ammonium d- ..cap alpha.. -bromocamphor-..pi..-sulfonate salt to give d-methadone. The latter in ethyl acetate solution was reduced with tritium gas to 1-..cap alpha..-methadol /sup 3/H in presence of Adams platinum oxide at normal temperature and pressure. Acetylation of 1-..cap alpha..-carbinol hydrochloride by means of acetyl chloride afforded 1-..cap alpha..-acetylmethadol /sup 3/H, specific activity: 20 Ci/mMole. The positions and extent of tritium labelling were determined by /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Nutritional regulation of mammary cell apoptosis in lactating ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Colitti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in understanding the control of the mammary cell population now offer new insights to understand the decline in milk yield of dairy animals, which has long been a biological conundrum for the mammary biologists. Evidence indicates that change in mammary cell number is the result of an imbalance between cell proliferation and cell removal and that this is a principal cause of declining production (Stefanon et al., 2001. Further, it suggests that the persistency of lactation, the rate of decline in milk yield with stage of lactation, is strongly influenced by the rate of cell death by apoptosis in the lactating gland (Wilde et al., 1997. The most significant advance in understanding the cell biology underpinning persistency of lactation has come from the demonstration that cell loss during lactation occurs by apoptosis. Several researches obtained in cell cultures in mouse and rat have indicated that gene expression and cellular activities are modulated by the reactive oxygen species..........

  9. Mammary blood flow regulation in the nursing rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, M.; Creasy, R.K.

    1984-11-01

    Cardiac output and mammary blood flow distribution prior to and after suckling were studied in 10 nursing rabbits by means of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Suckling was followed by a 5.8% rise in cardiac output and a 20.4% rise in mammary blood flow. Determinations of intraglandular blood flow distribution have shown that there was a 43% increase in blood flow to the glands suckled from as compared to a 22.7% rise to the contralateral untouched glands and a 4.9% rise in the remainder of untouched glands. The conclusion is that a local mechanism may be involved in the regulation of mammary blood flow in the nursing rabbit.

  10. Mammary gland development: cell fate specification, stem cells and the microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jamie L; Robertson, Claire; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-15

    The development of the mammary gland is unique: the final stages of development occur postnatally at puberty under the influence of hormonal cues. Furthermore, during the life of the female, the mammary gland can undergo many rounds of expansion and proliferation. The mammary gland thus provides an excellent model for studying the 'stem/progenitor' cells that allow this repeated expansion and renewal. In this Review, we provide an overview of the different cell types that constitute the mammary gland, and discuss how these cell types arise and differentiate. As cellular differentiation cannot occur without proper signals, we also describe how the tissue microenvironment influences mammary gland development.

  11. The mammary glands of the Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis (Mammalia: Sirenia): morphological characteristics and microscopic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernanda Rosa; da Silva, Vera Maria Ferreira; Barcellos, José Fernando Marques

    2014-08-01

    The mammaries from carcasses of two female Amazonian manatees were examined. Trichechus inunguis possesses two axillary mammaries beneath the pectoral fins, one on each side of the body. Each papilla mammae has a small hole on its apex--the ostium papillare. The mammaries are covered by a stratified squamous keratinized epithelium. The epithelium of the mammary ducts became thinner more deeply in the tissue and varied from stratified to simple cuboidal. There was no evidence of glandular activity or secretion into the ducts of the mammary glands.

  12. Perinatal ethinyl oestradiol alters mammary gland development in male and female Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen; Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie;

    2012-01-01

    Increased attention is being paid to human mammary gland development because of concerns for environmental influences on puberty onset and breast cancer development. Studies in rodents have showed a variety of changes in the mammary glands after perinatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals...... exposures may alter mammary gland development, disrupt lactation and alter susceptibility to breast cancer......., indicating progressed development of mammary glands when exposed to oestrogens early in life. However, laboratories use different parameters to evaluate the development of mammary glands, making studies difficult to compare. Moreover, studies of whole mounts in Wistar rats are lacking. In the present study...

  13. Large mammary hamartoma with focal invasive ductal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pervatikar Suneet

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammary hamartomas are uncommon benign lesions rarely associated with malignancy. We report a case of a 25-year-old female patient presenting with a lump in the left breast. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed features of invasive ductal carcinoma along with normal benign glands that were mistaken for normal breast tissue. However, the mastectomy specimen revealed the malignant mass within a larger hamartomatous mass. Mammary hamartomas are benign lesions but, on exceedingly rare occasions, they may be involved by incidental, coexisting carcinoma, as illustrated in this case report.

  14. Influenza Transmission in the Mother-Infant Dyad Leads to Severe Disease, Mammary Gland Infection, and Pathogenesis by Regulating Host Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane G Paquette

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal influenza viruses are typically restricted to the human upper respiratory tract whereas influenza viruses with greater pathogenic potential often also target extra-pulmonary organs. Infants, pregnant women, and breastfeeding mothers are highly susceptible to severe respiratory disease following influenza virus infection but the mechanisms of disease severity in the mother-infant dyad are poorly understood. Here we investigated 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection and transmission in breastfeeding mothers and infants utilizing our developed infant-mother ferret influenza model. Infants acquired severe disease and mortality following infection. Transmission of the virus from infants to mother ferrets led to infection in the lungs and mother mortality. Live virus was also found in mammary gland tissue and expressed milk of the mothers which eventually led to milk cessation. Histopathology showed destruction of acini glandular architecture with the absence of milk. The virus was localized in mammary epithelial cells of positive glands. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland infection, we performed global transcript analysis which showed downregulation of milk production genes such as Prolactin and increased breast involution pathways indicated by a STAT5 to STAT3 signaling shift. Genes associated with cancer development were also significantly increased including JUN, FOS and M2 macrophage markers. Immune responses within the mammary gland were characterized by decreased lymphocyte-associated genes CD3e, IL2Ra, CD4 with IL1β upregulation. Direct inoculation of H1N1 into the mammary gland led to infant respiratory infection and infant mortality suggesting the influenza virus was able to replicate in mammary tissue and transmission is possible through breastfeeding. In vitro infection studies with human breast cells showed susceptibility to H1N1 virus infection. Together, we have shown that the host-pathogen interactions of

  15. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  16. Activation of p21(CIP1/WAF1) in mammary epithelium accelerates mammary tumorigenesis and promotes lung metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoyun; Xia, Weiya; Yang, Jer-Yen; Hsu, Jennifer L; Chou, Chao-Kai; Sun, Hui-Lung; Wyszomierski, Shannon L; Mills, Gordon B; Muller, William J; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2010-12-03

    While p21 is well known to inhibit cyclin-CDK activity in the nucleus and it has also been demonstrated to have oncogenic properties in different types of human cancers. In vitro studies showed that the oncogenic function of p21is closely related to its cytoplasmic localization. However, it is unclear whether cytoplasmic p21 contributes to tumorigenesis in vivo. To address this question, we generated transgenic mice expressing the Akt-phosphorylated form of p21 (p21T145D) in the mammary epithelium. The results showed that Akt-activated p21 was expressed in the cytoplasm of mammary epithelium. Overexpression of Akt-activated p21 accelerated tumor onset and promoted lung metastasis in MMTV/neu mice, providing evidence that p21, especially cytoplasmic phosphorylated p21, has an oncogenic role in promoting mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  17. Pueraria mirifica Exerts Estrogenic Effects in the Mammary Gland and Uterus and Promotes Mammary Carcinogenesis in Donryu Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Yoshida, Midori; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Naomi; Okuno, Takahiro; Gi, Min; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM), a plant whose dried and powdered tuberous roots are now widely used in rejuvenating preparations to promote youthfulness in both men and women, may have major estrogenic influence. In this study, we investigated modifying effects of PM at various doses on mammary and endometrial carcinogenesis in female Donryu rats. Firstly, PM administered to ovariectomized animals at doses of 0.03%, 0.3%, and 3% in a phytoestrogen-low diet for 2 weeks caused significant increase in uterus weight. Secondly, a 4 week PM application to non-operated rats at a dose of 3% after 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) initiation resulted in significant elevation of cell proliferation in the mammary glands. In a third experiment, postpubertal administration of 0.3% (200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)/day) PM to 5-week-old non-operated animals for 36 weeks following initiation of mammary and endometrial carcinogenesis with DMBA and N-ethyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (ENNG), respectively, resulted in significant increase of mammary adenocarcinoma incidence. A significant increase of endometrial atypical hyperplasia multiplicity was also observed. Furthermore, PM at doses of 0.3%, and more pronouncedly, at 1% induced dilatation, hemorrhage and inflammation of the uterine wall. In conclusion, postpubertal long-term PM administration to Donryu rats exerts estrogenic effects in the mammary gland and uterus, and at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w./day was found to promote mammary carcinogenesis initiated by DMBA. PMID:27827907

  18. Pueraria mirifica Exerts Estrogenic Effects in the Mammary Gland and Uterus and Promotes Mammary Carcinogenesis in Donryu Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kakehashi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pueraria mirifica (PM, a plant whose dried and powdered tuberous roots are now widely used in rejuvenating preparations to promote youthfulness in both men and women, may have major estrogenic influence. In this study, we investigated modifying effects of PM at various doses on mammary and endometrial carcinogenesis in female Donryu rats. Firstly, PM administered to ovariectomized animals at doses of 0.03%, 0.3%, and 3% in a phytoestrogen-low diet for 2 weeks caused significant increase in uterus weight. Secondly, a 4 week PM application to non-operated rats at a dose of 3% after 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA initiation resulted in significant elevation of cell proliferation in the mammary glands. In a third experiment, postpubertal administration of 0.3% (200 mg/kg body weight (b.w./day PM to 5-week-old non-operated animals for 36 weeks following initiation of mammary and endometrial carcinogenesis with DMBA and N-ethyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (ENNG, respectively, resulted in significant increase of mammary adenocarcinoma incidence. A significant increase of endometrial atypical hyperplasia multiplicity was also observed. Furthermore, PM at doses of 0.3%, and more pronouncedly, at 1% induced dilatation, hemorrhage and inflammation of the uterine wall. In conclusion, postpubertal long-term PM administration to Donryu rats exerts estrogenic effects in the mammary gland and uterus, and at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w./day was found to promote mammary carcinogenesis initiated by DMBA.

  19. The determination of $\\alpha_s$ by the ALPHA collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Mattia; Fritzsch, Patrick; Korzec, Tomasz; Ramos, Alberto; Schaefer, Stefan; Simma, Hubert; Sint, Stefan; Sommer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    We review the ALPHA collaboration strategy for obtaining the QCD coupling at high scale. In the three-flavor effective theory it avoids the use of perturbation theory at $\\alpha > 0.2$ and at the same time has the physical scales small compared to the cutoff $1/a$ in all stages of the computation. The result $\\Lambda_\\overline{MS}^{(3)}=332(14)$~MeV is translated to $\\alpha_\\overline{MS}(m_Z)=0.1179(10)(2)$ by use of (high order) perturbative relations between the effective theory couplings at the charm and beauty quark "thresholds". The error of this perturbative step is discussed and estimated as $0.0002$.

  20. Aurora A Kinase Regulates Mammary Epithelial Cell Fate by Determining Mitotic Spindle Orientation in a Notch-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L. Regan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell fate determination in the progeny of mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells remains poorly understood. Here, we have examined the role of the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA in regulating the balance between basal and luminal mammary lineages. We find that AURKA is highly expressed in basal stem cells and, to a lesser extent, in luminal progenitors. Wild-type AURKA expression promoted luminal cell fate, but expression of an S155R mutant reduced proliferation, promoted basal fate, and inhibited serial transplantation. The mechanism involved regulation of mitotic spindle orientation by AURKA and the positioning of daughter cells after division. Remarkably, this was NOTCH dependent, as NOTCH inhibitor blocked the effect of wild-type AURKA expression on spindle orientation and instead mimicked the effect of the S155R mutant. These findings directly link AURKA, NOTCH signaling, and mitotic spindle orientation and suggest a mechanism for regulating the balance between luminal and basal lineages in the mammary gland.

  1. Myc is a Notch1 transcriptional target and a requisite for Notch1-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinakis, Apostolos; Szabolcs, Matthias; Politi, Katerina; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2006-06-13

    To explore the potential involvement of aberrant Notch1 signaling in breast cancer pathogenesis, we have used a transgenic mouse model. In these animals, mouse mammary tumor virus LTR-driven expression of the constitutively active intracellular domain of the Notch1 receptor (N1(IC)) causes development of lactation-dependent mammary tumors that regress upon gland involution but progress to nonregressing, invasive adenocarcinomas in subsequent pregnancies. Up-regulation of Myc in these tumors prompted a genetic investigation of a potential Notch1/Myc functional relationship in breast carcinogenesis. Conditional ablation of Myc in the mammary epithelium prevented the induction of regressing N1(IC) neoplasms and also reduced the incidence of nonregressing carcinomas, which developed with significantly increased latency. Molecular analyses revealed that both the mouse and human Myc genes are direct transcriptional targets of N1(IC) acting through its downstream Cbf1 transcriptional effector. Consistent with this mechanistic link, Notch1 and Myc expression is positively correlated by immunostaining in 38% of examined human breast carcinomas.

  2. Characterization of the Six1 homeobox gene in normal mammary gland morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManaman James L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Six1 homeobox gene is highly expressed in the embryonic mammary gland, continues to be expressed in early postnatal mammary development, but is lost when the mammary gland differentiates during pregnancy. However, Six1 is re-expressed in breast cancers, suggesting that its re-instatement in the adult mammary gland may contribute to breast tumorigenesis via initiating a developmental process out of context. Indeed, recent studies demonstrate that Six1 overexpression in the adult mouse mammary gland is sufficient for initiating invasive carcinomas, and that its overexpression in xenograft models of mammary cancer leads to metastasis. These data demonstrate that Six1 is causally involved in both breast tumorigenesis and metastasis, thus raising the possibility that it may be a viable therapeutic target. However, because Six1 is highly expressed in the developing mammary gland, and because it has been implicated in the expansion of mammary stem cells, targeting Six1 as an anti-cancer therapy may have unwanted side effects in the breast. Results We sought to determine the role of Six1 in mammary development using two independent mouse models. To study the effect of Six1 loss in early mammary development when Six1 is normally expressed, Six1-/- embryonic mammary glands were transplanted into Rag1-/- mice. In addition, to determine whether Six1 downregulation is required during later stages of development to allow for proper differentiation, we overexpressed Six1 during adulthood using an inducible, mammary-specific transgenic mouse model. Morphogenesis of the mammary gland occurred normally in animals transplanted with Six1-/- embryonic mammary glands, likely through the redundant functions of other Six family members such as Six2 and Six4, whose expression was increased in response to Six1 loss. Surprisingly, inappropriate expression of Six1 in the adult mammary gland, when levels are normally low to absent, did not inhibit

  3. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  4. Cbx8 Acts Non-canonically with Wdr5 to Promote Mammary Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chi-Yeh; Sun, Zhen; Mullokandov, Gavriel; Bosch, Almudena; Qadeer, Zulekha A; Cihan, Esma; Rapp, Zachary; Parsons, Ramon; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Farias, Eduardo F; Brown, Brian D; Gaspar-Maia, Alexandre; Bernstein, Emily

    2016-07-12

    Chromatin-mediated processes influence the development and progression of breast cancer. Using murine mammary carcinoma-derived tumorspheres as a functional readout for an aggressive breast cancer phenotype, we performed a loss-of-function screen targeting 60 epigenetic regulators. We identified the Polycomb protein Cbx8 as a key regulator of mammary carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, Cbx8 is overexpressed in human breast cancer and correlates with poor survival. Our genomic analyses revealed that Cbx8 positively regulates Notch signaling by maintaining H3K4me3 levels on Notch-network gene promoters. Ectopic expression of Notch1 partially rescues tumorsphere formation in Cbx8-depleted cells. We find that Cbx8 associates with non-PRC1 complexes containing the H3K4 methyltransferase complex component WDR5, which together regulate Notch gene expression. Thus, our study implicates a key non-canonical role for Cbx8 in promoting breast tumorigenesis.

  5. Cbx8 Acts Non-canonically with Wdr5 to Promote Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yeh Chung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin-mediated processes influence the development and progression of breast cancer. Using murine mammary carcinoma-derived tumorspheres as a functional readout for an aggressive breast cancer phenotype, we performed a loss-of-function screen targeting 60 epigenetic regulators. We identified the Polycomb protein Cbx8 as a key regulator of mammary carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, Cbx8 is overexpressed in human breast cancer and correlates with poor survival. Our genomic analyses revealed that Cbx8 positively regulates Notch signaling by maintaining H3K4me3 levels on Notch-network gene promoters. Ectopic expression of Notch1 partially rescues tumorsphere formation in Cbx8-depleted cells. We find that Cbx8 associates with non-PRC1 complexes containing the H3K4 methyltransferase complex component WDR5, which together regulate Notch gene expression. Thus, our study implicates a key non-canonical role for Cbx8 in promoting breast tumorigenesis.

  6. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of Mammary Epithelial Cells Promotes Malignant Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai; Luo, Man-Li; Desmedt, Christine; Nabavi, Sheida; Yadegarynia, Sina; Hong, Alex; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Gabrielson, Edward; Hines-Boykin, Rebecca; Pihan, German; Yuan, Xin; Sotirious, Christos; Dittmer, Dirk P; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Wulf, Gerburg M

    2016-07-01

    Whether the human tumor virus, Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), promotes breast cancer remains controversial and a potential mechanism has remained elusive. Here we show that EBV can infect primary mammary epithelial cells (MECs) that express the receptor CD21. EBV infection leads to the expansion of early MEC progenitor cells with a stem cell phenotype, activates MET signaling and enforces a differentiation block. When MECs were implanted as xenografts, EBV infection cooperated with activated Ras and accelerated the formation of breast cancer. Infection in EBV-related tumors was of a latency type II pattern, similar to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A human gene expression signature for MECs infected with EBV, termed EBVness, was associated with high grade, estrogen-receptor-negative status, p53 mutation and poor survival. In 11/33 EBVness-positive tumors, EBV-DNA was detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization for the viral LMP1 and BXLF2 genes. In an analysis of the TCGA breast cancer data EBVness correlated with the presence of the APOBEC mutational signature. We conclude that a contribution of EBV to breast cancer etiology is plausible, through a mechanism in which EBV infection predisposes mammary epithelial cells to malignant transformation, but is no longer required once malignant transformation has occurred.

  8. Epstein–Barr Virus Infection of Mammary Epithelial Cells Promotes Malignant Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Whether the human tumor virus, Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV, promotes breast cancer remains controversial and a potential mechanism has remained elusive. Here we show that EBV can infect primary mammary epithelial cells (MECs that express the receptor CD21. EBV infection leads to the expansion of early MEC progenitor cells with a stem cell phenotype, activates MET signaling and enforces a differentiation block. When MECs were implanted as xenografts, EBV infection cooperated with activated Ras and accelerated the formation of breast cancer. Infection in EBV-related tumors was of a latency type II pattern, similar to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. A human gene expression signature for MECs infected with EBV, termed EBVness, was associated with high grade, estrogen-receptor-negative status, p53 mutation and poor survival. In 11/33 EBVness-positive tumors, EBV-DNA was detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization for the viral LMP1 and BXLF2 genes. In an analysis of the TCGA breast cancer data EBVness correlated with the presence of the APOBEC mutational signature. We conclude that a contribution of EBV to breast cancer etiology is plausible, through a mechanism in which EBV infection predisposes mammary epithelial cells to malignant transformation, but is no longer required once malignant transformation has occurred.

