WorldWideScience

Sample records for alpha energy measurements

  1. Instrument for measuring total alpha particle energies of alpha emitters in ambient air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, S.; Brucker, G.J.; Cummings, B.; Bechtel, E.; Gentner, F.; Horne, S

    2000-11-11

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, testing and evaluation of a self-reading, carbon fiber, electrometer-type instrument. It is used for measuring the total energy of alpha particles emitted in air by progenies of {sup 222}Rn ({sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb, and {sup 214}Bi), and sometimes by other types of alpha emitters (e.g. {sup 212}Pb, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu). The purpose of these measurements is to assess the energy delivered by alpha emission from these sources to the lung tissue. A sample (charged progenies attached to aerosols) is collected on filter paper from a known volume of air and placed on the instrument. The discharge rate indicates the alpha energy in MeV l{sup -1} of air per min that is produced by the alpha emitters. The calibration procedure shows that the instrument has an energy sensitivity for alpha particles of 800.5 MeV/scale unit. The range of the readout scale is 30 units. Measurements of alpha contamination in air were made using this instrument in buildings, private homes and in a standard chamber. The value of the radon concentration in this chamber is traceable back to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  2. Computation and measurement of differential ranges of low-energy alpha particles in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping power formula of Bethe is discussed and is used to compute differential ranges of low-energy alpha particles in air, argon, aluminium and copper. A single radioactive source containing three active elements is used in experiments to measure the differential ranges in these materials. Finally a range-energy relationship for the alpha particles in air is deduced. (author)

  3. Development of the MICROMEGAS Detector for Measuring the Energy Spectrum of Alpha Particles by using a 241-Am Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Do Yoon; Shin, Jae Won; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Andriamonje, Samuel; Kadi, Yacine; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We have developed MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GASeous) detectors for detecting {\\alpha} particles emitted from an 241-Am standard source. The voltage applied to the ionization region of the detector is optimized for stable operation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The energy of {\\alpha} particles from the 241-Am source can be varied by changing the flight path of the {\\alpha} particle from the 241 Am source. The channel numbers of the experimentally-measured pulse peak positions for different energies of the {\\alpha} particles are associated with the energies deposited by the alpha particles in the ionization region of the detector as calculated by using GEANT4 simulations; thus, the energy calibration of the MICROMEGAS detector for {\\alpha} particles is done. For the energy calibration, the thickness of the ionization region is adjusted so that {\\alpha} particles may completely stop in the ionization region and their kinetic energies are fully deposited in the region. The efficiency of our MICROMEGA...

  4. A prototype low-background multiwire proportional chamber for measuring alphas and low-energy betas

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Bunker, R; Golwala, S R; Grant, D R; Kos, M; Nelson, R H; Rider, A; Schnee, R W; Sotolongo, D; Wang, B; Zahn, A

    2013-01-01

    A prototype low-background multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a radiopure MWPC to assay materials for alpha- and beta-emitting surface contaminants for future rare-event-search experiments, as well as other scientific fields. We discuss the design features and assembly techniques used to achieve the energy and position resolution for for efficient rejection of both intrinsic and external backgrounds. Results from a test setup using a 5.89\\,keV x-ray source indicate excellent operational stability and a near-ideal energy resolution of 15.8% FWHM. This detector technology promises significant advances in both alpha and low-energy (<200 keV) beta screening.

  5. Measurement of potential alpha energy concentration in some schools in Shillong city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its progeny account for more than 50% of total natural radiation exposure to humans and are considered to an important cause of lung cancer (UNSCEAR, 2008). Indoor radon levels are much higher than outdoor levels hence the importance of assessing radon levels in indoor environments, particularly schools which serve as a significant source of radon exposure both for children and the staffs. Children have smaller lung volumes and higher breathing rates therefore an augmented radon concentration results to a higher radiation dose in children. In our study, potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) of 20 schools in Shillong region has been measured using the SSNTD method with LR-115 type 2 detectors. The detectors in bare mode were placed in class rooms at different floors of each school during winter and summer season. The detectors in bare mode were placed in class rooms at diff rent floors of each school during winter and summer season. The PAEC (mWL) at each of the selected schools are calculated and it ranges from 2.56 - 58.2 mWL (Arithmetic mean) and 2.34 - 58.18 mWL (Geometric mean). And the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) ranges from 0.74 - 17.85 mSv.y-1. This preliminary study shows that the AEDE values of the schools under study are below the prescribed action limit by AERB i.e. 30 mSv.y-1. (author)

  6. Alpha activity measurement with lsc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, we showed that the alpha activity in liquid samples can be measured using a liquid scintillation analyzer without alpha/beta discrimination capability. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the performances of the method and to optimize the procedure of the sample preparation. A series of tests was performed to validate the procedure of alpha emitting radionuclides extraction in aqueous samples with Actinide Resin, especially regarding to the contact time required to extract all alpha nuclides. The main conclusions were that a minimum 18 hours stirring time is needed to achieve a percent recovery of the alpha nuclides grater than 90% and that the counting efficiency of alphas measurements with LSC is nearly 100%. (authors)

  7. Indirect measurement of {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N cross section at ultra-low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M L; Spitaleri, C; Cherubini, S; Crucilla, V; Gulino, M; Cognata, M La; Lamia, L; Pizzone, R G; Puglia, S M R; Rapisarda, G G; Romano, S [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Coc, A [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3/UPS, Batiment 104, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Mukhamedzhanov, A [Texas A and M College Station (United States); Burjan, V; Hons, V Z; Kroha, V [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez (Czech Republic); Hammache, F; Sereville, N de [IPN, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite de Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Irgaziev, B [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology Topi District Swabi NWFP (Pakistan); Kiss, G, E-mail: sergi@lns.infn.i [Institute of Nuclear Research of Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary)

    2010-01-01

    The indirect measurement of {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N cross section was performed by means of the Trojan Horse Method. This approach allowed to investigate the ultra-low energy range (E{sub c.m.} = 0-300 keV) relevant for several astrophysics environments, where two resonant levels of {sup 18}F at E{sup R}{sub c.m.} = 65 keV and E{sup R}{sub c.m.} = 183 keV play a significant role in the reaction rate determination.

  8. Backangle anomaly in scattering of {alpha} -particles from {sup 28} Si at low energies[25.55.Ci; 25.70.Ef; Nuclear reactions 28 Si( {alpha},{alpha})28 Si; E{alpha}=3.0 -7.8 MeV; Measured {sigma}(E{alpha},{theta}); {theta}lab=30 deg. -175 deg.; Deduced Regge-pole parameters; Natural target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coban, A.; Khiari, F.Z.; Abdelmonem, M.S.; Aksoy, A.; Naqvi, A.A

    2000-09-25

    In order to resolve the differences in the literature on the existence of quasi-molecular states in the {alpha} -{sup 28} Si system, excitation functions were measured for the scattering of {alpha} -particles from {sup 28} Si in the incident energy range E{sub lab}=3 -7.8 MeV. An angular distribution measurement was carried out in the angular range {theta}{sub lab}=30 deg. -174.5 deg. for every potential resonance observed in the excitation functions. Data was analysed using a Regge-pole formalism by coherently adding specific resonances to an underlying diffraction term calculated by a strong absorption model. Furthermore, the usual compound elastic contribution was incoherently added to the direct interaction part of the cross section. The 6.8 MeV resonance was confirmed with J=3 and some evidence was observed for a J=1 resonance around 6.0 MeV.

  9. Alpha Schottky junction energy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litz, Marc S.; Fan, Zhaoyang; Carroll, James J.; Bayne, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    Isotope batteries offer solutions for long-lived low-power sensor requirements. Alpha emitting isotopes have energy per decay 103 times that of beta emitters. Alpha particles are absorbed within 20 μm of most materials reducing shielding mitigation. However, damage to materials from the alphas limits their practical use. A Schottky Barrier Diode (SBD) geometry is considered with an alpha emitting contact-layer on a diamond-like crystal semiconductor region. The radiation tolerance of diamond, the safety of alpha particles, combined with the internal field of the SBD is expected to generate current useful for low-power electronic devices over decades. Device design parameters and calculations of the expected current are described.

  10. Alpha radiation measurement - Recommendations dossier for measurements optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    - alpha radiations - emissions and interactions: alpha particles emission, alpha particles/matter interaction; 4 - sources preparation: objectives and specificity of coatings, direct coating, direct coating of organic solutions, spontaneous coating - the polonium case, alpha sources fabrication by co-precipitation, electrodeposition, alpha sources for liquid scintillation; 5 - measurement of alpha radiation: alpha detection, calibration and background noise measurement, global alpha counting, spectrometry, liquid scintillation and PERALS scintillation, PERALS technique, synthesis of alpha measurement techniques; 6 - treatment of results: metrology definitions, peaks search and identification, energy drift control, spectra analysis, interpretation of results, analysis report; 7 - comparison between non-radiometric techniques: secondary ionization mass spectroscopy, resonant ionization mass spectroscopy - RIMS, thermo-ionization mass spectroscopy - TIMS, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy - ICP-MS, accelerator mass spectroscopy - AMS; 8 - quality assurance and alpha spectroscopy: materials and equipments, environmental conditions, test and calibration methods, validation; Appendix 1: example of a device fitted with a semi-conductor detector: defined solid angle measurement (principle, electronics, uncertainties on full spectrum and on the extrapolation); Appendix 2: cryogenic detectors for alpha spectroscopy; Appendix 3: activity metrology - method of triple to double coincidences ratio; Glossary. (J.S.)

  11. Measurement of $\\alpha_{s}$ with Radiative Hadronic Events

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkays, A Jr; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schiecks, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2008-01-01

    Hadronic final states with a hard isolated photon are studied using data taken at centre-of-mass energies around the mass of the Z0 boson with the OPAL detector at LEP. The strong coupling alpha S is extracted by comparing data and QCD predictions for event shape observables at average reduced centre-of-mass energies ranging from 24 GeV to 78 GeV, and the energy dependence of alpha S is studied. Our results are consistent with the running of alpha S as predicted by QCD and show that within the uncertainties of our analysis event shapes in hadronic Z0 decays with hard and isolated photon radiation can be described by QCD at reduced centre-of-mass energies. Combining all values from different event shape observables and energies gives alpha S (Mz)=0.1182 pm 0.0015(stat.) pm 0.0101(syst.).

  12. Alpha spectroscopy for in-situ liquid radioisotope measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using calculation and SRIM simulations of alpha particle energy spectroscopy, we show that the initial energies and concentrations of alpha-emitting radioisotopes can be measured in-situ in a liquid environment. We quantify the effect on the alpha spectrum of reducing the thickness of the liquid source in front of the alpha particle detector as well as adding a cover material onto the alpha particle detector surface. In all cases, initial energies and concentrations are recoverable from the alpha particle energy spectra. By reducing the thickness of the liquid source, the contribution to the spectrum for low count rate, low energy radioisotopes can be revealed. However, adding a cover on the detector obscures the contributions of these radioisotopes

  13. Energy dependence of event shapes and of $\\alpha_s$ at LEP 2

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Masik, J; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    Infrared and collinear safe event shape distributions and their mean values are determined using the data taken at ve di erent centre of mass energies above $M_Z$ with the DELPHI detector at LEP. From the event shapes, the strong coupling $\\alpha_s$ is extracted in $O(\\alpha^2_s)$, NLLA and a combined scheme using hadronisation corrections evaluated with fragmentation model generators as well as using an analytical power ansatz. Comparing these measurements to those obtained at MZ, the energy dependence (running) of $\\alpha_s$ is accessible. The logarithmic energy slope of the inverse strong coupling is measured to be $d\\alpha_{s}^{-1}/d log(E_{cm}) = 1.39 \\pm 0.34(stat) \\pm 0.17(syst)$, in good agreement with the QCD expectation of 1.27.

  14. First measurement of the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N cross section at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognata, M La; Spitaleri, C; Cherubini, S; Gulino, M; Lamia, L; Pizzone, R G; Puglia, S M R; Rapisarda, G G; Romano, S; Sergi, M L [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A; Tribble, R E; Al-Abdullah, T; Banu, A; Goldberg, V [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Coc, A [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Irgaziev, B [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, District Swabi, N. W. F. P. (Pakistan); Kiss, G G [ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Mrazek, J [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Crucilla, V, E-mail: LaCognata@lns.infn.i

    2010-01-01

    The {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction rate has been deduced by means of the Trojan horse method. For the first time the contribution of the 20 keV resonance has been directly evaluated, giving a value about 35% larger than the one in the literature. Moreover, the present approach has allowed to improve the accuracy by a factor 8.5, as it is based on the measured strength instead of spectroscopic measurements. The contribution of the 90 keV resonance has been also determined, which turned out to be of negligible importance to astrophysics.

  15. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  16. Measurements of energetic confined alphas and tritons on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a collaboration involving General Atomics, the A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the energy distribution of the fast-confined alpha particles in DT experiments on TFIR is being measured by active neutral particle analysis using the ablation cloud surrounding an injected impurity pellet as the neutralizer. Recent papers reported the first measurements of the energy distribution fast confined alpha particles and examined the influence of magnetic field ripple and sawtooth oscillations on the behavior of the alpha energy spectra and radial density distributions. This paper focuses on alpha and triton measurements in the core of quiescent TFTR discharges where the expected classical slowing down and pitch angle scattering effects are not complicated by stochastic ripple diffusion and sawtooth activity

  17. Measurements of $\\alpha_{s}$ with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Flagmeyer, U

    2000-01-01

    The data collected with DELPHI during the LEP1 period is used to perform a simultaneous fit to the strong coupling constant alpha /sub s/ in 2/sup nd/ order perturbation theory and to the renormalisation scale x/sub mu /. The results are compared to alpha /sub s/ fits in 2 /sup nd/ order perturbation theory with fixed scale x/sub mu / and to other theoretically motivated scale setting methods. To determine the energy dependence of alpha /sub s/, event shape distributions and their mean values are measured for square root (s)=48 GeV to 189 GeV. The strong coupling alpha /sub s/ is extracted in O( alpha /sub s //sup 2/). Next to leading log approximation (NLLA) and in a combined scheme using - evaluated with fragmentation model generators, and an analytical power ansatz. (16 refs).

  18. Consistent Measurements of $\\alpha_{s}$ from Precise Oriented Event Shape Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Niezurawski, P; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Rodrigo, Germán; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    2000-01-01

    An updated analysis using about 1.5 million events recorded at $\\sqrt{s} =M_Z$ with the DELPHI detector in 1994 is presented. Eighteen infrared and collinear safe event shape observables are measured as a function of the polar angle of the thrust axis. The data are compared to theoretical calculations in${\\cal O} (\\alpha_s^2)$ including the event orientation. A combined fit of $\\alpha_s$ and of the renormalization scale $x_{\\mu}$ in $\\cal O(\\alpha_s^2$)yields an excellent description of the high statistics data. The weighted average from 18 observables including quark mass effects and correlations is $\\alpha_s(M_Z^2) = 0.1174 \\pm 0.0026$. The final result, derived from the jet cone energy fraction, the observable with the smallest theoretical and experimental uncertainty, is $\\alpha_s(M_Z^2) = =0:1180 0:0006(exp:) 0:0013(hadr:) 0:0008(scale) 0:0007(mass). Further studies include an s determination using theoretical predictions in the next-to-leading log approximation (NLLA), matched NLLA and O(\\alpha^{2}_{s})...

  19. Measurement of potential alpha energy exposure (PAEE) of radon and its progenies in dwellings in the north-eastern region of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential alpha energy exposure (PAEE) due to radon and its progenies has been measured in dwellings at five different locations in the north-eastern region of India. The measurements were carried out using the passive time-integrated method by employing LR-115 (Type II) solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD). The data obtained in the present work has been compared with the indoor radon levels prescribed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) at which intervention may be considered. The geometric mean of potential alpha energy exposure (PAEE) due to indoor radon in dwellings of 24 towns in India is estimated as 8.8 ± 3.6 mWL and the corresponding annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) value has been found to be 2.7 ± 1.1 mSv y-1. A national average of indoor radon level was found to be 81 Bq m-3. The results are compared with the corresponding data of a few selected countries. (author)

  20. Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas

    CERN Document Server

    Bethke, S; Kluth, S; Schieck, J; Stewart, I W; Aoki, S; Beneke, M; Blumlein, J; Brambilla, N; Brodsky, S; Descotes-Genon, S; Erler, J; Forte, S; Gehrmann, T; Golterman, M; Hashimoto, S; Kronfeld, A; Kuhn, J; Lepage, P; Martin, A; Mateu, V; Menke, S; Nomura, Y; Pahl, C; Petriello, F; Pich, A; Rabbertz, K; Salam, G; Schulz, H; Sommer, R; Steinhauser, M; Webber, B; Yuan, CP; Zanderighi, G

    2011-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the "Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas" held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of alphas(mZ) in the MS-bar scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, tau-decays, electroweak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  1. Alpha activity measurements in Anarak copper mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha radiations in the ground arises from the decay of naturally occurring uranium and thorium, which are widely distributed in soils and rocks. According to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports, the highest of alpha activity is found in locations near copper mines. In this study, the amounts of natural activity of alpha emitters for 31 samples of surface soil of Talmesi Anarak mine, located in center of Iran, are measured by Nuclear Track method. Having virtually zero background and exposure time, are advantages of this method. After sampling, all of the 31 samples were transferred to laboratory to place CR-39 detectors vertically in them. In next step, CR-39 detectors were etched in NaOH 6 M, aqueous solution at 70 °C for 4 h. Then, number of tracks per area unit was counted by an optical microscope. The amounts of alpha activity were calculated in all samples and range of minimum 1.40E + 04 to maximum 3.03E + 05 Bq/kg .And also the activity of Th-232 and U-238 are measured by alpha-track method. Moreover “equivalent uranium” (eU) and “equivalent thorium” (eTh) by Hp-Ge detector, were calculated. - Highlights: ► We studied measuring the alpha activity in soils samples near copper mine by CR-39. ► According to experiments and mechanism of track formation, 2 formulas have introduced. ► We studied the accuracy of 2 formulas and present the optimal formula. ► Our results show these formulas are the same. ► Also we could calculate the concentration of U-238 and Th-232 by results of CR-39

  2. Measurement of alpha emitters in radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alpha emitters measurement in radioactive waste (10-2Ci/T) is essential for a good fissil materials management. This paper describes 3 classes of devices: device using a neutronic passive counting, device using a neutronic activation and detection of fission gamma, device using a neutronic activation and detection of prompt neutrons fission

  3. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Enterria, David [CERN; Skands, Peter Z. [Monash U.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  4. Measurement of U-235 absolute alpha value in the neutron energy range from 0.1 to 30 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to measure the neutron-physical constants with high accuracy and to investigate ways of formation and decay of excited nuclei a method has been developed at the I.V. Kurchatov AEI, based on the gamma-quanta and neutrons multiplicity spectrometry. During 1974-1978 there have been constructed a number of multisectional 4π-detectors which have demonstrated great possibilities for this method. A detector permitting the required accuracy of measurements of neutron cross sections and their ratios has been chosen and designed on the basis of these works. The detector with 4π-geometry has 46 sections and was based on naI(Tl) crystals with the total volume of the scintillator of approx. 100 1. The detector was used at the 26-m station. The results of U-235 absolute alpha value measurements are presented. The measurements are carried out over the energy range from 0.1 to 30 keV with the high accuracy - better than 5%. The equipment parameters and measurement conditions are listed

  5. Low energy alpha particle spectroscopy using CR-39 detector

    CERN Document Server

    Izerrouken, M; Ilic, R

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of using CR-39 to measure the depth profile of sup 1 sup 0 B in Si is analysed. The measuring technique exploits the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) sup 7 Li nuclear reaction. For this reason the track parameters (size, optical properties) of low energy alpha-particles (<1.47 MeV) were studied. The results showed that an energy resolution of about 100 keV could be obtained by an appropriate selection of etching conditions. The profile of sup 1 sup 0 B in Si at a depth as small as 1 mu m can be measured.

  6. The Use Of Optical Properties Of Cr-39 In Alpha Particle Equivalent Dose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, optical properties of alpha irradiated Cr-39 were measured as a function of optical photon wavelength from 200-1100 nm. Optical energy gap and optical absorption at finite wavelength was also calculated and correlated to alpha fluence and dose equivalent. Alpha doses were calculated from the corresponding irradiation fluence and specific energy loss using TRIM computer program. It was found that, the optical absorption of unattached Cr-39 was varied with alpha fluence and corresponding equivalent doses. Also the optical energy gab was varied with fluence and dose equivalent of alpha particles. This work introduces a reasonably simple method for the Rn dose equivalent calculation by Cr-39 track

  7. Source preparations for alpha and beta measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    Regarding alpha particle emitters subject for environmental studies, electrodeposition or co-precipitation as fluorides are the most common methods. For electro deposition stainless steel is generally used as cathode material but also other metals such as Ni, Ag, and Cu showed promising results. The use of other anode material than platinum, such as graphite should be investigated. For other purposes such as optimal resolution other more sophisticated methods are used but often resulting in poorer recovery. For beta particle emitters the type of detection system will decide the source preparation. Similar methods as for alpha particle emitters, electrodeposition or precipitation techniques can be used. Due to the continuous energy distribution of the beta pulse height distribution a high resolution is not required. Thicker sources from the precipitates or a stable isotopic carrier can be accepted but correction for absorption in the source must be done. (au)

  8. Source preparations for alpha and beta measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regarding alpha particle emitters subject for environmental studies, electrodeposition or co-precipitation as fluorides are the most common methods. For electro deposition stainless steel is generally used as cathode material but also other metals such as Ni, Ag, and Cu showed promising results. The use of other anode material than platinum, such as graphite should be investigated. For other purposes such as optimal resolution other more sophisticated methods are used but often resulting in poorer recovery. For beta particle emitters the type of detection system will decide the source preparation. Similar methods as for alpha particle emitters, electrodeposition or precipitation techniques can be used. Due to the continuous energy distribution of the beta pulse height distribution a high resolution is not required. Thicker sources from the precipitates or a stable isotopic carrier can be accepted but correction for absorption in the source must be done. (au)

  9. Workshop on High-precision $\\alpha_s$ measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experiment...

  10. Folding model study of the elastic $\\alpha + \\alpha$ scattering at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Ngo Hai; Khoa, Dao T

    2014-01-01

    The folding model analysis of the elastic $\\alpha + \\alpha$ scattering at the incident energies below the reaction threshold of 34.7 MeV (in the lab system) has been done using the well-tested density dependent versions of the M3Y interaction and realistic choices for the $^4$He density. Because the absorption is negligible at the energies below the reaction threshold, we were able to probe the $\\alpha + \\alpha$ optical potential at low energies quite unambiguously and found that the $\\alpha + \\alpha$ overlap density used to construct the density dependence of the M3Y interaction is strongly distorted by the Pauli blocking. This result gives possible explanation of a long-standing inconsistency of the double-folding model in its study of the elastic $\\alpha + \\alpha$ and $\\alpha$-nucleus scattering at low energies using the same realistic density dependent M3Y interaction.

  11. Alpha particles energy straggling in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparison of the calculated spectra by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the experimental alpha-particles spectra after their passage through noble gases target has good agreement for Ar, Kr, and Xe and significant deviation for He and Ne. These agreement or disagreement of the calculated and experimental spectra were ascribed to adequacy or inadequacy of the applied Bohr's charged particles energy loss formula for the specific medium. (author)

  12. Dark Energy from $\\alpha$-Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Linder, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    A class of inflation theories called $\\alpha$-attractors has been investigated recently with interesting properties interpolating between quadratic potentials, the Starobinsky model, and an attractor limit. Here we examine their use for late time cosmic acceleration. We generalize the class and demonstrate how it can interpolate between thawing and freezing dark energy, and reduce the fine tuning of initial conditions, allowing $w\\approx-1$ for a prolonged period or as a de Sitter attractor.

  13. A low-energy determination of $\\alpha_s$ at three loops

    CERN Document Server

    Vairo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We review one of the most accurate low-energy determinations of $\\alpha_s$. Comparing at short distances the QCD static energy at three loops and resummation of the next-to-next-to leading logarithms with its determination in 2+1-flavor lattice QCD, we obtain $\\alpha_s(1.5~{\\rm GeV})=0.336^{+0.012}_{-0.008}$, which corresponds to $\\alpha_s(M_Z)=0.1166^{+0.0012}_{-0.0008}$. We discuss future perspectives.

  14. Alpha scintillation cell for direct measurement of indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large volume (1500 cm3) alpha scintillation cell to measure indoor radon is described. Air is sampled directly into the cell and gross alpha activity is measured after three hours. The cells are suitable for concentrations higher than 10-20 Bq/m3. They were successfully used for randon measurements in kindergartens in Nova Gorica. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Measurement of total alpha activity in water; Messung der Gesamt-Alpha-Aktivitaet in Wasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikenberg, Jost [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Abt. fuer Strahlenschutz und Sicherheit; Florschuetz, Bernd [Hessisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt und Geologie, Kassel (Germany). Dezernat 15 - Strahlenschutz; Salvamoser, Josef [Institut fuer Angewandte Isotopen-, Gas- und Umweltuntersuchungen, Woerthsee (Germany); Steinkopff, Thomas [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Wilhelm, Christoph [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Sicherheitsmanagement - Analytische Labore; Wisser, Sascha [FCI, Mainz (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    The article describes the measurement of the total alpha activity in an (evaporated) liquid sample, and the various sample preparation methods for measurements with proportional counters or LSC. (orig.)

  16. Optimization of operating parameters for low level measurements of alpha emitters by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The members of public are exposed to both natural and anthropogenic sources of radiation. Naturally occurring radioactive materials comprises of uranium, thorium and their decay products with other radionuclides such as 40K, 3H, 22Na, 7Be, etc. Anthropogenic radionuclides comprises of 137Cs, 90Sr, 239Pu, 241Am, etc. They emit alpha, beta and gamma radiations. Measurement at low level radioactivity is challenging due to interference and other inherent uncertainties. Alpha emitters comprises of 238U and 232Th with their daughters along with those of anthropogenic origin like 239Pu, 241Am, etc. Measurement of alpha emitters is essential by considering the adverse effects of alpha radiation while inside the body. Alpha spectrometry is a sensitive and direct technique to identify and quantify the alpha emitters having detection limit, two to three order of magnitude lower than gamma spectrometry. Standardization of operating parameters is imperative prior to analysis. An attempt has been made to optimize the parameters for an Eight Chamber Alpha Spectrometer (ORTEC) with 450 mm2PIPS detector surface area, with an operating voltage of 50 volt and current of 20-30 nano amperes. Energy calibration of each chamber was done with Pu-Am mixed source and natural uranium standard source. Efficiency of each detector measured with various sources to detector distance for the standard sources was nearly same at equivalent distances, e.g. it is coming around 16% at 8 mm source to detector distance (Rack 2) of each chamber. At 4 mm source to detector distance (Rack-1) it is 25% and gradually it decreases upto 2% at 40 mm source to detector distance (Rack-10). Resolution of 241Am peak was found to 20-25 keV at 8 mm source to detector distance and varies with distance from the detector. It was found that 50% decrease in resolution i.e. FWHM value with the increase in source to detector distance. In the energy range of 4-10 MeV, 8 counts is obtained as background count per 86,000 secs

  17. Lattice measurement of \\alpha_s with a realistic charm quark

    CERN Document Server

    Blossier, B; Brinet, M; De Soto, F; Du, X; Morenas, V; Pene, O; Petrov, K; Rodriguez-Quintero, J

    2012-01-01

    We report on an estimate of \\alpha_s, renormalised in the MSbar scheme at the tau and Z^0 mass scales, by means of lattice QCD. Our major improvement compared to previous lattice calculations is that, for the first time, no perturbative treatment at the charm threshold has been required since we have used statistical samples of gluon fields built by incorporating the vacuum polarisation effects of u/d, s and c sea quarks. Extracting \\alpha_s in the Taylor scheme from the lattice measurement of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex, we obtain \\alpha_s^{MSbar}(m^2_Z)=0.1200(14) and \\alpha_s^{MSbar}(m^2_tau)=0.339(13).

  18. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs

  19. Measurement of radon daughters in air samples by alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of polonium 214 and polonium 218. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter (Author)

  20. Alpha scattering and capture reactions in the A = 7 system at low energies

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, P; Abele, H.; ZWIEBEL, R.; Staudt, G.; Krauss, H; Oberhummer, H.; Denker, A; Hammer, J. W.; Wolf, G.

    1993-01-01

    Differential cross sections for $^3$He-$\\alpha$ scattering were measured in the energy range up to 3 MeV. These data together with other available experimental results for $^3$He $+ \\alpha$ and $^3$H $+ \\alpha$ scattering were analyzed in the framework of the optical model using double-folded potentials. The optical potentials obtained were used to calculate the astrophysical S-factors of the capture reactions $^3$He$(\\alpha,\\gamma)^7$Be and $^3$H$(\\alpha,\\gamma)^7$Li, and the branching ratio...

  1. A portable alpha measurement system based on PDA and MCU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It introduces a portable alpha measurement system based on the PDA and MCU. The system employs a system-on-a-chip (SOC) single chip as the Micro-Control Unit (MCU). A pulse obtained from PIPS is preamplifier using sensitive charge and transmitted to signal regulate circuit. Then energy spectrum data can be received by a spectrum software in PDA using Bluetooth communication. This software integrate functions such as real-time α activity display, α spectrum display, automatic peak search, peak area calculation, energy calibration, peak identification and nuclide recognition This instrument has the characteristics like lightweight, low power consumption, good stability, high energy resolution, data displayed and processing without a computer. It can be used to quickly analysis a contamination on the spot. (authors)

  2. Measurement of differential (n,x{alpha}) cross section using 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Kiyosumi, Takehide; Nauchi, Yasushi; Saito, Keiichiro; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawano, Toshihiko

    1997-03-01

    We carried out the measurements of high resolution {alpha} emission spectra of {sup 58}Ni and {sup nat}Ni between 4.5 and 6.5 MeV, and {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) cross section using a 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber. In Ni measurement, overall energy resolution was improved to around 200 keV by optimizing a sample thickness and a neutron source width. Measured alpha spectra showed separate peaks corresponding to the ground and low-lying excited states of the residual nucleus ({sup 55}Fe). These results were compared with another direct measurement and statistical model calculations. In {sup 12}C measurement, GIC was applied for (n,x{alpha}) reactions of light nuclei. This application is difficult to (n,x{alpha}) cross sections of light nuclei, because of the influences of large recoil energy and multi-body break-up. We developed new methods which eliminate the effects of recoil nuclei and multi-body break-up and applied them to {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) reaction at En=14.1 MeV. In our experiment, the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 9}Be angular differential cross section and {sup 12}C(n,n`3{alpha}) cross section were obtained. (author)

  3. Measurement of transverse energy-energy correlations in multi-jet events in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV using the ATLAS detector and determination of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{s}}(m_Z)$

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; L{ö}sel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; 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Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    High transverse momentum jets produced in pp collisions at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV are used to measure the transverse energy--energy correlation function and its associated azimuthal asymmetry. The data were recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in the year 2011 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 158 $\\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$. The selection criteria demand the average transverse momentum of the two leading jets in an event to be larger than 250 GeV. The data at detector level are well described by Monte Carlo event generators. They are unfolded to the particle level and compared with theoretical calculations at next-to-leading-order accuracy. The agreement between data and theory is good and provides a precision test of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics at large momentum transfers. From this comparison, the strong coupling constant given at the $Z$ boson mass is determined to be $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{s}}(m_Z) = 0.1173 \\pm 0.0010 \\mbox{ (exp.) }^{+0.0065}_{-0.0026} \\mbox{ (theo.)}$.

  4. (n,{alpha}) cross section measurement of gaseous sample using gridded ionization chamber. Cross section determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Saito, Keiichiro; Ibara, Yasutaka; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    We are developing a method of (n,{alpha}) cross section measurement using gaseous samples in a gridded ionization chamber (GIC). This method enables cross section measurements in large solid angle without the distortion by the energy loss in a sample, but requires a method to estimate the detection efficiency. We solve this problem by using GIC signals and a tight neutron collimation. The validity of this method was confirmed through the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 9}Be measurement. We applied this method to the {sup 16}O(n,{alpha}){sup 13}C cross section around 14.1 MeV. (author)

  5. The 7Be(n,alpha)4He reaction and the Cosmological Lithium Problem: measurement of the cross section in a wide energy range at n_TOF (CERN)

    CERN Document Server

    Barbagallo, M; Cosentino, L; Maugeri, E; Heinitz, S; Mengoni, A; Dressler, R; Schumann, D; Kaeppeler, F; Colonna, N; Finocchiaro, P; Ayranov, M; Damone, L; Kivel, N

    2016-01-01

    The energy-dependent cross section of the 7Be(n,alpha)4He reaction, of interest for the so-called Cosmological Lithium Problem in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, has been measured for the first time from 10 meV to 10 keV neutron energy. The challenges posed by the short half-life of 7Be and by the low reaction cross section have been overcome at n_TOF thanks to an unprecedented combination of the extremely high luminosity and good resolution of the neutron beam in the new experimental area (EAR2) of the n_TOF facility at CERN, the availability of a sufficient amount of chemically pure 7Be, and a specifically designed experimental setup. Coincidences between the two alpha-particles have been recorded in two Si-7Be-Si arrays placed directly in the neutron beam. The present results are consistent, at thermal neutron energy, with the only previous measurement performed in the 60's at a nuclear reactor. The energy dependence here reported clearly indicates the inadequacy of the cross section estimates currently used in ...

  6. Feasibility of alpha particle measurement by CO2 laser Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of CO2 laser Thomson scattering from a multi-component burning plasma has been evaluated for the measurement of the velocity distribution of D-T produced alpha particles. The density and velocity distribution of the alpha particles from their initial energy of 3.5 MeV down to near-thermal energies may be measured by small angle (0) Thomson scattering. A computer simulation of the experiment indicates that a 100 MW pulsed laser combined with a bank of heterodyne receivers will be able to measure a scattered signal from the alpha particles with a post-detection signal-to-noise ratio of 75 for an assumed alpha density of 7.5 x 1011 cm-3

  7. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of 218Po, 214Pb and 214Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated

  8. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of 238,239Pu and 241Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to determine the isotopic constituents of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by a coincident alpha-conversion electron measurement. This presents a unique signature to allow the unfolding of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy and reduce backgrounds of an unseparated sample. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm2 silicon drift detector and alpha spectroscopy with a passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20-55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information and calibration to aid in the coincident measurement approach. Furthermore, an alpha-conversion electron spectrometer was assembled using the silicon based detectors described and results of a coincident spectrum analysis is reported for 241Am.

