WorldWideScience

Sample records for alpha magnetic spectrometer

  1. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, J.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Ao, L.; Arefiev, A.; Azzarello, P.; Babucci, E.; Baldini, L.; Basile, M.; Barancourt, D.; Barao, F.; Barbier, G.; Barreira, G.; Battiston, R.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bene, P.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Biland, A.; Bizzaglia, S.; Blasko, S.; Boella, G.; Boschini, M.; Bourquin, M.; Brocco, L.; Bruni, G.; Buenerd, M.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Camps, C.; Cannarsa, P.; Capell, M.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cecchi, C.; Chang, Y.H.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, Z.G.; Chernoplekov, N.A.; Chiueh, T.H.; Chuang, Y.L.; Cindolo, F.; Commichau, V.; Contin, A. E-mail: contin@bo.infn.it; Crespo, P.; Cristinziani, M.; Cunha, J.P. da; Dai, T.S.; Deus, J.D.; Dinu, N.; Djambazov, L.; DAntone, I.; Dong, Z.R.; Emonet, P.; Engelberg, J.; Eppling, F.J.; Eronen, T.; Esposito, G.; Extermann, P.; Favier, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fisher, P.H.; Fluegge, G.; Fouque, N.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gervasi, M.; Giusti, P.; Grandi, D.; Grimm, O.; Gu, W.Q.; Hangarter, K.; Hasan, A.; Hermel, V.; Hofer, H.; Huang, M.A.; Hungerford, W.; Ionica, M.; Ionica, R.; Jongmanns, M.; Karlamaa, K.; Karpinski, W.; Kenney, G.; Kenny, J.; Kim, W.; Klimentov, A.; Kossakowski, R.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraeber, M.; Laborie, G.; Laitinen, T.; Lamanna, G.; Laurenti, G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, S.C.; Levi, G.; Levtchenko, P.; Liu, C.L.; Liu, H.T.; Lopes, I.; Lu, G.; Lu, Y.S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luckey, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mana, C.; Margotti, A.; Mayet, F.; McNeil, R.R.; Meillon, B.; Menichelli, M.; Mihul, A.; Mourao, A.; Mujunen, A.; Palmonari, F.; Papi, A.; Park, I.H.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, E.; Pesci, A.; Pevsner, A.; Pimenta, M.; Plyaskin, V.; Pojidaev, V.; Postolache, V.; Produit, N.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rapin, D.; Raupach, F.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Ribordy, M.; Richeux, J.P.; Riihonen, E.; Ritakari, J.; Roeser, U.; Roissin, C.; Sagdeev, R.; Sartorelli, G.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E.S.; Shoutko, V.

    2002-02-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a large acceptance (0.65 sr m{sup 2}) detector designed to operate in the International Space Station (ISS) for three years. The purposes of the experiment are to search for cosmic antimatter and dark matter and to study the composition and energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays. A 'scaled-down' version has been flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery for 10 days in June 1998. The complete AMS is programmed for installation on the ISS in October 2003 for an operational period of 3 yr. This contribution reports on the experimental configuration that will be installed on the ISS.

  2. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Bene, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Brocco, L; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cecchi, C; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Cunha, J P D; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; Dantone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, P; Favier, Jean; Fiandrini, E; Fisher, P H; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Grimm, O; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Kraeber, M; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu, H T; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mihul, A; Mourao, A; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postolache, V; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Sartorelli, G; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torsti, J; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Vandenhirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Gunten, H V; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan, L G; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye, S W; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a large acceptance (0.65 sr m sup 2) detector designed to operate in the International Space Station (ISS) for three years. The purposes of the experiment are to search for cosmic antimatter and dark matter and to study the composition and energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays. A 'scaled-down' version has been flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery for 10 days in June 1998. The complete AMS is programmed for installation on the ISS in October 2003 for an operational period of 3 yr. This contribution reports on the experimental configuration that will be installed on the ISS.

  3. Permanent magnet system of alpha magnetic spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS) is the first large magnetic spectrometer in space. Its precursor flight was completed successfully in June 1998. The key part of AMS is the permanent magnet system, which was built by the Institute of Electric Engineering, the Institute of High Energy Physics and the Chinese Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology. This system includes a permanent magnet made of high grade NdFeB and a support structure. The unique design of the permanent magnet based on the magic ring fulfills the severe requirements on the magnetic field leakage and the dipole moment for space experiments. The permanent magnet weighs about 2 tons, and provides a geometric acceptance of 0.6 m2 ·sr and an analyzing power BL2 of 0.135 T·m2. It works up to 40℃ without demagnetization. The main structure is a thin double shell, which undergoes the strong magnetic force and torque of the permanent magnet, as well as the large load during launching and landing. The permanent magnet system fulfills the requirements from AMS, and satisfies the strict safety standards of NASA.

  4. Permanent magnet system of alpha magnetic spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈和生

    2000-01-01

    Alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS) is the first large magnetic spectrometer in space. Its precursor flight was completed successfully in June 1998. The key part of AMS is the permanent magnet system, which was built by the Institute of Electric Engineering, the Institute of High Energy Physics and the Chinese Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology. This system includes a permanent magnet made of high grade NdFeB and a support structure. The unique design of the permanent magnet based on the magic ring fulfills the severe requirements on the magnetic field leakage and the dipole moment for space experiments. The permanent magnet weighs about 2 tons, and provides a geometric acceptance of 0.6 m2·sr and an analyzing power BL2 of 0.135 T·m2. It works up to 40℃ without demagnetization. The main structure is a thin double shell, which undergoes the strong magnetic force and torque of the permanent magnet, as well as the large load during launching and landing. The permanent magnet system fulfills the requirem

  5. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Burger, W J

    1999-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is designed as a independent module for installation on the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) in the year 2002 for an operational period of three years. The principal scientific objectives are the searches for antimatter and dark matter in cosmic rays. The AMS uses 5.5 m sup 2 of silicon microstrip sensors to reconstruct charged particle trajectories in the field of a permanent magnet. The detector design and construction covered a 3 yr period which terminated with a test flight on the NASA space shuttle Discovery during June 2-12, 1988. In this contribution, we describe the shuttle version of the AMS silicon tracker, including preliminary results of the tracker performance during the flight. (author)

  6. Light nuclear charge measurement with Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basara, Laurent [Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, Povo 38123 (Italy); Choutko, Vitaly [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Li, Qiang, E-mail: q.li@cern.ch [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

    2016-06-11

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy particle detector installed and operating on board of the International Space Station (ISS) since May 2011. So far more than 70 billion cosmic ray events have been recorded by AMS. In the present paper the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) detector of AMS is used to measure cosmic ray nuclear charge magnitudes up to Z=10. The obtained charge magnitude resolution is about 0.1 and 0.3 charge unit for Helium and Carbon, respectively. These measurements are important for an accurate determination of the interaction probabilities of various nuclei with the AMS materials. The ECAL charge calibration and measurement procedures are presented.

  7. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Paniccia, M

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics detector designed to measure charged cosmic rays spectra up to TV region, with high energy photon detection capability up to few hundred GeV. With the large acceptance, the long duration (3 years) and the state of the art particle identification techniques, AMS will provide the most sensitive search for the existence of antimatter nuclei and for the origin of dark matter. The detector is being constructed with an eight layers Silicon Tracker inside a large superconducting magnet, providing a ~ 0.8 Tm2 bending power and an acceptance of ~ 0.5 m2sr. A Transition Radiation Detector and a 3D Electromagnetic Calorimeter allow for electron, positron and photon identification, while independent velocity measurements are performed by a Time of Flight scintillating system and a Ring Image Cherenkov detector. The overall construction is due to be completed by 2008.

  8. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer is a precision, large acceptance particle physics detector which was deployed on the International Space Station (ISS) in May 2011. It will be on the ISS for the entire lifetime of the Space Station of about 20 years. To date, the detector has collected over 24 billion cosmic ray events. Among the physics objectives of AMS are the search for an understanding of Dark Matter, Antimatter and the origin of cosmic rays as well as the exploration of new physics phenomena. This report presents an overview of the operations and performance of the AMS experiment on the ISS as well as the progress of the analysis of the data collected over one year of operations in space

  9. New Limits on Dark Matter Annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Cosmic Ray Positron Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergström, L.; Bringmann, T.; Cholis, I.; Hooper, D.; Weniger, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with

  10. The alpha magnetic spectrometer silicon tracker: Performance results with protons and helium nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Azzarello, Ph. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Battiston, R.; Bertucci, B. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Bolmont, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Astroparticules, IN2P3/CNRS, Universite de Montpellier II, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Bourquin, M. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Burger, W.J. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: william.burger@cern.ch; Capell, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cardano, F. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Chang, Y.H. [National Central University, Jhungli 320, Taiwan (China); Choutko, V. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cortina, E. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Dinu, N. [Institute for Space Science (ISS), R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Esposito, G.; Fiandrini, E. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Haas, D. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Haino, S. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Hakobyan, H. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2008-08-11

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer is designed for a long duration measurement of the cosmic-ray spectra at an altitude of 400 km. The particle rigidity and specific energy loss are measured by a silicon tracker located in a 0.8 T field. Ground results for the position resolution, detection efficiency and charge determination for singly and doubly charged relativistic particles are presented and discussed in the context of the spaceborne detector.

  11. Nuclei Measurements with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Melanie

    2017-03-01

    The exact behavior of nuclei fluxes in cosmic rays and how they relate to each other is important for understanding the production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of charged cosmic rays. Precise measurements with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of light nuclei fluxes and their ratios in primary cosmic rays with rigidities from GV to TV are presented. The high statistics of the measurements require detailed studies and in depth understanding of associated systematic uncertainties.

  12. A study of hadronic shower development in the ECAL of the alpha magnetic spectrometer Ⅱ%A study of hadronic shower development in the ECAL of the alpha magnetic spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    藏京京; 王健; 王健2; 汪先友; 王征; 徐明; 许伟伟; 肖虹; 严琪; 杨民; 陈国明; 卞建国; 范嘉伟; 李祖豪; 梁松; 孟祥伟; 陶军全; 唐志成

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the development of hadronic shower in an electromagnetic calorimeter of Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Ⅱ. Two parametrized empirical formulae were proposed to describe the hadronic shower shape in calorimeter. Using 100 GeV proton b

  13. Development of a high resolution alpha spectrometer using a magnetic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, W.S. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, C.S. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.R., E-mail: yhkim@kriss.re.kr [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.B. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.J. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M.K.; Lee, J.H. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); So, J.H. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.H. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a high resolution alpha spectrometer with a magnetic calorimeter. The operating principle of the detector is the calorimetric measurement of the temperature increase from particle absorption in a gold foil absorber at milli-Kelvin temperatures. A magnetic calorimeter made of gold doped with erbium on a superconducting meander pickup coil was used to accurately measure the temperature change, thereby acting as an ultra-sensitive thermometer. The detector demonstrated 1.2 keV FWHM equivalent resolution in alpha particle detection with an {sup 241}Am source. Many peaks were observed in the low-energy region from the absorption of low-energy X-rays, gamma rays, and conversion electrons. An energy resolution of 400 eV FWHM was achieved for 60 keV gamma rays that were measured with the alpha particles. Possible applications of such high resolution detectors are discussed.

  14. Three dimensional parametrization of electromagnetic shower in Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Ⅱ ECAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jun-Quan; CHEN He-Sheng; CHEN Gang; YANG Min; CHEN Guo-Ming; LI Zu-Hao; LI Xin-Qiao; TANG Zhi-Cheng; ZHANG Zhen; WANG Jian; L(U) Yu-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    We develop an empirical formula to parameterize the 3-dimension (3D) distribution of electromagnetic showers in the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Ⅱ electromagnetic calorimeter(ECAL). The formula was verified by ECAL test beam data in 2002 and found to perform well. The distribution of electron showers in the ECAL are well described by the formula, which has parameters that allow one to determine the 3D shape of electromagnetic showers in the ECAL. We use this formula to correct for lateral energy leakage and dead channels in the ECAL; good results are obtained.

  15. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS02) experiment on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behcet ALPAT

    2003-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment is realized in two phases. A precursor flight (STS-91)with a reduced experimental configuration (AMS01) has successfully flown on space shuttle Discovery in June 1998.The final version (AMS02) will be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) as an independent module inearly 2006 for an operational period of three years. The main scientific objectives of AMS02 include the searches forthe antimatter and dark matter in cosmic rays. In this work we will discuss the experimental details as well as the im-proved physics capabilities of AMS02 on ISS.

  16. New limits on dark matter annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer cosmic ray positron data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; Weniger, Christoph

    2013-10-25

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with proposed solutions ranging from local pulsars to TeV-scale dark matter. Here, we make use of this high quality data to place stringent limits on dark matter with masses below ~300 GeV, annihilating or decaying to leptonic final states, essentially independent of the origin of this rise. We significantly improve on existing constraints, in some cases by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  17. Possibility of testing the light dark matter hypothesis with the alpha magnetic spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Dan; Xue, Wei

    2013-01-25

    The spectrum and morphology of gamma rays from the Galactic center and the spectrum of synchrotron emission observed from the Milky Way's radio filaments have each been interpreted as possible signals of ∼ 7-10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating in the inner Galaxy. In dark matter models capable of producing these signals, the annihilations should also generate significant fluxes of ∼ 7-10 GeV positrons which can lead to a distinctive bumplike feature in a local cosmic ray positron spectrum. In this Letter, we show that while such a feature would be difficult to detect with PAMELA, it would likely be identifiable by the currently operating Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment. As no known astrophysical (i.e., nondark matter) sources or mechanisms are likely to produce such a sharp feature, the observation of a positron bump at around 7-10 GeV would significantly strengthen the case for a dark matter interpretation of the reported gamma-ray and radio anomalies.

  18. Astrophysics and particle physics in space with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lamanna, G

    2003-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer is a high energy particle physics experiment in space scheduled to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) by 2006 for a three-year mission. After a precursor flight of a prototype detector on board of the NASA Space Shuttle in June 1998, the construction of the detector in its final configuration is started and it will be completed by 2004. The purpose of this experiment is to provide a high statistics measurement of charged particles and nuclei in rigidity range 0.5 GV to few TV and to explore the high-energy (>1 GeV) gamma-ray sky. In this paper we describe the detector layout and present an overview of the main scientific goals both in the domain of astrophysics: cosmic- ray origin, age and propagation and the exploration of the most energetic gamma-ray sources; and in the domain of astroparticle: the antimatter and the dark matter searches. (53 refs).

  19. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  20. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Heat flux and temperature investigation of main radiators for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Min, E-mail: alice.m.xie@icloud.com; Gao, Jianmin; Wu, Shaohua; Qin, Yukun

    2016-09-11

    The investigation on heat flux can clarify the thermal condition and explain temperature behavior on the main radiators of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). In this paper, a detailed investigation of heat flux on the AMS main radiators is proposed. The heat transfer process of the AMS main radiators is theoretically analyzed. An updated thermal model of the AMS on the International Space Station (ISS) is developed to calculate the external heat flux density on the AMS main radiators. We conclude the ISS components and operations affect on the solar flux density of the AMS main radiators by reflecting or shading solar illumination. According to the energy conservation on the AMS main radiators, the temperature variation mainly depends on the solar flux change. The investigations are conducive to reference for the long-duration thermal control of the AMS, and knowledge for the thermal conditions on the ISS.

  1. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  2. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  3. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Heat flux and temperature investigation of main radiators for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Gao, Jianmin; Wu, Shaohua; Qin, Yukun

    2016-09-01

    The investigation on heat flux can clarify the thermal condition and explain temperature behavior on the main radiators of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). In this paper, a detailed investigation of heat flux on the AMS main radiators is proposed. The heat transfer process of the AMS main radiators is theoretically analyzed. An updated thermal model of the AMS on the International Space Station (ISS) is developed to calculate the external heat flux density on the AMS main radiators. We conclude the ISS components and operations affect on the solar flux density of the AMS main radiators by reflecting or shading solar illumination. According to the energy conservation on the AMS main radiators, the temperature variation mainly depends on the solar flux change. The investigations are conducive to reference for the long-duration thermal control of the AMS, and knowledge for the thermal conditions on the ISS.

  4. Indirect dark matter search with diffuse gamma rays from the Galactic Center with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacholkowska, A.; Lamanna, G.; Nuss, E.; Bolmont, J.; Adloff, C.; Alcaraz, J.; Battiston, R.; Brun, P.; Burger, W. J.; Choutko, V.; Coignet, G.; Falvard, A.; Fiandrini, E.; Girard, L.; Goy, C.; Jedamzik, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Moultaka, G.; Natale, S.; Pochon, J.; Pohl, M.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Sapinski, M.; Sevilla Noarbe, I.; Vialle, J. P.

    2006-07-01

    The detection of nonbaryonic dark matter through its gamma-ray annihilation in the center of our galaxy has been studied. The gamma fluxes according to different models have been simulated and compared to those expected to be observed with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), during a long-term mission on board of the international space station. Under the assumption that the dark matter is composed of the lightest, stable supersymmetric particle, the neutralino, the results of the simulations in the framework of minimal supergravity models, show that with a cuspy dark matter halo profile or a clumpy halo, the annihilation gamma-ray signal would be detected by AMS. More optimistic perspectives are obtained with the anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The latter leads also to a cosmologically important Li2 abundance. Finally, the discovery potential for the massive Kaluza-Klein dark matter candidates has been evaluated and their detection looks feasible.

  5. An indirect dark matter search with diffuse gamma rays from the Galactic Centre: prospects for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Jacholkowska, A; Nuss, E; Adloff, C; Alcaraz, J; Battiston, R; Bolmont, J; Brun, P; Burger, W J; Choutko, V; Coignet, G; Falvard, A; Flandrini, E; Girard, L; Goy, C; Jedamzik, K; Kossakowski, R; Moultaka, G; Natale, S; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Rosier-Lees, S; Sapinski, M; Noarbe, I S; Vialle, J P; Vialle, JP.

    2005-01-01

    The detection of non-baryonic dark matter through its gamma-ray annihilation in the centre of our galaxy has been studied. The gamma fluxes according to different models have been simulated and compared to those expected to be observed with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), during a long-term mission on board of the International Space Station. Under the assumption that the dark matter halo is composed of the lightest, stable supersymmetric particle, the neutralino, the results of the simulations in the framework of mSUGRA models, show that with a cuspy dark matter halo or a clumpy halo, the annihilation gamma-ray signal would be detected by AMS. More optimistic perspectives are obtained with the Anomaly Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking (AMSB) model. The latter leads also to a cosmologically important 6Li abundance. Finally, the discovery potential for the massive Kaluza-Klein dark matter candidates has been evaluated and their detection looks feasible.

  6. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  7. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The results show, for the first time, that neither e+ nor e- can be described by a single power law above 27.2 and 52.3 GeV, respectively. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. The dependence of the electron and positron fluxes on time will also be discussed.

  8. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) for Extraterrestrial Study of Antimatter, Matter and Missing Matter on the International Space Station

    CERN Multimedia

    Valtonen, E; Lee, M W; Berdugo perez, J F; Borgia, B; Battarbee, M C; Valente, V; Bartoloni, A

    2002-01-01

    % RE1\\\\ \\\\ AMS is the first magnetic particle physics spectrometer to be installed on the International Space Station. With a superconducting magnetic spectrometer, AMS will provide accurate measurements of electrons, positrons, protons, antiprotons and various nuclei up to TeV region. NASA has scheduled to install this detector on the International Space Station in May 2003. The first flight of AMS was done with a permanent magnet and this prototype detector has provided accurate information on the limit of the existence of antihelium. It also showed that proton and electron -positron spectra exhibited a complicated behavior in the near earth orbit. The construction of AMS is being carried out in Switzerland, Germany, Italy, France, Finland, Spain, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Taiwan, China and the United States. NASA provides the use of the space shuttle and the space station, as well as mission management.

  9. Prof. Samuel ting presents results from AMS experiment at CERN main auditorium. Geneva 3 April 2013. The international team running the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS1) today announced the first results in its search for dark matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    Geneva 3 April 2013. The international team running the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) today announced the first results in its search for dark matter. The results, presented by AMS spokesperson Professor Samuel Ting in a seminar at CERN, are to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters. They report the observation of an excess of positrons in the cosmic ray flux

  10. New ALPHA-2 magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 21 June, members of the ALPHA collaboration celebrated the handover of the first solenoid designed for the ALPHA-2 experiment. The magnet has since been successfully installed and is working well.   Khalid Mansoor, Sumera Yamin and Jeffrey Hangst in front of the new ALPHA-2 solenoid. “This was the first of three identical solenoids that will be installed between now and September, as the rest of the ALPHA-2 device is installed and commissioned,” explains ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst. “These magnets are designed to allow us to transfer particles - antiprotons, electrons and positrons - between various parts of the new ALPHA-2 device by controlling the transverse size of the particle bunch that is being transferred.” Sumera Yamin and Khalid Mansoor, two Pakistani scientists from the National Centre for Physics in Islamabad, came to CERN in February specifically to design and manufacture these magnets. “We had the chance to work on act...

  11. Inside the ETH spectrometer magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The ETH spectrometer magnet being prepared for experiment S134, which uses a frozen spin polarized target to study the associated production of a kaon and a lambda by negative pions interacting with protons (CERN-ETH, Zurich-Helsinki-Imperial College, London-Southampton Collaboration). (See Photo Archive 7406316)

  12. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  13. First Result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: Precision Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5-350 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Alberti, G.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Anderhub, H.; Arruda, L.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Baret, B.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Basili, A.; Batalha, L.; Bates, J.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Biland, A.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bolmont, J.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Boudoul, G.; Bourquin, M.; Brun, P.; Buénerd, M.; Burger, J.; Burger, W.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, C. R.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chernoplyiokov, N.; Chikanian, A.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Commichau, V.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Costado Dios, M. T.; Coste, B.; Crespo, D.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirkoz, B.; Dennett, P.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Diao, X. H.; Diago, A.; Djambazov, L.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Dubois, J. M.; Duperay, R.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; van Es, J.; Esser, H.; Falvard, A.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Flood, K.; Foglio, R.; Fohey, M.; Fopp, S.; Fouque, N.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallilee, M.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García, J.; García-López, R.; García-Tabares, L.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gentile, S.; Gervasi, M.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Girard, L.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy-Henningsen, C.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Grechko, A.; Gross, A.; Guerri, I.; de la Guía, C.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Hauler, F.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Heilig, J.; Hermel, R.; Hofer, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Hungerford, W.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Jongmanns, M.; Journet, L.; Jungermann, L.; Karpinski, W.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Koulemzine, A.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lauritzen, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, M. W.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; León Vargas, H.; Lepareur, V.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Lipari, P.; Lin, C. H.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, Y. S.; Lucidi, S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luo, J. Z.; Lustermann, W.; Lv, S.; Madsen, J.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masciocchi, F.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Menichelli, M.; Mereu, I.; Millinger, M.; Mo, D. C.; Molina, M.; Mott, P.; Mujunen, A.; Natale, S.; Nemeth, P.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oh, S.; Oliva, A.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Park, W. H.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Pauw, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Perrin, E.; Pessina, G.; Pierschel, G.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pochon, J.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Porter, S.; Pouxe, J.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. N.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ren, Z. L.; Ricol, J. S.; Riihonen, E.; Rodríguez, I.; Roeser, U.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rossi, L.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sabellek, A.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Santos, B.; Saouter, P.; Sarchioni, M.; Schael, S.; Schinzel, D.; Schmanau, M.; Schwering, G.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Siedling, R.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Steuer, M.; Stiff, K.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Sun, X. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tassan-Viol, J.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Titus, C.; Tomassetti, N.; Toral, F.; Torsti, J.; Tsai, J. R.; Tutt, J. C.; Ulbricht, J.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vargas Trevino, M.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Vergain, M.; Verlaat, B.; Vescovi, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viertel, G.; Volpini, G.; Wang, D.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Wallraff, W.; Weng, Z. L.; Willenbrock, M.; Wlochal, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, K. Y.; Wu, Z. S.; Xiao, W. J.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. G.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, M. M.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8×106 positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ˜250GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena.

  14. First Result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: Precision Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5350 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8×106 positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron...

  15. Study and Demarcating of Electron Magnetic Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIYe-jun; SHANYu-sheng; TAOYe-zheng; CHENGYou-jian; ZHANGHai-feng

    2003-01-01

    The principle of electron magnetic spectrometer is a moving charged particle circles a central point for the Lorenz force when it moves in a steady magnetic field, at the same time, we consider the influence of gravity excursion, magnetic grads excursion and curvature excursion. Having adopted yoke iron equalizing technology and had magnetic field and gravity field at the same line.

  16. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena.

  17. What Happened with Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A

    2010-05-27

    The spectrometer solenoid is supposed to be the first magnets installed in MICE [1]-[4]. This report described what happened during the test of the MICE spectrometer solenoid 2B. First, the report describes the temperatures in the magnet, the cooler top plate and the shield during the run where the magnet quenched at 258 A. During this quench, a lead between the bottom of the HTS leads and the diode bank burned out causing the magnet to quench. Second, three methods for measuring the net heat flow into the cold mass are described. Third, there is a discussion of possible resistive heating in the HTS leads between liquid helium temperature and the copper plate, which is at about 50 K. Fourth, there is a discussion of the measured first stage heat loads in the magnet, when there is no current in the magnet. The first stage heat load calculations are based on knowing the first stage temperatures of the three two-stage pulse tube coolers and the single stage GM cooler. Fifth, the estimated heat load to the first stage when the magnet has current in it is discussed. Sixth, there is a comparison of the stage 1 heat loads in magnet 1A [5], magnet 2A [6], and magnet 2B [7]. Finally there is a discussion of recommended changes for improving the spectrometer solenoids so that the coolers can keep them cold.

  18. Development of Electron Magnetic Spectrometer and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between ultra-short pulse laser and solid plasma produces hot electron. Thereare many methods to study hot electron spectrum and space distribution. But the way of electron magnetic spectrometer is the most directional method. Particles with charge act circle movement in spare magnetic field. Different energy electrons have different whirl radius. So along whirl diameter direction electron spectrum can be obtained. Actually, electron is affected by gravity excursion and magnetic grads and curvature excursion besides lawrence power. The direction of

  19. Measurement of the cosmic $e^{+} + e^{-}$ Flux from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080883

    2014-11-14

    The measurement of positrons and electrons (e+/-) in cosmic rays provides fundamental information about the origin and the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The interest in the e measurements is enhanced by the possibility to observe indirect evidences of Dark Matter annihilation in the e spectral shapes and arrival directions. The most precise space experiment for the detection of cosmic rays is the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). AMS is a large acceptance cosmic ray detector which has been installed on the International Space Station in May 2011 to conduct an unique long-duration ( ~20 years) mission of fundamental physics research in space. In this thesis, the events collected by AMS in the first 30 months of data taking have been analyzed to measure the (e+ + e-) energy spectrum. A total of 10.6 million events have been identified as e+/- and have been used for the measurement of the (e+ + e-) flux from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV. In this thesis the AMS detection capabilities, the e+/- identifica...

  20. Magnetic suspension based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer mechanism (FTIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köker, Ingo; Langenbach, Harald; Schmid, Manfred; Lautier, Jean-Michel

    2005-07-01

    In the frame of an ESTEC technology contract the development of a Magnetically Suspended Fourier Transform Spectrometer Mechanism (FTIS) was carried out. The aim of the development is to avoid the issues found in mechanically suspended systems and to provide an active alignment and disturbance rejection capability for spectrometer applications. In the frame of FTIS an actively controlled suspension system based on the use of magnetic bearings was defined, developed and built as a demonstration model.

  1. Commissioning of the magnetic field in the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, M; Bergsma, F; Bobbink, G; Bruni, A; Chevalier, L; Ennes, P; Fleischmann, P; Fontaine, M; Formica, A; Gautard, V; Groenstege, H; Guyot, C; Hart, R; Kozanecki, W; Iengo, P; Legendre, M; Nikitina, T; Perepelkin, E; Ponsot, P; Richardson, A; Vorozhtsov, A; Vorozthsov, S

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is a general-purpose detector at the 14 TeV proton-proton Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The muon spectrometer will operate in the magnetic field provided by a large, eight-coil barrel toroid magnet bracketed by two smaller toroidal end-caps. The toroidal field is non-uniform, with an average value of about 0.5 T in the barrel region, and is monitored using three-dimensional Hall sensors which must be accurate to 1 mT. The barrel coils were installed in the cavern from 2004 to 2006, and recently powered up to their nominal current. The Hall-sensor measurements are compared with calculations to validate the magnetic models, and used to reconstruct the position and shape of the coil windings. Field perturbations by the magnetic materials surrounding the muon spectrometer are found in reasonable agreement with finite-element magnetic-field simulations.

  2. A new method of alpha ray measurement using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Y; Inoue, Y.; Minowa, M.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new method of alpha($\\alpha$)-ray measurement that detects helium atoms with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer(QMS). A demonstration is undertaken with a plastic-covered $^{241}$Am $\\alpha$-emitting source to detect $\\alpha$-rays stopped in the capsule. We successfully detect helium atoms that diffuse out of the capsule by accumulating them for one to 20 hours in a closed chamber. The detected amount is found to be proportional to the accumulation time. Our method is applicable to p...

  3. Feasibility study of fast neutron energy spectrometer using magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, Hideshi; Ara, Katsuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-09-01

    A feasibility study of a fast neutron energy spectrometer (NES) using magnetic field was performed for development of a spectrometer having a measuring range of 3 decades and a covered energy range of 8 decades. The NES that is a kind of proton recoil spectrometer consists of a proton radiator, a magnet and a screen to detect protons. The pass of each charge particle flying into the magnetic field is deflected with a certain angle depending on the velocity of the particle, and it reaches the screen of charged particle detection after passing through the magnetic field. The energy of the particle is measured from the position on the screen at which the particle collide with. In this paper, optimization of the magnet geometry and the magnetic field intensity of the NES are discussed. The NES that is designed with the optimized geometry provides the measuring range of 3 decades with an energy measuring error of less than {+-}9%. A neutron energy range of 9 decades from 0.1 (eV) to 100 (MeV) is covered by adjusting the magnetic flux density. (author)

  4. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer coupled with the Lohengrin spectrometer for fission study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Materna T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The accurate knowledge of the fission of actinides is necessary for studies of innovative nuclear reactor concepts. The fission yields have a direct influence on the evaluation of the fuel inventory or the reactor residual power after shutdown. A collaboration between the ILL, LPSC and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at ILL in order to measure the isotopic and isomeric yields. The method is illustrated using the 233U(n,f98Y reaction. However, the extracted beam from the Lohengrin spectrometer is not isobaric ions which limits the low yield measurements. Presently, the coupling of the Lohengrin spectrometer with a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM is studied at the ILL in order to define and validate the enhanced purification of the extracted beam. This work will present the results of the spectrometer characterisation, along with a comparison with a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation especially developed for this purpose.

  5. The Monitor online system of the OPERA muon magnetic spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ugolino, U.; Acquafredda, R.; Masone, v.

    2008-01-01

    The OPERA muon magnetic spectrometer has been designed for muon detection, tracking and timing. The 44 bakelite Resistive Chambers (RPC) planes, imbibed inside the magnet iron slabs, must provide the tracking of the muon curved in the magnetic field to ease the momentum and charge measurement provided by the HPT. Furthermore, it provides the momentum for muons stopping in the iron. RPC signals will be also used as start of drift tube acquisition thanks to the very good time resolution of RPC detectors. Due to the required performances the tracking detector must be fully efficient and stable. In this conditions an online monitor is mandatory to continuously control stability of run conditions. We report the main characteristics and performances of the monitor system for the OPERA spectrometer and capabilities of the software developed for settings and data acquisition.

  6. Apollo lunar orbital sciences program alpha and X-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The development of the alpha and X-ray spectrometers which were used on the Apollo 15 and 16 flights is discussed. Specific subjects presented are: (1) lunar program management, (2) scientific and technical approach, (3) major test programs, (4) reliability, quality assurance, and safety, and (5) subcontract management.

  7. Alpha particles spectrometer with photodiode PIN; Espectrometro de particulas alfa con fotodiodo PIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon R, A.; Hernandez V, R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares e Ingenieria Electrica, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 09869 Zacatecas (Mexico); Ramirez G, J. [Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografia e Informatica, Direccion General de Innovacion y Tecnologia de Informacion, Av. Heroes de Nacozari Sur 2301, Fracc. Jardines del Parque, 20276 Aguascalientes (Mexico)], e-mail: achruiz@hotmail.com

    2009-10-15

    The radiation propagates in form of electromagnetic waves or corpuscular radiation; if the radiation energy causes ionization in environment that crosses it is considered ionizing radiation. To detect radiation several detectors types are used, if the radiation are alpha particles are used detectors proportional type or trace elements. In this work the design results, construction and tests of an alpha particles spectrometer are presented, which was designed starting from a photodiode PIN type. The system design was simulated with a code for electronic circuits. With results of simulation phase was constructed the electronic phase that is coupled to a multichannel analyzer. The resulting electronic is evaluated analyzing the electronic circuit performance before an alphas triple source and alpha radiation that produce two smoke detectors of domestic use. On the tests phase we find that the system allows obtain, in a multichannel, the pulses height spectrum, with which we calibrate the system. (Author)

  8. Services for a large warm spectrometer magnet : the LHC dipole magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Ridewood, J

    2005-01-01

    A summary of the general service requirements for a large warm dipole magnet and the challenges and issues associated with their installation will be presented. The LHCb spectrometer magnet will be used as an example, covering principally the power supply, cabling and cooling water system from conception to realisation and commissioning.

  9. Recent experiments in inverse kinematics with the magnetic spectrometer PRISMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioretto E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last period, two classes of experiments have been carried out with the large acceptance magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. In particular, the one- and two-neutron transfer processes at energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to deep below it and the population of exotic neutron rich nuclei in the A~130 and A~200 mass regions have been studied. Both kinds of experiments have been performed in inverse kinematics identifying in A, Z and velocity the light target-like recoils with PRISMA placed at very forward angles in order to have, at the same time, high efficiency and good energy and mass resolutions.

  10. Magnetic resonance spectrometer with a dc SQUID detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C.; Chang, J.; Pines, A.

    1990-03-01

    We describe a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based magnetic resonance spectrometer particularly suited to measurements in the frequency range of 100 kHz to several megahertz. Results are presented for nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of boron-11 in boron nitride at 4.2 K, yielding ωQ =1467±2 kHz. We also present a direct measurement of the methyl group tunneling frequency, ωt =210±10 kHz, of propionic acid in low field, at 4.2 K.

  11. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, C. G.; Canfield, M. J.; Graeper, G. B.; Lombardo, A. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Padalino, S. J. [Physics Department, SUNY Geneseo, Geneseo, New York 14454 (United States); Fiksel, G.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW.

  12. Mapping alpha-Particle X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (Map-X)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bristow, T.

    2014-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes (like physical and chemical weathering, water activity, diagenesis, low-temperature or impact metamorphism, and biogenic activity) leave traces of their actions as features in the size range 10s to 100s of micron. The Mapping alpha-particle X-ray Spectrometer ("Map-X") is intended to provide chemical imaging at 2 orders of magnitude higher spatial resolution than previously flown instruments, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks.

  13. Chemistry of Rocks and Soils in Gusev Crater from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R. C.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G. W.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater.

  14. Spectrometer magnet for experiment NA4 (deep inelastic muon scattering)

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This is one section of the toroidal-field spectrometer magnet of experiment NA4 (deep inelastic muon scattering), shown here during the installation period and later located in the North Area of the SPS. To see all 4 sections, select 7709201. Igor Savin from Dubna looks at what his lab had provided: the huge iron disks were machined at and provided by Dubna. Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers were installed in the gaps between the packs of 4 disks. When the beam from the SPS struck the target (to the right in this picture), the iron would quickly stop the hadronic shower, whilst the muons would go on, performing oscillations in the toroidal field. NA4 was a CERN-Dubna-Munich-Saclay (later also Bologna) collaboration, spokesman: Carlo Rubbia.

  15. Use of mercuric iodide X-ray detectors with alpha backscattering spectrometers for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Wang, Y. J.; Dorri, N.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra of different extraterrestrial samples taken with a mercuric iodide (HgI2) spectrometer inserted into an alpha backscattering instrument identical to that used in the Soviet Phobos mission. The results obtained with the HgI2 ambient temperature detector are compared with those obtained using an Si(Li) cryogenically cooled detector. Efforts to design an optimized instrument for space application are also described. The results presented indicate that the energy resolution and sensitivity of HgI2 detectors are adequate to meet the performance needs of a number of proposed space applications, particularly those in which cooled silicon X-ray detectors are impractical or even not usable, such as for the target science programs on geoscience opportunities for lunar surface, Mars surface, and other comet and planetary missions being planned by NASA and ESA.

  16. Results of the Alpha-Particle-X-Ray Spectrometer on Board of the Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, R.; Zipfel, J.; Brueckner, J.; Dreibus, G.; Lugmair, G.; Rieder, R.; Waenke, H.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity landed at Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is part of the instrument suite on both rovers. It is equipped with six 244Cm sources which provide x-ray excitation with alpha-particles (PIXE) and x-ray radiation (XRF). This combination allows x-ray spectroscopy of elements from Na to Br in the energy range of 0.9 to 16 keV. X-ray detectors with a high energy resolution of 160 eV at Fe K allow us to separate even closely spaced energy peaks, such as Na, Mg, Al and Si. The APXS is attached to the rover s arm and provides in-situ measurements of the chemical composition of soils, surfaces of rocks and outcrops and their abraded surfaces. This abstract gives an overview of APXS results obtained during the first year of operation on both landing sites.

  17. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J A; Hilsabeck, T J; Wink, C W; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C; Gatu Johnson, M; Kilkenny, J D; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ∼20 ps and energy resolution of ∼100 keV for total neutron yields above ∼10(16). At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ∼20 ps.

  18. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ˜20 ps and energy resolution of ˜100 keV for total neutron yields above ˜1016. At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ˜20 ps.

  19. Technical Design Report for the PANDA Solenoid and Dipole Spectrometer Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Erni, W; Krusche, B; Steinacher, M; Heng, Y; Liu, Z; Liu, H; Shen, X; Wang, O; Xu, H; Becker, J; Feldbauer, F; Heinsius, F -H; Held, T; Koch, H; Kopf, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Wiedner, U; Zhong, J; Bianconi, A; Bragadireanu, M; Pantea, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; De Napoli, M; Giacoppo, F; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Sfienti, C; Bialkowski, E; Budzanowski, A; Czech, B; Kistryn, M; Kliczewski, S; Kozela, A; Kulessa, P; Pysz, K; Schäfer, W; Siudak, R; Szczurek, A; zycki, W Czy; Domagala, M; Hawryluk, M; Lisowski, E; Lisowski, F; Wojnar, L; Gil, D; Hawranek, P; Kamys, B; Kistryn, St; Korcyl, K; Krzemien, W; Magiera, A; Moskal, P; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Smyrski, J; Wronska, A; Al-Turany, M; Augustin, I; Deppe, H; Flemming, H; Gerl, J; Goetzen, K; Hohler, R; Lehmann, D; Lewandowski, B; Lühning, J; Maas, F; Mishra, D; Orth, H; Peters, K; Saitô, T; Schepers, G; Schmidt, C J; Schmitt, L; Schwarz, C; Voss, B; Wieczorek, P; Wilms, A; Brinkmann, K -T; Freiesleben, H; Jaekel, R; Kliemt, R; Wuerschig, T; Zaunick, H -G; Abazov, V M; Alexeev, G; Arefev, A; Astakhov, V I; Barabanov, M Yu; Batyunya, B V; Davydov, Yu I; Dodokhov, V Kh; Efremov, A A; Fedunov, A G; Feshchenko, A A; Galoyan, A S; Grigorian, S; Karmokov, A; Koshurnikov, E K; Kudaev, V Ch; Lobanov, V I; Lobanov, Yu Yu; Makarov, A F; Malinina, L V; Malyshev, V L; Mustafaev, G A; Olshevski, A; Pasyuk, M A; Perevalova, E A; Piskun, A A; Pocheptsov, T A; Pontecorvo, G; Rodionov, V K; Rogov, Yu N; Salmin, R A; Samartsev, A G; Sapozhnikov, M G; Shabratova, A; Shabratova, G S; Skachkova, A N; Skachkov, N B; Strokovsky, E A; Suleimanov, M K; Teshev, R Sh; Tokmenin, V V; Uzhinsky, V V; Vodopyanov, A S; Zaporozhets, S A; Zhuravlev, N I; Zorin, A G; Branford, D; Föhl, K; Glazier, D; Watts, D; Woods, P; Eyrich, W; Lehmann, A; Teufel, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K; Tann, B; Tomaradze, A G; Bettoni, D; Carassiti, V; Cecchi, A; Dalpiaz, P; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Negrini, M; Savri`e, M; Stancari, G; Dulach, B; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Lucherini, V; Pace, E; Bersani, A; Macri, M; Marinelli, M; Parodi, R F; Brodski, I; Döring, W; Drexler, P; Düren, M; Gagyi-Palffy, Z; Hayrapetyan, A; Kotulla, M; Kühn, W; Lange, S; Liu, M; Metag, V; Nanova, M; Novotny, R; Salz, C; Schneider, J; Schoenmeier, P; Schubert, R; Spataro, S; Stenzel, H; Strackbein, C; Thiel, M; Thoering, U; Yang, S; Clarkson, T; Cowie, E; Downie, E; Hill, G; Hoek, M; Ireland, D; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Lehmann, I; Livingston, K; Lumsden, S; MacGregor, D; McKinnon, B; Murray, M; Protopopescu, D; Rosner, G; Seitz, B; Yang, G; Babai, M; Biegun, A K; Bubak, A; Guliyev, E; Jothi, V S; Kavatsyuk, M; Löhner, H; Messchendorp, J; Smit, H; van der Weele, J C; García, F; Riska, D -O; Büscher, M; Dosdall, R; Dzhygadlo, R; Gillitzer, A; Grunwald, D; Jha, V; Kemmerling, G; Kleines, H; Lehrach, A; Maier, R; Mertens, M; Ohm, H; Prasuhn, D; Randriamalala, T; Ritman, J; Roeder, M; Stockmanns, T; Wintz, P; Wüstner, P; Kisiel, J; Li, S; Li, Z; Sun, Z; Xu, H; Fissum, S; Hansen, K; Isaksson, L; Lundin, M; Schröder, B; Achenbach, P; Espi, M C Mora; Pochodzalla, J; Sanchez, S; Sanchez-Lorente, A; Dormenev, V I; Fedorov, A A; Korzhik, M V; Missevitch, O V; Balanutsa, V; Chernetsky, V; Demekhin, A; Dolgolenko, A; Fedorets, P; Gerasimov, A; Goryachev, V; Boukharov, A; Malyshev, O; Marishev, I; Semenov, A; Hoeppner, C; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Mann, A; Neubert, S; Paul, S; Weitzel, Q; Khoukaz, A; Rausmann, T; Täschner, A; Wessels, J; Varma, R; Baldin, E; Kotov, K; Peleganchuk, S; Tikhonov, Yu; Boucher, J; Hennino, T; Kunne, R; Ong, S; Pouthas, J; Ramstein, B; Rosier, P; Sudol, M; Van de Wiele, J; Zerguerras, T; Dmowski, K; Korzeniewski, R; Przemyslaw, D; Slowinski, B; Boca, G; Braghieri, A; Costanza, S; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Lavezzi, L; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Belikov, N I; Davidenko, A M; Derevshchikov, A A; Goncharenko, Yu M; Grishin, V N; Kachanov, V A; Konstantinov, D A; Kormilitsin, V A; Kravtsov, V I; Matulenko, Yu A; Melnik, Y M; Meshchanin, A P; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V V; Morozov, D A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Ryazantsev, A V; Semenov, P A; Soloviev, L F; Uzunian, A V; Vasilev, A N; Yakutin, A E; Baeck, T; Cederwall, B; Bargholtz, C; Geren, L; Tegnér, P E; Belostotskii, S; Gavrilov, G; Itzotov, A; Kiselev, A; Kravchenko, P; Manaenkov, S; Miklukho, O; Naryshkin, Yu; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Zhadanov, A; Fava, L; Panzieri, D; Alberto, D; Amoroso, A; Botta, E; Bressani, T; Bufalino, S; Bussa, M P; Busso, L; De Mori, F; Destefanis, M; Ferrero, L; Grasso, A; Greco, M; Kugathasan, T; Maggiora, M; Marcello, S; Serbanut, G; Sosio, S; Bertini, R; Calvo, D; Coli, S; De Remigis, P; Feliciello, A; Filippi, A; Giraudo, G; Mazza, G; Rivetti, A; Szymanska, K; Tosello, F; Wheadon, R; Morra, O; Agnello, M; Iazzi, F; Szymanska, K; Birsa, R; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Martin, A

    2009-01-01

    This document is the Technical Design Report covering the two large spectrometer magnets of the PANDA detector set-up. It shows the conceptual design of the magnets and their anticipated performance. It precedes the tender and procurement of the magnets and, hence, is subject to possible modifications arising during this process.

  20. Technical Design Report for the PANDA Solenoid and Dipole Spectrometer Magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I; Krusche, B.

    2009-01-01

    This document is the Technical Design Report covering the two large spectrometer magnets of the PANDA detector set-up. It shows the conceptual design of the magnets and their anticipated performance. It precedes the tender and procurement of the magnets and, hence, is subject to possible modificatio

  1. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  2. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Results from Gusev Crater and Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B.; Dreibus, G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.; Waenke, H.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.; Squyres, S.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of rocks and soils on Mars analyzed during the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit Mission was determined by X-ray analyses with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). Details of the data analysis method and the instrument calibration are presented. Measurements performed on Mars to address geometry effects and background contributions are shown. Cross calibration measurements among several instrument sensors and sources are discussed. An unintentional swap of the two flight instruments is evaluated. New concentration data acquired during the first 470 sols of rover Spirit in Gusev Crater are presented. There are two geological regions, the Gusev plains and the Columbia Hills. The plains contain soils that are very similar to previous landing sites on Mars. A meteoritic component in the soil is identified. Rocks in the plains revealed thin weathering rinds. The underlying abraded rock was classified as primitive basalt. One of these rocks contained significant Br that is probably associated with vein-filling material of different composition. One of the trenches showed large subsurface enrichments of Mg, S, and Br. Disturbed soils and rocks in the Columbia Hills revealed different elemental compositions. These rocks are significantly weathered and enriched in mobile elements, such as P, S, Cl, or Br. Even abraded rock surfaces have high Br concentrations. Thus, in contrast to the rocks and soils in the Gusev Plains, the Columbia Hills material shows more significant evidence of ancient aqueous alteration.