  9. Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    AD GRANT NUMBER DAMDI7-94-J-4040 TITLE: Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Gould, Ph.D...Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat DAMDI7-94-J-4040 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael Gould, Ph.D. Hong Lan, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  10. Aflatoxins ingestion and canine mammary tumors: There is an association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frehse, M S; Martins, M I M; Ono, E Y S; Bracarense, A P F R L; Bissoqui, L Y; Teixeira, E M K; Santos, N J R; Freire, R L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of mycotoxins on dogs feed and to explore the potential association between mycotoxins exposure and the chance of mamary tumors in a case-control study. The study included 256 female dogs from a hospital population, 85 with mammary tumors (case group) and 171 without mammary tumors (control group). An epidemiological questionnaire was applied to both groups, and the data were analyzed by the EpiInfo statistical package. For the study, 168 samples of the feed offered to dogs were analyzed for the presence of aflatoxins, fumonisins and zearalenone by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mycotoxins were found in 79 samples (100%) in the case group and 87/89 (97.8%) in the control group. Mycotoxins were detected in all types of feed, regardless feed quality. Level of aflatoxin B1 (p = 0.0356, OR = 2.74, 95%, CI 1.13 to 6.60), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) (p = 0.00007, OR = 4.60, 95%, CI = 2.16 to 9.79), and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) (p = 0.0133, OR = 9.91, 95%, CI 1.21 to 81.15) were statistically higher in case of mammary cancer. In contrast, neutering was a protective factor for mammary cancer (p = 0.0004, OR = 0.32, 95%, CI = 0.17 to 0.60).

  11. FEEDING GENISTEIN TO PREPUBERTAL GILTS STIMULATES THEIR MAMMARY DEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The possible role of dietary genistein on mammary development of prepubertal gilts was investigated. Forty-five gilts were fed one of three diets from 90 d of age until slaughter (day 183 ± 1). Diets were: without soya (CTL0, n=15); soya-based commercial (CTLS, n=15); and soya-based commercial with ...

  12. Morphogenesis of Mammary Glands in Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Challana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research was elucidated on the morphogenesis of mammary gland of buffalo during prenatal development. Total of 16 foetuses ranging from 1.2 cm (34 days to 108 cm CVRL (curved crown rump length (317 days were used for study. The study revealed that mammary line was first observed at 1.2 cm CVRL (34 days, mammary hillock at 1.7 cm (37 days, and mammary bud at 2.6 cm CVRL (41 days foetuses. Epidermal cone was found at 6.7 cm CVRL (58 days whereas primary and secondary ducts were observed at 7.4 cm CVRL (62 days and 15 cm CVRL (96 days, respectively. Connective tissue whorls were reported at 18.2 cm CVRL (110 days and internal elastic lamina and muscle layers at 24.1 cm CVRL (129 days. Lobules were observed at 29.3 cm CVRL (140 days, rosette of furstenberg at 39.5 cm CVRL (163 days, and keratin plug at 45.5 cm CVRL (176 days foetus. Primordia of sweat and sebaceous glands around hair follicle were seen at 21.2 cm CVRL (122 days of foetal life. Differentiation of all the skin layers along with cornification was observed at 69 cm (229 days in group III foetuses.

  13. Culture and characterization of mammary cancer stem cells in mammospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Eleonora; Cocola, Cinzia; Thaden, Frank Rüdiger; Pelucchi, Paride; Gray, Brian; Bertalot, Giovanni; Albertini, Alberto; Reinbold, Rolland; Zucchi, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Mammospheres (MMs) are a model for culturing and maintaining mammary gland stem cells (SCs) or cancer stem cells (CSCs) ex situ. As MMs recapitulate the micro-niche of the mammary gland or a tumor, MMs are a model for studying the properties of SCs or CSCs, and for mapping, isolating, and characterizing the SC/CSC generated lineages. Cancer stem cells share with normal SCs the properties of self-renewal and the capacity to generate all cell types and organ structures of the mammary gland. Analysis of human tumor samples suggests that CSCs are heterogeneous in terms of proliferation and differentiation potential. Mammospheres from CSCs likewise display heterogeneity. This heterogeneity makes analysis of CSC generated MMs challenging. To identify the unique and diverse properties of MM derived CSCs, comparative analysis with MMs obtained from normal SCs is required. Here we present protocols for identifying and enriching cells with SC features from a cancer cell line using the LA7CSCs as a model. A comprehensive and comparative approach for identifying, isolating, and characterizing MMs from SCs and CSCs from human breast is also introduced. In addition, we describe detailed procedures for identifying, isolating, and characterizing mammary gland specific cell types, generated during MM formation.

  14. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN MAMMARY GLAND - A PRENATAL STU DY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: 44 fetuses of varying gestational ages, ranging fr om 33m.m C.R.L. to 270m.m.C.R.L. (i.e. from 8weeks to 32weeks of intrauterine life were studied to note the developmental sequence of mammary gland. Tissues were prepared for microtomy by Paraffin wax embedding method. Serial sections were stained by Haematoxyli n & Eosin (H & E and Masson’s Trichome method(1. It was observed that the organ is subjec t to fluctuations in its development. In the present study the primary bud, secondary bud, & terti ary bud formation is seen at11th week ,14th week & 18 th week of gestation respectively .The canalization appeared at 20 th week of gestation. Variation is seen in the mode of canal ization as well as in the time of start of canalization. In the present study an endeavour has been made to establish the time of appearance of mammary buds and their time of canaliza tion .The observations are compared with the findings of other workers and discussed in the light of literature. Mammogenesis or development of mammary gland is of great importance for anatomists, surgeons, pathologists, physicians, obstetricians etc. A large number of dev elopmental anomalies like amastia, athelia, polymastia, polythelia, etc are of interest to them w hich can be understood more if thorough understanding of development of mammary gland is th ere.

  16. Detection of Mouse Mammary Tumour Virus in house mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Lise K; Leirs, Herwig; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    The prevalence of human breast cancer (HBC) is affected by several parameters. For the past decades MMTV, Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus, known to cause breast cancer in mice, has been hypothesized to affect the frequency of hormone dependent HBC. Though conclusive evidence has not been produced, still...

  17. Cat Mammary Tumors: Genetic Models for the Human Counterpart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Adega

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The records are not clear, but Man has been sheltering the cat inside his home for over 12,000 years. The close proximity of this companion animal, however, goes beyond sharing the same roof; it extends to the great similarity found at the cellular and molecular levels. Researchers have found a striking resemblance between subtypes of feline mammary tumors and their human counterparts that goes from the genes to the pathways involved in cancer initiation and progression. Spontaneous cat mammary pre-invasive intraepithelial lesions (hyperplasias and neoplasias and malignant lesions seem to share a wide repertoire of molecular features with their human counterparts. In the present review, we tried to compile all the genetics aspects published (i.e., chromosomal alterations, critical cancer genes and their expression regarding cat mammary tumors, which support the cat as a valuable alternative in vitro cell and animal model (i.e., cat mammary cell lines and the spontaneous tumors, respectively, but also to present a critical point of view of some of the issues that really need to be investigated in future research.

  18. Mammary remodeling in primiparous and multiparous dairy goats during lactation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safayi, Sina; Theil, Peter Kappel; Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring

    2010-01-01

    Milk production is generally lower but lactation persistency higher in primiparous (PP) than in multiparous (MP) goats. This may be related to differences in development and maintenance of mammary gland function, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The present study aimed to el...

  19. Altered oxidative stress and carbohydrate metabolism in canine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jayasri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Mammary tumors are the most prevalent type of neoplasms in canines. Even though cancer induced metabolic alterations are well established, the clinical data describing the metabolic profiles of animal tumors is not available. Hence, our present investigation was carried out with the aim of studying changes in carbohydrate metabolism along with the level of oxidative stress in canine mammary tumors. Materials and Methods: Fresh mammary tumor tissues along with the adjacent healthy tissues were collected from the college surgical ward. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, glutathione, protein, hexose, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD were analyzed in all the tissues. The results were analyzed statistically. Results: More than two-fold increase in TBARS and three-fold increase in glutathione levels were observed in neoplastic tissues. Hexokinase activity and hexose concentration (175% was found to be increased, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase (33%, fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (42%, and G6PD (5 fold activities were reduced in tumor mass compared to control. Conclusion: Finally, it was revealed that lipid peroxidation was increased with differentially altered carbohydrate metabolism in canine mammary tumors.

  20. Mechanism of inhibition of MMTV-neu and MMTV-wnt1 induced mammary oncogenesis by RARalpha agonist AM580.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Bertran, S; Samuels, T-A; Mira-y-Lopez, R; Farias, E F

    2010-06-24

    We hypothesized that specific activation of a single retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RARalpha), without direct and concurrent activation of RARbeta and gamma, will inhibit mammary tumor oncogenesis in murine models relevant to human cancer. A total of 50 uniparous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-neu and 50 nuliparous MMTV-wnt1 transgenic mice were treated with RARalpha agonist (retinobenzoic acid, Am580) that was added to the diet for 40 (neu) and 35 weeks (wnt1), respectively. Among the shared antitumor effects was the inhibition of epithelial hyperplasia, a significant increase (PAm580 also induced differentiation, in both in vivo and three-dimensional (3D) cultures. In these tumors Am580 inhibited the wnt pathway, measured by loss of nuclear beta-catenin, suggesting partial oncogene dependence of therapy. Am580 treatment increased RARbeta and lowered the level of RARgamma, an isotype whose expression we linked with tumor proliferation. The anticancer effect of RARalpha, together with the newly discovered pro-proliferative role of RARgamma, suggests that specific activation of RARalpha and inhibition of RARgamma might be effective in breast cancer therapy.

  1. New ALPHA-2 magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 21 June, members of the ALPHA collaboration celebrated the handover of the first solenoid designed for the ALPHA-2 experiment. The magnet has since been successfully installed and is working well.   Khalid Mansoor, Sumera Yamin and Jeffrey Hangst in front of the new ALPHA-2 solenoid. “This was the first of three identical solenoids that will be installed between now and September, as the rest of the ALPHA-2 device is installed and commissioned,” explains ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst. “These magnets are designed to allow us to transfer particles - antiprotons, electrons and positrons - between various parts of the new ALPHA-2 device by controlling the transverse size of the particle bunch that is being transferred.” Sumera Yamin and Khalid Mansoor, two Pakistani scientists from the National Centre for Physics in Islamabad, came to CERN in February specifically to design and manufacture these magnets. “We had the chance to work on act...

  2. Lyman Alpha Control

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Daniel Stefaniak

    2015-01-01

    This document gives an overview of how to operate the Lyman Alpha Control application written in LabVIEW along with things to watch out for. Overview of the LabVIEW code itself as well as the physical wiring of and connections from/to the NI PCI-6229 DAQ box is also included. The Lyman Alpha Control application is the interface between the ALPHA sequencer and the HighFinesse Wavelength Meter as well as the Lyman Alpha laser setup. The application measures the wavelength of the output light from the Lyman Alpha cavity through the Wavelength Meter. The application can use the Wavelength Meter’s PID capabilities to stabilize the Lyman Alpha laser output as well as switch between up to three frequencies.

  3. Predisposition of cows to mastitis in non-infected mammary glands: effects of dietary-induced negative energy balance during mid-lactation on immune-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Kasey M; Drackley, James K; Morin, Dawn E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Loor, Juan J

    2011-03-01

    Cows experiencing severe postpartal negative energy balance (NEB) are at greater risk of developing mastitis than cows in positive energy balance (PEB). Our objectives were to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles between lactating cows (n = 5/treatment) subjected to feed restriction to induce NEB and cows fed ad libitum to maintain PEB in order to identify genes involved in immune response and cellular metabolism that may predispose cows to an intramammary infection in non-infected mammary gland. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements, and cows fed PEB cows were fed the same diet ad libitum. At 5 days after feed restriction, one rear mammary gland from all cows was biopsied for RNA extraction and transcript profiling using microarray and quantitative PCR. Energy balance (NEB vs. PEB) resulted in 278 differentially expressed genes (DEG). Among up-regulated DEG (n = 180), Ingenuity Pathway Analysis® identified lipid metabolism (8) and molecular transport (14) as some of the most enriched molecular functions. Genes down-regulated by NEB (98) were associated with cell growth and proliferation (21) and cell death (18). Results indicate that DEG due to NEB in mid-lactation were associated with numerous biological functions but we did not identify genes that could, a priori, be associated with risk of intramammary infection in non-infected mammary glands. Further studies with early postpartal cows are required.

  4. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Quercetin on Angiogenesis of Experimental Mammary Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingquan Kong; Kainan Wu; Hui Lin

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the inhibitory effects of quercetin on angiogenesis of experimental mammary carcinoma.METHODS A 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced animal model of mammary carcinoma was established in rats. Seventy-nine female Sprague-Dawly rats were randomized into 4 groups namely, DMBA, DMBA with tamoxifen (TAM), DMBA with quercetin and control agents identified as group A, B, C and D respectively. Treatment was for 28 weeks. Samples of breast tissues were collected for histopathological observation and microvessel density (MVD) estimation by light microscopy. The expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and the protein product of H-ras were examined by immunohistochemical staining.tumor diameter of group A (76.2%, 2.37cm) were significantly higher than that in group B (40.9%, 1.82cm), C (45.5%, 1.71cm) and D (0%, 0cm) (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between groups B and C (P >0.05), which indicated that quercetin inhibited the incidence and growth of ing for VEGF, bFGF and the H-ras protein product showed significant differences between groups A and B, as well as groups A and C (P < 0.05), but no significant difference between groups B and C (P>0.05).CONCLUSION Quercetin can reduce the DMBA- induced mammary carcinoma incidence and tumor growth.The following mechanisms may be recausing inhibition of proliferation of the tumor cells and tumor angiogenesis.as VEGF and bFGF, so that angiogenesis in the mammary carcinomas is suppressed, with decreased mammary MVD in the rats receiving quercetin treatment.

  6. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marconato Laura

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies.

  7. Internal mammary lymph node management – further direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrana D

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available D Vrana,1,2 J Gatek3,4 1Department of Oncology, 2Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, 3Department of Surgery, Atlas Hospital, 4Faculty of Humanities, Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Zlín, Czech Republic We read the article titled “Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy: abandon or persist?” by Qiu et al with high interest. This was an excellent paper regarding the contemporary management of internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLN in early-stage breast cancer1 and we would like to take this opportunity to comment on this paper.There are several unresolved questions regarding early-stage breast management including axillary staging, clear resection margin, or IMLN.2–4 We have been focusing on the issues of IMLN for almost a decade and just recently published our data regarding IMLN management. We absolutely agree that one has to carefully balance the benefit and potential risks of biopsy or radiotherapy of IMLN.  Authors' reply Peng-Fei Qiu, Yong-Sheng WangBreast Cancer Center, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China  We appreciate the letter from Professors Vrana and Gatek regarding our article titled “Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy: abandon or persist?”.1 We have been following their publications regarding internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLN management since the publication of their article titled “Prognostic influence of internal mammary node drainage in patients with early-stage breast cancer” in December 20162 and we share their interest on this topic.  View the original paper by Qiu and colleagues.

  8. RUNX2 in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Nicola; McDonald, Laura; Morris, Joanna S; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen

    2013-06-01

    Runx2 is best known as an essential factor in osteoblast differentiation and bone development but, like many other transcription factors involved in development, is known to operate over a much wider tissue range. Our understanding of these other aspects of Runx2 function is still at a relatively early stage and the importance of its role in cell fate decisions and lineage maintenance in non-osseous tissues is only beginning to emerge. One such tissue is the mammary gland, where Runx2 is known to be expressed and participate in the regulation of mammary specific genes. Furthermore, differential and temporal expression of this gene is observed during mammary epithelial differentiation in vivo, strongly indicative of an important functional role. Although the precise nature of that role remains elusive, preliminary evidence hints at possible involvement in the regulation of mammary stem and/or progenitor cells. As with many genes important in regulating cell fate, RUNX2 has also been linked to metastatic cancer where in some established breast cell lines, retention of expression is associated with a more invasive phenotype. More recently, expression analysis has been extended to primary breast cancers where high levels of RUNX2 align with a specific subtype of the disease. That RUNX2 expression correlates with the so called "Triple Negative" subtype is particularly interesting given the known cross talk between Runx2 and estrogen receptor signaling pathways. This review summaries our current understanding of Runx2 in mammary gland development and cancer, and postulates a role that may link both these processes.

  9. Interpreting EEG alpha activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, O M; Vernon, D

    2014-07-01

    Exploring EEG alpha oscillations has generated considerable interest, in particular with regards to the role they play in cognitive, psychomotor, psycho-emotional and physiological aspects of human life. However, there is no clearly agreed upon definition of what constitutes 'alpha activity' or which of the many indices should be used to characterize it. To address these issues this review attempts to delineate EEG alpha-activity, its physical, molecular and morphological nature, and examine the following indices: (1) the individual alpha peak frequency; (2) activation magnitude, as measured by alpha amplitude suppression across the individual alpha bandwidth in response to eyes opening, and (3) alpha "auto-rhythmicity" indices: which include intra-spindle amplitude variability, spindle length and steepness. Throughout, the article offers a number of suggestions regarding the mechanism(s) of alpha activity related to inter and intra-individual variability. In addition, it provides some insights into the various psychophysiological indices of alpha activity and highlights their role in optimal functioning and behavior.

  10. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  11. Mammary gland-specific ablation of focal adhesion kinase reduces the incidence of p53-mediated mammary tumour formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miltenburg, van M.H.; Nimwegen, van M.J.; Tijdens, R.B.; Lalai, R.A.; Kuiper, R.; Klarenbeek, S.; Schouten, P.C.; Vries, de A.; Jonkers, J.M.M..; Water, van de B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elevated expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) occurs in numerous human cancers including colon-, cervix- and breast cancer. Although several studies have implicated FAK in mammary tumour formation induced by ectopic oncogene expression, evidence supporting a role for FAK in spontaneo

  12. Technical note: Measurement of mammary plasma flow in sows by downstream dilution of mammary vein infused para-aminohippuric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Uffe Krogh; Storm, Adam Christian; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to design a method to estimate mammary plasma flow (MPF) in lactating sows using downstream dilution of para-aminohippuric acid (pAH) and to compare these estimates with MPF estimates based on specific AA as internal markers (MPF-AA). A permanent indwelling...... catheter was surgically implanted in the femoral artery, and another 2 were inserted in the right cranial mammary vein of 8 second- and third-parity sows on d 76 ± 2 SEM of gestation. On the 3rd and 17th days in milk, arterial and venous blood samples were drawn in hourly intervals from 0.5 h before until...... 6.5 h after feeding. The MPF in the right cranial mammary vein was measured by downstream dilution of infused pAH (3.0 mmol/h). Total MPF-pAH was calculated assuming that the measured flow constituted the flow from 5 out of 14 suckled glands on the basis of the anatomical structure of the mammary...

  13. Downregulation of ATM Gene and Protein Expression in Canine Mammary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo-Ferreira, T M M; Bueno, R C; Terra, E M; Avante, M L; Tinucci-Costa, M; Carvalho, M; Cassali, G D; Linde, S D; Rogatto, S R; Laufer-Amorim, R

    2016-11-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene encodes a protein associated with DNA damage repair and maintenance of genomic integrity. In women, ATM transcript and protein downregulation have been reported in sporadic breast carcinomas, and the absence of ATM protein expression has been associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate ATM gene and protein expression in canine mammary tumors and their association with clinical outcome. ATM gene and protein expression was evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in normal mammary gland samples (n = 10), benign mammary tumors (n = 11), nonmetastatic mammary carcinomas (n = 19), and metastatic mammary carcinomas (n = 11). Lower ATM transcript levels were detected in benign mammary tumors and carcinomas compared with normal mammary glands (P = .011). Similarly, lower ATM protein expression was observed in benign tumors (P = .0003), nonmetastatic mammary carcinomas (P ATM gene or protein levels were detected among benign tumors and nonmetastatic and metastatic mammary carcinomas (P > .05). The levels of ATM gene or protein expression were not significantly associated with clinical and pathological features or with survival. Similar to human breast cancer, the data in this study suggest that ATM gene and protein downregulation is involved in canine mammary gland tumorigenesis.