  9. First direct measurement of resonance strengths in 17O({\\alpha}, {\\gamma})21Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Best, A; Couder, M; deBoer, R; Falahat, S; Kontos, A; LeBlanc, P J; Li, Q; O'Brien, S; Sonnabend, K; Talwar, R; Uberseder, E; Wiescher, M

    2011-01-01

    The reaction 17O({\\alpha},{\\gamma})21Ne has been measured by in-beam gamma spectroscopy for the first time in the energy range E{\\alpha} = 750 keV to 1650 keV using highly enriched anodized Ta2(17O)5 targets. Resonances were found at E({\\alpha}) = 1002 keV, 1386 keV and 1619 keV. Their strengths and primary gamma-ray branchings are given. The new results exclude the low reaction rate of Descouvemont and support the rate of Caughlan and Fowler. Implications for the neutron poisoning efficiency of 16O in the weak s process are discussed.

  10. Cross Section Measurement of 9Be(\\gamma,n)8Be and Implications for \\alpha+\\alpha+n -> 9Be in the r-Process

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, C W; Iliadis, C; Karwowski, H J; Rich, G C; Tompkins, J R; Howell, C R

    2011-01-01

    Models of the r-process are sensitive to the production rate of 9Be because, in explosive environments rich in neutrons, \\alpha(\\alpha n,\\gamma)9Be is the primary mechanism for bridging the stability gaps at A=5 and A=8. The \\alpha(\\alpha n,\\gamma)9Be reaction represents a two-step process, consisting of \\alpha+\\alpha -> 8Be followed by 8Be(n,\\gamma)9Be. We report here on a new absolute cross section measurement for the 9Be(\\gamma,n)8Be reaction conducted using a highly-efficient, 3He-based neutron detector and nearly-monoenergetic photon beams, covering energies from E_\\gamma = 1.5 MeV to 5.2 MeV, produced by the High Intensity \\gamma-ray Source of Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. In the astrophysically important threshold energy region, the present cross sections are 40% larger than those found in most previous measurements and are accurate to +/- 10% (95% confidence). The revised thermonuclear \\alpha(\\alpha n,\\gamma)9Be reaction rate could have implications for the r-process in explosive environme...

  11. Correlations of $\\alpha$-particles in splitting of $^{12}$C nuclei by neutrons of energy of 14.1 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Kattabekov, R R; Artemenkov, D A; Bradnova, V; Zarubin, P I; Zarubina, I G; Majling, L; Rusakova, V V; Sadovsky, A B

    2014-01-01

    Correlations of $\\alpha$-particles are studied on statistics of 400 events of splitting $^{12}$C $\\rightarrow$ 3$\\alpha$ in nuclear track emulsion exposed to $14.1 MeV$ neutrons. The ranges and emission angles of the $\\alpha$-particles are measured. Distributions over energy of $\\alpha$-particle pairs and triples are obtained.

  12. A measurement of energy correlations and a determination of. alpha. sub s (M sub(Z sup 0 ) sup 2 ) in e sup + e sup - annihilations at radical s=91 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akrawy, M.Z.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Allport, P.P.; Anderson, K.J.; Armitage, J.C.; Arnison, G.T.J.; Ashton, P.; Azuelos, G.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Banks, J.; Barker, G.J.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, J.R.; Beck, A.; Becker, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bella, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Binder, U.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Breuker, H.; Brown, R.M.; Brun, R.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Collins, W.J.; Conboy, J.E.; Couch, M.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; Debu, P.; Deninno, M.M.; Dieckmann, A.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M.S.; Duchovni, E.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Dumas, D.J.P.; El Mamouni, H.; Elcombe, P.A.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Farthouat, P.; Fischer, H.M.; Fong, D.G.; French, M.T.; Fukunaga, C.; Gaidot, A.; Ganel, O.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Geddes, N.I.; Gee, C.N.P.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S.W.; Gentit, F.X.; Gi; OPAL Collaboration

    1990-12-06

    From an analysis of multi-hadron events from Z{sup 0} decays, values of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(M{sup 2}{sub Z0}) = 0.131{plus minus}0.006(exp){plus minus}0.007(theor.) and {alpha}{sub s}(M{sup 2}{sub Z0}) = 0.117{sub -0.009}{sup +0.007}(exp.){sub -0.002}{sup +0.006}(theor.) are derived from the energy-energy correlation distribution and its asymmetry, respectively, assuming the QCD renormalization scale {mu} = M{sub Z0}. The theoretical error accounts for differences between O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) calculations. A two parameter fit of {Lambda}{sub MS} and the renormalization scale {mu} leads to {Lambda}{sub MS}=216{plus minus}85 MeV and {mu}{sup 2}/s=0.027{plus minus}0.013 or to {alpha}{sub s}(M{sup 2}{sub Z0}) = 0.117{sub -0.008}{sup +0.006}(exp.) for the energy-energy correlation distribution. The energy-energy correlation asymmetry distribution is insensitive to a scale change: thus the {alpha}{sub s} value quoted above for this variable includes the theoretical uncertainty associated with the renormalization scale. (orig.).

  13. Radon measurement of natural gas using alpha scintillation cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their sensitivity and ease of use, alpha-scintillation cells are being increasingly utilized for measurements of radon (222Rn) in natural gas. Laboratory studies showed an average increase of 7.3% in the measurement efficiency of alpha-scintillation cells when filled with less-dense natural gas rather than regular air. A theoretical calculation comparing the atomic weight and density of air to that of natural gas suggests a 6–7% increase in the detection efficiency when measuring radon in the cells. A correction is also applicable when the sampling location and measurement laboratory are at different elevations. These corrections to the measurement efficiency need to be considered in order to derive accurate concentrations of radon in natural gas

  14. A method for field measurements using alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha-ray spectrometry in combination with sample preparation methods are commonly performed within a laboratory. These procedures are both technically demanding and time consuming. The current work describes what information alpha spectrometry will give if it is performed in the field with a limited amount of equipment. The aim was to find a mobile method usable in the field or mounted inside a vehicle. Experiments were made on four electrodeposited samples with different nuclide mixes, measured during normal and reduced air pressure conditions. A prototype of an instrument made for mobile use is also briefly described. (author)

  15. Measurement of the branching ratio for beta-delayed alpha decay of 16N

    CERN Document Server

    Refsgaard, J; Dijck, E A; Fynbo, H O U; Lund, M V; Portela, M N; Raabe, R; Randisi, G; Renzi, F; Sambi, S; Sytema, A; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2015-01-01

    While the 12C(a,g)16O reaction plays a central role in nuclear astrophysics, the cross section at energies relevant to hydrostatic helium burning is too small to be directly measured in the laboratory. The beta-delayed alpha spectrum of 16N can be used to constrain the extrapolation of the E1 component of the S-factor; however, with this approach the resulting S-factor becomes strongly correlated with the assumed beta-alpha branching ratio. We have remeasured the beta-alpha branching ratio by implanting 16N ions in a segmented Si detector and counting the number of beta-alpha decays relative to the number of implantations. Our result, 1.49(5)e-5, represents a 25% increase compared to the accepted value and implies an increase of 14% in the extrapolated S-factor.

  16. Measurement of dijet production in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at high Q**2 and determination of alpha_s

    CERN Document Server

    Breitweg, J; Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Ahn, S H; Amelung, C; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Badgett, W F; Bailey, D C; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, Andreas; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M S; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Barret, O; Bashkirov, V; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Bednarek, B; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bienlein, J K; Bodmann, B; Bokel, C; Boogert, S; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Botje, M; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brümmer, N; Bussey, Peter J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Cartiglia, N; Chapin, D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cirio, R; Cloth, P; Coboken, K; Coldewey, C; Cole, J E; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Crittenden, James Arthur; Cross, R; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dagan, S; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J; Dementiev, R K; Deppe, O; Derrick, Malcolm; Desler, K; Devenish, R C E; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Eisenhardt, S; Engelen, J; Epperson, D E; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Fagerstroem, C P; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Gadaj, T; Galea, R; Gallo, E; García, G; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gendner, N; Gialas, I; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Graciani, R; Grijpink, S; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grzelak, G; Gwenlan, C; Göttlicher, P; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hamatsu, R; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G F; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hebbel, K; Heinloth, K; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iannotti, L; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Ishii, T; Jakob, H P; Jelen, K; Jeoung, H Y; Jones, T W; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Kerger, R; Khein, L A; Kim, C L; Kim, J Y; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K H; Koch, W; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P M; Koop, T; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, Andrzej; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kreisel, A; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Kötz, U; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lane, J B; Lee, J H; Lee, S B; Lee, S W; Levi, G; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, W; Liu, X; Lohrmann, E; Long, K R; Longhin, A; López-Duran-Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Löhr, B; Ma, K J; MacDonald, N; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Markun, P; Martens, J; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Maselli, S; Massam, Thomas; Mastroberardino, A; Matsushita, T; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; Mattingly, S E K; McCance, G J; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Meyer, A; Milite, M; Miller, D B; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Park, S K; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Peroni, C; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Raach, H; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, I; Reeder, D D; Repond, J; Robins, S A; Rodrigues, E; Rohde, M; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Ruske, O; Ruspa, M; Sabetfakhri, A; Sacchi, R; Sadrozinski, H F W; Salehi, H; Sampson, S; Sartorelli, G; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Seiden, A; Selonke, F; Shah, T P; Shcheglova, L M; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smalska, B; Smith, W H; Solano, A; Solomin, A N; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Staiano, A; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Stanek, R; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Szuba, D; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Toothacker, W S; Tsurugai, T; Tuning, N; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Umemori, K; Vaiciulis, A W; Van Sighem, A; Vázquez, M E; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Walczak, R; Walker, R; Waugh, R; Weber, A; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wieber, H; Wiggers, L; Wildschek, T; Williams, D C; Wing, M; Wodarczyk, M; Wolf, G; Wollmer, U; Wróblewski, A K; Wölfle, S; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yildirim, A; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zakrzewski, J A; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A

    2001-01-01

    Dijet production has been studied in neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering for 470 < Q**2 < 20000 GeV**2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 38.4 pb**{-1}. Dijet differential cross sections are presented in a kinematic region where both theoretical and experimental uncertainties are small. Next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD calculations describe the measured differential cross sections well. A QCD analysis of the measured dijet fraction as a function of Q**2 allows both a precise determination of alpha_s(M_Z) and a test of the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling constant. A detailed analysis provides a realistic estimate of the uncertainties of the NLO QCD cross sections arising from the parton distribution functions of the proton. The value of alpha_s(M_Z), as determined from the QCD fit, is alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1166 +- 0.0019 (stat.) {+ 0.0024}_{- 0.0033} (exp.)} {+ 0.0057}_{- 0.0044} (th.).

  17. Transverse Energy-Energy Correlations in Next-to-Leading Order in $\\alpha_s$ at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed; Llorente, Javier; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    We compute the transverse energy-energy correlation (EEC) and its asymmetry (AEEC) in next-to-leading order (NLO) in $\\alpha_s$ in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with the center-of-mass energy $E_{\\rm c.m.}=7$ TeV. We show that the transverse EEC and the AEEC distributions are insensitive to the QCD factorization- and the renormalization-scales, structure functions of the proton, and for a judicious choice of the jet-size, also the underlying minimum bias events. Hence they can be used to precisely test QCD in hadron colliders and determine the strong coupling $\\alpha_s$. We illustrate these features by defining the hadron jets using the anti-$k_T$ jet algorithm and an event selection procedure employed in the analysis of jets at the LHC and show the $\\alpha_s(M_Z)$-dependence of the transverse EEC and the AEEC in the anticipated range $0.11 \\leq \\alpha_s(M_Z) \\leq 0.13$.

  18. Measurement of (222)Rn by absorption in plastic scintillators and alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitev, Krasimir K

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates that common plastic scintillators like BC-400, EJ-200 and SCSF-81 absorb radon and their scintillation pulse decay times are different for alpha- and beta-particles. This allows the application of pulse shape analysis for separation of the pulses of alpha- and beta-particles emitted by the absorbed radon and its progeny. It is shown that after pulse shape discrimination of beta-particles' pulses, the energy resolution of BC-400 and EJ-200 alpha spectra is sufficient to separate the peaks of (222)Rn, (218)Po and (214)Po and allows (222)Rn measurements that are unaffected by the presence of thoron ((220)Rn) in the environment. The alpha energy resolution of SCSF-81 in the experiments degrades due to imperfect collection of the light emitted inside the scintillating fibers. The experiments with plastic scintillation microspheres (PSM) confirm previous findings of other researchers that PSM have alpha-/beta-discrimination properties and show suitability for radon measurements. The diffusion length of radon in BC-400 and EJ-200 is determined. The pilot experiments show that the plastic scintillators are suitable for radon-in-soil-gas measurements. Overall, the results of this work suggest that it is possible to develop a new type of radon measurement instruments which employ absorption in plastic scintillators, pulse-shape discrimination and analysis of the alpha spectra. Such instruments can be very compact and can perform continuous, real-time radon measurements and thoron detection. They can find applications in various fields from radiation protection to earth sciences. PMID:26851823

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (approximately40 Tm), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, Tecogen, a division of Thermo Power Corporation, a Thermo Electron company, is developing a real-time, field-deployable, alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (patent pending, to be assigned to the Department of Energy). The Thermo Alpha Monitor (TAM) will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste Focus Area and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This instrument for direct counting of alpha-emitters in aqueous streams is presently being developed by Thermo Power under a development program funded by the DOE Environmental Management program (DOE-EM), administered by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Under this contract, Thermo Power has demonstrated a solid-state, silicon-based semiconductor instrument, which uses a proprietary film-based collection system to quantitatively extract the

  20. Measurements of confined alphas and tritons in the MHD quiescent core of TFTR plasmas using the pellet charge exchange diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy distributions and radial density profiles of the fast confined trapped alpha particles in DT experiments on TFTR are being measured in the energy range 0.5--3.5 MeV using a Pellet Charge eXchange (PCX) diagnostic. A brief description of the measurement technique which involves active neutral particle analysis using the ablation cloud surrounding an injected impurity pellet as the neutralizer is presented. This paper focuses on alpha and triton measurements in the core of MHD quiescent TFTR discharges where the expected classical slowing down and pitch angle scattering effects are not complicated by stochastic ripple diffusion and sawtooth activity. In particular, the first measurement of the alpha slowing down distribution up to the birth energy, obtained using boron pellet injection, is presented. The measurements are compared with predictions using either the TRANSP Monte-Carlo code and/or a Fokker-Planck Post-TRANSP processor code, which assumes that the alphas and tritons are well confined and slow down classically. Both the shape of the measured alpha and triton energy distributions and their density ratios are in good agreement with the code calculations. The authors conclude that the PCX measurements are consistent with classical thermalization of the fusion-generated alphas and tritons

  1. Angular correlation measurements for 4-{alpha} decaying states in {sup 16}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Previous measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 8}Be){sup 16}O{sup *}(4 {alpha}) reaction identified discrete levels in {sup 16}O which decay by breakup into 4 {alpha} particles through a number of different decay sequences, including {sup 16}O{sup *} {yields} {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C (O{sub 2}{sup +}). These states are observed in a range of excitation energies where resonances are observed in inelastic {alpha} + {sup 12}C scattering leading to the {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C final states. These resonances were associated with 4 {alpha}-particle chain configurations in {sup 16}O. Should the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction possess this same extended structure, it would serve as an important piece of evidence supporting the idea that even more deformed structures are formed in the {sup 24}Mg compound system. In order to more firmly make this association, it is important to determine the spins of the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction.

  2. Design and performance of an ionisation chamber for the measurement of low alpha-activities

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Andreas; Krüger, Felix; Sobiella, Manfred; Wilsenach, Heinrich; Zuber, Kai

    2015-01-01

    A new ionisation chamber for alpha-spectroscopy has been built from radio-pure materials for the purpose of investigating long lived alpha-decays. The measurement makes use of pulse shape analysis to discriminate between signal and background events. The design and performance of the chamber is described in this paper. A background rate of ($10.9 \\pm 0.6$) counts per day in the energy region of 1 MeV to 9 MeV was achieved with a run period of 30.8 days. The background is dominantly produced by radon daughters.

  3. Design and performance of an ionisation chamber for the measurement of low alpha-activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, A.; Hutsch, J.; Krüger, F.; Sobiella, M.; Wilsenach, H.; Zuber, K.

    2016-04-01

    A new ionisation chamber for alpha-spectroscopy has been built from radio-pure materials for the purpose of investigating long lived alpha-decays. The measurement makes use of pulse shape analysis to discriminate between signal and background events. The design and performance of the chamber is described in this paper. A background rate of (10.9 ± 0.6) counts per day in the energy region of 1-9 MeV was achieved with a run period of 30.8 days. The background is dominantly produced by radon daughters.

  4. Micromegas detector for $^{33}$S(n,$\\alpha$) cross section measurement at n_TOF

    CERN Multimedia

    The present proposal is a consequence of the successful tests performed in 2011 related to the Letter of Intent CERN-INTC-2010-023/I-092. The main goal of this proposal is a first (n,$\\alpha$) cross section measurement with the Micromegas detector presently running at n_TOF for monitoring purposes and fission cross section measurements. The $^{33}$S(n,$\\alpha$) cross section is of interest in astrophysics mainly due to the origin of $^{36}$S which is still an open question. $^{33}$S is also of interest in medical physics since it has been proposed as a possible/alternative cooperating target to boron neutron capture therapy. Important discrepancies between previous measurements of $^{33}$S(n,$\\alpha$) cross section and especially between the resonance parameters are found in the literature. We propose to measure the (n,$\\alpha$) cross section of the stable isotope $^{33}$S in the energy range up to 300 keV covering the astrophysical range of interest. The possibility of increasing this energy range will be st...

  5. Alpha Decay in the Complex Energy Shell Model

    CERN Document Server

    Betan, R Id

    2012-01-01

    Alpha emission from a nucleus is a fundamental decay process in which the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels out through the potential barrier. We describe alpha decay of $^{212}$Po and $^{104}$Te by means of the configuration interaction approach. To compute the preformation factor and penetrability, we use the complex-energy shell model with a separable T=1 interaction. The single-particle space is expanded in a Woods-Saxon basis that consists of bound and unbound resonant states. Special attention is paid to the treatment of the norm kernel appearing in the definition of the formation amplitude that guarantees the normalization of the channel function. Without explicitly considering the alpha-cluster component in the wave function of the parent nucleus, we reproduce the experimental alpha-decay width of $^{212}$Po and predict an upper limit of T_{1/2}=5.5x10^{-7} sec for the half-life of $^{104}$Te. The complex-energy shell model in a large valence configuration space is capable of providing ...

  6. Alpha emitters activity measurement using the defined solid angle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The defined solid angle counting method can reach a very high accuracy, specially for heavy ions as alpha particles emitted by a radioactive source. The activity measurement of such sources with a relative uncertainty of the order of 0.01% is investigated. Such an accuracy is available only under suitable conditions: the radiation emitted by the source must be isotropic and all the particles emitted in the effective solid angle must be detected. The efficiency detection value must be equal to unity and phenomena such as absorption or scattering must be null. It is shown that corrections often become necessary. All parameters which can influence the measurements are studied

  7. Measurement of (alpha,n) reaction cross sections of erbium isotopes for testing astrophysical rate predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, G G; Rauscher, T; Török, Zs; Csedreki, L; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z

    2015-01-01

    The $\\gamma$-process in core-collapse and/or type Ia supernova explosions is thought to explain the origin of the majority of the so-called $p$ nuclei (the 35 proton-rich isotopes between Se and Hg). Reaction rates for $\\gamma$-process reaction network studies have to be predicted using Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations. Recent investigations have shown problems in the prediction of $\\alpha$-widths at astrophysical energies which are an essential input for the statistical model. It has an impact on the reliability of abundance predictions in the upper mass range of the $p$ nuclei. With the measurement of the $^{164,166}$Er($\\alpha$,n)$^{167,169}$Yb reaction cross sections at energies close to the astrophysically relevant energy range we tested the recently suggested low energy modification of the $\\alpha$+nucleus optical potential in a mass region where $\\gamma$-process calculations exhibit an underproduction of the $p$ nuclei. Using the same optical potential for the $\\alpha$-width which was der...

  8. A Further Measurement of the beta-Delayed alpha-Particle Emission of 16N

    CERN Document Server

    III, R H F; McDonald, J E; Wilds, E L

    2007-01-01

    We measured the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission spectrum of 16N with a sensitivity for beta-decay branching ratios of the order of 10-10. The 16N nuclei were produced using the d(15N,16N)p reaction with 70 MeV 15N beams and a deuterium gas target 7.5 cm long at a pressure of 1250 torr. The 16N nuclei were collected (over 10 s) using a thin aluminum foil with an areal density of 180 mu g/cm2 tilted at 7 Deg with respect to the beam. The activity was transferred to the counting area by means of a stepping motor in less than 3 s with the counting carried out over 8 s. The beta-delayed alpha-particles were measured using a time of flight method to achieve a sufficiently low background. Standard calibration sources (148Gd, 241Am, 208,209Po, and 227Ac) as well as alpha-particles and 7Li from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction were used for an accurate energy calibration. The energy resolution of the catcher foil (180-220 keV) was calculated and the time of flight resolution (3-10 nsec) was measured using the beta-de...

  9. Alpha scattering and capture reactions in the A = 7 system at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, P J; Zwiebel, R; Staudt, G; Krauss, H; Oberhummer, Heinz; Denker, A; Hammer, J W; Wolf, G

    1993-01-01

    Differential cross sections for $^3$He-$\\alpha$ scattering were measured in the energy range up to 3 MeV. These data together with other available experimental results for $^3$He $+ \\alpha$ and $^3$H $+ \\alpha$ scattering were analyzed in the framework of the optical model using double-folded potentials. The optical potentials obtained were used to calculate the astrophysical S-factors of the capture reactions $^3$He$(\\alpha,\\gamma)^7$Be and $^3$H$(\\alpha,\\gamma)^7$Li, and the branching ratios for the transitions into the two final $^7$Be and $^7$Li bound states, respectively. For $^3$He$(\\alpha,\\gamma)^7$Be excellent agreement between calculated and experimental data is obtained. For $^3$H$(\\alpha,\\gamma)^7$Li a $S(0)$ value has been found which is a factor of about 1.5 larger than the adopted value. For both capture reactions a similar branching ratio of $R = \\sigma(\\gamma_1)/\\sigma(\\gamma_0) \\approx 0.43$ has been obtained.

  10. Finite Pluricomplex energy measures

    OpenAIRE

    Di Nezza, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    We investigate probability measures with finite pluricomplex energy. We give criteria insuring that a given measure has finite energy and test these on various examples. We show that this notion is a biholomorphic but not a bimeromorphic invariant.

  11. Alpha-particle diagnostics with high energy neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the feasibility of alpha-particle diagnostics using a high energy neutral beam on the R-tokamak, a planned device at IPP-Nagoya, Japan, for reacting plasma experiments. In this method, injected neutral particles neutralize alpha particles so as to escape from the magnetically confined plasma through double charge exchange processes, He++ + A0 -- → He0 + A++. Requirements for a probing beam are dis cussed from viewpoints of penetration of an injected beam in the plasma and a neutralization efficiency of alpha particles in a wide velocity range. Either a Li0 beam or a He0 beam in the ground state, produced from a negative ion beam is suitable. A method to neutralize a He- beam into the ground state through an auto-detachment process is proposed. (author)

  12. Alpha-particle Measurements Needed for Burning Plasma Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next major step in magnetic fusion studies will be the construction of a burning plasma (BP) experiment where the goals will be to achieve and understand the plasma behavior with the internal heating provided by fusion-generated alpha particles. Two devices with these physics goals have been proposed: the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE). Extensive conceptual design work for the instrumentation to try to meet the physics demands has been done for these devices, especially ITER. This article provides a new look at the measurements specifically important for understanding the physics aspects of the alpha particles taking into account two significant events. The first is the completion of physics experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with deuterium-tritium fueling with the first chances to study alpha physics and the second is the realization that relatively compact plasmas, making use of advanced tokamak plasma concepts, are the most probable route to burning plasmas and ultimately a fusion reactor

  13. Alpha-particle Measurements Needed for Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth M. Young

    2001-09-26

    The next major step in magnetic fusion studies will be the construction of a burning plasma (BP) experiment where the goals will be to achieve and understand the plasma behavior with the internal heating provided by fusion-generated alpha particles. Two devices with these physics goals have been proposed: the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE). Extensive conceptual design work for the instrumentation to try to meet the physics demands has been done for these devices, especially ITER. This article provides a new look at the measurements specifically important for understanding the physics aspects of the alpha particles taking into account two significant events. The first is the completion of physics experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with deuterium-tritium fueling with the first chances to study alpha physics and the second is the realization that relatively compact plasmas, making use of advanced tokamak plasma concepts, are the most probable route to burning plasmas and ultimately a fusion reactor.

  14. Experimental setup and procedure for the measurement of the $^{7}Be(n,{\\alpha}){\\alpha}$ reaction at n_TOF

    CERN Document Server

    Cosentino, L; Barbagallo, M; Pappalardo, A; Colonna, N; Damone, L; Piscopo, M; Finocchiaro, P; Maugeri, E; Heinitz, S; Schumann, D; Dressler, R; Kivel, N; Aberle, O; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Ayranov, M; Bacak, M; Barros, S; Balibrea-Correa, J; Beecares, V; Becvar, F; Beinrucker, C; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Caamano, M; Calviani, M; Calvino, F; Cano-Ott, D; Cardella, R; Casanovas, A; Castelluccio, D M; Cerutti, F; Chen, Y H; Chiaveri, E; Cortes, G; Cortes-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dupont, E; Duran, I; Fernandez-Dominguez, B; Ferrari, A; Ferreira, P; Furman, W; Ganesan, S; Garcia-Rios, A; Gawlik, A; Gheorghe, I; Glodariu, T; Goebel, K; Goncalves, I F; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Harada, H; Heftrich, T; Heyse, J; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kaeppeler, F; Katabuchi, T; Kavrigin, P; Kimura, A; Kokkoris, M; Krticka, M; Leal-Chidonca, E; Lerendegui, J; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Meo, S Lo; Lonsdale, S; Losito, R; Macina, D; Marganiec, J; Martinez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mastromarco, M; Matteucci, F; Mazzone, A; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Montesano, S; Nolte, R; Oprea, A; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Praena, J; Quesada, J; Rajeev, K; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego-Perez, A; Rout, P; Rubbia, C; Ryan, J; Sabate-Gilarte, M; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Sedyshev, P; Stamatopoulos, A; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarifeno-Saldivia, A; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Vollaire, J; Wallner, A; Warren, S; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wolf, C; Woods, P J; Wright, T; Zugec, P

    2016-01-01

    The newly built second experimental area EAR2 of the n_TOF spallation neutron source at CERN allows to perform (n, charged particles) experiments on short-lived highly radioactive targets. This paper describes a detection apparatus and the experimental procedure for the determination of the cross-section of the 7Be(n,{\\alpha}) reaction, which represents one of the focal points toward the solution of the cosmological Lithium abundance problem, and whose only measurement, at thermal energy, dates back to 1963. The apparently unsurmountable experimental difficulties stemming from the huge 7Be {\\gamma}-activity, along with the lack of a suitable neutron beam facility, had so far prevented further measurements. The detection system is subject to considerable radiation damage, but is capable of disentangling the rare reaction signals from the very high background. This newly developed setup could likely be useful also to study other challenging reactions requiring the detectors to be installed directly in the neutr...

  15. High precision $^{113}$In($\\alpha,\\alpha$)$^{113}$In elastic scattering at energies around the Coulomb barrier for the astrophysical $\\gamma$ process

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, G G; Fülöp, Zs; Rauscher, T; Gyürky, Gy; Szücs, T; Halász, Z; Somorjai, E; Ornelas, A; Yalcin, C; Güray, R T; Özkan, N

    2013-01-01

    The $\\gamma$ process in supernova explosions is thought to explain the origin of proton-rich isotopes between Se and Hg, the so-called $p$ nuclei. The majority of the reaction rates for $\\gamma$ process reaction network studies has to be predicted in Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations using global optical potential parameterizations. While the nucleon+nucleus optical potential is fairly known, for the $\\alpha$+nucleus optical potential several different parameterizations exist and large deviations are found between the predictions calculated using different parameter sets. By the measurement of elastic $\\alpha$-scattering angular distributions at energies around the Coulomb barrier a comprehensive test for the different global $\\alpha$+nucleus optical potential parameter sets is provided. Between 20$^{\\circ}$ and 175$^{\\circ}$ complete elastic alpha scattering angular distributions were measured on the $^{113}$In \\textit{p} nucleus with high precision at E$_{c.m.}$ = 15.59 and 18.82 MeV. The elast...

  16. Measurements of DT alpha particle loss near the outer midplane of TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of DT alpha particle loss to the outer midplane region of TFTR have been made using a radially movable scintillator detector. The conclusion from this data is that mechanisms determining the DT alpha loss to the outer midplane are not substantially different from those for DD fusion products. Some of these results are compared with a simplified theoretical model for TF ripple-induced alpha loss, which is expected to be the dominant classical alpha loss mechanism near the outer midplane. An example of plasma-driven MHD-induced alpha particle loss is shown, but no signs of any ''collective'' alpha instability-induced alpha loss have yet been observed

  17. Measurement of Alpha Emitters Concentration in Imported Cigarettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aime of this study was to measured the alpha emitters concentration of (15) different kinds of imported cigarettes. the nuclear reaction used U-235(n, f) obtained by the bombardment of U-235 with thermal neutrons from (AmBe)neutron source with thermal flux of(5*103 n.cm-2.s-1). The Results obtained showed the values of the Uranium concentration, and varies from (0.041 ppm) in five stares kind to (2.374ppm) in Machbeth (chocolate) 100's kind. All the result obtained are within the limit levels as given by UNSCAR data

  18. Fission time for the {sup 235}U + {alpha} reaction measured by the crystal blocking technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuminov, O.A. [D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Vorobyevy Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: yuminov@p5-lnr.sinp.msu.ru; Borisov, A.M.; Drozdov, V.A.; Eremenko, D.O.; Fotina, O.V. [D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Vorobyevy Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Malaguti, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Via Irnerio 46, Bologna (Italy); Olivo, P. [Dipartimento Matemates, Universita' di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, Bologna (Italy); Platonov, S.Yu. [D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Vorobyevy Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Togo, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Via Irnerio 46, Bologna (Italy); Tulinov, A.F. [D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Vorobyevy Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-08-15

    The crystal blocking technique has been used to measure the total time of the induced fission process for the {sup 235}U + {alpha} reaction in the energy range of bombarding {alpha}-particles from 25.9 to 31.2 MeV. Experimental fission times observed in this reaction vary from 10{sup -17} to 10{sup -16} s, depending on the projectile energy. Together with the corresponding experimental data on angular anisotropy in the same reaction they were analyzed within the dynamic-statistical approach with allowance for the nuclear dissipation phenomenon and the double-humped fission barrier model. It was demonstrated that the time of induced fission at low excitation energies is sensitive to the nuclear dissipation magnitude.

  19. (n, {alpha}) cross section measurement of light nuclei using gridded ionization chamber and gaseous sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Saito, Keiichiro; Ibara, Yasutaka; Yamazaki, Tetsuro; Sato, Jun; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    We have developed a measuring method of (n, {alpha}) cross section by using gaseous sample in a gridded ionization chamber. In this study, we measured the {sup 12}C(n, {alpha}{sub 0}) and the {sup 16}O(n, {alpha}{sub 0}), (n, {alpha}{sub 123}) cross sections for En=11.5 and 12.8 MeV neutrons. We also deduced the {sup 12}C(n, x{alpha}) spectrum and analyzed the data by a kinematic calculation combined with the reaction data of the {sup 12}C(n, n`3{alpha}). (author)

  20. Proton and alpha evaporation spectra in low energy 12C and 16O induced reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E T Mirgle; D R Chakrabarty; V M Datar; Suresh Kumar; A Mitra; H H Oza

    2006-08-01

    Proton and alpha particle spectra have been measured in the 12C+93Nb and 12C+58Ni reactions at E(12C) = 40 and 50 MeV and in the 16O+93Nb reaction at E(16O) = 75 MeV. The spectra are compared with the statistical model calculations. The shapes of the calculated spectra are in agreement with experimental data except for the alpha spectrum in the 12C+93Nb reaction at 40 MeV. The observed evaporation bump is at ∼ 2 MeV lower energy compared to the calculated one. This discrepancy could imply alpha particle emission from a deformed configuration before compound nucleus formation at this near Coulomb barrier beam energy.

  1. Study of giant resonances at high excitation energy by alpha inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular distributions of 340 and 480 MeV alpha particles inelastically scattered by 208Pb, 116Sn and 58Ni up to 60 MeV of excitation have been measured. The experimental inelastic spectra have been analysed by means of a new global method. The repartition of multipole strength shows the already known low energy giant resonances into more details. New high energy giant resonances are observed

  2. Bioassay alpha spectrometry: energy resolution as a function of sample source preparation and counting geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha particle counting is based on the response of an electronic counting system to an incident alpha particle. Alpha spectrometry is used in our employee surveillance bioassay program to measure the concentration of isotopes of Am, Pu and U contained on sample source preparations. Nuclides of Am, Pu and U are separated from the sample matrix by anion exchange and are electroplated on a stainless steel disc. The plated source diameter is 12.7 mm. A tracer is added to the sample before anion exchange as a quality control procedure to provide a measure of chemical yield. Tracer alpha-particle emissions are recorded in a preassigned calibrated area of the energy spectrum and chemical recovery is calculated by the ratio of tracer counts per second divided by the tracer activity in becquerels (Bq). Percent tracer recovery may also be calculated by introducing the average counting efficiency factor in the denominator. Tracer yield is then used to provide a reliable estimate of the sample's analyte counts that are recorded in other preassigned energy dependent areas of the spectrum. The tracer spectrum in the presence or absence of other nuclides also provides evidence of the performance characteristics of the alpha spectrometer, for example, chamber vacuum and electronics. Electroplated samples are counted in any one of 96 detectors. The backgrounds of these detectors are maintained at less than 3 counts per 70,000 s over a 190 keV energy window to provide a limit of detection of less than 0.37 mBq per sample at the 95% confidence level. In this paper, resolution of the photopeak is shown to be a function of the source to detector distance and a function of degraded alpha energies due to Fe or other extraneous materials on the plated surface

  3. SPT hammer energy measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, W.D.; Salomone, L.A.

    1982-04-01

    A field measurement system and procedure which measures the energy delivered by a drill rig system was developed and successfully used to study the factors which affect delivered energy. Results are presented which indicate that the energy delivered by certain drill rig systems varies widely in engineering practice. The energy delivered to the drill stem varied with the number of turns of rope around the cathead, the fall height, drill rig type, hammer type, and operator characteristics. 17 refs.