  3. FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray spectrometer: Development of an instrumented gas-filled magnetic spectrometer at the ILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, A.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Jentschel, M.; Kessedjian, G.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Panebianco, S.; Sage, C.; Urban, W.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate thermal neutron-induced fission data are important for applications in reactor physics as well as for fundamental nuclear physics. FIPPS is the new FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray Spectrometer being developed at the Institut Laue Langevin for neutron-induced fission studies. FIPPS is based on the combination of a large Germanium detector array surrounding a fission target, a Time-Of-Flight detector and a Gas-Filled Magnet (GFM) to identify mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy of one of the fission fragments. The GFM will be instrumented with a Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) for individual 3D tracking of the fragments. A conceptual design study of the new spectrometer is presented.

  4. The magnetic shielding for the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrad, Gertrud, E-mail: gkonrad@ati.ac.at [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Technische Universität Wien, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Wien (Austria); Ayala Guardia, Fidel [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Baeßler, Stefan [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Borg, Michael [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Glück, Ferenc [Institute for Nuclear Physics (IKP), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O.B. 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Wigner Research Institute for Physics, P.O.B. 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Heil, Werner [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Hiebel, Stefan [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Sekels GmbH, Dieselstraße 6, D-61239 Ober-Mörlen (Germany); Muñoz Horta, Raquel; Sobolev, Yury [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-12-11

    Many experiments in nuclear and neutron physics are confronted with the problem that they use a superconducting magnetic spectrometer which potentially affects other experiments by their stray magnetic field. The retardation spectrometer aSPECT consists, inter alia, of a superconducting magnet system that produces a strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 6.2 T. In order not to disturb other experiments in the vicinity of aSPECT, we had to develop a magnetic field return yoke for the magnet system. While the return yoke must reduce the stray magnetic field, the internal magnetic field and its homogeneity should not be affected. As in many cases, the magnetic shielding for aSPECT must manage with limited space. In addition, we must ensure that the additional magnetic forces on the magnet coils are not destructive. In order to determine the most suitable geometry for the magnetic shielding for aSPECT, we simulated a variety of possible geometries and combinations of shielding materials of non-linear permeability. The results of our simulations were checked through magnetic field measurements both with Hall and nuclear magnetic resonance probes. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated values: the mean deviation from the simulated exterior magnetic field is (−1.7±4.8)%. However, in the two critical regions, the internal magnetic field deviates by 0.2% (decay volume) and <1×10{sup −4} (analyzing plane) from the simulated values.

  5. Computation of the magnetic field of a spectrometer in detectors region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, E.P. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Yuldasheva, M.B. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Yudin, I.P. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Yuldashev, O.I. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-11

    Computed results of the 3D magnetic field of a spectrometer intended for investigation of hadron production of charmed particles and the indication of the narrow resonances in neutron-nucleus interactions are presented. The methods used in computations: finite element method and finite element method with suggested new infinite elements are described. For accuracy control the computations were carried out on a sequence of three-dimensional meshes. Special attention is devoted to behaviour of the magnetic field in the basic detector (proportional chambers) region. The performed results can be used for the field behaviour estimate of similar spectrometer magnets. (orig.).

  6. Design and performance analysis of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for DT neutrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Jian-Min; ZHOU Lin; JIANG Shi-Lun

    2011-01-01

    A magnetic proton recoil (MPR) spectrometer is a novel instrument with superior performance, including high energy resolution, high count rate and good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for measurements of neutron spectra from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments and high power Tokomaks. In this work, the design of a compact MPR spectrometer (cMPR) was evaluated for deuteron-tritium (DT) neutron spectroscopy. The characteristics of the spectrometer were analyzed using 2-D beam transport simulations, 3-D particle transport calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations. Based on the theoretical results, an instrument design that satisfies special experimental requirements is proposed. The energy resolution and efficiency of the spectrometer are also evaluated. The results indicate that the proposed cMPR spectrometer would achieve a detection efficiency and energy resolution of approximately 10 and 4%, respectively, for DT neutrons.

  7. Magnetic interaction in oxygenated alpha Fe-phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmann, Ernő, E-mail: kuzmann@caesar.elte.hu; Homonnay, Zoltán; Horváth, Attila [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, P.O. Box 32, 1512 Budapest (Hungary); Pechousek, Jiri; Cuda, Jan; Machala, Libor; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Zboril, Radek [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Departments of Experimental Physics and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science Palacky University, 17. Listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Yin, Houping; Wei, Yen [Department of Chemistry, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Klencsár, Zoltán [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, 1117 (Hungary); Kubuki, Shiro [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Nath, Amar [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Asheville, NC 28804 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Alpha iron phthalocyanines (α-FePc) oxygenated at low temperatures were investigated with the help of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements (SQUID) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that upon oxygenation of α-FePc, new species were formed which could be associated with Fe{sup III}Pc oxygen adducts. Unexpectedly, magnetically split spectrum of oxygenated α-FePc was observed below 20 K. In-field Mössbauer spectra in a 5 T external magnetic field at 5K and magnetization measurements indicate antiferromagnetic coupling in oxygenated α-FePc.

  8. Alpha Channeling in Open-System Magnetic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, Nathaniel [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-06-19

    The Grant DE-SC0000736, Alpha Channeling in Open-System Magnetic Devices, is a continuation of the Grant DE-FG02-06ER54851, Alpha Channeling in Mirror Machines. In publications funded by DE-SC0000736, the grant DE-FG02-06ER54851 was actually credited. The key results obtained under Grant DE-SC0000736, Alpha Channeling in Open-System Magnetic Devices, appear in a series of publications. The earlier effort under DE-FG02- 06ER54851 was the subject of a previous Final Report. The theme of this later effort has been unusual confinement effects, or de-confinement effects, in open-field magnetic confinement devices. First, the possibilities in losing axisymmetry were explored. Then a number of issues in rotating plasma were addressed. Most importantly, a spinoff application to plasma separations was recognized, which also resulted in a provisional patent application. (That provisional patent application, however, was not pursued further.) Alpha channeling entails injecting waves into magnetically confined plasma to release energy from one particular ion while ejecting that ion. The ejection of the ion is actually a concomitant effect in releasing energy from the ion to the wave. In rotating plasma, there is the opportunity to store the energy in a radial electric field rather than in waves. In other words, the ejected alpha particle loses its energy to the radial potential, which in turn produces plasma rotation. This is a very useful effect, since producing radial electric fields by other means are technologically more difficult. In fact, one can heat ions, and then eject them, to produce the desired radial field. In each case, there is a separation effect of different ions, which generalizes the original alpha-channeling concept of separating alpha ash from hydrogen. In a further generalization of the separation concept, a double-well filter represents a new way to produce high-throughput separations of ions, potentially useful for nuclear waste remediation.

  9. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  10. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  11. Automated Grouping of Opportunity Rover Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer Compositional Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBommel, S. J.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schroder, C.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) conducts high-precision in situ measurements of rocks and soils on both active NASA Mars rovers. Since 2004 the rover Opportunity has acquired around 440 unique APXS measurements, including a wide variety of compositions, during its 42+ kilometers traverse across several geological formations. Here we discuss an analytical comparison algorithm providing a means to cluster samples due to compositional similarity and the resulting automated classification scheme. Due to the inherent variance of elements in the APXS data set, each element has an associated weight that is inversely proportional to the variance. Thus, the more consistent the abundance of an element in the data set, the more it contributes to the classification. All 16 elements standard to the APXS data set are considered. Careful attention is also given to the errors associated with the composition measured by the APXS - larger uncertainties reduce the weighting of the element accordingly. The comparison of two targets, i and j, generates a similarity score, S(sub ij). This score is immediately comparable to an average ratio across all elements if one assumes standard weighted uncertainty. The algorithm facilitates the classification of APXS targets by chemistry alone - independent of target appearance and geological context which can be added later as a consistency check. For the N targets considered, a N by N hollow matrix, S, is generated where S = S(sup T). The average relation score, S(sub av), for target N(sub i) is simply the average of column i of S. A large S(sub av) is indicative of a unique sample. In such an instance any targets with a low comparison score can be classified alike. The threshold between classes requires careful consideration. Applying the algorithm to recent Marathon Valley targets indicates similarities with Burns formation and average-Mars-like rocks encountered earlier at Endeavour Crater as well as a new class of felsic rocks.

  12. Magnetic fluctuations in nanosized goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, D E; Frandsen, C; Moerup, S [Department of Physics, Building 307, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Cervera-Gontard, L; Dunin-Borkowski, R E [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Building 307, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kasama, T [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Koch, C B [Department of Natural Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Hansen, M F [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: Mikkel.Hansen@nanotech.dtu.dk

    2009-01-07

    Moessbauer spectra of antiferromagnetic goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) particles usually show an asymmetric line broadening, which increases with increasing temperature, although the magnetic anisotropy is expected to be so large that magnetic relaxation effects should be negligible. By use of high resolution transmission electron microscopy we have studied a sample of goethite particles and have found that the particles contain many defects such as low angle grain boundaries, in accordance with previous studies of other samples of goethite particles. Such defects can result in a magnetic mismatch at the grain boundaries between nanometer-sized grains, leading to a weakened magnetic coupling between the grains. We show that the Moessbauer data of goethite can be explained by fluctuations of the sublattice magnetization directions in such weakly coupled grains. It is likely that the influence of defects such as low angle grain boundaries also plays a role with regards to the magnetic properties in other antiferromagnetic nanograin systems. We discuss the results in relation to Moessbauer studies of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiO nanoparticles.

  13. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianfu, E-mail: zhangjfu@gmail.com; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China); Qiu, Suizheng, E-mail: szqiu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Guoguang [Applied Institute of Nuclear Technology, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China)

    2015-12-15

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10{sup −7} at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  14. Characteristics of the magnetic analysis system for a compact MPR-type spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Jian-Min; ZHOU Lin; JIANG Shi-Lun; PENG Tai-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic proton recoil(MPR)spectrometer is a novel diagnostic instrument with high perfor-mance for measurements of neutron spectra in inertial confinement fusion(ICF)experiments and high power fusion devices.A compact MPR-type spectrometer dedicated to the research of pulsed deuterium-tritium(DT)neutron spectroscopy of special experimental conditions is currently under design.Analyses of the main parameters and performance of the magnetic analysis system through 3-D particle transport calculations and MonteCarlo simulations and calibration of the system performance as a test using CR-39 solid track detector and α particle from 239pu and 226Ra radioactive sources are presented in this paper.The results indicate that the magnetic analysis system will achieve a detection efficiency level of 10-5-10-4 at an energy resolution of 1.5%-2.1%,and fulfills the design goals of the spectrometer.

  15. Technique for 1st order design of a large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Cunsolo, A; Foti, A; Lazzaro, A; Melita, A L; Nociforo, C; Shchepunov, V A; Winfield, J S

    2002-01-01

    A general scheme of the layout of a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer based on a wide aperture quadrupole and a multipurpose bending magnet is described. Physical quantities such as momentum resolution, focal plane size and inclination are explicitly represented as functions of transport matrix elements. In this way such quantities are directly related to the parameters defining the configuration of the spectrometer. Realistic assumptions on the shapes, the distances and the fields of the magnetic elements are taken into account in order to limit the parameter space to be spanned. A self-consistent technique simplifies the search for the best configuration and avoids the problem of ending in local minima. This technique is applied to the MAGNEX spectrometer, for which two competitive configurations, characterised by different bending angle, are found and discussed.

  16. Design of a preamplifier for an alpha particles spectrometer; Diseno de un preamplificador para un espectrometro de particulas alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murillo O, R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Chacon R, A.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.co [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares e Ingenieria Electrica, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    To detect radiation diverse detector types are used, when these are alpha particles proportional type detectors are used, semiconductor, of scintillation or traces. In this work the design results, the construction and the first tests of a spectrometer (preamplifier) are presented for alpha particles that was designed starting from a Pin type photodiode. The system was designed and simulated with a program for electronic circuits. With the results of the simulation phase was constructed the electronics that is coupled to a spectroscopic amplifier and a multichannel analyzer. The total of the system is evaluated analyzing its performance before a triple source of alphas and that they are produced by two smoke detectors of domestic use. Of the tests phase we find that the system allows to obtain in a multichannel, the pulses height spectrum, with which we calibrate the system. (Author)

  17. Pattern recognition on brain magnetic resonance imaging in alpha dystroglycanopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Parayil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha dystroglycanopathies are heterogeneous group of disorders both phenotypically and genetically. A subgroup of these patients has characteristic brain imaging findings. Four patients with typical imaging findings of alpha dystroglycanopathy are reported. Phenotypic features included: global developmental delay, contractures, hypotonia and oculomotor abnormalities in all. Other manifestations were consanguinity (3, seizures (3, macrocephaly (1, microcephaly (3, retinal changes (2 and hypogenitalism (2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed polymicrogyria, white matter changes, pontine hypoplasia, and subcortical cerebellar cysts in all the patients, ventriculomegaly, callosal abnormalities, and absent septum pellucidum in two and Dandy -Walker variant malformation in three. Magnetic resonace imaging of the first cousin of one the patient had the same characteristic imaging features. Brain imaging findings were almost identical despite heterogeneity in clinical presentation and histopathological features. Pattern recognition of MR imaging features may serve as a clue to the diagnosis of alpha dystroglycanopathy.

  18. The magnetic shielding for the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    CERN Document Server

    Konrad, Gertrud; Baeßler, Stefan; Borg, Michael; Glück, Ferenc; Heil, Werner; Hiebel, Stefan; Horta, Raquel Munoz; Sobolev, Yury

    2014-01-01

    Many experiments in nuclear and neutron physics are confronted with the problem that they use a superconducting magnetic spectrometer which potentially affects other experiments by their stray magnetic field. The retardation spectrometer aSPECT consists, inter alia, of a superconducting magnet system that produces a strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 6.2T. In order not to disturb other experiments in the vicinity of aSPECT, we had to develop a magnetic field return yoke for the magnet system. While the return yoke must reduce the stray magnetic field, the internal magnetic field and its homogeneity should not be affected. As in many cases, the magnetic shielding for aSPECT must manage with limited space. In addition, we must ensure that the additional magnetic forces on the magnet coils are not destructive. In order to determine the most suitable geometry for the magnetic shielding for aSPECT, we simulated a variety of possible geometries and combinations of shielding materials of non-linear permeabi...

  19. New approach to determine the angular transmission in zero-degree magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benlliure, J.; Pereira-Conca, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Schmidt, K.H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2000-11-01

    A new method to estimate the angular transmission in zero-degree magnetic spectrometers is presented. This method is based on a parameterisation of the angular aperture of the spectrometer for any possible value of the magnetic rigidity of the transmitted particles. This parameterisation of the angular aperture together with a description of the kinematics of the reaction mechanism allows to determine the angular transmission analytically, avoiding tedious Monte-Carlo calculations. The analytical solutions are implemented for residual nuclei produced in fission, projectile-fragmentation and fusion-evaporation reactions. (orig.)

  20. New approach to determine the angular transmission in zero-degree magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benlliure, J. E-mail: j.benlliure@usc.es; Pereira-Conca, J.; Schmidt, K.-H

    2002-02-11

    A new method to estimate the angular transmission in zero-degree magnetic spectrometers is presented. This method is based on a parameterisation of the angular aperture of the spectrometer for any possible value of the magnetic rigidity of the transmitted particles. This parameterisation of the angular aperture together with a description of the kinematics of the reaction mechanism allows to determine the angular transmission analytically, avoiding tedious Monte-Carlo calculations. The analytical solutions are implemented for residual nuclei produced in fission, projectile-fragmentation and fusion-evaporation reactions.

  1. An optically detected magnetic resonance spectrometer with tunable laser excitation and wavelength resolved infrared detection

    CERN Document Server

    Negyedi, M; Gyüre, B; Dzsaber, S; Kollarics, S; Rohringer, P; Pichler, T; Simon, F

    2016-01-01

    We present the development and performance of an optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) spectrometer. The spectrometer represents advances over similar instruments in three areas: i) the exciting light is a tunable laser source which covers much of the visible light range, ii) the optical signal is analyzed with a spectrograph, iii) the emitted light is detected in the near-infrared domain. The need to perform ODMR experiments on single-walled carbon nanotubes motivated the present development and we demonstrate the utility of the spectrometer on this material. The performance of the spectrometer is critically compared to similar instruments. The present development opens the way to perform ODMR studies on various new materials such as molecules and luminescent quantum dots where the emission is in the near-infrared range and requires a well-defined excitation wavelength and analysis of the scattered light.

  2. What Caused the Lead burn-out in Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A

    2010-11-29

    The spectrometer solenoids are supposed to be the first magnets installed in the MICE Cooling Channel. The results of the test of Spectrometer Magnet 2B are reported in a previous MICE Note. Magnet 2B was tested with all five coils connected in series. The magnet failed because a lead to coil M2 failed before it could be trained to its full design current of 275 A. First, this report describes the condition of the magnet when the lead failure occurred. The lead that failed was between the cold mass feed-through and the heavy lead that connected to coil M2 and the quench protection diodes. It is believed that the lead failed because the minimum propagation zone (MPZ) length was too short. The quench was probably triggered by lead motion in the field external to the magnet center coil. The effect of heat transfer on quench propagation and MPZ length is discussed. The MPZ length is compared for a number of cases that apply to the spectrometer solenoid 2B as built and as it has been repaired. The required heat transfer coefficient for cryogenic stability and the quench propagation velocity along the leads are compared for various parts of the Magnet leads inside the cold mass cryostat. The effect of the insulation on leads on heat transfer is and stability is discussed.

  3. A magnetic-free high-resolution parabolic mirror time-of-flight electron energy spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张戈; 沈鸿元; 曾瑞荣; 黄呈辉; 林文雄; 黄见洪

    2001-01-01

    The principle and structure of a magnetic-free high-resolution high-efficiency parabolic mirror time-offligght electron energy spectrometer are presented. The electron energy spectrum of Nz in a flight tube is measured using a 105 fs Ti:sappbire laser under different gas pressures.

  4. A 5 tesla superconducting magnet and cryostats for an EPR/FMR spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuvekamp, E.M.C.M.; Gerritsma, G.J.; Kate, ten H.H.J.; Klundert, van de L.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of the cryogenic part of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectrometer using Ka-band (26.5-40 GHz) and U-band (40-60 GHz) frequencies for resonance measurements on large magnetic thin-films. The unit has two cryostats; the first has a room

  5. DC SQUID Spectrometers for Nuclear Quadrupole and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TonThat, Dinh M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUJD) is a very sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order of 1 μΦ0Hz-1/2 at liquid helium temperature (Φ0=h/2e). This inherent flux sensitivity of the SQUID is used in a spectrometer for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR.)and nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR). The processing magnetic field from the nuclear spins is coupled to the SQUID by mean of a flux transformer. The SQUID NMR spectrometer is used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of solid 129Xe at 4.2 K down to 0.1 mT.

  6. Energy distributions from a racetrack microtron measured with a magnetic spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorcini, B B; Rosander, S

    1993-01-01

    Energy spectra of accelerated electron beams from a racetrack microtron were measured using a magnetic spectrometer. The spectrometer utilized a 90 degrees dipole magnet. A ray-tracing program was developed to determine the slit positions of the spectrometer based on a detailed map of the magnetic field measured at field strengths corresponding to about 20 and 50 MeV. The total a priori uncertainty (previously often called systematic or class B uncertainty) of the measured most probable energy Ep is 0.22% (one approximate standard deviation) and the a posteriori uncertainty (previously often called random or class A uncertainty) is 0.04% (1 sigma). The estimated energy resolution (delta E/E) of the spectrometer is 4 x 10(-4). Spectral energy distributions of the electron beam were measured at a Ep = 21.1 and 51.6 MeV, and the obtained full width at half-maximum of the energy distributions were 53 and 34 keV, respectively. All the measurements were performed in vacuum to minimize the influence of electron energy loss and scatter.

  7. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer within the FIPPS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Faust, H.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Méplan, O.; Sage, C.; Serot, O.

    2016-06-01

    The Fission Product Prompt γ -ray Spectrometer, FIPPS, is under development to enable prompt γ -ray spectroscopy correlated with fission fragment identification. This will open new possibilities in the study of fission and of nuclear structure of neutron rich nuclei. FIPPS will consist of an array of γ and neutron detectors coupled with a fission fragment filter. The chosen solution for the filter is a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM). Both experimental and modeling work was performed in order to extract the key parameters of such a device and design the future GFM of the FIPPS project. Experiments performed with a GFM behind the LOHENGRIN spectrometer demonstrated the capability of additional beam purification.

  8. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeters for the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Mkrtchyan, H; Tadevosyan, V; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Christy, M E; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Gaskell, D; Horn, T; Jones, M K; Keppel, C E; Mack, D J; Malace, S P; Mkrtchyan, A; Niculescu, M I; Seely, J; Tvaskis, V; Wood, S A; Zhamkochyan, S

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeters of the various magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers design considerations, relevant construction information, and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are included. The energy resolution of the HMS and SOS calorimeters is better than $\\sigma/E \\sim 6%/\\sqrt E $, and pion/electron ($\\pi/e$) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1 -- 5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and simulated energy resolutions, but simulations systematically exceed experimentally determined $\\pi^-$ suppression factors by close to a factor of two. For the SHMS spectrometer presently under construction details on the design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is predicted over the full momentum range of the SHMS. Good electron/hadron separation is anticipated by combining the energy deposited in an initial...

  9. Simulations of the anisotropic kinetic and magnetic alpha effects

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A

    2007-01-01

    The validity of a closure called the minimal tau approximation (MTA), is tested in the context of dynamo theory, wherein triple correlations are assumed to provide relaxation of the turbulent electromotive force. Under MTA, the alpha effect in mean field dynamo theory becomes proportional to a relaxation time scale multiplied by the difference between kinetic and current helicities. It is shown that the value of the relaxation time is positive and, in units of the turnover time at the forcing wavenumber, it is of the order of unity. It is quenched by the magnetic field -- roughly independently of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, this independence becomes uncertain at large magnetic Reynolds number. Kinetic and current helicities are shown to be dominated by large scale properties of the flow.

  10. A digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using digital signal processor and field programmable gate array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Binghe, Sun; Yueping, Ma; Ruyan, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    A digital spectrometer for low-field magnetic resonance imaging is described. A digital signal processor (DSP) is utilized as the pulse programmer on which a pulse sequence is executed as a subroutine. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices that are logically mapped into the external addressing space of the DSP work as auxiliary controllers of gradient control, radio frequency (rf) generation, and rf receiving separately. The pulse programmer triggers an event by setting the 32-bit control register of the corresponding FPGA, and then the FPGA automatically carries out the event function according to preset configurations in cooperation with other devices; accordingly, event control of the spectrometer is flexible and efficient. Digital techniques are in widespread use: gradient control is implemented in real-time by a FPGA; rf source is constructed using direct digital synthesis technique, and rf receiver is constructed using digital quadrature detection technique. Well-designed performance is achieved, including 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, and 2 MHz signal receiving bandwidth. Both rf synthesis and rf digitalization operate at the same 60 MHz clock, therefore, the frequency range of transmitting and receiving is from DC to ˜27 MHz. A majority of pulse sequences have been developed, and the imaging performance of the spectrometer has been validated through a large number of experiments. Furthermore, the spectrometer is also suitable for relaxation measurement in nuclear magnetic resonance field.

  11. A digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using digital signal processor and field programmable gate array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Binghe, Sun; Yueping, Ma; Ruyan, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    A digital spectrometer for low-field magnetic resonance imaging is described. A digital signal processor (DSP) is utilized as the pulse programmer on which a pulse sequence is executed as a subroutine. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices that are logically mapped into the external addressing space of the DSP work as auxiliary controllers of gradient control, radio frequency (rf) generation, and rf receiving separately. The pulse programmer triggers an event by setting the 32-bit control register of the corresponding FPGA, and then the FPGA automatically carries out the event function according to preset configurations in cooperation with other devices; accordingly, event control of the spectrometer is flexible and efficient. Digital techniques are in widespread use: gradient control is implemented in real-time by a FPGA; rf source is constructed using direct digital synthesis technique, and rf receiver is constructed using digital quadrature detection technique. Well-designed performance is achieved, including 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, and 2 MHz signal receiving bandwidth. Both rf synthesis and rf digitalization operate at the same 60 MHz clock, therefore, the frequency range of transmitting and receiving is from DC to ~27 MHz. A majority of pulse sequences have been developed, and the imaging performance of the spectrometer has been validated through a large number of experiments. Furthermore, the spectrometer is also suitable for relaxation measurement in nuclear magnetic resonance field.

  12. High Precision Momentum Calibration of the Magnetic Spectrometers at MAMI for Hypernuclear Binding Energy Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Margaryan, A; Achenbach, P; Ajvazyan, R; Elbakyan, H; Montgomery, R; Nakamura, S N; Pochodzalla, J; Schulz, F; Toyama, Y; Zhamkochyan, S

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method for absolute momentum calibration of magnetic spectrometers used in nuclear physics, using the time-of-flight (TOF), differences of pairs of particles with different masses. In cases where the flight path is not known, a calibration can be determined by using the TOF differences of two pair combinations of three particles. A Cherenkov detector, read out by a radio frequency photomultiplier tube, is considered as the high-resolution and highly stable TOF detector. By means of Monte Carlo simulations it is demonstrated that the magnetic spectrometers at the MAMI electron-scattering facility can be calibrated absolutely with an accuracy $\\delta p/p\\leq 10^{-4}$, which will be crucial for high precision determination of hypernuclear masses.

  13. Influence of the Ion Source Operating Conditions on the Characteristics of a Prism Mass Spectrometer With Inhomogeneous Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Kuzema

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of magnetic field focusing the electron beam in ion source of mass spectrometer on the analytical characteristics of the instrument has been studied. The range of current of ion source's focusing electromagnet providing the optimal performance of the mass spectrometer has been determined.

  14. Design and Status of the Dipole Spectrometer Magnet for the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bartenev, V D; Datskov, V I; Koshurnikov, E; Shabounov, A; Shishov, Yu A; Swoboda, Detlef; Vodopyanov, A S

    2000-01-01

    Proposal of abstract for MT16, Tallahesse, Florida, 26th September to 2nd October 1999.A large Dipole Magnet is required for the Muon Arm Spectrometer of the ALICE experiment at the LHC.The absence of strong requirements on the symmetry and homogeneity of the magnetic field has lead to a design dominated by economic and feasibility considerations.In March 1997 the decision was taken to build a resistive dipole magnet for the muon spectrometer of the ALICE experiment. Since then, design work has been pursued in JINR/Russia and at CERN. While a common concept has been adopted for the construction of the steel core, two different proposals have been made for the manufacturing technology of the excitation coils. In both cases, however, the conductor material will be Aluminium.The general concept of the dipole magnet is based on a window frame return yoke, fabricated from low carbon steel sheets. The flat vertical poles follow the defined acceptance angle of 9 degrees. The excitation coils are of saddle type. The ...

  15. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  16. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeters for the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtchyan, Hamlet [Yerevan Physics Institute, JLAB; Carlini, Roger D. [JLAB; Tadevosyan, Vardan H. [Yerevan Physics Institute; Arrington, John Robert [ANL; Asaturyan, Arshak Razmik [Yerevan Physics Institute; Christy, Michael Eric [Hampton U.; Dutta, Dipangkar [Mississippi State U.; Ent, Rolf [JLAB; Fenker, Howard C. [JLAB; Gaskell, David J. [JLAB; Horn, Tanja [Catholic University of America, JLAB; Jones, Mark K. [JLAB; Keppel, Cynthia [JLAB, Hampton U.; Mack, David J. [JLAB; Malace, Simona P. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory and Duke University; Mkrtchyan, Arthur [Yerevan Physics Institute; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana [James Madison U.; Seely, Charles Jason [MIT; Tvaskis, Vladas [University of Manitoba; Wood, Stephen A. [JLAB; Zhamkochyan, Simon [Yerevan Physics Institute

    2013-08-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeters of the various magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers design considerations, relevant construction information, and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are included. The energy resolution of the HMS and SOS calorimeters is better than $\\sigma/E \\sim 6%/\\sqrt E $, and pion/electron ($\\pi/e$) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1 -- 5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and simulated energy resolutions, but simulations systematically exceed experimentally determined $\\pi^-$ suppression factors by close to a factor of two. For the SHMS spectrometer presently under construction details on the design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is predicted over the full momentum range of the SHMS. Good electron/hadron separation is anticipated by combining the energy deposited in an initial (preshower) calorimeter layer with the total energy deposited in the calorimeter.

  17. Methyl Quantum Tunneling and NITROGEN-14 Nqr Studies Using a DC SQUID Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bruce Elmer

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe ^ {11}B and ^{27} Al NQR resonances. I have increased the scope of this study to include ^{23}Na, ^{51}V, and ^ {55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, I present a technique to observe ^{14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupolar transition the remaining two ^ {14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, we have observed nitrogen -14 resonances in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  18. Effect of a spectrometer magnet on the beam-beam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornacchia, M; Parzen, G

    1981-01-01

    The presence of experimental apparatus in the interaction regions of an intersecting beam accelerator changes the configuration of the crossing beams. This changes the space-charge forces with respect to the standard, magnet-free crossing. The question is: what is the maximum allowable perturbation caused by the spectrometer magnet that can be tolerated from the point of view of the beam dynamics. This paper is limited to the perturbations that the curved trajectories cause the beam-beam space charge nonlinearities. The question has arisen of how one defines the strength of the perturbation. The only solution is to compute the strength of the most important nonlinear resources. In what follows, the computational method used in calculating these resonances is described, and compared with those induced by random orbit errors.

  19. Measurements of (n,{alpha}) cross-section of small samples using a lead-slowing-down-spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Catherine [Rensselaer Polytechnic Intstitute, 110 8th St., Troy, NY 12180 (United States)]. E-mail: romanc2@rpi.edu; Danon, Yaron [Rensselaer Polytechnic Intstitute, 110 8th St., Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Haight, Robert C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wender, Stephen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Vieira, David J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bond, Evelyn M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); O' Donnell, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Michaudon, Andre F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bredeweg, Todd A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Rochman, Dimitri [Brookhaven National Laboratory National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Granier, Thierry [CEA-DAM, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Ethvignot, Thierry [CEA-DAM, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)

    2006-06-23

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) a compensated ionization chamber (CIC) was placed in a lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS) to measure the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H cross-section as a feasibility test for further work. The LSDS consists of a 1.2 m cube of lead with a tungsten target in the center where spallation neutrons are produced when bombarded with pulses of 800 MeV protons. The resulting neutron flux is of the order of 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} /s which allows the cross-section measurement of samples of the order of 10's of nanograms. The initial experiment measured a 91 {mu}g sample of natural lithium flouride. Cross-section measurements were obtained in the 0.1 eV-2 keV energy range. A 62 {mu}g sample was placed in the chamber with a higher neutron beam intensity, and data was obtained in the 0.1-300 eV range. Adjustments in chamber dimensions and electronic configuration will improve gamma flash compensation at high beam intensity, decrease the dead time, and increase the energy range where data can be obtained. The intense neutron flux will allow the use of a smaller sample.

  20. The Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer deployment mechanism: An anthropomorphic approach to sensor placement on Martian rocks and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, Richard S.

    1995-01-01

    On July 4,1997, the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft lands on Mars and starts conducting technological and scientific experiments. One experiment, the Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer, uses a sensor head placed against rocks and soil to determine their composition. To guarantee proper placement, a deployment mechanism mounted on the Mars Rover aligns the sensor head to within 20 deg of the rock and soil surfaces. In carrying out its task, the mechanism mimics the action of a human hand and arm. Consisting of a flexible wrist, a parallel link arm, a brush dc motor actuator, and a revolutionary non-pyrotechnic fail-safe release device, the mechanism correctly positions the sensor head on rocks as high as 0.29 m and on targets whose surfaces are tilted as much as 45 deg from the nominal orientation of the sensor head face. The mechanism weighs less than 0.5 kg, can withstand 100 g's, and requires less than 2.8 N x m of actuation torque. The fail-safe coupler utilizes Cerrobend, a metal alloy that melts at 60 C, to fuse the actuator and the rest of the mechanism together. A film heater wrapped around the coupler melts the metal, and Negator springs drive the mechanism into its stowed position. The fail-safe actuates using 6.75 Watts for 5 minutes in the event of an actuator failure.

  1. Cross-section measurements for {sup 239}Pu(n,f) and {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}) with a lead slowing-down spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochman, D. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)]. E-mail: drochman@bnl.gov; Haight, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: haight@lanl.gov; O' Donnell, J.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: odonnell@lanl.gov; Wender, S.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: wender@lanl.gov; Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: vieira@lanl.gov; Bond, E.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: bond@lanl.gov; Bredeweg, T.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: toddb@lanl.gov; Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: j_wilhelmy@lanl.gov; Granier, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)]. E-mail: granier@cea.fr; Ethvignot, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)]. E-mail: ethvignot@cea.fr; Petit, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)]. E-mail: petit@cea.fr; Danon, Y. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)]. E-mail: danony@rpi.edu; Romano, C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)]. E-mail: romanc2@rpi.edu

    2006-08-01

    We present fission cross-section measurements with {approx}10ng of {sup 239}Pu performed using the LANSCE Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometer. Results of Li6(n,{alpha}) measurements with a sample size of 760ng of {sup 6}Li are also reported. This technical achievement demonstrates the feasibility of measuring neutron-induced fission cross-section on samples with 10ng of fissile actinides that are available on ultra-small quantities. Furthermore, results on neutron-induced alpha emission show that measurements for astrophysics purposes are feasible with the LSDS.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear da D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzil penicilina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Monica R.M.P.; Gemal, Andre L.; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Menezes, Sonia M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1995-12-31

    The development of new drugs from penicillins has induced the study of this substances by nuclear magnetic resonance. Several samples of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin were analysed using {sup 13} C NMR techniques in aqueous solution and solid state. Spectral data of this compounds were shown and the results were presented and analysed 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Magnetic field and element surface distribution of the CP2 star $\\alpha^2$ CVn

    CERN Document Server

    Glagolevskij, Y V; Hildebrandt, G; Lehmann, H; Scholz, G; Glagolevskij, Yu.V.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the radial velocity and the magnetic field of the CP star alpha^2 CVn. The observed variation of the magnetic field is compared with that of our model. We search for a relation between the magnetic field and the distribution of the chemical elements. The period in the radial velocities is constant over a time interval of about 100 years.

  4. Cryogenic magnetic bearing scanning mechanism design for the SPICA/SAFARI Fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Dool, Teun C.; Hamelinck, Roger F. M. M.; Kruizinga, Bob; Gielesen, Wim L. M.; Braam, Ben C.; Nijenhuis, Jan R.; Loix, Nicolas; Luyckx, Stanislas; van Loon, Dennis; Kooijman, Peter Paul; Swinyard, Bruce M.

    2010-07-01

    TNO, together with its partners Micromega and SRON, have designed a cryogenic scanning mechanism for use in the SAFARI Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) on board of the SPICA mission. The optics of the FTS scanning mechanism (FTSM) consists of two back-to-back cat's-eyes. The optics are mounted on a central "back-bone" tube which houses all the important mechatronic parts: the magnetic bearing linear guiding system, a magnetic linear motor serving as the OPD actuator, internal metrology with nanometer resolution, and a launch lock. A magnetic bearing is employed to enable a large scanning stroke in a small volume. It supports the optics in a free-floating way with no friction, or other non-linearities, enabling sub-nanometer accuracy within a single stage with a stroke of -4 mm to +31.5 mm. Because the FTSM will be used at cryogenic temperatures of 4 Kelvin, the main structure and optics are all constructed from 6061 Aluminum. The overall outside dimensions of the FTSM are: 393 x 130 x 125 mm, and the mass is 2.2 kg.

  5. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2013-04-15

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  6. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  7. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Magoon, J; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M; Ulreich, J; Ashabranner, R C; Bionta, R M; Carpenter, A C; Felker, B; Khater, H Y; LePape, S; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Rygg, J R; Yeoman, M F; Zacharias, R; Leeper, R J; Fletcher, K; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J; Paguio, R

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  8. A broadband microwave Corbino spectrometer at $^3$He temperatures and high magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Armitage, N P

    2014-01-01

    We present the technical details of a broadband microwave spectrometer for measuring the complex conductance of thin films covering the range from 50 MHz up to 16 GHz in the temperature range 300 mK to 6 K and at applied magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. We measure the complex reflection from a sample terminating a coaxial transmission line and calibrate the signals with three standards with known reflection coefficients. Thermal isolation of the heat load from the inner conductor is accomplished by including a section of NbTi superconducting cable (transition temperature around 8 $-$ 9 K) and hermetic seal glass bead adapters. This enables us to stabilize the base temperature of the sample stage at 300 mK. However, the inclusion of this superconducting cable complicates the calibration procedure. We document the effects of the superconducting cable on our calibration procedure and the effects of applied magnetic fields and how we control the temperature with great repeatability for each measurement. We have suc...

  9. A 4[pi] dilepton spectrometer: PEPSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buda, A. (Kernfysisch Versneller Inst., Groningen (Netherlands)); Bacelar, J.C.S. (Kernfysisch Versneller Inst., Groningen (Netherlands)); Balanda, A. (Kernfysisch Versneller Inst., Groningen (Netherlands)); Klinken, J. van (Kernfysisch Versneller Inst., Groningen (Netherlands)); Sujkowski, Z. (Kernfysisch Versneller Inst., Groningen (Netherlands)); Woude, A. van der (Kernfysisch Versneller Inst., Groningen (Netherlands))

    1993-11-01

    A novel positron-electron pair spectroscopy instrument (PEPSI) was designed to measure transitions in the energy region 10-40 MeV. It consists of Nd[sub 2]Fe[sub 14]B permanent magnets forming a compact 4[pi] magnetic filter consisting of 12 positron and 20 electron mini-orange-like spectrometers. The response function of PEPSI has been measured with mono-energetic beams of electrons from 5 to 20 MeV. The PEPSI spectrometer was used for measuring the internal pair conversion coefficient ([alpha][sub [pi

  10. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; Wink, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    A time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum is presented. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording. Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.

  11. Polarimetry of the HI Lyman-alpha for coronal magnetic field diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Hoover, Richard B.; Zukic, Muamer; Kim, Jongmin; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Baker, Phillip, C.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss and analyze the possible sources of observational and instrumental uncertainty that can be encountered in measuring magnetic fields of the solar corona through polarimetric observations of the Hanle effect of the coronal Ly-alpha line. The Hanle effect is the modification of the linear polarization of a resonantly scattered line, due to the presence of a magnetic field. Simulated observations are used to examine how polarimetric measurements of this effect are affected by the line-of-sight integration, the electron collisions, and the Ly-alpha geocorona. We plan to implement the coronal magnetic field diagnostics via the Ly-alpha Hanle effect using an all-reflecting Ly-alpha coronagraph/polarimeter (Ly-alphaCoPo) which employs reflecting multilayer mirrors, polarizers, and filters. We discuss here the requirements for such an instrument, and analyze the sources of instrumental uncertainty for polarimetric observations of the coronal Ly-alpha Hanle effect. We conclude that the anticipated polarization signal from the corona and the expected performance of the Ly-alphaCoPo instrument are such that the Ly-alpha Hanle effect method for coronal field diagnostics is feasible.

  12. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 μs. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from 2D in a tunneling methyl group and 14N in NH4ClO4.

  13. Two Years of Chemical Sampling on Meridiani Planum by the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer Onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, J.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B.C.; Dreibus, G.; Rieder, R.; Wanke, H.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Klingelhofer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.W.; Squyres, S.W.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2006-01-01

    For over two terrestrial years, the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring the martian surface at Meridiani Planum using the Athena instrument payload [1], including the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). The APXS has a small sensor head that is mounted on the robotic arm of the rover. The chemistry, mineralogy and morphology of selected samples were investigated by the APXS along with the Moessbauer Spectrometer (MB) and the Microscopic Imager (MI). The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) provided the possibility to dust and/or abrade rock surfaces down to several millimeters to expose fresh material for analysis. We report here on APXS data gathered along the nearly 6-kilometers long traverse in craters and plains of Meridiani.

  14. The barrel muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector has acquired its first cosmic event in a magnetic field produced by the barrel toroid magnet.

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A 3-D event display of a cosmic muon event, showing the path of a muon travelling through three layers of the barrel muon spectrometer. Three of the eight coils of the barrel toroid magnet can be seen in the top half of the drawing.

  15. Turbulent ${\\alpha}$-effect in twisted magnetic flux tubes dynamos in Riemannian space

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Analytical solution of first order torsion ${\\alpha}$-effect in twisted magnetic flux tubes representing a flux tube dynamo in Riemannian space is presented. Toroidal and poloidal component of the magnetic field decays as $r^{-1}$, while grow exponentially in time. The rate of speed of the helical dynamo depends upon the value of Frenet curvature of the tube. The $\\alpha$ factor possesses a fundamental contribution from constant torsion tube approximation. It is also assumed that the curvature of the magnetic axis of the tube is constant. Though ${\\alpha}$-effect dynamo equations are rather more complex in Riemann flux tube coordinates, a simple solution assuming force-free magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Dynamo solutions are possible if the dynamo action is able to change the signs of torsion and curvature of the dynamo flux tube simultaneously.

  16. On the evolution of the magnetic field of Ap star $\\alpha^2$ CVn

    CERN Document Server

    Bychkov, V D; Madej, J; Topilskaya, G P

    2016-01-01

    New high-precision measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field of Ap stars suggest the existence of secular intrinsic variations of the global magnetic field in some stars. We argue that such changes are apparent in the Ap star $\\alpha^2$ CVn in the time scale of $\\sim$ 10 years, which results from the analysis of literature data. Therefore, such an observation implies, that the rate of magnetic field evolution of Ap stars is much higher than was previously thought.

  17. The magnetic spectrometer PAMELA for the study of cosmic antimatter in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy); Hof, M. [Siegen univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.; Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy); Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    In the framework of the RIM (Russian Italian mission) program, PAMELA is the experiment devoted to the accurate measurement of the positron and antiproton spectra from the very low energy thresh-old of 100 MeV up to more than 50 GeV, and to hunt antinuclei with sensitivity better than 10{sup -7} in the helium/helium ratio. A permanent magnet equipped by microstrip silicon sensors, measures the particle momentum with MDR=400 GV/c on GF=25 cm{sup 2} sr. An accurate ToF system, a 19 X{sub o} deep imaging calorimeter, an aerogel Cherenkov counter and a TRD detector complement the spectrometer in order an efficient e{sup +-}/p{sup +-} separation and some light isotope identification capability. The PAMELA experiment will be carried out on a 700 km high polar orbit, on board of the Earth-observation meteor-3A satellite, to be launched at the end of 1988.

  18. Study of $\\overline{p}$-Nucleus Interaction with a High Resolution Magnetic Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment uses the high resolution, large solid angle and large momentum acceptance magnetic spectrometer SPES~II to study the interaction between @* and complex nuclei in the following experiments: \\\\ \\\\ \\item 1)~~~~A(@*, @*)A. Angular distribution of @* elastically scattered from |1|2C, |4|0Ca and |2|0|8Pb. \\item 2)~~~~A(@*, @*')A*. Excitation energy spectra and some angular distributions of @* inelastically scattered from |1|2C, |4|0Ca and |2|0|8Pb up to an excitation energy of &prop.~100~MeV. \\item 3)~~~~A(@*, p)A^z^-^1 (@*). Excitation energy spectra for knock out reaction on |6Li, |1|2C, |6|3Cu and |2|0|9Bi at several angles. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ Any beam momentum between 300 MeV/c and 800 MeV/c will be suitable for this experiment. In order to vary the effect of strong absorption of @* by nuclei, elastic and inelastic scattering will be performed at two or three different @* momenta (depending on the way LEAR will be operated) down to 300~MeV/c.

  19. Improved $\\alpha^4$ Term of the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, T

    2004-01-01

    We have completed the evaluation of all mass-dependent $\\alpha^4$ QED contributions to the muon $g-2$, or $a_\\mu$, in two or more different formulations. Their numerical values have been greatly improved by an extensive computer calculation. The new value of the dominant $\\alpha^4$ term $A_2^{(8)} (m_\\mu / m_e) $ is 132.6823 (72), which supersedes the old value 127.50 (41). The new value of the three-mass term $A_3^{(8)} (m_\\mu / m_e, m_\\mu / m_\\tau) $ is 0.0376 (9). The term $A_2^{(8)} (m_\\mu / m_\\tau) $ is crudely estimated to be about 0.005 and may be ignored for now. The total QED contribution to $a_\\mu$ is $116 584 719.35 (0.03)(1.15)(0.85) \\times 10^{-11}$, where 0.03 and 1.15 are uncertainties in the $\\alpha^4$ and $\\alpha^5$ terms and 0.85 is from the uncertainty in $\\alpha$ measured by atom interferometry. This raises the Standard Model prediction by $13.6 \\times 10^{-11}$, or about 1/5 of the measurement uncertainty of $a_\\mu$. It is within the noise of current uncertainty ($\\sim 100 \\times 10^{-11}...

  20. Improved $\\alpha^4$ Term of the Electron Anomalous Magnetic Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, T

    2006-01-01

    We report a new value of electron $g-2$, or $a_e$, from 891 Feynman diagrams of order $\\alpha^4$. The FORTRAN codes of 373 diagrams containing closed electron loops have been verified by at least two independent formulations. For the remaining 518 diagrams, which have no closed lepton loop, verification by a second formulation is not yet attempted because of the enormous amount of additional work required. However, these integrals have structures that allow extensive cross-checking as well as detailed comparison with lower-order diagrams through the renormalization procedure. No algebraic error has been uncovered for them. The numerical evaluation of the entire $\\alpha^4$ term by the integration routine VEGAS gives $-1.7283 (35) (\\alpha/\\pi)^4$, where the uncertainty is obtained by careful examination of error estimates by VEGAS. This leads to $a_e = 1 159 652 175.86 (0.10) (0.26) (8.48) \\times 10^{-12}$, where the uncertainties come from the $\\alpha^4$ term, the estimated uncertainty of $\\alpha^5$ term, and ...

  1. Measurement of the Internal Magnetic Field of Plasmas using an Alpha Particle Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.J. Zweben; D.S. Darrow; P.W. Ross; J.L. Lowrance; G. Renda

    2004-05-13

    The internal magnetic fields of plasmas can be measured under certain conditions from the integrated v x B deflection of MeV alpha particles emitted by a small radioactive source. This alpha source and large-area alpha particle detector would be located inside the vacuum vessel but outside the plasma. Alphas with a typical energy of 5.5 MeV (241Am) can reach the center of almost all laboratory plasmas and magnetic fusion devices, so this method can potentially determine the q(r) profile of tokamaks or STs. Orbit calculations, background evaluations, and conceptual designs for such a vxB (or ''AVB'') detector are described.

  2. Magnetic phase diagrams of {alpha}-MnMoO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenberg, H. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64287 Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23 (Germany)]. E-mail: ehrenberg@tu-darmstadt.de; Schwarz, B. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64287 Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23 (Germany); Weitzel, H. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64287 Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23 (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Field-induced spin-flop transitions in {alpha}-MnMoO{sub 4} are summarized in magnetic H-T phase diagrams for different directions of the applied magnetic field up to 12T. The antiferromagnetic arrangement in the spin-flop phase is preserved at least up to this field for a field parallel to the easy direction. This high transition field is in contrast to the low one of {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} and favours a model, based on dominant antiferromagnetic supersuperexchange couplings in {alpha}-MnMoO{sub 4} over a ferromagnetic Mn{sub 4} ''cluster'' model. The Neel temperature of 9.8(1)K was determined from the corresponding specific-heat anomaly, measured on a single crystal of {alpha}-MnMoO{sub 4}.