  14. The prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 is required for cyclooxygenase 2-mediated mammary hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sung-Hee; Ai, Youxi; Breyer, Richard M; Lane, Timothy F; Hla, Timothy

    2005-06-01

    Expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in breast cancer correlates with poor prognosis, and COX-2 enzyme inhibitors reduce breast cancer incidence in humans. We recently showed that COX-2 overexpression in the mammary gland of transgenic mice induced mammary cancer. Because prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the major eicosanoid and because the EP2 subtype of the PGE2 receptor is highly expressed in the mammary tumors, we tested if this G protein-coupled receptor is required for tumorigenesis. We crossed the MMTV-COX-2 transgenic mice with Ep2-/- mice and studied tumor development in bigenic mice. Lack of EP2 receptor strongly suppressed COX-2-induced effects such as precocious development of the mammary gland in virgins and the development of mammary hyperplasia in multiparous female mice. Interestingly, the expression of amphiregulin, a potent mammary epithelial cell growth factor was down regulated in mammary glands of Ep2-/- mice. Total cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were reduced in Ep2-/- mammary glands suggesting that PGE2 signaling via the EP2 receptor activates the Gs/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway. In mammary tumor cell lines, expression of the EP2 receptor followed by treatment with CAY10399, an EP2-specific agonist, strongly induced amphiregulin mRNA levels in a protein kinase A-dependent manner. These data suggest that PGE2 signaling via the EP2 receptor in mammary epithelial cells regulate mammary gland hyperplasia by the cAMP-dependent induction of amphiregulin. Inhibition of the EP2 pathway in the mammary gland may be a novel approach in the prevention and/or treatment of mammary cancer.

  15. Lymphoscintigraphy Can Select Breast Cancer Patients for Internal Mammary Chain Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindie, Elif, E-mail: elif.hindie@sls.aphp.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU de Bordeaux, University of Bordeaux-Segalen, Bordeaux (France); Groheux, David [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Hennequin, Christophe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Vercellino, Laetitia; Berenger, Nathalie; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Maylin, Claude [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hartmann Hospital, Neuilly sur Seine (France); Espie, Marc [Breast Diseases Unit, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Given the risk of undesired toxicity, prophylactic internal mammary (IM) chain irradiation should be offered only to patients at high risk of occult involvement. Lymphoscintigraphy for axillary sentinel node biopsy might help in selecting these patients. Methods and Materials: We reviewed published studies with the following selection criteria: {>=}300 breast cancer patients referred for axilla sentinel node biopsy; scintigraphy performed after peritumoral or intratumoral tracer injection; IM biopsy in the case of IM drainage; and axilla staged routinely independent of IM status. Results: Six prospective studies, for a total of 3,876 patients, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Parasternal drainage was present in 792 patients (20.4%). IM biopsy was performed in 644 patients and was positive in 111 (17.2%). Of the positive IM biopsies, 40% were associated with tumors in the lateral breast quadrants. A major difference in the IM positivity rate was found according to the axilla sentinel node status. In patients with negative axilla, the IM biopsy was positive in 7.8% of cases. In patients with positive axilla, however, the IM biopsy was positive in 41% (p < .00001). Because biopsy of multiple IM hot nodes is difficult, the true risk could be even greater, probably close to 50%. Conclusions: Patients with IM drainage on lymphoscintigraphy and a positive axilla sentinel node have a high risk of occult IM involvement. These women should be considered for IM radiotherapy.

  16. Functional contribution of alpha3L8' to the neuronal nicotinic alpha3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Silva, Walter I; Navedo, Manuel F; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2008-10-01

    The role of position L8', located in transmembrane domain 1 of the neuronal nicotinic alpha3 subunit, was characterized by using two-electrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes. Four amino acids (Ala, Ser, Phe, and Tyr) were inserted at this conserved position, and the mutant subunit was coexpressed with either wild-type beta2 or beta4 subunits. These substitutions led to significant alterations in the pharmacodynamic parameters of cholinergic agents, resulting in loss of function. Ala and Ser substitutions resulted in losses in agonist (ACh, nicotine, and DMPP) potency and intrinsic activity at both alpha3beta2 and alpha3beta4 receptors. Similarly, significant changes in antagonist potency were produced by the Ala and Ser substitutions. Phe and Tyr mutations did not alter the receptor's EC(50) for ACh or nicotine but reduced the EC(50) for DMPP at both receptors. The Phe mutation also reduced the intrinsic activity of all agonists tested at both receptors. The Tyr mutation, though, led to a decrease in intrinsic activity for all agonists at the alpha3beta2 receptor, yet resulted in no changes for DMPP, a decrease for nicotine, and an increase for ACh at the alpha3beta4 receptor. The most dramatic changes in the receptor's functional properties were produced by substitutions that introduced the largest changes in amino acid volume. Additional replacements (Gly, Thr, and Val) suggested an inverse correlation between amino acid volume at position alpha3L8' and EC(50) for alpha3beta4 nAChRs; however, alpha3beta2 nAChRs displayed a nonlinear correlation. These data demonstrate that structural alterations at position alpha3L8' could propagate to the agonist-binding site.

  17. Prenatal exposure to BPA alters the epigenome of the rat mammary gland and increases the propensity to neoplastic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Dhimolea

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens may play a causal role in the increased breast cancer incidence which has been observed in Europe and the US over the last 50 years. The xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA leaches from plastic food/beverage containers and dental materials. Fetal exposure to BPA induces preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions in the adult rat mammary gland. Previous results suggest that BPA acts through the estrogen receptors which are detected exclusively in the mesenchyme during the exposure period by directly altering gene expression, leading to alterations of the reciprocal interactions between mesenchyme and epithelium. This initiates a long sequence of altered morphogenetic events leading to neoplastic transformation. Additionally, BPA induces epigenetic changes in some tissues. To explore this mechanism in the mammary gland, Wistar-Furth rats were exposed subcutaneously via osmotic pumps to vehicle or 250 µg BPA/kg BW/day, a dose that induced ductal carcinomas in situ. Females exposed from gestational day 9 to postnatal day (PND 1 were sacrificed at PND4, PND21 and at first estrus after PND50. Genomic DNA (gDNA was isolated from the mammary tissue and immuno-precipitated using anti-5-methylcytosine antibodies. Detection and quantification of gDNA methylation status using the Nimblegen ChIP array revealed 7412 differentially methylated gDNA segments (out of 58207 segments, with the majority of changes occurring at PND21. Transcriptomal analysis revealed that the majority of gene expression differences between BPA- and vehicle-treated animals were observed later (PND50. BPA exposure resulted in higher levels of pro-activation histone H3K4 trimethylation at the transcriptional initiation site of the alpha-lactalbumin gene at PND4, concomitantly enhancing mRNA expression of this gene. These results show that fetal BPA exposure triggers changes in the postnatal and adult mammary gland epigenome and alters gene

  18. Mammary gland radius measurement and its application in female adults%成年女性乳房腺体半径的测定及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔建春; 董齐; 苏畅; 李立; 段续微; 柳青峰; 张颖; 杜怀林; 肖轩; 王博

    2012-01-01

    Objective We invented mammary lump skin-positioning membrane (named scare membrane) to facilitate localization of mammary lump during ultrasound scan.This study is to measure the radius of mammary of Chinese adult women for designing different types of skin-positioning membrane.Methods The radius of mammary glands in 236 cases of adult females was detected with color Doppler ultrasound at 5 different clock positions:12:00,3:00,6:00,9:00 and 10:30 or 1:30.SPSS 16.0 statistical software was used to analyze the data.The cut-off values of mammary glands radius at 99%,95%,75% and 50% were calculated.Paired t tests or nonparametric tests (relative sample rank sum tests) were used to verify the consistency of mammary gland radius between left and right sides.Results The cut-off value of 95% mammary gland radius was:7.700cm at 12:00,7.810 cm at 13:00,8.100 cm at 3:00,5.330 cm at 6:00 and 6.300 cm at 9:00 for left mammary gland ; 7.500 cm at 12:00,6.015 cm at 3:00,5.500 cm at 6:00,8.510 cm at 9:00 and 7.930 cm at 10:30 for right mammary gland.In comparison of left and right mammary gland radius,the difference had statistical significance between the group of left side at 1:30 and right side at 10:30,the group of left side at 3:00 and right side at 9:00(P <0.05).The right mamma was relatively larger.The cut-off values of the right mamma at the above two clock points were taken as radius of scale membranes while the average of percentage cut-off values at 12:00,3:00 of both mammas,left side at 9:00 and right side at 3:00 are taken as radius of scale membranes.Conclusions According to the cut-off values of 99%,95%,75% and 50% radius of adult female mammary glands,mammary lump skin-positioning membrane radius can be classified into 4 size-types:extra large,large,medium and small.The precise classification of radius of mammary scale membranes according to mammary glands of adult females provides convenience for production,manufacture and clinical application

  19. The biology of zinc transport in mammary epithelial cells: implications for mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Nicholas H; Hennigar, Stephen R; Kiselyov, Kirill; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2014-03-01

    Zinc plays a critical role in a vast array of cellular functions including gene transcription, protein translation, cell proliferation, differentiation, bioenergetics, and programmed cell death. The mammary gland depends upon tight coordination of these processes during development and reproduction for optimal expansion, differentiation, and involution. For example, zinc is required for activation of matrix metalloproteinases, intracellular signaling cascades such as MAPK and PKC, and the activation of both mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and lysosomal-mediated cell death. In addition to functional needs, during lactation the mammary gland must balance providing optimal zinc for cellular requirements with the need to secrete a substantial amount of zinc into milk to meet the requirements of the developing neonate. Finally, the mammary gland exhibits the most profound example of programmed cell death, which is driven by both apoptotic and lysosomal-mediated cell death. Two families of zinc-specific transporters regulate zinc delivery for these diverse functions. Members of the ZIP family of zinc transporters (ZIP1-14) import zinc into the cytoplasm from outside the cell or from subcellular organelles, while members of the ZnT family (ZnT1-10) export zinc from the cytoplasm. Recently, the ion channel transient receptor potential mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) has also been implicated in zinc transport. Herein, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which mammary epithelial cells utilize zinc with a focus on the transport of zinc into discrete subcellular organelles for specific cellular functions during mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

  20. Buffett’s Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Kabiller, David; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    Berkshire Hathaway has realized a Sharpe ratio of 0.76, higher than any other stock or mutual fund with a history of more than 30 years, and Berkshire has a significant alpha to traditional risk factors. However, we find that the alpha becomes insignificant when controlling for exposures to Betting...

  1. T-branes and $\\alpha'$-corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Marchesano, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We study $\\alpha'$-corrections in multiple D7-brane configurations with non-commuting profiles for their transverse position fields. We focus on T-brane systems, crucial in F-theory GUT model building. There $\\alpha'$-corrections modify the D-term piece of the BPS equations which, already at leading order, require a non-primitive Abelian worldvolume flux background. We find that $\\alpha'$-corrections may either i) leave this flux background invariant, ii) modify the Abelian non-primitive flux profile, or iii) deform it to a non-Abelian profile. The last case typically occurs when primitive fluxes, a necessary ingredient to build 4d chiral models, are added to the system. We illustrate these three cases by solving the $\\alpha'$-corrected D-term equations in explicit examples, and describe their appearance in more general T-brane backgrounds. Finally, we discuss implications of our findings for F-theory GUT local models.

  2. Monoclonal antibody mapping of keratins 8 and 17 and of vimentin in normal human mammary gland, benign tumors, dysplasias and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelstein, V I; Tchypysheva, T A; Ermilova, V D; Litvinova, L V; Troyanovsky, S M; Bannikov, G A

    1988-08-15

    The distribution of keratins 8 and 17 and of vimentin in 28 normal human mammary tissue samples, 16 benign tumors, 26 fibrocytic diseases and 52 malignant breast tumors have been studied using monoclonal antibodies HI, E3 and NT30, respectively. Three cell populations in normal mammary epithelium have been identified: luminal epithelium containing keratin 8, myoepithelium of the lobular structures positive for vimentin, and myoepithelium of extralobular ducts positive for keratin 17. In different kinds of benign tumor and dysplastic proliferation a mosaic of cells with all normal phenotypes has been observed. The majority of cells co-expressed keratins 8 and 17 or vimentin. In the overwhelming majority of carcinomas, cells did not contain myoepithelial markers (keratin 17 and vimentin) but expressed only keratin 8 specific to normal luminal epithelium.

  3. Oral, topical, and inhalation of Calcarea carbonica derivative complex (M8 to treat inflammatory mammary carcinoma in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    palatability for dogs, and inflammation reduction. Conclusion: The present report suggests that M8 influenced positively the anti -inflammatory treatment. Keywords: Calcarea carbonica complex; inflammatory mammary carcinoma; routes of administration References [1] Sorenmo K. Canine mammary gland tumors. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice. 2003 33(3:573-96. [2] Oliveira CC, Abud APR, Oliveira SM, Guimarães FSF, Andrade LF, Di Bernardi RP, Coletto ELO, Kuczera D, Da Lozzo EJ, Gonçalves JP, Trindade ES, Buchi DF. Developments on drug discovery and on new therapeutics: highly diluted tinctures act as biological response modifiers. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2011, 11(101: 2-11.

  4. Potential reduction of contralateral second breast-cancer risks by prophylactic mammary irradiation: validation in a breast-cancer-prone mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term breast-cancer survivors have a highly elevated risk (1 in 6 at 20 years of contralateral second breast cancer. This high risk is associated with the presence of multiple pre-malignant cell clones in the contralateral breast at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis. Mechanistic analyses suggest that a moderate dose of X-rays to the contralateral breast can kill these pre-malignant clones such that, at an appropriate Prophylactic Mammary Irradiation (PMI dose, the long-term contralateral breast cancer risk in breast cancer survivors would be considerably decreased. AIMS: To test the predicted relationship between PMI dose and cancer risk in mammary glands that have a high risk of developing malignancies. METHODS: We tested the PMI concept using MMTV-PyVT mammary-tumor-prone mice. Mammary glands on one side of each mouse were irradiated with X-rays, while those on the other side were shielded from radiation. The unshielded mammary glands received doses of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 Gy in 4-Gy fractions. RESULTS: In high-risk mammary glands exposed to radiation doses designed for PMI (12 and 16 Gy, tumor incidence rates were respectively decreased by a factor of 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1-5.0 at 12 Gy, and a factor of 3.1 (95% CI, 1.3-8.3 at 16 Gy, compared to those in the shielded glands that were exposed to very low radiation doses. The same pattern was seen for PMI-exposed mammary glands relative to zero-dose controls. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of cancer risk reduction by PMI was consistent with mechanistic predictions. Contralateral breast PMI may thus have promise as a spatially targeted breast-conserving option for reducing the current high risk of contralateral second breast cancers. For estrogen-receptor positive primary tumors, PMI might optimally be used concomitantly with systemically delivered chemopreventive drugs such as tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, while for estrogen-receptor negative tumors, PMI might be used alone.

  5. Signs of proinflammatory/genotoxic switch (adipogenotoxicosis) in mammary fat of breast cancer patients: role of menopausal status, estrogens and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, Lev M; Kovalevskij, Anatolij Y; Poroshina, Tatjana E; Kotov, Alexander V; Kovalenko, Irina G; Tsyrlina, Evgenia V; Leenman, Elena E; Revskoy, Sergey Y; Semiglazov, Vladimir F; Pozharisski, Kazimir M

    2007-08-01

    The abundance of fat tissue surrounding normal and malignant epithelial mammary cells raises the questions whether such "adipose milieu" is important in the local proinflammatory/genotoxic shift, which apparently promotes tumor development and worsens prognosis, and what conditions stimulate this shift, or "adipogenotoxicosis." We studied 95 mammary fat samples from 70 postmenopausal and 25 premenopausal breast cancer (BC) patients at a distance of 1.5-2.0 cm from tumors. The levels of leptin, adiponectin, TNFalpha and IL-6 release after 4-hr incubation of the samples were evaluated with ELISA, nitric oxide (NO) production by Griess reaction and lipid peroxidation by determination of thiobarbiturate-reactive products (TBRP). Infiltration of fat with macrophages (CD68-positive cells) and expression of cytochrome P450 1B1/estrogen 4-hydroxylase (CYP1B1) were detected by immunohistochemistry. Aromatase (CYP19) activity in mammary fat was measured by (3)H(2)O release from (3)H-1beta-androstenedione. In the postmenopausal BC patients, NO and TNFalpha production by adipose tissue explants increased independent of BMI and in parallel with decreasing leptin and, especially, adiponectin release. In the premenopausal patients, higher CYP1B1 expression and TBRP level were found in mammary fat, while higher aromatase activity was combined with higher CYP1B1 expression as well as NO and IL-6 production. In the postmenopausal group, impaired glucose tolerance was associated with higher IL-6 release production by fat and with higher IL-6/adiponectin ratio. Thus, signs of adipogenotoxicosis in mammary fat can be found in both pre- and postmenopausal BC patients. This condition is likely being maintained through estrogen- and glucose-related factors and mechanisms presumably associated with less favorable types of hormonal carcinogenesis.

  6. Laser assisted {alpha} decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda Cortes, Hector Mauricio

    2012-02-01

    Excited or short-lived nuclei often decay by emitting alpha particles that are assumed to be preformed inside the nucleus and confined in the nuclear potential well. In this picture, {alpha} decay refers to the tunneling of the alpha particle through the potential barrier. In this thesis we investigate for the first time how strong laser fields can assist the tunneling of the alpha particle and thus influence the nuclear decay. Generally speaking, laser-assisted {alpha} decay can be described as laser-assisted tunneling of a quasistationary state, i.e, a slowly decaying state. Our theoretical treatment is developed starting from the complex trajectory formulation of the well-known strong-field approximation used to describe laser-induced ionization. We extend this formulation and develop a method to treat the decay of quasistationary states. The effect of both static and optical and X-ray monochromatic fields on the lifetimes and {alpha}-particle emission spectra are investigated for a number of {alpha}-emitting nuclei. We find that even at strong intensities, the laser-induced acceleration of the {alpha} decay is negligible, ranging from a relative modification in the decay rate of 10{sup -3} for static fields of electric field strengths of 10{sup 15} V/m, to 10{sup -8} for strong optical fields with intensities of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, and to 10{sup -6} for strong X-ray fields with laser intensities around 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. However, the effect of the external field is visible in the spectrum of emitted alpha particles, leading in the case of optical fields even to rescattering phenomena for intensities approaching 6 x 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}. The dynamics of the alpha particle in laser fields of intensities below the rescattering limit is investigated.

  7. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC...... and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz......, previously reported toinfluence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and functionin the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2,OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glandswere increased during gestation...

  8. Histological and immunohistochemical identification of atypical ductal mammary hyperplasia as a preneoplastic marker in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, E; Gobbi, H; Saraiva, B S; Cassali, G D

    2012-03-01

    This study describes and evaluates the morphological and molecular relationship between canine mammary ductal hyperplasias with atypia and canine mammary neoplasias. Ductal hyperplasia was identified in association with malignant neoplasia in 56 of the 115 cases (48,8%), and although ductal hyperplasia without atypia was the type most frequently noted in the cases, most examples of hyperplasia with atypia were associated with mammary tumors. Estrogen receptor, E-cadherin, and cytokeratins 1, 5, 10 and 14 (CK34bE12) expression was quite lower than in normal mammary tissue, and HER2 overexpression was absent in all proliferative cells of ductal hyperplasia. The Ki-67 expression, epidermal growth factor receptor and progesterone receptor expression appeared higher in those hyperplastic lesions analyzed than in normal mammary glands. These findings suggest that canine mammary atypical hyperplasia may play an important role in the process of malignant neoplastic transformation, with molecular alterations that are similar to precursor lesions reported in humans.