  4. Suma-alpha software description. Study of its applications to detection problems and environmental radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Software named suma-espectros has been developed by TECNASA/CIEMAT for adding counts automatically from the alpha spectra, energy to energy, with the purpose of: evaluating real background of alpha spectrometers, studying its temporal variations, increasing the possibilities of isotopes detection -where it has been impossible to detect due elapsed time of the measurement- and implementing other applications. The programme is written in Visual-Basic and it can export data to Excel spreadsheets for later treatment. The software has established by default a channels range for adding the counts energy by energy but it can be adapted to the analysis of different isotopes and backgrounds simply changing a text file that is incorporated to the programme. The description of the programme management is described for whoever can realise its applications immediately. This software has the advantage of emitting an add-spectrum in cnf format that is used by alpha analyst (Genie 2K) for de convoluting spectra or doing calculations. (Author) 3 refs.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (∼ 40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and ground water

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water (approximately40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and

  7. Local versus nonlocal $\\alpha\\alpha$ interactions in $3\\alpha$ description of $^{12}$C

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Y; Descouvemont, P; Fujiwara, Y; Matsumura, H; Orabi, M; Theeten, M

    2008-01-01

    Local $\\alpha \\alpha$ potentials fail to describe $^{12}$C as a $3\\alpha$ system. Nonlocal $\\alpha \\alpha$ potentials that renormalize the energy-dependent kernel of the resonating group method allow interpreting simultaneously the ground state and $0^+_2$ resonance of $^{12}$C as $3\\alpha$ states. A comparison with fully microscopic calculations provides a measure of the importance of three-cluster exchanges in those states.

  8. RADON AND PROGENY ALPHA-PARTICLE ENERGY ANALYSIS USING NUCLEAR TRACK METHODOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary procedure for alpha energy analysis of radon and progeny using Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) is described in this paper. The method is based on the relationship between alpha-particle energies deposited in polycarbonate material (CR-39) and the track size developed after a well-established chemical etching process. Track geometry, defined by parameters such as major or minor diameters, track area and overall track length, is shown to correlate with alpha-particle energy over the range 6.00 MeV (218Po) to 7.69 MeV (214Po). Track features are measured and the data analyzed automatically using a digital imaging system and commercial PC software. Examination of particle track diameters in CR-39 exposed to environmental radon reveals a multi-modal distribution. Locations of the maxima in this distribution are highly correlated with alpha particle energies of radon daughters, and the distributions are sufficiently resolved to identify the radioisotopes. This method can be useful for estimating the radiation dose from indoor exposure to radon and its progeny.

  9. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained. PMID:27341133

  10. Measurement of the CKM Angle alpha with the B-factories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevan, Adrian; /Liverpool U.

    2005-12-21

    B-meson decays involving b {yields} u transitions are sensitive to the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} (or {phi}{sub 2}). The B-factories at SLAC and KEK have made significant progress toward the measurement of {alpha} in recent years. This paper summarizes the results of the B-factories' constraints on {alpha}.

  11. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eamon

    2016-03-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 Grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  12. Cosmological reconstruction and energy bounds in $f(R,R_{\\alpha \\beta}R^{\\alpha\\beta},\\phi)$ gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Zubair, M

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the cosmological reconstruction of $f(R,R_{\\alpha\\beta}R^{\\alpha\\beta},\\phi)$ (where $R$, $R_{\\alpha\\beta}R^{\\alpha\\beta}$ and $\\phi$ represents the Ricci scalar, Ricci invariant and scalar field) corresponding to power law and de Sitter evolution in the framework of FRW universe model. We derive the energy conditions for this modified theory which seem to be more general and can be reduced to some known forms of these conditions in general relativity, $f(R)$ and $f(R,\\phi)$ theories. We have presented the general constraints in terms of recent values of snap, jerk, deceleration and Hubble parameters. The energy bounds are analyzed for reconstructed as well as known models in this theory. Finally, the free parameters are analyzed comprehensively.

  13. Accurate measurements of surface emission rate for large-area alpha and beta reference sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For alpha emitters and beta emitters with maximum beta energy greater than 0.150 MeV, the characteristics of reference sources for the calibration of surface contamination monitors are specified by the international standard ISO 8769. According to this standard, the surface emission rate of reference sources has to be measured by absolute methods or by using an instrument that has been calibrated by means of sources that has been measured absolutely. Moreover, the surface emission rate has to be measured by the national standards laboratory with an uncertainty which must not exceed 3% (one standard deviation). In this paper, the counting system and the experimental conditions needed for accurate measurements of the surface emission rate are presented. The uncertainty of such measurements is much smaller than 3%. The evaluation of this uncertainty is also described. The counting system used for absolute alpha and beta surface emission rate measurements is composed of a large area, gas-flow, windowless proportional detector, an integral and a spectrometric counting channels. The method of measurement for alpha and beta surface emission rate is very simple but it is necessary to achieve the optimum experimental conditions of counting for obtaining accurate measurement results. Thus, the proportional detector has to work under a continuous and stable gas-flow and its plateau has to be long with a very low slope. To obtain a counting efficiency of 100%, it has to use a tight detector and a very pure counting gas. Additionally, the detector must be flushed and then operated under a steady gas-flow for several hours prior to measurements in order to be cleaned of air impurities. To perform alpha and beta surface emission rate measurements we optimized first the conditions of counting. For beta sources, the discrimination level has been adjusted by means of a 55 Fe source. Using this spectrum, we checked the stability of the counting system because the peak, corresponding

  14. Some rules to improve the energy resolution in alpha liquid scintillation with beta rejection

    CERN Document Server

    Aupiais, J; Dacheux, N

    2003-01-01

    Two common scintillating mixtures dedicated to alpha measurements by means of alpha liquid scintillation with pulse shape discrimination were tested: the di-isopropylnaphthalene - based and the toluene-based solvents containing the commercial cocktails Ultima Gold AB trademark and Alphaex trademark. We show the possibility to enhance the resolution up to 200% by using no-water miscible cocktails and by reducing the optical path. Under these conditions, the resolution of about 200 keV can be obtained either by the Tri Carb sup T sup M or by the Perals sup T sup M spectrometers. The time responses, e.g., the time required for a complete energy transfer between the initial interaction alpha particle-solvent and the final fluorescence of the organic scintillator, have been compared. Both cocktails present similar behavior. According to the Foerster theory, about 6-10 ns are required to complete the energy transfer. For both apparatus, the detection limits were determined for alpha emitters. The sensitivity of the...

  15. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined alphas and tritons on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radially-resolved energy and density distributions of the energetic confined alpha particles in D-T experiments on TFTR are being measured by active neutral particle analysis using low-Z impurity pellet injection. When injected into a high temperature plasma, an impurity pellet (e.g. Lithium or Boron) rapidly ablates forming an elongated cloud which is aligned with the magnetic field and moves with the pellet. This ablation cloud provides a dense target with which the alpha particles produced in D-T fusion reactions can charge exchange. A small fraction of the alpha particles incident on the pellet ablation cloud will be converted to helium neutrals whose energy is essentially unchanged by the charge transfer process. By measuring the resultant helium neutrals escaping from the plasma using a mass and energy resolving charge exchange analyzer, this technique offers a direct measurement of the energy distribution of the incident high-energy alpha particles. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons generated in D-D plasmas and H or He3 RF-driven minority ion tails. The diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail

  16. Application of Micro-coprecipitation Method to Alpha Source Preparation for Measuring Alpha Nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the source preparations, an electrodeposition is a commonly used method for the preparation of sources for an alpha spectrometry, because this technique is simple and produces a very thin deposit, which is essential for a high resolution of the alpha peak. Recently, micro-coprecipitation with rare earths have been used to yield sources for -spectrometry. In this work, the Pu, Am and Cm isotopes were purified from hindrance nuclides and elements with an a TRU resin in radioactive waste samples, and the activity concentrations of the Pu, Am and Cm isotopes were determined by radiation counting methods after alpha source preparation like micro coprecipitation. After the Pu isotopes in the radioactive waste samples were separated from the other nuclides with an anion exchange resin, the Am isotopes were purified with a TRU resin and an anion exchange resin or a TRU resin. Activity concentrations and chemical recoveries of 241Am purified with the TRU resin were similar to those with the TRU resin and anion exchange resin. In this study, to save on the analytical time and cost, the Am isotopes were purified with the TRU resin without using an additional anion exchange resin. After comparing the electrodeposition method with the micro-coprecipitation method, the micro-coprecipitation method was used for the alpha source preparation, because the micro-coprecipitation method is simple and more reliable for source preparation of the Pu, Am and Cm isotopes

  17. Radon and progeny alpha-particle energy analysis using nuclear track methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary procedure for alpha-energy analysis of radon and its progeny using nuclear track methodology (NTM) is described in this paper. The method is based on the relationship between alpha-particle energies deposited in polycarbonate material (CR-39) and the track size developed after a well-established chemical etching process. Track geometry, defined by parameters such as major or minor diameters, track area and overall track length, is shown to correlate with alpha-particle energy over the range 6.00 MeV (218Po) to 7.69 MeV (214Po). Track features are measured and the data analyzed automatically using a digital imaging system and commercial PC software. Examination of particle track diameters in CR-39 exposed to environmental radon reveals a multi-modal distribution. Locations of the maxima in this distribution are highly correlated with alphaparticle energies of radon daughters, and the distributions are sufficiently resolved to identify the radioisotopes. This method can be useful for estimating the radiation dose from indoor exposure to radon and its progeny. (author)

  18. 149Sm(n,alpha)146Nd cross sections in the MeV energy region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guohui [Peking University; Gledenov, Yu. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Khuukhenkhuu, G [National University of Mongolia; Sedysheva, M. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Szalanski, P. [University of Lodz; Koehler, Paul Edward [ORNL; Voronov, Yu. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Liu, Jiaming [Peking University; Liu, Xiang [Peking University; Han, Jinhua [Peking University; Chen, Jinxiang [Peking University

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the {sup 149}Sm(n,{alpha}){sup 146}Nd cross section at 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, and 6.5 MeV. Measurements were performed at the 4.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of Peking University with monoenergetic neutrons produced via the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction using a deuterium gas target. Alpha particles were detected with a double-section gridded ionization chamber having two back-to-back {sup 149}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples attached to the common cathode. Absolute neutron flux was measured using a small {sup 238}U fission chamber and monitored by a BF{sub 3} long counter. These are the first reported cross sections for this reaction at these energies, except at 6.0 eV, where our new data are in good agreement with our earlier result. The present results help to much better constrain the {sup 149}Sm(n,{alpha}){sup 146}Nd cross section in a region where its energy dependence is changing fairly rapidly and there are large differences between evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  19. Positronium energy levels at order $m \\alpha^7$: Product contributions in the two-photon-annihilation channel

    CERN Document Server

    Adkins, Gregory S; Wang, Ruihan

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing improvements in the measurement of positronium transition intervals motivate the calculation of the $O(m \\alpha^7)$ corrections to these intervals. In this work we focus on corrections to the spin-singlet parapositronium energies involving virtual annihilation to two photons in an intermediate state. We have evaluated all contributions to the positronium S-state energy levels that can be written as the product of a one-loop correction on one side of the annihilation event and another one-loop correction on the other side. These effects contribute $\\Delta E = -0.561971(25) m \\alpha^7/\\pi^3$ to the parapositronium ground state energy.

  20. Measuring industrial energy savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate measurement of energy savings from industrial energy efficiency projects can reduce uncertainty about the efficacy of the projects, guide the selection of future projects, improve future estimates of expected savings, promote financing of energy efficiency projects through shared-savings agreements, and improve utilization of capital resources. Many efforts to measure industrial energy savings, or simply track progress toward efficiency goals, have had difficulty incorporating changing weather and production, which are frequently major drivers of plant energy use. This paper presents a general method for measuring plant-wide industrial energy savings that takes into account changing weather and production between the pre and post-retrofit periods. In addition, the method can disaggregate savings into components, which provides additional resolution for understanding the effectiveness of individual projects when several projects are implemented together. The method uses multivariable piece-wise regression models to characterize baseline energy use, and disaggregates savings by taking the total derivative of the energy use equation. Although the method incorporates search techniques, multi-variable least-squares regression and calculus, it is easily implemented using data analysis software, and can use readily available temperature, production and utility billing data. This is important, since more complicated methods may be too complex for widespread use. The method is demonstrated using case studies of actual energy assessments. The case studies demonstrate the importance of adjusting for weather and production between the pre- and post-retrofit periods, how plant-wide savings can be disaggregated to evaluate the effectiveness of individual retrofits, how the method can identify the time-dependence of savings, and limitations of engineering models when used to estimate future savings

  1. Application of avalanche photodiodes for the measurement of actinides by alpha liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha emitters analysis using liquid scintillation spectroscopy is often used when sensitivity and fast samples preparation are the important points. A more extensive use of this technique is until now limited by its poor resolution compared to alpha particle spectroscopy with semiconductor detectors. To improve the resolution and thus promote this method for the measurement of actinides in environment, we have tested silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD) as new detectors for scintillation photons. The set-up consists of a large area avalanche photodiode (16 mm diameter) coupled to a thin vial containing alpha-emitters within a liquid scintillation cocktail. After optimization of several parameters like bias voltage, temperature, counting geometry and composition of the scintillating cocktail, energy resolutions have been found to be better than those obtained with standard photomultiplier tubes (PMT): 5% (200 keV FWHM) for 232Th and 4.2% (240 keV FWHM) for 236Pu. Our results show that the improvement is due to less fluctuations associated with light collection since the spatial response of APDs is more uniform than that of PMTs. The expected gain on quantum efficiency (80% for APDs instead of 25% for PMTs) is nullified by a corresponding increase on electronic noise and excess noise factor. Significant better results are foreseen by using green scintillators (450 - 550 nm wavelengths region) with larger Stokes-shift and blue-enhanced APDs which reach their maximum quantum efficiency in this region. (author)

  2. Black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels:The $ (Z \\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Wanping; Lu, Jingjun; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The next-to-leading order black-body radiation(BBR) shift to atomic energy-levels, namely $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction, was studied by using the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics(NRQED) at first. This $T^{2}$-dependent correction has not been investigated before, and only contains the contribution of eletric-dipole of thermal photon. In order to study the contribution of multipolar. We estimate the two-loop contributions of BBR-shift by using quantum electrodynamics approach(QED), and find both one-loop and two-loop diagram contribute to the $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction. Integrating the results which are obtained by these two approaches, the $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction we derived is in principle applicable to multi-electron atoms and contains the contribution of multipolar. The order of magnitude BBR-shift indicates this next-to-leading order BBR-shift may be as significant as the leading order in the multi-electron atoms or cold ones.

  3. Low-energy direct photon production in p p and alpha alpha collisions at the cern intersecting storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Young-il

    1986-01-01

    High transverse momentum (p(,T)) direct photons have given us some of our best evidence for low order perturbative QCD proces- ses in hadron collisions. It is also important to examine hadronic collisions with a weakly interacting probe in the low p(,T) region, where hadron interactions involve very complicated phenomena. A previous experiment at SQRT.(s) = 12 GeV has observed an excess of low p(,T) direct photons. The present experiment has studied direct soft photons in pp interactions at SQRT.(s) = 63 GeV and alpha-alpha interactions at SQRT.(s(,NN)) = 31.5 GeV at the CERN ISR. Comparisons of photon production with respect to track production in pp minimum bias events with that in pp events with high transverse energy (E(,T)) and with alpha-alpha minimum bias events are investigated. For alpha-alpha minimum bias data, within experimental errors there was no excess of photons with respect to tracks, compared with pp minimum bias data. But for pp high E(,T) data, we observed an interesting effect: as p(,T) i...

  4. Measurement of elastic 12C+alpha scattering: details of the experiment, analysis, and discussion of phase shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Detwiler, Rebecca [UNIV OF FL; Gorres, Joachim [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Stech, Edward J [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Ugalde, Claudio [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Wiescher, Michael C F [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Heil, Michael [GSI DARMSTADT; Kappeler, Franz [FORSCHUNGSZENTRUM KARLSRUHE; Azuma, Richard E [UNIV OF TORONTO; Buchmann, Lothar [TRIUMF

    2009-01-01

    Recent global analyses of {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O have incorporated both elastic-scallering and {beta}-decay data in addition to direct measurements. In that context, it has been shown that an improvement in the available elastic-scallering data could help determine the contribution of the two subthreshold states, 6.92(2{sup +}) and 7.12(1{sup -}) MeV, and with excellent statistics could restrict resonance parameters above the threshold. To this end angular distributions of {sup 12}C({alpha}, {alpha}){sup 12}C in the {alpha}-energy range of 2.6-8.2 MeV, at angles from 24 to 166 have been measured at the University of Notre Dame using an array of 32 silicon detectors. Details of the experiment are reported. In the present analysis, the phase shifts have been determined from our previously reported R-matrix fit to these data. The uncertainties in the R-matrix phase shifts ({ell} = 0...6) are derived by a new Monte Carlo analysis technique as described in the article. We provide these phase shifts here for general use, in particular for the improved analysis and extrapolation of the {alpha} radiative capture to low energies.

  5. Phoswich Detector for Simultaneous Measuring Alpha/beta Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new type phoswich detector consisting of the ZnS(Ag) and plastic scintillator for alpha/beta-ray simultaneous counting was developed for monitoring radiological contamination inside pipes. The detection performance was estimated using the PSD (pulse shape discrimination) method as a function of distance between the scintillator and radioactive source. The attenuation of particles traveling through a thin film for preventing the detector from being contaminated was experimentally estimated. It is concluded from our investigation that the phoswich detector developed can provide a sufficient alpha/beta-ray discrimination. The application of a thin film for preventing the detector from being contaminated was proven to be feasible.

  6. Dynamical symmetries of BEC: exact energy formulas and an application to alpha-conjugate nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algebraic approach, based on dynamical symmetries, to Bose-Einstein condensates will be illustrated. It allows to write symmetry-dictated exact energy formulas for boson condensates that depend typically on a few quantum numbers. The application to alpha condensation in nuclei will be discussed in detail, showing that symmetry alone is sufficient to predict the energy of N-alpha states in alpha conjugate nuclei. Experiments that might improve the present knowledge will be suggested. (author)

  7. Cronbach’s Alpha is not a Measure of Unidimensionality or Homogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    BADEMCİ, Vahit

    2014-01-01

    Reliability is a characteristic of scores, not tests or measurement instruments. One of the methods to estimate the reliability of the scores on a test or measurement instrument is Cronbach’s coefficient alpha method. In other words, Cronbach’s alpha is an estimate of the score reliability based on the internal consistency among the [item] scores. In addition to this, Cronbach’s coefficient alpha should not be interpreted as a measure of the test’s or the measurement instrument’s unidimension...

  8. Black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels:The $ (Z \\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Wanping; Mei, Xuesong; Lu, Jingjun; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The next-to-leading order black-body radiation(BBR) shift to atomic energy-levels, namely $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction, was studied by using the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics(NRQED). We also estimate the one-loop contribution of quadrupole and the two-loop contributions of BBR-shift of the thermal(real) photon. These corrections have not been investigated before. The order of magnitude BBR-shift indicates the one-loop contribution of quadrupole is stronger than the previou...

  9. Proton and alpha-particle capture reactions at sub-Coulomb energies relevant to the p process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harissopulos, S [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Lagoyannis, A [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Spyrou, A [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Zarkadas, Ch [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Galanopoulos, S [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Perdikakis, G [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Becker, H-W [Dynamitron-Tandem-Laboratorium, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Rolfs, C [Institut fuer Physik mit Ionenstrahlen, EP-II, Ruhr-Universitaet BochumI, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Strieder, F [Institut fuer Physik mit Ionenstrahlen, EP-II, Ruhr-Universitaet BochumI, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Kunz, R [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Fey, M [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Hammer, J W [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Dewald, A [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Zell, K-O [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Brentano, P von [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Julin, R [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Demetriou, P [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-10-01

    Several cross-section measurements of proton as well as {alpha}-particle capture reactions in the Se-Sb region have been carried out at sub-Coulomb energies with the aim to obtain global input parameters for Hauser-Feshbach (HF) calculations. Some of the results are compared with HF calculations using various optical model potentials and nuclear level densities.

  10. Gross Alpha Beta Radioactivity in Air Filters Measured by Ultra Low Level α/β Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cfarku, Florinda; Bylyku, Elida; Deda, Antoneta; Dhoqina, Polikron; Bakiu, Erjona; Perpunja, Flamur

    2010-01-01

    Study of radioactivity in air as very important for life is done regularly using different methods in every country. As a result of nuclear reactors, atomic centrals, institutions and laboratories, which use the radioactivity substances in open or closed sources, there are a lot radioactive wastes. Mixing of these wastes after treatment with rivers and lakes waters makes very important control of radioactivity. At the other side nuclear and radiological accidents are another source of the contamination of air and water. Due to their radio toxicity, especially those of Sr90, Pu239, etc. a contamination hazard for human begins exist even at low concentration levels. Measurements of radioactivity in air have been performed in many parts of the world mostly for assessment of the doses and risk resulting from consuming air. In this study we present the results of international comparison organized by IAEA Vienna, Austria for the air filters spiked with unknown Alpha and Beta Activity. For the calibration of system we used the same filters spiked: a) with Pu-239 as alpha source; b) Sr-90 as beta source and also the blank filter. The measurements of air filter samples after calibration of the system are done with Ultra Low Level α/β Counter (MPC 9604) Protean Instrument Corporation. The high sensitivity of the system for the determination of the Gross Alpha and Beta activity makes sure detection of low values activity of air filters. Our laboratory results are: Aα = (0.19±0.01) Bq/filter and Aα (IAEA) = (0.17±0.009) Bq/filter; Aβ = (0.33±0.009) Bq/filter and Aβ (IAEA) = (0.29±0.01) Bq/filter. As it seems our results are in good agreement with reference values given by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency).

  11. Invariance measures of stochastic 2D Navier-Stokes equations driven by $\\alpha$-stable processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zhao; Xu, Lihu; Zhang, Xicheng

    2011-01-01

    In this note we prove the well-posedness for stochastic 2D Navier-Stokes equation driven by general L\\'evy processes (in particular, $\\alpha$-stable processes), and obtain the existence of invariant measures.

  12. Factors affecting the energy resolution in alpha particle spectrometry with silicon diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work are presented the studies about the response of a multi-structure guard rings silicon diode for detection and spectrometry of alpha particles. This ion-implanted diode (Al/p+/n/n+/Al) was processed out of 300 μm thick, n type substrate with a resistivity of 3 kΩ·cm and an active area of 4 mm2. In order to use this diode as a detector, the bias voltage was applied on the n+ side, the first guard ring was grounded and the electrical signals were readout from the p+ side. These signals were directly sent to a tailor made preamplifier, based on the hybrid circuit A250 (Amptek), followed by a conventional nuclear electronic. The results obtained with this system for the direct detection of alpha particles from 241Am showed an excellent response stability with a high detection efficiency (≅ 100 %). The performance of this diode for alpha particle spectrometry was studied and it was prioritized the influence of the polarization voltage, the electronic noise, the temperature and the source-diode distance on the energy resolution. The results showed that the major contribution for the deterioration of this parameter is due to the diode dead layer thickness (1 μm). However, even at room temperature, the energy resolution (FWHM = 18.8 keV) measured for the 5485.6 MeV alpha particles (241Am) is comparable to those obtained with ordinary silicon barrier detectors frequently used for these particles spectrometry. (author)

  13. Cross section measurements of $\\alpha$-induced reactions on $^{92,94}$Mo and $^{112}$Sn for $p$-process studies

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, W; Käppeler, F; Giesen, U; Klein, H; Rauscher, T; Hentschel, D; Hilpp, S

    2008-01-01

    The $^{92}$Mo($\\alpha,n$)$^{95}$Ru, $^{94}$Mo($\\alpha,n$)$^{97}$Ru, and $^{112}$Sn($\\alpha,\\gamma$)$^{116}$Te cross sections were measured at the upper end of the $p$-process Gamow window between 8.2 MeV and 11.1 MeV. Our results are slightly lower than global Hauser-Feshbach calculations from the code NON-SMOKER, but still within the uncertainty of the prediction. The $^{112}$Sn($\\alpha,\\gamma$)$^{116}$Te cross section agrees well with a recently measured thick-target cross section in the same energy range. For the $^{92,94}$Mo($\\alpha,n$) reactions the present data close to the reaction thresholds could eliminate previous uncertainties within a factor of 20, and we can present now useful comparisons to statistical model calculations with different optical potentials.

  14. Measurement of alpha/phi2 in Bo --> pi pi, rho pi and rho rho

    CERN Document Server

    Dalseno, J

    2011-01-01

    We present a summary of the measurements of the CKM angle, alpha (phi2), performed by the BaBar and Belle experiments which collect BBbar pairs at the Y(4S) resonance produced in asymmetric e+ e- collisions. We discuss the measurements of the branching fractions and CP asymmetries in the B --> pi pi, rho pi and rho rho final states that lead to constraints on alpha (phi2).

  15. High frequency energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-frequency (> 100 MHz) energy measurements present special problems to the experimenter. Environment or available electronics often limit the applicability of a given detector type. The physical properties of many detectors are frequency dependent and in some cases, the physical effect employed can be frequency dependent. State-of-the-art measurements generally involve a detection scheme in association with high-speed electronics and a method of data recording. Events can be single or repetitive shot requiring real time, sampling, or digitizing data recording. Potential modification of the pulse by the detector and the associated electronics should not be overlooked. This presentation will review typical applications, methods of choosing a detector, and high-speed detectors. Special considerations and limitations of some applications and devices will be described

  16. Differential cross section measurements for the 6Li(n,t)alpha reaction in the few MeV region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, Matthew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taddeucci, Terence N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hale, Gerald M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, Johhn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    New measured differential cross sections of tritons and alpha particles following the {sup 6}Li(n,t){alpha} reaction are reported for incident neutron energies between 0.2 and approximately 20 MeV. The neutrons were produced by spallation at the WNR facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science CEnter (LANSCE), with the incident neutron energy determined by the time-of-flight method. Four E-{Delta}E telescopes were used at eight laboratory angles. These data have been incorporated into a prior R-matrix fit for the compound {sup 7}Li system, and result in an (n,t) reaction cross section that is 4% to 10% higher than previous evaluations in the 1-3 MeV incident neutron energy region.

  17. Development and evaluation of an alpha spectrometer for precise measurement of activity ratio of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In reprocessing plants, alpha spectrometry is used for the determination of plutonium concentration by isotope dilution alpha spectrometry. 238Pu content and for isotope correlations to calculate the specific activity and isotope composition of plutonium. All these studies involve the use of an alpha spectrometer to measure the activity ratio of 238Pu/(239Pu+240Pu) precisely. Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division (TPPED) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay, India has recently developed an alpha spectrometer, performance evaluation of which has been carried out by employing it to determine the activity ratio measurements of plutonium. Comparison of its performance with a commercially available system demonstrates that the indigenously developed instrument does provide acceptable levels of precision and accuracy for the activity ratio measurements of plutonium. (author)

  18. Measurement of Excitation Functions of 64Zn (n,p) 64Cu, 64Zn(n, Zn) 63Zn, 51V(n,alpha) 48Sc and 48Ti(n,p) 48Sc Reactions, Around 14-MeV Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross-sections of the reactions 64Zn (n,p) 64Cu, 64Zn(n,Zn) 63Zn, 51V(n,alpha)48Sc and 48Ti (n,p) 48Sc around 14-MeV show large discrepancies in the literature. Accurate measurements of these excitation functions were made in the energy range 13.63-14.73 MeV applying the neutron activation technique using a neutron generator. Results were obtained with a statistical error less than 7%. These measured excitation functions were used to check the statistical multistep compound/ statistical multistep direct (SMC/SMD) reaction models using EXIFON code. The calculations are in good agreement with the measurements, specially for the (n,Zn) reactions

  19. Alpha capture reaction cross section measurements on Sb isotopes by activation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Fülöp, Zs; Güray, R. T.; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Török, Zs; Yalçin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha induced reactions on natural and enriched antimony targets were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range from 9.74 MeV to 15.48 MeV, close to the upper end of the Gamow window at a temperature of 3 GK relevant to the γ-process. The experiments were carried out at the Institute for Nuclear Research, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki). 121Sb(α,γ)125I, 121Sb(α,n)124I and 123Sb(α,n)126I reactions were measured using a HPGe detector. In this work, the 121Sb(α,n)124 cross section results and the comparison with the theoretical predictions (obtained with standard settings of the statistical model codes NON-SMOKER and TALYS) were presented.

  20. Measurement of $\\alpha$-particle quenching in LAB based scintillator in independent small-scale experiments

    CERN Document Server

    von Krosigk, B; Hans, S; Junghans, A R; Kögler, T; Kraus, C; Kuckert, L; Liu, X; Nolte, R; O'Keeffe, H M; Tseung, H S Wan Chan; Wilson, J R; Wright, A; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2015-01-01

    The $\\alpha$-particle light response of liquid scintillators based on linear alkylbenzene (LAB) has been measured with three different experimental approaches. In the first approach, $\\alpha$-particles were produced in the scintillator via $^{12}$C($n$,$\\alpha$)$^9$Be reactions. In the second approach, the scintillator was loaded with 2% of $^{\\mathrm{nat}}$Sm providing an $\\alpha$-emitter, $^{147}$Sm, as an internal source. In the third approach, a scintillator flask was deployed into the water-filled SNO+ detector and the radioactive contaminants $^{222}$Rn, $^{218}$Po and $^{214}$Po provided the $\\alpha$-particle signal. The behavior of the observed $\\alpha$-particle light outputs are in agreement with each case successfully described by Birks' law. The resulting Birks parameter $kB$ ranges from $(0.0071\\pm0.0003)$ cm/MeV to $(0.0076\\pm0.0003)$ cm/MeV. In the first approach, the $\\alpha$-particle light response was measured simultaneously with the light response of recoil protons produced via neutron-proto...

  1. MPI and UE corrections to jet measurements and influence on PDF determination and $\\alpha_s$

    CERN Document Server

    Cerci, Salim

    2016-01-01

    The UE and MPI contributions and corrections to jet measurements will be presented, as well as an estimate on the uncertainties. In addition, the influence from initial and final state parton shower will be discussed.

  2. Measurements of alpha radioactivity in arsenic contaminated tube well drinking water using CR-39 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Dipak E-mail: dg@juphys.ernet.indipakghosh_in@yahoo.com; Deb, rgha; Kumar Patra, Kanchan

    2004-02-01

    Studies on the presence of alpha emitting nuclides in the environment assume importance since they are found to be carcinogenic. This paper resents the first ever report of the measurements of alpha activity in drinking water in different places of South and North 24 Parganas of West Bengal where arsenic contamination is severe. The study has been made with solid state nuclear track detector which is one of the most commonly used detectors in the studies involving nuclear radiation. Our analysis provides positive evidence of presence of high alpha activity in drinking water of South and North 24 Parganas.

  3. Feasibility of ion temperature measurement with a gyrotron scattering alpha particle diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collective Thomson scattering can be used to diagnose localized ion temperature as well as alpha particle velocity distribution and density in a D-T burning tokamak. With one diagnostic beam a simultaneous, but independent, measure of the bulk ion temperature and alpha particle parameters can be made. Use of a long pulse, millimeter-wave gyrotron offers a significant margin in signal to noise ratio capability (√Δftau > 1000) not previously possible with lasers. 9 refs., 2 figs

  4. Calculating alpha Eigenvalues in a Continuous-Energy Infinite Medium with Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betzler, Benjamin R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-04

    The {alpha} eigenvalue has implications for time-dependent problems where the system is sub- or supercritical. We present methods and results from calculating the {alpha}-eigenvalue spectrum for a continuous-energy infinite medium with a simplified Monte Carlo transport code. We formulate the {alpha}-eigenvalue problem, detail the Monte Carlo code physics, and provide verification and results. We have a method for calculating the {alpha}-eigenvalue spectrum in a continuous-energy infinite-medium. The continuous-time Markov process described by the transition rate matrix provides a way of obtaining the {alpha}-eigenvalue spectrum and kinetic modes. These are useful for the approximation of the time dependence of the system.

  5. Copernicus measurement of the Jovian Lyman-alpha emission and its aeronomical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, S. K.; Kerr, R. B.; Upson, W. L., II; Festou, M. C.; Donahue, T. M.; Barker, E. S.; Cochran, W. D.; Bertaux, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the intensity of the Lyman-alpha emission is a good indicator of the principal aeronomical processes on the major planets. The high-resolution ultraviolet spectrometer aboard the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory Copernicus was used in 1980 April and May to detect the Jovian Lyman-alpha emission by spectroscopically discriminating it from other Doppler shifted Lyman-alpha emissions such as those of the geocorona, and the interplanetary medium. Taking into consideration the reported emission data, it appears that an unusually large energy input due to the particle precipitation in the auroral region must have been responsible for the large observed Lyman-alpha intensity during the Voyager encounter. At most other times, the observed Jovian Lyman-alpha intensity can be explained, within the range of statistical uncertainty, by a model that takes into consideration the solar EUV flux, the solar Lyman-alpha flux, the high exospheric temperature, and the eddy diffusion coefficient without energy input from the auroral sources.

  6. A measurement of alpha-alpha elastic scattering at the CERN ISR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present measurements of the αα elastic scattering differential cross section at √s=126 GeV in the range 0.052. The data give an improved definition of the first cross section minimum at vertical stroketvertical stroke=0.098 (GeV/c)2 and are consistent with theoretical models of nucleus-nucleus scattering. The αα total cross section obtained by extrapolation to the optical point is 280+-70 mb. (orig.)

  7. Review of alpha-particle spectrometric measurements of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present the silicon surface-barrier detector is the most used α-particle detector mainly due to its high energy resolution, excellent stability, low background and low cost. In this presentation various parameters of importance for α-particle spectrometry are discussed, i.e. energy resolution and interval selection, energy calibration, background and peak tailing. Examples of α-particle spectra recorded from various actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) separated from environmental samples are shown, and the choice of yield determinants is discussed for each case. (author)

  8. Impact of ICRH on the measurement of fusion alphas by collective Thomson scattering in ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Eriksson, L.-G.; Bindslev, Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed for measuring the phase space distributions of confined fast ion populations in ITER plasmas. This study determines the impact of fast ions accelerated by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on the ability of CTS to diagnose fusion alphas......, corresponding to an off-axis resonance. The sensitivities of the results to the He-3 concentration (0.1-4%) and the heating power (20-40 MW) are considered. Fusion born alphas dominate the total CTS signal for large Doppler shifts of the scattered radiation. The tritons generate a negligible fraction...... perpendicular velocities, it may be difficult to draw conclusions about the physics of alpha particles alone by CTS. With this exception, the CTS diagnostic can reveal the physics of the fusion alphas in ITER even under the presence of fast ions due to ICRH....

  9. Energy resolution of alpha particles in a Micromegas detector at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest Micromesh Gas amplification Structures (Micromegas) are achieving outstanding energy resolution for low energy photons, with values as low as 11% FWHM for the 5.9 keV line of 55Fe in Argon/Isobutane mixtures at atmospheric pressure. At higher energies (MeV scale), these measurements are more complicated due to the difficulty in confining the events in the chamber, although there is no fundamental reason why resolutions of 1% FWHM or below could not be reached. There is much motivation to demonstrate experimentally this fact in Xe mixtures due to the possible application of Micromegas readouts to the Double Beta Decay (DBD) search of 136Xe, or in other experiments needing calorimetry and topology in the same detector. We report on systematic measurements of energy resolution with state-of-the-art Micromegas using a 5.5 MeV alpha source in high pressure Ar/Isobutane mixtures. Values as low as 1.6% FWHM have been obtained. Same measurements in Xe, of which a preliminary result is also shown here, are under progress.