  3. The alpha effect with imposed and dynamo-generated magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, A; Käpylä, P J; Brandenburg, A

    2009-01-01

    Estimates for the nonlinear alpha effect in helical turbulence are presented using two different approaches where a uniform magnetic field is applied either to the actual field, or where separate evolution equations are solved for a set of different test fields. Both approaches agree for stronger fields, but there are apparent discrepancies for weaker fields that can be explained by the influence of dynamo-generated magnetic fields on the scale of the domain that are referred to as meso-scale magnetic fields. Examples are discussed where with an imposed magnetic field the alpha effect is either drastically overestimated, or drastically underestimated compared with the kinematic value. It is demonstrated that the kinematic value can be estimated correctly by resetting the magnetic field in regular time intervals.

  4. CAPRICE98: A balloon borne magnetic spectrometer to study cosmic ray antimatter and composition at different atmospheric depths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambriola, M.L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bartalucci, S.; Basini, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bergstroem, D.; Bocciolini, M.; Boezio, M.; Bravar, U.; Cafagna, F.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellano, M.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C.; De Pascale, M.P.; Finetti, N.; Francke, T.; Hof, M.; Kremer, J.; Menn, W.; Mitchell, J.W.; Morselli, A.; Ormes, J.F.; Papini, P.; Perego, A.; Piccardi, S.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Schiavon, P.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stephens, S.A.; Stochaj, S.J.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Suffert, M.; Vacchi, A.; Weber, N.; Zampa, N

    1999-08-01

    CAPRICE98 is a superconducting magnetic spectrometer built by the WiZard collaboration. It was launched from Ft. Sumner, NM, USA on the 28th of May 1998. For the first time a gas RICH detector has been flown together with a silicon electromagnetic calorimeter. The instrument configuration included a time of flight detector and a drift chamber stack, which were placed in the region of a magnet field, for rigidity measurement. Science objectives for this experiment include the study of antimatter in cosmic rays and that of cosmic ray composition in the atmosphere with special focus on muons.

  5. The large silicon tracker for the AMS experiment on the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauluzzi, M.

    1996-02-01

    The design of the high precision microstrip silicon tracker for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment (AMS) is presented. We emphasize features of the silicon tracker which make it suitable for a space born experiment and for equipping large active areas.

  6. Latest Results from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    I review latest results from AMS on electrons and positrons in primary cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range. Separate fluxes for electrons and positrons as well as their sum are presented. Neither of the fluxes is compatible with a simple power law. New data on the fraction of positrons in the joint electron and positron flux are also presented, which extend the energy range of our previous observation and increase its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above about 200 GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy. The results confirm that a common new source of electrons and positrons exists.

  7. The First Five Years of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    In the five years since its installation on the International Space Station, it has collected more than 90 billion cosmic rays. Some of the unexpected results and their possible interpretations will be presented.

  8. Possibility of Testing the Light Dark Matter Hypothesis with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; Xue, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum and morphology of gamma-rays from the Galactic Center and the spectrum of synchrotron emission observed from the Milky Way's radio filaments have each been interpreted as possible signals of $\\sim$7-10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating in the Inner Galaxy. In dark matter models capable of producing these signals, the annihilations should also generate significant fluxes of $\\sim$7-10 GeV positrons which can lead to a distinctive bump-like feature in local cosmic ray positron spectrum. In this letter, we show that while such a feature would be difficult to detect with PAMELA, it would likely be identifiable by the currently operating AMS experiment. As no known astrophysical sources or mechanisms are likely to produce such a sharp feature, the observation of a positron bump at around 7-10 GeV would significantly strengthen the case for a dark matter interpretation of the reported gamma-ray and radio anomalies.

  9. Helical ${\\alpha}$-dynamos as twisted magnetic flux tubes in Riemannian space

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Analytical solution of ${\\alpha}$-dynamo equation representing strongly torsioned helical dynamo is obtained in the thin twisted Riemannian flux tubes approximation. The $\\alpha$ factor possesses a fundamental contribution from torsion which is however weaken in the thin tubes approximation. It is shown that assuming that the poloidal component of the magnetic field is in principle time-independent, the toroidal magnetic field component grows very fast in time, actually it possesses a linear time dependence, while the poloidal component grows under the influence of torsion or twist of the flux tube. The toroidal component decays spatially with as $r^{-2}$ while vorticity may decay as $r^{-5}$ (poloidal component) where r represents the radial distance from the magnetic axis of flux tube. Toroidal component of vorticity decays as $r^{-1}$. In turbulent dynamos unbounded magnetic fields may decay at least as $r^{-3}$.

  10. MASS SPECTROMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  11. Helicity and alpha-effect by current-driven instabilities of helical magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gellert, M; Hollerbach, R

    2011-01-01

    Helical magnetic background fields with adjustable pitch angle are imposed on a conducting fluid in a differentially rotating cylindrical container. The small-scale kinetic and current helicities are calculated for various field geometries, and shown to have the opposite sign as the helicity of the large-scale field. These helicities and also the corresponding $\\alpha$-effect scale with the current helicity of the background field. The $\\alpha$-tensor is highly anisotropic as the components $\\alpha_{\\phi\\phi}$ and $\\alpha_{zz}$ have opposite signs. The amplitudes of the azimuthal $\\alpha$-effect computed with the cylindrical 3D MHD code are so small that the operation of an $\\alpha\\Omega$ dynamo on the basis of the current-driven, kink-type instabilities of toroidal fields is highly questionable. In any case the low value of the $\\alpha$-effect would lead to very long growth times of a dynamo in the radiation zone of the Sun and early-type stars of the order of mega-years.

  12. Magnetic dynamics of small alpha-Fe2O3 and NiO particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefmann, K.; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt;

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the magnetic dynamics in nanocrystalline samples of alpha-Fe2O3 (hematite) and NiO by inelastic neutron scattering. By measuring around the structural and the antiferromagnetic reflections, we have probed uniform and staggered magnetic oscillations, respectively. In the hematite...... as a sign of superparamagnetic relaxation. Studies of the antiferromagnetic signal from NiO also show evidence of collective magnetic excitations, but with a higher energy of the precession state than for hematite. The inelastic signal at the structural reflection of NiO presents evidence for uniform...

  13. Non-linearity issues and multiple ionization satellites in the PIXE portion of spectra from the Mars alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John L.; Heirwegh, Christopher M.; Ganly, Brianna

    2016-09-01

    Spectra from the laboratory and flight versions of the Curiosity rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer were fitted with an in-house version of GUPIX, revealing departures from linear behavior of the energy-channel relationships in the low X-ray energy region where alpha particle PIXE is the dominant excitation mechanism. The apparent energy shifts for the lightest elements present were attributed in part to multiple ionization satellites and in part to issues within the detector and/or the pulse processing chain. No specific issue was identified, but the second of these options was considered to be the more probable. Approximate corrections were derived and then applied within the GUAPX code which is designed specifically for quantitative evaluation of APXS spectra. The quality of fit was significantly improved. The peak areas of the light elements Na, Mg, Al and Si were changed by only a few percent in most spectra. The changes for elements with higher atomic number were generally smaller, with a few exceptions. Overall, the percentage peak area changes are much smaller than the overall uncertainties in derived concentrations, which are largely attributable to the effects of rock heterogeneity. The magnitude of the satellite contributions suggests the need to incorporate these routinely in accelerator-based PIXE using helium beams.

  14. Cryogenic magnetic bearing scanning mechanism design for the SPICA/SAFARI Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dool, T.C. van den; Hamelinck, R.F.M.M.; Kruizinga, B.; Gielesen, W.L.M.; Braam, B.C.; Nijenhuis, J.R.; Loix, N.; Luyckx, S.; Loon, D. van; Kooijman, P.P.; Swinyard, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    TNO, together with its partners Micromega and SRON, have designed a cryogenic scanning mechanism for use in the SAFARI Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) on board of the SPICA mission. The optics of the FTS scanning mechanism (FTSM) consists of two back-to-back cat's-eyes. The optics are mounted o

  15. A High-Throughput, Arbitrary-Waveform, MPI Spectrometer and Relaxometer for Comprehensive Magnetic Particle Optimization and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Zhi Wei; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Hensley, Daniel W.; Taylor, Laura A.; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a promising new tracer modality with zero attenuation deep in tissue, high contrast and sensitivity, and an excellent safety profile. However, the spatial resolution of MPI is limited to around 1 mm currently and urgently needs to be improved for clinical applications such as angiography and brain perfusion. Although MPI resolution is highly dependent on tracer characteristics and the drive waveforms, optimization is limited to a small subset of possible excitation strategies by current MPI hardware that only does sinusoidal drive waveforms at very few frequencies. To enable a more comprehensive and rapid optimization of drive waveforms for multiple metrics like resolution and signal strength simultaneously, we demonstrate the first untuned MPI spectrometer/relaxometer with unprecedented 400 kHz excitation bandwidth and capable of high-throughput acquisition of harmonic spectra (100 different drive-field frequencies in only 500 ms). It is also capable of arbitrary drive-field waveforms which have not been experimentally evaluated in MPI to date. Its high-throughput capability, frequency-agility and tabletop size makes this Arbitrary Waveform Relaxometer/Spectrometer (AWR) a convenient yet powerfully flexible tool for nanoparticle experts seeking to characterize magnetic particles and optimize MPI drive waveforms for in vitro biosensing and in vivo imaging with MPI. PMID:27686629

  16. A High-Throughput, Arbitrary-Waveform, MPI Spectrometer and Relaxometer for Comprehensive Magnetic Particle Optimization and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Zhi Wei; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Hensley, Daniel W.; Taylor, Laura A.; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a promising new tracer modality with zero attenuation deep in tissue, high contrast and sensitivity, and an excellent safety profile. However, the spatial resolution of MPI is limited to around 1 mm currently and urgently needs to be improved for clinical applications such as angiography and brain perfusion. Although MPI resolution is highly dependent on tracer characteristics and the drive waveforms, optimization is limited to a small subset of possible excitation strategies by current MPI hardware that only does sinusoidal drive waveforms at very few frequencies. To enable a more comprehensive and rapid optimization of drive waveforms for multiple metrics like resolution and signal strength simultaneously, we demonstrate the first untuned MPI spectrometer/relaxometer with unprecedented 400 kHz excitation bandwidth and capable of high-throughput acquisition of harmonic spectra (100 different drive-field frequencies in only 500 ms). It is also capable of arbitrary drive-field waveforms which have not been experimentally evaluated in MPI to date. Its high-throughput capability, frequency-agility and tabletop size makes this Arbitrary Waveform Relaxometer/Spectrometer (AWR) a convenient yet powerfully flexible tool for nanoparticle experts seeking to characterize magnetic particles and optimize MPI drive waveforms for in vitro biosensing and in vivo imaging with MPI.

  17. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayler, Michael C. D.; Sjolander, Tobias F.; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1 μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100 μT to 1 mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  19. A method for (n,alpha) and (n,p) cross section measurements using a lead slowing-down spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason Tyler

    The need for nuclear data comes from several sources including astrophysics, stockpile stewardship, and reactor design. Photodisintegration, neutron capture, and charged particle out reactions on stable or short-lived radioisotopes play crucial roles during stellar evolution and forming solar isotopic abundances whereas these reactions can affect the safety of our national weapons stockpile or criticality and safety calculations for reactors. Although models can be used to predict some of these values, these predictions are only as good as the experimental data that constrains them. For neutron-induced emission of α particles and protons ((n,α) and (n,p) reactions) at energies below 1 MeV, the experimental data is at best scarce and models must rely on extrapolations from unlike situations, (i.e. different reactions, isotopes, and energies) providing ample room for uncertainty. In this work a new method of measuring energy dependent (n,α) and (n,p) cross sections was developed for the energy range of 0.1 eV - ˜100 keV using a lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS). The LSDS provides a ˜10 4 neutron flux increase over the more conventionally used time-of-flight (ToF) methods at equivalent beam conditions, allowing for the measurement of small cross sections (µb’s to mb’s) while using small sample masses (µg’s to mg’s). Several detector concepts were designed and tested, including specially constructed Canberra passivated, implanted, planar silicon (PIPS) detectors; and gas-electron-multiplier (GEM) foils. All designs are compensated to minimize γ-flash problems. The GEM detector was found to function satisfactory for (n,α) measurements, but the PIPS detectors were found to be better suited for (n,p) reaction measurements. A digital data acquisition (DAQ) system was programmed such that background can be measured simultaneously with the reaction cross section. Measurements of the 147Sm(n,α)144Nd and 149 Sm(n,α)146Nd reaction cross sections were

  20. The Aerogel Cherenkov Detector for the SHMS magnetic spectrometer in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, T; Ali, S; Asaturyan, A; Carmignotto, M A P; Dittmann, A; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Hlavin, N; Illieva, Y; Mkrtchyan, A; Nadel-Turonski, P; Pegg, I L; Ramos, A; Reinhold, J; Sapkota, I; Tadevosyan, V; Zhamkochyan, S; Wood, S A

    2016-01-01

    Hadronic reactions producing strange quarks such as exclusive or semi-inclusive kaon production, play an important role in studies of hadron structure and the dynamics that bind the most basic elements of nuclear physics. The small-angle capability of the new Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) in Hall C, coupled with its high momentum reach - up to the anticipated 11-GeV beam energy in Hall C - and coincidence capability with the well-understood High Momentum Spectrometer, will allow for probes of such hadron structure involving strangeness down to the smallest distance scales to date. To cleanly select the kaons, a threshold aerogel Cerenkov detector has been constructed for the SHMS. The detector consists of an aerogel tray followed by a diffusion box. Four trays for aerogel of nominal refractive indices of n=1.030, 1.020, 1.015 and 1.011 were constructed. The tray combination will allow for identification of kaons from 1 GeV/c up to 7.2 GeV/c, reaching 10^-2 proton and 10^-3 pion rejection, with kaon ...

  1. Design and Fabrication of the Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Super High Momentum Spectrometer at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouhan, Shailendra S. [Michigan State University; DeKamp, Jon [Michigan State University; Burkhart, E. E, [Michigan State University; Bierwagen, J. [Michigan State University; Song, H. [Michigan State University; Zeller, Albert F. [Michigan State University; Brindza, Paul D. [JLAB; Lassiter, Steven R. [JLAB; Fowler, Michael J. [JLAB; Sun, Qiuli (Eric) [JLAB

    2015-06-01

    A collaboration exists between NSCL and JLab to design and build JLab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet that allows the bending of the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3° to allow SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5°. Two full size coils have been wound and are cold tested for both magnetic and structural properties. Each coil is built from 90 layers of single-turn SSC outer conductor cable. An initial test coil with one third the turns was fabricated to demonstrate that the unique saddle shape with fully contoured ends could be wound with Rutherford superconducting cable. Learned lessons during the trial winding were integrated into the two complete full-scale coils that are now installed in the helium vessel. The fabrication of the iron yoke, cold mass, and thermal shield is complete, and assembly of the vacuum vessel is in progress. This paper presents the process and progress along with the modified magnet design to reduce the fringe field in the primary beam region and also includes the impact of the changes on coil forces and coil restraint system.

  2. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  3. How to measure energy of LEReC electron beam with magnetic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-11

    For successful cooling the energies of RHIC ion beam and LEReC electron beam must be matched with 10-4 accuracy. While the energy of ions will be known with required accuracy, e-beam energy can have as large initial offset as 5%. The final setting of e-beam energy will be performed by observing either Schottky spectrum [1, 2] or recombination signal from debunched ions co-traveling with the e-beam. Yet, to start observing such signals one has to set absolute energy of electron beam with accuracy better than 10-2, preferably better than 5∙10-3. The aim of this exercise is to determine whether and how such accuracy can be reached by utilizing LEReC 180° bend as a spectrometer.

  4. The Aerogel Cerenkov detector for the SHMS magnetic spectrometer in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, T.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Ali, S.; Asaturyan, A.; Carmignotto, M.; Dittmann, A.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Hlavin, N.; Illieva, Y.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Pegg, I.; Ramos, A.; Reinhold, J.; Sapkota, I.; Tadevosyan, V.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Wood, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic reactions producing strange quarks such as exclusive or semi-inclusive kaon production, play an important role in studies of hadron structure and the dynamics that bind the most basic elements of nuclear physics. The small-angle capability of the new Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) in Hall C, coupled with its high momentum reach - up to the anticipated 11-GeV beam energy in Hall C - and coincidence capability with the well-understood High Momentum Spectrometer, will allow for probes of such hadron structure involving strangeness down to the smallest distance scales to date. To cleanly select the kaons, a threshold aerogel Cerenkov detector has been constructed for the SHMS. The detector consists of an aerogel tray followed by a diffusion box. Four trays for aerogel of nominal refractive indices of n=1.030, 1.020, 1.015 and 1.011 were constructed. The tray combination will allow for identification of kaons from 1 GeV/c up to 7.2 GeV/c, reaching 10-2 proton and 10-3 pion rejection, with kaon detection efficiency better than 95%. The diffusion box of the detector is equipped with 14 five-inch diameter photomultiplier tubes. Its interior walls are covered with Gore diffusive reflector, which is superior to the commonly used Millipore paper and improved the detector performance by 35%. The inner surface of the two aerogel trays with higher refractive index is covered with Millipore paper, however, those two trays with lower aerogel refractive index are again covered with Gore diffusive reflector for higher performance. The measured mean number of photoelectrons in saturation is ~12 for n=1.030, ~8 for n=1.020, ~10 for n=1.015, and ~5.5 for n=1.011. The design details, the results of component characterization, and initial performance tests and optimization of the detector are presented.

  5. Design study of magnetic environments for XYZ polarization analysis using 3He for the new thermal time of flight spectrometer TOPAS

    CERN Document Server

    Salhi, Zahir; Ioffe, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We present a finite element calculation of the magnetic field (MagNet software) taken with the newly proposed PASTIS Coil, which uses a wide-angle banana shaped 3He Neuton Spin Filter cell (NSF) to cover a large range of scattering angle. The goal of this insert is to enable XYZ polarization analysis to be installed on the future thermal time-of flight spectrometer TOPAS.

  6. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Alpha Tau (K5 III) -- Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter Kenneth G.

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for (alpha) Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from Alpha Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfven waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These wakes cause non-thermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant .4lf\\en wave heating. We discuss implications of this interpretation for understanding the nature of magnetic dynamos operating in late-type giants.

  7. Structural, optical and magnetic properties of porous alpha-Fe2O3 nanostructures prepared by rapid combustion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, A; Vijaya, J Judith; Kennedy, L John

    2013-04-01

    Porous iron oxide (alpha-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were synthesized by the microwave combustion method (MCM) using urea as the fuel. For the purpose of comparison, it was also prepared using the conventional combustion method (CCM). The as-synthesized porous alpha-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. The XRD results confirmed the formation of rhombohedral alpha-Fe2O3 phase. The formation of alpha-Fe2O3 nanoparticles was confirmed by HR-SEM and HR-TEM, and their possible formation mechanisms were also proposed. The optical absorption and the band gap were determined by DRS spectra. The surface area was derived from the nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms using BET analysis. The magnetic properties of the synthesized alpha-Fe2O3 were investigated with vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and their hysteresis loops were obtained. Both the prepared samples show ferromagnetic behavior with hysteresis curve at room temperature. The relatively high saturation magnetization (65.23 emu/g) of alpha-Fe2O3-MCM suggests that this method is suitable for preparing high-quality nanocrystalline magnetic alpha-Fe2O3 for practical applications.

  8. Optimized shielding design for the time-resolved Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRSt) on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, C.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Hilsabeck, T.; Bionta, R.; Khater, H.

    2016-10-01

    To meet the goals for the MRSt to measure the neutron spectrum at the NIF with a time resolution of 20 ps and an accuracy of 5%, a S/B >5 for the down-scattered neutron measurement is required. As the MRSt-detector design consists of a pulse-dilation drift tube with a CsI photocathode positioned at the focal plane of the spectrometer and a microchannel plate (MCP) for signal gain, the S/B requirement can be met if the number of secondary electrons (SE) produced by neutron and γ-ray background in these components is reduced 50-100 times. It has been shown in ref. that the SE generated by the neutron and γ-ray background in the CsI is insignificant and won't affect the MRSt measurement. However, the MCP poses a greater S/B challenge due to higher background sensitivities. In this paper, we discuss an MRSt SE generation model, which includes the CsI photocathode and MCP, and the MRSt shielding design required to reduce the MCP background to the required level for a down-scattered neutron measurement. This work was supported in part by DOE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  9. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration; Spettrometro Alfa per la misura delle concentrazioni individuali in attivita' della progenie del radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Div. Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche E. Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Mariotti, F. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated. [Italian] Presso l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione, nell'ambito del programma di valutazione di dose da radon e' stato progettato e realizzato uno spettrometro alfa per il monitoraggio continuo in aria (CAM) della progenie del radon e del toron. Le caratteristiche costruttive dello strumento permettono, tramite l'utilizzo di batterie a diffusione a reti, di determinare l'attivita' individuale della progenie per diverse dimensioni granulometriche in particolare per la frazione attaccata e non al particolato amosferico con un taglio granulometrico di qualche nanometro. E' stato inoltre applicato un metodo spettrometrico a tre conteggi per il calcolo delle concentrazioni individuali della progenie del radon, {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi, effettuando un conteggio alfa di {sup 218}Po e due conteggi alfa di {sup 214}Po. Tale informazione consentira' una valutazione della dose di radon utilizzando il modello dosimetrico in alternativa a quello epidemiologico.

  10. Emerging Magnetism Arising from Self-Damage in (alpha) and (delta)-Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W; Chapline, G F; Jackson, D D; McElfresh, M W

    2005-11-16

    As a consequence of the unusual nature of plutonium's electronic structure, point- and extended-defects are expected to, and do exhibit extraordinary properties[1]. Low temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements on Pu and fcc-Pu(Ga) show that the magnetic susceptibility increases as a function of time, yet upon annealing the specimen returns to its initial magnetic susceptibility. This excess magnetic susceptibility (EMS) arises from the {alpha}-decay and U recoil damage cascades which produce vacancy and interstitials as point and extended defects. The temperature of the first annealing stage defines a temperature (<35K) below which we are able to characterize the time and temperature evolution of the accumulating damage cascades as being a saturation function. The temperature dependence of the EMS is well described by a time independent, Curie-Weiss curve arising from a volumetric region surrounding each U damage cascade. This saturation picture also leads directly to a determination of the microscopic volume of the specimen that is affected by the frozen-in damage cascade. For our measurements in d-Pu we calculate a diameter of the magnetically affected volume of {approx} 250 {angstrom} per damage cascade. This should be compared with an estimated volume that encloses the damage cascade itself (determined from molecular dynamics) of {approx}100 {angstrom}. Hence, the ratio of these volumes is {approx}8. The observed anomalous magnetic behavior is likely a consequence of the highly correlated nature of the electrons. Similarities with defects in hole-doped superconductors suggest a general phenomenon in strongly correlated electron systems, of which Pu may be a particularly unusual or special example.

  11. High field magnetization processes in single crystals of alpha-Tb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and alpha-Dy{sub 2}S{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisu, S; Omote, H; Nagata, S [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto-cho, Muroran, Hokkaido 050-8585 (Japan); Koyama, K, E-mail: ebisu@mmm.muroran-it.ac.j [HFLSM, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-03-01

    Rare earth sesquisulfides alpha-Tb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and alpha-Dy{sub 2}S{sub 3} possess orthorhombic crystal structure having two independent rare earth sites. High field magnetization processes for single crystals of these compounds have been investigated up to mu{sub o}H = 18 T. Some step-like transitions have been observed in both compounds. The magnetization of alpha-Tb{sub 2}S{sub 3} single crystal under the field along the 6-axis at T = 1.4 K shows a steep increase of about 4.5 mu{sub B}, which corresponds to a half of full saturation moment of free Tb{sup 3+}, at mu{sub o}H = 2.2 T. It is considered that the reorientation of Tb{sup 3+} moments on only one Tb site into a ferromagnetic arrangement occurs. When the magnetic field is perpendicular to the b-axis, one-step transition at mu{sub o}H = 0.7 T for H||c and two-step transitions at 0.7 and 1.2 T for H||a are observed. As for alpha-Dy{sub 2}S{sub 3}, the magnetization curve at T = 1.5 K shows two-step transitions at 1.3 and 1.6 T (H||b), three or four dull steps (H||a or c). The total height of two steps in the M-H curve for H||b corresponds to a half of full Dy{sup 3+} moment.

  12. Construction and operation of parallel electric and magnetic field spectrometers for mass/energy resolved multi-ion charge exchange diagnostics on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, S. S.; Roquemore, A. L.

    1998-07-01

    A novel charge exchange spectrometer using a dee-shaped region of parallel electric and magnetic fields was developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for neutral particle diagnostics on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The E∥B spectrometer has an energy range of 0.5⩽A (amu)E (keV)⩽600 and provides mass-resolved energy spectra of H+, D+, and T+ (or 3He+) ion species simultaneously during a single discharge. The detector plane exhibits parallel rows of analyzed ions, each row containing the energy dispersed ions of a given mass-to-charge ratio. The detector consists of a large area microchannel plate (MCP) which is provided with three rectangular, semicontinuous active area strips, one coinciding with each of the mass rows for detection of H+, D+, and T+ (or 3He+) and each mass row has 75 energy channels. To suppress spurious signals attending operation of the plate in the magnetic fringe field of the spectrometer, the MCP was housed in a double-walled iron shield with a wire mesh ion entrance window. Using an accelerator neutron generator, the MCP neutron detection efficiency was measured to be 1.7×10-3 and 6.4×10-3 counts/neutron/cm2 for 2.5 MeV-DD and 14 MeV-DT neutrons, respectively. The design and calibration of the spectrometer are described in detail, including the effect of MCP exposure to tritium, and results obtained during high performance D-D operation on TFTR are presented to illustrate the performance of the E∥B spectrometer. The spectrometers were not used during D-T plasma operation due to the cost of providing the required radiation shielding.

  13. Data acquisition and pulse generation system for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers on a single PC-ISA compatible board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, R.; Ranieri, G. A.; Ricci, D.

    1998-08-01

    A data acquisition and pulse generation system for NMR spectrometers is described. It has been implemented on a single board for MS-DOS personal computers with an ISA standard bus interface and uses a simple architecture optimizing the integration of the hardware and software resources. The system, owing to its versatility and low cost, is particularly suitable to upgrade old pulsed NMR instruments with outdated data and control systems, for applications where expensive new cryomagnetic instruments would be inappropriate, such as in industrial control or as educational tools. The board provides two simultaneous data acquisition channels allowing 250 000 12-bit conversions per second per channel, including real-time signal averaging, and is able to produce essentially any pulse sequence on several output lines. The duration of each pulse can range from 0957-0233/9/8/024/img6s to 180 s with a minimum pulse separation of 0957-0233/9/8/024/img7s and with a resolution of 0957-0233/9/8/024/img6s. All classic NMR pulse sequences are allowed in addition to those required for self-diffusion coefficient measurements using pulsed magnetic field gradients. All functions of the system are managed by machine-language routines callable from within a VisualBASIC program. The cost of the hardware of this device is under US500.

  14. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Clarke, John

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect 27Al NQR signals in ruby (Al2O3[Cr3+]) at 359 and 714 kHz.

  15. Development of the Portable Alpha - ray Spectrometer Based on the PIPS Detector%基于PIPS探测器的便携式α谱仪研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成毅; 庹先国; 周传文; 王洪辉; 穆克亮

    2011-01-01

    针对现场快速测量放射性污染的需要,设计开发了一种基于离子注入硅半导体探测器(PIPS)的便携式α谱仪.将PIPS探测器捕获的α射线通过电荷灵敏前置放大器、信号获取模块实现谱数据获取和处理,以C8051F120单片机为主控平台进行谱线分析,以矩阵键盘、LCD组建人机接口,采用锂离子电池及电源模块供电;设计了真空测量腔以得到能量分辨率更高、更干净的谱线.性能测试表明,仪器整机功耗为105 mA、在空气环境下能量分辨率为8.1%、在真空环境下能量分辨率为6.7%.该仪器具有精度高、稳定性好、低功耗、适于现场测量等特点.%In order to maintain the needs of determining radiation contamination in - situ rapidly, we established a kind of portable alpha - ray spectrometer based on the PIPS detector. The instrument employs PIPS detector to capture α- ray, signals are collected and disposed by preamplifier circuit and the signal acquisition module,then spectra analysis is achieved by C8051F120 MCU control platform. Man- machine interface was organizedby matrix keyboard and LCD display. Both lithium - ion batteries and power processing module were used to supply the system power. We designed a vacuum measurement chamber in order to obtain higher energy resolution and cleaner spectra. By performance testing we get that the whole power consumption of this instrument is 105mA, energy resolution is 8.1% in normal air environment and 6.7% in vacuum. The instrument has high- precision, good stability, low power consumption, and is very suitable for in - situ measuring.

  16. Millimeter-Scale Chemistry of Observable Endmembers with the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer and Mars Hand Lens Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBommel, Scott; Gellert, Ralf; Thompson, Lucy; Berger, Jeff; Campbell, Iain; Edgett, Ken; McBride, Marie; Minitti, Michelle; Desouza, Elstan; Boyd, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is a bulk chemistry instrument conducting high-precision in-situ measurements of Martian rocks and soils onboard both active NASA rovers [1]. Mounted at the end of the Curiosity rover arm, the APXS can conduct multi-spot (raster) investigations in a single morning or evening. Combining APXS raster spectra and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) images, a modeled terrain is developed in which the positions of APXS field of views (FOV) can be localized, thereby mitigating arm placement uncertainty. An acquired APXS spectrum is the result of the weighted sum of the signals from within the FOV. The spatial sensitivity of the APXS consists of an off-nadir contribution in addition to a vertical separation (standoff with respect to the APXS detector) contribution [2, 3]. MAHLI images and focus merge (MFM) products facilitate a 3D surface model of the target [4] compensating for the effects of sample relief in an APXS spectrum. Employing a MFM relief map, APXS placement is modeled in three-dimensions, permitting variable APXS docking (standoff, deployment angle). Through minimization, we arrive at millimeter-scale chemistry of veins, diagenetic features and dust-free rock endmembers of Martian targets. Several rasters have been conducted with Curiosity's APXS on Mars including a study of the Garden City outcrop. The area is characterized by its contrasting light and dark veins of cm-scale surface relief. Three-dimensional localization and minimization indicated calcium sulfate as the major component of the light vein while the dark vein is enriched in CaO (without accompanying SO3), MnO, Ni and Zn, with respect to average Mars composition. References: [1] Gellert et al. (2014), LPSC XLV, #1876. [2] VanBommel et al. (2015), LPSC XLVI, #2049. [3] VanBommel et al. (2016), XRS #2681. [4] Edgett et al. (2015), MAHLI Tech Rept 0001. Acknowledgements: The MSL APXS is financed and managed by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) with Mac

  17. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    The Omega spectrometer which came into action during the year. An array of optical spark chambers can be seen withdrawn from the magnet aperture. In the 'igloo' above the magnet is located the Plumbicon camera system which collects information from the spark chambers.

  18. Theta, alpha and beta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation: brain modulation in tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Ridder, Elsa van der Loo, Karolien Van der Kelen, Tomas Menovsky, Paul van de Heyning, Aage Moller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some forms of tinnitus are considered to be auditory phantom phenomena related to reorganization and hyperactivity of the auditory central nervous system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive tool capable of modulating human brain activity, using single pulse or burst stimuli. Burst rTMS has only been performed in the theta range, and has not been used clinically. The authors analyze whether burst TMS at theta (5 Hz, alpha (10 Hz and beta (20 Hz frequencies can temporarily suppress narrow band noise/white noise tinnitus, which has been demonstrated to be intractable to tonic stimulation. Methods: rTMS is performed both in tonic and burst mode in 46 patients contralateral to the tinnitus side, at 5, 10 and 20 Hz. Fourteen placebo negative rTMS responders are further analyzed. Results: In 5 patients, maximal tinnitus suppression is obtained with theta, in 2 with alpha and in 7 with beta burst stimulation. Burst rTMS suppresses narrow band/white tinnitus much better than tonic rTMS t(13=6.4, p<.000. Women experience greater suppression of their tinnitus with burst stimulation than men, t(12=2.9, p<.05. Furthermore left sided tinnitus is perceived as more distressing on the TQ than right sided tinnitus, t(12=3.2, p<.01. The lower the tinnitus pitch the more effectively rTMS suppresses tinnitus(r=-0.65, p<0.05. Discussion: Burst rTMS can be used clinically, not only theta burst, but also alpha and beta burst. Burst rTMS is capable of suppressing narrow band/white noise tinnitus very much better than tonic rTMS. This could be due the simple fact that burst neuromodulation is more powerful than tonic neuromodulation or to a differential effect of burst and tonic stimulation on the lemniscal and extralemniscal auditory system. In some patients only alpha or beta burst rTMS is capable of suppressing tinnitus, and theta burst not. Therefore in future rTMS studies it could be worthwhile not to limit burst

  19. Structure and magnetic properties of nanocomposite (Nd, Dy)-(Fe, Co)-B/alpha-Fe thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Q; Liu, W; Cui, W B; Yang, F; Zhao, X G; Zhang, Z D, E-mail: wliu@imr.ac.c [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research and International Center for Materials Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2009-02-07

    Exchange coupling is observed in the (Nd, Dy)-(Fe, Co)-B/alpha-Fe films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, with a maximum energy product (BH){sub max} of 16.2 MGOe and a coercivity {sub i}H{sub c} of 11.2 kOe. The existence of soft alpha-Fe in the films is verified by the two-step reversal process at low temperatures and x-ray diffraction as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. In comparison with its single-phase counterpart, the anisotropic (Nd, Dy)-(Fe, Co)-B/alpha-Fe film displays a more inhomogeneous magnetic-domain structure. The aligned nanocomposite film demonstrates anisotropic demagnetization behaviour, with the homogeneous reversal process becoming inhomogeneous as the field deviates from perpendicular to parallel to the film plane.

  20. Monolithic spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  1. Facile hydrothermal synthesis of alpha manganese sesquioxide ({alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanodumb-bells: Structural, magnetic, optical and photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanam, S., E-mail: gnanam.nanoscience@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai 600005, Tamilnadu (India); Rajendran, V. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai 600005, Tamilnadu (India)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles sizes of 35-42 nm have been prepared by hydrothermal process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shapes of {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Dumb-bell, Cauliflower, spherical with rod, spherical with wires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strong UV emission can be attributed to high purity and perfect crystallinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic activity of {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied by degradation of Remazol red B dye. - Abstract: Nanometer scale cubic bixbyite {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, at a temperature of 450 Degree-Sign C in the presence of various surfactants. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the average crystallite size of the sample is {approx}35-42 nm. The shapes of the {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles include: Dumb-bell-like (anionic surfactant), Cauliflower-like (nonionic surfactant), spherical with rods (cationic surfactant) and spherical with wires (surface modifier). The shapes of {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles depend on the type of surfactant used in the synthesis. The magnetic property of the anionic surfactant assisted sample was primarily studied, using the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The optical absorption spectra confirmed the effectiveness of the selected capping agents, as the anionic capped {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} colloids absorbed at shorter wavelength than the other agents, indicating a much smaller crystallite size. The property of strong UV emissions may be attributed to the high purity and perfect crystallinity of the as-prepared {alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The surfactants-assisted catalyst was tested for its photocatalytic activity towards the photodegradation of the harmful organic dye Remazol Red B, using a multilamp photo reactor. Possible formation mechanisms have also been proposed for the as-synthesized anionic surfactant assisted samples.

  2. A high-field magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using an oven-controlled crystal oscillator as the local oscillator of its radio frequency transceiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Tang, Weinan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    A home-made high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrometer with multiple receiving channels is described. The radio frequency (RF) transceiver of the spectrometer consists of digital intermediate frequency (IF) circuits and corresponding mixing circuits. A direct digital synthesis device is employed to generate the IF pulse; the IF signal from a down-conversion circuit is sampled and followed by digital quadrature detection. Both the IF generation and the IF sampling use a 50 MHz clock. An oven-controlled crystal oscillator, which has outstanding spectral purity and a compact circuit, is used as the local oscillator of the RF transceiver. A digital signal processor works as the pulse programmer of the spectrometer, as a result, 32 control lines can be generated simultaneously while an event is triggered. Field programmable gate array devices are utilized as the auxiliary controllers of the IF generation, IF receiving, and gradient control. High performance, including 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, 1 MHz receiving bandwidth, and 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, is achieved. High-quality images on a 1.5 T MRI system using the spectrometer are obtained.

  3. New schemes of static mass spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baisanov, O.A. [Military Institute of Air Defense Forces, Aktobe (Kazakhstan); Doskeyev, G.A. [Aktobe State University named after K. Zhubanov, Aktobe (Kazakhstan); Spivak-Lavrov, I.F., E-mail: baisanov@mail.ru [Aktobe State University named after K. Zhubanov, Aktobe (Kazakhstan)

    2011-07-21

    Different possibilities to increase the 'quality', or Q-quantity, of static mass spectrometers by expanding the ion beam before it enters the magnetic field are analyzed. The design of mass spectrometers using a cone-shaped achromatic prism is discussed. Different variants of achromatic mass spectrometers using electrostatic prisms and sector magnetic fields are also considered.

  4. The Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Chouhan, J. DeKamp, A. Zeller, P. Brindza, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, E. Sun

    2010-06-01

    A collaboration between NSCL and Jlab has developed the reference design and coil winding for Jlab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet. A warm iron ??C?? type superferric dipole magnet will bend the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3?? to allow the SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5??. This requires an integral field strength of up to 2.1 T.m. The major challenges are the tight geometry, high and unbalanced forces and a required low fringe field in primary beam path. A coil design based on flattened SSC Rutherford cable that provides a large current margin and commercially available fiberglass prepreg epoxy tape has been developed. A complete test coil has been wound and will be cold tested. This paper present the modified magnet design includes coil forces, coil restraint system and fringe field. In addition, coil properties, quench calculations and the full mechanical details are also presented.

  5. Correlation spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Flemming, Jeb H.; Jones, Gary D.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  6. CAPRICE98: a balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer equipped with a gas RICH and a silicon calorimeter to study cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbiellini, G.; Bartalucci, S.; Bellotti, R.; Bergstroem, D.; Bidoli, V.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V. E-mail: bonvicini@trieste.infn.it; Bravar, U.; Cafagna, F.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; Marzo, C. De; Pascale, M.P. De; Finetti, N.; Francke, T.; Grinstein, S.; Hof, M.; Khalchukov, F.; Kremer, J.; Menn, W.; Mitchell, J.W.; Morselli, A.; Ormes, J.F.; Papini, P.; Piccardi, S.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Simon, M.; Schiavon, P.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stochaj, S.J.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Stephens, S.A.; Suffert, M.; Vacchi, A.; Weber, N.; Zampa, N

    2001-04-01

    CAPRICE98 is a superconducting magnetic spectrometer, equipped with a gas RICH and a silicon calorimeter, launched from Ft. Sumner (USA), on the 28th of May 1998, by the WiZard collaboration. For the first time a gas RICH detector flew together with a silicon electromagnetic calorimeter, allowing mass resolved antiprotons, with E>18 GeV, to be detected. The detector configuration was completed by a time of flight for particle identification, and a set of three drift chambers for rigidity measurement. The science objectives are the study of antimatter in cosmic rays and the cosmic ray composition in the atmosphere with special focus on muons.

  7. Atomistic calculation of elastic constants of alpha-iron containing point defects by means of magnetic interatomic potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiesa, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Derlet, P.M. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)], E-mail: peter.derlet@psi.ch; Dudarev, S.L. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Van Swygenhoven, H. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2009-04-30

    The recently developed magnetic potential for ferromagnetic BCC Fe [S.L. Dudarev, P.M. Derlet, J. Phys. ondens. Mat. 17 (2005) 7097; P.M. Derlet, S.L. Dudarev, Prog. Mater. Sci. 52 (2007) 299] is used to investigate the change in the elastic constants of bcc {alpha}-Fe as a function of a concentration of interstitial and vacancy defects. The results are discussed in terms of experiment and current theoretical understanding.

  8. Multidimensional spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanni, Martin Thomas; Damrauer, Niels H.

    2010-07-20

    A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

  9. X-ray and H-alpha observations of a filament-disappearance flare - An empirical analysis of the magnetic field configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Webb, D. F.; Moore, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    On August, 29, 1973, a flare event occurred that involved the disappearance of a filament near central meridian. The event, well-observed in X-rays on Skylab and in H-alpha, was a four-ribbon flare involving both new and old magnetic inversion lines which were roughly parallel. The H-alpha, X-ray, and magnetic field data are used to deduce the magnetic polarities of the H-alpha brightening at the footpoints of the brightest X-ray loops. It is suggested that the event involved a reconnection of magnetic field lines rather than a brightening in place of preexisting loops. The simultaneity of the H-alpha brightening onsets in the four ribbons and the apparent lack of an eruption of the filament are consistent with this interpretation.

  10. Feasibility studies for assaying alpha-fetoprotein using antibody-activated magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang KW

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Kai-Wen Huang1, Shieh-Yueh Yang2,3, Yu-Wei Hong3, Jen-Jie Chieh3, Che-Chuan Yang3, Herng-Er Horng3, Chau-Chung Wu4, Chin-Yih Hong5, Hong-Chang Yang61Department of Surgery and Hepatitis Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 2MagQu Co, Ltd, Sindian Dist, New Taipei City, 3Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, 4Departments of Internal Medicine and Primary Care Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 5Graduate Institute of Bio-medical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 6Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Some previous reports have already shown the characterizations of immunomagnetic reduction (IMR. The assay technology involves the utilities of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles to label target biomolecules. However, the detection threshold and interference tests for IMR have not been investigated in detail. In this study, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP was used as a target biomolecule. The signals for AFP solutions of various concentrations, or with interfering materials, were detected via IMR. These samples were also used for characterizing the detection threshold and interference with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The results of assaying AFP level with IMR and ELISA were compared. The detection threshold for assaying AFP with IMR was found to be 3 ng/mL, which is 15 times lower than that of ELISA, and definitely suppresses false negative. For the interfering materials noted commonly in serum such as hemoglobin, bilirubin, triglyceride, and vascular endothelial growth factor, there was no detectable interfering effect when assaying AFP with IMR. Several serum samples from normal people and liver-tumor-bearing patients were used for the detections of AFP concentration via IMR. These results reveal the feasibilities of assaying AFP in blood

  11. Construction of a magnetic bottle spectrometer and its application to pulse duration measurement of X-ray laser using a pump-probe method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Namba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the temporal evolution of ultrashort X-ray pulses emitted by laser plasmas using a pump-probe method, a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer is constructed. The design is determined by numerical calculations of a mirror magnetic field and of the electron trajectory in a flight tube. The performance of the spectrometer is characterized by measuring the electron spectra of xenon atoms irradiated with a laser-driven plasma X-ray pulse. In addition, two-color above-threshold ionization (ATI experiment is conducted for measurement of the X-ray laser pulse duration, in which xenon atoms are simultaneously irradiated with an X-ray laser pump and an IR laser probe. The correlation in the intensity of the sideband spectra of the 4d inner-shell photoelectrons and in the time delay of the two laser pulses yields an X-ray pulse width of 5.7 ps, in good agreement with the value obtained using an X-ray streak camera.

  12. High Magnetic Shear Gain in a Liquid Sodium Stable Couette Flow Experiment; A Prelude to an alpha-Omega Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, Stirling A; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    The $\\Omega$-phase of the liquid sodium $\\alpha$-$\\Omega$ dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, $B_{\\phi} \\simeq 8\\times B_r$ from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, $B_r$. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at $Rm \\simeq 120$. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow where $ (\\delta v/v)^2 \\sim 10^{-3} $. This high $\\Omega$-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller $\\Omega$-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays only a smaller diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  13. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, Stirling [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Jui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finn, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pariev, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beckley, Howard [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH; Si, Jiahe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Martinic, Joe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westpfahl, David [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Slutz, James [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westrom, Zeb [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Klein, Brianna [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  14. Measurements of ion temperature and flow of pulsed plasmas produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device using an ion Doppler spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know surface damage characteristics of plasma-facing component materials during transient heat and particle loads such as type I ELMs. A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device has been used as transient heat and particle source in ELM simulation experiments. Characteristics of pulsed plasmas produced by the MCPG device play an important role for the plasma material interaction. In this study, ion temperature and flow velocity of pulsed He plasmas were measured by an ion Doppler spectrometer (IDS). The IDS system consists of a light collection system including optical fibers, 1m-spectrometer and a 16 channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. The IDS system measures the width and Doppler shift of HeII (468.58 nm) emission line with the time resolution of 1 μs. The Doppler broadened and shifted spectra were measured with 45 and 135 degree angles with respect to the plasmoid traveling direction. The observed emission line profile was represented by sum of two Gaussian components to determine the temperature and flow velocity. The minor component at around the wavelength of zero-velocity was produced by the stationary plasma. As the results, the ion velocity and temperature were 68 km/s and 19 eV, respectively. Thus, the He ion flow energy is 97 eV. The observed flow velocity agrees with that measured by a time of flight technique.

  15. Line-of-Sight Observables Algorithms for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Instrument Tested with Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, Sébastien; Rajaguru, S. P.; Wachter, Richard; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Schou, Jesper; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2012-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory produces line-of-sight (LOS) observables (Doppler velocity, magnetic-field strength, Fe i line width, line depth, and continuum intensity) as well as vector magnetic-field maps at the solar surface. The accuracy of LOS observables is dependent on the algorithm used to translate a sequence of HMI filtergrams into the corresponding observables. Using one hour of high-cadence imaging spectropolarimetric observations of a sunspot in the Fe i line at 6173 Å through the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer installed at the Dunn Solar Telescope, and the Milne-Eddington inversion of the corresponding Stokes vectors, we test the accuracy of the observables algorithm currently implemented in the HMI data-analysis pipeline: the MDI-like algorithm. In an attempt to improve the accuracy of HMI observables, we also compare this algorithm to others that may be implemented in the future: a least-squares fit with a Gaussian profile, a least-squares fit with a Voigt profile, and the use of second Fourier coefficients in the MDI-like algorithm.