  9. Molecular-based tumour subtypes of canine mammary carcinomas assessed by immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarli Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human breast cancer is classified by gene expression profile into subtypes consisting of two hormone (oestrogen and/or progesterone receptor-positive types (luminal-like A and luminal-like B and three hormone receptor-negative types [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-expressing, basal-like, and unclassified ("normal-like"]. Immunohistochemical surrogate panels are also proposed to potentially identify the molecular-based groups. The present study aimed to apply an immunohistochemical panel (anti-ER, -PR, -ERB-B2, -CK 5/6 and -CK14 in a series of canine malignant mammary tumours to verify the molecular-based classification, its correlation with invasion and grade, and its use as a prognostic aid in veterinary practice. Results Thirty-five tumours with luminal pattern (ER+ and PR+ were subgrouped into 13 A type and 22 B type, if ERB-B2 positive or negative. Most luminal-like A and basal-like tumours were grade 1 carcinomas, while the percentage of luminal B tumours was higher in grades 2 and 3 (Pearson Chi-square P = 0.009. No difference in the percentage of molecular subtypes was found between simple and complex/mixed carcinomas (Pearson Chi-square P = 0.47. No significant results were obtained by survival analysis, even if basal-like tumours had a more favourable prognosis than luminal-like lesions. Conclusion The panel of antibodies identified only three tumour groups (luminal-like A and B, and basal-like in the dog. Even though canine mammary tumours may be a model of human breast cancer, the existence of the same carcinoma molecular subtypes in women awaits confirmation. Canine mammary carcinomas show high molecular heterogeneity, which would benefit from a classification based on molecular differences. Stage and grade showed independent associations with survival in the multivariate regression, while molecular subtype grouping and histological type did not show associations. This suggests that caution should be

  10. CD44+/CD24- Cancer Stem Cells Are Associated With Higher Grade of Canine Mammary Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, K S; Jang, Y G; Shin, J I; Kim, N H; Lim, H Y; Lee, S M; Kim, J H; Sur, J H

    2015-11-01

    The CD44+/CD24- phenotype identifies cancer stem cell (CSC) properties in canine mammary carcinoma (MC); however, the histopathological features associated with this phenotype remain to be elucidated. Here, we determined whether the CD44+/CD24- phenotype was associated with hormonal receptor (HR; estrogen receptor [ER] and/or progesterone receptor [PR]) status and/or triple (ER, PR, and human epithelial growth factor receptor 2)-negative (TN) subtype; conventional histological evaluation was also performed. We found that, as single markers, both CD44+ and CD24+ were associated with less aggressive histological types, low grade, and a non-TN subtype; both markers were associated with HR positivity. On the other hand, a CD44+/CD24- phenotype was associated with higher grade of carcinoma. Therefore, our results suggest that immunohistochemical phenotyping for CD44/CD24 is useful for the evaluation of tumor behavior as well as CSC-like properties in canine MCs.

  11. Key stages in mammary gland development: the mammary end bud as a motile organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Lindsay; Silberstein, Gary B

    2005-01-01

    In the rodent, epithelial end buds define the tips of elongating mammary ducts. These highly motile structures undergo repeated dichotomous branching as they aggressively advance through fatty stroma and, turning to avoid other ducts, they finally cease growth leaving behind the open, tree-like framework on which secretory alveoli develop during pregnancy. This review identifies the motility of end buds as a unique developmental marker that represents the successful integration of systemic and local mammotrophic influences, and covers relevant advances in ductal growth regulation, extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, and cell adhesion in the inner end bud. An unexpected growth-promoting synergy between insulin-like growth factor-1 and progesterone, in which ducts elongate without forming new end buds, is described as well as evidence strongly supporting self-inhibition of ductal elongation by end-bud-secreted transforming growth factor-beta acting on stromal targets. The influence of the matrix metalloproteinase ECM-remodeling enzymes, notably matrix metalloproteinase-2, on end bud growth is discussed in the broader context of enzymes that regulate the polysaccharide-rich glycosaminoglycan elements of the ECM. Finally, a critical, motility-enabling role for the cellular architecture of the end bud is identified and the contribution of cadherins, the netrin/neogenin system, and ErbB2 to the structure and motility of end buds is discussed.

  12. Modulation of T-Cell Activation in an Experimental Model of Mammary Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    with MNU following pituitary isografts that, if left untreated, would go on to develop mammary Hurwitz---5 tumors at a high incidence (~70% at 10... isograft under the kidney capsule and 1 week later, given a single i.p. dose of MNU [as described in (19)]. Mice were monitored weekly for mammary tumors...system, mice are implanted with a pituitary isograft to induce proliferation of the mammary tissue and subsequently mutagenized with MNU (50 mg/kg

  13. Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding Protein-1 in Mammary Development and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    2002) and parathyroid related hormone (Wysolmerski et al. 1998). Here we have focused on the effects that FGF may have on the mammary gland and...mammary gland development, reduced tertiary branching, apoptosis, HER2/neu mice 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...inducible system. Preliminary data indicate a striking decrease in the lateral budding of mammary glands in animals expressing BP1. Matrigel plug assays

  14. Dietary Regulation of PTEN Signaling and Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells: Implications for Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    carcinoma 25 15 Cribriform carcinoma 5 Adenosquamous carcinoma 5 5 Glandular carcinoma 5 Mammary carcinoma in situ 5 Lymph node hyperplasia 5... Glandular carcinoma 7.14 Mammary carcinoma in situ 5.00 Lymph node hyperplasia 5.00 14.29 Lymph node with metastasis 5.00 7.14 a n...2010. Bidirectional signaling of mammary epithelium and stroma: implications for breast cancer- preventive actions of dietary factors. J Nutr Biochem

  15. Canonical Wnt Signaling as a Specific Marker of Normal and Tumorigenic Mammary Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    mammary epithelium impacts glandular development . We found ductal abnormali ties; however, the phenotype was not as severe as expected. Approximately...In previous reports we have clearly showed that cells w ith activated canonical Wnt signaling are present within the mammary epithelium starting at...Wnt1 transgenic cells. We generated a mouse line in which ~-catenin is conditionally deleted in the mammary epithelium of MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic

  16. A tumoriform lesion of the vulva with features of mammary-type fibrocystic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinova, Anastasia M; Kacerovska, Denisa; Michal, Michal; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2013-10-01

    : Fibrocystic disease is a common benign lesion of the breast. Variably sized cysts, apocrine metaplasia, fibrosis, calcification, chronic inflammation, and epithelial hyperplasia are the basic morphological changes seen in mammary fibrocystic disease. We report a rare tumoriform lesion of the vulva with features of fibrocystic disease, which seems to be the first description of this condition in the vulva. The pertinent literature is discussed. The reported lesion further demonstrates the analogy between tumors of anogenital mammary-like glands and mammary neoplasms.

  17. Transcriptomic response of goat mammary epithelial cells to Mycoplasma agalactiae challenge – a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogorevc, Jernej; Mihevc, Sonja Prpar; Hedegaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae (Ma) is one of the main aetiological agents of intramammary infections in small ruminants, causing contagious agalactia. To better understand the underlying disease patterns a primary goat mammary epithelial cell (pgMEC) culture was established from the mammary tissue......, steroid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis signalling, transcription regulation, and cell cycle regulation. Based on the results we suggest that mammary epithelial cells in vivo contribute to the immune system by the induced expression of cytokines and other chemotactic agents, activation...

  18. Loss of sfrp1 promotes ductal branching in the murine mammary gland

    OpenAIRE

    Gauger Kelly J; Shimono Akihiko; Crisi Giovanna M; Schneider Sallie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are a family of proteins that block the Wnt signaling pathway and loss of SFRP1 expression is found in breast cancer along with a multitude of other human cancers. Activated Wnt signaling leads to inappropriate mammary gland development and mammary tumorigenesis in mice. When SFRP1 is knocked down in immortalized non-malignant mammary epithelial cells, the cells exhibit a malignant phenotype which resembles the characteristics obs...

  19. A versatile retractor for use in harvesting the internal mammary artery and performing standard cardiac operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, S J; Core, M

    1989-04-01

    A versatile retractor is described that can be used to harvest either mammary artery without disturbing the operative field and can be converted to a standard sternotomy retractor. It uses the principle of elevating the cut sternal edge and applying external pressure to the area of the costochrondal junction to rotate the mammary pedicle into view. We have used this retractor and found it to be very efficient in exposing the mammary pedicle while being atraumatic to the sternum.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions alpha thalassemia alpha thalassemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alpha thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  1. Mammary-type myofibroblastoma of soft tissue: a tumor closely related to spindle cell lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, M E; Fletcher, C D

    2001-08-01

    Mammary myofibroblastoma is a benign breast tumor, with a reported predilection for older men. It is composed of fascicles of spindle cells having features of myofibroblasts, with intervening hyalinized collagenous stroma and a variably prominent component of adipose tissue. The spindle cells characteristically express both CD34 and desmin. Herein, we report the clinicopathologic features of nine tumors that were morphologically and immunohistochemically identical to myofibroblastoma of breast; however, they arose in subcutaneous soft tissue at extramammary sites. The study group comprised seven men and two women with an age range of 35-67 years (median 53 years). Lesions presented as either a slowly growing painless mass or were incidental findings at the time of surgery. The site distribution was as follows: inguinal/groin area (five cases) and one case each in posterior vaginal wall, buttock, anterior abdominal wall, and mid-back. Tumor size ranged from 2 to 13 cm (median 6 cm), and all lesions were well circumscribed. Eight tumors had a component of adipose tissue (ranging from 10% to 60%), within which some variation in adipocyte size was often seen. One case showed epithelioid cytomorphology and three cases showed rare atypical or multinucleated cells. Focal myxoid stromal change was seen in four cases. Tumor cells were positive for desmin (9 of 9 cases), CD34 (8 of 9 cases), and occasionally positive for smooth muscle actin (3 of 9 cases). Lesions were marginally excised with no recurrences to date, although follow-up is very limited. Lesions with morphologic and immunophenotypic features similar to myofibroblastoma of breast can arise at extramammary sites, with an apparent predilection for the inguinal area of older men. Both mammary and extramammary lesions show morphologic overlap with spindle cell lipoma and are likely closely related.

  2. Molecular characterizations of Nop16 in murine mammary tumors with varying levels of c-Myc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundel, Donald W; Stromquist, Emily; Greene, Amy L; Zhdankin, Olga; Regal, Ronald R; Rose-Hellekant, Teresa A

    2012-04-01

    NOP16, also known as HSPC111, has been identified as a MYC and estrogen regulated gene in in vitro studies, hence coexpression levels were strongly correlated. Importantly, high expression of NOP16 was associated with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. However, coexpression of NOP16, MYC and estrogen receptor (ESR1) varied widely in tumors and cell lines suggesting that transcriptional regulation differed according to pathological environments. The goal of this study was to determine the expression patterns of Nop16, Myc and Esr1 in murine mammary tumors with disparate histopathological and molecular features. We hypothesized that tumor environments with relatively high Myc levels would have different coexpression patterns than tumor environments with relatively low Myc levels. We measured levels of Myc and Nop16 mRNA and protein in tumors from WAP-c-myc mice that were of high grade and metastasized frequently. In contrast, Myc and Nop16 mRNA and proteins levels were significantly lower in the less aggressive tumors that developed in NRL-TGFα mice. Tumors from both mouse lines express ESR1 protein and we found that Esr1 mRNA levels correlated positively with Myc levels in both models. However, Myc and Nop16 transcript levels correlated positively only in tumors from NRL-TGFα mice. We identified prominent NOP16 protein in nuclei and less prominent staining in the cytoplasm of luminal cells of ducts and lobules from normal mammary glands as well as in hyperplasias and tumors obtained from NRL-TGFα mice. This staining pattern was reversed in tumors from WAP-c-Myc mice as nuclear staining was faint or absent and cytoplasmic staining more pronounced. In summary, the regulation of expression and localization of NOP16 varies in tumor environments with high versus low MYC levels and demonstrate the importance of stratifying clinical breast cancers based on MYC levels.

  3. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotarla Ion

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary.

  4. Pro-inflammatory cytokines: Useful markers for the diagnosis of canine mammary tumours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaluz, Ana; Yeste, Marc; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Rigau, Teresa; García, Félix; Rivera del Álamo, Maria Montserrat

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the expression of 60 pro-inflammatory cytokines as possible markers of malignancy in canine mammary tumours using a human cytokine antibody array. The cytokines were grouped into two different categories: (1) cytokines in which expression indicated the presence of a mammary tumour and (2) cytokines in which expression differentiated between simple mammary adenoma, tubulopapillary carcinoma or complex carcinoma. These data suggest that specific pro-inflammatory cytokines could be useful as tools for the diagnosis of canine mammary tumours.

  5. Giant venous aneurysm jeopardising internal mammary arterial graft patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caenegem, Olivier; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; de Kerchove, Laurent; Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    The authors report a 79-year old man with a history of coronary bypass surgery, presenting with acute heart failure and elevated troponin. Coronarography revealed a giant saphenous vein graft aneurysm, which was compressing the left internal mammary artery bypass graft. This was confirmed by a multislice enhanced-ECG gated cardiac CT, showing the venous aneurysm responsible for external compression of the arterial graft and its functional occlusion. Myocardial ischaemia, the mechanism leading to cardiac failure, was confirmed by hypoperfusion of the sub-endocardial area shown by the CT. The aneurysm was surgically removed without complications. The patient recovered and his cardiac function improved. This is the first recorded case of compression of the left internal mammary artery by an giant saphenous vein graft aneurysm having triggered severe myocardial ischaemia and heart failure. The authors review the incidence and complications of giant venous bypass graft aneurysms reported in the literature.

  6. Ocular melanoma and mammary mucinous carcinoma in an African lion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagnini Didier Q

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports of neoplasms in Panthera species are increasing, but they are still an uncommon cause of disease and death in captive wild felids. The presence of two or more primary tumor in large felids is rarely reported, and there are no documented cases of ocular melanoma and mammary mucinous carcinoma in African lions. Case presentation An ocular melanoma and a mammary mucinous carcinoma are described in an African lion (Panthera leo. The first tumour was histologically characterized by the presence of epithelioid and fusiform melanocytes, while the latter was composed of mucus-producing cells with an epithelial phenotype that contained periodic acid-Schiff (PAS and Alcian blue staining mucins. Metastases of both tumor were identified in various organs and indirect immunohistochemistry was used to characterize them. Peribiliary cysts were observed in the liver. Conclusions This is the first description of these tumor in African lions.

  7. Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1995-06-01

    An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

  8. Intracellular behaviour of samarium and europium in lactating mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayadi Ahlem; Maghraoui Samira; El Hili Ali; Galle Pierre; Tekaya Leila

    2012-01-01

    The subcellular localization of samarium and europium,two rare-earths,increasingly used in both medical and industrial fields,has been studied in several organs such as liver and kidney but never in the mammary gland despite of its importance in the biology of lactation and nutrition domains.The intracellular behaviour of samarium and europium after their intra-peritoneal administration in the lactating mammary gland cells was investigated.The results showed the presence of very electron dense deposits in the glandular epithelial cell lysosomes.These particular lysosomes were never observed in the marnrnary cell lysosomes of control rats.These intralysosomal deposits were probably composed of insoluble samarium or europium phosphates by analogy with previous studies,the transmission electron microscopy,the ion mass microscopy and the electron probe microanalysis,and other techniques allowing the identification of the chemical structure of the intralysosomal deposits.

  9. Serotoninergic and circadian systems: driving mammary gland development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aridany Suárez-Trujillo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since lactation is one of the most metabolically demanding states in adult female mammals, beautifully complex regulatory mechanisms are in place to time lactation to begin after birth and cease when the neonate is weaned. Lactation is regulated by numerous different homeorhetic factors, all of them tightly coordinated with the demands of milk production. Emerging evidence support that among these factors are the serotonergic and circadian clock systems. Here we review the serotoninergic and circadian clock systems and their roles in the regulation of mammary gland development and lactation physiology. We conclude by presenting our hypothesis that these two systems interact to accommodate the metabolic demands of lactation and thus adaptive changes in these systems occur to maintain mammary and systemic homeostasis through the reproductive cycles of female mammals.

  10. Mammary remodelling and metabolic activity in dairy goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safayi, Sina

    lactation, are the same factors involved also in determination of lactation persistency and performance differences between PP and MP animals, 3) milk protein synthesis in the lactating mammary gland will be less sensitive towards variations in nutrient supply in late compared to early lactation, 4) minor...... deficiencies in dietary provision of protein can be compensated by provision of energy (ATP) yielding substrates to sustain milk (protein) synthesis. The hypotheses were addressed in four papers based on three experiments with dairy goats. In Experiments 1 and 2, mammary remodelling was compared in PP and MP...... to a continuous lactation (CL). In Experiment 3, the importance of nutrient supply in regulation of milk (protein) synthesis was assessed. This was done by providing extra nutrients through intravascular isoosmotic infusion of nutrients (essential amino acids, acetate or glucose) and determining the impact...

  11. Positive modulation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors reverses subcronic PCP-induced deficits in the novel object recognition task in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Damgaard; Larsen, Dorrit Bjerg; Hansen, Suzanne Lisbet;

    2010-01-01

    deficit in female Lister hooded rats in teh novel object recognition (NOR) task. Here we show that positive modulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) mediated glutamate transmission alleviates cognitive deficits induced by sub-chronic PCP treatment. Female Lister hooded rats were treated sub......-cbronic PCP treatment induced a significant decrease in the discrimination index (DI) and both ampakines CX546 and CX516 were able to reverse this diruption of object memory in rats in the novel object recognition task. These data suggest that positive AMPAR modulation may represent a mechanism for treatment...

  12. Migrastatin analogues inhibit canine mammary cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Majchrzak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6 on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. RESULTS: OUR RESULTS SHOWED THAT TWO OF SIX FULLY SYNTHETIC ANALOGUES OF MIGRASTATIN: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6 disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. CONCLUSION: Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs

  13. STAT6 Deletion Enhances Immunity to Mammary Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Maryland Baltimore County Baltimore, MD 21250 REPORT DATE: June 2005 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR... CONTRACT NUMBER STAT6 Deletion Enhances Immunity to Mammary Carcinoma 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-01-1-0312 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...ductal epithelium; [33,47] immune response to immunization with PSA. Mucl.Tg Endogenous human/ Mucl C57BL/6 Mucl tissue distribution similar to human Mucl

  14. Screen of Bovine Mammary Gland Epithelial Cell Specifcity Promotor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao-fei; Li Qing-zhang; Qiu You-wen; Gao Xue-jun

    2012-01-01

    Three lactoproteins (α-Sl-casein, β-lactoglobulin, and β-casein) promotors were cloned, sequenced and compared relative luciferase expression. The results showed that the promotor activity of bovine α-S1-casein gene was the best, and would be used to produce pharmaceutically and medically important proteins in the mammary gland of transgenic animals and also for the construction of an inducible eukaryotic expression vector.