  10. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Measurement of very low alpha activity in water; Medida de muy baja actividad alfa en aguas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, M. T.; Acena, M. L.

    1987-07-01

    Measurement of very low levels of alpha-emitting nuclides in water needs substantial improvements. A system based on the adsorbing properties manganese dioxide eliminates the need for transporting very large volumes of water and increases the sensitivity of the measurement. (Author) 21 refs.

  12. Energy balance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhurandhar, N V; Schoeller, D; Brown, A W;

    2015-01-01

    Energy intake (EI) and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) are key modifiable determinants of energy balance, traditionally assessed by self-report despite its repeated demonstration of considerable inaccuracies. We argue here that it is time to move from the common view that self......-reports of EI and PAEE are imperfect, but nevertheless deserving of use, to a view commensurate with the evidence that self-reports of EI and PAEE are so poor that they are wholly unacceptable for scientific research on EI and PAEE. While new strategies for objectively determining energy balance are in their...... of energy balance....

  13. Measurement of radon diffusion in polyethylene based on alpha detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon diffusion in different materials has been measured in the past. Usually the diffusion measurements are based on a direct determination of the amount of radon that diffuses through a thin layer of material. Here we present a method based on the measurement of the radon daughter products which are deposited inside the material. Looking at the decay of 210Po allows us to directly measure the exponential diffusion profile characterized by the diffusion length. In addition we can determine the solubility of radon in PE. We also describe a second method to determine the diffusion constant based on the short-lived radon daughter products 218Po and 214Po, using the identical experimental setup. Measurements for regular polyethylene (PE) and High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (HMWPE) yielded diffusion lengths of (1.3±0.3) mm and (0.8±0.2) mm and solubilities of 0.5±0.1 and 0.7±0.2, respectively, for the first method; the diffusion lengths extracted from the second method are noticeably larger which may be caused by different experimental conditions during diffusion.

  14. Feynman-alpha measurements at Ben-Gurion University's subcritical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feynman-Alpha is a reactor-noise technique for measuring reactor parameters. This method consists of placing a detector and a continuous source in a multiplying medium and measuring a statistical property of the detector counts, namely the ratio of variance to mean in a definite time interval (the statistics differs from the Poisson distribution because of the correlations between neutrons produced by a common fission). By evaluating this property for several time intervals it is possible to deduce the decay constant alpha. (authors). 4 refs

  15. Alpha activity of 190 Pt isotope measured with CR-39 track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method to measure alpha activity of long-lived radioisotopes is reported. The method consists basically in using CR-39 track detectors in close contact with thick samples of the radioelement to be investigated. Accordingly, a long-term exposure experiment has been performed using metallic sheets of natural platinum to measure alpha activity of platinum 190 isotope. The half-life of platinum 190 has been obtained in good agreement with two recent theoretical half-life predictions. (author). 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Cross section measurement for (n,n{alpha}) reactions by 14 MeV neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasugai, Y.; Ikeda, Y.; Uno, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Yamamoto, H.; Kawade, K.

    1997-03-01

    Nine (n,n{alpha}) cross sections for (n,n{alpha}) reactions induced by 13.5-14.9 MeV neutrons were measured for {sup 51}V, {sup 65}Cu, {sup 71}Ga, {sup 76}Ge, {sup 87}Rb, {sup 91}Zr, {sup 93}Nb, {sup 96}Zr and {sup 109}Ag isotopes by using Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) at JAERI. The reactions for 91Zr and 96Zr were measured for the first time. The evaluated data of JENDL-3 and ENDF/B-VI were compared with the present data. Some of the evaluated values are much different from our data by a factor more than ten. (author)

  17. Total and partial cross sections of the $^{112}$Sn($\\alpha,\\gamma$)$^{116}$Te reaction measured via in-beam $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Netterdon, L; Scholz, P; Zilges, A

    2015-01-01

    An extended database of experimental data is needed to address uncertainties of the nuclear-physics input parameters for Hauser-Feshbach calculations. Especially $\\alpha$+nucleus optical model potentials at low energies are not well known. The in-beam technique with an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors was successfully applied to the measurement of absolute cross sections of an ($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$) reaction on a heavy nucleus at sub-Coulomb energies. The total and partial cross-section values were measured by means of in-beam $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. Total and partial cross sections were measured at four different $\\alpha$-particle energies from $E_\\alpha = 10.5$ MeV to $E_\\alpha = 12$ MeV. The measured total cross-section values are in excellent agreement with previous results obtained with the activation technique, which proves the validity of the applied method. The experimental data was compared to Hauser-Feshbach calculations using the nuclear reaction code TALYS. A modified version of the...

  18. A new study of $^{10}$B(p,$\\alpha$)$^{7}$Be reaction at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Caciolli, A; Broggini, C; La Cognata, M; Lamia, L; Menegazzo, R; Mou, L; Puglia, S M R; Rigato, V; Romano, S; Alvarez, C Rossi; Sergi, M L; Spitaleri, C; Tumino, A

    2016-01-01

    The $^{10}$B(p,$\\alpha$)$^{7}$Be reaction is of great interest since it has many applications in different fields of research such as nuclear astrophysics, nuclear physics, and models of new reactors for clean energy generation. This reaction has been studied at the AN2000 accelerator of the INFN National Laboratories of Legnaro (LNL). The total cross section has been measured in a wide energy range (250 $-$ 1182 keV) by using the activation method. The decays of the $^7$Be nuclei produced by the reaction were measured at the low counting facility of LNL by using two fully shielded high-purity germanium detectors. The present dataset shows a large discrepancy with respect to one of the previous data at the same energies and reduces the total uncertainty to the level of 6\\%. An R-matrix calculation has been performed on the present data using the parameters from previous Trojan Horse measurements for the 10 and 500 keV resonances. The present data do not lay on the R-matrix fit in one point suggesting the exis...

  19. Absolute alpha activity measurements of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils in Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahawatte, P.; Hewamanna, R. (Colombo Univ. (Sri Lanka). Radioisotope Centre)

    1991-01-01

    Deposits of monazite bearing soils occur along the Southwest, West and East Coasts of Sri Lanka. High levels of gamma activity in some plant species growing in the West Coast have been reported. The high levels were due to the presence of the daughter nuclides of {sup 232}Th, most of which are alpha emitters. Absolute alpha activity measurements of ash samples of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils were carried out using the alpha sensitive polymeric nuclear track detector CR-39. The values ranged from 60-1900 mBq/g and were in good agreement with the values obtained from conventional scintillation counting method. The activity concentration of {sup 228}Th in the ash samples was also calculated by measuring the activity concentration of emanated thoron trapped inside a glass bottle with the use of a CR-39 track detector. (author).

  20. Absolute alpha activity measurements of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposits of monazite bearing soils occur along the Southwest, West and East Coasts of Sri Lanka. High levels of gamma activity in some plant species growing in the West Coast have been reported. The high levels were due to the presence of the daughter nuclides of 232Th, most of which are alpha emitters. Absolute alpha activity measurements of ash samples of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils were carried out using the alpha sensitive polymeric nuclear track detector CR-39. The values ranged from 60-1900 mBq/g and were in good agreement with the values obtained from conventional scintillation counting method. The activity concentration of 228Th in the ash samples was also calculated by measuring the activity concentration of emanated thoron trapped inside a glass bottle with the use of a CR-39 track detector. (author)

  1. Energy of radon and progeny alphas in dependence of distance traveled in some media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method is introduced in this paper for calculating the energy of 222Rn and its progeny alpha particles from initial energy to zero in dependence on the distance traveled in air, water, hexane, cyclohexane, olive oil and CR-39. The method is based on fitting an inverse function into the range–energy data. The energy–distance equations derived here were used in Monte Carlo simulation of alphas from radon and progeny in the above-mentioned media. The method, the equations derived and the ranges of alpha are presented and discussed. - Highlights: ► A new method is introduced to calculate alpha energy - distance traveled in a medium. ► Alpha particles from 222Rn and its progeny from initial energy to zero are considered. ► Media including air, water, hexane, cyclohexane, olive oil and CR-39 are considered. ► The method is based on fitting an inverse function into the range–energy data. ► The energy–distance equations were derived and plotted using a Monte Carlo simulation

  2. Measurement of alpha activity from leaves and roots of radish plant enhanced by fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The addition of inorganic phosphate fertilizers to soil and crops is a common practice for increasing crop production in worldwide. The fertilizers in soil causes an increase in the radionuclides content along with the essential nutrients that can transfer from soil to various parts of plants. The aim of this work is to measure the alpha activity from various part of radish plant. The measurement of alpha activity was performed by track etch technique using LR-115 detectors. The results show that the alpha track density from lower part of leaves is higher than that from upper part. The alpha track density from upper and lower part of leaves varied from 12 ± 1.9 to 40.8 ± 1.9 tr cm−2 and 16 ± 2.2 to 51.3 ± 3.3 tr cm−2 respectively while it varied from 45 ± 4 to 135 ± 4 tr cm−2 for edible part of plants. With age of plants the radionuclide contents continuously get accumulated in the different part of plant and hence increase in alpha track density was observed during present work. The track density for plants grown with phosphate fertilizers was found to be higher compare to organic and urea fertilizers.

  3. Measurement of alpha-induced reaction cross sections on erbium isotopes for γ process studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Török, Zs.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Rauscher, T.

    2014-05-01

    The cross sections of the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb and 162,164,166Er(α,n)165,167,169Yb reactions have been measured at MTA Atomki. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured between Ec.m. = 11.21 MeV and Ec.m. = 16.09 MeV just above the astrophysically relevant energy region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at T9 = 3 GK). The 162Er(α,n)165Yb, 164Er(α,n)167Yb and 166Er(α,n)169Yb reactions were studied between Ec.m. = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV, Ec.m. = 13.17 and 16.59 MeV and Ec.m. = 12.68 and 17.08 MeV, respectively. The aim of this work is to provide experimental data for modeling the γ process which is thought to be responsible for the production of the proton-rich isotopes heavier than iron.

  4. Two-Group Theory of the Feynman-Alpha Method for Reactivity Measurement in ADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lénárd Pál

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of the Feynman-alpha method, which is used to determine the subcritical reactivity of systems driven by an external source such as an ADS, is extended to two energy groups with the inclusion of delayed neutrons. This paper presents a full derivation of the variance to mean formula with the inclusion of two energy groups and delayed neutrons. The results are illustrated quantitatively and discussed in physical terms.

  5. Feasibility of alpha particle measurement in a magnetically confined plasma by CO2 laser Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion-product alpha particles will dominate the behavior of the next generation of ignited D-T fusion reactors. Advanced diagnostics will be required to characterize the energy deposition of these fast alpha particles in the magnetically confined plasma. For small-angle coherent Thomson scattering of a CO2 laser beam from such a plasma, a resonance in the scattered power occurs near 900 with respect to the magnetic field direction. This spatial concentration permits a simplified detection of the scattered laser power from the plasma using a heterodyne system. The signal produced by the presence of fusion-product alpha particles in an ignited plasma is calculated to be well above the noise level, which results from statistical variations of the background signal produced by scattering from free electrons. 7 refs

  6. The implications of particle energy and acidic media on gross alpha and gross beta determination using liquid scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata-Garcia, D. [Laboratori de Radiologia Ambiental (LRA), Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1-11 Planta 3, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Llaurado, M., E-mail: montse.llaurado@ub.edu [Laboratori de Radiologia Ambiental (LRA), Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1-11 Planta 3, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rauret, G. [Laboratori de Radiologia Ambiental (LRA), Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1-11 Planta 3, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    The interaction of humans with radioactivity present in the environment from natural and artificial sources necessitates an evaluation of its risk on human health. Gross alpha and gross beta activities can provide a rapid evaluation of the radioactive content of a sample and can be simultaneously determined by using liquid scintillation counters. However, calibration of the liquid scintillation counter is required and is affected by many factors, such as particle energy and the acidity of the media. This study investigates what effect the particle energy used for calibration has on misclassification and how to account for this misclassification in routine measurements. The variability in measurement produced by the final pH, as well as any acids used in sample treatment, was also studied. These results showed that the most commonly used acid for these types of analyses, HNO{sub 3}, produced a high amount of misclassifications at very low pH. The results improved when HCl was used to adjust the sample to low pH. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the effect of alpha and beta energies on PSA optimisation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum PSA shifts to higher values as the alpha energy increases. Beta energies do not affect it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the effect of pH on the simultaneous determination of gross alpha/beta activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HNO{sub 3} produces a high amount of misclassification at very low pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results improve when HCl is used to adjust the sample to low pH.

  7. Review of alpha_s determinations

    OpenAIRE

    Pich, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The present knowledge on the strong coupling is briefly summarized. The most precise determinations of alpha_s, at different energies, are reviewed and compared at the Z mass scale, using the predicted QCD running. The impressive agreement achieved between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions constitutes a beautiful and very significant test of Asymptotic Freedom, establishing QCD as the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. The world average value of the strong coupl...

  8. Low geometry counter for the absolute measurement of the activity of alpha-emitting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low-geometry counter is described which allows the absolute determination of the activity for alpha-emitting sources. A Si implanted detector is used to obtain the spectrum of the sample. Two samples are measured with this counter and a 2 π gridded ion chamber. The results an their uncertainties for both instruments are discussed. (Author)

  9. A measurement system for alpha and beta surface emission rate using MWPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye; Fang, Fang; Ren, Jia-Fu; He, Lin-Feng; Tang, Fang-Dong; Xu, Yi-He; Ding, Wei-Cheng

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a large area multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a standard for the measurement of alpha and beta surface emission rate at the Shanghai Institute of Measurement and Testing Technology (SIMT). To shorten the preparation time for chamber gas refilling, a self-designed gas control unit was adopted. Various characteristics of the system have been studied. The uncertainties were analysed. Three certified alpha plane sources (Am-241) and six certified beta plane sources (Tl-204 and Sr-90/Y-90) were measured by this system. The results show excellent agreement with the surface emission rate reported by the National Institute of Measuring, China (NIM) that En values of all measured sources are within ±1. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41204133)

  10. Alpha particle density and energy distributions in tandem mirrors using Monte-Carlo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have simulated the alpha thermalization process using a Monte-Carlo technique, in which the alpha guiding center is followed between simulated collisions and Spitzer's collision model is used for the alpha-plasma interaction. Monte-Carlo techniques are used to determine the alpha radial birth position, the alpha particle position at a collision, and the angle scatter and dispersion at a collision. The plasma is modeled as a hot reacting core, surrounded by a cold halo plasma (T approx.50 eV). Alpha orbits that intersect the halo lose 90% of their energy to the halo electrons because of the halo drag, which is ten times greater than the drag in the core. The uneven drag across the alpha orbit also produces an outward, radial, guiding center drift. This drag drift is dependent on the plasma density and temperature radial profiles. We have modeled these profiles and have specifically studied a single-scale-length model, in which the density scale length (r/sub pD/) equals the temperature scale length (r/sub pT/), and a two-scale-length model, in which r/sub pD//r/sub pT/ = 1.1

  11. Measurement of alpha activity of Indian chewing tobacco samples using track etch technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha activity produced by eight different brands of chewing tobaccos have been measured using LR-115 type II plastic detector in the sandwiched pellet technique. Maximum value of alpha activity, 9.43 tracks cm-2 d-1 has been found in the raw tobacco leaves (Sample No. 8) while the minimum value 0.84 tracks cm-2 d-1 was shown by Sample No. 1. Other brands showed intermediate values which are also reported in this paper. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  12. Sources of variability in alpha emissivity measurements at LA and ULA levels, a multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, Brendan D., E-mail: brendan@xia.com [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Rd., Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Coleman, Stuart; Warburton, William K. [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Rd., Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Autran, Jean-Luc [Aix-Marseille University and CNRS, Faculté des Sciences–Service 142, F-13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Clark, Brett M. [Honeywell, 15128 E. Euclid Ave., Spokane, WA 99216 (United States); Cooley, Jodi [Southern Methodist University–Physics Department, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Gordon, Michael S. [IBM TJ Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Rd., Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Zhu, Zhengmao [IBM SRDC, 2070 Rte 52, Bldg 300, 1W4-111, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Alpha emissivity measurements are important in the semiconductor industry for assessing the suitability of materials for use in production processes. A recently published round-robin study that circulated the same samples to several alpha counting centers showed wide center-to-center variations in measured alpha emissivity. A separate analysis of these results hypothesized that much of the variation might arise from differences in sample-to-entrance window separations. XIA recently introduced an ultra low background counter, the UltraLo-1800 (“UltraLo”), that operates in a fundamentally different manner from the proportional counters used at most of the centers in the original study. In particular, by placing the sample within the counting volume, it eliminates the sample-to-entrance window separation issue noted above, and so offers an opportunity to test this hypothesis. In this work we briefly review how the UltraLo operates and describe a new round-robin study conducted entirely on UltraLo instruments using a set of standard samples that included two samples used in the original study. This study shows that, for LA (“Low Alpha” between 2 and 50 α/khr-cm{sup 2}) sample measurements, the only remaining site-to-site variations were due to counting statistics. Variations in ULA (“Ultra-Low Alpha”<2 α/khr-cm{sup 2}) sample measurements were reduced three-fold, compared to the earlier study, with the measurements suggesting that residual activity variations now primarily arise from site-to-site differences in the cosmogenic background. - Highlights: • We sent a set of samples to 6 counting centers for alpha emissivity measurement. • The counting centers conducted measurements using a recently developed instrument. • The variability in measurement results is examined and compared to a prior study. • Minimal variability observed in measurements of LA level samples. • Variability in ULA measurements appears to be due to cosmogenic background.

  13. Sources of variability in alpha emissivity measurements at LA and ULA levels, a multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha emissivity measurements are important in the semiconductor industry for assessing the suitability of materials for use in production processes. A recently published round-robin study that circulated the same samples to several alpha counting centers showed wide center-to-center variations in measured alpha emissivity. A separate analysis of these results hypothesized that much of the variation might arise from differences in sample-to-entrance window separations. XIA recently introduced an ultra low background counter, the UltraLo-1800 (“UltraLo”), that operates in a fundamentally different manner from the proportional counters used at most of the centers in the original study. In particular, by placing the sample within the counting volume, it eliminates the sample-to-entrance window separation issue noted above, and so offers an opportunity to test this hypothesis. In this work we briefly review how the UltraLo operates and describe a new round-robin study conducted entirely on UltraLo instruments using a set of standard samples that included two samples used in the original study. This study shows that, for LA (“Low Alpha” between 2 and 50 α/khr-cm2) sample measurements, the only remaining site-to-site variations were due to counting statistics. Variations in ULA (“Ultra-Low Alpha”2) sample measurements were reduced three-fold, compared to the earlier study, with the measurements suggesting that residual activity variations now primarily arise from site-to-site differences in the cosmogenic background. - Highlights: • We sent a set of samples to 6 counting centers for alpha emissivity measurement. • The counting centers conducted measurements using a recently developed instrument. • The variability in measurement results is examined and compared to a prior study. • Minimal variability observed in measurements of LA level samples. • Variability in ULA measurements appears to be due to cosmogenic background

  14. The large-scale cross-correlation of Damped Lyman Alpha Systems with the Lyman Alpha Forest: First Measurements from BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; Arnau, Eduard; Carithers, Bill; Lee, Khee-Gan; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Rich, James; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; White, Martin; York, Donald G

    2012-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the large-scale cross-correlation of Lyman alpha forest absorption and Damped Lyman alpha systems (DLA), using the 9th Data Release of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The cross-correlation is clearly detected on scales up to 40 Mpc/h and is well fitted by the linear theory prediction of the standard Cold Dark Matter model of structure formation with the expected redshift distortions, confirming its origin in the gravitational evolution of structure. The amplitude of the DLA-Lyman alpha cross-correlation depends on only one free parameter, the bias factor of the DLA systems, once the Lyman alpha forest bias factors are known from independent Lyman alpha forest correlation measurements. We measure the DLA bias factor to be b_D = (2.17 +/- 0.20) beta_F^{0.22}, where the Lyman alpha forest redshift distortion parameter beta_F is expected to be above unity. This bias factor implies a typical host halo mass for DLAs that is much larger than expected in present...

  15. Review of alpha_s determinations

    CERN Document Server

    Pich, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The present knowledge on the strong coupling is briefly summarized. The most precise determinations of alpha_s, at different energies, are reviewed and compared at the Z mass scale, using the predicted QCD running. The impressive agreement achieved between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions constitutes a beautiful and very significant test of Asymptotic Freedom, establishing QCD as the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. The world average value of the strong coupling is found to be alpha_s(M_Z^2)= 0.1186 \\pm 0.0007.

  16. Alpha spectroscopy in CR-39 SSNTDs using energy simulation and matrix of energy equations for open field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encouraged with the success of the matrix of energy equations in resolving alpha spectra for narrow energy band [O.A. Bondarenko, P.L. Salmon, D.L. Henshaw, A.P. Fews, Radiat. Meas. 26 (1996) 59; O.A. Bondarenko, P.L. Salmon, D.L. Henshaw, A.P. Fews, A.N. Ross, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 369 (1996) 582] and wide energy band [E.M. Awad, A.A. Soliman, Y.S. Rammah, Phys. Lett. A 369 (5-6) (2007) 359] as well, the present work extends the applicability of this method to work out for open field studies. 241Am alpha source was used for irradiating CR-39 samples in air at normal temperature and pressure and at three different distances to obtain three different energies. Alpha particles were sorted to ten different bins according to their dip angle and the energy inside each bin was determined using alpha particle range-energy relation. Then, the energy matrix inside each bin was constructed using some selected calibration tracks. This matrix was composed of two track axes, the track minor axis (m) and diameter of etched out track end (d) of some selected elliptical tracks. The energy E in (m,d) coordinates was given by Ek=Σi,j=02aijdkimkj. The adjusting parameters aij were obtained by solving an over-determined system of energy equations using the SVD method. The three energies in each bin were well resolved

  17. Radon measurement in α energy spectrum and its influence factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radon is one radioactive gas which should be monitored. Purpose: High sensitivity, good stability for distinguishing the characteristics of radon and thorium in air radon content measurement are required. Methods: One alpha energy spectrum measuring device was designed based on diffusion-accumulation theory. And the major influence factors were discussed. At the same time, the preliminary solution was proposed and testing was progressed. Results: We have got the results of energy calibration curve, energy resolution, sensitivity and other important information by standard radon chamber calibration. Conclusions: The experimental results show that this scheme is feasible and the performance is suited to the national standards for air radon measurement requirements. (authors)

  18. Measurements of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $\\alpha$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si

    OpenAIRE

    Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.; Kiener, J.; Thibaud, J. -P.; Tatischeff, V.; Deloncle, I.; Coc, A.; Duprat, J.; Hamadache, C.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Dalouzy, J. -C.; de Grancey, F.; Oliveira, F.; Dayras, F.; De Séréville, N.; Pellegriti, M. -G.

    2010-01-01

    $\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and...

  19. A new CVD Diamond Mosaic-Detector for (n,$\\alpha$) Cross-Section Measurements at the n_TOF Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, C; Guerrero, C; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Barbagallo, M; Becares, V; Becvar, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calvino, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapico, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Cortes-Giraldo, M.A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; Garcia, A.R; Giubrone, G; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B; Goncalves, I.F; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Hernandez-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D.G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; KäPpeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krticka, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L.S; Losito, R; Mallick, A; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martinez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P.F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P.M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J.M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M.S; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sabate-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J.L; Tarrio, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M.J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Wright, T; Zugec, P

    2013-01-01

    At the n_TOF experiment at CERN a dedicated single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) Diamond Mosaic-Detector has been developed for (n,$\\alpha$) cross-section measurements. The detector, characterized by an excellent time and energy resolution, consists of an array of 9 sCVD diamond diodes. The detector has been characterized and a cross-section measurement has been performed for the $^{59}$Ni(n,$\\alpha$)$^{56}$Fe reaction in 2012. The characteristics of the detector, its performance and the promising preliminary results of the experiment are presented.

  20. New $\\alpha$ ANC measurement of the 1/2$^+$ state in $^{17}$O at 6.356 MeV, that dominates the $^{13}$C($\\alpha$,n)$^{16}$O reaction rate at temperatures relevant for the s-process

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, M L; Koshchiy, E; Baby, L T; Belarge, J; Kemper, K W; Kuchera, A N; Santiago-Gonzalez, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of the $^{13}$C($\\alpha$,$n$)$^{16}$O reaction cross section is important for the understanding of the s-process in AGB stars, since it is considered to be the main source of neutrons. The sub-threshold 1/2$^+$ state at excitation energy of 6.356 MeV in $^{17}$O has a strong influence on the reaction cross section at energies relevant for astrophysics. Several experiments have been performed to determine the contribution of this state to the $^{13}$C($\\alpha,n)^{16}$O reaction rate. Nevertheless, significant discrepancies between different measurements remain. Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate these discrepancies. Method: An 8 MeV $^{13}$C beam (below the Coulomb barrier) was used to study the $\\alpha$-transfer reaction $^6$Li($^{13}$C,$d$)$^{17}$O. Results: The squared Coulomb modified ANC of the 1/2$^+$ state in $^{17}$O measured in this work is $(\\tilde C^{^{17}\\text{O}(1/2+)}_{\\alpha-^{13}\\text{C}})^2=3.6\\pm0.7\\hspace{0.2cm}\\text{fm}^{-1}$. Conclusions: Discrep...

  1. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  2. Questions of the optical potential for alpha-particles at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the high-priority elements for the accelerator driven systems (ADS) and fusion-reactor projects are also Zr, Mo and Li, so that the corresponding nuclear data for nucleon-, deuteron-, and α-particle interactions are of actual interest for neutron production, activation, heating, shielding requirements, and material damage estimation as well as radioactive waste transmutation projects. By using advanced nuclear models that account for details of nuclear structure and the quantum nature of the nuclear scattering, significant gains in accuracy can be achieved below 150 MeV, where intranuclear cascade calculations become less accurate. It is why this work reports on the progress of the analysis of optical potentials for nucleons, deuterons and α-particles on isotopes of these elements, and corresponding reaction cross sections calculations. The elastic-scattering angular distributions measured at deuteron energies between 3 and 50 MeV on the target nucleus 6Li, and between 1 and 14.7 MeV for the target nucleus 7Li have been thus analyzed by using the computer codes SCAT2 for pure elastic scattering processes and FRESCO for the coupled reaction channels for taking into account the effects of the elastic and inelastic alpha transfer in the d+6Li interaction. The good overall agreement obtained with the experimental data for both 6,7Li target nuclei from 1 to 50 MeV has finally proved suitable optical model potentials (OMPs). Within the double folding formalism of the alpha-nucleus optical potential, used previously for a semi-microscopic analysis of the alpha-particle elastic scattering on A∼100 nuclei at energies below 32 MeV, effects due to changes of the nuclear density at a finite temperature are considered. Parameterizations of the double-folding (DF) real potential as well as of a regional phenomenological potential have been used in the study of the (n,α) reaction cross sections for the target nuclei 92,95,98,100Mo. Taking the microscopic DF potentials

  3. The $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Day, J P; Elhanafy, M; Smith, E; Woodhouse, R; Papp, Z

    2011-01-01

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-$\\alpha$ resonance energies, experimental phase shifts and three-$\\alpha$ binding energies. We found that essentially a simple gaussian can provide a good description of two-$\\alpha$ and three-$\\alpha$ experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  4. Effect of UV radiation on the bulk etching rate activation energy and response of Cr-39 to alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of CR-39 plastic sheets is exposed to UV radiation from mercury lamp for different periods of time. Then irradiated by alpha particles from 241Am point source at different energies. The Bulk etching rate activation energy is calculated for non-exposed and exposed sheets for time periods of 1.5 and 3 hr. It is found that their energy values are 0.76, 0.75 and 0.72 eV respectively. The track diameter (d) is calculated for different exposure times, it is found that d increased gradually as the exposure time increases before saturation. Further, two samples are irradiated by alpha particles but one is pre-exposed to UV for a time period of 3 h before being exposed to alpha, then the response function (V) is calculated for both. The values of V decreased for pre-exposed sample. The present data are the first measurements of the recent nuclear track laboratory at the experimental nuclear physics department, NRC, AEA

  5. Cross-section measurement for the {sup 67}Zn(n, {alpha}){sup 64}Ni reaction at 6.0 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guohui; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Jiaguo; Liu, Jiaming; Chen, Jinxiang [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Gledenov, Yu.M.; Sedysheva, M.V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Khuukhenkhuu, G. [National University of Mongolia, Nuclear Research Centre, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Szalanski, P.J. [Institute of Physics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland)

    2010-01-15

    Up to now, no experimental cross-section data exist for the {sup 67}Zn(n,{alpha}){sup 64}Ni reaction in the MeV neutron energy region. In the present work, the cross-section of the {sup 67}Zn(n,{alpha}) {sup 64}Ni reaction was measured at E{sub n}=6.0 MeV. Experiments were performed at the Van de Graaff accelerator of Peking University, China. Fast neutrons were produced through the D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction using a deuterium gas target. Absolute neutron flux was determined by a small {sup 238}U fission chamber and a BF{sub 3} long counter was used as a neutron flux monitor. A twin gridded ionization chamber was employed as the {alpha} -particle detector and two back-to-back {sup 67}Zn samples were used for {alpha} events measurement. Background was measured and subtracted from foreground. The measured cross-section of the {sup 67}Zn(n,{alpha}){sup 64}Ni reaction was 7.3(1{+-}15%) mb at 6.0 MeV. The present result was compared with existing evaluations and TALYS code calculations. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of the CKM Angle Alpha at the BABAR Detector Using B Meson Decays to Rho Final States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalyi, Attila; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-10-16

    This thesis contains the results of an analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} using 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. From a fitted signal yield of 617 {+-} 52 events, the longitudinal polarizations fraction, f{sub L}, of the decay is measured to be 0.978 {+-} 0.014(stat){sub -0.029}{sup +0.021}(syst). The nearly fully longitudinal dominance of the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} decay allows for a measurement of the time dependent CP parameters S{sub L} and C{sub L}, where the first parameter is sensitive to mixing induced CP violation and the second one to direct CP violation. From the same signal yield, these values are found to be S{sub L} = -0.33 {+-} 0.24(stat){sub -0.14}{sup +0.08}(syst) and C{sub L} = - 0.03 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst). The CKM angle {alpha} is then determined, using these results and the branching fractions and polarizations of the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0}. This measurement is done with an isospin analysis, in which a triangle is constructed from the isospin amplitudes of these three decay modes. A {chi}{sup 2} expression that includes the measured quantities expressed as the lengths of the sides of the isospin triangles is constructed and minimized to determine a confidence level on {alpha}. Selecting the solution compatible with the Standard Model, one obtains {alpha} = 100{sup o} {+-} 13{sup o}.

  7. Direct measurement of alpha_QED(mZ)at the FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Janot, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    When the measurements from the FCC-ee become available, an improved determination of the standard-model "input" parameters will be needed to fully exploit the new precision data towards either constraining or fitting the parameters of beyond-the-standard-model theories. Among these input parameters is the electromagnetic coupling constant estimated at the Z mass scale, alpha_QED(mZ). The measurement of the muon forward- backward asymmetry at the FCC-ee, just below and just above the Z pole, can be used to make a direct determination of alpha_QED(mZ) with an accuracy deemed adequate for an optimal use of the FCC-ee precision data.

  8. Technique for measuring the losses of alpha particles to the wall in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed to measure the losses of alpha particles to the wall in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) or any large deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning tokamak by a nuclear technique. For this purpose, a chamber containing a suitable fluid would be mounted near the wall of the tokamak. Alpha particles would enter the chamber through a thin window and cause nuclear reactions in the fluid. The material would then be transported through a tube to a remote, low-background location for measurement of the activity. The most favorable reaction suggested here is 10B(α,n)13N, although 14N(α,γ)18F and others may be possible. The system, the sensitivity, the probe design, and the sources of error are described

  9. NUCLEIDE-LARA, a library for alpha, X and gamma emissions sorted by increasing energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NUCLEIDE-LARA library presents, for almost 400 radionuclides of practical interest, the tables of alpha, X and gamma emissions sorted by increasing energy, as well as the associated intensity and radioactive half-life of the parent radionuclide. (authors)

  10. Measuring and Comparing Energy Flexibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsomatzis, Emmanouil; Hose, Katja; Pedersen, Torben Bach;

    2015-01-01

    Flexibility in energy supply and demand becomes more and more important with increasing Renewable Energy Sources (RES) production and the emergence of the Smart Grid. So-called prosumers, i.e., entities that produce and/or consume energy, can offer their inherent flexibilities through so......-called demand response and thus help stabilize the energy markets. Thus, prosumer flexibility becomes valuable and the ongoing Danish project TotalFlex [1] explores the use of prosumer flexibility in the energy market using the concept of a flex-offer [2], which captures energy flexibilities in time and...... induced by time and amount individually, and by their com- bination. To this end, we introduce several flexibility measures that take into account the combined effect of time and energy on flex-offer flexibility and discuss their respective pros and cons through a number of realistic examples....

  11. alpha-nucleus potentials, alpha-decay half-lives, and shell closures for superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Systematic alpha-nucleus folding potentials are used to analyze alpha-decay half-lives of superheavy nuclei. Preformation factors of about several per cent are found for all nuclei under study. The systematic behavior of the preformation factors and the volume integrals of the potentials allows to predict alpha-decay energies and half-lives for unknown nuclei. Shell closures can be determined from measured alpha-decay energies using the discontinuity of the volume integral at shell closures. ...

  12. First spectroscopic measurements of [OIII] emission from Lyman-alpha selected galaxies at z ~ 3.1

    CERN Document Server

    McLinden, Emily M; Rhoads, James E; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hibon, Pascale; Richardson, Mark L A; Cresci, Giovanni; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Pasquali, Anna; Bian, Fuyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Woodward, Charles E

    2010-01-01

    We present the first spectroscopic measurements of the [OIII] 5007 A line in two z ~ 3.1 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) using the new near-infrared instrument LUCIFER on the 8.4m Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). We also describe the optical imaging and spectroscopic observations used to identify these Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies. Using the [OIII] line we have measured accurate systemic redshifts for these two galaxies, and discovered a velocity offset between the [OIII] and Ly-alpha lines in both, with the Ly-alpha line peaking 284 and 142 km/s redward of the systemic velocity. These velocity offsets imply that there are powerful outflows in high-redshift LAEs. They also ease the transmission of Ly-alpha photons through the intergalactic medium around the galaxies. By measuring these offsets directly, we can refine both Ly-alpha-based tests for reionization, and Ly-alpha luminosity function measurements where the Ly-alpha forest affects the blue wing of the line. Our work also provides the first direc...