  16. The coincidence counting technique for orders of magnitude background reduction in data obtained with the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H; Manuel, M J-E; Gatu Johnson, M; Schaeffer, J C; Frankel, R; Sinenian, N; Childs, R A; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Burke, M; Roberts, S

    2011-07-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been built and successfully used at OMEGA for measurements of down-scattered neutrons (DS-n), from which an areal density in both warm-capsule and cryogenic-DT implosions have been inferred. Another MRS is currently being commissioned on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for diagnosing low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium implosions and high-yield DT implosions. As CR-39 detectors are used in the MRS, the principal sources of background are neutron-induced tracks and intrinsic tracks (defects in the CR-39). The coincidence counting technique was developed to reduce these types of background tracks to the required level for the DS-n measurements at OMEGA and the NIF. Using this technique, it has been demonstrated that the number of background tracks is reduced by a couple of orders of magnitude, which exceeds the requirement for the DS-n measurements at both facilities.

  17. Optimization of a partially non-magnetic primary radiation shielding for the triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II

    CERN Document Server

    Pyka, N M; Rogov, A

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been used to optimize the monochromator shielding of the polarized cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II. By using the Monte Carlo program MCNP-4B, the density of the total spectrum of incoming neutrons and gamma radiation from the beam tube SR-2 has been determined during the three-dimensional diffusion process in different types of heavy concrete and other absorbing material. Special attention has been paid to build a compact and highly efficient shielding, partially non-magnetic, with a total biological radiation dose of less than 10 mu Sv/h at its outsides. Especially considered was the construction of an albedo reducer, which serves to reduce the background in the experiment outside the shielding. (orig.)

  18. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Bionta, R M; Casey, D T; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Khater, H Y; Sayre, D B; Knauer, J P; Sangster, T C; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm(2) and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm(2) are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  19. Design of combined magnetic field system for magnetic-bottle time-of-flight spectrometer%磁瓶飞行时间谱仪用复合磁场系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王超; 田进寿; 张美志; 康轶凡

    2011-01-01

    根据磁瓶飞行时间谱仪磁场系统的基本要求,设计了一套符合其使用的复合磁场系统.最高强度达1.2T的强非均匀磁场部分由永久磁铁和结构经过优化的截圆锥状磁极靴所产生.永久磁铁为N52系列NdFeB,磁极靴材料为高磁导率珀明德合金.强度为1.0×10-3 T的弱均匀引导磁场由半径为3 cm、长度为3m螺线管提供.磁极靴与螺线管之间的距离为5 cm.%Based on the primary requirement for the magnetic field system in magnetic-bottle time-of-flight spectrometer, an appropriate combined inhomogeneous magnetic field system is designed. The inhomogeneous higher magnetic field part, with the highest field of 1. 2 T. is produced by the combination of a permanent magnet and a pole piece with optimized shape. The magnet, known as NdFeB magnet, is one of rare earth permanent magnets in N52. The guiding uniform magnetic field of 1. 0× 10-3 T is provided by solenoid, with length of 3 m and radius of 3 cm. The pitch between the pole piece and the near end of used solenoid is determined to be 5 cm, which can satisfy the actual engineering needs.

  20. Angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations and magnetic breakdown in {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, K., E-mail: uchida@issp.u-tokyo.ac.j [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Konoike, T.; Osada, T. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    We present results of stereographic measurements of interlayer magnetoresistance in the quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) organic conductor, {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4}, at around charge density wave (CDW) transition temperature T{sub c{approx}}8K. At 2 K in the CDW phase, there exists the anomalous Lebed resonance pattern, the amplitude of which is modulated by Danner-Chaikin oscillations in case of applied magnetic field close to the Q2D conducting plane. On the contrary, at 7 K just below T{sub c}, we have found that the Kajita oscillation of the cylindrical Fermi surfaces appears superposed on the anomalous Lebed resonance. A quantum model of interlayer tunneling demonstrates these behaviors qualitatively. These results suggest that magnetic breakdown plays a key role in anomalous angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations.

  1. The Aerogel $\\check{C}$erenkov Detector for the SHMS magnetic spectrometer in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, T.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Ali, S.; Asaturyan, A.; Carmignotto, M.; Dittmann, A.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Hlavin, N.; Illieva, Y.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Pegg, I.; Ramos, A.; Reinhold, J.; Sapkota, I.; Tadevosyan, V.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Wood, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    Hadronic reactions producing strange quarks such as exclusive or semi-inclusive kaon production, play an important role in studies of hadron structure and the dynamics that bind the most basic elements of nuclear physics. The small-angle capability of the new Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) in Hall C, coupled with its high momentum reach - up to the anticipated 11-GeV beam energy in Hall C - and coincidence capability with the well-understood High Momentum Spectrometer, will allow for probes of such hadron structure involving strangeness down to the smallest distance scales to date. To cleanly select the kaons, a threshold aerogel Cerenkov detector has been constructed for the SHMS. The detector consists of an aerogel tray followed by a diffusion box. Four trays for aerogel of nominal refractive indices of n=1.030, 1.020, 1.015 and 1.011 were constructed. The tray combination will allow for identification of kaons from 1 GeV/c up to 7.2 GeV/c, reaching 10-2 proton and 10-3 pion rejection, with kaon detection efficiency better than 95%. The diffusion box of the detector is equipped with 14 five-inch diameter photomultiplier tubes. Its interior walls are covered with Gore diffusive reflector, which is superior to the commonly used Millipore paper and improved the detector performance by 35%. The inner surface of the two aerogel trays with higher refractive index is covered with Millipore paper, however, those two trays with lower aerogel refractive index are again covered with Gore diffusive reflector for higher performance. The measured mean number of photoelectrons in saturation is ~12 for n=1.030, ~8 for n=1.020, ~10 for n=1.015, and ~5.5 for n=1.011. The design details, the results of component characterization, and initial performance tests and optimization of the detector are presented.

  2. Spectrometer gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waechter, David A.; Wolf, Michael A.; Umbarger, C. John

    1985-01-01

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  3. A Faraday rotation search for magnetic fields in quasar damped Ly alpha absorption systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Abraham L.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a Faraday rotation survey of 61 radio-bright QSOs conducted at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The Galactic contribution to the Faraday rotation is estimated and subtracted to determine the extragalactic rotation measure (RRM) for each source. Eleven of these QSOs are known to exhibit damped Ly alpha absorption. The rate of incidence of significant Faraday rotation of these 11 sources is compared to the remaining 50 and is found to be higher at the 99.8% confidence level. However, as this is based upon only two detections of Faraday rotation in the damped Ly alpha sample, the result is only tentative. If the two detections in the damped Ly alpha sample are dug to the absorbing systems, then the inferred rotation measure induced by these systems is roughly 250 rad/sq m. The two detections were for the two lowest redshift absorbers in the sample. We find that a rotation measure of 250 rad/sq m would have gone undetected for any other absorber in the damped Ly alpha sample due to the 1/(1 + 2) squared dilution of the observed RRM with redshift. Thus the data are consistent with, but do not prove, the hypothesis that Faraday rotation is a generic property of damped Ly alpha absorbers. We do not confirm the suggestion that the amplitude of RRMs increases with redshift. Rather, the data are consistent with no redshift evolution. We find that the uncertainty in the estimation of the Galactic rotation measure (GRM) is a more serious problem than previously realized for extra-galactic Faraday rotation studies of QSO absorbers. A careful analysis of current methods for estimating GRM indicate that it can be determined to an accuracy of about 15 - 20 rad/sq m. Previous studies underestimated this uncertainty by more than a factor of 2. Due to this uncertainty, rotation measures such as we suspect are associated with damped Ly alpha absorption systems can only be detected at redshifts less than z approximately

  4. Orientation of hyperfine magnetic fields of {alpha}-iron films produced by laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuike, Mamoru, E-mail: yyasu@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp; Usui, Ryo; Yamada, Yasuhiro [Tokyo University of Science (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshio [RIKEN (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Iron films were produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of iron in Ar gas and Moessbauer spectra of these films were obtained at room temperature. The orientation of the hyperfine magnetic field was found to vary depending on the pressure of the Ar gas. Iron films produced at low Ar pressures exhibited magnetic fields parallel to the substrate surface. The magnetic field became increasingly perpendicular to the substrate with increasing Ar pressure. Collisions with Ar gas molecules reduced the translational energies of laser-evaporated iron atoms and thus the orientation of crystals formed on the substrate varied depending on the Ar pressure.

  5. The Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old…

  6. The Magnetic Structure of H-alpha Macrospicules in Solar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, H.; Sakurai, T.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements by Ulysses in the high-speed polar solar wind have shown the wind to carry some fine-scale structures in which the magnetic field reverses direction by having a switchback fold in it. The lateral span of these magnetic switchbacks, translated back to the Sun, is of the scale of the lanes and cells of the magnetic network in which the open magnetic field of the polar coronal hole and polar solar wind are rooted. This suggests that the magnetic switchbacks might be formed from network-scale magnetic loops that erupt into the corona and then undergo reconnection with the open field. This possibility motivated us to undertake the study reported here of the structure of Ha macrospicules observed at the limb in polar coronal holes, to determine whether a significant fraction of these eruptions appear to be erupting loops. From a search of the polar coronal holes in 6 days of image- processed full-disk Ha movies from Big Bear Solar Observatory, we found a total of 35 macrospicules. Nearly all of these (32) were of one or the other of two different forms: 15 were in the form of an erupting loop, and 17 were in the form of a single column spiked jet. The erupting-loop macrospicules are appropriate for producing the magnetic switchbacks in the polar wind. The spiked-jet macrospicules show the appropriate structure and evolution to be driven by reconnection between network-scale closed field (a network bipole) and the open field rooted against the closed field. This evidence for reconnection in a large fraction of our macrospicules (1) suggests that many spicules may be generated by similar but smaller reconnection events and (2) supports the view that coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in coronal holes and in quiet regions are driven by explosive reconnection events in the magnetic network.

  7. In vivo screening of hepatocellular carcinoma using AC susceptibility of anti-alpha fetoprotein-activated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Jie Chieh

    Full Text Available With antibody-mediated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs applied in cancer examinations, patients must pay at least twice for MNP reagents in immunomagnetic reduction (IMR of in vitro screening and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of in vivo tests. This is because the high maintenance costs and complex analysis of MRI have limited the possibility of in vivo screening. Therefore, this study proposes novel methods for in vivo screening of tumors by examining the AC susceptibility of bound MNPs using scanning superconducting-quantum-interference-device (SQUID biosusceptometry (SSB, thereby demonstrating high portability and improved economy. The favorable agreement between in vivo tests using SSB and MRI demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo screening using SSB for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC targeted by anti-alpha fetoprotein (AFP-mediated MNPs. The magnetic labeling was also proved by in vitro tests using SSB and biopsy assays. Therefore, patients receiving bioprobe-mediated MNPs only once can undergo in vivo screening using SSB in the future.

  8. Alpha shape theory for 3D visualization and volumetric measurement of brain tumor progression using magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoud Al-Tamimi, Mohammed Sabbih; Sulong, Ghazali; Shuaib, Ibrahim Lutfi

    2015-07-01

    Resection of brain tumors is a tricky task in surgery due to its direct influence on the patients' survival rate. Determining the tumor resection extent for its complete information via-à-vis volume and dimensions in pre- and post-operative Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) requires accurate estimation and comparison. The active contour segmentation technique is used to segment brain tumors on pre-operative MR images using self-developed software. Tumor volume is acquired from its contours via alpha shape theory. The graphical user interface is developed for rendering, visualizing and estimating the volume of a brain tumor. Internet Brain Segmentation Repository dataset (IBSR) is employed to analyze and determine the repeatability and reproducibility of tumor volume. Accuracy of the method is validated by comparing the estimated volume using the proposed method with that of gold-standard. Segmentation by active contour technique is found to be capable of detecting the brain tumor boundaries. Furthermore, the volume description and visualization enable an interactive examination of tumor tissue and its surrounding. Admirable features of our results demonstrate that alpha shape theory in comparison to other existing standard methods is superior for precise volumetric measurement of tumor.

  9. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic detection of oligomannosidic n glycans in alpha-mannosidosis: a method of monitoring treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenarius, Derk Frederik Matthaus; Svendsen, John-Sigurd; Malm, Dag

    2011-10-01

    In Alpha-mannosidosis (MIM 248500) the patients accumulate mainly unbranched oligosaccharide chains in the lysosomes in all body tissues, including the brain. With ensuing therapeutic modalities in man (BMT and ERT) non-invasive methods of monitoring the effect of treatment are needed. Paramount is the possible effect of the treatment on the brain, since this organ is regarded as difficult to reach because of the blood-brain barrier. We therefore performed proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain in two untreated patients, and a 16-year-old patient treated with BMT at the age of 10 to assess whether this non-invasive method could be applied in the monitoring of the accumulation of abnormal chemicals in the brain of patients. We found an abnormal peak that was not present in the treated patient. A similar pattern was also found in MRS of urine from patients, reflecting the concentration of oligosaccharides in serum and tissues. We therefore conclude that MRS can be a useful method to monitor the effect of treatment for Alpha-Mannosidosis.

  10. A Magnetic Alpha-Omega Dynamo in Active Galactic Nuclei Disks: II. Magnetic Field Generation, Theories and Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Pariev, V I; Finn, J M; Pariev, Vladimir I.; Colgate, Stirling A.; Finn, John M.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that a dynamo can operate in an Active Galactic Nuclei accretion disk due to the Keplerian shear and due to the helical motions of expanding and twisting plumes of plasma heated by many star passages through the disk. Each plume rotates a fraction of the toroidal flux into poloidal flux, always in the same direction, through a finite angle, and proportional to its diameter. The predicted growth rate of poloidal magnetic flux, based upon two analytic approaches and numerical simulations, leads to a rapid exponentiation of a seed field, \\sim 0.1 to \\sim 0.01 per Keplerian period of the inner part of the disk. The initial value of the seed field may therefore be arbitrarily small yet reach, through dynamo gain, saturation very early in the disk history. Because of tidal disruption of stars close to the black hole, the maximum growth rate occurs at a radius of about 100 gravitational radii from the central object. The generated mean magnetic field, a quadrupole field, has predominantly even parity so ...

  11. The iron $K_\\alpha$ lines as a tool for magnetic field estimations in non-flat accretion flows

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, A F; Bao, Y

    2004-01-01

    Observations of AGNs and microquasars by ASCA, RXTE, Chandra and XMM-Newton indicate the existence of broad X-ray emission lines of ionized heavy elements in their spectra. Such spectral lines were discovered also in X-ray spectra of neutron stars and X-ray afterglows of GRBs. Recently, Zakharov et al. (MNRAS, 2003, 342, 1325) described a procedure to estimate an upper limit of the magnetic fields in regions from which X-ray photons are emitted. The authors simulated typical profiles of the iron $K_\\alpha$ line in the presence of magnetic field and compared them with observational data in the framework of the widely accepted accretion disk model. Here we further consider typical Zeeman splitting in the framework of a model of non-flat accretion flows, which is a generalization of previous consideration into non-equatorial plane motion of particles emitting X-ray photons. Using perspective facilities of space borne instruments (e.g. Constellation-X mission) a better resolution of the blue peak structure of iro...

  12. Nanosurface-confined anisotropic growth and magnetism of ellipsoidal alpha-Fe nanogranules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Seung Hun; Kim, Chang Yeoul; Riu, Doh Hyung; Taguchi, Yosuke; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the nanosurface-confined anisotropic growth of ordered-ellipsoidal Fe nanogranules when an Fe plume was deposited at a slanting angle onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) film. Layer-by-layer growth was also investigated. This growth is driven by two critical factors: (1) a new rhombic AAO cell and (2) the slanting deposition of the Fe plume. During slanting deposition, the rhombic AAO cell induces strong restrictions in the nucleation site, growth direction, and granular size; therefore, the degree of freedom during growth is restricted. The magnetic dipoles of the ordered Fe nanogranules are placed along the long axis of the ellipsoid at an angle of 180 degrees (antiparallel) due to the demagnetizing field, shape anisotropy, and magnetic dipole-to-dipole interactions.

  13. Calculated electronic and magnetic structure of screw dislocations in alpha iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odbadrakh, K.; Rusanu, A.; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Samolyuk, G. D.; Eisenbach, M.; Wang, Yang; Nicholson, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Local atomic magnetic moments in crystalline Fe are perturbed by the presence of dislocations. The effects are most pronounced near the dislocation core and decay slowly as the strain field of the dislocation decreases with distance. We have calculated local moments using the locally self-consistent multiple scattering (LSMS) method for a supercell containing a screw-dislocation quadrupole. Finite size effects are found to be significant indicating that dislocation cores affect the electronic structure and magnetic moments of neighboring dislocations. The influence of neighboring dislocations points to a need to study individual dislocations from first principles just as they appear amid surrounding atoms in large-scale classical force field simulations. An approach for the use of the LSMS to calculate local moments in subvolumes of large atomic configurations generated in the course of classical molecular dynamics simulation of dislocationdynamics is discussed.

  14. Calculated electronic and magnetic structure of screw dislocations in alpha iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu [ORNL; Rusanu, Aurelian [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Wang, Yang Nmn [ORNL; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Local atomic magnetic moments in crystalline Fe are perturbed by the presence of dislocations. The effects are most pronounced near the dislocation core and decay slowly as the strain field of the dislocation decreases with distance. We have calculated local moments using the locally self-consistent multiple scattering (LSMS) method for a supercell containing a screw-dislocation quadrupole. Finite size effects are found to be significant indicating that dislocation cores affect the electronic structure and magnetic moments of neighboring dislocations. The influence of neighboring dislocations points to a need to study individual dislocations from first principles just as they appear amid surrounding atoms in large-scale classical force field simulations. An approach for the use of the LSMS to calculate local moments in subvolumes of large atomic configurations generated in the course of classical molecular dynamics simulation of dislocation dynamics is discussed. VC2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3562217

  15. Development of hard X-ray photoelectron SPLEED-based spectrometer applicable for probing of buried magnetic layer valence states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, Xeniya, E-mail: kozina@uni-mainz.de [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ikenaga, Eiji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Viol Barbosa, Carlos Eduardo; Ouardi, Siham; Karel, Julie [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Yamamoto, Masafumi [Division of Electronics for Informatics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan); Kobayashi, Keisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Elmers, Hans Joachim; Schönhense, Gerd [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg – Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Felser, Claudia [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A high-voltage compatible spin-HAXPES detector based on SPLEED from W(001) has been developed. • Magnetic properties of a TMR device were studied by core-level photoemission on the Fe 2p{sub 3/2} states. • The developed instrument enabled probing of buried layers in the region of the valence states. - Abstract: A novel design of high-voltage compatible polarimeter for spin-resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (Spin-HAXPES) went into operation at beamline BL09XU of SPring-8 in Hyogo, Japan. The detector is based on the well-established principle of electron diffraction from a W(001) single-crystal at a scattering energy of 103.5 eV. It's special feature is that it can be operated at a high negative bias potential up to 10 kV, necessary to access the HAXPES range. The polarimeter is operated behind a large hemispherical analyzer (Scienta R-4000). It was optimized for high transmission of the transfer optics. A delay-line detector (20 mm dia.) is positioned at the exit plane of the analyzer enabling conventional multichannel intensity spectroscopy simultaneously with single-channel spin analysis. The performance of the combined setup is demonstrated by the spin-resolved data for the valence-region of a FeCo functional layer of a tunneling device, buried beneath 3 nm of oxidic material. The well-structured spin polarization spectrum validates Spin-HAXPES in the valence energy range as powerful method for bulk electronic structure analysis. The spin polarization spectrum exhibits a rich structure, originating from clearly discernible transitions in the majority and minority partial spin spectra.

  16. CE -3有效载荷 APXS 可靠性预计及评估%The Reliability Prediction and Assessment of Chang'E-3 Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高旻; 王焕玉; 张承模; 崔兴柱; 梁晓华; 彭文溪

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the reliability prediction of Chang'E-3 Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer. The payload is aimed to identify elements of lunar surface, and it is capable to determine the abundances of the elements.Weakness in the design could be found by calculating the reliability of the APXS reliability prediction reliability of a given comparison.APXS electronics systems carry out aging tests.The life factor of operating temperature could be obtained by Arrhenius reaction model.And then the reliability prediction of the results could be assessed through Bayesian point estimation and Bayesian internal estimation method.The main factors affecting the results were discussed.The reliability requirements of APXS under the development phase are pro-posed.%粒子激发X射线谱仪( APXS)是以元素成分鉴别和定量分析为目标的CE-3巡视器有效载荷。该工作针对APXS电子学系统建立了可靠性模型,并进行了可靠性预计。通过对APXS可靠性预计计算的可靠度与给定的可靠度进行对比,发现设计中的薄弱环节。对APXS电子学系统进行老化试验,用阿伦尼乌斯( ARRHENISUS)反应模型获得了工作温度下的寿命因子,利用贝叶斯法点估计和区间估计对试验的结果进行了可靠性评估,并对影响结果的主要因素进行讨论,提出APXS研制阶段的各项可靠性要求。

  17. Calculated Electronic and Magnetic Structure of Screw Dislocations in Alpha Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu [ORNL; Rusanu, Aurelian [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Wang, Yang [Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Local atomic magnetic moments in crystalline Fe are perturbed by the presence of dislocations. The effects are most pronounced near the dislocation core and decay slowly as the strain field of the dislocation decreases with distance. We have calculated the local moments using the Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) method for an 1848 atom supercell containing a screw- dislocation quadrupole. The atomic positions were determined by relaxation with an embedded atom force field. Finite size effects are found to be significant for this small cell size indicating that dislocation cores affect the electronic structure and magnetic moments of neighboring dislocations. The influence of neighboring dislocations point to a need to study individual dislocations from first principles just as they appear amidst surrounding atoms in large scale classical force field simulations. An approach for the use of the LSMS to calculate local moments in sub-volumes of large atomic configurations generated in the course of classical MD simulation of dislocation dynamics is discussed.

  18. View of the Axial Field Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Axial Field Spectrometer, with the vertical uranium/scintillator calorimeter and the central drift chamber retracted for service. One coil of the Open Axial Field Magnet is just visible to the right.

  19. Detection of a covalent intermediate in the mechanism of action of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase by using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, B Y; Reilly, P J; Robyt, J F

    1989-05-01

    The catalytic mechanism of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (1,4-alpha-D-glucan glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1) has been examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at subzero temperatures by using [1-13C]maltotetraose as substrate. Spectral summation and difference techniques revealed a broad resonance peak, whose chemical shift, relative signal intensity and time-course appearance corresponded to a beta-carboxyl-acetal ester covalent enzyme-glycosyl intermediate. This evidence supports a double-displacement covalent mechanism for porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase-catalyzed hydrolysis of glycosidic linkages, based on the presence of catalytic aspartic acid residues within the active site of this enzyme.

  20. Temperature Effect Correction for Chang'E-3 Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer%嫦娥三号粒子激发X射线谱仪能谱温度影响的修正方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴明烨; 樊瑞睿; 刘雅清; 董亦凡; 吴峰; 赵小芸; 王焕玉; 彭文溪; 张承模; 张家字; 崔兴柱; 梁晓华; 汪锦州; 杨家卫

    2012-01-01

    Alpha particle X-ray spectrometer ( APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang'E-3 lunar rover of China's Lunar Exploration Project The present paper introduces briefly the components of APXS, how it works and its working environment on the lunar surface. The environmental temperature effect has been studied with simulations and experiments, and the results show that the temperature of the APXS sensor will be varying during the measuring on the lunar surface. And another experiment reveals that the energy resolution becomes worse if the sensor's temperature is varying. In this paper, a correction method based on Pearson's chi-squared test is presented. The method can improve the energy resolution when the sensor's temperature is varying. We have tested the method with the spectra acquired by APXS in the temperature varying period of Temperature Cycling Test, and the results show that the method is efficient and reliable.%粒子激发X射线谱仪(APXS)是中国探月工程二期嫦娥三号月球巡视器的有效载荷之一.简要介绍APXS的工作原理、组成部分,以及它在月面的工作环境,通过模拟及实验研究了月面热环境对APXS的影响,结果显示,APXS将工作在显著的变温过程中.相对恒温过程,APXS在变温过程中的能量分辨率明显变差.为了消除该温度效应的影响,提出了一种基于皮尔逊卡方检验(Pearson's chi-squared test)的修正方法,能够有效提高变温过程中的能量分辨率.通过温度循环试验中变温阶段的数据对该方法进行了测试,结果表明,该方法具有很好的修正效果和较高的可靠性.

  1. NMR spectrometers as "magnetic tongues"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Amoresano, Claudia; Trotta, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    the analyzed samples based on their chemical composition. We were able to correlate the NMR metabolomic fingerprints recorded for canned tomato samples to the sensory descriptors bitterness, sweetness, sourness, saltiness, tomato and metal taste, redness, and density, suggesting that NMR might be a very useful...

  2. Development of Miniature Spectrometers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-guo

    2007-01-01

    Spectrometer is an essential and necessary optical element used for measuring the chemical components and content of the matter.The development of miniature spectrometers can be traced back to 1980s.The development state and different manufacturing methods of micro-spectrometers are presented.Finally,we analyze the miniaturization trend of spectrometers.Some groundwork for the scientific research is offered by introducing micro-spectrometers development.

  3. A 4-PI DILEPTON SPECTROMETER - PEPSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUDA, A; BACELAR, JCS; BALANDA, A; VANKLINKEN, J; SUJKOWSKI, Z; VANDERWOUDE, A

    1993-01-01

    A novel positron-electron pair spectroscopy instrument (PEPSI) was designed to measure transitions in the energy region 10-40 MeV. It consists of Nd2Fe14B permanent magnets forming a compact 4 pi magnetic filter consisting of 12 positron and 20 electron mini-orange-like spectrometers. The response f

  4. Controlled synthesis of alpha-Fe2O3 nanorods and its size-dependent optical absorption, electrochemical, and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Suyuan; Tang, Kaibin; Li, Tanwei

    2007-08-15

    Uniform alpha-Fe(2)O(3) nanorods with diameter of about 30 nm and length up to 500 nm were synthesized by a template-free hydrothermal method and a following calcination of the intermediate product in the air at 500 degrees C for 2 h. By carefully tuning the concentration of the reactants, a series of alpha-Fe(2)O(3) nanorods with gradient in aspect ratios can be obtained. The effect of the solvent was also evaluated. Based on the experimental facts, the formation mechanism of this one-dimensional structure was proposed. The size-dependent properties of the as-obtained alpha-Fe(2)O(3) nanorods were investigated. The optical absorption properties of the samples showed that the band gaps of the samples decreased in the sequence in which the size increased. The electrochemical performance of the samples showed that the discharge capacity decreased as the size of the sample increased, which may result from the high surface area and small size. The magnetic hysteresis measurements taken at 5 K showed that the coercivities of the samples were related to the aspect ratios of the samples, which may result from the larger shape anisotropy. However, the temperature-dependent field cooling magnetization showed that there was no Morin transition in the as-prepared samples, which may result from the surface effect.

  5. Development of an ion time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit

    signal. Without loss of generality, the secondary signal is obtained by the passage of the ion through a thin carbon foil, which produces ion-induced secondary electron emission (IISEE). The time-of-flight spectrometer physically acts as an ion/electron separator. The electrons that enter the active volume of the spectrometer are transported onto the microchannel plate detector to generate the secondary signal. The electron optics can be designed in variety of ways depending on the nature of the measurement and physical requirements. Two ion time-of-flight spectrometer designs are introduced: the parallel electric and magnetic (PEM) field spectrometer and the cross electric and magnetic (CEM) field spectrometer. The CEM field spectrometers have been extensively used in a wide range of applications where precise mass differentiation is required. The PEM field spectrometers have lately found interest in mass spectroscopy applications. The application of the PEM field spectrometer for energy measurements is a novel approach. The PEM field spectrometer used in the measurements employs axial electric and magnetic fields along the nominal direction of the incident ion. The secondary electrons are created by a thin carbon foil on the entrance disk and transported on the microchannel plate that faces the carbon foil. The initial angular distribution of the secondary electrons has virtually no effect on the transport time of the secondary electrons from the surface of the carbon foil to the electron microchannel plate detector. Therefore, the PEM field spectrometer can offer high-resolution energy measurement for relatively lower electric fields. The measurements with the PEM field spectrometer were made with the Tandem linear particle accelerator at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center at Yorktown Heights, NY. The CEM field spectrometer developed for the thesis employs axial electric field along the nominal direction of the ion, and has perpendicular magnetic field. As the

  6. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon-based near-infrared interference spectrometer for measurement of the HeI 2{sup 3}S-2{sup 3}P spectral line shape in magnetically confined torus plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogane, S.; Shikama, T., E-mail: shikama@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Zushi, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    In magnetically confined torus plasmas, the local emission intensity, temperature, and flow velocity of atoms in the inboard and outboard scrape-off layers can be separately measured by a passive emission spectroscopy assisted by observation of the Zeeman splitting in their spectral line shape. To utilize this technique, a near-infrared interference spectrometer optimized for the observation of the helium 2{sup 3}S–2{sup 3}P transition spectral line (wavelength 1083 nm) has been developed. The applicability of the technique to actual torus devices is elucidated by calculating the spectral line shapes expected to be observed in LHD and QUEST (Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak). In addition, the Zeeman effect on the spectral line shape is measured using a glow-discharge tube installed in a superconducting magnet.

  7. Optical Calibration For Jefferson Lab HKS Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Yuan; L. Tang

    2005-11-04

    In order to accept very forward angle scattering particles, Jefferson Lab HKS experiment uses an on-target zero degree dipole magnet. The usual spectrometer optics calibration procedure has to be modified due to this on-target field. This paper describes a new method to calibrate HKS spectrometer system. The simulation of the calibration procedure shows the required resolution can be achieved from initially inaccurate optical description.

  8. Mini-Orange Spectrometer at CIAE

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yun; Li, Guang-Sheng; Li, Cong-Bo; He, Chuang-Ye; Chen, Qi-Ming; Zhong, Jian; Zhou, Wen-Kui; Deng, Li-Tao; Zhu, Bao-Ji

    2016-01-01

    A Mini-Orange spectrometer used for in-beam measurements of internal conversion electrons, which consists of a Si(Li) detector and different sets of SmO$_5$ permanent magnets for filtering and transporting the conversion electrons to the Si(Li) detector, has been developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy. The working principle and configuration of the Mini-Orange spectrometer are described. The performance of the setup is illustrated by measured singles conversion electron spectra using the Mini-Orange spectrometer.

  9. A SSS Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The SSS spectrometer, so called simple scintillation spectrometer, is made by BTI (Bubble Technology Industries). The spectrometer can be used in the neutron energy range from 4.0 to 17 MeV. The SSS includes two sections: A probe and an analyzer module

  10. Forward fitting of experimental data from a NE213 neutron detector installed with the magnetic proton recoil upgraded spectrometer at JETa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda, F.; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Sundén, E. Andersson

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the data analysis of neutron spectra measured with a NE213 liquid scintillator at JET. We calculated the neutron response matrix of the instrument combining MCNPX simulations, a generic proton light output function measured with another detector and the fit of data from ohmic pulses. For the analysis, we selected a set of pulses with neutral beam injection heating (NBI) only and we applied a forward fitting procedure of modeled spectral components to extract the fraction of thermal neutron emission. The results showed the same trend of the ones obtained with the dedicated spectrometer TOFOR, even though the values from the NE213 analysis were systematically higher. This discrepancy is probably due to the different lines of sight of the two spectrometers (tangential for the NE213, vertical for TOFOR). The uncertainties on the thermal fraction estimates were from 4 to 7 times higher than the ones from the TOFOR analysis.

  11. Magnetic field effects on the charge-density-wave and superconducting states in pressurized {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartsovnik, M.V., E-mail: mark.kartsovnik@wmi.badw.de [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Biberacher, W.; Andres, D.; Jakob, S.; Kunz, M.; Neumaier, K. [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Mueller, H. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble (France); Kushch, N.D. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-01

    Coupling of a magnetic field to the orbital and spin degrees of freedom of charge carriers is well known to cause suppression of superconductivity. While the orbital pair-breaking generally dominates in conventional superconductors, the Pauli paramagnetic effect may become important in some heavy fermion compounds or strongly anisotropic materials such as high-T{sub c} or organic superconductors. The same two mechanisms are predicted to be operative also in the case of charge-density-wave (CDW) ordering. However, now they lead to opposite effects: the paramagnetic coupling weakens the CDW interaction whereas the orbital coupling enhances it in a system with an imperfectly nested Fermi surface. Here we report on the experimental evidence of both kinds of magnetic field effects on the CDW and superconducting instabilities in the layered organic metal {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4} under quasihydrostatic pressure.

  12. Learning Experience for Calibration Speciifcation for Superconducting Pulsed Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers%超导脉冲傅里叶变换核磁共振谱仪校准规范解读

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖鹏; 张伟; 黄挺

    2015-01-01

    Calibration Specification for Superconducting Pulsed Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers JJF1448–2014 was conducted. Through the analysis of the main technical indicators of the superconducting pulsed Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, the reasons of ethyl benzene certified reference material,chloroform certified reference material,deuterated benzene/p-dioxane certified reference material and the features and advantages of calibration method in calibration specification JJF 1448–2014 were expounded. New standard calibration method is reasonable, the standards materials have simple structure, and can calibrate the main technical index of instruments, the efficiency was improved, it meets the most of the Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) calibration requirements.%对超导脉冲傅里叶变换核磁共振谱仪校准规范JJF 1448–2014进行了解读.通过对超导脉冲傅里叶变换核磁共振谱仪主要技术指标的类型分析,说明了采用乙基苯溶液标准物质、氯仿溶液标准物质、氘代苯/p-二氧六环溶液标准物质被采用的原因及其在JJF 1448–2014校准方法中的特点及优势.新规范校准方法合理、所采用的标准物质结构简单、能够对仪器的主要技术指标进行校准,提高了效率,满足大部分傅里叶变换核磁共振的校准要求.

  13. Preliminary results from a new spin spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J.G.; Bedrossian, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Cummins, T.R. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics] [and others

    1998-12-31

    The first preliminary results from a novel spectrometer for elementally-specific measurements of magnetic surfaces and ultrathin films are presented here. The key measurements are based upon spin-resolving and photon-dichroic photoelectron spectroscopy. True spin-resolution is achieved by the use of a Mini-Mott detection scheme. The photon-dichroic measurements include the variant magnetic x-ray linear dichroism (MXLD). Both a multi-channel, energy dispersive collection scheme as well as the spin-detecting Mini-Mott apparatus are used in data collection. The Spin Spectrometer is based at the Spectromicroscopy Facility (Beamline 7) at the Advanced Light Source.

  14. Alpha Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha Thalassemia Physicians often mistake alpha thalassemia trait for iron deficiency anemia and incorrectly prescribe iron supplements that have no effect 1 on the anemia. αα αα Normal alpha ...

  15. Effect of Selective Co Addition on Magnetic Properties of Nd2(FeCo)14B/alpha-Fe Nanocomposite Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    uta.edu Received 17 July 2012, in final form 11 October 2012 Published 13 December 2012 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysD/46/045001 Abstract Nd2Fe14B /α-Fe...obtained in the isotropic Nd2(FeCo)14B/α-(FeCo) nanocomposite magnets compared with 15 MG Oe of Nd2Fe14B /α-Fe nanocomposite magnets prepared under the...The effect of Co addition on magnetic properties of the Nd2Fe14B single phase has been extensively studied since the initial discovery of the Nd–Fe

  16. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Osipenko, M; Ricco, G; Caiffi, B; Pompili, F; Pillon, M; Angelone, M; Verona-Rinati, G; Cardarelli, R; Mila, G; Argiro, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on $^6$Li into $\\alpha$ and $t$ whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction $Q$-value. The $^6$LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2$\\times 10^{-4}$ to 3.5$\\times 10^{-8}$ for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the $^6$Li(n,$\\alpha$)$t$ cross section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  17. Neutron diffraction texture analysis for {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} oriented by high magnetic field and sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terada, N; Suzuki, H S; Suzuki, T S; Kitazawa, H; Sakka, Y [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Kaneko, K; Metoki, N [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: TERADA.Noriki@nims.go.jp

    2009-05-21

    We have performed neutron diffraction experiments on highly oriented {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, obtained by slip casting under a magnetic field and sintering. In order to investigate the magnetic field, B, and sintering temperature, T{sub sint}, dependence of the degree of alignment of the orientation, we used samples treated with systematically varied B up to 12 T and T{sub sint} up to 1600 deg. C. The degree of alignment of the magnetic easy axis (the hexagonal c-axis) is rapidly enhanced by sintering above 1200 deg. C, which is coincident with the temperature at which crystal grains start to grow. The angular distribution of the c-axis for the sample sintered at 1600 deg. C, obtained by {omega}-scan neutron diffraction profiles, is almost coincident with the probability distribution calculated for the particle size two times larger than that in the starting material. We discuss the orientation process mechanism with sintering in light of the results of this analysis.

  18. Dielectric relaxation studies in 5CB nematic liquid crystal at 9 GHz under the influence of external magnetic field using microwave cavity spectrometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Johri; Abhay Saxena; S Johri; S Saxena; D P Singh

    2011-04-01

    Resonance width, shift in resonance frequency, relaxation time and activation energy of 5CB nematic liquid crystal are measured using microwave cavity technique under the influence of an external magnetic field at 9 GHz and at different temperatures. The dielectric response in liquid crystal at different temperatures and the effects of applied magnetic field on transition temperatures are studied in the present work. The technique needs a small quantity (< 0.001 cm3) of the sample and provides fruitful information about the macroscopic structure of the liquid crystal.

  19. Refinement of the microstructure and enhancement of the magnetic properties in alpha-Fe/(Nd,DY)(2)Fe14B annealing nanocomposite using the two-step technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, X.; Hu, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The Nd8-xDyxFe87.5B4.5 (x = 0- 1.0) nanocomposites have been prepared by melt spinning and subsequent two-step heat treatment technique. The crystallization behaviors, microstructures and magnetic properties of the samples have been investigated. The experimental results show that the crystalliza....... A dramatic enhancement of remanence J(r) from 0.84 to 1.1 T, coercivity H-cj from 417 to 520 kA/m and energy product (BH)(m) from 76.8 to 110 kJ/m(3) have been obtained in Nd7Dy1Fe87.5B4.5 (30 vol%alpha-Fe) nanocomposite....

  20. Quadrupole magnetic mapping of the high resolution spectrometers of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, Hall A. (Q.M.M. project: Quadrupole Magnetic Measurement); Cartographie magnetique des quadripoles des spectrometre a haute resolution du Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, Hall A. (Le projet Q.M.M.: Quadrupole Magnetic Measurement)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quemener, Gilles [Ecole Doctorale des Science Fondamentales, Universite Blaise Pascal, U.F.R. de Recherche Scientifique et Technique, F-63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    1997-12-19

    This thesis describes the magnetic measurements that have been performed on the superconducting quadrupoles of the High Resolution Spectrometers of TJNAF, Hall A (USA), which are designed to measure particle momentum up to 4 GeV.c{sup -1} with a {sigma}p/p = 10{sup -4} resolution. The mapping method is based on rotating coil technique, the originality being a segmentation of the probe along the quad axis. Together with an accurate magnet modelling, the measurement of the flux variations through the set of rotating coils allows to determine the magnetic field at each point. We use the 3D field formalism, i.e., the Fourier-Bessel expansion of the field obtained by solving the Laplace equation. We describe the QMM method and then the apparatus consisting in two probes of length 1.6 m and 3.2 m built to map the three quadrupoles Q1, Q2, Q3. Data processing uses Fourier analysis. The mapping of the Electron Arm took place in situ in 1996. A first set of results concerns integral measurements including the properties of excitation cycle of the magnets (saturation and hysteresis). Second set of results in terms of local field yields the 3D field maps of the quadrupoles. After having applied corrections to the data we obtain a local field accuracy of 5 Gauss on each component, i.e. an uncertainty of 5.10{sup -4} relative to the quadrupole central field. We use SNAKE ray-tracing code with the implementation of QMM field maps and obtain preliminary results on HRS optics. (author) 48 refs., 93 figs., 41 tabs.

  1. Magnetic immunoassay coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for simultaneous quantification of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xing; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Yiwen; Xiao, Guangyang; Hu, Bin, E-mail: binhu@whu.edu.cn

    2015-04-01

    The absolute quantification of glycoproteins in complex biological samples is a challenge and of great significance. Herein, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared to selectively capture glycoproteins, while antibody conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized as element tags to label two different glycoproteins. Based on that, a new approach of magnetic immunoassay-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of glycoproteins. Taking biomarkers of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as two model glycoproteins, experimental parameters involved in the immunoassay procedure were carefully optimized and analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated. The limits of detection (LODs) for AFP and CEA were 0.086 μg L{sup −1} and 0.054 μg L{sup −1} with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 7, c = 5 μg L{sup −1}) of 6.5% and 6.2% for AFP and CEA, respectively. Linear range for both AFP and CEA was 0.2–50 μg L{sup −1}. To validate the applicability of the proposed method, human serum samples were analyzed, and the obtained results were in good agreement with that obtained by the clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA, and extended the applicability of metal nanoparticle tags based on ICP-MS methodology in multiple glycoprotein quantifications. - Highlights: • 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared and characterized. • ICP-MS based magnetic immunoassay approach was developed for quantification of glycoproteins. • AFP and CEA were quantified simultaneously with Au and Ag NPs as element tags. • The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for target glycoproteins.

  2. Assembling the muon spectrometer branch of R702

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The experiment R702 by the CERN-Saclay CEN-ETH Zurich Collaboration was set up to search for charmed particles and elrctron pairs, with two magnetic spectrometers at 90 deg, threshold Cerenkov counters, drift and proportional chambers, hodoscopes and lead glass counters. Early in 1976 a special iron-plate muon magnet (shown in the photo) was fitted between the two electron spectrometers to extend the experiment to detect muon-electron coincidences. Ludwig Dumps stays on the right.

  3. Measuring the (d, sup 2 He) reaction with the focal-plane detection system of the BBS magnetic spectrometer at AGOR

    CERN Document Server

    Rakers, S; Bassini, R; Baeumer, C; Berg, A M; Frekers, D; De Frenne, D; Hagemann, M; Hannen, V M; Harakeh, M N; Hartig, M; Henderson, R; Heyse, J; Huu, M A D; Jacobs, E; Mielke, M; Schippers, J M; Schmidt, R; Werf, S Y; Wörtche, H J

    2002-01-01

    At intermediate energies, the (d, sup 2 He) charge-exchange reaction can be used to observe Gamow-Teller strength in the beta sup + direction. sup 2 He denotes the two-proton system being in the singlet sup 1 S sub 0 state. In the present experiment the two protons, which in the laboratory frame are emitted into the forward direction, have been momentum analyzed and detected in coincidence by the same spectrometer and detector. Protons from deuteron breakup processes can induce a large accidental coincidence background because of the much larger breakup cross-section as compared to the (d, sup 2 He) cross-section. Nevertheless, background-free sup 2 He spectra with a resolution of 145 keV at an incident energy of 170 MeV are obtained, allowing the identification of many levels with high precision in the residual nuclei. The essential features of the detection system and the data-acquisition and analysis techniques which make our (d, sup 2 He) experiments possible are described. Two nuclei, sup 1 sup 2 C and s...

  4. The SAGE spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Herzberg, R.D.; Butler, P.A.; Cox, D.M.; Cresswell, J.R.; Mistry, A.; Page, R.D.; Parr, E.; Sampson, J.; Seddon, D.A.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P.J.; Lazarus, I.H.; Letts, S.C.; Pucknell, V.F.E.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The SAGE spectrometer has been constructed for in-beam nuclear structure studies. SAGE combines a Ge-detector array and an electron spectrometer for detection of γ-rays and internal conversion electrons, respectively, and allows simultaneous observation of both electrons and γ-rays emitted from excited nuclei. SAGE is set up in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae and works in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled recoil separator and the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer allowing the use of the recoil-decay tagging method. (orig.)

  5. SAMURAI spectrometer for RI beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Chiga, N.; Isobe, T.; Kondo, Y.; Kubo, T.; Kusaka, K.; Motobayashi, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ohnishi, J.; Okuno, H.; Otsu, H.; Sako, T.; Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, R.; Yoneda, K.

    2013-12-01

    A large-acceptance multiparticle spectrometer SAMURAI has been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) for RI beam experiments. It was designed primarily for kinematically complete experiments such as the invariant-mass spectroscopy of particle-unbound states in exotic nuclei, by detecting heavy fragments and projectile-rapidity nucleons in coincidence. The system consists of a superconducting dipole magnet, beam line detectors, heavy fragment detectors, neutron detectors, and proton detectors. The SAMURAI spectrometer was commissioned in March 2012, and a rigidity resolution of about 1/1500 was obtained for RI beams up to 2.4 GeV/c.

  6. SAMURAI spectrometer for RI beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, T., E-mail: kobayash@lambda.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Chiga, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Isobe, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kondo, Y. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kubo, T.; Kusaka, K.; Motobayashi, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nakamura, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ohnishi, J.; Okuno, H.; Otsu, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sako, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sekiguchi, K.; Takahashi, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Tanaka, R. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Yoneda, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    A large-acceptance multiparticle spectrometer SAMURAI has been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) for RI beam experiments. It was designed primarily for kinematically complete experiments such as the invariant-mass spectroscopy of particle-unbound states in exotic nuclei, by detecting heavy fragments and projectile-rapidity nucleons in coincidence. The system consists of a superconducting dipole magnet, beam line detectors, heavy fragment detectors, neutron detectors, and proton detectors. The SAMURAI spectrometer was commissioned in March 2012, and a rigidity resolution of about 1/1500 was obtained for RI beams up to 2.4 GeV/c.

  7. Improved Mass Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Improved Mass Spectrometer project will develop system requirements and analyze the path to space qualification.   The results of this project...

  8. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  9. Realization of two light particle correlation experiments: behaviour to very low relative momenta (measurement with a magnetic spectrometer) and influence of the violence of reaction on the emission sources (measured by the neutron detector ORION); Mise en oeuvre de deux experiences de correlations de particules legeres: comportement a tres faibles impulsions relatives (mesure avec un spectrometre magnetique) et influence de la violence de reaction sur les sources d`emission (mesuree avec le detecteur de neutrons ORION)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sezac, L. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1993-01-20

    The correlation measurements between light particles emitted during heavy ion collisions allow to estimate the time-space extension of the emitting sources. This report about the preliminaries of two correlation experiments is split into two parts. The first one describes a test experiment, performed to study the feasibility of a correlation experiment at very low relative momenta with the help of a magnetic spectrometer. The results will allow to determine the still unknown relative effects from the final state interaction and the combination of both Coulomb interaction and quantum statistics. A correlation study without experimental selection of the impact parameter gives unclear answers about the sizes and the temporal characteristics of the emitting systems. The second part analyses the sources of the alpha particles detected in the reaction chamber of the multidetector ORION used as a violence of the reaction filter. The results show that it is possible to consider as a good filter a fast information called `prompt peak` (correlated to the neutron multiplicity detected with ORION). Under such conditions a study of two particle correlations from equilibrated systems with a reasonable statistics becomes thinkable. The results obtained allow to characterize the emitting sources (speed, intensity, temperature) as a function of the violence of the reaction for the system {sup 208} Pb + {sup 93} Nb at 29 MeV/u. (author) 85 refs.