  15. FoxM1 Regulates Mammary Luminal Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janai R. Carr

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevated expression of FoxM1 in breast cancer correlates with an undifferentiated tumor phenotype and a negative clinical outcome. However, a role for FoxM1 in regulating mammary differentiation was not known. Here, we identify another function of FoxM1, the ability to act as a transcriptional repressor, which plays an important role in regulating the differentiation of luminal epithelial progenitors. Regeneration of mammary glands with elevated levels of FoxM1 leads to aberrant ductal morphology and expansion of the luminal progenitor pool. Conversely, knockdown of FoxM1 results in a shift toward the differentiated state. FoxM1 mediates these effects by repressing the key regulator of luminal differentiation, GATA-3. Through association with DNMT3b, FoxM1 promotes methylation of the GATA-3 promoter in an Rb-dependent manner. This study identifies FoxM1 as a critical regulator of mammary differentiation with significant implications for the development of aggressive breast cancers.

  16. Treatment of Congenital Absence of the Mammary Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Yazawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast reconstruction for breast deformity is significant not only for esthetic purposes but also from a psychological perspective. There have been a few reports on treatment of congenital simple absence of the mammary gland. For patients in puberty, even if they are in the middle of the growth phase, breast reconstruction is very important for the mental quality of life. In our two cases of congenital absence of unilateral mammary gland, breast reconstruction with a tissue expander worked well in terms of esthetic results and the psychological condition of the young patients. In our institute, operative indications are as follows: (1 a girl over 15 years old (this age is selected as breast growth can be determined at this time, (2 no endocrine-related disorders, (3 preoperative examination of breast MRI or US showing the absence or significant hypoplasia of mammary gland, and (4 a wish for breast reconstruction by the patient herself. For patients in the middle of the growth phase, silicone breast implant does not require a donor site and is easily adjustable in terms of volume to match the growth of the breast on the unaffected side by exchanging the silicone breast implant. Therefore, silicone breast implant is a better procedure than skin flaps with their accompanying large donor sites.

  17. Epidermal growth factor in mammary glands and milk from rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Raaberg, Lasse; Nexø, Ebba;

    1993-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is one of the major growth-promoting agents in milk. Using immunohistochemistry we localized EGF in the mammary glands of lactating rats to the luminal border of the secretory cells. Following proteolytic pretreatment of the histological sections, the EGF-immunoreact......Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is one of the major growth-promoting agents in milk. Using immunohistochemistry we localized EGF in the mammary glands of lactating rats to the luminal border of the secretory cells. Following proteolytic pretreatment of the histological sections, the EGF......-immunoreactivity was revealed homogeneously in the cytoplasm of the secretory cells, which might suggest that EGF is present as a precursor molecule in the mammary glands. Altered glucose metabolism during lactation results in secondary hypoinsulinaemia in the lactating rat. As insulin is also known to affect lactation...... in several species, we treated normal lactating rats daily with insulin and studied the effect on the composition of milk. A significant increase in the content of total protein and milk fat was observed after a few days of insulin-treatment, as compared to a control group [total protein: 50 (36-97) g/l vs...

  18. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in mammary gland tissue sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2004-02-17

    Real-time three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of epithelial structures in human mammary gland tissue blocks mapped with selected markers would be an extremely helpful tool for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. Besides its clear clinical application, this tool could also shed a great deal of light on the molecular basis of breast cancer initiation and progression. In this paper we present a framework for real-time segmentation of epithelial structures in two-dimensional (2D) images of sections of normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue blocks. Complete 3D rendering of the tissue can then be done by surface rendering of the structures detected in consecutive sections of the blocks. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are first sliced, and sections are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy and their background is corrected using a phantom image. We then use the Fast-Marching algorithm to roughly extract the contours of the different morphological structures in the images. The result is then refined with the Level-Set method which converges to an accurate (sub-pixel) solution for the segmentation problem. Finally, our system stacks together the 2D results obtained in order to reconstruct a 3D representation of the entire tissue block under study. Our method is illustrated with results from the segmentation of human and mouse mammary gland tissue samples.

  19. Cholesterol transport and regulation in the mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontsouka, Edgar C; Albrecht, Christiane

    2014-03-01

    The milk-producing alveolar epithelial cells secrete milk that remains after birth the principal source of nutrients for neonates. Milk secretion and composition are highly regulated processes via integrated actions of hormones and local factors which involve specific receptors and downstream signal transduction pathways. Overall milk composition is similar among mammalian species, although the content of individual constituents such as lipids may significantly differ from one species to another. The milk lipid fraction is essentially composed of triglycerides, which represent more than 95 % of the total lipids in human and commercialized bovine milk. Though sterols, including cholesterol, which is the major milk sterol, represent less than 0.5 % of the total milk lipid fraction, they are of key importance for several biological processes. Cholesterol is required for the formation of biological membranes especially in rapidly growing organisms, and for the synthesis of sterol-based compounds. Cholesterol found in milk originates predominantly from blood uptake and, to a certain extent, from local synthesis in the mammary tissue. The present review summarizes current knowledge on cellular mechanisms and regulatory processes determining intra- and transcellular cholesterol transport in the mammary gland. Cholesterol exchanges between the blood, the mammary alveolar cells and the milk, and the likely role of active cholesterol transporters in these processes are discussed. In this context, the hormonal regulation and signal transduction pathways promoting active cholesterol transport as well as potential regulatory crosstalks are highlighted.

  20. alpha_s from tau decays revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, D; Golterman, M; Jamin, M; Maltman, K; Osborne, J; Peris, S

    2011-01-01

    Being a determination at low energies, the analysis of hadronic tau decay data provides a rather precise determination of the strong coupling alpha_s after evolving the result to M_Z. At such a level of precision, even small non-perturbative effects become relevant for the central value and error. While those effects had been taken into account in the framework of the operator product expansion, contributions going beyond it, so-called duality violations, have previously been neglected. The following investigation fills this gap through a finite-energy sum rule analysis of tau decay spectra from the OPAL experiment, including duality violations and performing a consistent fit of all appearing QCD parameters. The resulting values for alpha_s(M_tau) are 0.307(19) in fixed-order perturbation theory and 0.322(26) in contour-improved perturbation theory, which translates to the n_f=5 values 0.1169(25) and 0.1187(32) at M_Z, respectively.

  1. Expression of G alpha 16, a G-protein alpha subunit specific for hematopoiesis in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeilstöcker, M; Karlic, H; Salamon, J; Krömer, E; Mühlberger, H; Pavlova, B; Selim, U; Tüchler, H; Fritsch, G; Kneissl, S; Heinz, R; Pitterman, E; Paukovits, M R

    1996-07-01

    G-proteins are essential in signal transduction pathways. A G-protein alpha subunit termed G alpha 16 was found to be exclusively expressed in hematopoietic cell lines. In cells derived from patients, G alpha 16 expression has been detected in progenitor- and pre-B ALL cells and also in peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). In this study, we analyzed G alpha 16 expression using a RT-PCR technique by testing elutriated blood cells from normal donors, PBSC from breast cancer patients and bone marrow or peripheral blood cells from acute leukemia patients. Both of two ALL patients and 15/16 AML patients expressed G alpha 16. In elutriation experiments, G alpha 16 expression was found in fractions containing the highest number of precursor cells but was absent in mature T and B cell fractions. In addition, CD34-enriched PBSC were positive for G alpha 16 expression. Further in vitro experiments using the cell line KG1 showed that G alpha 16 expression was not affected by the growth inhibiting hemoregulatory peptide pEEDCK which has a sequence homology present within G alpha 16. Taken together, these data demonstrate that G alpha 16 is expressed in various normal and malignant hematopietic progenitors but not in their differentiated counterparts. G alpha 16 could play a vital role in signal transduction pathways controlling proliferation in early normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

  2. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by blood tests showing the low levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin and abnormal liver tests. Other tests such as ultrasound imaging or tests using specialized X-ray techniques may be necessary. A liver biopsy may ...

  3. Pueraria mirifica Exerts Estrogenic Effects in the Mammary Gland and Uterus and Promotes Mammary Carcinogenesis in Donryu Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kakehashi; Midori Yoshida; Yoshiyuki Tago; Naomi Ishii; Takahiro Okuno; Min Gi; Hideki Wanibuchi

    2016-01-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM), a plant whose dried and powdered tuberous roots are now widely used in rejuvenating preparations to promote youthfulness in both men and women, may have major estrogenic influence. In this study, we investigated modifying effects of PM at various doses on mammary and endometrial carcinogenesis in female Donryu rats. Firstly, PM administered to ovariectomized animals at doses of 0.03%, 0.3%, and 3% in a phytoestrogen-low diet for 2 weeks caused significant increase in u...

  4. AlphaACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-20

    CBR can be found in the world around us (e.g., a doctor’s diagnosis based on a prior patient case, a lawyer preparing arguments based on legal ... metaphors in decision research. Judgment & Decision Making, 3(3), 195-204. Payne, J., Bettman, J., & Johnson, E. (1993). The Adaptive Decision Maker...alphaact. com 64 AlphaACT HAZMAT User Guide 8.3 Changing Measurement Units AlphaACT HAZMAT lets you show distances in either metric or English

  5. Structural determinants within residues 180-199 of the rodent. alpha. 5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit involved in. alpha. -bungarotoxin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, K.E.; Xiadong Wu; Conti-Tronconi, B.M. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (United States))

    1991-11-05

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to sequence segments of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) {alpha} subunits have been used to identify regions that contribute to formation of the binding sites for cholinergic ligands. The authors have previously defined {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX) binding sequences between residues 180 and 199 of a putative rat neuronal nAChR {alpha} subunit, designated {alpha}5, and between residues 181 and 200 of the chick neuronal {alpha}7 and {alpha}8 subunits. These sequences are relatively divergent compared with the Torpedo and muscle nAChR {alpha}1 {alpha}-BTX binding sites, which indicates a serious limitation of predicting functional domains of proteins based on homology in general. Given the highly divergent nature of the {alpha}5 sequence, they were interested in determining the critical amino acid residues for {alpha}-BTX binding. In the present study, the effects of single amino acid substitutions of Gly or Ala for each residue of the rat {alpha}(180-199) sequence were tested, using a competition assay, in which peptides compete for {sup 125}I-{alpha}-BTX binding with native Torpedo nAChR. These results indicate that a disulfide bridge between the vicinal cysteines at positions 191 and 192 of the {alpha}5 sequence is not an absolute requirement for {alpha}-BTX binding activity.

  6. Binding of transcobalamin II by human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Y; Lönnerdal, B

    2001-01-01

    The presence of nutrient binders in milk may have an important role during milk production and may influence the nutrient's bioavailability to the infant. Human milk and plasma contain at least two types of vitamin B12 binders: transcobalamin II (TCII) and haptocorrin (Hc). Vitamin B12 in milk is exclusively bound to Hc (Hc-B12). In plasma, the major vitamin B12 binding protein that is responsible for delivering absorbed vitamin B12 to most tissues and cells is TCII (TCII-B12). Currently, little is known about the route of secretion of vitamin B12 into human milk. It is possible that a receptor-mediated pathway is involved, since maternal vitamin B12 supplementation increases the amount of the vitamin secreted into human milk if the mother's vitamin B12 consumption is low, but remains unchanged if her intake is adequate. In this study, we investigated the process by which the mammary gland acquires vitamin B12 from maternal circulation, whether as a free vitamin or as a Hc-B12 or TCII-B12 complex. TCII was purified from plasma incubated with [57Co]vit B12 (B12*), while Hc was purified from whey incubated with B12*. Both proteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography using gel filtration and anion-exchange columns. Purity of the separated proteins was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding studies were carried out on a monolayer of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at 4 degrees C using free B12* and TCII-B12* and Hc-B12* complexes. Minimal binding of free B12* and Hc-B12* to HMEC was observed; however, HMEC exhibited a high affinity for the TCII-B12* complex. This study suggests that a specific cell surface receptor for the TCII-B12 complex exists in the mammary gland. It is possible that once vitamin B12 is in the mammary gland it is transferred to Hc (which may be synthesized by the mammary gland) and then secreted into milk as a Hc-B12 complex.

  7. ALPHA-2: the sequel

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    While many experiments are methodically planning for intense works over the long shutdown, there is one experiment that is already working at full steam: ALPHA-2. Its final components arrived last month and will completely replace the previous ALPHA set-up. Unlike its predecessor, this next generation experiment has been specifically designed to measure the properties of antimatter.   The ALPHA team lower the new superconducting solenoid magnet into place. The ALPHA collaboration is working at full speed to complete the ALPHA-2 set-up for mid-November – this will give them a few weeks of running before the AD shutdown on 17 December. “We really want to get some experience with this device this year so that, if we need to make any changes, we will have time during the long shutdown in which to make them,” says Jeffrey Hangst, ALPHA spokesperson. “Rather than starting the 2014 run in the commissioning stage, we will be up and running from the get go.&...

  8. Folic acid supplementation promotes mammary tumor progression in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deghan Manshadi, Shaidah; Ishiguro, Lisa; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Medline, Alan; Renlund, Richard; Croxford, Ruth; Kim, Young-In

    2014-01-01

    Folic acid supplementation may prevent the development of cancer in normal tissues but may promote the progression of established (pre)neoplastic lesions. However, whether or not folic acid supplementation can promote the progression of established (pre)neoplastic mammary lesions is unknown. This is a critically important issue because breast cancer patients and survivors in North America are likely exposed to high levels of folic acid owing to folic acid fortification and widespread supplemental use after cancer diagnosis. We investigated whether folic acid supplementation can promote the progression of established mammary tumors. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a control diet and mammary tumors were initiated with 7,12-dimethylbenza[a]anthracene at puberty. When the sentinel tumor reached a predefined size, rats were randomized to receive a diet containing the control, 2.5x, 4x, or 5x supplemental levels of folic acid for up to 12 weeks. The sentinel mammary tumor growth was monitored weekly. At necropsy, the sentinel and all other mammary tumors were analyzed histologically. The effect of folic acid supplementation on the expression of proteins involved in proliferation, apoptosis, and mammary tumorigenesis was determined in representative sentinel adenocarcinomas. Although no clear dose-response relationship was observed, folic acid supplementation significantly promoted the progression of the sentinel mammary tumors and was associated with significantly higher sentinel mammary tumor weight and volume compared with the control diet. Furthermore, folic acid supplementation was associated with significantly higher weight and volume of all mammary tumors. The most significant and consistent mammary tumor-promoting effect was observed with the 2.5x supplemental level of folic acid. Folic acid supplementation was also associated with an increased expression of BAX, PARP, and HER2. Our data suggest that folic acid supplementation may promote the progression

  9. Kinetics of mammary clonogenic cells and rat mammary cancer induction by X-rays or fission neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Kenji [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Higgins, P.D.; Tanner, M.A.; Gould, M.N.; Clifton, K.H.

    1999-12-01

    Following the hormonal treatment of rats with high prolactin levels and glucocorticoid deficiency (Prl+/Glc-) for 48 days (Day +48), total recoverable mammary DNA was increased by more than sevenfold, tritiated thymidine uptake by nearly fourfold, and total mammary clonogens by about fivefold. Irradiation with 4, 40, and 80 cGy X-rays on Day +48 increased total mammary carcinomas per rat-day-at-risk linearly with dose, and 40 and 80 cGy significantly decreased first carcinoma latency. A dose of 40 cGy X-rays before hormone treatment (Day -1) yielded tumor latencies and frequencies insignificantly different from unirradiated controls but significantly different from those when the dose was given on Day +48. Total carcinomas per rat-day-at-risk were fitted better by a function of dose to the power 0.4 than by a linear function after exposure to 1, 10. and 20 cGy fission neutrons, and 10 and 20 cGy significantly shortened the time to appearance of the first cancer. In contrast to results with X-rays, 10 cGy neutrons on Day -1 yielded tumor frequencies and latencies insignificantly different from 10 cGy neutrons on Day +48. The carcinogenic action of X-rays, but not of neutrons, was thus influenced by total clonogen numbers and/or proliferation rates. (author)

  10. Developmental signaling pathways regulating mammary stem cells and contributing to the etiology of triple-negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel,Maria Cristina; Bertolette, Daniel; Castro, Nadia P.; Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Cuttitta, Frank; Salomon, David S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has been considered as temporal and spatial aberrations of normal development in tissues. Similarities between mammary embryonic development and cell transformation suggest that the underlying processes required for mammary gland development are also those perturbed during various stages of mammary tumorigenesis and breast cancer (BC) development. The master regulators of embryonic development Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin play key roles in modulating mammary gland morphogenes...

  11. Measurement of Mammary Blood Flow in Dairy Goats%奶山羊乳腺血流量检测的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋移福; 马卫明; 王中华; 贺加双; 傅莹; 曹永芝; 池洪亮; 谢冰; 刘莲莲

    2011-01-01

    The mammary nutrition research in lactating ruminants, especially in dairy cows, has become a hot spot of animal nutrition research at present, and mammary blood flow is one of the key factors that affect the absorption, uptake and utilization of mammary nutrients, therefore, the accurate measurement of mammary blood flow has the theoretical and practical significance. This article took the mammary gland of dairy goats as the object and the transit-time ultrasonic blood flow meter was used to assess the measurement of mammary blood flow and the accuracy under different conditions. The results showed that external pudendal vein ligation could effectively prevent external pudendal vein blood refluxed into the mammary vein and did not affect the mammary blood flow (P >0.05); the effect of nutrition on mammary blood flow was slow but significant (P <0.01 ); milking had little effect on mammary blood flow ( P > 0.05 ), but lying could increase mammary blood flow significantly (P <0.01 ); increasing the feeding times could reduce mammary blood flow fluctuations and enhance the rate of accuracy of measuring mammary blood flow, the mammary blood flow was decreased gradually from 01:00 to 12:00 o' clock and then increased, at the same time the milk yield was in a positive correlation with the average of the blood flow. In conclusion, the external pudendal vein ligation can effectively prevent the blood flow measurement from inaccuracy; nutrition has a great effect on the mammary blood flow; milking has little effect on the blood flow while lying can increase blood flow significantly; the measurement of manmnary blood flow will be more accurate under the conditions of increasing the feeding times. [Chinese Journal of Animal Nutrition, 2011, 23(6) :1035-1042]%目前泌乳反刍动物尤其是奶牛乳腺营养研究已成为动物营养研究中的热点,乳腺血流量是影响乳腺营养物质吸收、摄取和利用的关键因素之一,因此乳腺血流量的

  12. Reconstruction after Anterior Chest Wall Keloid Resection Using Internal Mammary Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Rei; Ono, Shimpei; Akaishi, Satoshi; Dohi, Teruyuki; Iimura, Takeshi; Nakao, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is difficult to completely resect huge anterior chest wall keloids and then close the wound directly. We report here our retrospective analysis of our case series of patients with such keloids who underwent reconstruction with internal mammary artery perforator (IMAP) pedicled propeller flaps and then received postoperative high-dose-rate superficial brachytherapy. Methods: All consecutive patients with large/severe keloids on the anterior chest wall who underwent keloid resection followed by reconstruction with IMAP-pedicled propeller flaps and then high-dose-rate superficial brachytherapy in our academic hospital were identified. All cases were followed for >18 months. Donor site position, perforator pedicle, flap size, angle of flap rotation, complications, and recurrence were documented. Results: There were nine men and one woman. The average age was 37.9 years. The average follow-up duration was 28.7 months. The largest flap was 16 × 4 cm. The dominant perforators of the internal mammary artery were located in the sixth (n = 2), seventh (n = 5), eighth (n = 1), and ninth (n = 2) intercostal spaces. Twelve months after surgery, patients reported marked relief from keloid-associated pain and itching, except in two patients who underwent partial keloid resection; their remaining keloids were still troublesome but after conservative therapies, including steroid ointments/plasters, the keloids gradually ameliorated. Eighteen months after surgery, there was no keloid recurrence or new development of keloids on the donor site. Conclusions: IMAP-pedicled propeller flaps transfer skin tension from the anterior chest wall to the abdomen. Our series suggests that this approach combined with radiation therapy can control keloid recurrence.