  13. Conception and optimisation of a new apparatus for the radioactive aerosols alpha emitters measurement in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the atmospheric contaminations due to artificial radioelements alpha emitters (239 Pu, 241 Am, 244 Cm,...) is a very difficult problem to resolve because of the three following reasons: the nature of the radiation to detect; very small activities, which correspond to LDCA; existence in the atmosphere of descendants radon and thoron, which are alpha emitters too. To avoid the drawbacks that the present apparatus present, we have conceived, realised and focused a new apparatus based on the following principals: aerosols collection by gas jet technic on solid state support and measurement in real time under a few millibar pression using a solid detector. First of all, we have tried to make the aerosol collection rate better studying the collector nature and dimension influence, the distance between the collector and the gas jet exit and the air flow. Using different supports, we have shown that the energy resolution is not depending on the support nature, but it depends very much on atmospheric conditions. Direct measurements of the radioactive samples are made by the annular detector insered between the nozzle and the collector. The good resolution, the efficacity and the discrimination of natural and artificial contaminations show off the feasibility of this apparatus

  14. Scanning of irradiated silicon detectors using $\\alpha$ particles and low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, G L; Glaser, M; Kohout, Z; Konícek, J; Lemeilleur, F; Leroy, C; Linhart, V; Mares, J J; Pospísil, S; Roy, P; Sopko, B; Sinor, M; Svejda, J; Vorobel, V; Wilhelm, I

    1999-01-01

    In a spectroscopic study of non-irradiated and proton-irradiated silicon diodes, the detectors were illuminated from the front side and from the rear side by various alpha particle sources (mainly ThC') and by monoenergetic protons with energies from 1.0 to 2.5~MeV. Their response characteristics have been studied as a function of the incoming particle energy and the applied bias voltage. The charge collection efficiency was determined as a function of fluence

  15. Two source emission behaviour of alpha fragments of projectile having energy around 1 GeV per nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, V; Pathak, Ramji

    2010-01-01

    The emission of projectile fragments alpha has been studied in ^{84}Kr interactions with nuclei of the nuclear emulsion detector composition at relativistic energy below 2 GeV per nucleon. The angular distribution of projectile fragments alpha in terms of transverse momentum could not be explained by a straight and clean-cut collision geometry hypothesis of Participant - Spectator (PS) Model. Therefore, it is assumed that projectile fragments alpha were produced from two separate sources that belong to the projectile spectator region differing drastically in their temperatures. It has been clearly observed that the emission of projectile fragments alpha are from two different sources. The contribution of projectile fragments alpha from contact layer or hot source is a few percent of the total emission of projectile fragments alphas. Most of the projectile fragments alphas are emitted from the cold source. It has been noticed that the temperature of hot and cold regions are dependent on the projectile mass num...

  16. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  17. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  18. Testing an ionization chamber with gaseous samples and measurements of the (n, alpha) reaction cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Gledenov, Yu M; Salatskii, V I; Sedyshev, P V; Andrzejewski, J; Szalanski, P

    1999-01-01

    A new ionization chamber with gaseous samples (GIC) has been designed and tested on the thermal and resonance neutron beams of FLNP's neutron sources. The exposed gas volume serves as a target for neutrons. The obtained thermal cross sections for the sup 1 sup 7 O(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 4 C, sup 2 sup 1 Ne(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 8 O and sup 3 sup 6 Ar(n, alpha) sup 3 sup 3 S reactions are (233+-12) mb, (0.18+-0.09) mb and (5.43+-0.27) mb, respectively. These measurements have been performed on a pure beam of thermal neutrons from the high flux reactor IBR-2; and they demonstrated high efficiency and reliability of the method. Compared to samples on substrates, the application of gaseous samples makes the beam background essentially lower, and what is more important, the background component is totally absent due to the absence of Li and B microimpurities in gaseous samples while they do present in the samples on substrates. The method is also applicable to measurements with resonance neutrons. The recovery capabili...

  19. Sources of Variability in Alpha Emissivity Measurements at LA and ULA Levels, a Multicenter Study

    CERN Document Server

    McNally, B D; Warburton, W K; Autran, J; Clark, B M; Cooley, J; Gordon, M S; Zhu, Z

    2014-01-01

    Alpha emissivity measurements are important in the semiconductor industry for assessing the suitability of materials for use in production processes. A recently published round-robin study that circulated the same samples to several alpha counting centers showed wide center-to-center variations in measured alpha emissivity. A separate analysis of these results hypothesized that much of the variation might arise from differences in sample-to-entrance window separations. XIA recently introduced an ultra low background counter, the UltraLo-1800 (UltraLo), that operates in a fundamentally different manner from the proportional counters used at most of the centers in the original study. In particular, by placing the sample within the counting volume, it eliminates the sample-to-entrance window separation issue noted above, and so offers an opportunity to test this hypothesis. In this work we briefly review how the UltraLo operates and describe a new round-robin study conducted entirely on UltraLo instruments using...

  20. Synthesis of a Round Robin about measurement of gross alpha and beta in various waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2011 the CETAMA (Analytical Methods Committee) has organized 3 Round-Robin tests successively to determine the capability of laboratories to measure gross alpha and beta in various waters. Different parameters are considered such as the origin of radionuclides (natural and artificial) and the variation of the salt content (from a low mineralized solution to highly mineralized water such as seawater). Technical specifications are defined within the working group 'Water analysis' in order to solve some problems observed in measurement of gross alpha and beta activity concentrations. The objective is to identify the causes of a discrepancy between the values obtained from the total counts and the sum of the reference values of each radionuclide alone. These Round-Robin tests allow accredited laboratories (or nearly accredited) to train in order to obtain accepted results in French regulatory proficiency tests organized by the IRSN. From the reference values of the various radionuclides (delivered by a primary metrology laboratory) contained in the samples, the averages of the results obtained by the laboratories are calculated and compared. Synthesis of the results highlighted the difficulty in obtaining reference values for gross alpha and gross beta activity. A method is proposed, established from standard and official guidelines based on robust calculation, to determine these assigned values with their associated uncertainty. Feedback from the various interlaboratory comparisons led to suggesting recommendations, particularly in terms of calibration and sample preparation, which allow a significant improvement in the accuracy (trueness and precision) of the method. (authors)

  1. Alpha spectroscopy in CR-39 SSNTDs using energy simulation and matrix of energy equations for open field studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awad, E.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menofia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt); Department of General Sciences, Yanbu Industrial College, PO Box 30436, Madinat Yanbu Al-Sinaiya (Saudi Arabia); Soliman, A.A. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education (Al Arish), Suez Canal University, 45111 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Bisha Teachers' College, King Khalid University, Bisha, PO Box 551 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: asoliman_99@yahoo.com; El-Samman, H.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menofia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt); Arafa, W.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Women, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Rammah, Y.S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menofia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt)

    2008-04-21

    Encouraged with the success of the matrix of energy equations in resolving alpha spectra for narrow energy band [O.A. Bondarenko, P.L. Salmon, D.L. Henshaw, A.P. Fews, Radiat. Meas. 26 (1996) 59; O.A. Bondarenko, P.L. Salmon, D.L. Henshaw, A.P. Fews, A.N. Ross, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 369 (1996) 582] and wide energy band [E.M. Awad, A.A. Soliman, Y.S. Rammah, Phys. Lett. A 369 (5-6) (2007) 359] as well, the present work extends the applicability of this method to work out for open field studies. {sup 241}Am alpha source was used for irradiating CR-39 samples in air at normal temperature and pressure and at three different distances to obtain three different energies. Alpha particles were sorted to ten different bins according to their dip angle and the energy inside each bin was determined using alpha particle range-energy relation. Then, the energy matrix inside each bin was constructed using some selected calibration tracks. This matrix was composed of two track axes, the track minor axis (m) and diameter of etched out track end (d) of some selected elliptical tracks. The energy E in (m,d) coordinates was given by E{sub k}={sigma}{sub i,j=0}{sup 2}a{sub ij}d{sub k}{sup i}m{sub k}{sup j}. The adjusting parameters a{sub ij} were obtained by solving an over-determined system of energy equations using the SVD method. The three energies in each bin were well resolved.

  2. Cross-section measurement of the 18F(alpha,p)21Ne reaction and possible implication for neutron production in explosive helium burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Hye Young [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couder, Manoel [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Falahat, Sascha [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Gorres, Joachim [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Lamm, Larry O [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Le Blanc, P J [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; O' Brien, Shawn P [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Palumbo, Annalia [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Stech, Edward J [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Strandberg, Elizabeth [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Tan, Wanpeng [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Ugalde, Claudio [ANL; Wiescher, Michael C. F. [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME

    2009-01-01

    At the high temperature and density conditions of hot or explosive helium burning, the {sup 18}F({alpha},p){sup 21}Ne reaction may compete successfully wilh the {sup 18}F({beta}{sup +}{nu}) decay. This suggesls {sup 21}Ne({alpha},n) as an alternative neutron source in Ihe r-process. We have determined the total cross section of the {sup 18}F({alpha},p){sup 21}Ne reaction by studying the time-reverse reaction {sup 21}Ne(p,{alpha}){sup 18}F. Using the activation technique, the total reaction yield was measured in the proton beam energy range of 2.3-4.0 MeV, which corresponds to energies of 0.5-2.1 MeV in the {sup 18}F + {alpha} system. The resulting yield curve was analyzed in terms of the thick target formalism and the R-matrix theory. The reaction rate was deduced experimentally for the first time for the temperature of 0.1 < T{sub 9} < I. The experimemal reaction rate was compared with Hauser-Feshbach predictions. The astrophysical implications of the new rate are discussed.

  3. Measurement of the Strong Coupling Constant $\\alpha_s$ and the Vector and Axial-Vector Spectral Functions in Hadronic Tau Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Evans, H G; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1999-01-01

    The spectral functions of the vector current and the axial-vector current have been measured in hadronic tau decays using the OPAL detector at LEP. Within the framework of the Operator Product Expansion a simultaneous determination of the strong coupling constant alpha_s, the non-perturbative operators of dimension 6 and 8 and of the gluon condensate has been performed. Different perturbative descriptions have been compared to the data. The Contour Improved Fixed Order Perturbation Theory gives alpha_s(mtau**2) = 0.348 +- 0.009 +- 0.019 at the tau-mass scale and alpha_s(mz**2) = 0.1219 +- 0.0010 +- 0.0017 at the Z-mass scale. The values obtained for alpha_s(mz**2) using Fixed Order Perturbation Theory or Renormalon Chain Resummation are 2.3% and 4.1% smaller, respectively. The running of the strong coupling between s_0 ~1.3 GeV**2 and s_0 = mtau**2 has been tested from direct fits to the integrated differential hadronic decay rate R_tau. A test of the saturation of QCD sum rules at the tau-mass scale has been...

  4. K-alpha conversion efficiency measurments for x-ray scattering in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Urry, M K; Robey, H; Niemann, C; Landen, O L; Morse, E; Glenzer, S H

    2006-11-21

    The conversion efficiency of ultra short-pulse laser radiation to K-{alpha} x-rays has been measured for various chlorine-containing targets to be used as x-ray scattering probes of dense plasmas. The spectral and temporal properties of these sources will allow spectrally-resolved x-ray scattering probing with picosecond temporal resolution required for measuring the plasma conditions in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Simulations of x-ray scattering spectra from these plasmas show that fuel capsule density, capsule ablator density, and shock timing information may be inferred.

  5. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2014-01-01

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 μm were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 μm. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 μm scintillator plates.

  6. Measuring and monitoring energy poverty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article undertakes a review of alternative measures and indicators of energy poverty targeted to specific audiences and for particular purposes. At the national and international scales there have been some efforts for constructing measures of energy poverty. However, much more needs to be done to develop an internationally consistent measurement framework and to put in place data collection systems that will enable regular reporting. At the programme and project level, indicator systems by necessity need to be designed for specific purposes. Nevertheless, the article proposes that in many instances it is desirable to widen the scope of metrics used for designing and evaluating policies and programmes. In the past, monitoring and evaluation indicators have focused largely on outputs, service delivery or dissemination. Central to the recommendations laid out in the paper is the call for widening the focus of evaluation and necessity to design indicators that adequately assess the needs of beneficiaries and describe the living conditions of families and communities, who are targeted by such programmes and initiatives. - Highlights: ► Consistent measurement frameworks and regular data collection systems on energy poverty are needed. ► Metrics used for designing and evaluating energy access programmes should be widened. ► Indicators that adequately assess needs and describe living conditions of targeted beneficiaries are required.

  7. Clinical value of combined measurement of serum alpha-fetoprotein, alpha-L-fucosidase and ferritin levels in the diagnosis of primary liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of combined measurement of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), alpha-L-fucosidase (AFU) and ferritin (SF) levels in the diagnosis of primary liver cancer. Methods: Serum AFP, AFU (with RIA) and SF (with biochemical method) were determined in 52 patients with primary liver cancer and 40 controls. Results: The positive rates of AFP, AFU and SF in patient with liver cancer were 82.7%, 86.6% and 76.9%, respectively. Positive rates with combined measurement of AFP plus AFU, AFP plus SF, and AFP plus AFU, SF were 94.2%, 90.4% and 98.1% respectively. Conclusion: Combined measurement of AFP, AFU and SF can significantly increase the positive rate in the diagnosis of primary liver cancer. (authors)

  8. Measurement of the 10 keV resonance in the $^{10}$B($p, \\alpha_0$)$^7$Be reaction via the Trojan Horse Method

    CERN Document Server

    Spitaleri, C; Puglia, S M R; Romano, S; La Cognata, M; Crucilla, V; Pizzone, R G; Rapisarda, G G; Sergi, M L; Del Santo, M Gimenez; Carlin, N; Munhoz, M G; Souza, F A; de Toledo, A Szanto; Tumino, A; Irgaziev, B; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Tabacaru, G; Burjan, V; Kroha, V; Hons, Z; Mrazek, J; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Li, Chengbo; Wen, Qungang; Wakabayashi, Y; Yamaguchi, H

    2014-01-01

    The $^{10}$B(p,$\\alpha_0$)$^7$Be bare nucleus astrophysical S(E)-factor has been measured for the first time at energies from about 100 keV down to about 5 keV by means of the Trojan Horse Method (THM). In this energy region, the S(E)-factor is strongly dominated by the 8.699 MeV $^{11}$C level (J$^{\\pi}$=$\\frac{5}{2}$$^+$), producing an s-wave resonance centered at about 10 keV in the entrance channel. Up to now, only the high energy tail of this resonant has been measured, while the low-energy trend is extrapolated from the available direct data. The THM has been applied to the quasi-free $^2$H($^{10}$B,$\\alpha_0$$^7$Be)n reaction induced at a boron-beam energy of 24.5 MeV. An accurate analysis brings to the determination of the $^{10}$B(p,$\\alpha_0$)$^7$Be S(E)-factor and of the corresponding electron screening potential $U_e$, thus giving for the first time an independent evaluation of it.

  9. Systematic measurements of proton- and alpha-capture cross sections relevant to the modelling of the p process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harissopulos, S. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Spyrou, A. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Lagoyannis, A. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Zarkadas, Ch. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Becker, H.-W. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Rolfs, C. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Strieder, F. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Hammer, J.W. [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Dewald, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Zell, K.-O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Brentano, P. von [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Julin, R. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Demetriou, P. [IAA, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Goriely, S. [IAA, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-07-25

    Several in-beam cross section measurements of proton- as well as {alpha}-capture reactions in the Se-Sb region have been carried out to obtain global input parameters for Hauser-Feshbach (HF) calculations. In total, 20 (p,{gamma}) and 7 ({alpha}, {gamma}) reactions were measured. We compare some of these results with Hauser-Feshbach calculations using various optical model potentials and nuclear level densities.

  10. Alpha-decay energies of superheavy nuclei for the Fayans functional

    CERN Document Server

    Tolokonnikov, S V; Kortelainen, M; Lutostansky, Yu S; Saperstein, E E

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-decay energies for several chains of super-heavy nuclei are calculated by using Fayans functional FaNDF$^0$. They are compared to the experimental data and predictions of two Skyrme functionals, SLy4 and SkM*, and of the macro-micro method as well. The corresponding lifetimes are calculated with the use of the semi-phenomenological formulas by Parkhomenko and Sobiczewski and by Royer and Zhang.

  11. Evaluation of different parameters affecting the liquid scintillation spectrometry measurement of gross alpha and beta index in water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid scintillation spectrometry is a fast competitive technique for the simultaneous evaluation of gross alpha and beta indexes. However, the implementation of this technique should not be considered as straightforward, and the pre-concentration methods to decrease the detection limit together with quenching and alpha, and beta crossover corrections should be carefully chosen according to the needs of the laboratory. Both aspects are being approached in this work as to find an easy and robust method for alpha/beta measurement in water samples, taking into account the quenching and alpha/beta crossover interferences effects. Results showed that most of the pre-concentration methods increased the quenching in the measurement, although HNO3 0.05 M points to be the best solution for pre-concentration and re-dissolution of the sample as converges into low quenching and maximum recovery. Subsequently, in the measurement of water samples with different conductivities, the analysis of the raw counts to obtain gross alpha and beta indexes was carried out using different approaches to implement quenching and interference corrections. If quenching and salt content in the sample are relatively low, interference and quenching-efficiency corrections do not improve the accuracy of the results within the usual precision assumed for a result of gross alpha and beta index (25%). Special attention must be paid when corrections are applied to high quenched or saline samples and when alpha and beta activities values are different in several orders of magnitude. - Highlights: → Developed method for simultaneously quantifying gross alpha and gross beta indexes based on LSC was as accurate and precise as the results obtained from methods based on gas proportional counting and ZnS alpha counting. → Alpha/beta crossover and/or quenching corrections were applied and the results obtained did not improve accuracy within 25% dispersion, a widespread acceptance limit for gross alpha and

  12. Evaluation of different parameters affecting the liquid scintillation spectrometry measurement of gross alpha and beta index in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Villa, M. [Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion. Servicio Radioisotopos. Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Casacuberta, N. [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals-Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona. Spain (Spain); Penalver, A.; Borrull, F. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Aguilar, C., E-mail: carme.aguilar@urv.cat [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Liquid scintillation spectrometry is a fast competitive technique for the simultaneous evaluation of gross alpha and beta indexes. However, the implementation of this technique should not be considered as straightforward, and the pre-concentration methods to decrease the detection limit together with quenching and alpha, and beta crossover corrections should be carefully chosen according to the needs of the laboratory. Both aspects are being approached in this work as to find an easy and robust method for alpha/beta measurement in water samples, taking into account the quenching and alpha/beta crossover interferences effects. Results showed that most of the pre-concentration methods increased the quenching in the measurement, although HNO{sub 3} 0.05 M points to be the best solution for pre-concentration and re-dissolution of the sample as converges into low quenching and maximum recovery. Subsequently, in the measurement of water samples with different conductivities, the analysis of the raw counts to obtain gross alpha and beta indexes was carried out using different approaches to implement quenching and interference corrections. If quenching and salt content in the sample are relatively low, interference and quenching-efficiency corrections do not improve the accuracy of the results within the usual precision assumed for a result of gross alpha and beta index (25%). Special attention must be paid when corrections are applied to high quenched or saline samples and when alpha and beta activities values are different in several orders of magnitude. - Highlights: > Developed method for simultaneously quantifying gross alpha and gross beta indexes based on LSC was as accurate and precise as the results obtained from methods based on gas proportional counting and ZnS alpha counting. > Alpha/beta crossover and/or quenching corrections were applied and the results obtained did not improve accuracy within 25% dispersion, a widespread acceptance limit for gross alpha and

  13. Use of proportional gas scintillator in absolute measurements of alpha-gamma emitter activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute activity of U-235 contained in a U3 O8 sample was measured utilizing a sum-coincidence circuit which selects only the alpha particles which are simultaneous with the 143 KeV and 186 KeV gamma radiations from the Th-231 (product nucleus). The alpha particles were detected by means of a new type of a gas scintillating chamber, in which the light emitted by excitation of the gas atoms, due to the passage of a charged incoming particle, has its intensity increased by the action of an applied electric field. The gamma radiations were detected by means of a NaI(Tl) 1'' x 11/2'' scintillation detector. The value obtained for the half-life of U-235 was compared with the data available from various observers which used different experimental techniques. It is shown tht the results, are in excellent agreement with the best international data available on the subject and that, therefore, the sum-coincidence technique constitutes an important method for such measurements. (Author)

  14. Renewable energy: Method and measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis presents various possibilities for renewable energy in Norway. The wind power would give a practical and economic alternative. The external costs for the wind power would be moderate. In chapter 3 the utility cost analysis for renewable alternatives are studied relative to the macroeconomic efficiency. Some methodical problems and how these analyses are used are reviewed. In the practical utility cost analyses wind power is studied relative to gas power which is the non-renewable alternative present in Norway today. A qualitative part is included. It is not possible to determine whether wind power is preferable to gas power in the macroeconomic perspective. Wind power would be the choice if high environmental and CO2 cleaning costs are expected. The first conclusion to be drawn is that it is difficult to decide whether wind power is the best solution based on cost benefit analysis. However, the alternative seems to be quite robust in the analysis. Due to the central position the energy supplies have in the society this business should be heavily regulated. The sector is also overtaxed as a reduction in consumption is desired. The analysis shows that the system does not function perfectly. The thesis surveys various measures for improving the renewable energy supply and focuses on the wind power. A model for and analysis of the measures are carried out and resulted in a second conclusion. The measures have various properties as to the influence on the market. A subsidy is a fine measure for stimulation production of green power while a tax reduces efficiently the production of black power. A system with green licenses in combination with a subsidy and a tax would be preferable as to increasing the part of renewable energy of the total production. It is therefore necessary to have clearly defined goals and use suitable measures for achieving them. The costs of wind power is falling and it would therefore soon be macroeconomic profitable. It is also

  15. Energy resolution of alpha particles in a microbulk Micromegas detector at high pressure argon and xenon mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest micromesh gas amplification structures (Micromegas) are achieving outstanding energy resolution for low energy photons, with values as low as 11% FWHM for the 5.9 keV line of 55Fe in argon/isobutane mixtures at atmospheric pressure. At higher energies (MeV scale), these measurements are more complicated due to the difficulty in confining the events in the chamber, although there is no fundamental reason why resolutions of 1% FWHM or below could not be reached. There is much motivation to demonstrate experimentally this fact in Xe mixtures due to the possible application of Micromegas readouts to the double beta decay search of 136Xe, or in other experiments needing calorimetry and topology in the same detector. In this paper, we report on systematic measurements of energy resolution with state-of-the-art Micromegas using a 5.5 MeV alpha source in high pressure Ar/isobutane mixtures. Values as low as 1.8% FWHM have been obtained, with possible evidence that better resolutions are achievable. Similar measurements in Xe, of which a preliminary result is also shown here, are under progress.

  16. Low-energy neutrino measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davide D'angelo

    2012-10-01

    Low-energy solar neutrino detection plays a fundamental role in understanding both solar astrophysics and particle physics. After introducing the open questions on both fields, we review here the major results of the last two years and expectations for the near future from Borexino, Super-Kamiokande, SNO and KamLAND experiments as well as from upcoming (SNO+) and planned (LENA) experiments. Scintillator neutrino detectors are also powerful antineutrino detectors which can detect neutrinos emitted by the Earth crust and mantle. First measurements of geoneutrinos have occurred which can bring fundamental contribution in understanding the geophysics of the planet.

  17. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 μm were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 μm. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 μm scintillator plates. -- Highlights: • A scintillator plate was fabricated using Gd2Si2O7 grains of several 10 to 550 μm. • Scintillator grains were fixed on a glass substrate and were mechanically polished. • Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grains size of 91 μm. • This technique has no limitation in area size. • Radiation background was eliminated by thin thickness of scintillator, i.e. 100 μm

  18. Gross alpha/beta measurements in water samples using liquid scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid scintillation techniques provide the detection and quantification of alpha and beta emitters in aqueous sample. Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) techniques using Pulse Decay Analysis (PDA) allow counting of alpha and beta radiation in the same sample simultaneously. PDA uses special pulse decay time discrimination electronics to differentiate alpha pulses from beta pulses in a liquid scintillator. In this experiment, Packard Tricarb 2770 TR-SL LSC has been used. Ultima Gold LLT produced by Packard Instrument Company was used as the liquid scintillator. The optimum counting parameters and Pulse Decay Discriminator (PDD) settings were provided for the best alpha and beta separation. PDD was verified by counting a pure alpha ''2''4''1Am and a pure beta ''3''6Cl. Spill of beta in alpha and alpha in beta was found around 0.1% at the optimum discriminator setting of 139. The counting efficiencies were 100% and 97% for alpha and beta counting respectively. Water samples were pre-concentrated to achieve the Turkish maximum permissible levels of 0.037 BqL''-''1 for gross alpha radioactivity and 0.37 BqL''-''1 for gross beta radioactivity in drinking water. After counting, the alpha and beta spill corrections were made and the gross alpha and beta radioactivities were calculated. LSC method results were compared with the gas flow proportional counters

  19. The WASTED Resolutions: exploration of the spatial and energy limits of the Webcam Alpha Spectrometer TEchnology Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryman, Joseph; Pallone, Arthur

    2012-02-01

    Scientists and engineers build simple, low-cost, webcam-based instruments for use in many disciplines. Analysis of the optical signal received through the three broadband color filters -- red, green and blue -- form the basis of many of those instruments. The CMOS sensors in webcam pixels also produce signals in response to ionizing radiations -- such as alpha particles from a radioactive source. Simple alpha radiography has been demonstrated with an alpha source and a webcam modified to expose the sensors. The performance of the Webcam Alpha Spectrometer TEchnology Demonstrator (WASTED) built from such a modified webcam and a commercially available alpha source mounted to an optics rail is analyzed in terms of the energy upper-half-width-half-maximum and of the spatial modulation transfer function.

  20. The determination of radium-226 in uranium ores and mill products by alpha energy spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reliable routine procedure for determining 226Ra by alpha energy spectrometry is described. Radium is isolated as sulphate from the sample matrix by co-precipitation with a small mass of barium and analysed using a ruggedized silicon surface barrier detector. The method is capable of providing high accuracy over a large 226Ra concentration range and is applicable to materials such as uranium ores, uranium mill products and effluent streams. Samples resulting from nitric acid leach experiments with Elliot Lake ores were examined using the procedure. The distribution of 223Ra, 224Ra and 226Ra between the leach products, (residue and leach liquor), is discussed. (author)

  1. CIT alpha particle extraction and measurement: Low-Z ablation cloud profile simulation for alpha-particle diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the expected properties of the ablation cloud of low-Z pellets interacting with a thermonuclear plasma, which in turn is proposed as a charge-neutralization medium for confined alpha particles, a numerical program has been developed. The physical model for this program is based on Park's low-Z pellet-plasma interaction model for the interior of the cloud adjacent to the pellet's surface out to the sonic surface (roughly, a millimeter in separation), and then propagating outward from this region using the conservation laws of enthalpy, momentum, and mass, along with the assumption of charge-state equilibrium. The effects of local heating by the plasma electrons slowing down in the cloud, and ionization of the ablatant material are treated self-consistently in the model. In collaboration with Dr. Paul Parks of General Atomics Corporation, a joint ODU-GAC research plan for modeling low-Z pellet-plasma interactions has been devised, and considerable progress has been made in its implementation. Recently, using a constraint in the ablatant flow, so that it approximates its observed flow along the magnetic field, results from the program were obtained which could be compared with the results from the GAC experiments on TEXT. The predictions of the program are in poor agreement with the TEXT data as to the dimensions of the C+3 region of the cloud along the magnetic field. The failure of the model appears to be the breakdown of the assumption that charge-state equilibrium exists in the cloud. This problem is particularly severe for the TEXT parameters so modifications in the model to include non-equilibrium effects are being implemented

  2. CIT alpha particle extraction and measurement: Low-Z ablation cloud profile simulation for alpha-particle diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the expected properties of the ablation cloud of low-Z pellets interacting with a thermonuclear plasma, which in turn is proposed as a charge-neutralization medium for confined alpha particles, a numerical program has been developed. The physical model for this program is based on Parks' low-Z pellet-plasma interaction model for the interior of the cloud adjacent to the pellet's surface out to the sonic surface (roughly, a millimeter in separation) and then propagating outward from this region using the conservation laws of enthalpy, momentum, and mass, along with the assumption of charge-state equilibrium. The effects of local heating by the plasma electrons slowing down in the cloud, and ionization of the ablatant material are treated self-consistently in the model. In collaboration with Dr. Paul Parks of General Atomics Corporation, a joint ODU-GAC research plan for modeling low-Z pellet-plasma interactions has been devised, and considerable progress has been made in its implementation. Recently, using a constraint in the ablatant flow, results from the program were obtained which could be compared with the results from the GAC experiments on TEXT. The predictions of the program are in pretty good agreement with the TEXT data as to the dimensions of the C+3 region of the cloud along the magnetic field. Also a small improvement has been made in the low-Z pellet plasma-penetration program, which brings the predictions of the model in closer agreement with the carbon pellet injection experiments on TFTR. 22 refs., 3 figs

  3. Trojan Horse method and radioactive ion beams: study of $^{18}$F(p,$\\alpha$)$^{15}$O reaction at astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Gulino, M; Rapisarda, G G; Kubono, S; Lamia, L; La Cognata, M; Yamaguchi, H; Hayakawa, S; Wakabayashi, Y; Iwasa, N; Kato, S; Komatsubara, H; Teranishi, T; Coc, A; De Séréville, N; Hammache, F; Spitaleri, C

    2012-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method was applied for the first time to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction to study the reaction $^{18}$F(p,$\\alpha$)$^{15}$O via the three body reaction $^{18}$F(d,$\\alpha$ $^{15}$O)n at the low energies relevant for astrophysics. The abundance of $^{18}$F in Nova explosions is an important issue for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. For this reason it is necessary to study the nuclear reactions that produce or destroy $^{18}$F in Novae. $^{18}$F(p,$\\alpha$)$^{15}$O is one of the main $^{18}$F destruction channels. Preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  4. Classification of alpha-active workplace aerosols based on coefficient of transportability as measured by the dialysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a method by which potentially inhaled workplace aerosols containing plutonium compounds are classified on the basis of measured transportability in Ringer's solution. It is suggested that the criterion 'transportability' be used in the ICRP respiratory tract model. Transportability is measured as the fraction of plutonium alpha activity, deposited on a collecting filter, that passes through a semi-permeable membrane in Ringer's physiological solution during two days of dialysis. First order kinetic equations are used for explanation of dialysis results. The dissolution characteristics of alpha-active aerosols are important in interpretation of their passage from the lungs after inhalation. (author)

  5. Cross-section measurement and analysis for the 149Sm(n,alpha)146Nd reaction at 6.0 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledenov, Yu. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Zhang, Guohui [Peking University; Khuukhenkhuu, G [National University of Mongolia; Sedysheva, M. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Szalanski, P. [University of Lodz; Koehler, Paul Edward [ORNL; Liu, Jiaming [Peking University; Wu, Hao [Peking University; Liu, Xiang [Peking University; Chen, Jinxiang [Peking University

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the {sup 149}Sm(n,{alpha}){sup 146}Nd cross section at 6.0 MeV to be 0.12 {+-} 0.018 mb. This is the first reported result for this cross section in the MeV region and so should be helpful for constraining nuclear data evaluations (which differ by a factor of 40 for this reaction at this energy) and for testing and improving nuclear models. The experiment was performed at the at the 4.5-MV Van de Graaff accelerator of Peking University. Neutrons were produced via the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction using a deuterium gas target, and absolute neutron flux was determined with a small {sup 238}U fission chamber. Alpha particles were detected using a two-section gridded ionization chamber in which two large-area {sup 149}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples were placed back-to-back so that the cross section and forward/backward ratio were measured for nearly the entire 4{pi} solid angle. The data were compared to statistical-model predictions using the code talys. Good agreement between the measured and theoretical cross sections could be obtained with a small modification of the {alpha}-optical potential parameters from their default values in talys. However, we were not able to reproduce the measured forward/backward ratio. In addition, using the previously reported {sup 147}Sm(n,{alpha}){sup 144}Nd cross section at 6.0 MeV together with our new result, good agreement was found between the measured and predicted cross-section ratio for these two isotopes. Finally, none of the existing evaluated data libraries are in agreement with our new data to within the experimental uncertainties.

  6. Alpha induced reaction cross section measurements on 162Er for the astrophysical gamma process

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, G G; Rauscher, T; Török, Zs; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z; Somorjai, E

    2014-01-01

    The cross sections of the 162Er(a,g,)166Yb and 162Er(a,n)165Yb reactions have been measured for the first time. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured from Ec.m. = 16.09 down to Ec.m. = 11.21 MeV, close to the astrophysically relevant region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at 3 GK stellar temperature). The 162Er(a,n)165Yb reaction was studied above the reaction threshold between Ec.m. = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV. The fact that the 162Er(a,g)166Yb cross sections were measured below the (a,n) threshold at first time in this mass region opens the opportunity to study directly the a-widths required for the determination of astrophysical reaction rates. The data clearly show that compound nucleus formation in this reaction proceeds differently than previously predicted.

  7. Alpha induced reaction cross section measurements on 162Er for the astrophysical γ process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross sections of the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb and 162Er(α,n)165Yb reactions have been measured for the first time. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured from Ec.m.=16.09 MeV down to Ec.m.=11.21 MeV, close to the astrophysically relevant region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at 3 GK stellar temperature). The 162Er(α,n)165Yb reaction was studied above the reaction threshold between Ec.m.=12.19 and 16.09 MeV. The fact that the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb cross sections were measured below the (α,n) threshold at first time in this mass region opens the opportunity to study directly the α-widths required for the determination of astrophysical reaction rates. The data clearly show that compound nucleus formation in this reaction proceeds differently than previously predicted

  8. Precision Measurements with High Energy Neutrino Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Conrad, J M; Bolton, T; Conrad, Janet M.; Shaevitz, Michael H.; Bolton, Tim

    1998-01-01

    Neutrino scattering measurements offer a unique tool to probe the electroweak and strong interactions as described by the Standard Model (SM). Electroweak measurements are accessible through the comparison of neutrino neutral- and charged-current scattering. These measurements are complimentary to other electroweak measurements due to differences in the radiative corrections both within and outside the SM. Neutrino scattering measurements also provide a precise method for measuring the F_2(x,Q^2) and xF_3(x,Q^2 structure functions. The predicted Q^2 evolution can be used to test perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics as well as to measure the strong coupling constant, alpha _s, and the valence, sea, and gluon parton distributions. In addition, neutrino charm production, which can be determined from the observed dimuon events, allows the strange-quark sea to be investigated along with measurements of the CKM matrix element |V_{cd}| and the charm quark mass.

  9. Excited levels of 238Np from spectroscopic measurements of the 237Np(n,γ)238Np reaction and /sup 242m/Am alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma rays and conversion electrons emitted following neutron capture in a 237Np target have been measured by use of the GAMS and BILL spectrometers at Grenoble. Gamma ray and alpha particle measurements of /sup 242m/Am alpha decay (Ge(Li)γ singles, γ-γ coincidences, α singles) have been made at Livermore. The data from these measurements have been combined with earlier measurements (Ionescu 1979, Asaro 1964) to produce a more detailed level scheme for 238Np. Approximately 36 levels have been identified from all of the experimental evidence. The experimentally-observed bandhead energies can be compared with predicted values derived from a simple linear addition of excitation energies observed in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splitting of each configurational pair were obtained from theoretical calculations (Piepenbring 1978). We have assigned configurations to ten rotational bands whose bandhead energies range from 0 to 342 keV and which represent all but one of the configurations predicted to occur below 385 keV

  10. Microscopic study of the /sup 14/O(. cap alpha. ,p)/sup 17/F reactions at stellar energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funck, C.; Langanke, K.