  10. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Carpenter, P.T. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Escallier, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2014-01-21

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  11. Determination of {alpha}-widths in {sup 19}F relevant to fluorine nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, F. de [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Coc, A. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Aguer, P. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Angulo, C. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Bogaert, G. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Kiener, J. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Lefebvre, A. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Tatischeff, V. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Thibaud, J.P. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Fortier, S. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Maison, J.M. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Rosier, L. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Rotbard, G. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Vernotte, J. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Arnould, M. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Inst. d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique; Jorissen, A. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Inst. d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique; Mowlavi, N. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Inst. d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique

    1996-01-29

    Nucleosynthesis of fluorine in the context of helium burning occurs through the {sup 15}N({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}F reaction. At temperatures where fluorine formation takes place in most astrophysical models, the narrow resonance associated with the 4.378 MeV level of {sup 19}F is expected to dominate the reaction rate, but its strength is not known. We used a {sup 15}N confined gas target to study this level by means of the transfer reaction {sup 15}N({sup 7}Li,t){sup 19}F at 28 MeV. Reaction products were analysed with a split pole magnetic spectrometer and the angular distributions for the first 16 levels of {sup 19}F were extracted. These distributions are fairly well reproduced by FR-DWBA calculations in the framework of an {alpha}-cluster transfer model with a compound nucleus contribution obtained by Hauser-Feshbach calculations. {alpha}-spectroscopic factors were deduced and, for unbound levels, the {alpha}-widths were determined and compared with the existing direct measurements. The {alpha}-width of the level of astrophysical interest (E{sub x} 4.378 MeV) was found to be {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}=1.5 x 10{sup -9} eV, a value 60 times smaller than the commonly used one. The astrophysical consequences for {sup 19}F production in AGB stars are discussed. (orig.).

  12. The role of combined addition of Ti and B in magnetic hardening of devitrified Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B/(Fe{sub 3}B,{alpha}-Fe) nanocomposite magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W.Y.; Stoica, M.; Eckert, J.; Ehrenberg, H. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Chang, H.W.; Chang, W.C. [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, 168, San-Hsing, Min-Hsiung, Yi 621 (China)

    2008-05-15

    Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B/(Fe{sub 3}B,{alpha}-Fe) nanocomposite magnets with high coercivity have been prepared by devitrification of Pr{sub 9}Fe{sub 88.5-x}Ti{sub 2.5}B{sub x} (x=7, 9, 11, 13, and 15) amorphous ribbons. Similar to Zr and Nb, Ti substitutes rare earth sites and participates in forming the (Pr,Ti){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase. The increasing amount of nonmagnetic TiB{sub 2} with increasing x in the nanocomposite magnets may precipitate along the grain boundaries and refine the microstructure by inhibiting the grain growth, and results in a continuous increase of coercivity. It also leads to an increase of the fraction of soft phases in the nanocomposites, which enhances the remanence. The squareness of the demagnetization curves is also improved by appropriate B addition. As a result, the energy product attains a maximum value of 129.6 kJ/m{sup 3} for x=13. A more obvious shoulder and significantly enhanced coercivity (2424 kA/m) in the hysteresis curves at 70 K was observed for the sample with x = 15 in comparison with the ribbon with x=7. This further demonstrates that B addition promotes the formation of TiB{sub 2} and the Fe{sub 3}B soft phase in good agreement with XRD results. Accordingly, the introduction of a proper amount of nonmagnetic phases can enhance the magnetic properties of the nanocomposite magnets. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. The Pickup Ion Composition Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jason A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Battel, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Observations of newly ionized atoms that are picked up by the magnetic field in the expanding solar wind contain crucial information about the gas or dust compositions of their origins. The pickup ions (PUIs) are collected by plasma mass spectrometers and analyzed for their density, composition, and velocity distribution. In addition to measurements of PUIs from planetary sources, in situ measurements of interstellar gas have been made possible by spectrometers capable of differentiating between heavy ions of solar and interstellar origin. While important research has been done on these often singly charged ions, the instruments that have detected many of them were designed for the energy range and ionic charge states of the solar wind and energized particle populations, and not for pickup ions. An instrument optimized for the complete energy and time-of-flight characterization of pickup ions will unlock a wealth of data on these hitherto unobserved or unresolved PUI species. The Pickup Ion Composition Spectrometer (PICSpec) is one such instrument and can enable the next generation of pickup ion and isotopic mass composition measurements. By combining a large-gap time-of-flight-energy sensor with a -100 kV high-voltage power supply for ion acceleration, PUIs will not only be above the detection threshold of traditional solid-state energy detectors but also be resolved sufficiently in time of flight that isotopic composition can be determined. This technology will lead to a new generation of space composition instruments, optimized for measurements of both heliospheric and planetary pickup ions.

  14. A 4 π dilepton spectrometer: PEPSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buda, A.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bałanda, A.; van Klinken, J.; Sujkowski, Z.; van der Woude, A.

    1993-11-01

    A novel positron-electron pair spectroscopy instrument (PEPSI) was designed to measure transitions in the energy region 10-40 MeV. It consists of Nd 2Fe 14B permanent magnets forming a compact 4 π magnetic filter consisting of 12 positron and 20 electron mini-orange-like spectrometers. The response function of PEPSI has been measured with mono-energetic beams of electrons from 5 to 20 MeV. The PEPSI spectrometer was used for measuring the internal pair conversion coefficient ( απ) of the 15.1 MeV M1 transition from a Jπ = 1 + state to the ground state in 12C. Our experimental value of απ = (3.3 ± 0.5) × 10 -3 is in good agreement with theoretical estimates.

  15. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  16. Inhibition by Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles Loaded with Alpha-Synuclein RNAi Plasmid in a Parkinson's Disease Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shuiqin; Zhang, Ling-Kun; Zhang, Li; Zhuang, Siyi; Zhan, Xiuyu; Chen, Wu-Ya; Du, Shiwei; Yin, Liang; You, Rong; Li, Chu-Hua; Guan, Yan-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Lewy bodies are considered as the main pathological characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD). The major component of Lewy bodies is α-synuclein (α-syn). The use of gene therapy that targeting and effectively interfere with the expression of α-syn in neurons has received tremendous attention. In this study, we used magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with oleic acid molecules as a nano-carrier. N-isopropylacrylamide derivative (NIPAm-AA) was photo-immobilized onto the oleic acid molecules, and shRNA (short hairpin RNA) was absorbed. The same method was used to absorb nerve growth factor (NGF) to NIPAm-AA to specifically promote neuronal uptake via NGF receptor-mediated endocytosis. Additionally, shRNA plasmid could be released into neurons because of the temperature and pH sensitivity of NIPAm-AA interference with α-syn synthesis. We investigated apoptosis in neurons with abrogated α-syn expression in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles carrying shRNA for α-syn could provide effective repair in a PD model. PMID:28042339

  17. Magnetic couplings in the quasi-2D triangular Heisenberg antiferromagnets {alpha}-ACr{sub 2}O{sub 4} (A=Ca, Sr, Ba)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, V., E-mail: vincent.hardy@ensicaen.fr [Laboratoire CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, UMR 6508 CNRS, 6 Boulevard du Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France); Martin, C. [Laboratoire CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, UMR 6508 CNRS, 6 Boulevard du Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France); Damay, F.; Andre, G. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, UMR 12, CEA-Saclay, CEA-CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2013-03-15

    We carried out a comparative study of the A=Ca, Sr, Ba compounds of the {alpha}-ACr{sub 2}O{sub 4} series, a family of layered chromites, which can be classified as S=3/2 quasi-2D triangular Heisenberg antiferromagnets (2DTHAF). The sizeable distortion, with respect to the perfect triangle lattice, of the spin layer topology can be progressively decreased by increasing the size of A{sup 2+}, which leads to an increase of both the average distance between nearest-neighbouring Cr{sup 3+} and of the interplane spacing. The evolution with A{sup 2+} of the antiferromagnetic transition T{sub N}, the intraplane coupling J, and the interplane coupling J Prime has been determined on the basis of magnetization and heat capacity measurements and is discussed in the framework of the standard theoretical models describing quasi 2DTHAF. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing the ionic radius of A{sup 2+} has a non-monotonous impact on T{sub N}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The small single-ion anisotropy can split the antiferromagnetic transition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intraplane coupling is consistent with direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interplane coupling derived from standard 2DTHAF models is questionable.

  18. X-Ray, FUV, and UV Observations of alpha Centauri B: Determination of Long-term Magnetic Activity Cycle and Rotation Period

    CERN Document Server

    DeWarf, L E; Guinan, E F

    2010-01-01

    We have been carrying out a study of stellar magnetic activity, dynamos, atmospheric physics, and spectral irradiances from a sample of solar-type G0-5 V stars with different ages. One of the major goals of this program is to study the evolution of the Sun's X-ray through NUV spectral irradiances with age. Of particular interest is the determination of the young Sun's elevated levels of high-energy fluxes because of the critical roles that X-ray through FUV emissions play on the photochemical and photoionization evolution of early, young planetary atmospheres and ionospheres. Motivated by the current exoplanetary search missions that are hunting for earth-size planets in the habitable zones of nearby main-sequence G-M stars, we are expanding our program to cooler, less luminous, but much more numerous main-sequence K-type stars, such as alpha Centauri B. The long life (2-3x longer than our Sun) and slow evolution of K stars provide nearly constant energy sources for possible hosted planets. Presented here are...

  19. Miniaturised TOF mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, U.; Wurz, P.; Whitby, J.

    2003-04-01

    For the BepiColombo misson of ESA to Mercury, we built a prototype of a miniaturised Time of Flight mass spectrometer with a low mass and low power consumption. Particles will be set free form the surface and ionized by short laser pluses. The mass spectrometer is dedicated to measure the elemental and isotopic composition of almost all elements of Mercurys planetary surface with an adequate dynamique range, mass range and mass resolution. We will present first results of our prototype and future designs.

  20. The GRIFFIN spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, C. E.; Garnsworthy, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) is an advanced new high-efficiency γ-ray spectrometer being developed for use in decay spectroscopy experiments with low-energy radioactive ion beams provided by TRIUMF's Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC-I) radioactive ion beam facility. GRIFFIN will be comprised of sixteen large-volume clover-type high-purity germanium (HPGe) γ-ray detectors coupled to custom digital signal processing electronics and used in conjunction with a suite of auxiliary detection systems. This article provides an overview of the GRIFFIN spectrometer and its expected performance characteristics.

  1. ALPHA-2: the sequel

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    While many experiments are methodically planning for intense works over the long shutdown, there is one experiment that is already working at full steam: ALPHA-2. Its final components arrived last month and will completely replace the previous ALPHA set-up. Unlike its predecessor, this next generation experiment has been specifically designed to measure the properties of antimatter.   The ALPHA team lower the new superconducting solenoid magnet into place. The ALPHA collaboration is working at full speed to complete the ALPHA-2 set-up for mid-November – this will give them a few weeks of running before the AD shutdown on 17 December. “We really want to get some experience with this device this year so that, if we need to make any changes, we will have time during the long shutdown in which to make them,” says Jeffrey Hangst, ALPHA spokesperson. “Rather than starting the 2014 run in the commissioning stage, we will be up and running from the get go.&...

  2. Magnetic field effect on the exciplex between all-s-trans- 1,4-diphenylbuta- 1,3-diene and 1,4-dicyanobenzene: a comparative study with other alpha,omega-diphenyl polyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, T; Basu, S

    2001-04-01

    The exciplex between all-s-trans-1,4-diphenylbuta-1,3-diene and 1,4-dicyanobenzene has been studied by steady state fluorescence along with the magnetic field effect (MFE) and compared with the other alpha,omega-diphenyl polyenes. The exciplex formation and magnetic field effect are dictated by the chain length of the polyene rather than the electronic requirement of these phenomena. The wavelength dependence of the MFE confirms the presence of two different charge-transfer complexes.

  3. Speckle-based spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, Maumita; Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2015-01-01

    A novel spectrometer concept is analyzed and experimentally verified. The method relies on probing the speckle displacement due to a change in the incident wavelength. A rough surface is illuminated at an oblique angle, and the peak position of the covariance between the speckle patterns observed...

  4. The Omega spectrometer in the West Hall.

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    Inside the hut which sits on top of the superconducting magnet are the TV cameras that observe the particle events occurring in the spark chambers in the magnet gap below. On the background the two beam lines feeding the spectrometer target, for separated hadrons up to 40 GeV, on the right, for 80 GeV electrons, on the left, respectively. The latter strikes a radiator thus sending into Omega tagged photons up to 80 GeV. On the foreground, the two sections of the large gas Cerenkov counter working at atmospheric pressure, used for trigger purpose.

  5. Electron spectrometer for “in-beam” spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, J.; Król, A.; Perkowski, J.; Sobczak, K.; Wojtkiewicz, R.; Kisieliński, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Kownacki, J.; Korman, A.

    2008-02-01

    A spectrometer that uses a set of silicon detectors and a combination of two magnetic fields for separation and for transportation of electrons from the target position to the silicon detectors has been constructed at the University of Lodz for "in-beam" studies of internal conversion electrons. The separation of electrons from positrons is achieved in a simplified mini-orange set-up. The transportation field is produced by a set of permanent magnets arranged in a form of coaxial rings. The background from delta electrons and gamma rays is highly reduced. The spectrometer was designed to be coupled to OSIRIS-II, the array of gamma-ray detectors at the Warsaw Heavy Ion Laboratory. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated by examples of spectra obtained from the conversion electron spectrometer and also the OSIRIS-II array, which were recorded in- and off- beam.

  6. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-05-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  7. In Situ Mass Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The In Situ Mass Spectrometer projects focuses on a specific subsystem to leverage advanced research for laser-based in situ mass spectrometer development...

  8. Magnetic iron oxide and manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticles for the collection of alpha-emitting radionuclides from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, Matthew J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-10-31

    Magnetic nanoparticles are well known to possess chemically active surfaces and high surface areas that can be employed to extract a range of ions from aqueous solutions. Additionally, their paramagnetic property provides a convenient means for bulk collection of the material from solution after the targeted ions have been adsorbed. Herein, two nanoscale amphoteric metal oxides, each possessing useful magnetic attributes, were evaluated for their ability to collect both naturally occurring radioactive isotopes (polonium (Po), radium (Ra), and uranium (U)) as well as the transuranic element americium (Am) from a suite of naturally occurring aqueous matrices. The nanomaterials include commercially available paramagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) and magnetite that was modified to incorporate manganese (Mn) into the crystal structure. The chemical stability of these nanomaterials was evaluated in Hanford Site, WA ground water between the natural pH (~8) and pH 1 (acidified with HCl). Whereas the magnetite was observed to have good stability over the pH range, the Mn-doped material was observed to leach Mn at low pH. The materials were evaluated in parallel to characterize their uptake performance of the aforementioned alpha-emitting radionuclide spikes from Hanford Site ground water across a range of pH (from ~8 down to 2). In addition, radiotracer uptake experiments were performed on Columbia River water, seawater, and human urine at their natural pH and at pH 2. Despite the observed leaching of Mn from the Mn-doped nanomaterial in the lower pH range, it exhibited generally superior analyte extraction performance compared to the magnetite, and analyte uptake was observed across a broader pH range. The uptake behavior of the various radiotracers on these two materials at different pH levels can generally be explained by the amphoteric nature of the nanoparticle surfaces. Finally, the rate of sorption of the radiotracers on the two materials in unacidified groundwater was

  9. Overview of the magnetic properties experiments on the Mars Exploration Rovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. B.; Goetz, W.; Bertelsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers have accumulated airborne dust on different types of permanent magnets. Images of these magnets document the dynamics of dust capture and removal over time. The strongly magnetic subset of airborne dust appears dark brown to black in Panoramic Camera (Pancam) images......, while the weakly magnetic one is bright red. Images returned by the Microscopic Imager reveal the formation of magnetic chains diagnostic of magnetite-rich grains with substantial magnetization (>8 Am-2 kg(-1)). On the basis of Mossbauer spectra the dust contains magnetite, olivine, pyroxene......, and nanophase oxides in varying proportions, depending on wind regime and landing site. The dust contains a larger amount of ferric iron (Fe3+/Fe-tot similar to 0.6) than rocks in the Gusev plains (similar to 0.1-0.2) or average Gusev soil (similar to 0.3). Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer data of the dust...

  10. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Simon; Taylor, Fredric; Ade, Peter; Kunde, Virgil; Jennings, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) is a remote sensing instrument to be flown on the Cassini orbiter. It contains two Fourier transform spectrometers covering wavelengths of 7-1000 microns. The instrument is expected to have higher spectral resolution, smaller field of view, and better signal-to-noise performance than its counterpart, IRIS, on the Voyager missions. These improvements allow the study of the variability of the composition and temperature of the atmospheres of both Saturn and Titan with latitude, longitude and height, as well as allowing the possibility of discovery of previously undetected chemical species in these atmospheres. The long wavelengths accessible to CIRS allow sounding deeper into both atmospheres than was possible with IRIS.

  11. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  12. ALICE photon spectrometer crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Members of the mechanical assembly team insert the last few crystals into the first module of ALICE's photon spectrometer. These crystals are made from lead-tungstate, a crystal as clear as glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, emitting a flash of light allowing the energy of photons, electrons and positrons to be measured.

  13. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, William J. (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250.degree. C., and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  14. Galileo Ultraviolet Spectrometer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, C. W.; Mcclintock, W. E.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Barth, C. A.; Esposito, L. W.; Thomas, G. E.; Sandel, B. R.; Hunten, D. M.; Broadfoot, A. L.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Galileo ultraviolet spectrometer experiment uses data obtained by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS) mounted on the pointed orbiter scan platform and from the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (EUVS) mounted on the spinning part of the orbiter with the field of view perpendicular to the spin axis. The UVS is a Ebert-Fastie design that covers the range 113-432 nm with a wavelength resolution of 0.7 nm below 190 and 1.3 nm at longer wavelengths. The UVS spatial resolution is 0.4 deg x 0.1 deg for illuminated disk observations and 1 deg x 0.1 deg for limb geometries. The EUVS is a Voyager design objective grating spectrometer, modified to cover the wavelength range from 54 to 128 nm with wavelength resolution 3.5 nm for extended sources and 1.5 nm for point sources and spatial resolution of 0.87 deg x 0.17 deg. The EUVS instrument will follow up on the many Voyager UVS discoveries, particularly the sulfur and oxygen ion emissions in the Io torus and molecular and atomic hydrogen auroral and airglow emissions from Jupiter. The UVS will obtain spectra of emission, absorption, and scattering features in the unexplored, by spacecraft, 170-432 nm wavelength region. The UVS and EUVS instruments will provide a powerful instrument complement to investigate volatile escape and surface composition of the Galilean satellites, the Io plasma torus, micro- and macro-properties of the Jupiter clouds, and the composition structure and evolution of the Jupiter upper atmosphere.

  15. Development of Neutron Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Lee, J. S.; Seong, B. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    Neutron spectrometers which are used in the basic researches such as physics, chemistry and materials science and applied in the industry were developed at the horizontal beam port of HANARO reactor. In addition, the development of core components for neutron scattering and the upgrade of existing facilities are also performed. The vertical neutron reflectometer was fabricated and installed at ST3 beam port. The performance test of the reflectometer was completed and the reflectometer was opened to users. The several core parts and options were added in the polarized neutron spectrometer. The horizontal neutron reflectometer from Brookhaven National Laboratory was moved to HANARO and installed, and the performance of the reflectometer was examined. The HIPD was developed and the performance test was completed. The base shielding for TAS was fabricated. The soller collimator, Cu mosaic monochromator, Si BPC monochromator and position sensitive detector were developed and applied in the neutron spectrometer as part of core component development activities. In addition, the sputtering machine for mirror device are fabricated and the neutron mirror is made using the sputtering machine. The FCD was upgraded and the performance of the FCD are improved over the factor of 10. The integration and upgrade of the neutron detection system were also performed.

  16. Chemical Synthesis of alpha-Iron Cobalt and Metastable gamma-Iron Nickel Magnetic Nanoparticles with Tunable Magnetic Properties for Study of RF Heating and Magnetomechanical Responses in Polymeric Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNerny, Katie L.

    that dilute ferrofluids (or magnetic fluids) composed of either gamma-FeNi or alpha-FeCo monodisperse MNPs spontaneously aggregate into chain configurations, which have unknown heating capabilities and important implications for magnetomechanical responses. These chain configurations have been examined through small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The chaining of MNPs is also important for the potential deformation of extracellular matrix (ECM) tissue scaffold materials in vivo. This thesis will show that MNPs can be functionalized with a collagen-antibody and attched to ECM scaffolds. Tissue specificity and binding affinity of functionalized nanoparticles will be presented along with results confirming the usefulness of these particles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These results have implications for using functionalized MNPs in the future for heart valve and Achilles tendon repair, in situ non-contact strain measurement of implants, as well as temporal and spatial tracking of degradation products from scaffolds after implantation using MRI or alternating gradient field magnetometers. A final part of this thesis will examine how MNPs decorate Pluronic polymer liquid crystals so that we can probe the structural features of these nanocomposites and study the strain that results upon application of an external magnetic field gradient for comparison to scaffold-based ferrogel materials.

  17. Lyman alpha SMM/UVSP absolute calibration and geocoronal correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1987-01-01

    Lyman alpha observations from the Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft were analyzed and provide instrumental calibration details. Specific values of the instrument quantum efficiency, Lyman alpha absolute intensity, and correction for geocoronal absorption are presented.

  18. Mass spectrometers: instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, R. G.; Hoke, S. H., II; Morand, K. L.; Lammert, S. A.

    1992-09-01

    Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the past three years are reviewed. The subject is characterized by an enormous diversity of designs, a high degree of competition between different laboratories working with either different or similar techniques and by extremely rapid progress in improving analytical performance. Instruments can be grouped into genealogical charts based on their physical and conceptual interrelationships. This is illustrated using mass analyzers of different types. The time course of development of particular instrumental concepts is illustrated in terms of the s-curves typical of cell growth. Examples are given of instruments which are at the exponential, linear and mature growth stages. The prime examples used are respectively: (i) hybrid instruments designed to study reactive collisions of ions with surfaces: (ii) the Paul ion trap; and (iii) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the area of ion/surface collisions, reactive collisions such as hydrogen radical abstraction from the surface by the impinging ion are studied. They are shown to depend upon the chemical nature of the surface through the use of experiments which utilize self-assembled monolayers as surfaces. The internal energy deposited during surface-induced dissociation upon collision with different surfaces in a BEEQ instrument is also discussed. Attention is also given to a second area of emerging instrumentation, namely technology which allows mass spectrometers to be used for on-line monitoring of fluid streams. A summary of recent improvements in the performance of the rapidly developing quadrupole ion trap instrument illustrates this stage of instrument development. Improvements in resolution and mass range and their application to the characterization of biomolecules are described. The interaction of theory with experiment is illustrated through the role of simulations of ion motion in the ion trap. It is emphasized that mature instruments play a

  19. Alpha fetoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal alpha globulin; AFP ... Greater than normal levels of AFP may be due to: Cancer in testes , ovaries, biliary (liver secretion) tract, stomach, or pancreas Cirrhosis of the liver Liver cancer ...

  20. Real time Faraday spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Tommy E.; Struve, Kenneth W.; Colella, Nicholas J.

    1991-01-01

    This invention uses a dipole magnet to bend the path of a charged particle beam. As the deflected particles exit the magnet, they are spatially dispersed in the bend-plane of the magnet according to their respective momenta and pass to a plurality of chambers having Faraday probes positioned therein. Both the current and energy distribution of the particles is then determined by the non-intersecting Faraday probes located along the chambers. The Faraday probes are magnetically isolated from each other by thin metal walls of the chambers, effectively providing real time current-versus-energy particle measurements.

  1. Wide-angle spectrometer at intersection I-2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    The members of the British-Scandinavian ISR Collaboration "manning the rails" of the wide-angle spectrometer at intersection I-2, whose vacuum chamber is visible to theleft. The equipment of this high-momentum version of experiment R203 consists of scintillation counter hodoscopes, wire spark chambers, and spherical high-pressure threshold Cerenkov counters before and after an analysing magnet. The equipment is mounted on a movable platform. The smaller magnet suspended above the spectrometer measures the momentum of cosmic rays.

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  3. Deceleration of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind by Instabilities and the Rotational Force: Implications for Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Hollweg, Joseph V

    2014-01-01

    Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including relative drifts between particle species. Two non-collisional mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles. In this paper, we derive an analytic expression for the rate $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ at which energy is released by alpha-particle deceleration, accounting for azimuthal flow and conservation of total momentum. We find that $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}} > 0 $ at $r r_{\\mathrm{crit}}$. We compare the value of $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ at $r< r_{\\mathrm{crit}}$ with empirical heating rates for protons and alpha particles, denoted $Q_{\\mathrm{p}}$ and $Q_{\\alpha}$, deduced from in-situ measurements of fast-wind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ exceeds $Q_{\\alpha}$ at $r < 1\\,\\mathrm{AU}$, $Q_{...

  4. MASS SPECTROMETER LEAK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, W.R.

    1960-10-18

    An improved valve is described for precisely regulating the flow of a sample fluid to be analyzed, such as in a mass spectrometer, where a gas sample is allowed to "leak" into an evacuated region at a very low, controlled rate. The flow regulating valve controls minute flow of gases by allowing the gas to diffuse between two mating surfaces. The structure of the valve is such as to prevent the corrosive feed gas from contacting the bellows which is employed in the operation of the valve, thus preventing deterioration of the bellows.

  5. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  6. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  7. The SPEDE electron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neill, George

    This thesis presents SPEDE (SPectrometer for Electron DEtection) and documents its construction, testing and performance during commissioning at Jyvaskyla, Finland, before deployment at the HIE-ISOLDE facility at CERN coupled with the MINIBALL array to perform in-beam electron-gamma spectroscopy using post-accelerated radioactive ion beams. Commissioning experiments took place in two two-day stints during spring 2015, coupled with several JUROGAMII gamma-detectors. This spectrometer will help aid in fully understanding exotic regions of the nuclear chart such as regions with a high degree of octupole deformation, and in those nuclei exhibiting shape coexistence. For the rst time, electron spectroscopy has been performed at the target position from states populated in accelerated nuclei via Coulomb excitation. The FWHM of SPEDE is approximately 7 keV at 320 keV, and Doppler correction was possible to improve Doppler broadened peaks. The results are intended to give the reader a full understanding of the dete...

  8. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, I.; Huppert, M.; Wörner, H. J., E-mail: hwoerner@ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Brown, M. A. [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bokhoven, J. A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Laboratory for Catalysis and Sustainable Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  9. Simulation of the SAGE spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.M.; Herzberg, R.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Konki, J.; Greenlees, P.T.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sorri, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hauschild, K. [Universite Paris-Sud, CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay (France)

    2015-06-15

    The SAGE spectrometer combines a Ge-detector array with a Si detector to allow simultaneous detection of γ-rays and electrons. A comprehensive GEANT4 simulation package of the SAGE spectrometer has been developed with the ability to simulate the expected datasets based on user input files. The measured performance of the spectrometer is compared to the results obtained from the simulations. (orig.)

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  13. Spatial heterodyne spectrometer for FLEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alan; Zheng, Sheng-Hai; Brown, Stephen; Bell, Andrew

    2007-10-01

    A spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) has significant advantages for high spectral resolution imaging over narrow pre-selected bands compared to traditional solutions. Given comparable optical étendue at R~6500, a field-widened SHS will have a throughput-resolution product ~170 x larger than an air-spaced etalon spectrometer, and ~1000 x larger than a standard grating spectrometer. The monolithic glass Michelson design and lack of moving parts allows maximum stability of spectral calibration over the mission life. For these reasons, SHS offers considerable advantages for the core spectrometer instrument in the European Space Agency's (ESA) Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission.

  14. Grazing-incidence spectrometer on the SSPX spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W

    2008-05-02

    The Silver Flat Field Spectrometer (SFFS) is a high-resolution grazing-incidence diagnostic for magnetically confined plasmas. It covers the wavelength range of 25-450 {angstrom} with a resolution of {Delta}{lambda} = 0.3 {angstrom} FWHM. The SFFS employs a spherical 1200 lines/mm grating for flat-field focusing. The imaging is done using a back-illuminated Photometrics CCD camera allowing a bandwidth of around 200 {angstrom} per spectrum. The spectrometer has been used for atomic spectroscopy on electron beam ion traps and for plasma spectroscopy on magnetic confinement devices. The design of the SFFS and the spectrometer setup at the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) in Livermore will be presented.

  15. Operation of a 400MHz NMR magnet using a (RE:Rare Earth)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting coil: Towards an ultra-compact super-high field NMR spectrometer operated beyond 1GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Y; Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Kominato, K; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Jin, X; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2014-10-18

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS) are the key technology to achieve super-high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers with an operating frequency far beyond 1GHz (23.5T). (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO, RE: rare earth) conductors have an advantage over Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-x (Bi-2212) conductors in that they have very high tensile strengths and tolerate strong electromagnetic hoop stress, thereby having the potential to act as an ultra-compact super-high field NMR magnet. As a first step, we developed the world's first NMR magnet comprising an inner REBCO coil and outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils. The magnet was successfully charged without degradation and mainly operated at 400MHz (9.39T). Technical problems for the NMR magnet due to screening current in the REBCO coil were clarified and solved as follows: (i) A remarkable temporal drift of the central magnetic field was suppressed by a current sweep reversal method utilizing ∼10% of the peak current. (ii) A Z2 field error harmonic of the main coil cannot be compensated by an outer correction coil and therefore an additional ferromagnetic shim was used. (iii) Large tesseral harmonics emerged that could not be corrected by cryoshim coils. Due to those harmonics, the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectra are ten-fold lower than those for a conventional LTS NMR magnet. As a result, a HSQC spectrum could be achieved for a protein sample, while a NOESY spectrum could not be obtained. An ultra-compact 1.2GHz NMR magnet could be realized if we effectively take advantage of REBCO conductors, although this will require further research to suppress the effect of the screening current.

  16. $\\alpha_s$ review (2016)

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2016-01-01

    The current world-average of the strong coupling at the Z pole mass, $\\alpha_s(m^2_{Z}) = 0.1181 \\pm 0.0013$, is obtained from a comparison of perturbative QCD calculations computed, at least, at next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy, to a set of 6 groups of experimental observables: (i) lattice QCD "data", (ii) $\\tau$ hadronic decays, (iii) proton structure functions, (iv) event shapes and jet rates in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (v) Z boson hadronic decays, and (vi) top-quark cross sections in p-p collisions. In addition, at least 8 other $\\alpha_s$ extractions, usually with a lower level of theoretical and/or experimental precision today, have been proposed: pion, $\\Upsilon$, W hadronic decays; soft and hard fragmentation functions; jets cross sections in pp, e-p and $\\gamma$-p collisions; and photon F$_2$ structure function in $\\gamma\\,\\gamma$ collisions. These 14 $\\alpha_s$ determinations are reviewed, and the perspectives of reduction of their present uncertainties are discussed.

  17. Characterization of the proposed 4-{\\alpha} cluster state candidate in 16O

    CERN Document Server

    Li, K C W; Adsley, P; Papka, P; Smit, F D; Brümmer, J W; Diget, C Aa; Freer, M; Harakeh, M N; Kokalova, Tz; Nemulodi, F; Pellegri, L; Rebeiro, B; Swartz, J A; Triambak, S; van Zyl, J J; Wheldon, C

    2016-01-01

    The $\\mathrm{^{16}O}(\\alpha, \\alpha^{\\prime})$ reaction was studied at $\\theta_{lab} = 0^\\circ$ at an incident energy of $\\textrm{E}_{lab}$ = 200 MeV using the K600 magnetic spectrometer at iThemba LABS. Proton and $\\alpha$-decay from the natural parity states were observed in a large-acceptance silicon-strip detector array at backward angles. The coincident charged particle measurements were used to characterize the decay channels of the $0_{6}^{+}$ state in $\\mathrm{^{16}O}$ located at $E_{x} = 15.097(5)$ MeV. This state is identified by several theoretical cluster calculations to be a good candidate for the 4-$\\alpha$ cluster state. The results of this work suggest the presence of a previously unidentified resonance at $E_{x}\\approx15$ MeV that does not exhibit a $0^{+}$ character. This unresolved resonance may have contaminated previous observations of the $0_{6}^{+}$ state.

  18. Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high nθ can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  3. Optical design and performance of the SASP spectrometer at TRIUMF

    CERN Document Server

    Walden, P L; Miller, C A; Yen, S; Abegg, R; Auld, E G; Campbell, J; Chakhalyan, J; Churchman, R; Duncan, F; Falk, W; Frekers, D; Green, A; Green, P E W; Hartig, M; Häusser, O; Haddock, C; Hicks, K; Hutcheon, D; Jones, G; Ke, Y; Korkmaz, E J; Khan, N; Ling, A; Lobb, D E; Naqvi, S I H; Olsen, W C; Opper, A; Otter, Alan J; Punyasena, M; Reeve, P; Zhao, J

    1999-01-01

    A new Q-Q-Clamshell magnetic spectrometer called SASP has been commissioned in the proton hall at TRIUMF. The principal optical characteristics are: a solid angle acceptance of 13.5 msr, a momentum bite of 25%, a momentum resolution of DELTA p/p=2x10 sup - sup 4 , and a maximum central momentum of 720 MeV/c. We describe the optical design, the magnetostatic design, the magnetic field mapping procedure, and the performance of this instrument.

  4. Measure of exposure of short-lived radon products using an alpha spectrometer for measuring indoor aerosol activity concentration and dose evaluation; Misure di esposizione ai prodotti di decadimento del radon a breve vita tramite uno spettrometro alfa per la misura dell'attivita' del particolato atmosferico indoor e valutazioni dosimetriche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Castellani, C.M.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Divisione Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Mariotti, F. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    A new italian law introduces the regulation of occupational exposure to radon. To evaluate the inhalation of radon daughters by the workers a sampling device has been assembled with the aim of evaluation of unattached and aerosol attached radon daughters' fractions. The instrument, based on selection of the aerosuspended particles by means of a wire screen type battery and subsequent collection on a total filter, allows to describe the behaviour of both fractions using defined temporal pattern of collecting particles and counting them by alpha spectroscopy. A measurement campaign to test the radon daughter dichotomous spectrometer in comparison with a commercial Radon Working Level meter, has been performed in a research laboratory of central Italy affected by high radon concentrations. The radon concentration during the measurement campaign has been also measured. The equilibrium factor F{sub e}q ad the attachment factor fp have been evaluated during 3 days campaign. Using the measured mean parameters (radon concentration, F{sub e}q, f{sub p}) the dose evaluation for workers using dosimetric approach has been performed. A comparison between the epidemiologic approach, based on the radon concentration, and dosimetric approach is also presented. [Italian] L'esposizione a radon in ambiente lavorativo e la conseguente inalazione dei suoi prodotti di decadimento in forma particolata e' oggetto di una recente normativa italiana in materia di protezione dalle radiazioni ionizzanti. Per rispondere a questa necessita', presso l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione dell'ENEA di Bologna e' stato progettato e realizzato uno spettrometro alfa per la misura della progenie del radon con la finalita' di valutare, su brevi periodi di tempo, la concentrazione individuale dei suoi prodotti di decadimento e, con l'impiego di batterie a diffusione a reti, consentire inoltre la discriminazione della concentrazione della frazione attaccata e non

  5. MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  6. Radon measurement using a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kondo, Sohei (Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.); Mifune, Masaki; Konishi, Masanobu; Shirai, Chiaki

    1992-12-01

    A convenient radon detecting device for the purpose of estimating natural radiation exposure is described. The [alpha] radioactivity of radon gas absorbed in fine active carbon particles exposed to air is measured with a liquid scintillation spectrometer (Packard-PICO-RAD system). Its detection limits are 2mBq/l in air and 0.5 Bq/l in water with an accuracy of about 10 %. Radon concentrations at Misasa hot springs in Tottori prefecture were measured using this method. They were 0.16 [approx] 7.7 Bq/l in a bath room and 0.057 [approx] 0.36 Bq/l outdoors. Radon concentrations of the hot springs were 82 [approx] 1,700 Bq/l. (author).

  7. A double-resonance spectrometer for pure NQR detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader, Roman; Shporer, Mordechai

    The design of a high-sensitivity double-resonance NQR spectrometer is described. An NQR frequency is scanned in zero magnetic field and absorption is detected via an NMR signal in a high magnetic field. The sample is kept stationary and the magnetic field is turned on and off electronically. A new approach was used to switch the magnetic field. The solenoid consists of two coils. The current in one of the coils is kept constant. Current driven in parallel direction in the other coil yields a high magnetic field and when reversed the magnetic field vanishes. In this manner the power dissipation of the system remains constant and thermal swings during magnetic field switching are avoided.

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  9. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  10. The PNL high-transmission three-stage mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, J. J.; Ells, D. R.; Bond, L. A.; Freedman, P. A.; Tattersall, B. N.; Lagergren, C. R.

    1992-12-01

    We have constructed a three-stage isotope-ratio mass spectrometer of unique ion-optical design that achieves high ion transmission efficiency and high abundance sensitivity. The spectrometer has tandem 90 deg deflection magnets with boundaries 18 deg off normal. The magnet drift lengths are 1.48 times the 27-cm radius of deflection. This extended geometry gives a mass dispersion equivalent to a 40-cm-radius magnet with normal boundaries. The first magnet renders the ion beam parallel in the vertical plane and provides a focus in the horizontal plane of mass dispersion. The second magnet brings the beam to a stigmatic focus. This novel ion-optical design gives 100 percent transmission without the need for intermediate focusing lenses. It also provides a 16 percent increase in mass resolution over the traditional tandem geometry with normal magnet boundaries. Complete transmission of ions is maintained through a third-stage cylindrical electric sector of 38-cm radius, which provides increased isotope-abundance sensitivity. The isotope-abundance sensitivity of the new mass spectrometer is an order of magnitude better than similar instruments with normal magnet boundaries. This is because the vertical focusing of the ion beam prevents ion scattering from the top and bottom of the flight tube. The measured values of the isotope-abundance sensitivity one-half mass unit away from the rhenium ion peaks at masses 185 and 187 are M - 1/2 = (6.5 +/- 0.5)(10)(exp -10) and M + 1/2 = (3.1 +/- 0.8)(10)(exp -10). By extrapolation, the uranium isotope-abundance sensitivity is M - 1 = 1(10)(exp -10). Construction of the instrument was facilitated by using standard commercial mass spectrometer components.

  11. A spectrometer for study of high mass objects created in relativistic heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, T.A.; Barish, K.N.; Batsouli, S.; Bennett, M.J.; Bennett, S.J.; Chikanian, A.; Coe, S.D.; Cormier, T.M.; Davies, R.R.; De Cataldo, G.; Dee, P.; Diebold, G.E.; Dover, C.B.; Ewell, L.A.; Emmet, W.; Fachini, P.; Fadem, B.; Finch, L.E.; George, N.K.; Giglietto, N.; Greene, S.V.; Haridas, P.; Hill, J.C. E-mail: jhill@iastate.edu; Hirsch, A.S.; Hoversten, R.A.; Huang, H.Z.; Jaradat, H.; Kim, B.; Kumar, B.S.; Lajoie, J.G.; Lainis, T.; Lewis, R.A.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Libby, B.; Majka, R.D.; Miller, T.E.; Munhoz, M.G.; Nagle, J.L.; Petridis, A.; Pless, I.A.; Pope, J.K.; Porile, N.T.; Pruneau, C.; Rabin, M.S.Z.; Reid, J.D.; Rimai, A.; Riso, J.; Rose, A.; Rotondo, F.S.; Sandweiss, J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Skank, H.; Slaughter, A.J.; Sleage, G.; Smith, G.A.; Spinelli, P.; Srivastava, B.K.; Tincknell, M.L.; Toothacker, W.S.; Van Buren, G.; Wilson, W.K.; Wohn, F.K.; Wolin, E.J.; Xu, Z.; Zhao, K

    1999-11-21

    Experiment E864 at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator uses a high sensitivity, large acceptance spectrometer, designed to search for strangelets and other novel forms of matter produced in high-energy heavy ion collisions. The spectrometer has excellent acceptance and rate capabilities for measuring the production properties of known particles and nuclei such as p-bar, d-bar and {sup 6}He. The experiment uses a magnetic spectrometer and employs redundant time of flight and position detectors and a hadronic calorimeter. In this paper we describe the design and performance of the spectrometer.

  12. VEGAS: VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussa, Srikanth; VEGAS Development Team

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (NSF-ATI) program is funding a new spectrometer backend for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This spectrometer is being built by the CICADA collaboration - collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) at the University of California Berkeley.The backend is named as VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) and will replace the capabilities of the existing spectrometers. This backend supports data processing from focal plane array systems. The spectrometer will be capable of processing up to 1.25 GHz bandwidth from 8 dual polarized beams or a bandwidth up to 10 GHz from a dual polarized beam.The spectrometer will be using 8-bit analog to digital converters (ADC), which gives a better dynamic range than existing GBT spectrometers. There will be 8 tunable digital sub-bands within the 1.25 GHz bandwidth, which will enhance the capability of simultaneous observation of multiple spectral transitions. The maximum spectral dump rate to disk will be about 0.5 msec. The vastly enhanced backend capabilities will support several science projects with the GBT. The projects include mapping temperature and density structure of molecular clouds; searches for organic molecules in the interstellar medium; determination of the fundamental constants of our evolving Universe; red-shifted spectral features from galaxies across cosmic time and survey for pulsars in the extreme gravitational environment of the Galactic Center.

  13. Photo ion spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected autoionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy.

  14. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  15. Spectrometers and Polyphase Filterbanks in Radio Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Danny C

    2016-01-01

    This review gives an introduction to spectrometers and discusses their use within radio astronomy. While a variety of technologies are introduced, particular emphasis is given to digital systems. Three different types of digital spectrometers are discussed: autocorrelation spectrometers, Fourier transform spectrometers, and polyphase filterbank spectrometers. Given their growing ubiquity and significant advantages, polyphase filterbanks are detailed at length. The relative advantages and disadvantages of different spectrometer technologies are compared and contrasted, and implementation considerations are presented.

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  20. A Fourier transform spectrometer for visible and near ultra-violet measurements of atmospheric absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, C. L.; Gerlach, J. C.; Whitehurst, M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a prototype, ground-based, Sun-pointed Michelson interferometric spectrometer is described. Its intended use is to measure the atmospheric amount of various gases which absorb in the near-infrared, visible, and near-ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Preliminary spectra which contain the alpha, 0.8 micrometer, and rho sigma tau water vapor absorption bands in the near-infrared are presented to indicate the present capability of the system. Ultimately, the spectrometer can be used to explore the feasible applications of Fourier transform spectroscopy in the ultraviolet where grating spectrometers were used exclusively.

  1. Novel Micro Fourier Transform Spectrometers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Yan-mei; LIANG Jing-qiu; LIANG Zhong-zhu; WANG-Bo; ZHANG Jun

    2008-01-01

    The miniaturization of spectrometer opens a new application area with real-time and on-site measurements. The Fourier transform spectrometer(FTS) is much attractive considering its particular advantages among the approaches. This paper reviews the current status of micro FTS in worldwide and describes its developments; In addition, analyzed are the key problems in designing and fabricating FTS to be settled during the miniaturization. Finally, a novel model of micro FTS with no moving parts is proposed and analyzed, which may provide new concepts for the design of spectrometers.

  2. Adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The present proposal describes the development of an adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), or "Snapshot" spectrometer which can "instantaneously"...

  3. Design of and data reduction from compact Thomson parabola spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, J. T.; Willis, C.; Freeman, R. R.; Van Woerkom, L. [Physics Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Thomson parabola spectrometers are used to characterize MeV ion beams produced in high intensity laser interactions. These spectrometers disperse multiple ion species according to their charge to mass ratio through the use of parallel electric and magnetic fields. Analytical solutions for ion deflection in electric and magnetic fields have been used to extract ion spectra with the assumption that fringing effects are negligible. Experimental space restrictions and dynamic range requirements necessitate designs that stress the analytical assumptions. Depending on design parameters, the error in the analytical assumption can be comparable to the energy resolution. Estimates are provided to approximate the error on the total ion deflection. A method for modeling ion trajectories including fringing effects is presented using software freely available or in common use. The magnetostatic fields are modeled in 3D, including material properties of nearby magnetic materials using RADIA. Electrostatic fields are modeled in 2D for a spectrometer implementing angled plates using the partial differential equation toolbox in MATLAB. Using these models to calculate the ion trajectory allows for analysis of a Thomson parabola spectrometer with an arbitrary field configuration.

  4. Event reconstruction in the PHENIX central arm spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.T. E-mail: mitchell@bnl.gov; Akiba, Y.; Aphecetche, L.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T.C.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bennett, M.J.; Buesching, H.; Burward-Hoy, J.; Butsyk, S.; Chiu, M.; Christ, T.; Chujo, T.; Constantin, P.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Drees, A.; Hansen, A.G.; Hemmick, T.K.; Jia, J.; Johnson, S.C.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kohama, T.; Lajoie, J.G.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.F.; Messer, F.; Nilsson, P.; Ohnishi, H.; Park, J.; Rosati, M.; Rose, A.A.; Ryu, S.S.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sato, S.; Shigaki, K.; Silvermyr, D.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J.P.; Suzuki, M.; Tydesjoe, H.; Van Hecke, H.W.; Velkovska, J.; Volkov, M.A.; White, S.; Xie, W

    2002-04-11

    The central arm spectrometers for the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have been designed for the optimization of particle identification in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The spectrometers present a challenging environment for event reconstruction due to a very high track multiplicity in a complicated, focusing, magnetic field. In order to meet this challenge, nine distinct detector types are integrated for charged particle tracking, momentum reconstruction, and particle identification. The techniques which have been developed for the task of event reconstruction are described.

  5. Precision Measurement of the (e^{+}+e^{-}) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-11-28

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e^{+}+e^{-}) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e^{+}+e^{-}) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=-3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale).

  6. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cerreta, D.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Gil, E. Cortina; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Haas, D.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Levi, G.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lolli, M.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. We present the detailed variation with rigidity of the flux spectral index for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at high rigidities.

  7. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Cortina Gil, E; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2015-05-01

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. We present the detailed variation with rigidity of the flux spectral index for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at high rigidities.

  8. High Statistics Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, L.; Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200 GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  9. Precision Measurement of the Helium Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays of Rigidities 1.9 GV to 3 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cerreta, D.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Gil, E. Cortina; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Haas, D.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Korkmaz, M. A.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, Hu; Lolli, M.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of the precise rigidity dependence of the helium flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. A precise measurement of the helium flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1.9 GV to 3 TV based on 50 million events is presented and compared to the proton flux. The detailed variation with rigidity of the helium flux spectral index is presented for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at rigidities larger than 100 GV. The rigidity dependence of the helium flux spectral index is similar to that of the proton spectral index though the magnitudes are different. Remarkably, the spectral index of the proton to helium flux ratio increases with rigidity up to 45 GV and then becomes constant; the flux ratio above 45 GV is well described by a single power law.