  13. Mammary transcriptome analysis of lactating dairy cows following administration of bovine growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoard, S A; Hayashi, A A; Sciascia, Q; Rounce, J; Sinclair, B; McNabb, W C; Roy, N C

    2016-12-01

    The galactopoietic effect of growth hormone (GH) in lactating ruminants is well established; however the mechanisms that mediate these effects are not well understood. The first objective of this study was to determine the effect of GH on the synthesis of the major casein and whey proteins. The second objective was to identify the genes and pathways that may be involved in mediating the effect of GH on milk synthesis. A single subcutaneous injection of a commercially available slow release formulation of GH (Lactatropin®), or physiological saline solution (control) was administered to non-pregnant dairy cows (n=4/group) in mid-late lactation. Milk samples were collected for composition analysis and mammary lobulo-alveolar tissue was collected postmortem 6 days post injection. Gene expression profiles were evaluated using either a 22 000 bovine complementary DNA microarray or quantitative PCR (qPCR), and microarrays were validated by qPCR. The yield of all the major casein and whey proteins was increased 32% to 41% in GH-treated cows, with the exception of α-lactalbumin yield which was elevated by 70% relative to controls. Treatment with GH treatment tended to increase the concentration of α-lactalbumin but had no effect on the concentration of any of the major milk proteins. Messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance of the major whey and casein genes, with the exception of α-s2-casein, was increased in response to GH compared with controls, which is consistent with the positive effect of GH on milk production. Treatment with GH treatment influenced the mRNA abundance of genes involved in cell growth and proliferation, transcriptional and translational regulation, actin cytoskeleton signalling, lipid metabolism and cell death. This study has provided new insights into the cell signalling that may be involved in mediating the effect of GH on milk production in the mammary gland of lactating dairy cows.

  14. Stat5a increases lactation of dairy cow mammary gland epithelial cells cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao Fei; Li, Meng; Li, Qing Zhang; Lu, Li Min; Tong, Hui Li; Gao, Xue Jun

    2012-10-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (Stat5a) transduces signals of extracellular cytokines and growth factors to the nucleus of mammary gland epithelial cells and thereby regulates gene transcription during pregnancy, lactation, and weaning. However, its function on the milk production of dairy cows needs further investigation. In this experiment, the effects of Stat5a on lactation ability of dairy cow mammary gland epithelial cells (DCMECs) were analyzed. Eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1+-stat5a-αS1 was constructed by inserting stat5a gene into the plasmid vector pcDNA3.1+ and replacing CMV promoter with α-S1-casein 5' flanking sequence. The recombinant vector was stably transfected into DCMECs after geneticin (G418) selection. The proliferation and viability of DCMECs, expression of β-casein and stat5a gene, and the content of lactose were detected. The results showed that stat5a gene in eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1+-stat5a-αS1 was highly expressed in DCMECs and could increase the lactation ability of DCMECs. The associativity of Stat5a with nutrients on the lactation ability of DCMECs was also evaluated. Lysine (Lys), methionine (Met), sodium acetate, β-sodium hydroxybutyrate, and glucose all had more positive effects on the lactation function of DCMECs after pcDNA3.1+-stat5a-αS1 transfection. The proliferation and viability of DCMECs, expression of β-casein and stat5a gene, and contents of lactose and triglyceride were detected. The results revealed that nutrients could promote expression of Stat5a gene to increase lactation of DCMECs. These data help to clarify the function of stat5 gene on lactation and gene regulatory networks linking stat5a.

  15. File list: NoD.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. Estrogenic effect of the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 on endogenous estrogen receptor alpha and beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrim, Cândida Z; Amado, Francisco L; Helguero, Luisa A

    2011-03-01

    Estrogens are key regulators in mammary development and breast cancer and their effects are mediated by estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ). These two receptors are ligand activated transcription factors that bind to regulatory regions in the DNA known as estrogen responsive elements (EREs). ERα and ERβ activation is subject to modulation by phosphorylation and p42/p44 MAP kinases are the best characterized ER modifying kinases. Using a reporter gene (3X-ERE-TATA-luciferase) to measure activation of endogenous ERs, we found that MEK1 inhibitor PD98059, used in concentrations insufficient to inhibit MEK1 activation of p42/p44 MAP kinases, exerted estrogenic effects on the reporter gene and on the ERE-regulated RIP 140 protein. Such estrogenic effects were observed in mammary epithelial HC11 cells and occur on unliganded ERα and ligand activated ERβ. Additionally, concentrations of PD98059 able to inhibit p42/p44 phosphorylation were not estrogenic. Further, inhibition of p42 MAP kinase expression with siRNAs also resulted in loss of PD98059 estrogenic effect. In summary, PD98059 in concentrations below the inhibitory for MEK1, exerts estrogenic effects in HC11 mammary epithelial cells.

  7. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Cameron N; Smith, Yvonne E; Cao, Yuan; Burrows, Allan D; Cross, Ryan S N; Ling, Xiawei; Redvers, Richard P; Doherty, Judy P; Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Natoli, Anthony L; Restall, Christina M; Lucas, Erin; Pearson, Helen B; Deb, Siddhartha; Britt, Kara L; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Li, Jason; Harmey, Judith H; Pouliot, Normand; Anderson, Robin L

    2015-03-01

    The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53) tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8) and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36) might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer.

  8. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron N. Johnstone

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53 tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3, parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8 and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36 might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer.

  9. Decreased adrenal medullary tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene)-induced mammary carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunce, O.R.; Badary, O.A.; Abou El-Ela, S.; Hartle, D.K. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Adrenal cortical hormones suppress initiation and promotion of DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis. The authors found a positive correlation between presence of DMBA-induced adrenal cortical necrosis and mammary tumor incidence. Because they find adrenal medullary as well as cortical lesions in tumor bearing (TB) DMBA-treated rats, they evaluated medullary function by quantitating hybridized cDNA- TH-S{sup 35} with in situ TH-mRNA u sing computer assisted quantitative autoradiographic technique. Virgin female Sprague-Dawley rats were given a 10 mg i.g. dose of DMBA. Three wks later, rats were placed on 20% polyunsaturated (PUFA) fat diets containing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. All were killed 15 wks post-DMBA. TH-mRNA levels in adrenal medullae of TB animals were decreased compared to non-TB rats. Histopathology indicated a high incidence of medullary necrosis in TB rats, whereas, adrenal necrosis did not occur in non-TB animals. Adrenal necrosis correlated positively with tumor burden, but no correlation was found between incidence of adrenal lesions and type of PUFA in the diet. The authors suggest that DMBA adrenal necrosis may reduce TH-mRNA in the medulla, compromise its catecholamine synthetic capability, and thereby contribute to the overall metabolic stress condition of TB rats.

  10. Mammary stem cells: Novel markers and novel approaches to increase lactation efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue r...

  11. Immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cells express stem cell markers and differentiate in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Han; Zheng, Nan; Gao, Haina; Dai, Wenting; Zhang, Yangdong; Li, Songli; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-08-01

    The bovine mammary epithelial cell is a secretory cell, and its cell number and secretory activity determine milk production. In this study, we immortalized a bovine mammary epithelial cell line by SV40 large T antigen gene using a retrovirus based on Chinese Holstein primary mammary epithelial cells (CMEC) cultured in vitro. An immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line surpassed the 50-passage mark and was designated the CMEC-H. The immortalized mammary epithelial cells grew in close contact with each other and exhibited the typical cobblestone morphology characteristic with obvious boundaries. The telomerase expression of CMEC-H has consistently demonstrated the presence of telomerase activity as an immortalized cell line, but the cell line never induced tumor formation in nude mice. CMEC-H expressed epithelial (cytokeratins CK7, CK8, CK18, and CK19), mesenchymal (vimentin), and stem/progenitor (CD44 and p63) cell markers. The induced expression of milk proteins, αS1 -casein, β-casein, κ-casein, and butyrophilin, indicated that CMEC-H maintained the synthesis function of the mammary epithelial cells. The established immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line CMEC-H is capable of self-renewal and differentiation and can serve as a valuable reagent for studying the physiological mechanism of the mammary gland.

  12. Promoter mutation and reduced expression of BRCA1 in canine mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, H B; Sun, W D; Yang, X; Jiang, Q Y; Chen, S; Lin, D G

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is one of the most important genes in human familial breast cancer, which also plays an important role in canine mammary tumors. The objectives of this study were to determine the promoter sequence of canine BRCA1, to investigate its promoter mutation status and to describe BRCA1 expression pattern in canine mammary tumors. The promoter sequence of canine BRCA1 was acquired by aligning human BRCA1 promoter sequence with canine genomic sequence and confirmed by standard promoter activity analysis. Same as human BRCA1 promoter, the CAAT box and G/C box were found in canine BRCA1 promoter. In order to explore the mutation status of the promoter region and to investigate the expression pattern of this gene, 10 normal canine mammary tissues, 15 benign mammary tumors and 15 malignant mammary tumors were used. By sequencing, 46.7% of the malignant mammary tumors were found with a deletion of one cytosine in the promoter region. The mRNA expression of BRCA1 was significantly reduced in benign and malignant mammary tumors (Ppromoter sequence and to describe the promoter mutation status in canine mammary tumors.

  13. CRIPTO/GRP78 Signaling Maintains Fetal and Adult Mammary Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T. Spike

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the extracellular signaling factors that govern mammary stem cell behavior. Here, we identify CRIPTO and its cell-surface receptor GRP78 as regulators of stem cell behavior in isolated fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells. We develop a CRIPTO antagonist that promotes differentiation and reduces self-renewal of mammary stem cell-enriched populations cultured ex vivo. By contrast, CRIPTO treatment maintains the stem cell phenotype in these cultures and yields colonies with enhanced mammary gland reconstitution capacity. Surface expression of GRP78 marks CRIPTO-responsive, stem cell-enriched fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells, and deletion of GRP78 from adult mammary epithelial cells blocks their mammary gland reconstitution potential. Together, these findings identify the CRIPTO/GRP78 pathway as a developmentally conserved regulator of fetal and adult mammary stem cell behavior ex vivo, with implications for the stem-like cells found in many cancers.

  14. CRIPTO/GRP78 Signaling Maintains Fetal and Adult Mammary Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spike, Benjamin T.; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Booker, Evan; Kalathur, Madhuri; Rodewald, Rose; Lipianskaya, Julia; La, Justin; He, Marielle; Wright, Tracy; Klemke, Richard; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Gray, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the extracellular signaling factors that govern mammary stem cell behavior. Here, we identify CRIPTO and its cell-surface receptor GRP78 as regulators of stem cell behavior in isolated fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells. We develop a CRIPTO antagonist that promotes differentiation and reduces self-renewal of mammary stem cell-enriched populations cultured ex vivo. By contrast, CRIPTO treatment maintains the stem cell phenotype in these cultures and yields colonies with enhanced mammary gland reconstitution capacity. Surface expression of GRP78 marks CRIPTO-responsive, stem cell-enriched fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells, and deletion of GRP78 from adult mammary epithelial cells blocks their mammary gland reconstitution potential. Together, these findings identify the CRIPTO/GRP78 pathway as a developmentally conserved regulator of fetal and adult mammary stem cell behavior ex vivo, with implications for the stem-like cells found in many cancers. PMID:24749068

  15. A hypothesis to relate salivary tumors with mammary and prostate neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Adriana B

    2005-04-21

    Salivary, mammary and prostate glands are sex hormone-dependent organs sharing common aspects in structure, hormonal responsiveness and tumor histopathology. Salivary tumors (especially the malignant types) are not as frequent as mammary and prostate neoplasias. Hence, prognosis of some salivary tumors is not always efficient. Here, we review the oncology of salivary gland and its putative relation to breast/prostate tumors.

  16. Cellular Mechanisms in Regulating Mammary Cell Turnover During Lactation and Dry Period in Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, J V; Theil, P K; Sørensen, M T

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in regulating mammary cell turnover during the pregnancy-lactaion cycle in dairy cows are unclear. The objective of present experiment was to describe expression of genes encoding proteins known to be involved in pathways regulating mammary cell proliferation, apoptosis......, differentiation, cell survival, and tissue remodeling....

  17. A Novel Technique of Preserving Internal Mammary Artery Perforators in Nipple Sparing Breast Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swistel, Alexander; Small, Kevin; Dent, Briar; Cohen, Oriana; Devgan, Lara

    2014-01-01

    Summary: As nipple-sparing mastectomy with implant-based reconstruction has increased, attention must be paid to the viability of the nipple-areolar complex. This article describes the use of preoperative Doppler ultrasound to identify the internal mammary artery perforators. Preserving the internal mammary artery improves vascular supply to the nipple-areolar complex. PMID:25426381

  18. A Novel Technique of Preserving Internal Mammary Artery Perforators in Nipple Sparing Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Swistel, MD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary: As nipple-sparing mastectomy with implant-based reconstruction has increased, attention must be paid to the viability of the nipple-areolar complex. This article describes the use of preoperative Doppler ultrasound to identify the internal mammary artery perforators. Preserving the internal mammary artery improves vascular supply to the nipple-areolar complex.

  19. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  20. Predictors of internal mammary vessel diameter: A computed tomographic angiography-assisted anatomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Julia A; Tholpady, Sunil S; Momeni, Arash; Chu, Michael W

    2016-10-01

    The internal mammary vessels are the most common recipient vessels in free flap breast reconstruction. The literature on internal mammary vascular anatomy is limited by small sample sizes, cadaveric studies, or intraoperative changes. The purpose of this study is to analyze internal mammary anatomy using computed tomographic angiography. A retrospective review of 110 consecutive computed tomographic angiography studies of female patients was performed. Measurements of vessel caliber, distance of internal mammary vessels to sternum, location of internal mammary vein bifurcation, intercostal space height, and chest width were analyzed. Patient demographics and comorbidities were reviewed. The right internal mammary artery and vein were larger than the left in all intercostal spaces (p = 0.02 and p breast reconstruction. On average, the internal mammary vein bifurcates at the third intercostal space; patients with larger chest widths and body mass index had larger caliber internal mammary vessels, and 25% of patients had third intercostal space <1.5 cm and, thus, may not be suitable candidates for rib-sparing techniques.

  1. Sox10 Regulates Stem/Progenitor and Mesenchymal Cell States in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dravis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To discover mechanisms that mediate plasticity in mammary cells, we characterized signaling networks that are present in the mammary stem cells responsible for fetal and adult mammary development. These analyses identified a signaling axis between FGF signaling and the transcription factor Sox10. Here, we show that Sox10 is specifically expressed in mammary cells exhibiting the highest levels of stem/progenitor activity. This includes fetal and adult mammary cells in vivo and mammary organoids in vitro. Sox10 is functionally relevant, as its deletion reduces stem/progenitor competence whereas its overexpression increases stem/progenitor activity. Intriguingly, we also show that Sox10 overexpression causes mammary cells to undergo a mesenchymal transition. Consistent with these findings, Sox10 is preferentially expressed in stem- and mesenchymal-like breast cancers. These results demonstrate a signaling mechanism through which stem and mesenchymal states are acquired in mammary cells and suggest therapeutic avenues in breast cancers for which targeted therapies are currently unavailable.

  2. Effect of primrose oil and corn oil diets on eicosanoid synthesis by rat mammary tumor induced by dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ela, S.H.A.; Bunce, O.R.

    1986-03-01

    Evening primrose oil (PO) contains 9% gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and 75% linoleic acid (LA) each of which are prostaglandin precursors. Corn oil (CO) contains 60% linoleic acid. Fifty day old virgin female rats were given DMBA (5 mg, intragastric). Three weeks post DMBA the rats were separated into two dietary groups of 20% PO and 20% CO, respectively. At 16 weeks post DMBA the rats were killed and mammary tumors analyzed by RIA for PGE/sub 1/, PGE/sub 2/, and 6-keto F/sub 1..cap alpha... PGE/sub 1/ levels in PO fed animals were increased two fold over those fed CO indicating that it is possible to shunt GLA toward monoenoic eicosanoid synthesis. However PGE/sub 2/ and 6 keto F/sub 1..cap alpha../ levels were 5x higher in PO compared to CO. Although this could be attributed to higher cis linoleic acid content of PO, more subtle mechanisms may be responsible.

  3. Mammary gene expression profiles during an intramammary challenge reveal potential mechanisms linking negative energy balance with impaired immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Kasey M; Drackley, James K; Morin, Dawn E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Loor, Juan J

    2010-04-01

    Our objective was to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles during a Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis) mastitis challenge between lactating cows subjected to dietary-induced negative energy balance (NEB; n = 5) and cows fed ad libitum to maintain positive energy balance (PEB; n = 5) to better understand the mechanisms associated with NEB and risk of mastitis during the transition period. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements for 7 days, and cows assigned to PEB were fed the same diet for ad libitum intake. Five days after feed restriction, one rear mammary quarter of each cow was inoculated with 5,000 cfu of S. uberis (O140J). At 20 h postinoculation, S. uberis-infected mammary quarters from all cows were biopsied for RNA extraction. Negative energy balance resulted in 287 differentially expressed genes (DEG; false discovery rate ≤ 0.05), with 86 DEG upregulated and 201 DEG downregulated in NEB vs. PEB. Canonical pathways most affected by NEB were IL-8 signaling (10 genes), glucocorticoid receptor signaling (13), and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (10). Among the genes differentially expressed by NEB, cell growth and proliferation (48) and cellular development (36) were the most enriched functions. Regarding immune response, HLA-A was upregulated due to NEB, whereas the majority of genes involved in immune response were downregulated (e.g., AKT1, IRAK1, MAPK9, and TRAF6). This study provided new avenues for investigation into the mechanisms relating NEB and susceptibility to mastitis in lactating dairy cows.

  4. Lentiviral Transduction of Mammary Stem Cells for Analysis of Gene Function during Development and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welm, Bryan E.; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Bledau, Anita S.; Welm, Alana L.; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The mouse mammary gland is the only epithelial organ capable of complete regeneration upon orthotopic transplantation, making it ideally suited for in vivo gene function studies through viral mediated gene delivery. A hurdle that has challenged the widespread adoption of this technique has been the inability to transduce mammary stem cells effectively. We have overcome this limitation by infecting total primary mammary epithelial cells in suspension with high titer lentiviruses. Transduced cells gave rise to all major cell types of the mammary gland, and were capable of clonal outgrowth and functional differentiation in serial transplants. To demonstrate that this method is a valuable alternative to developing transgenic animals, we used lentiviral-mediated Wnt-1 overexpression to replicate MMTV-Wnt-1 mammary phenotypes and used a dominant-negative Xenopus Suppressor of Hairless to reveal a requirement for Notch signaling during ductal morphogenesis. Importantly, this method is also applicable to transduction of cells from other tissues. PMID:18371425

  5. Unique expression pattern of the three insulin receptor family members in the rat mammary gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Henning; Klopfleisch, Robert; Vienberg, Sara Gry

    2011-01-01

    Supra-pharmacological doses of the insulin analog X10 (AspB10) increased the incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley rats in chronic toxicity studies, most likely via receptor-mediated mechanisms. However, little is known about the expression of the insulin receptor family in the rat......) in young, virgin, female Sprague-Dawley rats and compared to expression in reference organs. The mammary gland displayed the highest expression of IRR and IGF-1R. In contrast, low expression of IR transcripts was observed in the mammary gland tissue with expression of the IR-A isoform being 5-fold higher...... of IGF-1R and PR in the mammary gland varied during the estrous cycle. These findings are important for the understanding of carcinogenic effects of insulin analogs in the rat mammary gland, and relevant for development of refined short-term models for preclinical safety assessment of insulin analogs....