    1988-03-28

    We have studied the /sup 14/O(..cap alpha..,p)/sup 17/F reaction at astrophysically important energies within a microscopic multichannel calculation based on the framework of the generator coordinate method. Our study gives a consistent description of the /sup 18/Ne states close to the ..cap alpha..-threshold as well as of the direct (..cap alpha..,p) reaction process which has not been considered in previous calculations. We find that the /sup 14/O(..cap alpha..,p)/sup 17/F rate at temperatures T less than or equal to 5x10/sup 8/ K is strongly influenced by the 2/sup +/ resonance at E = 30 keV above the ..cap alpha..-threshold and by the direct reaction cross section. At higher temperatures /sup 18/Ne states not present in our model space become important. We have estimated the influence of these resonances on the /sup 14/O(..cap alpha..,p)/sup 17/F rate within the standard formalism developed by Fowler assigning experimentally unknown spins to the states on the basis of a Thomas-Ehrman shift analysis using theoretical and experimental informations on the respective analogue states in /sup 18/O. We find an /sup 14/O(..cap alpha..,p)/sup 17/F rate which is noticeably higher than the rate estimated by Wiescher et al. for T less than or equal to 5x10/sup 8/ K. Both rates are of the same magnitude for T greater than or equal to 10/sup 9/ K. Our estimate predicts that the /sup 14/O(..cap alpha..,p)/sup 17/F rate is compatible to the /sup 15/O(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 19/Ne rate under nova conditions. For explosive burning on accreting neutron stars our rate allows for a break-out from the CNO cycle via the /sup 14/O(..cap alpha..,p)/sup 17/F reaction.

  11. Inertial Confinement Fusion alpha-heating signatures in prompt gamma-ray measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jennifer; Herrmann, Hans; Cerjan, Charlie; Sayre, Daniel; Carpenter, Arthur; Liebman, Judy; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Kim, Yongho

    2015-11-01

    Prompt gamma-rays measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with the Gamma-ray Reaction History detector (GRH) supply vital diagnostic information, such as the peak burn time, burn width, and total neutron yield, from prompt DT-fusion gamma-ray emission during high convergence implosion experiments. Additionally, the stagnated cold shell density distribution may be inferred from the time-integrated, calibrated 12C (n,n' γ) signal, thus providing estimates of remaining ablator carbon areal density. Furthermore, simulations suggest that alpha heating signatures might be accessible using more highly resolved temporal gamma-ray emission. Correlation of these signatures with time-dependent neutron emission will constrain the implosion dynamics immediately prior to thermonuclear burn. Measurement of these gamma-ray signatures will be discussed along with updates on our work toward inferred total DT yield and 12C areal density. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07-NA27344, LLNL-ABS-670282.

  12. Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO2 interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.

  13. First application of the Trojan Horse Method with a Radioactive Ion Beam: study of the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O}} reaction at astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Cherubini, S; Spitaleri, C; Rapisarda, G G; La Cognata, M; Lamia, L; Pizzone, R G; Romano, S; Kubono, S; Yamaguchi, H; Hayakawa, S; Wakabayashi, Y; Iwasa, N; Kato, S; Komatsubara, T; Teranishi, T; Coc, A; de Séréville, N; Hammache, F; Kiss, G; Bishop, S; Binh, D N

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of nuclear cross sections at astrophysical energies involving unstable species is one of the most challenging tasks in experimental nuclear physics. The use of indirect methods is often unavoidable in this scenario. In this paper the Trojan Horse Method is applied for the first time to a radioactive ion beam induced reaction studying the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O process at low energies relevant to astrophysics via the three body reaction $^{2}$H($^{18}$F,${\\alpha}^{15}$O)n. The knowledge of the $^{18}$F($p, {\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O reaction rate is crucial to understand the nova explosion phenomena. The cross section of this reaction is characterized by the presence of several resonances in $^{19}$Ne and possibly interference effects among them. The results reported in Literature are not satisfactory and new investigations of the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O reaction cross section will be useful. In the present work the spin-parity assignments of relevant levels have been discussed and the astro...

  14. The quiet time spectra of low energy hydrogen and helium nuclei. [suggesting protons and alphas of solar origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of the 1972-1973 quiet time hydrogen and helium spectra from 1.3-40 MeV/nuc are discussed. For both spectra the relative-intensity minimum occurs at lower energies than those reported for earlier years. There is no evidence of a low energy turnup in the He spectrum down to 2.4 MeV/nuc. The spectra indicate that the galactic component dominates down to about 10 MeV; a stable, non-solar He-4 component extends from higher energies down to about 2.4 MeV/nuc. At lower energies the periods of minimum H and He intensity do not coincide, and the relative abundance of H and He at 1.3-2.3 MeV/nuc is variable, with H/He ratios ranging from about 3 to about 10. The observations suggest that the 1.3-2.3 MeV/nuc protons and alphas are of solar origin.

  15. Optimization of parameters of alpha spectrometry with silicon detector for low level measurements of actinides in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of actinides in environmental and biological samples is an important activity of radiation protection program at nuclear energy facilities. High resolution alpha spectrometry with passivated ion implanted Silicon detectors is widely used for the determination of actinides concentration. Low levels of activity concentrations in these samples often require long counting duration of a few days to obtain accurate and statistically significant data for further impact assessment. In alpha spectrometry, the chamber in which Si detector operated is a critical component and maintained at a desired vacuum for minimizing the alpha particle attenuation. Experimental evaluation of variations in energy resolution and tailing of alpha spectra was investigated under different chamber air pressures from about 6.7 Pa to more than 2700 Pa under the chamber hold mode and pump electrically switched off conditions. As part of validation, data collected on an IAEA inter-comparison exercise sample are presented under short and long counting durations with pump operating and switched off conditions respectively. It has been observed that the FWHM values do not significantly degrade, to impact the low and medium level concentration alpha spectra, for variations in vacuum chamber pressures from about 6.7 Pa to 2700 Pa. - Highlights: ► Several parameters relevant to low level alpha spectrometry have been investigated and appropriately optimized. ► The most important parameter has been the influence of chamber pressure on resolution when the chamber is in hold mode while the vacuum pump is electrically switched off for more than 40 h. ► Samples were counted for about 4 day for low levels of detection. Efficiency, tail length, detector size and other parameters were evaluated.

  16. The fluorine destruction in stars: First experimental study of the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; Lamia, L.; Mrazek, J.; Palmerini, S.; Piskor, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S. [INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); University of Catania and INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); and others

    2012-11-12

    The {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogendeficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E{sub cm}{approx} 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{sup 16}O)n reaction. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel, which is the dominant one at such energies, shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before that cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential important consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  17. Benchmark and combined velocity-space tomography of fast-ion D-alpha spectroscopy and collective Thomson scattering measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.;

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the combination of fast-ion D-alpha spectroscopy (FIDA) and collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements to determine a common best estimate of the fastion velocity distribution function by velocity-space tomography. We further demonstrate a benchmark of FIDA tomography and CTS...

  18. Separately measuring radon and thoron concentrations exhaled from soil using AlphaGUARD and liquid scintillation counter methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown that radon and thoron concentrations exhaled from soil were separately measured using the AlphaGUARD and liquid scintillation counter (LSC) methods. The thoron concentrations from the RAD 7 were used to create the conversion equation to calculate thoron levels with the AlphaGUARD. However, the conversion factor was found to depend on the air flow rate. When air containing thoron of ∼60 kBq m-3 was fed to the scintillation cocktail, thoron and thoron progeny could not be measured with the LSC method. The radon concentration of about 10 kBq m-3 was measured with three methods, first with the LSC method and then with two AlphaGUARDs (one in the diffusion mode and the other in the flow mode (0.5 l min-1)). There were no significant differences between these results. Finally, it was shown that the radon and thoron concentrations in air could be measured with the AlphaGUARD and LSC methods. (authors)

  19. Automated 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck junction using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop an automated approach for 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck (FHN) junction using bone models derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hip joint.Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired from 30 male volunteers (healthy active individuals and high-performance athletes, aged 18–49 years) using a water-excited 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) sequence. In a subset of these subjects (18 water-polo players), additional True Fast Imaging with Steady-state Precession (TrueFISP) images were acquired from the right hip joint. For both MR image sets, an active shape model based algorithm was used to generate automated 3D bone reconstructions of the proximal femur. Subsequently, a local coordinate system of the femur was constructed to compute a 2D shape map to project femoral head sphericity for calculation of alpha angles around the FHN junction. To evaluate automated alpha angle measures, manual analyses were performed on anterosuperior and anterior radial MR slices from the FHN junction that were automatically reformatted using the constructed coordinate system.High intra- and inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients  >  0.95) was found for manual alpha angle measurements from the auto-extracted anterosuperior and anterior radial slices. Strong correlations were observed between manual and automatic measures of alpha angles for anterosuperior (r  =  0.84) and anterior (r  =  0.92) FHN positions. For matched DESS and TrueFISP images, there were no significant differences between automated alpha angle measures obtained from the upper anterior quadrant of the FHN junction (two-way repeated measures ANOVA, F  <  0.01, p  =  0.98).Our automatic 3D method analysed MR images of the hip joints to generate alpha angle measures around the FHN junction circumference with very good reliability and reproducibility. This work has the

  20. Measurement of the track etch rates along proton and alpha particle trajectories in CR-39 and calculation of the detection efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Dörschel, B; Hermsdorf, D; Kadner, K; Kuehne, H

    1999-01-01

    Computation of the neutron response of CR-39 detectors needs to simulate the track formation by neutron induced charged particles taking into account the bulk etch rate and the track etch rate varying along the particle trajectories. The latter one was determined experimentally by track length measurement. The results allowed to derive the relationship between the track etch rate and the restricted energy loss of the charged particles. On this basis, the geometrical track parameters and track etch rates as well as the critical angle of particle incidence could be determined for protons and alpha particles in the energy range from 0.2 to 8.8 MeV. The energy dependence of the critical angle enabled to determine the detection efficiency for a charged particle of given energy and direction.

  1. Measurement of the cross section of charmed hadrons and the nuclear dependence alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Covarrubias, E.Alejandro; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2009-12-01

    With data from the SELEX experiment we study charm hadro-production. We report the differential production cross sections as function of the longitudinal and transverse momentum, as well as for two different target materials, of 14 charmed hadron and/or their decay modes. This is the most extensive study to date. SELEX is a fixed target experiment at Fermilab with high forward acceptance; it took data during 1996-1997 with 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} and {pi}{sup -}, and 540 GeV/c proton and {pi}{sup +} beams. It used 5 target foils (two copper and three diamond). We use the results to determine {alpha}, used in parametrizing the production cross section as {infinity} A{sup {alpha}}, where A is the mass number of the target nuclei. We found within our statistics that {alpha} is independent of the longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} in the interval 0.1 < x{sub F} < 1.0, with {alpha} = 0.778 {+-} 0.014. The average value of {alpha} for charm production by pion beams is {alpha}{sub meson} = 0.850 {+-} 0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average {alpha}{sub baryon} = 0.755 {+-} 0.016 for charm production by baryon beams ({Sigma}{sup -} and protons).

  2. Cross Section Measurement for the 95Mo(n, {alpha})92Zr Reaction at 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guohui [Peking University; Wu, Hao [Peking University; Zhang, Jiaguo [Peking University; Liu, Jiaming [Peking University; Yin, Yuxiang [Peking University; Chen, Jinxiang [Peking University; Gledenov, Youri Mikhailovich [ORNL; Sedysheva, M. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Khuukhenkhuu, G [National University of Mongolia; Koehler, Paul Edward [ORNL; Szalanski, P. [University of Lodz

    2011-01-01

    For the {sup 95}Mo(n, {alpha}){sup 92}Zr reaction cross section, there is only one experimental datum in the MeV neutron energy region with large uncertainty. As a result, very large deviations exist in different evaluated nuclear data libraries. This paper report the measurement of cross sections of the {sup 95}Mo(n, {alpha}){sup 92}Zr reaction at En = 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 MeV. Experiments were performed at the 4.5 MV Van de Graaff of Peking University, China. A twin gridded ionization chamber was used as alpha particle detector and two large area {sup 95}Mo samples placed back to back were adopted. Fast neutrons were produced through the D(d, n){sup 3}He reaction by using a deuterium gas target. A small {sup 238}U fission chamber was adopted for absolute neutron flux determination and a BF{sub 3} long counter was used for neutron flux monitor. Present experimental data are compared with existing evaluations and measurement.

  3. Absolute measurements of the alpha-gamma emitters activities by a sum-coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute activity of U-235 contained in a UO2 sample, using a sum-coincidence circuit which selected only the alpha particles which were simultaneous with the well known 184 Kev gamma radiation from Th-231. The alpha particles were detected by ZnS(Ag) scintillator specially designed to show its maximun efficiency for U-235 alpha particles, whereas the gamma radiation was detected by NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The values obtained for the half-life of U-235 was compared with data from various observers using different experimental techniques. (Author)

  4. Radionuclide, scintillation cocktail and chemical/color quench influence on discriminator setting in gross alpha/beta measurements by LSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross alpha/beta measurements in drinking waters enable radiochemical composition analysis in environmental studies providing efficient screening method that can indicate whether water contains elevated levels of any radionuclide. Routine gross alpha/beta activity monitoring in drinking waters has been carried out for a few years in laboratory for low-level radioactivity measurements in Novi Sad according to ASTM method, performing measurements on liquid scintillation counter Quantulus 1220 which can simultaneously generate alpha/beta spectra of samples by Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA circuit). In this paper, PSA discriminator impact was investigated to ensure obtaining of accurate and reliable alpha/beta activities. One novelty of presented work is PSA parameter setup with two combinations of radionuclides (241Am, 226Ra and 90Sr/90Y) with varying activity concentrations. Performed experiments also make contribution to investigations on the manner in which chemical and color quench affect optimal PSA parameter setting and further on, their altogether influence on gross alpha/beta activity measurements. Nitromethane, 15.8 M nitric acid and water, as well as yellow and yellow-orange dye, were used as quenching agents in order to test PSA/interference factor behavior in the presence of quenchers with different quenching strengths. Variation of PSA setting in quenched samples with two different commercially available cocktails (Ultima Gold LLT and OptiPhase HiSafe 3) was also tested. Lastly, application i.e. assessment of obtained PSA-SQP(E) correlation on the obtained results of activity concentrations of few artesian well water samples and colored spiked samples, based on the measured SQP(E) value of samples, has been demonstrated. - Highlights: • Thorough study on influence of relevant factors on optimal PSA level in gross alpha/beta measurements in waters is presented. • Experiments were performed on liquid scintillation counter Quantulus 1220™ according to

  5. Systematic Continuum Errors in the Lyman-Alpha Forest and The Measured Temperature-Density Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Khee-Gan

    2011-01-01

    Continuum fitting uncertainties are a major source of error in estimates of the temperature-density relation (usually parametrized as a power-law, T ~ \\Delta^{\\gamma - 1}) of the inter-galactic medium (IGM) through the flux probability distribution function (PDF) of the Lyman-\\alpha\\ forest. Using a simple order-of-magnitude calculation, we show that few percent-level systematic errors in the placement of the quasar continuum due to e.g. a uniform low-absorption Gunn-Peterson component, could lead to errors in {\\gamma} of order unity. This is quantified further using a simple semi-analytic model of the Lya forest flux PDF. We find that under-(over-)estimates in the continuum level can lead to a lower (higher) measured value of \\gamma . At current observational limits, continuum biases significantly increase the error in {\\gamma} from \\sigma_{\\gamma} = 0.1 to \\sigma_{\\gamma} = 0.3 within our model. We argue that steps need to be taken to directly estimate the level of continuum bias in order to make recent cla...

  6. Neutral gas in Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies Haro 11 and ESO 338-IG04 measured through sodium absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Sandberg, A; Hayes, M; Fathi, K; Schaerer, D; Mas-Hesse, J M; Rivera-Thorsen, T

    2013-01-01

    Context. The Lyman alpha emission line of galaxies is an important tool for finding galaxies at high redshift, and thus probe the structure of the early universe. However, the resonance nature of the line and its sensitivity to dust and neutral gas is still not fully understood. Aims. We present measurements of the velocity, covering fraction and optical depth of neutral gas in front of two well known local blue compact galaxies that show Lyman alpha in emission: ESO 338-IG 04 and Haro 11. We thus test observationally the hypothesis that Lyman alpha can escape through neutral gas by being Doppler shifted out of resonance. Methods. We present integral field spectroscopy from the GIRAFFE/Argus spectrograph at VLT/FLAMES in Paranal, Chile. The excellent wavelength resolution allows us to accurately measure the velocity of the ionized and neutral gas through the H-alpha emission and Na D absorption, which traces the ionized medium and cold interstellar gas, respectively. We also present independent measurements w...

  7. Energy measurement in the standard penetration test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, W.D.; Salomone, L.A.; Yokel, F.Y.

    1981-08-01

    A field measurement system and procedure which measures the energy delivered by a drill rig system were developed and successfully used to study the factors which affect delivered energy. Results are presented which indicate the energy delivered by certain drill rig systems used in engineering practice. Also, the transmission characteristics of certain hammer/anvil systems are examined.

  8. Simplicial edge representation of protein structures and alpha contact potential with confidence measure

    CERN Document Server

    Li, X; Liang, J; Li, Xiang; Hu, Changyu; Liang, Jie

    2003-01-01

    Protein representation and potential function are essential ingredients for studying proteins folding and protein prediction. We introduce a novel geometric representation of contact interactions using the edge simplices from alpha shape of protein structure. This representation can eliminate implausible neighbors not in physical contact, and can avoid spurious contact between two residues when a third residue is between them. We develop statistical alpha contact potential. A studentized bootstrap method is then introduced for assessing the 95% confidence intervals for each of the 210 parameters. We found with confidence that there is significant long range propensity (>30 residues apart) for hydrophobic interactions. We test alpha contact potential for native structure discrimination using several decoy sets, and found it often has comparable performance with atom-based potentials requiring more parameters. We also show that alpha contact potential has better performance than potential defined by cut-off dis...

  9. Measurement of gross alpha, gross beta, radon and radium activity concentrations in aqueous samples using liquid scintillation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Malaysia has taken a positive step toward providing a better water quality by introducing more water quality parameters into its Water Quality Standard. With regard to the natural radionuclides that may present in the water, 3 parameters were introduced that is gross alpha, gross beta and radium which need to be measured and cannot exceed 0.1, 1.0 and 1.0 Bq/ L respectively. This study was conducted to develop a more practical method in measuring these parameters in aqueous environmental samples. Besides having a lot of former tin mining areas, some part of Malaysia is located on the granitic rock which also contributes to a certain extent the amount of natural radionuclides such as uranium and thorium. For all we know these two radionuclides are the origin of other radionuclides being produced from their decay series. The State of Kelantan was chosen as the study area, where the water samples were collected from various part of the Kelantan River. 25 liters of samples were collected, acidify to pH 2 and filtered before the analysis. Measurement of these parameters was done using liquid scintillation counter (LSC). The LSC was set up to the optimum discriminator level and counting was done using alpha-beta mode. The results show that gross alpha and beta can be measured using scintillation cocktail and radium and radon using extraction method. The results for gross alpha, gross beta, 222Ra and 226Ra are 0.39-6.42, 0.66-16.18, 0.40-4.65 and 0.05-0.56 Bq/ L. MDA for gross alpha, gross beta and radium is 0.03, 0.08 and 0.00035 Bq/ L respectively. (Author)

  10. A study of jet rates and measurement of [alpha][sub S] at the Z[sup 0] resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This experiment was performed with the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Only charged tracks measured in the central drift chamber were used for the measurement of the jet production rates. The value of the strong coupling [alpha][sub s](M[sub Z][sup o]) is determined from the production rates of jets in hadronic Z[sup 0] decays in e[sup +] e[sup [minus

  11. Measurement of gross alpha and beta in air filter samples by using liquid scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of gross alpha and gross beta in particulate air filter samples was carried out by alpha, beta discrimination method using Liquid Scintillation Analyzer by setting the PSA value at 55 for 5 ml 0.1 HCl plus 15 ml of Ultima Gold AB cocktail by using 241Am and 90Sr/90Y sources. The standardized method was compared with the gross alpha and gross beta activity determined by conventional method of direct counting with end window G.M. counter and ZnS (Ag). The minimum detectable activity of LSA method was found to be 9.3 mBq and 17.7 mBq for gross alpha and gross beta respectively for 6000 sec compared to the conventional method of 9.8 mBq and 189 mBq respectively at the same counting time. The result of analysis by both method indicate that the alpha, beta discrimination set up of LSA method is highly effective in the determination of low level alpha, beta activity in air filter samples. (author)

  12. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement; Medida de los descendientes del radon en aire por Espectrometria Alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acena, M. L.; Crespo, M. T.

    1989-07-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs.

  13. Long-range alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, alpha-particle and alpha-contamination detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity even if the particles are intercepted. Alpha detectors have had to be operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. Alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of ∼30,000 ion pairs per mega-electron-volt of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) offers several advantages over more traditional alpha detectors. First and foremost, it can operate efficiently even if the contamination is not easily accessible. Second, ions generated by contamination in crevices and other unmonitorable locations can be detected if the airflow penetrates those areas. Third, all of the contamination on a large surface will generate ions that can be detected in a single detector; hence, the detector's sensitivity to distributed sources is not limited by the size of the probe. Finally, a simple ion chamber can detect very small electric currents, making this technique potentially quite sensitive

  14. Automated 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck junction using MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Walker, Duncan; Crozier, Stuart; Engstrom, Craig

    2015-10-01

    To develop an automated approach for 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck (FHN) junction using bone models derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hip joint. Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired from 30 male volunteers (healthy active individuals and high-performance athletes, aged 18-49 years) using a water-excited 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) sequence. In a subset of these subjects (18 water-polo players), additional True Fast Imaging with Steady-state Precession (TrueFISP) images were acquired from the right hip joint. For both MR image sets, an active shape model based algorithm was used to generate automated 3D bone reconstructions of the proximal femur. Subsequently, a local coordinate system of the femur was constructed to compute a 2D shape map to project femoral head sphericity for calculation of alpha angles around the FHN junction. To evaluate automated alpha angle measures, manual analyses were performed on anterosuperior and anterior radial MR slices from the FHN junction that were automatically reformatted using the constructed coordinate system. High intra- and inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients  >  0.95) was found for manual alpha angle measurements from the auto-extracted anterosuperior and anterior radial slices. Strong correlations were observed between manual and automatic measures of alpha angles for anterosuperior (r  =  0.84) and anterior (r  =  0.92) FHN positions. For matched DESS and TrueFISP images, there were no significant differences between automated alpha angle measures obtained from the upper anterior quadrant of the FHN junction (two-way repeated measures ANOVA, F  angle measures around the FHN junction circumference with very good reliability and reproducibility. This work has the potential to improve analyses of cam-type lesions of the FHN junction for large-scale morphometric and clinical MR

  15. NUCLEIDE-LARA, a library for alpha, X and gamma emissions sorted by increasing energy; NUCLEIDE-LARA, bibliotheque des emissions alpha, X et gamma classees par ordre d'energie croissante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Dulieu, Ch.; Chiste, V

    2008-07-01

    The NUCLEIDE-LARA library presents, for almost 400 radionuclides of practical interest, the tables of alpha, X and gamma emissions sorted by increasing energy, as well as the associated intensity and radioactive half-life of the parent radionuclide. (authors)

  16. Measurement of $^{7}$Be(n,$\\alpha$)$^{4}$He and $^{7}$Be(n,p)$^{7}$Li cross-sections for the Cosmological Lithium Problem

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to measure in the second experimental area of n TOF the $^{7}$Be(n,$\\alpha$)$^{4}$He and $^{7}$Be(n,p)$^{7}$Li reaction in a wide energy range. Both reactions are of interest for the long- standing "Cosmological $^{7}$Li problem" in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). The very high specific activity of $^{7}$Be, and the low cross section of the (n,$\\alpha$) reaction make this measurement extremely dicult. As afirst step, we request some beam time for detector tests at EAR2. For the $^{7}$Be(n,p) reaction, previously measured up to 13 keV, the diculty is mostly associated withthe availability of a high-purity $^{7}$Be sample. To this purpose we ask for three shifts of offline ISOLDE mass separation for the preparation of the sample to be used at n TOF. To this end, a prior endorsement by INTC of the scientific validity and feasibility of the proposed measurement is requested, to start activity on the sample production. The present proposal is part of a wider collaborative effort aimed at measuring neutr...

  17. Measuring Energy Efficiency of Water Utilities

    OpenAIRE

    Gay Alanis, Leon F

    2009-01-01

    Water infrastructure systems worldwide use large amounts of energy to operate. Energy efficiency efforts are relevant because even relatively small gains in efficiency have the potential to bring significant benefits to these utilities in terms of financial savings and enhanced sustainability and resiliency. In order to achieve higher efficiency levels, energy usage must be measured and controlled. A common tool used to measure energy efficiency in water utilities and perform comparisons ...

  18. A study of jet rates and measurement of {alpha}{sub S} at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This experiment was performed with the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Only charged tracks measured in the central drift chamber were used for the measurement of the jet production rates. The value of the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup o}) is determined from the production rates of jets in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays in e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} annihilations. The relative jet rates are obtained using the JADE-type algorithms. The results are compared with the jet rates obtained from a new jet algorithm proposed by N. Brown et al. called the ``Durham`` algorithm. The data can be well described by O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) QCD calculations and by QCD shower model calculations. A fit of the theoretical predictions to the data taken with the SLD yields a value, {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup o}) = 0.120 {plus_minus} 0.002(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.003(exp.){sub {minus}0.009}{sup +0.011}(theor.). The error is dominated by the theoretical uncertainties. The measurement is compared with results from other experiments and it is shown that the value obtained for {alpha}{sub s} agrees well with these results and furthermore supports the evidence for the running of the strong coupling, consistent with the non-Abelian nature of QCD. The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) can deliver partially longitudinally polarized electrons to the interaction point. Jet production rates and values for {alpha}{sub s} are calculated both for right-handed and left-handed initial state electrons. All results are consistent with the unpolarized result, as predicted by the Standard Model.

  19. Measurement of the $^{44}$Ti($\\alpha$,p)$^{47}$V reaction cross section, of relevance to $\\gamma$-ray observation of core collapse supernovae, using reclaimed $^{44}$Ti

    CERN Multimedia

    Despite decades of research, fundamental uncertainties remain in the underlying explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae. One of the most direct methods that might help resolve this problem is a comparison of the predicted to the observed flux of $\\gamma$-rays due to decay of $^{44}$Ti produced in the explosion, as it is believed this could reveal the location of the mass cut, a key hydrodynamical property of the explosion. Such a study is at present limited by the uncertainty in the $^{44}$Ti($\\alpha$,p)$^{47}$V reaction rate. In this experiment we propose to measure the cross section for this reaction at astrophysically relevant energies. The single previous measurement of this reaction was limited to higher energies due to low beam intensities. Here, a more intense beam will be employed, generated from $^{44}$Ti reclaimed as part of the ERAWAST project at PSI.

  20. Cross sections of $\\alpha$-induced reactions for targets with masses $A \\approx 20-50$ at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A simple reduction scheme using so-called reduced energies $E_{\\rm{red}}$ and reduced cross sections $\\sigma_{\\rm{red}}$ allows the comparison of heavy-ion induced reaction cross sections for a broad range of masses of projectile and target and over a wide energy range. A global behavior has been found for strongly bound projectiles whereas much larger reduced cross sections have been observed for weakly bound and halo projectiles. It has been shown that this simple reduction scheme works also well for $\\alpha$-particle induced reactions on heavy target nuclei, but very recently significant deviations have been seen for $\\alpha$+$^{33}$S and $\\alpha$+$^{23}$Na. Motivated by these unexpected discrepancies, the present study analyses $\\alpha$-induced reaction cross sections for targets with masses $A \\approx 20-50$. The study shows that the experimental data for $\\alpha$-induced reactions on nuclei with $A \\approx 20-50$ deviate slightly from the global behavior of reduced cross sections. However, in general th...

  1. Production of helium and helium-hydrogen positive ion beams for the alpha particle measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to produce diagnostic helium neutral beam for alpha particle measurement in nuclear fusion plant of deuterium-tritium reation, helium ion (He+) or helium-hydrogen ion (HeH+) beams of ∼20 keV have been considered as a primary beam. For He+ beam, it is important to produce focused high-current-density ion beam in order to pass through small apertures of alkali gas cell with an enough signal level. For HeH+ beam, conditions producing HeH+ has not been investigated in detail as yet. In order to extract these beams, focused high-current-density neutral beam system is applied. For He+ beam extraction of ∼22 kV, it is confirmed that current density of ∼86 mA/cm2 is achieved, whose value is close to necessary value in ITER. For HeH+ beam extraction in the case of ∼300 V acceleration, the production rate of HeH+ component increases with the increase of helium gas pressure ratio to hydrogen gas pressure when its value is > ∼75%. In the case of 25 kV acceleration, if 15% of total current (which includes H+, H2+, H3+, He+ and HeH+ components) is HeH+ component, current density of HeH+ is estimated as ∼13 mA/cm2, whose value is larger than necessary value in ITER. From melted traces of the target plate, it is estimated that the divergence angle is about ±0.8deg. (author)

  2. Debate on energy - the NGOs' fourteen measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents and comments fourteen measures proposed by NGOs to support energy transition. These measures aim at limiting the increase of energy bills by reducing energy consumption (with buildings consuming less energy, a better-balanced and sustainable mobility, and putting an end to electricity waste), at ensuring access for all to basic energy services such as heating, lighting and so on (i.e. eradicate energy precariousness), at programming a progressive stop of polluting and risky energies, of energies generating a greenhouse effect, of energies presenting major technological risks or based on limited resources (to progressively suppress polluting or inefficient heating modes, to give up the dream of non-conventional fossil energies, to plan nuclear phasing-out ), at securing energy needs (with support to renewable energies, and agriculture as an actor of energy transition), at allowing citizen and territories to take decisions related to energy in hand again (with a better distribution of abilities between State and Communities, and support to citizen projects in renewable energy and energy efficiency), and at ensuring the conditions of success of energy transition (through reconversion and training, financing, and through a fair and transition-oriented tax system)

  3. Calibration and validation of measures a total alpha beta counter in the tunisian mineral water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risks due to contamination of mineral waters are essentially risk internal radiation following ingestion of radionuclides which brought us in this study to determine the global alpha and beta of the Tunisian mineral water. We used an alpha beta global counter. The results obtained by this technique have shown that alpha activity of these 10 waters are all lower than 50 mBq / l and are varied between 3.75 and 8.4 mBq / l and beta activity was found only 9 waters are also lower than 50 mBq / l (between 7.17 and 18.25) when only one is between 100 and 500 mBq / l (101.17).

  4. Measurements of the ion fraction and mobility of alpha and beta decay products in liquid xenon using EXO-200

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J B; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Belov, V; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Burenkov, A; Cao, G F; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Danilov, M; Daugherty, S J; Davis, C G; Davis, J; Delaquis, S; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A; DeVoe, R; Didberidze, T; Dolgolenko, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hall, C; Hughes, M; Jewell, M J; Jiang, X S; Johnson, A; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; Ling, J; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Nelson, R; O'Sullivan, K; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Robinson, A; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tsang, R; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Waite, A; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Wright, J D; Wood, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zeldovich, O Ya

    2015-01-01

    Alpha decays in the EXO-200 detector are used to measure the fraction of charged $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ and $^{214}\\mathrm{Bi}$ daughters created from alpha and beta decays, respectively. $^{222}\\mathrm{Rn}$ alpha decays in liquid xenon (LXe) are found to produce $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}^{+}$ ions $50.3 \\pm 3.0\\%$ of the time, while the remainder of the $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ atoms are neutral. The fraction of $^{214}\\mathrm{Bi}^{+}$ from $^{214}\\mathrm{Pb}$ beta decays in LXe is found to be $76.4 \\pm 5.7\\%$, inferred from the relative rates of $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ and $^{214}\\mathrm{Po}$ alpha decays in the LXe. The average velocity of $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ ions is observed to decrease for longer drift times. Initially the ions have a mobility of $0.390 \\pm 0.006~\\mathrm{cm}^2/(\\mathrm{kV}~\\mathrm{s})$, and at long drift times the mobility is $0.219 \\pm 0.004~\\mathrm{cm}^2/(\\mathrm{kV}~\\mathrm{s})$. Time constants associated with the change in mobility during drift of the $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}^{+}$ ions are found to be propor...

  5. Improved measurement of parton distribution functions and $\\alpha_s(M_Z)$ with the LHeC

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper-Sarkar, A M

    2016-01-01

    The potential of the LHeC, a future electron-proton collider, for precision Deep Inelastic Scattering measurements is reviewed with particular emphasis on the reduction of uncertainties on the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton and on the measurement of $\\alpha_s(M_Z)$. The interpretation of possible Beyond Standard Model (BSM) signals at the LHC is crucially dependent on precise knowledge of the predictions of the Standard Model (SM) and the uncertainties on PDFs and $\\alpha_s(M_Z) $are a limiting factor. The LHeC project, running in parallel with later stages of LHC running, would provide much improved precision on the PDFs as compared to the precision expected from LHC data alone.

  6. Energy self-sufficiently measurement; Energieautark messen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenninger, Philipp; Ulrich, Marco [ABB AG, Forschungszentrum Deutschland, Ladenburg (Germany); Maret, Yannick [ABB Schweiz AG, Corporate Research, Daettwil (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    For inaccessible and remote measurement points wireless solutions now are available. Of course, the measurement and transmittance of data require electricity. Currently, the electricity is provided by special batteries. But an intensive work is carried out on instruments and transmitters which receive their energy from processes from the environment, and thus operate energy self-sufficiently.

  7. Collecting Saliva and Measuring Salivary Cortisol and Alpha-amylase in Frail Community Residing Older Adults via Family Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson, Nancy A.; Granger, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Salivary measures have emerged in bio-behavioral research that are easy-to-collect, minimally invasive, and relatively inexpensive biologic markers of stress. This article we present the steps for collection and analysis of two salivary assays in research with frail, community residing older adults-salivary cortisol and salivary alpha amylase. The field of salivary bioscience is rapidly advancing and the purpose of this presentation is to provide an update on the developments for investigator...