  10. Precision Measurement of the (e++e-) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e++e-) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e++e-) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ =-3.170 ±0.008 (stat+syst)±0.008 (energy scale) .

  11. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Ali Cavasonza, L.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Aupetit, S.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Dong, F.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eronen, T.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R. J.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gómez-Coral, D. M.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kang, S. C.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Konak, C.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. S.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, Hu; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vázquez Acosta, M.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wei, C. C.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49 ×1 05 antiproton events and 2.42 ×1 09 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the antiproton p ¯, proton p , and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e- flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  12. Precision Measurement of the Boron to Carbon Flux Ratio in Cosmic Rays from 1.9 GV to 2.6 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Ali Cavasonza, L.; Ambrosi, G.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Aupetit, S.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindel, K. F.; Bindi, V.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demakov, O.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Dong, F.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eronen, T.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R. J.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gómez-Coral, D. M.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guo, K. H.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kang, S. C.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Konak, C.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. S.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, Hu; Lordello, V. D.; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Machate, F.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mikuni, V. M.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vázquez Acosta, M.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wei, C. C.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the boron to carbon flux ratio (B/C) is important in understanding the propagation of cosmic rays. The precise measurement of the B /C ratio from 1.9 GV to 2.6 TV, based on 2.3 million boron and 8.3 million carbon nuclei collected by AMS during the first 5 years of operation, is presented. The detailed variation with rigidity of the B /C spectral index is reported for the first time. The B /C ratio does not show any significant structures in contrast to many cosmic ray models that require such structures at high rigidities. Remarkably, above 65 GV, the B /C ratio is well described by a single power law RΔ with index Δ =-0.333 ±0.014 (fit ) ±0.005 (syst ) , in good agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence which predicts Δ =-1 /3 asymptotically.

  13. Precision Measurement of the ($e^+ + e^−$) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray ($e^+ + e^−$) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million ($e^+ + e^−$) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=−3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale).

  14. High Statistics Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5–500 GeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Accardo, L; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  15. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  16. Precision Measurement of the Helium Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays of Rigidities 1.9 GV to 3 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Gil, E Cortina; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Korkmaz, M A; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Liu, Hu; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; von Dratzig, A Schulz; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2015-11-20

    Knowledge of the precise rigidity dependence of the helium flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. A precise measurement of the helium flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1.9 GV to 3 TV based on 50 million events is presented and compared to the proton flux. The detailed variation with rigidity of the helium flux spectral index is presented for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at rigidities larger than 100 GV. The rigidity dependence of the helium flux spectral index is similar to that of the proton spectral index though the magnitudes are different. Remarkably, the spectral index of the proton to helium flux ratio increases with rigidity up to 45 GV and then becomes constant; the flux ratio above 45 GV is well described by a single power law.

  17. CERN celebrated the first year in space for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) with a visit from the crew of the shuttle mission, STS-134, who successfully delivered AMS to the International Space Station (ISS) last year.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    During the celebrations at CERN, the astronauts unveiled a commemorative plaque on the lawn outside the POCC to mark the occasion and later gave a public lecture at CERN. Picture 28 : STS-134 astronauts (left to right) Andrew Feustel, Gregory Chamitoff, Gregory Johnson, Michael Fincke and Mark Kelly in the AMS Payload Operations Centre at CERN.

  18. Precision Measurement of the Boron to Carbon Flux Ratio in Cosmic Rays from 1.9 GV to 2.6 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeğmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindel, K F; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demakov, O; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guo, K H; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lordello, V D; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Machate, F; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mikuni, V M; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-12-02

    Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the boron to carbon flux ratio (B/C) is important in understanding the propagation of cosmic rays. The precise measurement of the B/C ratio from 1.9 GV to 2.6 TV, based on 2.3 million boron and 8.3 million carbon nuclei collected by AMS during the first 5 years of operation, is presented. The detailed variation with rigidity of the B/C spectral index is reported for the first time. The B/C ratio does not show any significant structures in contrast to many cosmic ray models that require such structures at high rigidities. Remarkably, above 65 GV, the B/C ratio is well described by a single power law R^{Δ} with index Δ=-0.333±0.014(fit)±0.005(syst), in good agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence which predicts Δ=-1/3 asymptotically.

  19. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  20. The GRAVITY spectrometers: optical qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Senol; Straubmeier, Christian; Wiest, Michael; Wank, Imke; Fischer, Sebastian; Horrobin, Matthew; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy; Perraut, Karine; Brandner, Wolfgang; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY1 is a 2nd generation Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) operated in the astronomical K-band. In the Beam Combiner Instrument2 (BCI) four Fiber Couplers3 (FC) will feed the light coming from each telescope into two fibers, a reference channel for the fringe tracking spectrometer4 (FT) and a science channel for the science spectrometer4 (SC). The differential Optical Path Difference (dOPD) between the two channels will be corrected using a novel metrology concept.5 The metrology laser will keep control of the dOPD of the two channels. It is injected into the spectrometers and detected at the telescope level. Piezo-actuated fiber stretchers correct the dOPD accordingly. Fiber-fed Integrated Optics6 (IO) combine coherently the light of all six baselines and feed both spectrometers. Assisted by Infrared Wavefront Sensors7 (IWS) at each Unit Telescope (UT) and correcting the path difference between the channels with an accuracy of up to 5 nm, GRAVITY will push the limits of astrometrical accuracy to the order of 10 μas and provide phase-referenced interferometric imaging with a resolution of 4 mas. The University of Cologne developed, constructed and tested both spectrometers of the camera system. Both units are designed for the near infrared (1.95 - 2.45 μm) and are operated in a cryogenic environment. The Fringe Tracker is optimized for highest transmission with fixed spectral resolution (R = 22) realized by a double-prism.8 The Science spectrometer is more diverse and allows to choose from three different spectral resolutions8 (R = [22, 500, 4000]), where the lowest resolution is achieved with a prism and the higher resolutions are realized with grisms. A Wollaston prism in each spectrometer allows for polarimetric splitting of the light. The goal for the spectrometers is to concentrate at least 90% of the ux in 2 × 2 pixel (36 × 36 μm2) for the Science channel and in 1 pixel (24 × 24 μm) in the Fringe Tracking channel. In Section 1, we present

  1. Automated Nuclear Quadruple Resonance Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANCHUK, M.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of an autodyne Nuclear quadruple resonance spectrometer is offered. The change of frequency of oscillatory LC circuit of the spectrometer is carried out in two ways: by varicap and variable capacitor. A processor module for the capacitor and varicap control is developed. The unit allows to scan and measure the level and frequency of the NQR-signal. The unit is controlled by the personal computer.

  2. Automated Nuclear Quadruple Resonance Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Improvement of an autodyne Nuclear quadruple resonance spectrometer is offered. The change of frequency of oscillatory LC circuit of the spectrometer is carried out in two ways: by varicap and variable capacitor. A processor module for the capacitor and varicap control is developed. The unit allows to scan and measure the level and frequency of the NQR-signal. The unit is controlled by the personal computer.

  3. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The huge superconducting magnet (3 m inside coil diameter, 2 m gap, 18 kGauss) contains a large number of optical spark chambers partly surrounding a hydrogen target which is hit by the beam entering from behind. The half cylindrical aluminium hut houses eight television cameras viewing the spark chambers from the top. The big gas Cerenkov counter in front of the picture (6 m x 4 m x 3 m) which identifies fast forward particles was constructed at Saclay as a contribution of one of the Omega.

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  6. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  7. Broadband EUV survey spectrometer for short-timescale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, B.E.; Hartog, D.J. Den; Fonck, R.J.

    1993-11-01

    A fast and inexpensive spectrometer system has been developed to record EUV impurity spectra in a magnetic fusion research device. To simplify the vacuum system, light is passed out of the spectrometer`s vacuum to the detector using a sodium-salicylate-coated fiber optic coupler. This coupler is positioned such that the focal field is nearly flat over its aperture. The system`s detector is a microchannel-plate-intensified, linear, self-scanning photodiode array. The 1024-pixel array covers a bandwidth of over 80 nm and is read out once every millisecond. The readout, which is four times faster than the manufacturer`s maximum rating, is fully synchronized to the experiment using a locally-designed control circuit.

  8. Preparation and characterization of highly water-soluble magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles via surface double-layered self-assembly method of sodium alpha-olefin sulfonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Honghong; Qin, Li [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Feng, Ying [Department of Bridge Engineering, Shanxi Railway Institute, Weinan 714000 (China); Hu, Lihua [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Zhou, Chunhua, E-mail: chm_zhouch@ujn.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2015-06-15

    A kind of double-layered self-assembly sodium alpha-olefin sulfonate (AOS) capped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN) with highly water-solubility was prepared by a wet co-precipitation method with a pH of 4.8. The resulting Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN could be dispersed into water to form stable magnetic fluid without other treatments. The result of X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN maintained original crystalline structure and exhibited a diameter of about 7.5 nm. The iron oxide phase of nanoparticles determined by Raman spectroscopy is Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis confirmed that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN with spherical morphology were uniformly dispersed in water. FT-IR spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) verified the successful preparation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN capped with double-layered self-assembled AOS. The corresponding capacities of monolayer chemical absorption and the second-layer self-assembly absorption were respectively 4.07 and 14.71 wt% of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-MN, which were much lower than those of other surfactants. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) test result showed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN possessed superparamagnetic behavior with the saturation magnetization value of about 44.45 emu/g. The blocking temperature T{sub B} of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN capped with double-layered AOS is 170 K. - Highlights: • Double-layered self-assembly sodium alpha-olefin sulfonate (AOS) capped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles are prepared by a wet co-precipitation method. • Double-layered Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN exhibits highly water-solubility. • The iron oxide phase is determined by Raman spectroscopy. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN capped with double-layered AOS possesses super-paramagnetic behavior. • The blocking temperature T{sub B} of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-AOS-MN capped with double-layered AOS is 170 K.

  9. A compact, high-efficiency charged-particle spectrometer for studies of stellar nucleosynthesis and kinetic implosion physics at OMEGA and the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, G. D.; Armstrong, E.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Milanese, L. M.; Simpson, R.; Wink, C.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Zylstra, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Park, H.-S.; Bionta, R.

    2016-10-01

    A compact and highly efficient magnet-based spectrometer (called MOS, for Mini Orange Spectrometer) has been designed for measurements of energy spectra of low-energy protons and alphas in experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The MOS brings a much needed capability to these laser facilities, able to measure charged-particle spectra with high accuracy and high energy resolution at energies <5 MeV for yields <5x108. High efficiency is accomplished by maximizing the solid angle. The MOS enables studies of low-probability stellar nucleosynthesis reactions like the 3He+3He reaction, which is part of the solar proton-proton chain. It will also enable other basic science experiments, including studies of stopping power in ICF-relevant plasmas, astrophysical shocks and kinetic physics. The optimization of the MOS design utilized simulated magnetic fields and particle tracing with the software COMSOL. Performance requirements of the MOS system, including desired detection efficiencies and energy resolution, are discussed. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE and LLNL.

  10. The fratricide of alpha-Omega dynamos by their alpha-squared siblings

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Context. Helically forced magneto-hydrodynamic shearing-sheet turbulence can support different large-scale dynamo modes, although the {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} mode is generally expected to dominate because it is the fastest growing. In an {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} dynamo, most of the field amplification is produced by the shear. As differential rotation is an ubiquitous source of shear in astrophysics, such dynamos are believed to be the source of most astrophysical large-scale magnetic fields. Aims. We study the stability of oscillatory migratory {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} type dynamos in turbulence simulations. Methods. We use shearing-sheet simulations of hydromagnetic turbulence that is helically forced at a wavenumber that is about three times larger than the lowest wavenumber in the domain so that both {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} and {\\alpha}2 dynamo action is possible. Results. After initial dominance and saturation, the {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} mode is found to be destroyed by an orthogonal {\\alpha}2 mode sustained by the helical t...

  11. Software Polarization Spectrometer "PolariS"

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuno, Izumi; Kano, Amane; Kuroo, Makoto; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M; Kuji, Seisuke; Kuno, Nario

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a software-based polarization spectrometer, PolariS, to acquire full-Stokes spectra with a very high spectral resolution of 61 Hz. The primary aim of PolariS is to measure the magnetic fields in dense star-forming cores by detecting the Zeeman splitting of molecular emission lines. The spectrometer consists of a commercially available digital sampler and a Linux computer. The computer is equipped with a graphics processing unit (GPU) to process FFT and cross-correlation using the CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) library developed by NVIDIA. Thanks to a high degree of precision in quantization of the analog-to-digital converter and arithmetic in the GPU, PolariS offers excellent performances in linearity, dynamic range, sensitivity, bandpass flatness and stability. The software has been released under the MIT License and is available to the public. In this paper, we report the design of PolariS and its performance verified through engineering tests and commissioning observations.

  12. Performance Validation of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Mair, Katharina

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is a general-purpose experiment for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which is scheduled to begin operation in the year 2007, providing experiments with proton-proton collisions. The center-of-mass energy of 14TeV and the design luminosity of 1034 cm−2s−1 will allow to explore many new aspects of fundamental physics. The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer aims at a momentum resolution better than 10% for transverse momentum values ranging from pT = 6 GeV to pT = 1TeV. Precision tracking will be performed by Ar-CO2-gas filled Monitored Drift Tube chambers (MDTs), with a single wire resolution of < 100 μm. In total, about 1 200 chambers, arranged in a large structure, will allow muon track measurements over distances up to 15m in a magnetic field of 0.5 T. Given the large size of the spectrometer it is impossible to keep the shape of the muon chambers and their positions stable within the requested tracking accuracy of 50 μm. Therefore the concept of an optical alig...

  13. The MAGNEX spectrometer: results and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Cappuzzello, F; Carbone, D; Cavallaro, M

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the main achievements and future perspectives of the MAGNEX spectrometer at the INFN-LNS laboratory in Catania (Italy). MAGNEX is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer for the detection of the ions emitted in nuclear collisions below Fermi energy. In the first part of the paper an overview of the MAGNEX features is presented. The successful application to the precise reconstruction of the momentum vector, to the identification of the ion masses and to the determination of the transport efficiency is demonstrated by in-beam tests. In the second part, an overview of the most relevant scientific achievements is given. Results from nuclear elastic and inelastic scattering as well as from transfer and charge exchange reactions in a wide range of masses of the colliding systems and incident energies are shown. The role of MAGNEX in solving old and new puzzles in nuclear structure and direct reaction mechanisms is emphasized. One example is the recently observed signature of the long search...

  14. Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Cable, Morgan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Haag, Justin; Lamborn, Andrew; McKinley, Ian; Rodriguez, Jose; van Gorp, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a modular visible to short wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer architecture which could be adapted to a variety of mission concepts requiring low mass and low power. Imaging spectroscopy is an established technique to address complex questions of geologic evolution by mapping diagnostic absorption features due to minerals, organics, and volatiles throughout our solar system. At the core of UCIS is an Offner imaging spectrometer using M3 heritage and a miniature pulse tube cryo-cooler developed under the NASA Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration (MatISSE) program to cool the focal plane array. The TRL 6 integrated spectrometer and cryo-cooler provide a basic imaging spectrometer capability that is used with a variety of fore optics to address lunar, mars, and small body science goals. Potential configurations include: remote sensing from small orbiters and flyby spacecraft; in situ panoramic imaging spectroscopy; and in situ micro-spectroscopy. A micro-spectroscopy front end is being developed using MatISSE funding with integration and testing planned this summer.

  15. Measurement of electric and magnetic polarizabilities with Primakoff reaction at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Colantoni, M

    2005-01-01

    The COMPASS spectrometer is well suited to perform precise measurements of the pion polarizabilities via the Primakoff reaction $\\pi(Z,A)\\rightarrow\\pi+(Z,A)+\\psi$. The electric ($\\bar{\\alpha}_{\\pi}$) and magnetic ($\\bar{\\beta}_{\\pi}$) polarizabilities characterize the response of the response of the pion quark substructure to the electromagnetic field of the $\\psi$ during the $\\pi\\psi$ scattering. The results of a simulation for the foreseen 2004 setup are presented. The measurement of the pion polarizabilities allows for a test of the chiral perturbation theory ($_{X}PT$) predictions.

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  19. A Magnetic Alpha-Omega Dynamo in Active Galactic Nuclei Disks: I. The Hydrodynamics of Star-Disk Collisions and Keplerian Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pariev, V I; Pariev, Vladimir I.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    2006-01-01

    A magnetic field dynamo in the inner regions of the accretion disk surrounding the supermassive black holes in AGNs may be the mechanism for the generation of magnetic fields in galaxies and in extragalactic space. We argue that the two coherent motions produced by 1) the Keplerian motion and 2) star-disk collisions, numerous in the inner region of AGN accretion disks, are both basic to the formation of a robust, coherent dynamo and consequently the generation of large scale magnetic fields. They are frequent enough to account for an integrated dynamo gain, e^{10^{9}} at 100 gravitational radii of a central black hole, many orders of magnitude greater than required to amplify any seed field no matter how small. The existence of extra-galactic, coherent, large scale magnetic fields whose energies greatly exceed all but massive black hole energies is recognized. In paper II (Pariev, Colgate, and Finn 2006) we argue that in order to produce a dynamo that can access the free energy of black hole formation and pro...

  20. The role of chelating agents on the structural and magnetic properties of {alpha} - Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, J.R.; Cunha, T.R.; Duque, J.G.S.; Meneses, C.T. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Itabaiana, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Lima, R.J.S. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (DF/UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: In this work we have studied the influence of the insertion of chelating agents (AC) on the synthesis process of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocrystals obtained by co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) added to the magnetization results show that the addition influence significantly on the control particles size and the sizes distribution (presenting a average crystallite size around 6(2) nm). Therefore the nanoparticles prepared without organic precursor present average size of 75 nm and temperature dependent field cooling magnetization showed that there was Morin transition. Rietveld refinement analysis added to image of Scanning Electronic Microscopy show that for low concentrations of sucrose the particles shape are changed of randomly form to rod-like and directed to a preferential growth in 110 crystalline plane. Zero Field Cooling-Field Cooling (ZFC-FC) magnetizations curves show that samples obtained in low temperature present a superparamagnetic behavior with blocking and irreversibility temperatures around 95 and 135K, respectively. Besides, a more careful analysis performed in the XRD, SEM, TEM and ZFC-FC magnetization data show clearly the dependence of the size, shape and size distribution of the samples as function of the chelating agent concentration. We have concluded that the presence of sucrose in the synthesis inhibited the coalescence effect and provoke change in crystallite shape (CNPq). (author)

  1. Polarized triple-axis spectrometer TASP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeni, P.; Keller, P. [Lab. for Neutron Scattering ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland) and Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    The polarized triple-axis spectrometer TASP at SINQ has been optimized for measuring magnetic cross sections in condensed matter. The neutrons are polarized or analyzed either by means of benders or Heusler monochromators. The beam divergence, i.e. the intensity, and the spectral range of the neutrons is rather large because of the supermirror coatings of the feeding neutron guide. The intensity can be further increased at the sample position by means of a focussing monochromator and a focussing anti-trumpet. The end position of TASP allows the tailoring of the neutron beam already before the monochromator and to scatter neutrons over very wide ranges of angles. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs.

  2. A compact neutron-gamma spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cester, D.; Nebbia, G.; Stevanato, L.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Viesti, G.

    2013-08-01

    A compact neutron/gamma detector has been developed using a liquid scintillator cell coupled to a Flat Panel PMT; performances have been compared with a second cell coupled to a traditional linearly-focused 12 dynodes PMT. Energy resolution and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) measured by using a fast digitizer are very similar for the two detectors with the time resolution of the Flat Panel PMT slightly worse. The new detector results to be weakly affected by the influence of a moderate magnetic field while the traditional PMT exhibits strong pulse reduction. The compact size and the low power consumption obtained by using the Flat Panel PMT are very useful in portable neutron/gamma spectrometers.

  3. H$\\alpha$ and EUV observations of a partial CME

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, Damian J; Antolin, Patrick; Mathioudakis, Mihalis

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained H$\\alpha$ high spatial and time resolution observations of the upper solar chromosphere and supplemented these with multi-wavelength observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) and the {\\it Hinode} ExtremeUltraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The H$\\alpha$ observations were conducted on 11 February 2012 with the Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics Camera (HARDcam) instrument at the National Solar Observatory's Dunn Solar Telescope. Our H$\\alpha$ observations found large downflows of chromospheric material returning from coronal heights following a failed prominence eruption. We have detected several large condensations ("blobs") returning to the solar surface at velocities of $\\approx$200 km s$^{-1}$ in both H$\\alpha$ and several SDO AIA band passes. The average derived size of these "blobs" in H$\\alpha$ is 500 by 3000 km$^2$ in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the direction of travel, respectively. A comparison of our "blob" widths to those found from coronal rain, indicate...

  4. Structure and magnetism of [n-BuNH3]12[Cu4(GeW9O34)2].14H2O sandwiching a rhomblike Cu4(8+) tetragon through alpha-Keggin linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamase, Toshihiro; Abe, Hiroko; Ishikawa, Eri; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Ohshima, Yuhgo

    2009-01-05

    A sandwich-type polyoxometalate, [Cu(4)(GeW(9)O(34))(2)](12-) (1a), in which two B-alpha-[GeW(9)O(34)](12-) ligands sandwich a rhomblike Cu(4)(8+) tetragon through alpha-Kappaeggin linkage, is first isolated as a [n-BuNH(3)](+) salt, [n-BuNH(3)](12)[Cu(4)(GeW(9)O(34))(2)].14H(2)O (1). A Cu(4)O(14) cluster for the rhomblike Cu(4)(8+) tetragon in 1a with C(2h) local symmetry consists of two Jahn-Teller (JT) distorted CuO(6) octahedra (at internal sites) with a short diagonal Cu(int)...Cu(int) distance of 3.10-3.11 A and two CuO(5) square pyramids (at external site) with a long diagonal Cu(ext)...Cu(ext) distance of 5.34-5.35 A, the feature of which is different from [Cu(4)(H(2)O)(2)(GeW(9)O(34))(2)](12-) (2a), comprising the four JT-distorted CuO(6) octahedral Cu(4)(8+) tetragons through beta-Keggin linkage: the axial Cu(ext)-O bond distance (2.27-2.29 A) for 1a is shorter than the corresponding JT-axial distance (2.36 A) for 2a. Measurements of magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy for 1 are carried out for better understanding of the molecular magnetism of the Cu(4)(8+) tetragon in comparison with 2a. The analysis of the magnetic behavior, based on the isotropic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian comprising three exchange parameters (J, J', and J''), gives J = -24.1 cm(-1) for the Cu(ext)..Cu(int) sides, J' = -99.1 cm(-1) for the Cu(int)...Cu(int) diagonal, and J'' = +0.04 cm(-1) for the Cu(ext)...Cu(ext) diagonal of the Cu(4)(8+) rhombus. The S = 1 ground state of 1 displays g(||) = 2.42, g( perpendicular)= 2.07, D = -1.44 x 10(-2) cm(-1), and |A(Cu||)| = 46.5 x 10(-4) cm(-1). An observation of the asymmetric magnetization between a positive and a negative pulsed field (up to 10(3) T/s) at 0.5 K on the hysteresis loop indicates the quantum tunneling at zero field. The magnetic exchange interactions of four unpaired d(x(2)-y(2))-electron spins are discussed in terms of the point-dipole approximation, and the primary contribution

  5. A Computer-based Tutorial on Double-Focusing Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbar, Richard R.; Browman, Andrew A.; Mead, William C.; Williams, Robert A.

    1998-10-01

    WhistleSoft is developing a set of computer-based, self-paced tutorials on particle accelerators that targets a broad audience, including undergraduate science majors and industrial technicians. (See http://www.whistlesoft.com/s~ilbar/.) We use multimedia techniques to enhance the student's rate of learning and retention of the material. The tutorials feature interactive On-Screen Laboratories and use hypertext, colored graphics, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. Parts of our Dipoles module deal with the double-focusing spectrometer and occur throughout the piece. Radial focusing occurs in the section on uniform magnets, while vertical focusing is in the non-uniform magnets section. The student can even understand the √2π bend angle on working through the (intermediate-level) discussion on the Kerst-Serber equations. This talk will present our discussion of this spectrometer, direct to you from the computer screen.

  6. OPENCORE NMR: open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments.

  7. JPL Fourier transform ultraviolet spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cageao, R. P.; Friedl, R. R.; Sander, Stanley P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Ultraviolet Spectrometer (FTUVS) is a new high resolution interferometric spectrometer for multiple-species detection in the UV, visible and near-IR. As an OH sensor, measurements can be carried out by remote sensing (limb emission and column absorption), or in-situ sensing (long-path absorption or laser-induced fluorescence). As a high resolution detector in a high repetition rate (greater than 10 kHz) LIF system, OH fluorescence can be discriminated against non-resonant background emission and laser scatter, permitting (0, 0) excitation.

  8. A high-throughput neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, Anton; Noakes, Terry; Bartsch, Friedl; Bertinshaw, Joel; Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Raeside, Tyler; Yethiraj, Mohana; Danilkin, Sergey; Kearley, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    A cross-disciplinary high-throughput neutron spectrometer is currently under construction at OPAL, ANSTO's open pool light-water research reactor. The spectrometer is based on the design of a Be-filter spectrometer (FANS) that is operating at the National Institute of Standards research reactor in the USA. The ANSTO filter-spectrometer will be switched in and out with another neutron spectrometer, the triple-axis spectrometer, Taipan. Thus two distinct types of neutron spectrometers will be accessible: one specialised to perform phonon dispersion analysis and the other, the filter-spectrometer, designed specifically to measure vibrational density of states. A summary of the design will be given along with a detailed ray-tracing analysis. Some preliminary results will be presented from the spectrometer.

  9. Overview of the Axial Field Spectrometer in the ISR tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A view of the Axial Field Spectrometer – the last large experiment at the ISR. The horizontal top and vertical outer arrays of the uranium-scintillator hadron calorimeter are clear to be seen, with the blue cylindrical pole piece of the magnet just visible. The pipes that are visible in front of the pole piece are cryogenic feed pipes for the superconducting low-beta quadrupoles.

  10. Identification of neutrino interactions using the DONUT spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Giokaris, N.; Saoulidou, N.; Tzanakos, G.; Baller, B.; Boehnlein, D.; Lundberg, B. E-mail: lundberg@fnal.gov; Rameika, R.; Song, J.S.; Yoon, C.S.; Chung, S.H.; Berghaus, P.; Kubantsev, M.; Reay, N.W.; Sidwell, R.; Stanton, N.; Yoshida, S.; Aoki, S.; Hara, T.; Ciampa, D.; Erickson, C.; Heller, K.; Rusack, R.; Graham, M.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sielaff, J.; Trammell, J.; Wilcox, J.; Hoshino, K.; Jiko, H.; Kawada, J.; Kawai, T.; Komatsu, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Miyanishi, M.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Narita, K.; Niwa, K.; Nonaka, N.; Okada, K.; Sato, O.; Toshito, T.; Akdogan, T.; Kulik, A.; Paolone, V.; Rosenfeld, C.; Kafka, T.; Oliver, W.; Schneps, J.; Skender, M

    2004-01-01

    The experimental apparatus used for the first direct observation of the tau neutrino (the DONUT experiment) is described. Its main features consisted of a target system composed of nuclear emulsion targets and scintillation fiber trackers, a magnetic charged-particle spectrometer and detectors for lepton identification. This paper will concentrate on the description of the electronic detectors and their performance in selecting neutrino interactions, making the vertex predictions necessary for locating events in the emulsion target and lepton identification.

  11. Spherical polarimetry on the three-axis spectrometer IN22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnault, L.P.; Geffray, B.; Fouilloux, P.; Longuet, B.; Mantegezza, F.; Tasset, F.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Bourgeat-Lami, E.; Thomas, M.; Gibert, Y

    2003-07-01

    The existence at the ILL of three-axis spectrometers (TAS) offering high flux of polarized neutrons in the thermal range ('CRG' IN22 and IN20B) has open a new field of investigation of magnetic and lattice excitation spectra. In this paper, we will show recent technical developments concerning the installation and the optimization of the spherical neutron polarization analysis on TAS IN22.

  12. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Alpha Tau (K5 III) - Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo in Late-Type Giant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Airapetian, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for a Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from a Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfv6n waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These waves cause nonthermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant Alfven wave heating.

  13. First direct mass measurements on nobelium and lawrencium with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dworschak, Michael Gerhard

    2009-12-08

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt was set up for high-precision mass measurements of heavy radionuclides produced in fusion evaporation reactions and separated from the primary beam by the velocity filter SHIP. It consists of a gas stopping cell for the deceleration of the high energetic reaction products, an RFQ cooler and buncher for cooling and accumulation of the ions, and a double Penning trap system to perform mass measurements. The mass is determined by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the ion of interest in a strong homogeneous magnetic field and comparing it to the frequency of a well-known reference ion. With this method relative uncertainties in the order of 10{sup -8} can be achieved. Recently, mass measurements of the three nobelium isotopes {sup 252-254}No (Z=102) and the lawrencium isotope {sup 255}Lr (Z=103) were performed successfully. These were the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements ever per- formed. The production rate of the atoms of interest was about one per second or less. The results of the measurements on nobelium confirm the previous mass values which were deduced from Q{sub {alpha}} values. In the case of {sup 255}Lr the mass excess value, which was previously only estimated from systematic trends, was for the first time directly measured. These results mark the first step in the exploration of the region of transuranium elements which is planned at SHIPTRAP. The main objective is to fix the endpoints of {alpha} decay chains which are originating from superheavy elements close to the predicted island of stability. (orig.)

  14. Mid infrared MEMS FTIR spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfan, Mazen; Sabry, Yasser M.; Mortada, Bassem; Sharaf, Khaled; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    In this work we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, a bulk-micromachined wideband MEMS-based spectrometer covering both the NIR and the MIR ranges and working from 1200 nm to 4800 nm. The core engine of the spectrometer is a scanning Michelson interferometer micro-fabricated using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) technology. The spectrum is obtained using the Fourier Transform techniques that allows covering a very wide spectral range limited by the detector responsivity. The moving mirror of the interferometer is driven by a relatively large stroke electrostatic comb-drive actuator. Zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) multimode optical fibers are used to connect light between the white light source and the interferometer input, as well as the interferometer output to a PbSe photoconductive detector. The recorded signal-to-noise ratio is 25 dB at the wavelength of 3350 nm. The spectrometer is successfully used in measuring the absorption spectra of methylene chloride, quartz glass and polystyrene film. The presented solution provides a low cost method for producing miniaturized spectrometers in the near-/mid-infrared.

  15. The smallsat TIR spectrometer MIBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijtens, J.A.P.; Court, A.J.; Lucas, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    In frame of the ESA Earthcare MSI study, TNO Science and Industry has developed a compact spectrometer which is optimized for operation in the 7 to 14 μm wavelength region. By optimizing the throughput of the system, and using the advantages of modern manufacturing technologies to the largest extend

  16. A cryogenic scan mechanism for use in Fourier transform spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakun, Claef F.; Blumenstock, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements, design, assembly and testing of the linear Scan Mechanism (SM) of the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) Instrument. The mechanism consists of an over constrained flexible structure, an innovative moving magnet actuator, passive eddy current dampers, a Differential Eddy Current (DEC) sensor, Optical Limit Sensors (OLS), and a launch lock. Although all the components of the mechanism are discussed, the flexible structure and the magnetic components are the primary focus. Several problems encountered and solutions implemented during the development of the scan mechanism are also described.

  17. Operation of A Sunpower M87 Cryocooler In A Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breon, S. R.; Shirey, K. A.; Banks, I. S.; Warner, B. A.; Boyle, R. F.; Mustafi, S.; Krebs,Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) is an experiment that will be flown as an attached payload on the International Space Station to detect dark matter and antimatter. It uses large superconducting magnets cooled with superfluid helium to bend the path of cosmic particles through a series of detectors, which then measure the mass, speed, charge, and direction of the particles. Four Sunpower M87N Stirling-cycle cryocoolers are used to extend the mission life by cooling the outer vapor-cooled shield of the dewar. The main magnet coils are separated by a distance of approximately 1 m and the coolers are located approximately 1.5 m from the center line of the magnet, where the field is as high as 925 gauss perpendicular to the cryocooler axis and 400 gauss along the cryocooler axis. Interactions between the applied magnetic field and the linear motor may result in additional forces and torques on the compressor piston. Motion of the compressor arid displacer pistons through the magnetic field spatial gradients will generate eddy currents. Additional eddy currents are created during magnet charge, discharge, and quench by the time-varying magnetic field. The results of tests to determine the magnitude of the forces, torques, and heating effects, as well as the need for additional magnetic shielding, are presented.

  18. Development of Real-Time Image Stabilization and Control Systems for an Airborne Infrared Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The total solar eclipse of August 21, 2017 offers a unique opportunity for study of the infrared solar corona. The Airborne Infrared Spectrometer (AIR-Spec), currently under development, is an infrared telescope and spectrometer that will search for several magnetically sensitive coronal emission lines between 1.4 and 4 micrometers.  This instrument will be the first to observe several of these lines, and the measurement campaign will determine whether any lines may be useful for future direc...

  19. Stretched-wire, remote, position-sensing device for EPICS. [Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensslin, N.; Greene, S.J.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1976-05-01

    A description is given of design considerations, physical layout, electronics, and PDP-11 computer programming for the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) taut-wire system. EPICS is a high-resolution pion channel and spectrometer facility at Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The taut-wires are remote, position-sensing devices attached to the relatively inaccessible channel magnets for monitoring their relative positions.

  20. From carbon to actinides: A new universal 1MV accelerator mass spectrometer at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Hotchkis, M.; Levchenko, V.; Fink, D.; Hauser, T.; Kitchen, R.

    2015-10-01

    A new 1 MV NEC pelletron AMS system at ANSTO is presented. The spectrometer comprises large radius magnets for actinide measurements. A novel feature of the system is fast switching between isotopes both at low and high energy sections allowing measurements of up to 8 isotopes within a single sequence. Technical details and layout of the spectrometer is presented. Performance data for 14C, 10Be, 26Al and actinides demonstrate the system is ready for routine AMS measurements.

  1. From carbon to actinides: A new universal 1MV accelerator mass spectrometer at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcken, K.M., E-mail: klaus.wilcken@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Hotchkis, M.; Levchenko, V.; Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Hauser, T.; Kitchen, R. [National Electrostatics Corporation, 7540 Graber Road, Middleton, WI 53562-0310 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    A new 1 MV NEC pelletron AMS system at ANSTO is presented. The spectrometer comprises large radius magnets for actinide measurements. A novel feature of the system is fast switching between isotopes both at low and high energy sections allowing measurements of up to 8 isotopes within a single sequence. Technical details and layout of the spectrometer is presented. Performance data for {sup 14}C, {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and actinides demonstrate the system is ready for routine AMS measurements.

  2. Spherical neutron polarization analysis on the three-axis spectrometer IN22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnault, L.P.; Geffray, B.; Fouilloux, P.; Longuet, B.; Mantegazza, F.; Tasset, F.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Pujol, S.; Bourgeat-Lami, E.; Kernavanois, N.; Thomas, M.; Gibert, Y

    2004-07-15

    The recent availability at the ILL of two three-axis spectrometers, IN20B and IN22, offering high flux of polarized neutrons in the thermal-energy range has opened a new field of investigation of magnetic and lattice excitations. In this short article, we will show recent technical developments concerning the installation and the optimization of the spherical neutron polarimetry (SNP) on the three-axis spectrometer IN22.

  3. An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Solar Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Jenna; DeLuca, Edward E.; Golub, Leon; Cheimets, Peter; Philip, Judge

    2016-05-01

    The airborne infrared spectrometer (AIR-Spec) is an innovative solar spectrometer that will observe the 2017 solar eclipse from the NSF/NCAR High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER). AIR-Spec will image five infrared coronal emission lines to determine whether they may be useful probes of coronal magnetism.The solar magnetic field provides the free energy that controls coronal heating, structure, and dynamics. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections and ultimately drives space weather. Therefore, direct coronal field measurements have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind.While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, AIR-Spec will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. During the total solar eclipse of 2017, AIR-Spec will observe five magnetically sensitive coronal emission lines between 1.4 and 4 µm from the HIAPER Gulfstream V at an altitude above 14.9 km. The instrument will measure emission line intensity, width, and Doppler shift, map the spatial distribution of infrared emitting plasma, and search for waves in the emission line velocities.AIR-Spec consists of an optical system (feed telescope, grating spectrometer, and infrared detector) and an image stabilization system, which uses a fast steering mirror to correct the line-of-sight for platform perturbations. To ensure that the instrument meets its research goals, both systems are undergoing extensive performance modeling and testing. These results are shown with reference to the science requirements.

  4. R×B drift momentum spectrometer with high resolution and large phase space acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Konrad, G; Abele, H

    2013-02-11

    We propose a new type of momentum spectrometer, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse the charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, and measures the particles with large phase space acceptance and high resolution. This kind of R×B spectrometer is designed for the momentum analyses of the decay electrons and protons in the PERC (Proton and Electron Radiation Channel) beam station, which provides a strong magnetic field to guide the charged particles in the instrument. Instead of eliminating the guiding field, the R×B spectrometer evolves the field gradually to the analysing field, and the charged particles can be adiabatically transported during the dispersion and detection. The drifts of the particles have similar properties as their dispersion in the normal magnetic spectrometer. Besides, the R×B spectrometer is especially ideal for the measurements of particles with low momenta and large incident angles. We present a design of the R×B spectrometer, which can be used in PERC. For the particles with solid angle smaller than 88 msr, the maximum aberration is below 10(-4). The resolution of the momentum spectra can reach 14.4 keV/c, if the particle position measurements have a resolution of 1 mm.

  5. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  6. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  7. Magnetic fields and differential rotation on the pre-main sequence II: The early-G star HD 141943 - coronal magnetic field, H-alpha emission and differential rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, S C; Vélez, J C Ramírez; Alecian, E; Brown, C J; Carter, B D; Donati, J F; Dunstone, N; Hart, R; Semel, M; Waite, I A

    2011-01-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations of the pre-main sequence early-G star HD 141943 were obtained at three observing epochs (2007, 2009 and 2010). The observations were obtained using the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian telescope with the UCLES echelle spectrograph and the SEMPOL spectropolarimeter visitor instrument. The brightness and surface magnetic field topologies (given in Paper I) were used to determine the star's surface differential rotation and reconstruct the coronal magnetic field of the star. The coronal magnetic field at the 3 epochs shows on the largest scales that the field structure is dominated by the dipole component with possible evidence for the tilt of the dipole axis shifting between observations. We find very high levels of differential rotation on HD 141943 (~8 times the solar value for the magnetic features and ~5 times solar for the brightness features) similar to that evidenced by another young early-G star, HD 171488. These results indicate that a significant increase in the level of differe...

  8. Commissioning of the vacuum system of the KATRIN Main Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Arenz, M; Bahr, M; Barrett, J P; Bauer, S; Beck, M; Beglarian, A; Behrens, J; Bergmann, T; Besserer, U; Blümer, J; Bodine, L I; Bokeloh, K; Bonn, J; Bornschein, B; Bornschein, L; Büsch, S; Burritt, T H; Chilingaryan, S; Corona, T J; De Viveiros, L; Doe, P J; Dragoun, O; Drexlin, G; Dyba, S; Ebenhöch, S; Eitel, K; Ellinger, E; Enomoto, S; Erhard, M; Eversheim, D; Fedkevych, M; Felden, A; Fischer, S; Formaggio, J A; Fränkle, F; Furse, D; Ghilea, M; Gil, W; Glück, F; Urena, A Gonzalez; Görhardt, S; Groh, S; Grohmann, S; Grössle, R; Gumbsheimer, R; Hackenjos, M; Hannen, V; Harms, F; Hauÿmann, N; Heizmann, F; Helbing, K; Herz, W; Hickford, S; Hilk, D; Hillen, B; Höhn, T; Holzapfel, B; Hötzel, M; Howe, M A; Huber, A; Jansen, A; Kernert, N; Kippenbrock, L; Kleesiek, M; Klein, M; Kopmann, A; Kosmider, A; Kovalík, A; Krasch, B; Kraus, M; Krause, H; Krause, M; Kuckert, L; Kuffner, B; La Cascio, L; Lebeda, O; Leiber, B; Letnev, J; Lobashev, V M; Lokhov, A; Malcherek, E; Mark, M; Martin, E L; Mertens, S; Mirz, S; Monreal, B; Müller, K; Neuberger, M; Neumann, H; Niemes, S; Noe, M; Oblath, N S; Off, A; Ortjohann, H -W; Osipowicz, A; Otten, E; Parno, D S; Plischke, P; Poon, A W P; Prall, M; Priester, F; Ranitzsch, P C -O; Reich, J; Rest, O; Robertson, R G H; Röllig, M; Rosendahl, S; Rupp, S; Rysavy, M; Schlösser, K; Schlösser, M; Schönung, K; Schrank, M; Schwarz, J; Seiler, W; Seitz-Moskaliuk, H; Sentkerestiova, J; Skasyrskaya, A; Slezak, M; Spalek, A; Steidl, M; Steinbrink, N; Sturm, M; Suesser, M; Telle, H H; Thümmler, T; Titov, N; Tkachev, I; Trost, N; Unru, A; Valerius, K; Venos, D; Vianden, R; Vöcking, S; Wall, B L; Wandkowsky, N; Weber, M; Weinheimer, C; Weiss, C; Welte, S; Wendel, J; Wierman, K L; Wilkerson, J F; Winzen, D; Wolf, J; Wüstling, S; Zacher, M; Zadoroghny, S; Zboril, M

    2016-01-01

    The KATRIN experiment will probe the neutrino mass by measuring the beta-electron energy spectrum near the endpoint of tritium beta-decay. An integral energy analysis will be performed by an electro-static spectrometer (Main Spectrometer), an ultra-high vacuum vessel with a length of 23.2 m, a volume of 1240 m^3, and a complex inner electrode system with about 120000 individual parts. The strong magnetic field that guides the beta-electrons is provided by super-conducting solenoids at both ends of the spectrometer. Its influence on turbo-molecular pumps and vacuum gauges had to be considered. A system consisting of 6 turbo-molecular pumps and 3 km of non-evaporable getter strips has been deployed and was tested during the commissioning of the spectrometer. In this paper the configuration, the commissioning with bake-out at 300{\\deg}C, and the performance of this system are presented in detail. The vacuum system has to maintain a pressure in the 10^{-11} mbar range. It is demonstrated that the performance of t...

  9. The MAGNEX spectrometer: Results and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.

    2016-06-01

    This review discusses the main achievements and future perspectives of the MAGNEX spectrometer at the INFN-LNS laboratory in Catania (Italy). MAGNEX is a large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer for the detection of the ions emitted in nuclear collisions below Fermi energy. In the first part of the paper an overview of the MAGNEX features is presented. The successful application to the precise reconstruction of the momentum vector, to the identification of the ion masses and to the determination of the transport efficiency is demonstrated by in-beam tests. In the second part, an overview of the most relevant scientific achievements is given. Results from nuclear elastic and inelastic scattering as well as from transfer and charge-exchange reactions in a wide range of masses of the colliding systems and incident energies are shown. The role of MAGNEX in solving old and new puzzles in nuclear structure and direct reaction mechanisms is emphasized. One example is the recently observed signature of the long searched Giant Pairing Vibration. Finally, the new challenging opportunities to use MAGNEX for future experiments are briefly reported. In particular, the use of double charge-exchange reactions toward the determination of the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. The new NUMEN project of INFN, aiming at these investigations, is introduced. The challenges connected to the major technical upgrade required by the project in order to investigate rare processes under high fluxes of detected heavy ions are outlined.

  10. Generalized dual symmetry of nonabelian theories and the freezing of \\alpha_s

    CERN Document Server

    Das, C R; Nielsen, H B

    2006-01-01

    The quantum Yang-Mills theory, describing a system of fields with non-dual (chromo-electric g) and dual (chromo-magnetic \\tilde g) charges and revealing the generalized dual symmetry, is developed by analogy with the Zwanziger formalism in QED. The renormalization group equations (RGEs) for pure nonabelian theories are analysed for both constants, \\alpha = g^2 / 4\\pi and \\tilde\\alpha = {\\tilde g}^2 / 4\\pi. The pure SU(3) \\times \\widetilde{SU(3)} gauge theory is investigated as an example. We consider not only monopoles, but also dyons. The behaviour of the total SU(3) \\beta-function is investigated in the whole region of \\alpha \\equiv \\alpha_s: 0 \\le \\alpha < \\infty. It is shown that this \\beta-function is antisymmetric under the interchange \\alpha \\leftrightarrow 1/\\alpha and is given by the well-known perturbative expansion not only for \\alpha \\ll 1, but also for \\alpha \\gg 1. Using an idea of the Maximal Abelian Projection by t' Hooft, we considered the formation of strings - the ANO flux tubes - in the...

  11. On-chip spiral spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Redding, Brandon; Bromberg, Yaron; Sarma, Raktim; Cao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    We designed an on-chip spectrometer based on an evanescently-coupled multimode spiral waveguide. Interference between the modes in the waveguide forms a wavelength-dependent speckle pattern which can be used as a fingerprint to identify the input wavelength after calibration. Evanescent coupling between neighboring arms of the spiral enhances the temporal spread of light propagating through the spiral, leading to a dramatic increase in the spectral resolution. Experimentally, we demonstrated that a 250 {\\mu}m radius spiral spectrometer provides a resolution of 0.01 nm at a wavelength of 1520 nm. Spectra containing 40 independent spectral channels can be recovered simultaneously and the operation bandwidth can be increased further when measuring sparse spectra.

  12. Exploiting a Transmission Grating Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald E. Bell

    2004-12-08

    The availability of compact transmission grating spectrometers now allows an attractive and economical alternative to the more familiar Czerny-Turner configuration for many high-temperature plasma applications. Higher throughput is obtained with short focal length refractive optics and stigmatic imaging. Many more spectra can be obtained with a single spectrometer since smaller, more densely packed optical input fibers can be used. Multiple input slits, along with a bandpass filter, can be used to maximize the number of spectra per detector, providing further economy. Curved slits can correct for the strong image curvature of the short focal length optics. Presented here are the governing grating equations for both standard and high-dispersion transmission gratings, defining dispersion, image curvature, and desired slit curvature, that can be used in the design of improved plasma diagnostics.

  13. On-Chip Random Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Redding, Brandon; Sarma, Raktim

    2013-01-01

    Light scattering in disordered media has been studied extensively due to its prevalence in natural and artificial systems [1]. In the field of photonics most of the research has focused on understanding and mitigating the effects of scattering, which are often detrimental. For certain applications, however, intentionally introducing disorder can actually improve the device performance, e.g., in photovoltaics optical scattering improves the efficiency of light harvesting [2-5]. Here, we utilize multiple scattering in a random photonic structure to build a compact on-chip spectrometer. The probe signal diffuses through a scattering medium generating wavelength-dependent speckle patterns which can be used to recover the input spectrum after calibration. Multiple scattering increases the optical pathlength by folding the paths in a confined geometry, enhancing the spectral decorrelation of speckle patterns and thus increasing the spectral resolution. By designing and fabricating the spectrometer on a silicon wafe...