  6. Signalling pathways implicated in early mammary gland morphogenesis and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Howard

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Specification of mammary epithelial cell fate occurs during embryogenesis as cells aggregate to form the mammary anlage. Within the embryonic mammary bud, a population of epithelial cells exists that will subsequently proliferate to form a ductal tree filling the stromal compartment, and which can produce milk upon terminal differentiation after birth. Subsequently, these structures can be remodelled and returned to a basal state after weaning before regenerating in future pregnancies. The plasticity of the mammary epithelial cell, and its responsiveness to hormone receptors, facilitates this amazing biological feat, but aberrant signalling may also result in unintended consequences in the form of frequent malignancies. Reflecting this intimate connection, a considerable number of signalling pathways have been implicated in both mammary gland morphogenesis and carcinogenesis.

  7. Interplay between progesterone and prolactin in mammary development and implications for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heather J; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2012-06-24

    Progesterone and prolactin remodel mammary morphology during pregnancy by acting on the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy. The roles of each hormone in mammary development have been well studied, but evidence of signalling cross-talk between progesterone and prolactin is still emerging. Factors such as receptor activator of NFkB ligand (RANKL) may integrate signals from both hormones to orchestrate their joint actions on the epithelial cell hierarchy. Common targets of progesterone and prolactin signalling are also likely to integrate their pro-proliferative actions in breast cancer. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the interplay between progesterone and prolactin in mammary development may reveal therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review summarises our understanding of Pg and PRL action in mammary gland development before focusing on molecular mechanisms of signalling cross-talk and the implications for breast cancer.

  8. Mixtures of environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals affect mammary gland development in female and male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith; Boberg, Julie; Pedersen, Anne Stilling; Mortensen, Mette Sidsel; Jørgensen, Jennifer Solgaard; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hass, Ulla

    2015-07-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are able to alter mammary gland development in female rodents, but little is known on the effects of anti-androgens and mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with dissimilar modes of action. Pregnant rat dams were exposed during gestation and lactation to mixtures of environmentally relevant EDCs with estrogenic, anti-androgenic or dissimilar modes of action (TotalMix) of 100-, 200- or 450-fold high end human intake estimates. Mammary glands of prepubertal and adult female and male offspring were examined. Oestrogens increased mammary outgrowth in prepubertal females and the mRNA level of matrix metalloproteinase-3, which may be a potential biomarker for increased outgrowth. Mixtures of EDCs gave rise to ductal hyperplasia in adult males. Adult female mammary glands of the TotalMix group showed morphological changes possibly reflecting increased prolactin levels. In conclusion both estrogenic and anti-androgenic chemicals given during foetal life and lactation affected mammary glands in the offspring.

  9. 奶牛乳腺上皮细胞系的培养与鉴定%Culture and Identification of the Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹康; 贡笑笑; 左晓昕; 陈银银; 占今舜; 赵国琦

    2015-01-01

    fibroblast cells proliferated rapidly and a small amount of epithelial cells divided. At 8 days of cultivation, bovine mammary epithelial cells proliferated rapidly and formed island-like colonies, and grew like‘cobblestone’ and‘slabstone’ as monolayer. 3) Bovine mammary epithelial cells showed positive reaction against cytokeratine 18 antigen. 4) At passages 10 and 20 of cultiva-tion, the cell chromosome number was 60 and the cells had normal diploid karyotype. In conclusion, tissue culture cells are able to obtain stable, functional bovine mammary epithelial cells, but are not immortalized cells.

  10. Evidence for Alpha Receptors in the Human Ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeb, Ralph; Knopf, Joy; Golijanin, Dragan; Bourne, Patricia; Erturk, Erdal

    2007-04-01

    An immunohistochemical and western blot expression analysis of human ureters was performed in order to characterize the alpha-1-adrenergic receptor distribution along the length of the human ureteral wall. Mapping the distribution will assist in understanding the potential role alpha -1-adrenergic receptors and their subtype density might have in the pathophysiology of ureteral colic and stone passage. Patients diagnosed with renal cancer or bladder cancer undergoing nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy, or cystectomy had ureteral specimens taken from the proximal, mid, distal and tunneled ureter. Tissues were processed for fresh frozen examination and fixed in formalin. None of the ureteral specimens were involved with cancer. Serial histologic sections and immunohistochemical studies were performed using antibodies specific for alpha-1-adrenergic receptor subtypes (alpha 1a, alpha 1b, alpha 1d). The sections were examined under a light microscope and scored as positive or negative. In order to validate and quantify the alpha receptor subtypes along the human ureter. Western blotting techniques were applied. Human ureter stained positively for alpha -1-adrenergic receptors. Immunostaining appeared red, with intense reaction in the smooth muscle of the ureter and endothelium of the neighboring blood vessels. There was differential expression between all the receptors with the highest staining for alpha-1D subtype. The highest protein expression for all three subtypes was in the renal pelvis and decreased with advancement along the ureter to the distal ureter. At the distal ureter, there was marked increase in expression as one progressed towards the ureteral orifice. The same pattern of protein expression was exhibited for all three alpha -1-adrenergic receptor subtypes. We provide preliminary evidence for the ability to detect and quantify the alpha-1-receptor subtypes along the human ureter which to the best of our knowledge has never been done with

  11. User acceptability of an alpha-fetoprotein screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    1995-01-01

    and duration of anxiety, influence on daily life and whether the woman wanted the alpha-fetoprotein test again in a new pregnancy. Three thousand, three hundred and thirty-one questionnaires were analyzed. The participation rate was 81.2%. For 219 women (6.6%), the first alpha-fetoprotein test was abnormal...... (high or low) and the tests were later found to be false positives. There was a strong association between anxiety experienced in conjunction with the alpha-fetoprotein screening programme and the alpha-fetoprotein test result. Two percent of the women with a normal test result reported severe anxiety......The objective of the study was to determine user acceptability among women who were classified as false positives or test negatives in an alpha-fetoprotein screening programme. The study was performed as a questionnaire study over a one-year period from October 1, 1988 to September 30, 1989...

  12. A cis-proline in alpha-hemoglobin stabilizing protein directs the structural reorganization of alpha-hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, David A; Feng, Liang; Zhou, Suiping; Jeffrey, Philip D; Bendak, Katerina; Gow, Andrew; Weiss, Mitchell J; Shi, Yigong; Mackay, Joel P

    2009-10-23

    alpha-Hemoglobin (alphaHb) stabilizing protein (AHSP) is expressed in erythropoietic tissues as an accessory factor in hemoglobin synthesis. AHSP forms a specific complex with alphaHb and suppresses the heme-catalyzed evolution of reactive oxygen species by converting alphaHb to a conformation in which the heme is coordinated at both axial positions by histidine side chains (bis-histidyl coordination). Currently, the detailed mechanism by which AHSP induces structural changes in alphaHb has not been determined. Here, we present x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and mutagenesis data that identify, for the first time, the importance of an evolutionarily conserved proline, Pro(30), in loop 1 of AHSP. Mutation of Pro(30) to a variety of residue types results in reduced ability to convert alphaHb. In complex with alphaHb, AHSP Pro(30) adopts a cis-peptidyl conformation and makes contact with the N terminus of helix G in alphaHb. Mutations that stabilize the cis-peptidyl conformation of free AHSP, also enhance the alphaHb conversion activity. These findings suggest that AHSP loop 1 can transmit structural changes to the heme pocket of alphaHb, and, more generally, highlight the importance of cis-peptidyl prolyl residues in defining the conformation of regulatory protein loops.

  13. Postnatal and postpartal morphology of the mammary gland in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militzer, K; Schwalenstöcker, H

    1996-08-01

    The object of this work was to compare the postnatal and postpartal morphology of the mammary gland of nu/nu with that of nu/(+)-mice. All studies were carried out on groups of female (athymic) nude mice with NMRI genetic background, their nu/(+)-siblings and dams. The various age groups (3, 21, 40, 55, 70 and 120 days) each consisted of 6 nu/nu- and 6 heterozygous nu/(+)-mice respectively. The morphological examination of the mammary gland tissue were made on histological sections and whole mounts. Body weights, total areas of the mammary glands and the number of the terminal end buds were compared. The mammary gland of the athymic nude mouse exhibited no essential morphological differences from the normal developing mammary gland of the hairy euthymic nu/(+)-animal. The area of the mammary gland increased with increasing body weight. Both collectives of mice differed only in their rate of mammary gland development. As a result, the terminal end buds appeared numerously as growth points of mammary gland in nu/(+)-animals as early as the 21st day of life. The athymic nude mice showed a maximum only on the 40th day of life and a lower degree of density and differentiation of specific mammary gland structures (lateral buds, lobulo-alveolar glandular endings) until the 70th day of life. The mammary gland of 120-day-old animals and dams of both animal groups reached the same state of maturity. Thus it is not the rate of development of the dam, but other, yet unidentified factors, which determine, if successful breeding of nude mice with homozygous parents is possible.

  14. Plant alpha-amylase inhibitors and their interaction with insect alpha-amylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Octávio L; Rigden, Daniel J; Melo, Francislete R; Grossi-De-Sá, Maria F

    2002-01-01

    Insect pests and pathogens (fungi, bacteria and viruses) are responsible for severe crop losses. Insects feed directly on the plant tissues, while the pathogens lead to damage or death of the plant. Plants have evolved a certain degree of resistance through the production of defence compounds, which may be aproteic, e.g. antibiotics, alkaloids, terpenes, cyanogenic glucosides or proteic, e.g. chitinases, beta-1,3-glucanases, lectins, arcelins, vicilins, systemins and enzyme inhibitors. The enzyme inhibitors impede digestion through their action on insect gut digestive alpha-amylases and proteinases, which play a key role in the digestion of plant starch and proteins. The natural defences of crop plants may be improved through the use of transgenic technology. Current research in the area focuses particularly on weevils as these are highly dependent on starch for their energy supply. Six different alpha-amylase inhibitor classes, lectin-like, knottin-like, cereal-type, Kunitz-like, gamma-purothionin-like and thaumatin-like could be used in pest control. These classes of inhibitors show remarkable structural variety leading to different modes of inhibition and different specificity profiles against diverse alpha-amylases. Specificity of inhibition is an important issue as the introduced inhibitor must not adversely affect the plant's own alpha-amylases, nor the nutritional value of the crop. Of particular interest are some bifunctional inhibitors with additional favourable properties, such as proteinase inhibitory activity or chitinase activity. The area has benefited from the recent determination of many structures of alpha-amylases, inhibitors and complexes. These structures highlight the remarkable variety in structural modes of alpha-amylase inhibition. The continuing discovery of new classes of alpha-amylase inhibitor ensures that exciting discoveries remain to be made. In this review, we summarize existing knowledge of insect alpha-amylases, plant alpha

  15. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  16. Function of SREBP1 in the Milk Fat Synthesis of Dairy Cow Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs belong to a family of nuclear transcription factors. The question of which is the most important positive regulator in milk fat synthesis in dairy cow mammary epithelial cells (DCMECs between SREBPs or other nuclear transcription factors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ, remains a controversial one. Recent studies have found that mTORC1 (the mammalian target of rapamycin C1 regulates SREBP1 to promote fat synthesis. Thus far, however, the interaction between the SREBP1 and mTOR (the mammalian target of rapamycin pathways in the regulation of milk fat synthesis remains poorly understood. This study aimed to identify the function of SREBP1 in milk fat synthesis and to characterize the relationship between SREBP1 and mTOR in DCMECs. The effects of SREBP1 overexpression and gene silencing on milk fat synthesis and the effects of stearic acid and serum on SREBP1 expression in the upregulation of milk fat synthesis were investigated in DCMECs using immunostaining, Western blotting, real-time quantitative PCR, lipid droplet staining, and detection kits for triglyceride content. SREBP1 was found to be a positive regulator of milk fat synthesis and was shown to be regulated by stearic acid and serum. These findings indicate that SREBP1 is the key positive regulator in milk fat synthesis.

  17. The Type 7 Serotonin Receptor, 5-HT7, Is Essential in the Mammary Gland for Regulation of Mammary Epithelial Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Vaibhav P.; Hernandez, Laura L.; Stull, Malinda A.; Horseman, Nelson D.

    2015-01-01

    Autocrine-paracrine activity of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a crucial homeostatic parameter in mammary gland development during lactation and involution. Published studies suggested that the 5-HT7 receptor type was important for mediating several effects of 5-HT in the mammary epithelium. Here, using 5-HT7 receptor-null (HT7KO) mice we attempt to understand the role of this receptor in mediating 5-HT actions within the mammary gland. We demonstrate for the first time that HT7KO dams are inefficient at sustaining their pups. Histologically, the HT7KO mammary epithelium shows a significant deviation from the normal secretory epithelium in morphological architecture, reduced secretory vesicles, and numerous multinucleated epithelial cells with atypically displaced nuclei, during lactation. Mammary epithelial cells in HT7KO dams also display an inability to transition from lactation to involution as normally seen by transition from a columnar to a squamous cell configuration, along with alveolar cell apoptosis and cell shedding. Our results show that 5-HT7 is required for multiple actions of 5-HT in the mammary glands including core functions that contribute to changes in cell shape and cell turnover, as well as specialized secretory functions. Understanding these actions may provide new interventions to improve lactation performance and treat diseases such as mastitis and breast cancer. PMID:25664318

  18. The Type 7 Serotonin Receptor, 5-HT7, Is Essential in the Mammary Gland for Regulation of Mammary Epithelial Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav P. Pai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autocrine-paracrine activity of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT is a crucial homeostatic parameter in mammary gland development during lactation and involution. Published studies suggested that the 5-HT7 receptor type was important for mediating several effects of 5-HT in the mammary epithelium. Here, using 5-HT7 receptor-null (HT7KO mice we attempt to understand the role of this receptor in mediating 5-HT actions within the mammary gland. We demonstrate for the first time that HT7KO dams are inefficient at sustaining their pups. Histologically, the HT7KO mammary epithelium shows a significant deviation from the normal secretory epithelium in morphological architecture, reduced secretory vesicles, and numerous multinucleated epithelial cells with atypically displaced nuclei, during lactation. Mammary epithelial cells in HT7KO dams also display an inability to transition from lactation to involution as normally seen by transition from a columnar to a squamous cell configuration, along with alveolar cell apoptosis and cell shedding. Our results show that 5-HT7 is required for multiple actions of 5-HT in the mammary glands including core functions that contribute to changes in cell shape and cell turnover, as well as specialized secretory functions. Understanding these actions may provide new interventions to improve lactation performance and treat diseases such as mastitis and breast cancer.

  19. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC.

  20. MicroRNA expression in canine mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, R Michelle; Wright, Zachary M; Stickney, Mark J; Porter, Weston W; Murphy, Keith E

    2008-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 18-22-nt noncoding RNAs that are involved in post-transcriptional regulation of genes. Oncomirs, a subclass of miRNAs, include genes whose expression, or lack thereof, are associated with cancers. Until the last decade, the domestic dog was an underused model for the study of various human diseases that have genetic components. The dog exhibits marked genetic and physiologic similarity to the human, thereby making it an excellent model for study and treatment of various hereditary diseases. Furthermore, because the dog presents with distinct, spontaneously occurring mammary tumors, it may serve as a model for genetic analysis and treatments of humans with malignant breast tumors. Because miRNAs have been found to act as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes in several different cancers, expression patterns of ten miRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16, miR-17-5p, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, miR-181b, let-7f) known to be associated with human breast cancers were compared to malignant canine mammary tumors (n = 6) and normal canine mammary tissue (n = 10). Resulting data revealed miR-29b and miR-21 to have a statistically significant (p pattern of expression as in the human, except for miR-145 which does not show a difference in expression between the normal and cancerous canine samples. In addition, when analyzed according to specific cancer phenotypes, miR-15a and miR-16 show a significant downregulation in canine ductal carcinomas while miRsR-181b, -21, -29b, and let-7f show a significant upregulation in canine tubular papillary carcinomas.

  1. Bakers' asthma caused by alpha amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivieso, R; Subiza, J; Subiza, J L; Hinojosa, M; de Carlos, E; Subiza, E

    1994-10-01

    Two bakers with bronchial asthma and two with rhinoconjunctivitis are described. Prick and RAST tests were positive with wheat flour in all of them, but the challenge test (nasal or bronchial) with wheat flour extract was positive only in one asthmatic baker. The prick test, RAST, and nasal or bronchial challenge done with alpha amylase extract (a glycolytic enzyme obtained from Aspergillus oryzae and used as a flour additive) were positive in all four patients. Our results support previous data indicating that alpha amylase used in bakeries is an important antigen that could cause respiratory allergy in bakers. It can function as sole causative allergen or in addition with other allergens used in the baking industry.

  2. Tsc1 deficiency impairs mammary development in mice by suppression of AKT, nuclear ERα, and cell-cycle-driving proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenqi Qin; Hang Zheng; Ling Zhou; Yanhua Ou; Bin Huang; Bo Yan; Zhenshu Qin; Cuilan Yang; Yongchun Su; Xiaochun Bai; Jiasong Guo; Jun Lin

    2016-01-01

    Loss of Tsc1/Tsc2 results in excess cell growth that eventually forms hamartoma in multiple organs. Our study using a mouse model with Tsc1 conditionally knockout in mammary epithelium showed that Tsc1 deficiency impaired mammary development. Phosphorylated S6 was up-regulated in Tsc1 −/− mammary epithelium, which could be reversed by rapamycin, suggesting that mTORC1 was hyperactivated in Tsc1 −/− mammary epithelium. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin restored the development of Tsc1 −/− mammary...

  3. AlphaSphere

    OpenAIRE

    Place, A.; Lacey, L.; Mitchell, T.

    2013-01-01

    The AlphaSphere is an electronic musical instrument featuring a series of tactile, pressure sensitive touch pads arranged in a spherical form. It is designed to offer a new playing style, while allowing for the expressive real-time modulation of sound available in electronic-based music. It is also designed to be programmable, enabling the flexibility to map a series of different notational arrangements to the pad-based interface.\\ud \\ud The AlphaSphere functions as an HID, MIDI and OSC devic...

  4. Modifications of the alpha,beta-double bond in chalcones only marginally affect the antiprotozoal activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S F; Kharazmi, A; Christensen, S B

    1998-01-01

    Methods for selective alkylation of chalcones in the alpha- or beta-position and for selective reduction of the alpha,beta-double bond have been developed. The antiparasitic potencies of the alpha,beta-double bond modified chalcones only differ marginally from the potencies of the parent chalcones...