  8. Measuring energy efficiency: Is energy intensity a good evidence base?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Energy intensity measure reflects consumption, not energy efficiency. • Thermodynamic indicators should describe energy efficiency at all levels. • These indicators should have no reference to economic or financial parameters. • A set of energy efficiency indicators should satisfy several basic principles. • There are trade-offs between energy efficiency, power and costs. - Abstract: There is a widespread assumption in energy statistics and econometrics that energy intensity and energy efficiency are equivalent measures of energy performance of economies. The paper points to the discrepancy between the engineering concept of energy efficiency and the energy intensity as it is understood in macroeconomic statistics. This double discrepancy concerns definitions (while engineering concept of energy efficiency is based on the thermodynamic definition, energy intensity includes economic measures) and use. With regard to the latter, the authors conclude that energy intensity can only provide indirect and delayed evidence of technological and engineering energy efficiency of energy conversion processes, which entails shortcomings for management and policymaking. Therefore, we suggest to stop considering subsectoral, sectoral and other levels of energy intensities as aggregates of lower-level energy efficiency. It is suggested that the insufficiency of energy intensity indicators can be compensated with the introduction of thermodynamic indicators describing energy efficiency at the physical, technological, enterprise, sub-sector, sectoral and national levels without references to any economic or financial parameters. Structured statistical data on thermodynamic efficiency is offered as a better option for identifying break-through technologies and technological bottle-necks that constrain efficiency advancements. It is also suggested that macro-level thermodynamic indicators should be based on the thermodynamic first law efficiency and the energy

  9. Analysis of alpha-cluster transfer in {sup 16}O + {sup 12}C and {sup 12}C + {sup 16}O at energies near Coulomb barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Sh., E-mail: sh.m.hamada@gmail.com [Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Burtebayev, N. [Eurasia National University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Gridnev, K.A. [St. Petersburg University (Russian Federation); Amangeldi, N. [Eurasia National University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this work is to track the phenomenon of {alpha}-cluster transfer mechanism at low energies 1.25, 1.5 and 1.75 MeV/n, close to the Coulomb barrier energy for {sup 12}C({sup 16}O, {sup 12}C){sup 16}O and {sup 16}O({sup 12}C, {sup 16}O){sup 12}C nuclear systems. The measurements of the angular distribution show a significant increase in the differential cross section at large angles due to alpha-transfer mechanism. The optical model code SPI-GENOA could be used effectively for fitting the experimental data with the theoretical predictions nearly up to angle 90{sup o}, where the differential cross section decreases steadily with increasing the scattering angle. For the second hemisphere, at angles greater than 100{sup o}, there is a large increase in cross section due to the contribution of {alpha}-transfer mechanism, and the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) method could be used effectively for fitting the experimental data with the theoretical predictions at this region using (DWUCK5) code.

  10. Measuring Residential Energy Efficiency Improvements with DEA

    OpenAIRE

    Grösche, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper measures energy efficiency improvements of US single-family homes between 1997 and 2001 using a two-stage procedure. In the first stage, an indicator of energy efficiency is derived by means of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), and the analogy between the DEA estimator and traditional measures of energy efficiency is demonstrated. The second stage employs a bootstrapped truncated regression technique to decompose the variation in the obtained efficiency estimates into a climatic com...

  11. Alpha particle energy response of 1-mm-thick polycarbonate track detectors by 50 Hz-HV electrochemical etching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical etching (ECE) method enlarges charged particle tracks to enhance its applications in particular in health physics and radiation dosimetry. The ECE method is usually based on using a high frequency-high voltage (HF-HV) generator with 250-μm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs). The authors' recent studies on nitrogen and helium ions and alpha tracks in 1-mm-thick large-size PCTDs under a 50 Hz-HV ECE process provided promising results. In this study, alpha track efficiency and mean track diameter versus energy responses and registration energy range as well as alpha and background track shapes under three sets of 50 Hz-4, 5 and 6 kV applied field conditions have been studied and are reported. The efficiency versus alpha energy has a Bragg-type response from ∼15 keV to ∼4.5 MeV for the field conditions applied with an efficiency value of 40-50 % at the Bragg peak. The results are presented and discussed. (authors)

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-06-16

    Thermo Power Corporation has proven the technical viability of an on-line, real-time alpha radionuclide instrument for aqueous sample analysis through laboratory and initial field tests of the instrument. The instrument has been shown to be isotonically sensitive to extremely low (ten parts per trillion, or femto Curies per liter) levels of a broad range of radioisotopes. Performance enhancement and other scaling data obtained during the course of this investigation have shown that on-line, real-time operation is possible, with a sub 30-minute response time analyzing 20 ppb (30 pCi/1) natural uranium. Now that these initial field tests in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have been successfully completed, Thermo Power plans to conduct comprehensive field tests of the instrument. The purpose of these endurance tests will be to determine the endurance characteristics of the Thermo Alpha Monitor for Water when it is used by non-Thermo Power personnel in a series of one or more extended field tests. Such endurance testing is the vital next step towards the commercialization of the Alpha Monitor. Subsequently, it will be possible to provide the DOE with an instrument that has the capability of obtaining rapid feedback about the concentrations of alpha-emitting isotope contamination in effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area). It will also be useful for process control of remediation and D and D operations such as monitoring scrubber/rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium and D and D Focus Areas).

  13. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    OpenAIRE

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    We review the relationship between energy efficiency improvement measures and productivity in industry. We review over 70 industrial case studies from widely available published databases, followed by an analysis of the representation of productivity benefits in energy modeling. We propose a method to include productivity benefits in the economic assessment of the potential for energy efficiency improvement. The case-study review suggests that energy efficiency investments can provide a signi...

  14. Alpha particle spectroscopy by gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gridded ionization chamber has been constructed with the aim of determining its ultimate energy resolution in alpha spectroscopy, utilizing a cooled FET pre-amplifier of the type normally employed with semiconductor detectors. With suitable mechanical collimation of the alpha particles, their fine structure has been measured with an energy resolution of -11.5 keV (fwhm), achieved using an Ar + 0.75% C2H2 mixture as the filling gas. (orig.)

  15. DT results of TFTR's alpha collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase to complement the results of the lost alpha scintillator detectors which have been operating on TFTR since 1988. Measurements of the energy distribution of escaping alphas have been made by measuring the range of alphas implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Exposed samples have been analyzed for 4 DT plasma discharges at plasma currents of 1.0 and 1.8 MA. The results at 1.0 MA are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss at 3.5 MeV. The 1.8 MA results, however, indicate a large anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas at an energy ∼30% below the birth energy and at a total fluence nearly an order of magnitude above expected first orbit loss. This anomalous loss is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. Several potential explanations for this loss process are examined. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations

  16. Determination of x-ray to alpha ratio and average effective energy required in interpretation of x-ray counting data for internally deposited plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the assessment of plutonium in the lungs, several corrections must be made to X-ray counting data obtained from direct measurement of a person inhaled plutonium aerosol. X/α ratio varying with isotopic composition is one of the important correction factors required in interpretation of the counting data. This paper describes a method of determination of X/α ratio of plutonium, using X-ray - alpha coincidence counter consisted of a proportional counter and a thin NaI-detector, and also describes an empirical method for estimating average effective energy of plutonium which has different isotopic composition. (author)

  17. Labor and energy impacts of energy-conservation measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Three papers are presented discussing the labor and energy impacts of energy-conservation measures, namely: Generation of the Industry/Occupation Wage Matrix and Related Matters, by Carole Green; Job Shifts from Energy Conservation (Salary Distribution Effects), by Robert A. Herendeen; and Energy and Labor Implication of Improving Thermal Integrity of New Houses, by John Joseph Nangle. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper.

  18. Measurement of energy in laboratory vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the literature concerning energy and energy measurement as it relates to oil spill processes, was presented. Flow patterns, turbulence and relative energy levels in two laboratory vessels were characterized based on preliminary measurements. The first measurement technique selected was the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). This method involves placing seed particles into a fluid and then illuminating the fluid with a laser. The movement of a particle in a given cell is then measured as a function of time. It is possible to calculate turbulence and energy from at least two successive frames. At each point of the image frame, one can calculate turbulent energy. The second measurement technique selected was hot wire anemometry. Although the data obtained with this method was similar to that obtained with PIV, anemometry requires the intrusion of a probe into the area. It is not possible to use this method to measure the surface flow only. Initial measurements were obtained under different operating conditions in two laboratory vessels. The energy levels measured were significant on laboratory vessel surfaces, and sub-surface turbulence was found to be low. 48 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs

  19. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies

  20. Measurement of the reaction O-17(\\alpha,n)Ne-20 and its impact on the s process in massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Best, A; Görres, J; Couder, M; deBoer, R; Falahat, S; Güray, R T; Kontos, A; Kratz, K -L; LeBlanc, P J; Li, Q; O'Brien, S; Özkan, N; Pignatari, M; Sonnabend, K; Talwar, R; Tan, W; Uberseder, E; Wiescher, M; 10.1103/PhysRevC.87.045805

    2013-01-01

    The ratio between the rates of the reactions O-17(\\alpha,n)Ne-20 and O-17(\\alpha,\\gamma)Ne-21 determines whether O-16 is an efficient neutron poison for the s process in massive stars, or if most of the neutrons captured by O-16(n,\\gamma) are recycled into the stellar environment. This ratio is of particular relevance to constrain the s process yields of fast rotating massive stars at low metallicity. Recent results on the (\\alpha,\\gamma) channel have made it necessary to measure the (\\alpha,n) reaction more precisely and investigate the effect of the new data on s process nucleosynthesis in massive stars. We present a new measurement of the O-17(\\alpha, n) reaction using a moderating neutron detector. In addition, the (\\alpha, n_1) channel has been measured independently by observation of the characteristic 1633 keV \\gamma-transition in Ne-20. The reaction cross section was determined with a simultaneous R-matrix fit to both channels. (\\alpha,n) and (\\alpha, \\gamma) resonance strengths of states lying below ...

  1. Beam energy online measurement of BEPCII LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shao-Zhe; Chi, Yun-Long

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes beam energy online measurement of BEPCII linac, presents the calculation formula and some of the results. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring beam positions in the horizontal direction with three beam position monitors (BPM) eliminating the effect of orbit fluctuation, which is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in the end of this paper.

  2. Study of the {sup 7}Li (p,{alpha}){sup 4}He Reaction at Astrophysical Energies Through the Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegriti, M.G.; Aliotta, M.; Cherubini, S.; Lattuada, M.; Miljanic, D.; Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Soic, N.; Spitaleri, C.; Zadro, M.; Zappala, R.A.

    2000-12-31

    The Trojan Horse Method has been applied to obtain information about {sup 7}Li(p,{alpha}),{sup 4}He reaction at astrophysical energies. The {sup 7}Li(d,{alpha} n){sup 4}He reaction has been used and the two body reaction cross section for the {sup 7}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 4}He has been extracted together with its astrophysical factor S(E).

  3. Determination of the fine-structure constant {alpha} by measuring the quotient of the Planck constant and the neutron mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, E.; Nistler, W.; Weirauch, W. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    Using a special high-precision apparatus at ILL the quotient h/m{sub n} (h Planck constant, m{sub n} neutron mass) has been measured. The value measured for h/m{sub n} leads to {alpha}{sup -1} = 137.03601082(524) (relative uncertainty: 3.9{center_dot}10{sup -8}) It was the first time that this fundamental constant has been determined by means of neutrons. The experiment, which had been running since 1981 in a preliminary version and since 1987 in the final version, which was finished in December 1996, is described. (author).

  4. Faddeev calculation of 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems using alpha alpha resonating-group method kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M; Suzuki, Y; Baye, D; Sparenberg, J M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out Faddeev calculations of three-alpha (3 alpha) and two-alpha plus Lambda (alpha alpha Lambda) systems, using two-cluster resonating-group method kernels. The input includes an effective two-nucleon force for the alpha alpha resonating-group method and a new effective Lambda N force for the Lambda alpha interaction. The latter force is a simple two-range Gaussian potential for each spin-singlet and triplet state, generated from the phase-shift behavior of the quark-model hyperon-nucleon interaction, fss2, by using an inversion method based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Owing to the exact treatment of the Pauli-forbidden states between the clusters, the present three-cluster Faddeev formalism can describe the mutually related, alpha alpha, 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems, in terms of a unique set of the baryon-baryon interactions. For the three-range Minnesota force which describes the alpha alpha phase shifts quite accurately, the ground-state and excitation energies of 9Be Lambda are...

  5. Best Alternatives to Cronbach's Alpha Reliability in Realistic Conditions: Congeneric and Asymmetrical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trizano-Hermosilla, Italo; Alvarado, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    The Cronbach's alpha is the most widely used method for estimating internal consistency reliability. This procedure has proved very resistant to the passage of time, even if its limitations are well documented and although there are better options as omega coefficient or the different versions of glb, with obvious advantages especially for applied research in which the ítems differ in quality or have skewed distributions. In this paper, using Monte Carlo simulation, the performance of these reliability coefficients under a one-dimensional model is evaluated in terms of skewness and no tau-equivalence. The results show that omega coefficient is always better choice than alpha and in the presence of skew items is preferable to use omega and glb coefficients even in small samples. PMID:27303333

  6. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  7. Best Alternatives to Cronbach's Alpha Reliability in Realistic Conditions: Congeneric and Asymmetrical Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado Izquierdo, Jesús María; Trizano Hermosilla, Italo

    2016-01-01

    The Cronbach's alpha is the most widely used method for estimating internal consistency reliability. This procedure has proved very resistant to the passage of time, even if its limitations are well documented and although there are better options as omega coefficient or the different versions of glb, with obvious advantages especially for applied research in which the ítems differ in quality or have skewed distributions. In this paper, using Monte Carlo simulation, the performance of these r...

  8. Contribution to the study of the alpha-alpha interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new variable energy cyclotron at Berkeley that can accelerate an alpha beam up to an energy of 130 MeV and the mass production of lithium diffused junctions have enabled us to perform 2 series of measurement, in the first one we use alpha beams with an energy ranging between 50 and 120 MeV to study alpha-alpha forces in the second one we use the flexibility of the variable energy cyclotron the resonances around 40 MeV, region that can not yet be reached by tandem accelerators. This work is divided into 6 chapters. The first chapter is dedicated to the formalism of partial wave analysis and the theory of the compound nucleus. In the second chapter the author presents the 88 cyclotron at Berkeley and the diffusion chamber, the alpha detectors are lithium diffused junctions made of silicon. The third chapter deals with the experimental methods used and the issue of the reduction of the volume of data. In the fourth chapter the results obtained in the upper part of the energy range are described in terms of complex shifts that allow the description of the α-α interaction at high energy. The very low impact parameter has enabled us to find 2 new components (l=6 and l=8) of the rotational spectrum and to define a more accurate phenomenological potential. The fifth chapter is dedicated to the narrow resonances we have found between 12 and 27 MeV. We present in the last chapter a calculation of the binding energy of C12 in which we have considered the 12C nucleus as formed by 3 alpha particles interacting with each other through the phenomenological potential defined above

  9. Low-level measurement of alpha-particle emitting nuclei in ceramics and lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly all natural materials contain trace quantities of uranium (U) and thorium (Th) and their daughter nuclides, many of which emit α-particles in their decay. Lead, at the end of the U-decay chain, typically contains some radioactive 210Pb which is chemically inseparable from the other Pb isotopes. α-particle emission from these decays can affect sensitive electronic components, such as memory chips or processors. Measurement of α-particle emitters can be accomplished by direct detection of the α-particles (which typically provides no positive identification of the emitting isotope because of energy loss in the sample) or by low-background γ-ray spectroscopy (which does provide positive identification via characteristic γ-rays). The latter is by far the best method for screening kg-sized samples of materials like ceramics, aluminum, iron, or copper. The difference between α counting and γ-ray spectroscopy is less for measuring 210Pb in Pb since the 46.5 keV characteristic γ-rays directly following the 210Pb decay are strongly absorbed and both methods are limited to thin layers. This paper discusses these two cases and concludes that a large n-type germanium γ-ray spectrometer is probably the best overall system for both measurements. (author)

  10. Light and energy - daylight measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christoffersen, Jens; Logadottir, A.; Traberg-Borup, S.; Barrie-Nielsen, K.

    2009-07-01

    All measurements where conducted in the spring of 2007, except the Interpane panel. The solar cell panels have been evaluated by three performance indicators to assess the daylight quantity within the room and the systems ability to maintain view to the outside. In the study, we used two performance indicators to assess the daylight quantity within the room: 1. the daylight factor (overcast sky) 2. the relative work plane illuminance (clear sky condition) Overcast sky: In general, all panels provided less daylight than the recommended requirement in the Danish Building Regulation of 2% on the work plane. This will most likely result in additional need for electric lighting. However, larger window areas and more parts of the facade with clear unobstructed glass may be one solution. Clear sky: In general, all panels provided less interior light levels than the two reference systems in the back of the room. Almost all systems aloud more or less direct sunlight in the window perimeter through the clear openings and additional needs for some kind of shading device is to be expected. Some systems blocked a large portion of the light in the majority of the room, and additional electric light in this part of the room may be needed. Only one performance indicator where used to describe the quality of the panels. View: In general, all panels, except two, obstruct the view significantly and cause figure/background confusion for a view position close to the window and the discrepancies of colour judgements. Only two systems provided a fairly clear view to the outside without to much distortion of the view. (au)

  11. Energy Based Acoustic Measurement Senors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research focuses on fully developing energy density sensors that will yield a significant benefit both for measurements of interest to NASA, as well as for...

  12. Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

  13. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Salewski, Mirko; Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Garcıa-Munoz, Manuel; Heidbrink, Bill; Korsholm, Soren Bang; Leipold, Frank; Madsen, Jens; Moseev, Dmitry; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Rasmussen, Jesper; Stejner, Morten; Tardini, Giovanni; Weiland, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$. To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) light from the plasma center in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra agree very well with synthetic spectra calculated from a TRANSP/NUBEAM simulation. Based on the measured FIDA spectra alone, we infer $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ by tomographic inversion. Salient features of our measurement of $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ agree reasonably well with the simulation: the measured as well as the simulated $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ are lopsided towards negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field, and they have similar shapes. Further, the peaks in the simulation of $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ at full and half injection energies of the neutral beam also appear in the measurement at similar velocity-space locations. We expect that we can measure spectra in up to seven vi...

  14. Measuring high energy excitations - the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of the main neutron techniques for measuring high energy excitations: the reactor triple axis, and the pulsed source rotor spectrometers, crystal analyzer methods, and resonance detector and absorption methods, will be reviewed in turn. The possibilities opened up the order of magnitude increased in source fluxes now in sight will be explored having in mind in particular the measurement of single crystal excitations to higher energies

  15. Measurement of fission fragments energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    Benetti, P; Calligarich, E; Cesana, A; Dolfini, R; Ioppolo, T; Raselli, G L; Terrani, M

    2002-01-01

    The mean energy of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf fission fragments emerging from an absorber and the determination of the capture rate in the absorber itself have been measured using two independent and complementary nuclear techniques. The results can be applied to the measurement of the energy self-absorption in a non-zero thickness source and can be used to validate simulation programs.

  16. Operational Measures For Energy Efficiency In Shipping

    OpenAIRE

    Emin ÖZTÜRK

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify potential solutions to improve energy efficiency of the existing ships. To have an Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) on board has become mandatory for all ships starting from 1 January 2013. Increasing fuel prices and growing environmental concerns are driving the shipping industry to be more efficient. Therefore it is necessary to develop energy efficient operational measures.

  17. OECD Energy Intensity: Measures, Trends, and Convergence

    OpenAIRE

    Liddle, Brantley

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on several different measures of OECD countries’ energy intensity levels, plots their trends, applies a number of techniques to determine whether those intensities are converging, explores the importance of that convergence, and estimates the future steady-state or long-run distribution of energy intensity for the OECD. The paper finds that OECD energy intensity typically is declining, and a number of parametric and nonparametric methods indicate a strong degree of converge...

  18. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H{sub 2} gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 4} in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter {eta} = (P{sub beam}/F{sub rev}){center dot}(dF{sub rev}/dP{sub beam}). These two measurement techniques are described in this report.

  19. Energy efficiency measurement in industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the meaning of energy efficiency is clear, different definitions exist and important issues relating to its implementation still need to be addressed. It is now recognised that complicating factors – such as complex industrial sites and energy flows, multiple products and fuels, and the influence of production rate on energy efficiency – render it necessary to adopt a structured framework to define and measure energy efficiency more precisely. In this paper, a methodology is proposed to build such a framework. The whole energy system of a site is represented using a single matrix equation, which expresses the relationship between imported energies and energy drivers. The elements of the matrix are the specific energy consumptions of each single process. Mathematical process modelling, through statistical analysis of energy consumption data, is used to quantify the specific energy consumption as a function of the output. The results of this structured approach are relevant for energy benchmarking, budgeting and targeting purposes. Furthermore, this approach is suitable for implementation in an energy management system standard (e.g. EN 16001, ISO 50001) or LCA standard (e.g. ISO 14044). Glass and cast iron melting processes are presented in order to illustrate the application of the method. -- Highlights: ► A structured framework for energy efficiency in industrial processes is proposed. ► Two energy efficiency indicators are revised to take into account a variable output. ► The whole energy system of a factory can be represented by a single matrix equation. ► Mathematical modelling is used to characterise the energy consumption of a process. ► The results are relevant for energy benchmarking, budgeting and energy targeting.

  20. Alpha spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Felix; Wilsenach, Heinrich; Zuber, Kai [IKTP TU-Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Alpha decays from long living isotopes are one of the limiting backgrounds for experiments searching for rare decays with stringent background constrains, such as neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. It is thus very important to accurately measure the half-lives of these decays, in order to properly model their background contribution. Therefore, it is important to be able to measure half-lives from alpha decays of the order of 1 x 10{sup 15} yr. A measurement of such a long lived decay imposes, however, a series of challenges, where the correct discrimination between background and true signal is critical. There is also a more general interest in such long living half-life measurements, as their value depends crucially on the underlying nuclear model. This work proposes a setup to measure long lived alpha decays, based on the design of the Frisch-Grid ionisation chamber. It is shown that the proposed design provides a good separation of signal and background events. It is also demonstrated that, with pulse shape analysis, it is possible to constrain the source position of the decay, further improving the quality of the data. A discussion of the characterisation of the detector is also presented as well as some results obtained with calibration sources.

  1. Alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha decays from long living isotopes are one of the limiting backgrounds for experiments searching for rare decays with stringent background constrains, such as neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. It is thus very important to accurately measure the half-lives of these decays, in order to properly model their background contribution. Therefore, it is important to be able to measure half-lives from alpha decays of the order of 1 x 1015 yr. A measurement of such a long lived decay imposes, however, a series of challenges, where the correct discrimination between background and true signal is critical. There is also a more general interest in such long living half-life measurements, as their value depends crucially on the underlying nuclear model. This work proposes a setup to measure long lived alpha decays, based on the design of the Frisch-Grid ionisation chamber. It is shown that the proposed design provides a good separation of signal and background events. It is also demonstrated that, with pulse shape analysis, it is possible to constrain the source position of the decay, further improving the quality of the data. A discussion of the characterisation of the detector is also presented as well as some results obtained with calibration sources.

  2. The Trojan-Horse Method applied to the {sup 6}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 3}He reaction down to astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Pappalardo, L.; Cherubini, S.; Del Zoppo, A.; La Cognata, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Pizzone, R.G.; Rinollo, A.; Romano, S.; Typel, S

    2004-04-05

    The Trojan-Horse Method has been applied to the three-body d({sup 6}Li,{alpha}{sup 3}He)n break-up reaction in order to extract the bare nucleus S(E) factor for the {sup 6}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 3}He down to astrophysical energies.

  3. Near Fermi Energy reaction dynamics and clustering in alpha-conjugate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiguang; Schmidt, Katarzyna; Kim, E.-J.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Wuenschel, S.; Natowitz, J. B.; Zheng, H.; Blando, N.; Bonasera, A.; Giuliani, G.

    2015-10-01

    Theoretical study predicted that the self-organizing of alpha cluster is favored over deuteron below a critical density with moderate temperature, where the possible Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is expected to occur. However the experimental information about the alpha states at low density is scarce. It is natural to pursue experiments with α conjugate beams and advanced detection apparatus to explore the collective dynamics of alpha clustered systems at low density. Systematical experiments were carried out with 40Ca and 28Si beams at 10, 25, 35 MeV/u incident on 28Si, 12C, 40Ca and 180Ta targets, detected with the NIMROD-ISiS 4 Pi detector array. It is found that there is a strong neck-like emission, which consists mainly of alpha-like fragments. The characteristic of the α emission source is explored by shape analysis, multi-particle correlation and quantum fluctuation approaches. How these observables reveal the possible alpha BEC in low density and possible exotic toroidal and linear chain configurations made out of alpha clusters is discussed.

  4. Cross Sections for proton induced high energy $\\gamma$-ray emission (PIGE) in reaction $^{19}$F(p,$\\alpha\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Cabanelas, P; Fonseca, M; Galaviz, D; Henriques, A; Jesus, A P; Luís, H; Sánchez-Benítez, A; Santos, C; Silva, H; Teubig, P; Velho, P

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction $^{19}$F(p,$\\alpha\\gamma$)$^{16}$O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF$_2$/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130$^{o}$ with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  5. Measured appearance energies of Cn+ (3 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used mass spectrometric techniques to determine the appearance energies for the formation of small, singly charged Cn+ fragment ions (3 60 under single collision conditions. The measured appearance energies range from 79 eV (C3+) to 91 eV (C10+) and show, within the experimental error bar of ± 5 eV, little variation with the cluster size. This result is distinctly different from the behaviour of the previously measured appearance energies for the large fragment ions C58+ to C44+ and indicates that the small fragment ions are the result of a different fragmentation pathway. (author)

  6. Wake Measurements at alpha ventus - Dependency on Stability and Turbulence Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhellweg, Annette; Cañadillas, Beatriz; Kinder, Friederike; Neumann, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Wind and power deficit in the wake are assessed for the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus. Operational data are evaluated for the power deficit in the wake of a single wind turbine and in a row of wind turbines. The wake of a single wind turbine is described by the maximum power deficit and expansion width of the wake. The impact of atmospheric stability in respect to vertical wind shear and turbulence intensity is assessed showing that wake effects are more pronounced under stable conditions.

  7. Spectral Energy Distribution Fitting of HETDEX Pilot Survey Lyman-alpha Emitters in COSMOS and GOODS-N

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Alex; Gronwall, Caryl; Acquaviva, Viviana; Bridge, Joanna; Zeimann, Gregory R; Blanc, Guillermo A; Bond, Nicholas A; Finkelstein, Steven L; Song, Mimi; Gawiser, Eric; Fox, Derek B; Gebhardt, Henry; Malz, A I; Schneider, Donald P; Drory, Niv; Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    We use broadband photometry extending from the rest-frame UV to the near-IR to fit the individual spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 63 bright (L(Ly-alpha) > 10^43 ergs/s) Ly-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the redshift range 1.9 < z < 3.6. We find that these LAEs are quite heterogeneous, with stellar masses that span over three orders of magnitude, from 7.5 < log M < 10.5. Moreover, although most LAEs have small amounts of extinction, some high-mass objects have stellar reddenings as large as E(B-V) ~0.4. Interestingly, in dusty objects the optical depths for Ly-alpha and the UV continuum are always similar, indicating that Ly-alpha photons are not undergoing many scatters before escaping their galaxy. In contrast, the ratio of optical depths in low-reddening systems can vary widely, illustrating the diverse nature of the systems. Finally, we show that in the star formation rate (SFR)-log mass diagram, our LAEs fall above the "main-sequence" defined by z ~ 3 continuum selected star-forming...

  8. Fiber-optic diagnostic for energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a fiber-optic diagnostic based on calorimetry to measure the total energy deposited in a liquid-filled load resistor. Thermodynamic calculations show the fluid temperature to come to equilibrium in about two seconds and to remain there for several tens of seconds. Thus fluid temperature can determine the energy deposited. Using a fluoroptic thermometer, the change in temperature of a copper sulfate solution load resistor was measured as a function of the energy stored in a capacitor bank. A comparison of these results with the calculated temperature rise shows agreement to +-3% over the energy range from 1.4 kJ to 5.9 kJ. Measurements were then made of the energy deposited in a sodium chloride solution load resistor on the Ripple accelerator. These were made as a function of energy stored in the Marx generator from 7.4 kJ to 21.2 kJ. Electrical measurements of the energy deposited were made at the same time. These were high on the average by 8%

  9. Novel 4{pi} Detection System for the Measurement of the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H Reaction Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorginis, Georgios; Bencardino, Raffaele [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)

    2011-12-13

    A dedicated one-dimensional Time Projection Chamber (1D-TPC) was designed and produced at IRMM to determine the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H cross section in the 0.4-2.8 MeV energy range, aiming at 5% accuracy. The basic TPC components were a twin gridded ionisation chamber (GIC) with interwired electrodes and fast digitisation of the anode and cathode signals. The energy of both reaction products emitted from a thin {sup 6}LiF sample at the common TPC cathode was measured. A Kr(97%)CO{sub 2}(3%) mixture was used as the detector gas at a pressure up to 3.5 bar. A {sup 238}U sample mounted on the cathode of an ionisation chamber without grid was used as the neutron flux monitor. Special care was taken to reduce the experimental sources of uncertainty. The beam-monitor {sup 238}U sample was characterised at IRMM by low-geometry {alpha}-counting with an accuracy of 0.1%. A {sup 6}Li sample was produced at IRMM by vacuum evaporation of {sup 6}LiF onto transparent aluminium backing. The number of {sup 6}Li atoms will be measured via Thermal Neutron Depth Profiling with an expected accuracy of 2% with respect to an IRMM Standard Reference Material. First test measurements were performed using a monoenergetic neutron beam produced by the T(p,n){sup 3}He reaction at the IRMM 7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. The experimental method and preliminary results are presented.

  10. The value of serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase measurement for the assessment of tumour response to radio- and photodynamic therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Korbelik, M.; Naraparaju, V. R.; Yamamoto, N.

    1998-01-01

    Serum activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase), the extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme that appears to be produced exclusively by cancer cells, was measured in mice bearing SCCVII tumours (squamous cell carcinoma). The NaGalase levels in these mice increased with time of tumour growth and were directly proportional to tumour burden. After exposure of SCCVII tumours to a single X-ray dose of 20 Gy, the serum NaGalase levels gradually decreased during the first 10 days after tr...

  11. LINAC4 low energy beam measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hein, L M; Lallement, J B; Lombardi, A M; Midttun, O; Posocco, P; Scrivens, R

    2012-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator for negative Hydrogen ions (H−), which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac (Linac2) as linear injector for the CERN accelerators. The low energy part, comprising a 45 keV Low Energy Beam Transport system (LEBT), a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) is being assembled in a dedicated test stand for pre-commissioning with a proton beam. During 2011 extensive measurements were done after the source and after the LEBT with the aim of preparing the RFQ commissioning and validating the simulation tools, indispensable for future source upgrades. The measurements have been thoroughly simulated with a multi-particle code, including 2D magnetic field maps, error studies, steering studies and the generation of beam distribution from measurements. Emittance, acceptance and transmission measurements will be presented and compared to the results of the simulations.

  12. Optimizing BAO measurements with non-linear transformations of Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xinkang; Seljak, Uros

    2014-01-01

    We explore the effect of applying a non-linear transformation to the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest transmitted flux $F=e^{-\\tau}$ and the ability of analytic models to predict the resulting clustering amplitude. Both the large-scale bias of the transformed field (signal) and the amplitude of small scale fluctuations (noise) can be arbitrarily modified, but we were unable to find a transformation that increases significantly the signal-to-noise ratio on large scales using Taylor expansion up to third order. We achieve a 33% improvement in signal to noise for Gaussianized field in transverse direction. On the other hand, we explore analytic model for the large-scale biasing of the Ly$\\alpha$ forest, and present an extension of this model to describe the biasing of the transformed fields. Using hydrodynamic simulations we show that the model works best to describe the biasing with respect to velocity gradients, but is less successful in predicting the biasing with respect to large-scale density fluctuations, especially ...

  13. Alpha particles in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of 39 (mostly view graph) presentations addresses various aspects of alpha particle physics in thermonuclear fusion research, including energy balance and alpha particle losses, transport, the influence of alpha particles on plasma stability, helium ash, the transition to and sustainment of a burning fusion plasma, as well as alpha particle diagnostics. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Alpha power effects on energy confinement time and ignition, and enhancement of ion neoclassical heat conduction due to electron and superthermal ion energy scattering collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Part A of the paper a purely theoretical model is adopted for the local heat diffusivities χe and χi. The global τE is constructed after Callen et al. and is used in a zero dimensional ignition power balance to study alpha power and fast alpha loss effects on ignition. The Horton-Choi-Yushmanov-Parail model for χe permits ignition in a CIT-like tokamak with B = 13.5 T, Ip = 18 MA, if the fast alpha losses and the ηi mode can be controlled. Part B considers the extra components of neoclassical ion heat conduction driven by energy scattering collisions with electrons and superthermal ions. These components are important in auxiliary heated discharges and can be the most important if the plasma ion distribution has an enhanced non-Maxwellian tail. (author). 19 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  15. A framework to characterize energy efficiency measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel framework to characterize energy efficiency measures is proposed. • It allows a greater knowledge sharing, facilitating the adoption of the best measures. • It supports policy-makers in developing drivers for industrial energy efficiency. - Abstract: The need to increase the diffusion of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) is of crucial importance to achieve a consistent reduction of energy consumption and green house gases (GHG) emissions. A clear comprehension of the characteristics of such EEMs could assist in gathering and capitalizing all the information needed by industrial firms in selecting and adopting technologies, as well as by policy-makers in designing appropriate policies for their diffusion. Therefore, in this study, starting from a literature review of the studies analyzing the attributes of EEMs, we aim at providing an innovative and comprehensive framework to characterize such measures, based on 17 attributes grouped according to six categories, such as: economic, energy, environmental, production-related, implementation-related and the possible interaction with other systems. We applied this scheme to an extensive range of EEMs in cross-cutting technologies, i.e. motors, compressed air, lighting and HVAC systems. The analysis provides a relevant contribution firstly to the structuring and the sharing of knowledge on EEMs and hence to the comprehension of the barriers currently hindering their adoption; secondly, it provides a structured basis for the analysis of the drivers that policy-makers should develop in order to promote industrial energy efficiency

  16. Measuring Income and Projecting Energy Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy is a key requirement for a healthy, productive life and a major driver of the emissions leading to an increasingly warm planet. The implications of a doubling and redoubling of per capita incomes over the remainder of this century for energy use are a critical input into understanding the magnitude of the carbon management problem. A substantial controversy about how the Special Report on Emssions Scenarios (SRES) measured income and the potential implications of how income was measured for long term levels of energy use is revisited again in the McKibbin, Pearce and Stegman article appearing elsewhere in this issue. The recent release of a new set of purchasing power estimates of national income, and the preparations for creating new scenarios to support the IPCC's fifth assessment highlight the importance of the issues which have arisen surrounding income and energy use. Comparing the 1993 and 2005 ICP results on Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) based measures of income reveals that not only do the 2005 ICP estimates share the same issue of common growth rates for real income as measured by PPP and US $, but the lack of coherence in the estimates of PPP incomes, especially for developing countries raises yet another obstacle to resolving the best way to measure income. Further, the common use of an income term to mediate energy demand (as in the Kaya identity) obscures an underlying reality about per capita energy demands, leading to unreasonable estimates of the impact of changing income measures and of the recent high GDP growth rates in India and China. Significant new research is required to create both a reasonable set of GDP growth rates and long term levels of energy use.