  14. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings.

  15. Holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Matos, O; Rodrigo, José A; Vaveliuk, P; Calvo, M L

    2011-02-15

    We propose a spectrum analyzer based on the properties of a hologram recorded with the field transmitted by a Fabry-Perot etalon. The spectral response of this holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer (HFPS) is analytically investigated in the paraxial approximation and compared with a conventional Fabry-Perot etalon of similar characteristics. We demonstrate that the resolving power is twice increased and the free spectral range (FSR) is reduced to one-half. The proposed spectrometer could improve the operational performance of the etalon because it can exhibit high efficiency and it would be insensible to environmental conditions such as temperature and vibrations. Our analysis also extends to another variant of the HFPS based on holographic multiplexing of the transmitted field of a Fabry-Perot etalon. This device increases the FSR, keeping the same HFPS performance.

  16. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-01-01

    Processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei comprise a major part of stellar nucleosynthesis and hypothesized mechanisms for thermonuclear supernovae. In an effort towards understanding alpha processes from first principles, we describe in this letter the first ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of nucleons and apply a technique called the adiabatic projection method to reduce the eight-body system to an effective two-cluster system. We find good agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for S-wave and D-wave scattering. The computational scaling with particle number suggests that alpha processes involving heavier nuclei are also within reach in the near future.

  17. Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometers calibration and the heliosphere neutrals composition: reassessment

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi

    2016-01-01

    The Voyagers (V) 1 and 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometers (UVS) data harvest covers outer planets encounters, heliosphere sky-background measurements, and stellar spectrophotometry. Because their operation period overlaps with many ultraviolet missions, the V1 and V2 UVS calibration with other spectrometers are invaluable. Here we revisit the UVS calibration to assess the intriguing 243 % (V1) and 156 % (V2) sensitivity enhancements recently proposed. Using the Saturn Lyman-$\\alpha$ airglow, observed in-situ by both Voyagers, and remotely by IUE, we match the Voyager values to IUE, taking into account the shape of the Saturn Lyman-$\\alpha$ line observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. For all known ranges of the interplanetary hydrogen density, we show that the V1 and V2 UVS sensitivities cannot be enhanced by the amounts thus far proposed. The same diagnostic holds for distinct channels covering the diffuse HeI 58.4 nm emission. Our prescription is to keep the origi...

  18. The Alpha Dynamo Effects in Laboratory Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Stewart C. Prager

    2001-10-16

    A concise review of observations of the alpha dynamo effect in laboratory plasmas is given. Unlike many astrophysical systems, the laboratory pinch plasmas are driven magnetically. When the system is overdriven, the resultant instabilities cause magnetic and flow fields to fluctuate, and their correlation induces electromotive forces along the mean magnetic field. This alpha-effect drives mean parallel electric current, which, in turn, modifies the initial background mean magnetic structure towards the stable regime. This drive-and-relax cycle, or the so-called self-organization process, happens in magnetized plasmas in a timescale much shorter than resistive diffusion time, thus it is a fast and unquenched dynamo process. The observed alpha-effect redistributes magnetic helicity (a measure of twistedness and knottedness of magnetic field lines) but conserves its total value. It can be shown that fast and unquenched dynamos are natural consequences of a driven system where fluctuations are statistically either not stationary in time or not homogeneous in space, or both. Implications to astrophysical phenomena will be discussed.

  19. Versatile inelastic neutron spectrometer (VINS) project for J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, T.J. [Neutron Science Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan)], E-mail: taku@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Yamamuro, O.; Hirota, K.; Shibayama, M.; Yoshizawa, H. [Neutron Science Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Itoh, S. [High Energy Accerelator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Watanabe, S.; Asami, T. [Neutron Science Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Kindo, K.; Uwatoko, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kanaya, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Higashi, N.; Ueno, K. [High Energy Accerelator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2009-02-21

    We have proposed a Versatile Inelastic Neutron Spectrometer (VINS) for the spallation neutron source at the Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF), Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). VINS is a direct-geometry Fermi chopper spectrometer designed to provide considerably high neutron flux with moderate energy and Q resolutions. VINS is characterized by its wide energy and Q range (0.5<{delta}E<1000 meV and Q< 40 A{sup -1} at {delta}E=1000 meV), enabled by an array of detectors covering large solid angle [-30 deg.<2{theta}<130 deg. horizontally and -30 deg.<{phi}<30 deg. vertically (2.8 Sr)]. Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulation estimates the sample position neutron flux as high as roughly 1x10{sup 6} neutrons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for the {delta}E/E{sub i}{approx}5% mode at E{sub i}=10 meV. With these wide E-Q coverage and high neutron flux, VINS will be one of the most efficient and versatile inelastic spectrometers at J-PARC. Target science ranges from conventional solid-state physics, such as highly correlated electron systems, frustrated magnets and relaxors, to rather interdisciplinary areas, exemplified by glasses, quasicrystals, polymers and liquids. A particular focus is placed on extreme sample environments; high magnetic-field and high-pressure environments are planned.

  20. ALPHA experiment facility and Prof. Jeffrey Hangst.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Picture 01-07: General views of the ALPHA experiment Picture 5: Andrea Gutierrez, a PhD student from UBC, transfers liquid helium from a storage dewar into the cryostat containing the superconducting magnetic trap used by the ALPHA experiment.Picture 08-11: Jeffery Hangst, spokesperson for ALPHA Picture 12: The ALPHA silicon detector, which surrounds the trapping resion and is used for imaging antiproton annihilations (Credit University of Liverpool) Picture 13: Untrapped antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the inner surface of the ALPHA trap. These are measured by the ALPHA annihilation detector. The events are concentrated at the electrode radius of about 22.3 mm. The coordinates are defined in the Nature article, Figure 1b. Picture 14: The electrodes (gold) for the ALPHA Penning trap being inserted into the vacuum chamber and cryostat assembly. This is the trap used to combine or "mix" positrons and antiprotons to make antihydrogen. (Credit: Niels Madsen ALPHA/Swansea.) Picture 15: Top, a diagram of the...

  1. HD 164492C: a rapidly-rotating, H$\\alpha$-bright, magnetic early B star associated with a 12.5d spectroscopic binary

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, G A; Sikora, J; Bernier, M -É; Rivinius, Th; Alecian, E; Petit, V; Grunhut, J H

    2016-01-01

    We employ high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry to derive the physical properties and magnetic characteristics of the multiple system HD 164492C, located in the young open cluster M20. The spectrum reveals evidence of 3 components: a broad-lined early B star (HD 164492C1), a narrow-lined early B star (HD 164492C2), and a late B star (HD 164492C3). Components C2 and C3 exhibit significant ($>100$ km/s) bulk radial velocity variations with a period of $12.5351(7)$ d that we attribute to eccentric binary motion around a common centre-of-mass. Component C1 exhibits no detectable radial velocity variations. Using constraints derived from modeling the orbit of the C2+C3 binary and from synthesis of the combined spectrum, we determine the approximate physical characteristics of the components. We conclude that a coherent evolutionary solution consistent with the published age of M20 implies a distance to the system of $0.9\\pm 0.2$ kpc, corresponding to the smallest published values. We confirm the dete...

  2. Cavity BPM System Tests for the ILC Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, M.

    2007-12-21

    The main physics program of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a measurement of the beam energy at the interaction point with an accuracy of 10{sup -4} or better. To achieve this goal a magnetic spectrometer using high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs) has been proposed. This paper reports on the cavity BPM system that was deployed to test this proposal. We demonstrate sub-micron resolution and micron level stability over 20 hours for a 1 m long BPM triplet. We find micron-level stability over 1 hour for 3 BPM stations distributed over a 30 m long baseline. The understanding of the behavior and response of the BPMs gained from this work has allowed full spectrometer tests to be carried out.

  3. Faddeev calculation of 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems using alpha alpha resonating-group method kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M; Suzuki, Y; Baye, D; Sparenberg, J M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out Faddeev calculations of three-alpha (3 alpha) and two-alpha plus Lambda (alpha alpha Lambda) systems, using two-cluster resonating-group method kernels. The input includes an effective two-nucleon force for the alpha alpha resonating-group method and a new effective Lambda N force for the Lambda alpha interaction. The latter force is a simple two-range Gaussian potential for each spin-singlet and triplet state, generated from the phase-shift behavior of the quark-model hyperon-nucleon interaction, fss2, by using an inversion method based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Owing to the exact treatment of the Pauli-forbidden states between the clusters, the present three-cluster Faddeev formalism can describe the mutually related, alpha alpha, 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems, in terms of a unique set of the baryon-baryon interactions. For the three-range Minnesota force which describes the alpha alpha phase shifts quite accurately, the ground-state and excitation energies of 9Be Lambda are...

  4. FPGA based pulsed NQR spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemnani, Preeti; Rajarajan, A. K.; Joshi, Gopal; Motiwala, Paresh D.; Ravindranath, S. V. G.

    2014-04-01

    An NQR spectrometer for the frequency range of 1 MHz to 5 MHZ has been designed constructed and tested using an FPGA module. Consisting of four modules viz. Transmitter, Probe, Receiver and computer controlled (FPGA & Software) module containing frequency synthesizer, pulse programmer, mixer, detection and display, the instrument is capable of exciting nuclei with a power of 200W and can detect signal of a few microvolts in strength. 14N signal from NaNO2 has been observed with the expected signal strength.

  5. Static Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, Michael; Murr, Patrik J; Rauscher, Markus S; Tremmel, Anton J; Wiesent, Benjamin R; Koch, Alexander W

    2016-04-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy has established itself as the standard method for spectral analysis of infrared light. Here we present a robust and compact novel static Fourier transform spectrometer design without any moving parts. The design is well suited for measurements in the infrared as it works with extended light sources independent of their size. The design is experimentally evaluated in the mid-infrared wavelength region between 7.2 μm and 16 μm. Due to its large etendue, its low internal light loss, and its static design it enables high speed spectral analysis in the mid-infrared.

  6. Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Fourier-transform spectrometer provides approximately hundredfold increase in luminosity at detector plane over that achievable with older instruments of this type. Used to analyze such weak sources as pollutants and other low-concentration substances in atmosphere. Interferometer creates fringe patterns on two distinct arrays of light detectors, which observe different wavelength bands. Objective lens focuses scene on image plane, which contains optical chopper. To make instrument less susceptible to variations in scene under observation, field and detector lenses focus entrance aperture, rather that image, onto detector array.

  7. Sign of helicity in the alpha-Omega geodynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the sign of helicity in the alpha-Omega dynamo and point out that the alpha effect in the geodynamo is induced by helical wave but not helical flow as in the solar dynamo. We then postulate the mechanisms of the Earth's magnetic tilt angle, westward drift and dipole reversals.

  8. Superparamagnetic relaxation in alpha-Fe particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Pedersen, Michael Stanley;

    1998-01-01

    The superparamagnetic relaxation time of carbon-supported alpha-Fe particles with an average size of 3.0 Mm has been studied over a large temperature range by the use of Mossbauer spectroscopy combined with AC and DC magnetization measurements. It is found that the relaxation time varies with tem...

  9. The High-Acceptance Dielectron Spectrometer HADES

    CERN Document Server

    Agakichiev, G; Bannier, B; Bassini, R; Belver, D; Belyaev, A V; Blanco, A; Boehmer, M; Boyard, J L; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Chernenko, S; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Díaz, J; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Eberl, T; Enghardt, W; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O V; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, Paulo J R; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gil1, A; Gilardi, C; Golubeva, M; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Guber, F; Heilmann, M; Heinz, T; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Kanaki, K; Karavicheva, T; Kirschner, D; König, I; König, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Lang, S; Lange, J S; Lapidus, K; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Mishra, D; Moriniere, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, Lutz; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; PerezCavalcanti, T; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Roy-Stephan, M; Rustamov, A; Sadovskii, A; Sailer, B; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Sudol, M; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlustý, P; Traxler, M; Trebac, R; Tsertos, H; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wisniowski, M; Wojcik, T; Wuestenfel, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zhou, P; Zumbruch, P

    2009-01-01

    HADES is a versatile magnetic spectrometer aimed at studying dielectron production in pion, proton and heavy-ion induced collisions. Its main features include a ring imaging gas Cherenkov detector for electron-hadron discrimination, a tracking system consisting of a set of 6 superconducting coils producing a toroidal field and drift chambers and a multiplicity and electron trigger array for additional electron-hadron discrimination and event characterization. A two-stage trigger system enhances events containing electrons. The physics program is focused on the investigation of hadron properties in nuclei and in the hot and dense hadronic matter. The detector system is characterized by an 85% azimuthal coverage over a polar angle interval from 18 to 85 degree, a single electron efficiency of 50% and a vector meson mass resolution of 2.5%. Identification of pions, kaons and protons is achieved combining time-of-flight and energy loss measurements over a large momentum range. This paper describes the main featur...

  10. The CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mecking, B.A.; Adams, G.; Ahmad, S.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Asryan, G.; Audit, G.; Auger, T.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.P.; Barbosa, F.J.; Barrow, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Berman, B.L.; Bianchi, N.; Boiarinov, S.; Bonneau, P.; Briscoe, W.J.; Brooks, W.K.; Burkert, V.D.; Carman, D.S.; Carstens, T.; Cetina, C.; Christo, S.B.; Cole, P.L.; Coleman, A.; Connelly, J.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cuevas, R.C.; Degtyarenko, P.V.; Dennis, L.; DeSanctis, E.; DeVita, R.; Distelbrink, J.; Dodge, G.E.; Dodge, W.; Doolittle, G.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Duncan, W.S.; Dytman, S.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K.S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Feuerbach, R.J.; Ficenec, J.; Frolov, V.; Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Giovanetti, K.L.; Golovatch, E.; Gram, J.; Guidal, M.; Gyurjyan, V.; Heddle, D.; Hemler, P.; Hersman, F.W.; Hicks, K.; Hicks, R.S.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde-Wright, C.E.; Insley, D.; Ito, M.M.; Jacobs, G.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Joyce, D.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.J.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L.; Koubarovski, V.; Kuhn, S.E.; Lake, A.; Lawrence, D.; Longhi, A.; Lukashin, K.; Lachniet, J.; Magahiz, R.A.; Major, W.; Manak, J.J.; Marchand, C.; Martin, C.; Matthews, S.K.; McMullen, M.; McNabb, J.W.C.; Mestayer, M.D.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Murphy, L.Y.; Mutchler, G.S.; Napolitano, J.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Nozar, M.; O' Brien, J.T.; Opper, A.K.; O' Meara, J.E.; Pasyuk, E.; Philips, S.A.; Polli, E.; Price, J.W.; Pozdniakov, S.; Qin, L.M.; Raue, B.A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Riggs, C.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B.G.; Robb, J.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Roudot, F.; Salgado, C.; Sapunenko, V.; Schumacher, R.A.; Serov, V.S.; Sharabian, Y.G.; Smith, E.E.S. E-mail: elton@jlab.org; Smith, L.C.; Smith, T.; Sober, D.I.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, W.M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D.J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tilles, D.; Todor, L. [and others

    2003-05-11

    The CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) is used to study photo- and electro-induced nuclear and hadronic reactions by providing efficient detection of neutral and charged particles over a good fraction of the full solid angle. A collaboration of about 30 institutions has designed, assembled, and commissioned CLAS in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The CLAS detector is based on a novel six-coil toroidal magnet which provides a largely azimuthal field distribution. Trajectory reconstruction using drift chambers results in a momentum resolution of 0.5% at forward angles. Cherenkov counters, time-of-flight scintillators, and electromagnetic calorimeters provide good particle identification. Fast triggering and high data-acquisition rates allow operation at a luminosity of 10{sup 34} nucleon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. These capabilities are being used in a broad experimental program to study the structure and interactions of mesons, nucleons, and nuclei using polarized and unpolarized electron and photon beams and targets. This paper is a comprehensive and general description of the design, construction and performance of CLAS.

  11. The high-acceptance dielectron spectrometer HADES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakichiev, G.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Atkin, E.; Badura, E.; Balanda, A.; Bassi, A.; Bassini, R.; Bellia, G.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A. V.; Benovic, M.; Bertini, D.; Bielcik, J.; Böhmer, M.; Boiano, C.; Bokemeyer, H.; Bartolotti, A.; Boyard, J. L.; Brambilla, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chepurnov, V.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Coniglione, R.; Cosentino, L.; Dahlinger, M.; Daues, H. W.; Destefanis, M.; Díaz, J.; Dohrmann, F.; Dressler, R.; Durán, I.; Dybczak, A.; Eberl, T.; Enghardt, W.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O. V.; Fernández, C.; Finocchiaro, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Fuentes, B.; Galatyuk, T.; Garabatos, C.; Garzón, J. A.; Genolini, B.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gilardi, C.; Gilg, H.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Grosse, E.; Guber, F.; Hehner, J.; Heidel, K.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Hoffmann, J.; Holzmann, R.; Homolka, J.; Hutsch, J.; Ierusalimov, A. P.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jaskula, M.; Jourdain, J. C.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Kanaki, K.; Karavicheva, T.; Kastenmüller, A.; Kidon, L.; Kienle, P.; Kirschner, D.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Körner, H. J.; Kolb, B. W.; Kopf, U.; Korcyl, K.; Kotte, R.; Kozuch, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kulessa, R.; Kurepin, A.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Lehnert, J.; Leinberger, U.; Lichtblau, C.; Lins, E.; Lippmann, C.; Lorenz, M.; Magestro, D.; Maier, L.; Maier-Komor, P.; Maiolino, C.; Malarz, A.; Marek, T.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Migneco, E.; Mishra, D.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Münch, M.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Nekhaev, A.; Niebur, W.; Novotny, J.; Novotny, R.; Ott, W.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pérez Cavalcanti, T.; Petri, M.; Piattelli, P.; Pietraszko, J.; Pleskac, R.; Ploskon, M.; Pospísil, V.; Pouthas, J.; Prokopowicz, W.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Ritman, J.; Roche, G.; Rodriguez-Prieto, G.; Rosenkranz, K.; Rosier, P.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Rustamov, A.; Sabin-Fernandez, J.; Sadovsky, A.; Sailer, B.; Salabura, P.; Salz, C.; Sánchez, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schäfer, D.; Schicker, R. M.; Schmah, A.; Schön, H.; Schön, W.; Schroeder, C.; Schroeder, S.; Schwab, E.; Senger, P.; Shileev, K.; Simon, R. S.; Skoda, M.; Smolyankin, V.; Smykov, L.; Sobiella, M.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Stelzer, H.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sudoł, M.; Suk, M.; Szczybura, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tiflov, V.; Tikhonov, A.; Tlusty, P.; Toia, A.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Troyan, A. Yu.; Tsertos, H.; Turzo, I.; Ulrich, A.; Vassiliev, D.; Vázquez, A.; Volkov, Y.; Wagner, V.; Wallner, C.; Walus, W.; Wang, Y.; Weber, M.; Wieser, J.; Winkler, S.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y. V.; Zeitelhack, K.; Zentek, A.; Zhou, P.; Zovinec, D.; Zumbruch, P.

    2009-08-01

    HADES is a versatile magnetic spectrometer aimed at studying dielectron production in pion, proton and heavy-ion-induced collisions. Its main features include a ring imaging gas Cherenkov detector for electron-hadron discrimination, a tracking system consisting of a set of 6 superconducting coils producing a toroidal field and drift chambers and a multiplicity and electron trigger array for additional electron-hadron discrimination and event characterization. A two-stage trigger system enhances events containing electrons. The physics program is focused on the investigation of hadron properties in nuclei and in the hot and dense hadronic matter. The detector system is characterized by an 85% azimuthal coverage over a polar angle interval from 18° to 85° , a single electron efficiency of 50% and a vector meson mass resolution of 2.5%. Identification of pions, kaons and protons is achieved combining time-of-flight and energy loss measurements over a large momentum range ( 0.1 < p < 1.0 GeV/ c . This paper describes the main features and the performance of the detector system.

  12. Multi-GeV Electron Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Faccini, R; Bacci, A; Batani, D; Bellaveglia, M; Benocci, R; Benedetti, C; Cacciotti, L; Cecchetti, C A; Clozza, A; Cultrera, L; Di~Pirro, G; Drenska, N; Anelli, F; Ferrario, M; Filippetto, D; Fioravanti, S; Gallo, A; Gamucci, A; Gatti, G; Ghigo, A; Giulietti, A; Giulietti, D; Gizzi, L A; Koester, P; Labate, L; Levato, T; Lollo, V; Londrillo, P; Martellotti, S; Pace, E; Patack, N; Rossi, A; Tani, F; Serafini, L; Turchetti, G; Vaccarezza, C; Valente, P

    2010-01-01

    The advance in laser plasma acceleration techniques pushes the regime of the resulting accelerated particles to higher energies and intensities. In particular the upcoming experiments with the FLAME laser at LNF will enter the GeV regime with almost 1pC of electrons. From the current status of understanding of the acceleration mechanism, relatively large angular and energy spreads are expected. There is therefore the need to develop a device capable to measure the energy of electrons over three orders of magnitude (few MeV to few GeV) under still unknown angular divergences. Within the PlasmonX experiment at LNF a spectrometer is being constructed to perform these measurements. It is made of an electro-magnet and a screen made of scintillating fibers for the measurement of the trajectories of the particles. The large range of operation, the huge number of particles and the need to focus the divergence present unprecedented challenges in the design and construction of such a device. We will present the design ...

  13. The high-acceptance dielectron spectrometer HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agakichiev, G.; Destefanis, M.; Gilardi, C.; Kirschner, D.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J.S.; Lehnert, J.; Lichtblau, C.; Lins, E.; Metag, V.; Mishra, D.; Novotny, R.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Petri, M.; Ritman, J.; Salz, C.; Schaefer, D.; Skoda, M.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Toia, A. [Justus-Liebig-Univ. Giessen, II. Physikalisches Inst., Giessen (Germany); Agodi, C.; Coniglione, R.; Cosentino, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Vassiliev, D. [Lab. Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Alvarez-Pol, H.; Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Duran, I.; Fernandez, C.; Fuentes, B.; Garzon, J.A.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Rodriguez-Prieto, G.; Sabin-Fernandez, J.; Sanchez, M.; Vazquez, A. [Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Dept. de Fisica de Particulas, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Atkin, E.; Volkov, Y. [State Univ., Moscow Engineering Physics Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Badura, E.; Bertini, D.; Bielcik, J.; Bokemeyer, H.; Dahlinger, M.; Daues, H.W.; Galatyuk, T.; Garabatos, C.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Hehner, J.; Heinz, T.; Hoffmann, J.; Holzmann, R.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B.W.; Kopf, U.; Lang, S.; Leinberger, U.; Magestro, D.; Muench, M.; Niebur, W.; Ott, W.; Pietraszko, J.; Rustamov, A.; Schicker, R.M.; Schoen, H.; Schoen, W.; Schroeder, C.; Schwab, E.; Senger, P.; Simon, R.S.; Stelzer, H.; Traxler, M.; Yurevich, S.; Zovinec, D.; Zumbruch, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Balanda, A.; Kozuch, A.; Przygoda, W. [Jagiellonian Univ. of Krakow, Smoluchowski Inst. of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Pantwowa Wyzsza Szkola Zawodowa, Nowy Sacz (Poland); Bassi, A.; Bassini, R.; Boiano, C.; Bartolotti, A.; Brambilla, S. [Sezione di Milano, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Bellia, G.; Migneco, E. [Lab. Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Univ. di Catania (Italy)] (and others)

    2009-08-15

    HADES is a versatile magnetic spectrometer aimed at studying dielectron production in pion, proton and heavy-ion-induced collisions. Its main features include a ring imaging gas Cherenkov detector for electron-hadron discrimination, a tracking system consisting of a set of 6 superconducting coils producing a toroidal field and drift chambers and a multiplicity and electron trigger array for additional electron-hadron discrimination and event characterization. A two-stage trigger system enhances events containing electrons. The physics program is focused on the investigation of hadron properties in nuclei and in the hot and dense hadronic matter. The detector system is characterized by an 85% azimuthal coverage over a polar angle interval from 18 to 85 , a single electron efficiency of 50% and a vector meson mass resolution of 2.5%. Identification of pions, kaons and protons is achieved combining time-of-flight and energy loss measurements over a large momentum range (0.1< p< 1.0 GeV/c). This paper describes the main features and the performance of the detector system. (orig.)

  14. Fully Automatic In-Syringe Magnetic Stirring-Assisted Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Hyphenated to High-Temperature Torch Integrated Sample Introduction System-Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrometer with Direct Injection of the Organic Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Raquel; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Fikarová, Kateřina; Sklenářová, Hana; Maestre, Salvador; Miró, Manuel; Todolí, Jose-Luis

    2017-03-21

    A proof of concept study involving the online coupling of automatic dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) with direct introduction and analysis of the organic extract is herein reported for the first time. The flow-based analyzer features a lab-in-syringe (LIS) setup with an integrated stirring system, a Meinhard nebulizer in combination with a heated single-pass spray chamber, and a rotary injection valve, used as an online interface between the microextraction system and the detection instrument. Air-segmented flow was used for delivery of a fraction of the nonwater miscible extraction phase, 12 μL of xylene, to the nebulizer. All sample preparative steps including magnetic stirring assisted DLLME were carried out inside the syringe void volume as a size-adaptable yet sealed mixing and extraction chamber. Determination of trace level concentrations of cadmium, copper, lead, and silver as model analytes has been demonstrated by microextraction as diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) complexes. The automatic LIS-DLLME method features quantitative metal extraction, even in troublesome sample matrixes, such as seawater, salt, and fruit juices, with relative recoveries within the range of 94-103%, 93-100%, and 92-99%, respectively. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences at the 0.05 significance level were found between concentration values experimentally obtained and the certified values of two serum standard reference materials.

  15. A Pulsed Spectrometer Designed for Feedback NQR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiano, J. L.; Ginsberg, M. D.

    2000-02-01

    A pulsed NQR spectrometer specifically designed to facilitate real-time tuning of pulse sequence parameters is described. A modular approach based on the interconnection of several rack-mounted blocks provides easy access to all spectrometer signals and simplifies the task of modifying the spectrometer design. We also present experimental data that demonstrates the ability of the spectrometer to increase the signal to noise ratio of NQR measurements by automatically adjusting the pulse width in the strong off-resonant comb pulse sequence.

  16. Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd [Photonic Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Karami, Mohammad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-10-15

    A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers' calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper K{alpha} and K{beta} lines by using a flat {alpha}-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5-3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer.

  17. Thermal chopper spectrometer for the European spallation source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klenø, Kaspar Hewitt; Lefmann, Kim

    2011-01-01

    One of the instruments being considered for the ESS is a thermal chopper spectrometer, intended for the study of lattice vibrations and magnetic excitations. However, as the ESS will be a long pulsed source, we propose a very long instrument (180–300 m). We here present a guide system that can ac...... achieve a flux of 3.47 ×108 n/(s·cm2) and a resolution of dE/E = 5.3% for 1 Å neutrons on the sample with a transport efficiency of 80%. Furthermore, we demonstrate the efficiency of the instrument using a virtual experiment measuring an elastic line width...

  18. The determination of $\\alpha_s$ by the ALPHA collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Mattia; Fritzsch, Patrick; Korzec, Tomasz; Ramos, Alberto; Schaefer, Stefan; Simma, Hubert; Sint, Stefan; Sommer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    We review the ALPHA collaboration strategy for obtaining the QCD coupling at high scale. In the three-flavor effective theory it avoids the use of perturbation theory at $\\alpha > 0.2$ and at the same time has the physical scales small compared to the cutoff $1/a$ in all stages of the computation. The result $\\Lambda_\\overline{MS}^{(3)}=332(14)$~MeV is translated to $\\alpha_\\overline{MS}(m_Z)=0.1179(10)(2)$ by use of (high order) perturbative relations between the effective theory couplings at the charm and beauty quark "thresholds". The error of this perturbative step is discussed and estimated as $0.0002$.

  19. The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Eldering, Annmarie; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Bekker, Dmitriy; Manatt, Ken; Rider, David; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GeoFTS) is an imaging spectrometer designed for a geostationary orbit (GEO) earth science mission to measure key atmospheric trace gases and process tracers related to climate change and human activity. GEO allows GeoFTS to continuously stare at a region of the earth for frequent sampling to capture the variability of biogenic fluxes and anthropogenic emissions from city to continental spatial scales and temporal scales from diurnal, synoptic, seasonal to interannual. The measurement strategy provides a process based understanding of the carbon cycle from contiguous maps of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) collected many times per day at high spatial resolution (2.7kmx2.7km at nadir). The CO2/CH4/CO/CF measurement suite in the near infrared spectral region provides the information needed to disentangle natural and anthropogenic contributions to atmospheric carbon concentrations and to minimize uncertainties in the flow of carbon between the atmosphere and surface. The half meter cube size GeoFTS instrument is based on a Michelson interferometer design that uses all high TRL components in a modular configuration to reduce complexity and cost. It is self-contained and as independent of the spacecraft as possible with simple spacecraft interfaces, making it ideal to be a "hosted" payload on a commercial communications satellite mission. The hosted payload approach for measuring the major carbon-containing gases in the atmosphere from the geostationary vantage point will affordably advance the scientific understating of carbon cycle processes and climate change.

  20. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  1. Field spectrometer (S191H) preprocessor tape quality test program design document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Program QA191H performs quality assurance tests on field spectrometer data recorded on 9-track magnetic tape. The quality testing involves the comparison of key housekeeping and data parameters with historic and predetermined tolerance limits. Samples of key parameters are processed during the calibration period and wavelength cal period, and the results are printed out and recorded on an historical file tape.

  2. A Mass Spectrometer Simulator in Your Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Introduced to study components of ionized gas, the mass spectrometer has evolved into a highly accurate device now used in many undergraduate and research laboratories. Unfortunately, despite their importance in the formation of future scientists, mass spectrometers remain beyond the financial reach of many high schools and colleges. As a result,…

  3. Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the SRG satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt; Rasmussen, I.

    1994-01-01

    The flight version of the Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OXS) on the SPECTRUM-X- GAMMA satellite is presented. The spectrometer is a panel that is placed in front of one of the SODART telescopes. It is composed of an array of the three Bragg crystals, LiF(220), Si(111) and RAP(001) for high...

  4. Magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2011-05-11

    A broad overview on magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts is presented and the use of magnetic nanomaterials as catalysts is discussed. Magnetic materials are used as organocatalysts and their applications range to challenging reactions, such as hydroformylation and olefin metathesis. Magnetic nanomaterials are also being used in environmental applications, such as for photo- and biocatalysis and for the adsorption and removal of pollutants from air and water. These materials show great promise as enantioselective catalysts, which are used extensively for the synthesis of medicines, drugs, and other bioactive molecules. By functionalizing these materials using chiral ligands, a series of chiral nanocatalysts can be designed, offering great potential to reuse these otherwise expensive catalyst systems. Characterization of magnetic catalysts is often a challenging task, and NMR characterization of these catalysts is difficult because the magnetic nature of the materials interferes with the magnetic field of the spectrometer.

  5. Lyman Alpha Control

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Daniel Stefaniak

    2015-01-01

    This document gives an overview of how to operate the Lyman Alpha Control application written in LabVIEW along with things to watch out for. Overview of the LabVIEW code itself as well as the physical wiring of and connections from/to the NI PCI-6229 DAQ box is also included. The Lyman Alpha Control application is the interface between the ALPHA sequencer and the HighFinesse Wavelength Meter as well as the Lyman Alpha laser setup. The application measures the wavelength of the output light from the Lyman Alpha cavity through the Wavelength Meter. The application can use the Wavelength Meter’s PID capabilities to stabilize the Lyman Alpha laser output as well as switch between up to three frequencies.

  6. A high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer for planetary spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Sinton, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The employment of a high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) is described for planetary and other astronomical spectroscopy in conjunction with the 88-inch telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. The FTS system is designed for a broad range of uses, including double-beam laboratory spectroscopy, infrared gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data system is well-suited to astronomical applications because of its great speed in acquiring and transforming data, and because of the enormous storage capability of the magnetic tape unit supplied with the system. The basic instrument is outlined 2nd some of the initial results from the first attempted use on the Mauna Kea 88-inch telescope are reported.

  7. Interpreting EEG alpha activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, O M; Vernon, D

    2014-07-01

    Exploring EEG alpha oscillations has generated considerable interest, in particular with regards to the role they play in cognitive, psychomotor, psycho-emotional and physiological aspects of human life. However, there is no clearly agreed upon definition of what constitutes 'alpha activity' or which of the many indices should be used to characterize it. To address these issues this review attempts to delineate EEG alpha-activity, its physical, molecular and morphological nature, and examine the following indices: (1) the individual alpha peak frequency; (2) activation magnitude, as measured by alpha amplitude suppression across the individual alpha bandwidth in response to eyes opening, and (3) alpha "auto-rhythmicity" indices: which include intra-spindle amplitude variability, spindle length and steepness. Throughout, the article offers a number of suggestions regarding the mechanism(s) of alpha activity related to inter and intra-individual variability. In addition, it provides some insights into the various psychophysiological indices of alpha activity and highlights their role in optimal functioning and behavior.

  8. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  9. Electron Velocity Distribution Function in Magnetic Clouds in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchil, Teresa; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the kinetic properties of the electron velocity distribution functions within magnetic clouds, since they are the dominant thermal component. The study is based on high time resolution data from the GSFC WIND/SWE electron spectrometer and the Berkeley 3DP electron plasma instruments. Recent studies on magnetic clouds have shown observational evidence of anti-correlation between the total electron density and electron temperature, which suggest a polytrope law P(sub e) = alpha(Nu(sub e) (sup gamma)) for electrons with the constant gamma approximates 0.5 non-Maxwellian electron distributions (i.e. non-thermal) within magnetic clouds. These works suggested that the non-thermal electrons can contribute as much as 50% of the total electron pressure within magnetic clouds. We have revisited some of the magnetic cloud events previously studied and attempted to quantify the nature of the non-thermal electrons by modeling the electron velocity distribution function using a kappa distribution function to characterize the kinetic non-thermal effects. If non-thermal tail effects are the source for the anti-correlation between the moment electron temperature and density and if the kappa distribution is a reasonable representative model of non-thermal effects, then the electron velocity distribution within magnetic clouds should show indication for small K-values when gamma < 1.

  10. Overview of the magnetic properties experiments on the Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, M.B.; Goetz, W.; Bertelsen, P.; Binau, C.S.; Folkmann, F.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.; Hjollum, J.I.; Hviid, S.F.; Jensen, J.; Kinch, K.M.; Leer, K.; Madsen, D.E.; Merrison, J.; Olsen, M.; Arneson, H.M.; Bell, J.F.; Gellert, Ralf; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, M.J.; Klingelhofer, G.; McCartney, E.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Proton, J.B.; Rodionov, D.; Sims, M.; Squyres, S. W.; Wdowiak, T.; Yen, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers have accumulated airborne dust on different types of permanent magnets. Images of these magnets document the dynamics of dust capture and removal over time. The strongly magnetic subset of airborne dust appears dark brown to black in Panoramic Camera (Pancam) images, while the weakly magnetic one is bright red. Images returned by the Microscopic Imager reveal the formation of magnetic chains diagnostic of magnetite-rich grains with substantial magnetization (>8 Am2 kg-1). On the basis of M??ssbauer spectra the dust contains magnetite, olivine, pyroxene, and nanophase oxides in varying proportions, depending on wind regime and landing site. The dust contains a larger amount of ferric iron (Fe3+/Fe tot ??? 0.6) than rocks in the Gusev plains (???0.1-0.2) or average Gusev soil (???0.3). Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer data of the dust show that some of the iron in magnetite is substituted by titanium and chromium. The good correlation of the amount of calcium and sulfur in the dust may be caused by the presence of a calcium sulfate related phase. The overall mineralogical composition points to a basaltic origin of the airborne dust, although some alteration has taken place as indicated by the large degree of oxidation. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Implementation of the {alpha}-CHERS diagnostic for D-T operation of TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, G.R.; Fonck, R.J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Energy; Stratton, F.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1995-03-01

    The {alpha}-CHERS diagnostic is a high throughput charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic designed to measure the density profile and time evolution of 0-500 keV alpha particles during D-T operation of TFTR. Following successful tests with a prototype ({alpha}-CHERS system, an improved, multi-channel system has been installed for D-T Operation. Three spatial channels may be observed simultaneously, and the spectral resolution of 0.5 nm permits increased alpha energy resolution and improved impurity line identification. More efficient coupling optics between the spectrometer and CCD detectors have increased the light throughput, and radiation shielding has been installed around the detectors and spectrometers to eliminate the neutron/gamma ray noise observed in high power D-D plasmas.

  12. Design of a pulsed angular selective electron gun for the KATRIN main spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winzen, Daniel; Hannen, Volker; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Zacher, Michael; Weinheimer, Christian [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, Muenster (Germany); Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino mass) experiment will study the tritium {beta}-spectrum near the endpoint of 18.6 keV, aiming to measure the mass of the electron antineutrino. Using an electrostatic retarding spectrometer (MAC-E-Filter), the projected sensitivity for m{sub ve} is 200 meV/c{sup 2} at 90% C.L. In order to map out the electric and magnetic fields in the main spectrometer, an angular selective electron gun is currently being developed. The e-gun uses an UV-Laser to produce electrons via the photo-electric effect from a copper substrate which are then accelerated electrostatically. It features a small energy spread of approx. 0.1 eV, a sharp emission angle and will be able to cover the whole magnetic flux tube of KATRIN. Using a pulsed laser it is also possible to investigate the time of flight (TOF) of electrons through the spectrometer, offering enhanced sensitivity to spectrometer properties far away from the analysing plane. By comparing information from transmission function measurements and TOF data with Monte Carlo simulations of the setup, one will be able to achieve a detailed understanding of the spectrometer properties.

  13. Conceptual design of a polarized 3He neutron spin filter for polarized neutron spectrometer POLANO at J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, T.; Ohoyama, K.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Ohkawara, M.; Kira, H.; Hayashida, H.; Sakai, K.; Hiroi, K.; Oku, T.; Kakurai, K.; Chang, L. J.

    2016-04-01

    A 3He neutron spin filter (NSF) has been designed for a new polarized neutron chopper spectrometer called the Polarization Analysis Neutron Spectrometer with Correlation Method (POLANO) at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. It is designed to fit in a limited space on the spectrometer as an initial neutron beam polarizer and is polarized in situ by spin exchange optical pumping. This will be the first generation 3He NSF on POLANO, and a polarized neutron beam up to 100 meV with a diameter of 50 mm will be available for research on magnetism, hydrogen materials, and strongly correlated electron systems.

  14. Cryogenic Scan Mechanism for Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasunas, John C.; Francis, John L.

    2011-01-01

    A compact and lightweight mechanism has been developed to accurately move a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) scan mirror (a cube corner) in a near-linear fashion with near constant speed at cryogenic temperatures. This innovation includes a slide mechanism to restrict motion to one dimension, an actuator to drive the motion, and a linear velocity transducer (LVT) to measure the speed. The cube corner mirror is double-passed in one arm of the FTS; double-passing is required to compensate for optical beam shear resulting from tilting of the moving cube corner. The slide, actuator, and LVT are off-the-shelf components that are capable of cryogenic vacuum operation. The actuator drives the slide for the required travel of 2.5 cm. The LVT measures translation speed. A proportional feedback loop compares the LVT voltage with the set voltage (speed) to derive an error signal to drive the actuator and achieve near constant speed. When the end of the scan is reached, a personal computer reverses the set voltage. The actuator and LVT have no moving parts in contact, and have magnetic properties consistent with cryogenic operation. The unlubricated slide restricts motion to linear travel, using crossed roller bearings consistent with 100-million- stroke operation. The mechanism tilts several arc seconds during transport of the FTS mirror, which would compromise optical fringe efficiency when using a flat mirror. Consequently, a cube corner mirror is used, which converts a tilt into a shear. The sheared beam strikes (at normal incidence) a flat mirror at the end of the FTS arm with the moving mechanism, thereby returning upon itself and compensating for the shear

  15. An electron/ion spectrometer with the ability of low energy electron measurement for fast ignition experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, T.; Sakagami, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kato, R., E-mail: ozaki@nifs.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    An electron energy spectrometer (ESM) is one of the most fundamental diagnostics in the fast ignition experiment. It is necessary to observe the spectra down to a low energy range in order to obtain the accurate deposition efficiency toward the core. Here, we realize the suitable ESM by using a ferrite magnet with a moderate magnetic field of 0.3 T and a rectangular magnetic circuit covered with a steel plate in the inlet side.

  16. The role of electron scattering from registration detector in the "Troitsk nu-mass" MAC-E type spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, P. V.; Nozik, A. A.; Pantuev, V. S.; Skasyrskaya, A. K.

    2016-10-01

    There is a proposal to search for a sterile neutrino in a few keV mass range by the "Troitsk nu-mass" facility. In order to estimate sterile neutrino mixing one needs to make precision spectrum measurements well below the endpoint using the existing electrostatic spectrometer with a magnetic adiabatic collimation, or MAC-E filter. The expected signature will be a kink in the electron energy spectrum in tritium beta-decay. In this paper we consider the systematic effect of electron backscattering on the detector used in the spectrometer. For this purpose we provide a set of Monte-Carlo simulation results of electron backscattering on a silicon detector with a thin golden window with realistic electric and magnetic fields in the spectrometer. We have found that the probability of such an effect reaches up to 20-30%. The scattered electron could be reflected backwards to the detector by electrostatic field or by magnetic mirror. There is also a few percent probability to escape from the spectrometer through its entrance. A time delay between the scattering on the detector and the return of the reflected electron can reach a couple of microseconds in the Troitsk spectrometer. Such estimations are critical for the planning upgrades of the detector and the registration electronics. All considered effects are relevant to any MAC-E type spectrometer with solid detector.

  17. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  18. [The coding correction of slit diffraction in Hadamard transform spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Shu-Rong; Huang, Yu; Wang, Jun-Bo

    2013-08-01

    According to the principles of Hadamard transform spectrometer and the slit diffraction characteristics, the influence of spectrometer entrance slit diffraction of Hadamard transform spectrometer on the measurement result was analyzed, for the diffraction case, the Hadamard transform spectrometer instrument structure matrix was studied, and the Hadamard transform spectrometer encoding/decoding method was established. The analysis of incident spectral verified the correctness of the coding/ decoding. This method is very important for the high precision measurement of Hadamard transform spectrometer.

  19. Measurement of actinides in environmental samples by Photo-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadieux, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Clark, S. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Univ. of Georgia (United States); Fjeld, R.A.; Reboul, S.; Sowder, A. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Systems Engineering

    1994-05-01

    This work describes the adaptation of extractive scintillation with a Photo-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) (ORDELA, Inc.) spectrometer to the analysis of actinides in environmental samples from the Savannah River Site (SRS). Environmental quality assurance standards and actual water samples were treated by one of two methods; either a two step direct extraction, or for more complex samples, pretreatment by an extraction chromatographic separation prior to measurement of the alpha activity by PERALS.

  20. Buffett’s Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Kabiller, David; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    Berkshire Hathaway has realized a Sharpe ratio of 0.76, higher than any other stock or mutual fund with a history of more than 30 years, and Berkshire has a significant alpha to traditional risk factors. However, we find that the alpha becomes insignificant when controlling for exposures to Betting...

  1. Radiation calibration for LWIR Hyperspectral Imager Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhixiong; Yu, Chunchao; Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zhenggang; Yan, Min; Yuan, Xiaochun; Zhang, Peizhong

    2014-11-01

    The radiometric calibration of LWIR Hyperspectral imager Spectrometer is presented. The lab has been developed to LWIR Interferometric Hyperspectral imager Spectrometer Prototype(CHIPED-I) to study Lab Radiation Calibration, Two-point linear calibration is carried out for the spectrometer by using blackbody respectively. Firstly, calibration measured relative intensity is converted to the absolute radiation lightness of the object. Then, radiation lightness of the object is is converted the brightness temperature spectrum by the method of brightness temperature. The result indicated †that this method of Radiation Calibration calibration was very good.

  2. A Compact High-Energy Neutron Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, F D; Buffler, A; Dangendorf, V; Herbert, M S; Jones, D T L; Nchodu, M R; Nolte, R; Smit, F D

    2007-01-01

    A compact liquid organic neutron spectrometer (CLONS) based on a single NE213 liquid scintillator (5 cm diam. x 5 cm) is described. The spectrometer is designed to measure neutron fluence spectra over the energy range 2-200 MeV and is suitable for use in neutron fields having any type of time structure. Neutron fluence spectra are obtained from measurements of two-parameter distributions (counts versus pulse height and pulse shape) using the Bayesian unfolding code MAXED. Calibration and test measurements made using a pulsed neutron beam with a continuous energy spectrum are described and the application of the spectrometer to radiation dose measurements is discussed.

  3. Digital Logarithmic Airborne Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352, 583, and 609keV in the low-energy spectral sections after the energ...

  4. Ultralow field NMR spectrometer with an atomic magnetometer near room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guobin; Li, Xiaofeng; Sun, Xianping; Feng, Jiwen; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2013-12-01

    We present a Cs atomic magnetometer with a sensitivity of 150fT/Hz(1/2) operating near room temperature. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal of 125μL tap water was detected at an ultralow magnetic field down to 47nT, with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the NMR signal approaching 50 after eight averages. Relaxivity experiments with a Gd(DTPA) contrast agent in zero field were performed, in order to show the magnetometer's ability to measure spin-lattice relaxation time with high accuracy. This demonstrates the feasibility of an ultralow field NMR spectrometer based on a Cs atomic magnetometer, which has a low working temperature, short data acquisition time and high sensitivity. This kind of NMR spectrometer has great potential in applications such as chemical analysis and magnetic relaxometry detection in ultralow or zero fields.

  5. Study of the cross section determination with the PRISMA spectrometer: The 40Ar + 208Pb case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatović, T.; Szilner, S.; Corradi, L.; Montanari, D.; Pollarolo, G.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Goasduff, A.; Jelavić Malenica, D.; Mărginean, N.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Soić, N.; Stefanini, A. M.; Ur, C. A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    The PRISMA spectrometer's response function was successfully applied to match three angular and magnetic settings over a wide angular range for measurements of quasi-elastic reactions in 40Ar + 208Pb . The absolute scale of cross sections has been obtained by using the Rutherford cross section at the forward angles and the information from the energy distributions measured with the spectrometer without and with coincidences with the CLARA γ-array. The semi-classical model GRAZING has been used to test the unfolding procedure and for comparison with the corrected cross sections.

  6. The upgraded cold neutron three axis spectrometer FLEXX at BER II at HZB

    OpenAIRE

    Le, M. D.; Skoulatos, M.; Quintero Castro, D.L.; Toft Petersen, R.; Groitl, F.; Rule, K. C.; Habicht, K.