  5. Chemoprevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis by Apiaceae Spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqil, Farrukh; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Munagala, Radha; Ravoori, Srivani; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Schultz, David J.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that many herbs and spices have medicinal properties that alleviate symptoms or prevent disease. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effects of the Apiaceae spices, anise, caraway, and celery seeds against 17β-estrogen (E2)-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in an ACI (August-Copenhagen Irish) rat model. Female ACI rats were given either control diet (AIN 93M) or diet supplemented with 7.5% (w/w) of anise, caraway, or celery seed powder. Two weeks later, one half of the animals in each group received subcutaneous silastic implants of E2. Diet intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and animals were euthanized after 3 and 12 weeks. E2-treatment showed significantly (2.1- and 3.4-fold) enhanced growth of pituitary gland at 3 and 12 weeks, respectively. All test spices significantly offset the pituitary growth by 12 weeks, except celery which was effective as early as three weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in mammary tissues showed significant reduction in E2-mediated mammary cell proliferation. Test spices reduced the circulating levels of both E2 and prolactin at three weeks. This protection was more pronounced at 12 weeks, with celery eliciting the highest effect. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to determine the potential molecular targets of the spices. Anise and caraway diets significantly offset estrogen-mediated overexpression of both cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor α (ERα). The effect of anise was modest. Likewise, expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 was inhibited by all test spices. Based on short-term molecular markers, caraway was selected over other spices based on its enhanced effect on estrogen-associated pathway. Therefore, a tumor-end point study in ACI rats was conducted with dietary caraway. Tumor palpation from 12 weeks onwards revealed tumor latency of 29 days in caraway-treated animals compared with first tumor appearance at 92 days in control

  6. Canine Mammary Carcinomas: A Comparative Analysis of Altered Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farruk M. Lutful Kabir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer represents the second most frequent neoplasm in humans and sexually intact female dogs after lung and skin cancers, respectively. Many similar features in human and dog cancers including, spontaneous development, clinical presentation, tumor heterogeneity, disease progression and response to conventional therapies have supported development of this comparative model as an alternative to mice. The highly conserved similarities between canine and human genomes are also key to this comparative analysis, especially when compared to the murine genome. Studies with canine mammary tumor (CMT models have shown a strong genetic correlation with their human counterparts, particularly in terms of altered expression profiles of cell cycle regulatory genes, tumor suppressor and oncogenes and also a large group of non-coding RNAs or microRNAs (miRNAs. Because CMTs are considered predictive intermediate models for human breast cancer, similarities in genetic alterations and cancer predisposition between humans and dogs have raised further interest. Many cancer-associated genetic defects critical to mammary tumor development and oncogenic determinants of metastasis have been reported and appear to be similar in both species. Comparative analysis of deregulated gene sets or cancer signaling pathways has shown that a significant proportion of orthologous genes are comparably up- or down-regulated in both human and dog breast tumors. Particularly, a group of cell cycle regulators called cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs acting as potent tumor suppressors are frequently defective in CMTs. Interestingly, comparative analysis of coding sequences has also shown that these genes are highly conserved in mammals in terms of their evolutionary divergence from a common ancestor. Moreover, co-deletion and/or homozygous loss of the INK4A/ARF/INK4B (CDKN2A/B locus, encoding three members of the CKI tumor suppressor gene families (p16/INK4A, p14ARF and p15

  7. Chemoprevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis by Apiaceae Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrukh Aqil

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Scientific evidence suggests that many herbs and spices have medicinal properties that alleviate symptoms or prevent disease. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effects of the Apiaceae spices, anise, caraway, and celery seeds against 17β-estrogen (E2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in an ACI (August-Copenhagen Irish rat model. Female ACI rats were given either control diet (AIN 93M or diet supplemented with 7.5% (w/w of anise, caraway, or celery seed powder. Two weeks later, one half of the animals in each group received subcutaneous silastic implants of E2. Diet intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and animals were euthanized after 3 and 12 weeks. E2-treatment showed significantly (2.1- and 3.4-fold enhanced growth of pituitary gland at 3 and 12 weeks, respectively. All test spices significantly offset the pituitary growth by 12 weeks, except celery which was effective as early as three weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in mammary tissues showed significant reduction in E2-mediated mammary cell proliferation. Test spices reduced the circulating levels of both E2 and prolactin at three weeks. This protection was more pronounced at 12 weeks, with celery eliciting the highest effect. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to determine the potential molecular targets of the spices. Anise and caraway diets significantly offset estrogen-mediated overexpression of both cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor α (ERα. The effect of anise was modest. Likewise, expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 was inhibited by all test spices. Based on short-term molecular markers, caraway was selected over other spices based on its enhanced effect on estrogen-associated pathway. Therefore, a tumor-end point study in ACI rats was conducted with dietary caraway. Tumor palpation from 12 weeks onwards revealed tumor latency of 29 days in caraway-treated animals compared with first tumor appearance at 92

  8. Loss of sfrp1 promotes ductal branching in the murine mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauger Kelly J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs are a family of proteins that block the Wnt signaling pathway and loss of SFRP1 expression is found in breast cancer along with a multitude of other human cancers. Activated Wnt signaling leads to inappropriate mammary gland development and mammary tumorigenesis in mice. When SFRP1 is knocked down in immortalized non-malignant mammary epithelial cells, the cells exhibit a malignant phenotype which resembles the characteristics observed in metastatic breast cancer stem-like cells. However, the effects of SFRP1 loss on mammary gland development in vivo are yet to be elucidated. The work described here was initiated to investigate the role of SFRP1 in mammary gland development and whether SFRP1−/− mice exhibit changes in mammary gland morphology and cell signaling pathways shown to be associated with SFRP1 loss in vitro. Results 10 week old nulliparous SFRP1−/− mammary glands exhibited branching with clear lobulo-alveolar development, which normally only occurs in hormonally stimulated mid-pregnant wt mammary glands. Explant cultures of SFRP1−/− mammary glands display increased levels of a well known Wnt signaling target gene, Axin2. Histomorphologic evaluation of virgin glands revealed that by 10 weeks of age, the duct profile is markedly altered in SFRP1−/− mice showing a significantly higher density of ducts with distinct alveoli present throughout the mammary gland, and with focal ductal epithelial hyperplasia. These findings persist as the mice age and are evident at 23 weeks of age. Changes in gene expression, including c-Myc, TGFβ-2, Wnt4, RANKL, and Rspo2 early in mammary gland development are consistent with the excessive hyper branching phenotype. Finally, we found that loss of SFRP1 significantly increases the number of mammary epithelial cells capable of mammosphere formation. Conclusions Our study indicates that SFRP1 gene is critical for maintaining proper

  9. Loss of vitamin D receptor signaling from the mammary epithelium or adipose tissue alters pubertal glandular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Abby L; Zinser, Glendon M; Waltz, Susan E

    2014-10-15

    Vitamin D₃ receptor (VDR) signaling within the mammary gland regulates various postnatal stages of glandular development, including puberty, pregnancy, involution, and tumorigenesis. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D₃ treatment induces cell-autonomous growth inhibition and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, mammary adipose tissue serves as a depot for vitamin D₃ storage, and both epithelial cells and adipocytes are capable of bioactivating vitamin D₃. Despite the pervasiveness of VDR in mammary tissue, individual contributions of epithelial cells and adipocytes, as well as the VDR-regulated cross-talk between these two cell types during pubertal mammary development, have yet to be investigated. To assess the cell-type specific effect of VDR signaling during pubertal mammary development, novel mouse models with mammary epithelial- or adipocyte-specific loss of VDR were generated. Interestingly, loss of VDR in either cellular compartment accelerated ductal morphogenesis with increased epithelial cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis within terminal end buds. Conversely, VDR signaling specifically in the mammary epithelium modulated hormone-induced alveolar growth, as ablation of VDR in this cell type resulted in precocious alveolar development. In examining cellular cross-talk ex vivo, we show that ligand-dependent VDR signaling in adipocytes significantly inhibits mammary epithelial cell growth in part through the vitamin D₃-dependent production of the cytokine IL-6. Collectively, these studies delineate independent roles for vitamin D₃-dependent VDR signaling in mammary adipocytes and epithelial cells in controlling pubertal mammary gland development.

  10. Related dipeptide and characteristic dipeptide of optimal pH in alpha-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge-Xin; Li, Wei-Jiang

    2002-12-13

    Alpha-amylase is an enzyme of great significance to industry, but most alpha-amylases are unstable at lower pH. In this paper, we have studied the related dipeptide and characteristic dipeptide of optimal pH in alpha-amylase. On analysis, it gives the explicit results as follows: (1) Ten dipeptides are associated with alpha-amylase's optimal pH. AH, DV, EH, HR, and YV are of positive correlation, AM, IC, NG, NL, and PS are of negative correlation. (2) GE, RE, GS, and KS are higher pH alpha-amylase characteristic dipeptides; AS, GS, DY, and GI are high pH alpha-amylase characteristic dipeptides; TE, VR, DS, and ET are middle pH alpha-amylase characteristic dipeptides; DK, NT, PT, and RV are low pH alpha-amylase characteristic dipeptides; AT, DS, GR, and SR are lower pH alpha-amylase characteristic dipeptides.

  11. Lifting fixed points of completely positive semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Prunaru, Bebe

    2011-01-01

    Let $\\{\\phi_s\\}_{s\\in S}$ be a commutative semigroup of completely positive and contractive linear maps acting on a von Neumann algebra $N$. Assume there exists a semigroup $\\{\\alpha_s\\}_{s\\in S}$ of *-endomorphisms of some larger von Neumann algebra $M\\supset N$ and a projection $p\\in M$ with $N=pMp$ such that $\\alpha_s(1-p)\\le 1-p$ for every $s\\in S$ and $\\phi_s(y)=p\\alpha_s(y)p$ for all $y\\in N$. If $\\inf_{s\\in S}\\alpha_s(1-p)=0$ then we show that the map $E:M\\to N$ defined by $E(x)=pxp$ for $x\\in M$ induces a complete isometry between the fixed point spaces of $\\{\\alpha_s\\}_{s\\in S}$ and $\\{\\phi_s\\}_{s\\in S}$.

  12. Altered proliferation and differentiation properties of primary mammary epithelial cells from BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burga, Laura N; Tung, Nadine M; Troyan, Susan L; Bostina, Mihnea; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Fountzilas, Helena; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Miron, Alexander; Yassin, Yosuf A; Lee, Bernard T; Wulf, Gerburg M

    2009-02-15

    Female BRCA1 mutation carriers have a nearly 80% probability of developing breast cancer during their life-time. We hypothesized that the breast epithelium at risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers harbors mammary epithelial cells (MEC) with altered proliferation and differentiation properties. Using a three-dimensional culture technique to grow MECs ex vivo, we found that the ability to form colonies, an indication of clonality, was restricted to the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1-positive fraction in MECs but not in HCC1937 BRCA1-mutant cancer cells. Primary MECs from BRCA1 mutation carriers (n = 9) had a 28% greater ability for clonal growth compared with normal controls (n = 6; P = 0.006), and their colonies were significantly larger. Colonies in controls and BRCA1 mutation carriers stained positive for BRCA1 by immunohistochemistry, and 79% of the examined single colonies from BRCA1 carriers retained heterozygosity for BRCA1 (ROH). Colonies from BRCA1 mutation carriers frequently showed high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression (71% EGFR positive versus 44% in controls) and were negative for estrogen receptor (ERalpha; 32% ER negative, 44% mixed, 24% ER positive versus 90% ER positive in controls). Expression of CK14 and p63 were not significantly different. Microarray studies revealed that colonies from BRCA1-mutant PMECs anticipate expression profiles found in BRCA1-related tumors, and that the EGFR pathway is up-regulated. We conclude that BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to an increased ability for clonal growth and proliferation in the PMECs of BRCA1 mutation carriers, possibly as a result of EGFR pathway activation. These altered growth and differentiation properties may render BRCA1-mutant PMECs vulnerable to transformation and predispose to the development of ER-negative, EGFR-positive breast cancers.

  13. Symposium: Role of the extracellular matrix in mammary development. Regulation of milk protein and basement membrane gene expression: The influence of the extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggeler, J.; Park, C.S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1988-10-01

    Synthesis and secretion of milk proteins ({alpha}-casein, {beta}-casein, {gamma}-casein, and transferrin) by cultured primary mouse mammary epithelial cells is modulated by the extracellular matrix. In cells grown on released or floating type I collagen gels, mRNA for {beta}-casein and transferrin is increased as much as 30-fold over cells grown on plastic. Induction of {beta}-casein expression depends strongly on the presence of lactogenic hormones, especially prolactin, in the culture. When cells are plated onto partially purified reconstituted basement membrane, dramatic changes in morphology and milk protein gene expression are observed. Cells cultured on the matrix for 6 to 8 d in the presence of prolactin, insulin, and hydrocortisone form hollow spheres and duct-like structures that are completely surrounded by matrix. The cells lining these spheres appear actively secretory and are oriented with their apices facing the lumen. Hybridization experiments indicate that mRNA for {beta}-casein can be increased as much as 70-fold in these cultures. Because > 90% of the cultured cells synthesize immunoreactive {beta}-casein, as compared with only 40% of cells in the late pregnant gland, the matrix appears to be able to induce protein expression in previously silent cells. Synthesis of laminin and assembly of a mammary-specific basal lamina by cells cultured on different extracellular matrices also appears to depend on the presence of lactogenic hormones. These studies provide support for the concept of dynamic reciprocity in which complex interactions between extracellular matrix and the cellular cytoskeleton contribute to the induction and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression in the mammary gland.

  14. Alpha Antihydrogen Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Cesar, C L; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-01-01

    ALPHA is an experiment at CERN, whose ultimate goal is to perform a precise test of CPT symmetry with trapped antihydrogen atoms. After reviewing the motivations, we discuss our recent progress toward the initial goal of stable trapping of antihydrogen, with some emphasis on particle detection techniques.

  15. Case Study - Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Leybourne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study was developed from an actual scenario by Dr. Steve Leybourne of Boston University.  The case documents the historical evolution of an organization, and has been used successfully in courses dealing with organizational and cultural change, and the utilization of ‘soft skills’ in project-based management. This is a short case, ideal for classroom use and discussion.  The issues are easily accessible to students, and there is a single wide ranging question that allows for the inclusion of many issues surrounding strategic decision-making, and behavioural and cultural change. Alpha was one of the earlier companies in the USA to invest in large, edge-of-town superstores, with plentiful free vehicle parking, selling food and related household products. Alpha was created in the 1950s as a subsidiary of a major publicly quoted retail group.  It started business by opening a string of very large discount stores in converted industrial and warehouse premises in the south of the United States. In the early days shoppers were offered a limited range of very competitively priced products. When Alpha went public in 1981 it was the fourth largest food retailer in the US, selling an ever-widening range of food and non-food products.  Its success continued to be based on high volume, low margins and good value for money, under the slogan of ‘Alpha Price.’

  16. Alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line; Stensland, Hilde Monica Frostad Riise; Olsen, Klaus Juul;

    2015-01-01

    of the three subgroups of genotype/subcellular localisation and the clinical and biochemical data were done to investigate the potential relationship between genotype and phenotype in alpha-mannosidosis. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS software. Analyses of covariance were performed...

  17. The microRNA 424/503 cluster reduces CDC25A expression during cell cycle arrest imposed by transforming growth factor β in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet-Navas, David; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Olivan, Mireia; Castro, Veronica; Saucedo-Cuevas, Laura; Marshall, Netonia; Putcha, Preeti; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bardot, Evan; Ezhkova, Elena; Iavarone, Antonio; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Silva, Jose M

    2014-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the microRNA 424(322)/503 [miR-424(322)/503] cluster is transcriptionally controlled by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the mammary epithelium. Induction of this microRNA cluster impacts mammary epithelium fate by regulating apoptosis and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling. Here, we expanded our finding to demonstrate that miR-424(322)/503 is an integral component of the cell cycle arrest mediated by TGF-β. Mechanistically, we showed that after TGF-β exposure, increased levels of miR-424(322)/503 reduce the expression of the cell cycle regulator CDC25A. miR-424(322)/503-dependent posttranscriptional downregulation of CDC25A cooperates with previously described transcriptional repression of the CDC25A promoter and proteasome-mediated degradation to reduce the levels of CDC25A expression and to induce cell cycle arrest. We also provide evidence that the TGF-β/miR-424(322)/503 axis is part of the mechanism that regulates the proliferation of hormone receptor-positive (HR(+)) mammary epithelial cells in vivo.

  18. The MicroRNA 424/503 Cluster Reduces CDC25A Expression during Cell Cycle Arrest Imposed by Transforming Growth Factor β in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Olivan, Mireia; Castro, Veronica; Saucedo-Cuevas, Laura; Marshall, Netonia; Putcha, Preeti; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bardot, Evan; Ezhkova, Elena; Iavarone, Antonio; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the microRNA 424(322)/503 [miR-424(322)/503] cluster is transcriptionally controlled by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the mammary epithelium. Induction of this microRNA cluster impacts mammary epithelium fate by regulating apoptosis and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling. Here, we expanded our finding to demonstrate that miR-424(322)/503 is an integral component of the cell cycle arrest mediated by TGF-β. Mechanistically, we showed that after TGF-β exposure, increased levels of miR-424(322)/503 reduce the expression of the cell cycle regulator CDC25A. miR-424(322)/503-dependent posttranscriptional downregulation of CDC25A cooperates with previously described transcriptional repression of the CDC25A promoter and proteasome-mediated degradation to reduce the levels of CDC25A expression and to induce cell cycle arrest. We also provide evidence that the TGF-β/miR-424(322)/503 axis is part of the mechanism that regulates the proliferation of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) mammary epithelial cells in vivo. PMID:25266660

  19. Molecular remission in PML/RAR alpha-positive acute promyelocytic leukemia by combined all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin (AIDA) therapy. Gruppo Italiano-Malattie Ematologiche Maligne dell'Adulto and Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica Cooperative Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, F; Diverio, D; Avvisati, G; Luciano, A; Barbui, T; Bernasconi, C; Broccia, G; Cerri, R; Falda, M; Fioritoni, G; Leoni, F; Liso, V; Petti, M C; Rodeghiero, F; Saglio, G; Vegna, M L; Visani, G; Jehn, U; Willemze, R; Muus, P; Pelicci, P G; Biondi, A; Lo Coco, F

    1997-08-01

    Two hundred fifty-three patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) were eligible to enter the multicentric GIMEMA-AIEOP "AIDA" trial during the period July 1993 to February 1996. As a mandatory prerequisite for eligibility, all patients had genetic evidence of the specific t(15;17) lesion in their leukemic cells confirmed by karyotyping or by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of the PML/RAR alpha fusion gene (the latter available in 247 cases). Median age was 37.8 years (range, 2.2 to 73.9). Induction treatment consisted of oral all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), 45 mg/m2/d until complete remission (CR), given with intravenous Idarubicin, 12 mg/m2/d on days 2, 4, 6, and 8. Three polychemotherapy cycles were given as consolidation. Hematologic and molecular response by RT-PCR was assessed after induction and after consolidation. At the time of analysis, 240 of the 253 eligible patients were evaluable for induction. Of these, 11 (5%) died of early complications and 229 (95%) achieved hematologic remission. No cases of resistant leukemia were observed. Of 139 cases studied by RT-PCR after induction, 84 (60.5%) were PCR-negative and 55 (39.5%) PCR-positive. One hundred sixty-two patients were evaluable by RT-PCR at the end of consolidation. Of these, 159 (98%) tested PCR-negative and 3 (2%), PCR-positive. After a median follow up of 12 months (range, 0 to 33), the estimated actuarial event-free survival for the whole series of 253 eligible patients was 83% +/- 2.6% and 79% +/- 3.2% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. This study indicates that the AIDA protocol is a well-tolerated regimen that induces molecular remission in almost all patients with PML/RAR alpha-positive APL. Preliminary survival data suggest that a remarkable cure rate can be obtained with this treatment.

  20. No association between Epstein-Barr Virus and Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with Breast Cancer in Mexican Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Martínez-López, Juan L. E.; Hernández-Sancén, Paulina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. It has been suggested that infection by Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus or a similar virus, MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV), play a role in the etiology of the disease. However, studies looking at the presence of these viruses in breast cancer have produced conflicting results, and this possible association remains controversial. Here, we used polymerase chain reaction assay to screen specific sequences of EBV and MMTV-LV in 86 tumor and 65 adjacent tissues from Mexican women with breast cancer. Neither tumor samples nor adjacent tissue were positive for either virus in a first round PCR and only 4 tumor samples were EBV positive by a more sensitive nested PCR. Considering the study's statistical power, these results do not support the involvement of EBV and MMTV-LV in the etiology of breast cancer.