    2014-01-01

    The cold neutron three axis spectrometer FLEXX is a work horse instrument for inelastic neutron scattering matching the sample environment capabilities for high magnetic fields up to 17.5 T and low temperatures down to 30 mK at the BER II neutron source at HZB. During the upgrade of the BER II neutron source and its instruments the primary spectrometer of FLEX [1] was completely rebuilt leading to a substantial increase in the flux reaching the sample [2]. The major benefit from the exchange ...

  7. Laser assisted {alpha} decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda Cortes, Hector Mauricio

    2012-02-01

    Excited or short-lived nuclei often decay by emitting alpha particles that are assumed to be preformed inside the nucleus and confined in the nuclear potential well. In this picture, {alpha} decay refers to the tunneling of the alpha particle through the potential barrier. In this thesis we investigate for the first time how strong laser fields can assist the tunneling of the alpha particle and thus influence the nuclear decay. Generally speaking, laser-assisted {alpha} decay can be described as laser-assisted tunneling of a quasistationary state, i.e, a slowly decaying state. Our theoretical treatment is developed starting from the complex trajectory formulation of the well-known strong-field approximation used to describe laser-induced ionization. We extend this formulation and develop a method to treat the decay of quasistationary states. The effect of both static and optical and X-ray monochromatic fields on the lifetimes and {alpha}-particle emission spectra are investigated for a number of {alpha}-emitting nuclei. We find that even at strong intensities, the laser-induced acceleration of the {alpha} decay is negligible, ranging from a relative modification in the decay rate of 10{sup -3} for static fields of electric field strengths of 10{sup 15} V/m, to 10{sup -8} for strong optical fields with intensities of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, and to 10{sup -6} for strong X-ray fields with laser intensities around 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. However, the effect of the external field is visible in the spectrum of emitted alpha particles, leading in the case of optical fields even to rescattering phenomena for intensities approaching 6 x 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}. The dynamics of the alpha particle in laser fields of intensities below the rescattering limit is investigated.

  8. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kano, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N..; Ishikawa, R.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Giono, G.; Holloway, T.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; DePontieu, B.; Casini, R.; Auchere F.; Bueno, J. Trujillo; Sainz, R. Manso; Belluzzi, L.; Ramos, A. Asensio; Stepan, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2014-01-01

    To Understand energy release process in the Sun including solar flares, it is essentially important to measure the magnetic field of the atmosphere of the Sun. Magnetic field measurement of the upper layers (upper chromosphere and above) was technically difficult and not well investigated yet. Upper chromosphere and transition region magnetic field measurement by Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) sounding rocket to be launched in 2015. The proposal is already selected and developments of the flight components are going.

  9. Calibration of a photomultiplier array spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Steven A.; Wright, C. Wayne; Piazza, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the calibration of a photomultiplier array spectrometer is presented. Through this approach, incident light radiance derivation is made by recognizing and tracing gain characteristics for each photomultiplier tube.

  10. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  11. Long-Wave Infrared Dyson Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis Z.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for an ultra compact long-wave infrared slit spectrometer based on the dyson concentric design. The dyson spectrometer has been integrated in a dewar environment with a quantum well infrared photodetecor (QWIP), concave electron beam fabricated diffraction grating and ultra precision slit. The entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to maximize signal to noise ratio performance, hence eliminating thermal signal from transmissive elements and internal stray light. All of this is done while maintaining QWIP thermal control. A general description is given of the spectrometer, alignment technique and predicated performance. The spectrometer has been designed for optimal performance with respect to smile and keystone distortion. A spectral calibration is performed with NIST traceable targets. A 2-point non-uniformity correction is performed with a precision blackbody source to provide radiometric accuracy. Preliminary laboratory results show excellent agreement with modeled noise equivalent delta temperature and detector linearity over a broad temperature range.

  12. Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an UV-NIR (350nm to 1050 nm) portable remote imaging spectrometer (PRISM) for flight on a variety of airborne platforms with high SNR and response...

  13. Electronically-Scanned Fourier-Transform Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Ocallaghan, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    Instrument efficient, lightweight, and stable. Fourier-transform spectrometer configuration uses electronic, instead of mechanical, scanning. Configuration insensitive to vibration-induced sampling errors introduced into mechanically scanned systems.

  14. Low Power Mass Spectrometer employing TOF Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A low power Mass Spectrometer employing multiple time of flight circuits for parallel processing is possible with a new innovation in design of the Time of flight...

  15. Low Power FPGA Based Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design a general purpose reconfigurable wide bandwidth spectrometer for use in NASA's passive microwave missions, deep space network and radio...

  16. ISLA: An Isochronous Spectrometer with Large Acceptances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazin, D., E-mail: bazin@nscl.msu.edu; Mittig, W.

    2013-12-15

    A novel type of recoil mass spectrometer and separator is proposed for the future secondary radioactive beams of the ReA12 accelerator at NSCL/FRIB, inspired from the TOFI spectrometer developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for online mass measurements. The Isochronous Spectrometer with Large Acceptances (ISLA) is able to achieve superior characteristics without the compromises that usually plague the design of large acceptance spectrometers. ISLA can provide mass-to-charge ratio (m/q) measurements to better than 1 part in 1000 by using an optically isochronous time-of-flight independent of the momentum vector of the recoiling ions, despite large acceptances of 20% in momentum and 64 msr in solid angle. The characteristics of this unique design are shown, including requirements for auxiliary detectors around the target and the various types of reactions to be used with the re-accelerated radioactive beams of the future ReA12 accelerator.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions alpha thalassemia alpha thalassemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alpha thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  18. CHANG'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer: The synthesis design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, XingZhu; Peng, Wenxi; Wang, Huanyu; Liang, XiaoHua

    the Active Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) was designed to deduce the elemental abundances of samples on the moon. Similar to the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers onboard MSL and MER , the APXS was also an instrument took the advantage of X-ray fluorescence mechanism to determine elemental abundances, it determines the chemical compositions of both soil and rocks along the traverse of the rover. To provide a sound instrument working on the lunar surface,Four components were integrated in the APXS, the performances of the components were described in this paper.

  19. Design and construction of a NIR spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Barcala-Riveira, J M; Fernandez-Marron, J L; Molero-Menendez, F; Navarrete-Marin, J J; Oller-Gonzalez, J C

    2003-01-01

    This document describes the design and construction of a NIR spectrometer based on an acoustic-optic tunable filter. The spectrometer will be used for automatic identification of plastics in domestic waste. The system works between 1200 and 1800 nm. Instrument is controlled by a personal computer. Computer receives and analyses data. A software package has been developed to do these tasks. (Author) 27 refs.

  20. A Spectrometer Based on Diffractive Lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Daoyi; YAN Yingbai; JIN Guofan; WU Minxian

    2001-01-01

    A novel spectrometer is designed based on diffractive lens. It is essentially a flat field spectrometer. All the focal points are along the optical axis. Besides, all the asymmetrical aberrations vanish in our mounting. Thus low aberration can be obtained. In this article a diffractive lens is modeled as a special grating and analyzed by using a grating-based method. And a stigmatic point is introduced to reduce the aberrations.

  1. Mass Spectrometer for Airborne Micro-Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria and other micro-organisms identified continously with aid of new technique for producing samples for mass spectrometer. Technique generates aerosol of organisms and feeds to spectrometer. Given species of organism produces characteristic set of peaks in mass spectrum and thereby identified. Technique useful for monitoring bacterial makeup in environmental studies and in places where cleanliness is essential, such as hospital operating rooms, breweries, and pharmaceutical plants.

  2. 1987 calibration of the TFTR neutron spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    The {sup 3}He neutron spectrometer used for measuring ion temperatures and the NE213 proton recoil spectrometer used for triton burnup measurements were absolutely calibrated with DT and DD neutron generators placed inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. The details of the detector response and calibration are presented. Comparisons are made to the neutron source strengths measured from other calibrated systems. 23 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Ruggedized Spectrometers Are Built for Tough Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Curiosity Chemistry and Camera instrument, or ChemCam, analyzes the elemental composition of materials on the Red Planet by using a spectrometer to measure the wavelengths of light they emit. Principal investigator Roger Wiens worked with Ocean Optics, out of Dunedin, Florida, to rework the company's spectrometer to operate in cold and rowdy conditions and also during the stresses of liftoff. Those improvements have been incorporated into the firm's commercial product line.

  4. A digital control system for neutron spectrometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Knud Bent; Skaarup, Per

    1968-01-01

    A description is given of the principles of a digital system used to control neutron spectrometers. The system is composed of independent functional units with the control programme stored on punched paper tape or in a computer.......A description is given of the principles of a digital system used to control neutron spectrometers. The system is composed of independent functional units with the control programme stored on punched paper tape or in a computer....

  5. Study of neutron spectrometers for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellne, Jan

    2005-11-15

    A review is presented of the developments in the field of neutron emission spectrometry (NES) which is of relevance for identifying the role of NES diagnostics on ITER and selecting suitable instrumentation. Neutron spectrometers will be part of the ITER neutron diagnostic complement and this study makes a special effort to examine which performance characteristics the spectrometers should possess to provide the best burning plasma diagnostic information together with neutron cameras and neutron yield monitors. The performance of NES diagnostics is coupled to how much interface space can be provided which has lead to an interest to find compact instruments and their NES capabilities. This study assesses all known spectrometer types of potential interest for ITER and makes a ranking of their performance (as demonstrated or projected), which, in turn, are compared with ITER measurement requirements as a reference; the ratio of diagnostic performance to interface cost for different spectrometers is also discussed for different spectrometer types. The overall result of the study is an assessment of which diagnostic functions neutron measurements can provide in burning plasma fusion experiments on ITER and the role that NES can play depending on the category of instrument installed. Of special note is the result that much higher quality diagnostic information can be obtained from neutron measurements with total yield monitors, profile flux cameras and spectrometers when the synergy in the data is considered in the analysis and interpretation.

  6. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated (252)Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements.

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  8. Revisiting the Interpretation of Thorium Abundances at Hansteen Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, D. J.; Hawke, B. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2004-01-01

    Hansteen Alpha is one of the few remaining locations on the Moon thought to be formed by highlands volcanism. Hansteen Alpha is a triangular shaped feature located in the southern portion of Oceanus Procellarum (12 degrees W, 50 degrees S) and its size is approximately 25 km on each side. As described by Hawke et al., there is clear evidence that: 1) Hansteen Alpha was emplaced by extrusive volcanic processes; and 2) it was formed by a viscous lava that should be enriched in Th. However, in the study of Hawke et al. using available Lunar Prospector (LP) Th data, it was concluded that the Hansteen Alpha region was not greatly enriched in Th as would be expected for a highly evolved, viscous lava. It was further concluded based on other compositional data that the magma that formed Hansteen Alpha did not correspond to any known rock type. Here we revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at Hansteen Alpha for a couple of reasons. First, the size of Hansteen Alpha is smaller than the spatial resolution of the LP Gamma-ray Spectrometer (LP-GRS) from which the Th abundances were derived. Therefore, the LP-GRS pixels covering Hansteen Alpha may not truly represent the Th abundance of the Hansteen Alpha feature. Second, recent work has led to a much greater understanding of the Th spatial distribution for small-area features on the lunar surface. In particular, using forward modeling techniques, we have developed the ability to obtain information about Th abundances for features that are at or smaller than the FWHM spatial resolution (approximately [80 square kilometers]) of the LP-GRS data.

  9. Isomeric effects in ion-induced fragmentation of alpha- and beta-alanine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobocinski, P.; Bari, S.; Postma, J.; Alvarado, F.; Hoekstra, R.; Manil, B.; Rangama, J.; Bernigaud, V.; Huber, B. A.; Schlatholter, T.; McGuigan, KG; Tokesi, K; Sulik, B

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dissociation of alpha- and beta- alanine following impact of slow multicharged ions, namely He(+), He(2+), O(5+) and Xe(20+) at 10 keV per charge unit. The collision products were analyzed using a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In general, for a given proj

  10. Mobile mass spectrometer for determination of heavy metals in sea water: Numerical simulation and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, V. T.; Pavlov, A. K.; Chichagov, Yu. V.; Tubol'Tsev, Yu. V.; Savchenko, M. I.; Smirnov, O. B.; Viktorova, O. S.; Viktorov, I. V.; Vlasov, S. A.; Dubenskiĭ, B. M.; Nedvigin, V.; Gao, Ya.

    2007-12-01

    A prototype mobile mass spectrometer for direct detection of heavy metal traces in water is proposed. The instrument allows automated dosed injection of liquid samples (2.5 20.0 μl) into the lock vacuum chamber of the instrument, extraction of salts containing target components for their following introduction into the high-vacuum chamber of the instrument, and determination of the component concentrations in the initial sample by means of a portable magnetic mass spectrometer equipped with an original electron-impact ion source. Experimental testing of the spectrometer using aqueous solutions containing Zn, Fe, Cu, As, and Cd shows that the instrument can detect heavy metals in water, including salt water, at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/l to 10 μg/l. The experimental results are discussed.

  11. alpha_s from tau decays revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, D; Golterman, M; Jamin, M; Maltman, K; Osborne, J; Peris, S

    2011-01-01

    Being a determination at low energies, the analysis of hadronic tau decay data provides a rather precise determination of the strong coupling alpha_s after evolving the result to M_Z. At such a level of precision, even small non-perturbative effects become relevant for the central value and error. While those effects had been taken into account in the framework of the operator product expansion, contributions going beyond it, so-called duality violations, have previously been neglected. The following investigation fills this gap through a finite-energy sum rule analysis of tau decay spectra from the OPAL experiment, including duality violations and performing a consistent fit of all appearing QCD parameters. The resulting values for alpha_s(M_tau) are 0.307(19) in fixed-order perturbation theory and 0.322(26) in contour-improved perturbation theory, which translates to the n_f=5 values 0.1169(25) and 0.1187(32) at M_Z, respectively.

  12. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by blood tests showing the low levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin and abnormal liver tests. Other tests such as ultrasound imaging or tests using specialized X-ray techniques may be necessary. A liver biopsy may ...

  13. AlphaACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-20

    CBR can be found in the world around us (e.g., a doctor’s diagnosis based on a prior patient case, a lawyer preparing arguments based on legal ... metaphors in decision research. Judgment & Decision Making, 3(3), 195-204. Payne, J., Bettman, J., & Johnson, E. (1993). The Adaptive Decision Maker...alphaact. com 64 AlphaACT HAZMAT User Guide 8.3 Changing Measurement Units AlphaACT HAZMAT lets you show distances in either metric or English

  14. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  15. An echelle diffraction grating for imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minyue; Wang, Han; Li, Mingyu; He, Jian-Jun

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate an echelle diffraction grating (EDG) of 17 input waveguides and 33 output waveguides. For each input waveguide, only 17 of 33 output waveguides are used, receiving light ranging from 1520 nm to 1600 nm wavelength. The channel spacing of the EDG is 5 nm, with loss of -6dB and crosstalk of -17dB for center input waveguide and -15dB for edge input waveguides. Based on the 3 μm SOI platform the device is polarization insensitive. As a simple version of EDG spectrometer it is designed to be a part of the on-chip spectroscopic system of the push-broom scanning imaging spectrometer. The whole on-chip spectrometer consists of an optical on-off switch array, a multi-input EDG and detector array. With the help of on-off switch array the multiple input waveguides of the EDG spectrometer could work in a time division multiplexed fashion. Since the switch can scan very fast (less than 10 microseconds), the imaging spectrometer can be operated in push-broom mode. Due to the CMOS compatibility, the 17_channel EDG scales 2.5×3 mm2. The full version of EDG spectrometer is designed to have 129 input waveguides and 257 output waveguides (129 output channel for each input waveguide), working in wavelength ranging from 1250 nm to 1750 nm, and had similar blazed facet size with the 17_channel one, which means similar fabrication tolerance in grating facets. The waveguide EDG based imaging spectrometer can provide a low-cost solution for remote sensing on unmanned aerial vehicles, with advantages of small size, light weight, vibration-proof, and high scalability.

  16. Fire Hose instability driven by alpha particle temperature anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Matteini, Lorenzo; Schwartz, Steven; Landi, Simone

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, the instability can be triggered also when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies both of them can drive the instability, and we observe generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in...

  17. Determination of technical readiness for an atmospheric carbon imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobilia, Joseph; Kumer, John B.; Palmer, Alice; Sawyer, Kevin; Mao, Yalan; Katz, Noah; Mix, Jack; Nast, Ted; Clark, Charles S.; Vanbezooijen, Roel; Magoncelli, Antonio; Baraze, Ronald A.; Chenette, David L.

    2013-09-01

    The geoCARB sensor uses a 4-channel push broom slit-scan infrared imaging grating spectrometer to measure the absorption spectra of sunlight reflected from the ground in narrow wavelength regions. The instrument is designed for flight at geostationary orbit to provide mapping of greenhouse gases over continental scales, several times per day, with a spatial resolution of a few kilometers. The sensor provides multiple daily maps of column-averaged mixing ratios of CO2, CH4, and CO over the regions of interest, which enables flux determination at unprecedented time, space, and accuracy scales. The geoCARB sensor development is based on our experience in successful implementation of advanced space deployed optical instruments for remote sensing. A few recent examples include the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the geostationary Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS GEO-1) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), along with sensors under development, the Near Infared camera (NIRCam) for James Webb (JWST), and the Global Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Solar UltraViolet Imager (SUVI) for the GOES-R series. The Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (TIMS), developed in part through the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), provides an important part of the strong technological foundation for geoCARB. The paper discusses subsystem heritage and technology readiness levels for these subsystems. The system level flight technology readiness and methods used to determine this level are presented along with plans to enhance the level.

  18. Femtosecond photoelectron and photoion spectrometer with vacuum ultraviolet probe pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Markus; Grilj, Jakob; Sistrunk, Emily; Gühr, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We describe a setup to study ultrafast dynamics in gas-phase molecules using time-resolved photoelectron and photoion spectroscopy. The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) probe pulses are generated via strong field high-order harmonic generation from infrared femtosecond laser pulses. The band pass characteristic in transmission of thin indium (In) metal foil is exploited to isolate the $9^{\\text{th}}$ harmonic of the 800 nm fundamental (H9, 14 eV, 89 nm) from all other high harmonics. The $9^{\\text{th}}$ harmonic is obtained with high conversion efficiencies and has sufficient photon energy to access the complete set of valence electron levels in most molecules. The setup also allows for direct comparison of VUV single-photon probe with 800 nm multi-photon probe without influencing the delay of excitation and probe pulse or the beam geometry. We use a magnetic bottle spectrometer with high collection efficiency for electrons, serving at the same time as a time of flight spectrometer for ions. Characterization measurem...

  19. A compact E × B filter: A multi-collector cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blase, Ryan C., E-mail: rblase@swri.edu; Miller, Greg; Brockwell, Tim; Waite, J. Hunter [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States); Westlake, Joseph [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory LLC, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, Maryland 20723 (United States); Ostrom, Nathaniel; Ostrom, Peggy H. [Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University, 288 Farm Lane RM 203, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    A compact E × B mass spectrometer is presented. The mass spectrometer presented is termed a “perfect focus” mass spectrometer as the resolution of the device is independent of both the initial direction and energy of the ions (spatial and energy independent). The mass spectrometer is small in size (∼10.7 in.{sup 3}) and weight (∼2 kg), making it an attractive candidate for portability when using small, permanent magnets. A multi-collector Faraday cup design allows for the detection of multiple ion beams in discrete collectors simultaneously; providing the opportunity for isotope ratio monitoring. The mass resolution of the device is around 400 through narrow collector slits and the sensitivity of the device follows expected theoretical calculations of the ion current produced in the electron impact ion source. Example mass spectra obtained from the cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer are presented as well as information on mass discrimination based on instrumental parameters and isotope ratio monitoring of certain ion signals in separate Faraday cups.

  20. Background reduction of the KATRIN spectrometers. Transmission function of the pre-spectrometer and systematic tests of the main-spectrometer wire electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prall, Matthias

    2011-07-04

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment, KATRIN will determine the mass of the anti {nu}{sub e} with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV (90% C.L.) via a measurement of the {beta}-spectrum of tritium decaying in a windowless gaseous molecular tritium source near its endpoint of 18.57 keV. This approach relies exclusively on the relativistic kinematics of the decay products rendering the experiment model independent and reducing the systematic uncertainty. An ultra-low background of a few mHz and an energy resolution of 0.93 eV are among the requirements to reach the sensitivity. These demands are fulfilled with the main spectrometer (MS). While the {beta}-decay electrons are guided by a magnetic field through the experiment, the MS acts as a high-pass filter for the {beta}-decay electrons. Only those above an energy barrier, the retarding potential, are transmitted to the detector. The last about 30 eV of the T{sub 2} {beta}-spectrum will be scanned in this way. The MS is equipped with a 650 m{sup 2}, two-layered, UHV compatible and quasi-massless wire electrode suppressing secondary electron background originating at the main-spectrometer walls and caused by residual radioactivity and cosmic muons. Its energy resolution of 0.93 eV is only achieved, if a large part of the 248 wire electrode modules, which determine the electric field inside the MS, has a mechanical precision of 0.2 mm. Not a single of the about 28.000 wires of the electrode must break during the lifetime of KATRIN. A 2-dimensional laser sensor for contact-less position (precision about 0.01 mm) and tension (precision about 0.04 N) measurements was developed and applied, to firstly, verify the mechanical precision of the electrode modules and secondly, to examine their reliability. A 3-dimensional coordinate measurement table was automated to perform these measurements in a clean room. This table was also used to verify the precision of components using a camera system and image recognition methods (0.05 mm

  1. Scattering from Alpha-Stable Non-Gaussian Distributed Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yu-Chao; GUO Li-Xin; WU Zhen-Sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ The scattering problem of alpha-stable non-Gaussian distributed rough surfaces is studied. The alpha-stable non-Gaussian distribution is used to describe the surfaces that exhibit sharp and sparse peaks, not usually seen in Gaussian distributed surfaces. Then a magnetic field integral equation is formulated to calculate the scattered field and the scattering coefficient. Numerical simulations show that the magnitude distribution of the scattered field is affected significantly by the probability distribution of the surface when the height of the surface changes in a random way. In addition, simulation results are presented as bistatic scattering coefficient for alpha-stable distributed surfaces.

  2. Integration and Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ishino, Masaya

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has a characteristic muon spectrometer with toroidal magnetic-field for the purpose of stand-alone precision tracking and momentum selective trigger. By the combination of four types of detector technologies, the pseudo-rapidity range of | η | < 2.7 is covered by tracking chambers and | η | < 2.4 by trigger chambers. The tracking system is designed to achieve momentum resolution of better than 10% up to transverse momenta of 1 TeV. Based on the matrix-coincidence logic, the trigger system generates level-1 trigger signal and sends it to global DAQ system. Up to now, most of the system has been installed into the ATLAS pit, and all the system will be completed by the end of 2007. In the mean time, detector commissioning is intensively performed with cosmic-rays. We present the results from this activity.

  3. Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer -- Operational Performance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, Anthony D; Olson, John E; Watrous, Matthew G; Ward, Michael B.; Dahl, David A.

    2010-12-01

    This report describes the operational testing of a new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used to measure each isotope beam. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at loadings of 2.4 and 12 fg on resin beads and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples. The measured limit of detection (3s) for 240Pu was 3.4 attograms for SRM 996. The limit of quantitation (LOQ), defined as 10 s, was 11.2 attograms. The measured concentration of 239Pu in the CRS standard was 152 ± 6 fg/g.

  4. Polarization analysis for the thermal chopper spectrometer TOPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voigt Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the progress of the construction of the thermal time-of-flight spectrometer with polarization analysis TOPAS at the Mayer-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ. The instrument components approach the status to be ready for installation. The special feature of the instrument is its capability for wide-angle polarization analysis in the thermal spectral range. Here we describe a novel approach to rotate the neutron spin adiabatically into the X, Y or Z direction of the laboratory frame by combination of permanent magnets aligned as Halbach rings and electrically generated fields. Despite the severe spatial restrictions the design exhibits a very high adiabaticity and interacts only weakly with the coil layout for the analyzing 3He spin filter cell (SFC.

  5. How to tickle spins with a fourier transform NMR spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Takuya F; Carnevale, Diego; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-02-01

    In the long bygone days of continuous-wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, a selected transition within a multiplet of a high-resolution spectrum could be irradiated by a highly selective continuous-wave (CW) radio-frequency (rf) field with a very weak amplitude ω(2)/(2π)≤J. This causes splittings of connected transitions, allowing one to map the connectivities of all transitions within the energy-level diagram of the spin system. Such "tickling" experiments stimulated the invention of two-dimensional spectroscopy, but seem to have been forgotten for nearly 50 years. We show that tickling can readily be achieved in homonuclear systems with Fourier transform spectrometers by applying short pulses in the intervals between the sampling points. Extensions to heteronuclear systems are even more straightforward since they can be carried out using very weak CW rf fields.

  6. Fast neutron detection with a segmented spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langford, T.J., E-mail: thomas.langford@yale.edu [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bass, C.D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Erwin, D.K. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Heimbach, C.R.; Nico, J.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    A fast neutron spectrometer consisting of segmented plastic scintillator and {sup 3}He proportional counters was constructed for the measurement of neutrons in the energy range 1–200 MeV. We discuss its design, principles of operation, and the method of analysis. The detector is capable of observing very low neutron fluxes in the presence of ambient gamma background and does not require scintillator pulse-shape discrimination. The spectrometer was characterized for its energy response in fast neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Measurements of the fast neutron flux and energy response at 120 m above sea-level (39.130°N, 77.218°W) and at a depth of 560 m in a limestone mine are presented. Finally, the design of a spectrometer with improved sensitivity and energy resolution is discussed.

  7. A compact multichannel spectrometer for Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenbeck, N. L.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Dowd, A. S.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The availability of high-efficiency volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and intensified CCD (ICCD) cameras have motivated a simplified, compact spectrometer for Thomson scattering detection. Measurements of T{sub e} < 100 eV are achieved by a 2971 l/mm VPH grating and measurements T{sub e} > 100 eV by a 2072 l/mm VPH grating. The spectrometer uses a fast-gated ({approx}2 ns) ICCD camera for detection. A Gen III image intensifier provides {approx}45% quantum efficiency in the visible region. The total read noise of the image is reduced by on-chip binning of the CCD to match the 8 spatial channels and the 10 spectral bins on the camera. Three spectrometers provide a minimum of 12 spatial channels and 12 channels for background subtraction.

  8. A compact multichannel spectrometer for Thomson scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbeck, N L; Schlossberg, D J; Dowd, A S; Fonck, R J; Winz, G R

    2012-10-01

    The availability of high-efficiency volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and intensified CCD (ICCD) cameras have motivated a simplified, compact spectrometer for Thomson scattering detection. Measurements of T(e) VPH grating and measurements T(e) > 100 eV by a 2072 l∕mm VPH grating. The spectrometer uses a fast-gated (~2 ns) ICCD camera for detection. A Gen III image intensifier provides ~45% quantum efficiency in the visible region. The total read noise of the image is reduced by on-chip binning of the CCD to match the 8 spatial channels and the 10 spectral bins on the camera. Three spectrometers provide a minimum of 12 spatial channels and 12 channels for background subtraction.

  9. Fast Neutron Detection with a Segmented Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Langford, T J; Beise, E J; Breuer, H; Erwin, D K; Heimbach, C R; Nico, J S

    2014-01-01

    A fast neutron spectrometer consisting of segmented plastic scintillator and He-3 proportional counters was constructed for the measurement of neutrons in the energy range 1 MeV to 200 MeV. We discuss its design, principles of operation, and the method of analysis. The detector is capable of observing very low neutron fluxes in the presence of ambient gamma background and does not require scintillator pulse-shape discrimination The spectrometer was characterized for energy resolution and efficiency in fast neutron fields of 2.5 MeV, 14 MeV, and fission spectrum neutrons, and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Measurements of the fast neutron flux and energy response at 120 m above sea-level (39.130 deg. N, 77.218 deg. W) and at a depth of 560 m in a limestone mine are presented. Finally, the design of a spectrometer with improved sensitivity and energy resolution is discussed.

  10. Fast neutron detection with a segmented spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, T. J.; Bass, C. D.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Erwin, D. K.; Heimbach, C. R.; Nico, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    A fast neutron spectrometer consisting of segmented plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters was constructed for the measurement of neutrons in the energy range 1-200 MeV. We discuss its design, principles of operation, and the method of analysis. The detector is capable of observing very low neutron fluxes in the presence of ambient gamma background and does not require scintillator pulse-shape discrimination. The spectrometer was characterized for its energy response in fast neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Measurements of the fast neutron flux and energy response at 120 m above sea-level (39.130°N, 77.218°W) and at a depth of 560 m in a limestone mine are presented. Finally, the design of a spectrometer with improved sensitivity and energy resolution is discussed.

  11. Digital Logarithmic Airborne Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, GuoQiang; Li, Chen; Tan, ChengJun; Ge, LiangQuan; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-01-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352, 583, and 609keV in the low-energy spectral sections after the energy calibration. The photopeak energy resolution of 137Cs improves to 6.75% from the original 7.8%. Furthermore, the energy resolution of three photopeaks, namely, K, U, and Th, is maintained, and the overall stability of the energy spectrum is increased through potassium peak spectrum stabilization. Thus, effectively measuring energy from 20keV to 10MeV is possible.

  12. Digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Li, Chen; Tan, Cheng-Jun; Ge, Liang-Quan; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-07-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. After energy calibration, the spectrometer can clearly distinguish photopeaks at 239, 352, 583 and 609 keV in the low-energy spectral sections. The photopeak energy resolution of 137Cs improves to 6.75% from the original 7.8%. Furthermore, the energy resolution of three photopeaks, namely, K, U, and Th, is maintained, and the overall stability of the energy spectrum is increased through potassium peak spectrum stabilization. Thus, it is possible to effectively measure energy from 20 keV to 10 MeV.

  13. RESPECT: Neutron resonance spin-echo spectrometer for extreme studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgii, R.; Kindervater, J.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2016-11-01

    We propose the design of a REsonance SPin-echo spECtrometer for exTreme studies, RESPECT, that is ideally suited for the exploration of non-dispersive processes such as diffusion, crystallization, slow dynamics, tunneling processes, crystal electric field excitations, and spin fluctuations. It is a variant of the conventional neutron spin-echo technique (NSE) by (i) replacing the long precession coils by pairs of longitudinal neutron spin-echo coils combined with RF-spin flippers and (ii) by stabilizing the neutron polarization with small longitudinal guide fields that can in addition be used as field subtraction coils thus allowing to adjust the field integrals over a range of 8 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the dynamic range of RESPECT can in principle be varied over 8 orders of magnitude in time, if neutrons with the required energy are made available. Similarly as for existing NSE-spectrometers, spin echo times of up to approximately 1 μs can be reached if the divergence and the correction elements are properly adjusted. Thanks to the optional use of neutron guides and the fact that the currents for the correction coils are much smaller than in standard NSE, intensity gains of at least one order of magnitude are expected, making the concept of RESPECT also competitive for operation at medium flux neutron sources. RESPECT can also be operated in a MIEZE configuration allowing the investigation of relaxation processes in depolarizing environments as they occur when magnetic fields are applied at the sample position, i.e. for the investigation of the dynamics of flux lines in superconductors, magnetic fluctuations in ferromagnetic materials, and samples containing hydrogen.

  14. Development of the methods for simulating the neutron spectrometers and neutron-scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoshin, S. A.; Belushkin, A. V.; Ioffe, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Reviewed are the results of simulating the neutron scattering instruments with the program package VITESS upgraded by the routines for treating the polarized neutrons, as developed by the authors. The reported investigations have been carried out at the Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics at JINR in collaboration with the Juelich research center (Germany). The performance of the resonance and gradient adiabatic spin flippers, the Drabkin resonator, the classical and resonance spin-echo spectrometers, the spin-echo diffractometer for the small-angle neutron scattering, and the spin-echo spectrometer with rotating magnetic fields is successfully modeled. The methods for using the 3D map of the magnetic field from the input file, either mapped experimentally or computed using the finite-elements technique, in the VITESS computer code, are considered in detail. The results of neutron-polarimetry experiments are adequately reproduced by our simulations.

  15. Fabrication and testing of the recoil mass spectrometer at Bombay Pelletron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Nagaraj; H C Jain; P K Joshi; S D Paul; R Palit; H V Panchal; B S Naidu; A Chatterjee; A Navin

    2001-07-01

    A recoil mass spectrometer (RMS) has been designed, fabricated and installed at the 15°S beam-line of the Pelletron at TIFR. The RMS consists of a quadrupole doublet just after the target chamber followed by an ‘electrostatic deflector’, a magnetic dipole and a second electrostatic deflector. The recoils produced in the 12C+58Ni reaction using 60 MeV 12C beam were focussed with the help of electric and magnetic fields and detected in a strip detector placed at the focal plane of the RMS. Further testing of the spectrometer to obtain mass resolution and efficiency are in progress.

  16. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  17. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  18. Upgrade of an old Raman Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    Improvement of a conventional Jeol Raman spectrometer with a single channel photo multiplier detector is described. New optical components (fibres, mirror, lens and CCD detector) have been chosen to design a high quality and easy-to-use instrument. Tests have shown that with this modified...... spectrometer Raman spectra can be acquired of a quality comparable to the spectra obtained previously, but the time needed to obtain a spectrum is markedly reduced. Selected test spectra and a simple calibration procedure to obtain the wavenumber values from the band CCD pixel position are presented....

  19. Wide size range fast integrated mobility spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian

    2013-10-29

    A mobility spectrometer to measure a nanometer particle size distribution is disclosed. The mobility spectrometer includes a conduit and a detector. The conduit is configured to receive and provide fluid communication of a fluid stream having a charged nanometer particle mixture. The conduit includes a separator section configured to generate an electrical field of two dimensions transverse to a dimension associated with the flow of the charged nanometer particle mixture through the separator section to spatially separate charged nanometer particles of the charged nanometer particle mixture in said two dimensions. The detector is disposed downstream of the conduit to detect concentration and position of the spatially-separated nanometer particles.

  20. Vacuum system for the SAMURAI spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y.; Otsu, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, T.; Motobayashi, T.; Sato, H.; Yoneda, K.

    2013-12-01

    The first commissioning experiment of the SAMURAI spectrometer and its beam line was performed in March, 2012. The vacuum system for the SAMURAI spectrometer includes its beam line and the SAMURAI vacuum chamber with the windows for detecting neutrons and charged particles. The window for neutrons was made of stainless steel with a thickness of 3 mm and was designed with a shape of partial cylinder to support itself against the atmospheric pressure. The window for charged particles was of the combination of Kevlar and Mylar with the thickness of 280 and 75 μm, respectively. The pressure in the vacuum system was at a few Pa throughout the commissioning experiment.

  1. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  2. Photoacoustic absorption spectrometer for highly transparent dielectrics with parts-per-million sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waasem, Niklas; Fieberg, Stephan; Hauser, Janosch; Gomes, Gregory; Haertle, Daniel; Kühnemann, Frank; Buse, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    A sensitive photoacoustic absorption spectrometer for highly transparent solids has been built and tested. As the light source an optical parametrical oscillator pumped by a nanosecond pulse laser with 10 Hz repetition rate is employed, covering the complete wavelength range from 407 to 2600 nm. A second-harmonic-generation unit extends the range of accessible wavelengths down to 212 nm. A lead-zirconate-titanate piezo transducer, directly coupled to the sample, detects the photoacoustically generated sound waves. Absorption spectra of lithium triborate, lithium niobate, and alpha barium borate crystals with absorption coefficients down to 10-5 cm-1 are presented.

  3. New gas-filled mode of the large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, C., E-mail: schmitt@ganil.f [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Rejmund, M.; Navin, A.; Lecornu, B.; Jacquot, B.; France, G. de; Lemasson, A.; Shrivastava, A. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Greenlees, P.; Uusitalo, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Subotic, K. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Gaudefroy, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Theisen, Ch.; Sulignano, B. [CEA-Saclay DSM/IRFU/SPhN, F-91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L. [IPHC, UMR7178, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite Louis Pasteur, BP28, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2010-09-21

    A new gas-filled operation mode of the large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS at GANIL is reported. A beam rejection factor greater than 10{sup 10} is obtained for the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 150}Sm system at 196 MeV. The unprecedented transmission efficiency for the evaporation residues produced in this reaction is estimated to be around 80% for {alpha}x n channels and above 95% for x ny p channels. A detailed study of the performance of the gas-filled VAMOS and future developments are discussed. This new operation mode opens avenues to explore the potential of fusion reactions in various kinematics.

  4. One of the three multiwire proportional chambers used in the photon tagging system at the Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The momentum of incoming electrons, generated by SPS beams, is determined by magnets before they are directed onto a foil. The tagging system, a magnet and the MWPCs then determines the electron momentum after the foil and the difference between the two measurements gives the momentum of the photon which is heading for the spectrometer. The MWPCs were built in Daresburyand coupled with new CERN read0ut electronics.

  5. AlphaSphere

    OpenAIRE

    Place, A.; Lacey, L.; Mitchell, T.

    2013-01-01

    The AlphaSphere is an electronic musical instrument featuring a series of tactile, pressure sensitive touch pads arranged in a spherical form. It is designed to offer a new playing style, while allowing for the expressive real-time modulation of sound available in electronic-based music. It is also designed to be programmable, enabling the flexibility to map a series of different notational arrangements to the pad-based interface.\\ud \\ud The AlphaSphere functions as an HID, MIDI and OSC devic...

  6. Particle Transportation Through the JLab Hall A BigBite Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalmi, Sheren

    2015-04-01

    The BigBite spectrometer of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab is under refurbishment for use in an experiment (E120-10-103) to measure deep inelastic electron scattering off helium-3 and tritium mirror nuclei in the valence quark region (high Bjorken x range). The experiment will use an 11 GeV upgraded beam to determine the ratio of the neutron to proton F2 inelastic structure functions, and the ratio of the down to up quark, d/u, quark probability distributions in the nucleon. The BigBite spectrometer is based on a custom-shaped dipole magnet, which provides for large momentum and angular acceptances needed for the above measurements. Simulations using a ROOT-based Monte Carlo model for tracking and visualizing scattered electrons passing through the BigBite magnet will be presented. The optics parameters of the dipole magnet have been extracted from a field map produced by a TOSCA magnetostatics calculation. The simulations are necessary to estimate the phase space of the scattered electrons inside the relocated detectors of the spectrometer, and check for electrons which could possibly miss a detector and escape detection. This work is supported by Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission SACM, Kent State University, NSF Grant PHY-1405814, and DOE Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177. Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242.

  7. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauser, C. F., E-mail: cesar.clauser@ib.edu.ar; Farengo, R. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  8. Cosmic gamma ray detection and discovery potential with the AMS-2 spectrometer; Detection de rayons {gamma} cosmiques et potentiel de decouvertes avec le spectrometre AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, L

    2004-12-15

    Yet designed to measure charged component of the cosmic rays, the foreseen Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) could also release {gamma}-ray studies, in the energy range from GeV to TeV, using the tracker system, for {gamma}-rays converted in e{sup +}e{sup -} pair, and the electromagnetic calorimeter. In the first part of the thesis are described the calibrations and the performances of the engineering model of the calorimeter, obtained from the analysis of data taken during a test-beam performed at CERN in July 2002. In the second part of the thesis, the AMS-02 discovery potential for {gamma}-astrophysics is presented. While exposure maps of the {gamma}--sky are computed for one year of data taking with the {gamma}--detectors, the acceptance of the calorimeter is obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations. The AMS-02 potential is then estimated for signals from the Vela pulsar and for some supersymmetric signals from the Galactic Center. (author)

  9. Hybrid plasmon photonic crystal resonance grating for integrated spectrometer biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-01-15

    Using nanofabricated hybrid metal-dielectric nanohole array photonic crystal gratings, a hybrid plasmonic optical resonance spectrometer biosensor is demonstrated. The new spectrometer sensor technique measures plasmonic optical resonance from the first-order diffraction rather than via the traditional method of measuring optical resonance from transmission. The resonance spectra measured with the new spectrometer technique are compared with the spectra measured using a commercial optical spectrometer. It is shown that the new optical resonance spectrometer can be used to measure plasmonic optical resonance that otherwise cannot be measured with a regular optical spectrometer.

  10. High Performance Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-29

    Our efforts in this project were focused on three different materials, namely; interstitial Sm-Fe carbides and nitrides, high energy product Nd2Fe14B ...magnets with MgO addition, and nanocomposite Nd2Fe14B /alpha-Fe consisting of a fine mixture of hard and soft phases. In the Sm-Fe carbides and

  11. Large- and small-scale interactions and quenching in an alpha2-dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Peter; Stepanov, Rodion; Sokoloff, Dmitry

    2006-12-01

    The evolution of the large-scale magnetic field in a turbulent flow of conducting fluid is considered in the framework of a multiscale alpha2-dynamo model, which includes the poloidal and the toroidal components for the large-scale magnetic field and a shell model for the small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence. The conjugation of the mean-field description for the large-scale field and the shell formalism for the small-scale turbulence is based on strict conformity to the conservation laws. The model displays a substantial magnetic contribution to the alpha effect. It was shown that a large-scale magnetic field can be generated by current helicity even solely. The alpha quenching and the role of the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm) are studied. We have determined the dynamic nature of the saturation mechanism of dynamo action. Any simultaneous cross correlation of alpha and large-scale magnetic field energy EB is negligible, whereas coupling between alpha and EB becomes substantial for moderate time lags. An unexpected result is the behavior of the large-scale magnetic energy with variation of the magnetic Prandtl number. Diminishing of Pm does not have an inevitable ill effect on the magnetic field generation. The most efficient large-scale dynamo operates under relatively low Prandtl numbers--then the small-scale dynamo is suppressed and the decrease of Pm can lead even to superequipartition of the large-scale magnetic field (i.e., EB>Eu). In contrast, the growth of Pm does not promote the large-scale magnetic field generation. A growing counteraction of the magnetic alpha effect reduces the level of mean large-scale magnetic energy at the saturated state.

  12. Triple-axis spectrometer DruechaL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehrer, W.; Keller, P. [Lab. for Neutron Scattering ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland) and Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    DruechaL is a triple-axis spectrometer located at a cold guide. The characteristics of guide and instrument allow the use of a broad spectral range of neutrons. The resolution in momentum and energy transfer can be tuned to match the experimental requirements by using either collimators or focusing systems (monochromator, antitrumpet, analyser). (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  13. HyTES: Thermal Imaging Spectrometer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Realmuto, Vincent; Lamborn, Andy; Paine, Chris; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES). It is an airborne pushbroom imaging spectrometer based on the Dyson optical configuration. First low altitude test flights are scheduled for later this year. HyTES uses a compact 7.5-12 micrometer m hyperspectral grating spectrometer in combination with a Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) and grating based spectrometer. The Dyson design allows for a very compact and optically fast system (F/1.6). Cooling requirements are minimized due to the single monolithic prism-like grating design. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal science-grade imaging spectroscopy solution for high altitude, lighter-than-air (HAA, LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The QWIP sensor allows for optimum spatial and spectral uniformity and provides adequate responsivity which allows for near 100mK noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) operation across the LWIR passband. The QWIP's repeatability and uniformity will be helpful for data integrity since currently an onboard calibrator is not planned. A calibration will be done before and after eight hour flights to gage any inconsistencies. This has been demonstrated with lab testing. Further test results show adequate NEDT, linearity as well as applicable earth science emissivity target results (Silicates, water) measured in direct sunlight.

  14. Digital Signal Processing in the GRETINA Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromaz, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Developments in the segmentation of large-volume HPGe crystals has enabled the development of high-efficiency gamma-ray spectrometers which have the ability to track the path of gamma-rays scattering through the detector volume. This technology has been successfully implemented in the GRETINA spectrometer whose high efficiency and ability to perform precise event-by-event Doppler correction has made it an important tool in nuclear spectroscopy. Tracking has required the spectrometer to employ a fully digital signal processing chain. Each of the systems 1120 channels are digitized by 100 Mhz, 14-bit flash ADCs. Filters that provide timing and high-resolution energies are implemented on local FPGAs acting on the ADC data streams while interaction point locations and tracks, derived from the trace on each detector segment, are calculated in real time on a computing cluster. In this presentation we will give a description of GRETINA's digital signal processing system, the impact of design decisions on system performance, and a discussion of possible future directions as we look towards soon developing larger spectrometers such as GRETA with full 4 π solid angle coverage. This work was supported by the Office of Science in the Department of Energy under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  15. Resolution of a triple axis spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans

    1969-01-01

    A new method for obtaining the resolution function for a triple-axis neutron spectrometer is described, involving a combination of direct measurement and analytical calculation. All factors which contribute to the finite resolution of the instrument may be taken into account, and Gaussian...

  16. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  17. A compact positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李道武; 刘军辉; 章志明; 王宝义; 张天保; 魏龙

    2011-01-01

    Using LYSO scintillator coupled on HAMAMATSU R9800 (a fast photomultiplier) to form the small size γ-ray detectors, a compact lifetime spectrometer has been built for the positron annihilation experiments. The system time resolution FWHM=193 ps and the co

  18. IR Spectrometer Project for the BTA Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Afanasiev, V. L.; Emelianov, E. V.; Murzin, V. A.; Vdovin, V. F.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a project of new cooled infrared spectrometer-photometer for 6-m telescope BTA (Special Astrophysical Observatory of Russian Science Academy). The device would extend the wavelength range accessible for observations on the 6-m BTA telescope toward near infrared (0.8-2.5 um).

  19. Computer Enhanced SRO NQR-Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Koichi; Hashimoto, Masao

    1986-02-01

    An automatic computer supported SRO NQR spectrometer system was constructed for the measurement of time dependent NQR signal intensities. The system has several functions: fast scanning (500 kH z/25 s), averaging, smoothing, automatic noise level estimation, automatic peak detection, etc. The process of the ß → α phase transition of p-dichlorobenzene is illustrated by the 3-dimensional spectrum .

  20. Broadband Infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, C G; Cunningham, C T; Tringe, J W

    2010-12-16

    This report summarizes the most important results of our effort to develop a new class of infrared spectrometers based on a novel broadband heterodyne design. Our results indicate that this approach could lead to a near-room temperature operation with performance limited only by quantum noise carried by the incoming signal. Using a model quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP), we demonstrated key performance features of our approach. For example, we directly measured the beat frequency signal generated by superimposing local oscillator (LO) light of one frequency and signal light of another through a spectrograph, by injecting the LO light at a laterally displaced input location. In parallel with the development of this novel spectrometer, we modeled a new approach to reducing detector volume though plasmonic resonance effects. Since dark current scales directly with detector volume, this ''photon compression'' can directly lead to lower currents. Our calculations indicate that dark current can be reduced by up to two orders of magnitude in an optimized ''superlens'' structure. Taken together, our spectrometer and dark current reduction strategies provide a promising path toward room temperature operation of a mid-wave and possibly long-wave infrared spectrometer.