  17. Manufacturing of thin films of boron for the measurement of the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7} Li reaction used in BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smilgys, Barbara; Oliveira, Sandro Guedes de; Hadler Neto, Julio Cesar; Vellame, Igor Alencar [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin; Soares, Cleber Jose; Salim, Leonardo Alfredo [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas; Coelho, Paulo Rogerio Pinto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is considered to be a possible treatment for different types of aggressive cancers located in areas of difficult access or which already have metastasis. The working principle of this therapy is the selective delivery of a greater amount of boron to the tumor cells than to the healthy ones, followed by the neutron irradiation that will induce the emission of {alpha} particles through the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7} Li reaction used in BNCT reaction. The high energy deposition of the product particles causes the death of the cells and this therapy becomes much effective if the healthy tissue is less exposed to this radiation. The objective of this work is to develop a method for measuring the rate of this reaction by using thin films of boron. We have manufactured thin films with different concentrations of boron deposited on mica and the thin films were exposed to different irradiation time intervals at the reactor IEA-R1 located at IPEN, Sao Paulo. Here we show our first results on the density and uniformity of the thin films, where the detection of the particles is made using plastic track detectors (CR-39) which have their structures damaged by the passage of ions. (author)

  18. Indirect measurement of the {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C reaction cross section through the Trojan-Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R.G.; Tumino, A. [Universita di Catania, Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Catania (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Tribble, R.; Trache, L.; Fu, Changbo; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tabacaru, G. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute, College Station, TX (United States); Rolfs, C. [Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    The low-energy, bare-nucleus cross section for {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C is extracted by means of the Trojan-Horse Method applied to the {sup 2}H({sup 15}N,{alpha}{sup 12}C)n reaction at E{sub beam}=60 MeV. The astrophysical S-factor is compared to the direct data in the same energy region. A nice agreement shows up down to 100 keV, while the low-energy behaviour of the S-factor suggests a smaller rate than is reported in the literature. (orig.)

  19. Measurement of microbial alpha-amylases with p-nitrophenyl glycosides as the substrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepeta, R W; Edberg, S C

    1984-01-01

    The detection of alpha-amylase is commonly used in clinical microbiology laboratories to aid in differentiating Streptococcus bovis from other streptococci. It is also useful in identifying Eikenella corrodens and the gravis subspecies of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and in separating species of the genera Bacteroides, Clostridium, Actinomyces, and Bacillus. Currently, the most frequently used procedure utilizes starch as the substrate and iodine as the indicator. Starch is incorporated into a agar medium, the isolate is inoculated on the surface, and the medium is incubated for 24 to 48 h. A 15-min test containing p-nitrophenyl polyglycosides as the substrate complex was developed to yield results comparable with the agar-based starch test. The reagent was made in liquid form, 0.20 ml per tube, and could be incubated either in ambient air or at 35 degrees C. When dried, the p-nitrophenyl polyglycoside reagent could be stored at 0 degrees C for 4 weeks. PMID:6418764

  20. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry parameter $\\alpha_b$ and the helicity amplitudes for the decay $\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi\\Lambda^0$ with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Grybel, Kai; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novakova, Jana; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petteni, Michele; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    A measurement of the parity-violating decay asymmetry parameter, $\\alpha_b$, and the helicity amplitudes for the decay $\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi(\\mu^+\\mu^-) \\Lambda^0 (p\\pi^-)$ is reported. The analysis is based on 1400 $\\Lambda_b^0$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}_b^0$ baryons selected in $4.6~\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ of proton--proton collision data with a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. By combining the $\\Lambda_b^0$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}_b^0$ samples under the assumption of $CP$ conservation, the value of $\\alpha_b$ is measured to be $0.30\\pm0.16 ({\\rm stat})\\pm 0.06 ({\\rm syst})$. This measurement provides a test of theoretical models based on perturbative QCD or heavy-quark effective theory.

  1. The C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction at astrophysical energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction rate is estimated for temperatures important for He flashes in white dwarfs and for nonhomogeneous big-bang nucleosynthesis. If available, the resonant contributions to the rate are derived using recent experimental data. The direct capture rate is evaluated on the basis of a microscopic multichannel calculation of the C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction. Possible interference contributions are discussed. The present rate is compared to previous estimates of Hashimoto et al. (1986) and of Buchmann et al. (1988). 23 refs

  2. The C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funck, C.; Langanke, K. (Muenster Universitaet (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-09-01

    The C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction rate is estimated for temperatures important for He flashes in white dwarfs and for nonhomogeneous big-bang nucleosynthesis. If available, the resonant contributions to the rate are derived using recent experimental data. The direct capture rate is evaluated on the basis of a microscopic multichannel calculation of the C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction. Possible interference contributions are discussed. The present rate is compared to previous estimates of Hashimoto et al. (1986) and of Buchmann et al. (1988). 23 refs.

  3. Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Lyman-alpha Forest Fluctuations in BOSS Data Release 9

    CERN Document Server

    Slosar, Anže; Kirkby, David; Bailey, Stephen; Busca, Nicolás G; Delubac, Timothée; Rich, James; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brownstein, Joel; Carithers, Bill; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle S; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Goff, J -M Le; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Lee, Khee-Gan; Margala, Daniel; McDonald, Patrick; Medolin, Bumbarija; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D; Nichol, Robert C; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M; Roe, Yodovina Piškur N A; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Sheldon, Erin S; Seljak, Uroš; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David H; Yèche, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    We use the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 9 (DR9) to detect and measure the position of the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the three-dimensional correlation function in the Lyman-alpha forest flux fluctuations at a redshift z=2.4. The feature is clearly detected at significance between 3 and 5 sigma (depending on the broadband model and method of error covariance matrix estimation) and is consistent with predictions of the standard LCDM model. We assess the biases in our method, stability of the error covariance matrix and possible systematic effects. We fit the resulting correlation function with several models that decouple the broadband and acoustic scale information. For an isotropic dilation factor, we measure 100x(alpha_iso-1) = -1.6 ^{+2.0+4.3+7.4}_{-2.0-4.1-6.8} (stat.) +/- 1.0 (syst.) (multiple statistical errors denote 1,2 and 3 sigma confidence limits) with respect to the acoustic scale in the fiducial cosmological model (flat LCDM with Omega_m=0.27, h=0...

  4. Expected accuracy in a measurement of the CKM angle alpha using a Dalitz plot analysis of B0 ---> rho pi decays in the BTeV project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestermanov, K.E.; Vasiliev, A.N; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Butler, J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Kasper, P.; Kiselev, V.V.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Kutschke, R.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Minaev, N.G.; /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab /Minnesota U. /Syracuse U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-12-01

    A precise measurement of the angle {alpha} in the CKM triangle is very important for a complete test of Standard Model. A theoretically clean method to extract {alpha} is provided by B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} decays. Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the BTeV reconstruction efficiency and to estimate the signal to background ratio for these decays were performed. Finally the time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis, using the isospin amplitude formalism for tre and penguin contributions, was carried out. It was shown that in one year of data taking BTeV could achieve an accuracy on {alpha} better than 5{sup o}.

  5. Measurement and analysis of the excitation function for alpha induced reaction on Ga and Sb isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excitation functions for the reactions 69Ga(αxn)sup(73-x)As, 69Ga(α,p3n)69Ge, 69Ga(α,2p4n)67Ga, 71Ga(α,xn)sup(75-x)As, 121Sb(α,xn)sup(125-x)I, 121Sb(α,p3n)121Te and 123Sb(α,xn)sup(127-x)I were obtained from the measurements of the residual activity of stacked foils of gallium nitrate evaporated on aluminium backings from threshold to 65 MeV. The excitation functions for the production of 74As, 72As, 71As, 69Ge and 67Ga from α - induced reactions on Ga and 126I, 124I, 123I, 121I and 121Te from α - induced reactions on Sb are presented. The experimental data are compared with calculations considering equilibrium as well as pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism according to the hybrid model of Blann (1971). The high energy part of the excitation functions are dominated by the pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism. Calculations were done using the a priori calculational method of Overlaid Alice Code of Blann. From the reactions 71Ga(α,3n)72As and 123Sb(α,3n)124I an initial exciton number nsub(o)=4(nsub(n)=2, nsub(p)=2, nsub(h)=0) with the mean free path multiplier parameter k set to 2 has been deduced for both the targets. However, there are a few exceptions (i) the theory overestimates the cross-section for the 69Ga(α,2p4n)67Ga reaction whereas it underestimate the cross-section for the 121Sb(α,p3n)121Te reaction and the high energy tail of 121Sb(α,2n)123I excitation function. Factors to which these discrepancies between theory and experiment in case of these reactions may be attributed are indicated. Barring these reactions the overall agreement between theory and experiment is good taking into account the limitations of the theory. (author). 43 refs., 7 tabs., 19 figs

  6. Energy Savings Measure Packages: Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, S.; Booten, C.

    2011-11-01

    This document presents the most cost effective Energy Savings Measure Packages (ESMP) for existing mixed-fuel and all electric homes to achieve 15% and 30% savings for each BetterBuildings grantee location across the US. These packages are optimized for minimum cost to homeowners for given source energy savings given the local climate and prevalent building characteristics (i.e. foundation types). Maximum cost savings are typically found between 30% and 50% energy savings over the reference home. The dollar value of the maximum annual savings varies significantly by location but typically amounts to $300 - $700/year.

  7. Energy Savings Measure Packages. Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Sean [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Booten, Chuck [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This document presents the most cost effective Energy Savings Measure Packages (ESMP) for existing mixed-fuel and all electric homes to achieve 15% and 30% savings for each BetterBuildings grantee location across the United States. These packages are optimized for minimum cost to homeowners for source energy savings given the local climate and prevalent building characteristics (i.e. foundation types). Maximum cost savings are typically found between 30% and 50% energy savings over the reference home; this typically amounts to $300 - $700/year.

  8. OECD energy intensity. Measures, trends, and convergence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddle, B. [Centre for Strategic Economic Studies, Victoria University, Level 13, 300 Flinders Street, Melbourne, VIC, 8001 (Australia)

    2012-11-15

    This paper focuses on several different measures of Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries' energy intensity levels, plots their trends, applies a number of techniques to determine whether those intensities are converging, explores the importance of that convergence, and estimates the future steady-state or long-run distribution of energy intensity for the OECD. The paper finds that OECD energy intensity typically is declining, and a number of parametric and nonparametric methods indicate a strong degree of convergence. However, convergence is conditioned on country specific factors since differences in individual energy/GDP ratios persist. These findings suggest limits to the general decline in developed country energy intensity.

  9. Measurement of electro-sprayed 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes using 4π-alpha spectrometry. Application to environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new protocol for plutonium deposition using the electro-spray technique coupled with 4π-α spectrometry is proposed to improve the detection limit, shorten the counting time. In order to increase the detection efficiency, it was proposed to measure 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes electro-sprayed deposit simultaneously on both sides of the source support, that must be as transparent as possible to alpha-emissions, in a two-alpha detectors chamber. A radiochemical protocol was adapted to electro-spray constraints and a very thin carbon foil was selected for 4π -alpha spectrometry. The method was applied to a batch of sediment samples and gave the same results as an electrodeposited source measured using conventional alpha spectrometry with a 25 % gain on counting time and 10 % on plutonium 238 detection limit. Validation and application of the technique have been made on reference samples. (author)

  10. The alpha channeling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  11. Enermet in the forefront of energy measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takala, R.; Suonperae, J.; Alatalo-Korpi, H. [ed.

    1997-11-01

    The deregulation of energy markets presents increasing challenges to the traditional measurement business and at the same time puts special demands on system solutions. Power companies are placing emphasis on the remote accessibility of measurement data at customer sites and on a greater variety of rates. Enermet, a member of the IVO Group, is a frontrunner in this business area, investing 8 % of its turnover in product development

  12. Pairing gaps and Fermi energies at scission for 296Lv alpha-decay

    CERN Document Server

    Mirea, M

    2014-01-01

    The pairing corrections, the single particle occupation numbers, are investigated within density-dependent delta interaction formalism for pairing residual interactions. The potential barrier is computed in the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic model. The microscopic part is based on the Woods-Saxon two center shell model. The alpha-decay of a superheavy element is treated, by paying a special attention to the region of the scission configurations. The sequence of nuclear shapes follows the superasymmetric fission path for alpha decay. It was found that the pairing gaps of the states that reach asymptotically the potential well of the alpha particle have large values at scission but become zero after scission. The 1s1/2 single particle levels of the nascent alpha particle are fully occupied while the superior levels are empties in the scission region and remains in the same states during the penetration of the Coulomb barrier. The projection of the numbers of particle on the two fragments are obtained ...

  13. Fragmentation of alpha- and beta-alanine molecules by ions at Bragg-peak energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bari, S.; Sobocinski, P.; Postma, J.; Alvarado, F.; Hoekstra, R.; Bernigaud, V.; Manil, B.; Rangama, J.; Huber, B.; Schlathoelter, T.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of keV He(+), He(2+), and O(5+) ions with isolated alpha and beta isomers of the amino acid alanine was studied by means of high resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We observed a strong isomer dependence of characteristic fragmentation channels which manifests in

  14. AN UPDATED {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He REACTION RATE AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES WITH THE TROJAN HORSE METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Sergi, M. L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A.; La Cognata, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Tognelli, E.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Universita di Ferrara, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    The lithium problem influencing primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis is one of the most interesting unsolved issues in astrophysics. {sup 6}Li is the most fragile of lithium's stable isotopes and is largely destroyed in most stars during the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. For these stars, the convective envelope easily reaches, at least at its bottom, the relatively low {sup 6}Li ignition temperature. Thus, gaining an understanding of {sup 6}Li depletion also gives hints about the extent of convective regions. For this reason, charged-particle-induced reactions in lithium have been the subject of several studies. Low-energy extrapolations of these studies provide information about both the zero-energy astrophysical S(E) factor and the electron screening potential, U{sub e} . Thanks to recent direct measurements, new estimates of the {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He bare-nucleus S(E) factor and the corresponding U{sub e} value have been obtained by applying the Trojan Horse method to the {sup 2}H({sup 6}Li, {alpha} {sup 3}He)n reaction in quasi-free kinematics. The calculated reaction rate covers the temperature window 0.01 to 2T{sub 9} and its impact on the surface lithium depletion in PMS models with different masses and metallicities has been evaluated in detail by adopting an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code.

  15. Stopping power and energy loss straggling of thin Formvar foil for 0.3-2.7 MeV protons and alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammeri, S.; Ammi, H.; Dib, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Ourabah, S.; Msimanga, M.; Chekirine, M.; Guesmia, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stopping power and energy loss straggling data for protons (1H+) and alpha particles (4He+) crossing Formvar thin polymeric foils (thickness of ˜0.3 μm) have been measured in the energy range (0.3-2.7) MeV by using the indirect transmission technique. The determined stopping power data were compared to SRIM-2010, PSTAR or ASTAR calculation codes and then analyzed in term of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory to extract the target mean excitation and ionization potential . A resulting value of ≈(69.2±1.8) eV was deduced from proton stopping data. The measured straggling data were corrected from surface roughness effects due to target thickness inhomogeneity observed by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The obtained data were then compared to derived straggling values by Bohr's and Bethe-Livingston's classical theories or by Yang's empirical formula. A deviation of ˜40%-80% from the Bohr's straggling value has been observed for all reported energies, suggesting that the Bohr theory cannot be correctly applied to describe the electronic energy loss straggling process with the used low thickness of Formvar foil. The inner-shell contribution of target electrons to energy loss process is also advanced to explain the observed deviation from experiment in case of He+ ions. Finally, the reliability of Bragg's additivity rule was discussed in case of stopping power and straggling results.

  16. Set-up of an alpha-spectrometry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principle of operation of alpha-spectrometry system is described, using a solid state detector, which allows to precisely determine sample's activity and specify alpha-emitting radionuclides. Measurements which allow to define system performances are shown, that is energy resolution and real sensitivity of spectrometer

  17. Oscillations in the Habitable Zone around Alpha Centauri B

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    The Alpha Centauri AB system is an attractive one for radial velocity observations to detect potential exoplanets. The high metallicity of both Alpha Centauri A and B suggest that they could have possessed circumstellar discs capable of forming planets. As the closest star system to the Sun, with well over a century of accurate astrometric measurements (and Alpha Centauri B exhibiting low chromospheric activity) high precision surveys of Alpha Centauri B's potential exoplanetary system are possible with relatively cheap instrumentation. Authors studying habitability in this system typically adopt habitable zones (HZs) based on global radiative balance models that neglect the radiative perturbations of Alpha Centauri A. We investigate the habitability of planets around Alpha Centauri B using 1D latitudinal energy balance models (LEBMs), which fully incorporate the presence of Alpha Centauri A as a means of astronomically forcing terrestrial planet climates. We find that the extent of the HZ is relatively uncha...

  18. Investigation of (n,alpha) Reaction for Rare-earth Elements in the MeV Neutron Energy Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledenov, R. Y. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Koehler, Paul Edward [ORNL; N_TOF collaboration, [CNR-INFM, Trieste, Italy

    2011-01-01

    Cross sections and forward/backward ratios in the laboratory reference system were measured for {sup 143}Nd(n, {alpha}){sup 140}Ce at 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 MeV, {sup 147}Sm(n, {alpha}){sup 144}Nd at 5.0 and 6.0 MeV, and {sup 149}Sm(n, {alpha}){sup 146}Nd at 6.0 MeV. A twin gridded ionization chamber and large-area back-to-back {sup 143}Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {sup 147,149}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples were employed. Experiments were performed at the 4.5 MV Van de Graaff of Peking University, China. Fast neutrons were produced through the D(d, n){sup 3}He reaction by using a deuterium gas target. A small {sup 238}U fission chamber was employed for absolute neutron flux determination and a BF{sub 3} long counter was used as neutron flux monitor. Present experimental data are compared with previous measurements, evaluations, and model calculations.

  19. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium-yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  20. New approach to energy loss measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to energy loss measurements is proposed. In the same experiment electronic stopping force (power) in gold, nickel, carbon, polycarbonate and Havar for 40Ar, 28Si, 16O, 4He and 1H ions in the energy range 0.12-11 MeV/u has been measured. In this paper we give the full results for gold, nickel, and carbon and for 40Ar, 16O, 4He and 1H ions. Good agreement of the measured stopping force values for light ions with literature data is interpreted as the positive test of the experimental technique. The same technique used with heavy ions yields agreement with the published data only for energies above 1 MeV/u. At lower energies we observe progressively increasing discrepancy. This discrepancy is removed completely as soon as we neglect pulse height defect compensation. This observation makes us believe that the majority of the published results as well as semi-empirical calculations based on them (like the popular SRIM) may be in error at low ion energies. Procedures to evaluate foil quality and to determine pulse height defect for charged ions in semiconductor detectors are given. Our improved MCP-based time pick-off detector is described in detail

  1. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dustin, E-mail: djanders@caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm{sup 3} lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm{sup 3} LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  2. Some characteristics of the CR-39 solid state nuclear - Track Detector for register of protons and low energy alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results related to registration properties of the CR-39 Solid State Nuclear Track Detector for charged particles are presented and discussed. The existence of an inverse proportion between the induction time and the temperature as well as normal concentration of solutions, is showed by the study of CR-39 chemical etching characteristics in NaOH and KOH solutions, comprising varied concentration and temperature. The bulk-etch rate and activation energy of the process were obtained. The critical energy and critical energy-loss rate of CR-39 track-detectors for registration of protons were experimentally determined. Samples were exposed to 24 Mev proton beams in the IEN/CNEN Cyclotron (CV-28), using scattering chamber with a tantalum thin target and aluminium absorbers in contact with the samples, in order to provide the required fluctuation in the scattered beam energy. From the mean track-diameter plotted against incident proton energy the critical energy was obtained. From the calculated energy-loss rate vs. energy curve, the critical energy loss rate were evaluated. The CR-39 response for low energy alpha particles (E = 7h) under the conditions of 6.25 N NaOH at 700C. It is shown that successive chemical etchings do not produce the same track geometry as obtained by means of a continous revelation with the same total etching time. (Author)

  3. PRODUCTIVITY BENEFITS OF INDUSTRIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY MEASURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A journal article by: Ernst Worrell1, John A. Laitner, Michael Ruth, and Hodayah Finman Abstract: We review the relationship between energy efficiency improvement measures and productivity in industry. We review over 70 industrial case studies from widely available published dat...

  4. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE GANIL BEAM ENERGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CASANDJIAN, JM; MITTIG, W; BEUNARD, R; GAUDARD, L; LEPINESZILY, A; VILLARI, ACC; AUGER, G; BIANCHI, L; CUNSOLO, A; FOTI, A; LICHTENTHALER, R; PLAGNOL, E; SCHUTZ, Y; SIEMSSEN, RH; WIELECZKO, JP

    1993-01-01

    The energy of the GANIL cyclotron beam was measured on-line during the Pb-208 + Pb-208 elastic scattering experiment ''Search for Color van der Waals Force in the Pb-208 + Pb-208 Mott scattering'' with an absolute precision of 7 x 10(-5) at approximately 1.0 GeV, which represents an improvement of o

  5. Bi209 alpha activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study for measuring Bi209 alpha activity is presented. Ilford L4 nuclear emulsion pellicles loaded with bismuth citrate to obtain a load of 100 mg/cm3 of dry emulsion, were prepared. Other pellicles were prepared with the same. Ilford L4 gel to estimate the background radiation. To observe 'fading' effect, pellicles loaded with bismuth were submitted to neutrons of high energy, aiming to record recoil proton tracks. The pellicles were confined in nitrogen atmosphere at temperature lower than -100C. The Bi209 experimental half-life was obtained and compared with the estimated theoretical data. (M.C.K.)

  6. Is the Double Giant Dipole Resonance Process Responsible for Alpha Emission in Ternary Fission?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Hong-Yin(韩洪银); WAND Yi-Hua(王屹华); G.Mouze

    2001-01-01

    The Monte Carlo program built on the double giant dipole resonance model proposed by Mouze et al. [Nuovo Cimento A 110(1997)1097] was employed to calculate the energy spectrum of alpha particles emitted in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf. It has been found that in the case of the zero orbital angular momentum of alpha particles in the alpha decay of the fragments, the measured alpha spectrum can be reproduced approximately by the model without any adjustable parameter.

  7. Development of a strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source for a confined alpha particle measurement at ITER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaki, M; Shinto, K; Kobuchi, T; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Tsumori, K; Nishiura, M; Kaneko, O; Matsuda, Y; Wada, M; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Hirano, Y

    2008-02-01

    A strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source has been designed and constructed as a beam source for a high-energy He(0) beam probe system for diagnosis of fusion produced alpha particles in the thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The He(+) beam was extracted from the ion source at an acceleration voltage of 18-35 kV. Temperature distributions of the beam target were observed with an IR camera. The 1/e-holding beam profile half-width was about 15 mm at optimum perveance (Perv) of 0.03 (I(beam)=2.4 A). A beam current about 3 A was achieved at an acceleration voltage of 26.7 kV with an arc power of 10 kW (Perv=0.023). PMID:18315239

  8. Spectral Energy Distribution Fitting of Hetdex Pilot Survey Ly-alpha Emitters in Cosmos and Goods-N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Alex; Ciardullo, Robin; Cronwall, Caryl; Acquaviva, Viviana; Bridge, Joanna; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Blanc, Guillermo; Bond, Nicholas; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Gawiser, Eric; Fox, Derek B.; Gebhardt, Henry; Malz, A. I; Schneider, Donald P.; Drory, Niv; Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    We use broadband photometry extending from the rest-frame UV to the near-IR to fit the individual spectral energy distributions of 63 bright (L(Ly-alpha) greater than 10(exp 43) erg s(exp -1) Ly-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the redshift range 1.9 less than z less than 3.6. We find that these LAEs are quite heterogeneous, with stellar masses that span over three orders of magnitude, from 7.5 greater than logM/solar mass less than 10.5. Moreover, although most LAEs have small amounts of extinction, some high-mass objects have stellar reddenings as large as E(B - V ) is approximately 0.4. Interestingly, in dusty objects the optical depths for Ly-alpha and the UV continuum are always similar, indicating that Lya photons are not undergoing many scatters before escaping their galaxy. In contrast, the ratio of optical depths in low-reddening systems can vary widely, illustrating the diverse nature of the systems. Finally, we show that in the star-formation-rate-log-mass diagram, our LAEs fall above the "main-sequence" defined by z is approximately 3 continuum selected star-forming galaxies. In this respect, they are similar to submillimeter-selected galaxies, although most LAEs have much lower mass.

  9. Variation of Fission-Fragment Kinetic Energy Distribution, Mass Distribution, and Yield of Long-Range Alpha Particles in the Resonance-Neutron-Induced Fission of U235 and Pu239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These measurements were undertaken to obtain additional information on the fission process, and to investigate the application of this information to the assignment of J-values to resonance levels, as the usual methods of determining J-values are of limited applicability in the case of fissile isotopes. An earlier study of U235 showed that the fission-fragment kinetic energy and the alpha yield varied significantly from level to level, and fell into two groups suggestive of the two possible J-values. The present paper reports on measurements on Pu239. A study of 19 levels shows 15 levels with high average kinetic energy and 4 levels with low average kinetic energy, the former being assigned J -1 and the latter J = 0 on the basis of the expected ratio of population of the two spin states and also for maximum compatibility with other determinations. Some variation of relative alpha-particle yield was found. It is concluded that (1) there are definite variations of kinetic energy of the fragments from level to level; (2) the variation in the case of U235 is correlated with the relative yield of symmetric fission; (3) there is some indication in the case of Pu239 that the variation of fragment energy is correlated with the J-values; and (4) the relative yield of alpha particles varies in an expected fashion. (author)

  10. Particularization of alpha contamination using CR-39 track detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M F Zaki; Y H El-Shaer

    2007-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear track detectors have found wide use in various domains of science and technology, e.g. in environmental experiments. The measurement of alpha activity on sources in an environment, such as air is not easy because of short penetration range of alpha particles. Furthermore, measurement of alpha activity by most gas ionization detectors suffers from high background induced by the accompanying gamma radiation. Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) have been used successfully as detecting devices and as a passive system to detect alpha contamination on different surfaces. This work presents the response of CR-39 (for two types) to alpha particles from two sources, 238Pu with energy 5 MeV and 241Am with energy 5.4 MeV. The methods of etching and counting are investigated, along with the achievable linearity, efficiency and reproducibility. The sensitivity to low activity and energy resolution are studied.

  11. NEMVP: North American energy measurement and verification protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This measurement and verification protocol discusses procedures that,when implemented, allow buyers, sellers, and financiers of energy projects to quantify energy conservation measure performance and savings.

  12. Suma-alpha software description. Study of its applications to detection problems and environmental radioactivity measurements; Descripcion del Programa Suma-Alfas. Estudio de sus Aplicaciones a Problemas de Deteccion y Medida de la Radiactividad Ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Perez, C.

    2010-05-01

    Software named suma-espectros has been developed by TECNASA/CIEMAT for adding counts automatically from the alpha spectra, energy to energy, with the purpose of: evaluating real background of alpha spectrometers, studying its temporal variations, increasing the possibilities of isotopes detection -where it has been impossible to detect due elapsed time of the measurement- and implementing other applications. The programme is written in Visual-Basic and it can export data to Excel spreadsheets for later treatment. The software has established by default a channels range for adding the counts energy by energy but it can be adapted to the analysis of different isotopes and backgrounds simply changing a text file that is incorporated to the programme. The description of the programme management is described for whoever can realise its applications immediately. This software has the advantage of emitting an add-spectrum in cnf format that is used by alpha analyst (Genie 2K) for de convoluting spectra or doing calculations. (Author) 3 refs.

  13. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Laitner, John A.; Michael, Ruth; Finman, Hodayah

    2004-08-30

    We review the relationship between energy efficiency improvement measures and productivity in industry. We review over 70 industrial case studies from widely available published databases, followed by an analysis of the representation of productivity benefits in energy modeling. We propose a method to include productivity benefits in the economic assessment of the potential for energy efficiency improvement. The case-study review suggests that energy efficiency investments can provide a significant boost to overall productivity within industry. If this relationship holds, the description of energy-efficient technologies as opportunities for larger productivity improvements has significant implications for conventional economic assessments. The paper explores the implications this change in perspective on the evaluation of energy-efficient technologies for a study of the iron and steel industry in the US. This examination shows that including productivity benefits explicitly in the modeling parameters would double the cost-effective potential for energy efficiency improvement, compared to an analysis excluding those benefits. We provide suggestions for future research in this important area.

  14. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the relationship between energy efficiency improvement measures and productivity in industry. We review over 70 industrial case studies from widely available published databases, followed by an analysis of the representation of productivity benefits in energy modeling. We propose a method to include productivity benefits in the economic assessment of the potential for energy efficiency improvement. The case-study review suggests that energy efficiency investments can provide a significant boost to overall productivity within industry. If this relationship holds, the description of energy-efficient technologies as opportunities for larger productivity improvements has significant implications for conventional economic assessments. The paper explores the implications this change in perspective on the evaluation of energy-efficient technologies for a study of the iron and steel industry in the US. This examination shows that including productivity benefits explicitly in the modeling parameters would double the cost-effective potential for energy efficiency improvement, compared to an analysis excluding those benefits. We provide suggestions for future research in this important area

  15. Circular polarisation measurements of the L sub. alpha. cascade radiation for the 3 sup 2 D sub j states of atomic hydrogen, excited by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, D.; Slevin, J. (Saint Patrick' s Coll., Maynooth (Ireland)); Chwirot, S. (Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, Torun (Poland). Inst. Fizyki); Srivastava, R. (Roorkee Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-28

    Measurements are reported for the circular polarisation of the L{sub {alpha}} radiation arising from the cascade of the 3{sup 2}D{sub j} states of atomic hydrogen to the 2{sup 2}P{sub j} states detected in coincidence with electrons with n = 3 energy loss. Data for the atomic orientation parameter L {sub perpendicular} are presented at incident electron energies of 54.4 and 100 eV and at scattering angles {theta}{sub e} of 20{sup 0} and 25{sup 0}. These data, together with previous measurements for this transition, constitute a determination of the complete parameter set {l brace}{gamma}, P{sub 1}, {rho}{sub 00}, L {sub perpendicular}{r brace} for 3{sup 2}D{sub j} excitations in this dynamic range. Calculations for P{sub 3} and L {sub perpendicular} using distorted-wave approximation theory are also performed. The theoretical results are presented and compared with the experimental data. (author).

  16. New approach to energy loss measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Trzaska, W H; Alanko, T; Mutterer, M; Raeisaenen, J; Tjurin, G; Wojdyr, M

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to energy loss measurements is proposed. In the same experiment electronic stopping force (power) in gold, nickel, carbon, polycarbonate and Havar for sup 4 sup 0 Ar, sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 4 He and sup 1 H ions in the energy range 0.12-11 MeV/u has been measured. In this paper we give the full results for gold, nickel, and carbon and for sup 4 sup 0 Ar, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 4 He and sup 1 H ions. Good agreement of the measured stopping force values for light ions with literature data is interpreted as the positive test of the experimental technique. The same technique used with heavy ions yields agreement with the published data only for energies above 1 MeV/u. At lower energies we observe progressively increasing discrepancy. This discrepancy is removed completely as soon as we neglect pulse height defect compensation. This observation makes us believe that the majority of the published results as well as semi-empirical calculations based on them (like the popular SRIM) may be in er...

  17. 10 CFR 436.104 - Energy conservation measures and standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy conservation measures and standards. 436.104 Section 436.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Guidelines for General Operations Plans § 436.104 Energy conservation measures and standards....

  18. Scintillation Measurement of Low-Energy Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate measurement of low-energy photons (less than 100 keV) detected in sodium iodide is difficult because of the inherent instability of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) operated at high gain. The cost of a multichannel analyser and spectrum stabilizer for routine measurements is justified only if many radioisotopes are to be assayed. A low cost system suitable for several low-energy gamma-emitting isotopes, such as 145Sm, 133Gd, 159Dy, 109Cd, 119Sn, 123Te and others, incorporates a ratio detector as a spectrum stabilizer and permits accurate counting of the low-energy photons in spite of PMT gain fluctuations. This system was used very successfully on 125I. The photon energy here is mainly 27.4 keV and the gain of the amplifier following the PMT was adjusted to give approximately thirty volt pulses at its output and the peak spread over approximately thirty volts. A two-channel analyser was set with one channel on the lower energy half of the peak, the other channel on the upper energy half. Each channel output went into the ratio detector which indicated if the ratio was high, low or 1:1. Any change in the overall gain was compensated for by adjusting the amplifier ''fine gain'' until the ratio returned to 1:1. The count-rate, measured with a scaler, was related to the activity in an absolutely standardized sample. The photon absorption in the sample must be reproducible. For the 125I example quoted, sample activity was in the region of 1 μCi, but much lower activities may be determined with longer counting times and attention to background reduction. (author)

  19. Energy gaps measured by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been used to measure energy gaps in the charge-density-wave (CDW) phases of the layer-structure dichalcogenides and in the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8. Measured values of ΔCDW at 4.2 K for 2H-TaSe2, 2H-TaS2, and 2H-NbSe2 are 80, 50, and 34 meV giving values of 2ΔCDW/kBTc equal to 15.2, 15.4, and 23.9, indicating strong coupling in these CDW systems. Measured values of ΔCDW at 4.2 K in 1T-TaSe2 and 1T-TaS2 are ∼150 meV for both materials giving 2ΔCDW/kBTc∼5.8. STM scans of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 at 4.2 K resolve atoms on the BiOx layer and show possible variations in electronic structure. The energy gap determined from I versus V and dI/dV versus V curves is in the range 30--35 meV giving values of 2Δ/kBTc∼8. Spectroscopy measurements with the STM can exhibit large zero-bias anomalies which complicate the analysis of the energy-gap structure, but adequate separation has been accomplished

  20. Energy efficiency policies and measures in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Eva

    2012-07-01

    This report represents the national case study of Norway for the IEE-project {sup M}onitoring of EU and national energy efficiency targets (ODYSSEE-MURE 2010)'. The Norwegian part of the project is co-funded by Enova. The report presents the recent energy efficiency trends in Norway on the basis of indicators extracted from the ODYSSEE database. The database contains information on energy use in a detailed level of the industry, transport, household and service sectors and other energy use. lt also contains information on energy drivers like heated square meters in the households and services sectors, transported passenger-km and ton-km of gods, value added, production index, production volumes etc. Final energy consumption has increased from 195 TWh in 1990 lo 229 TWh in 2010 The last ten years the energy consumption has varied between 212I Wh (2009) and 229 TWh (2010) with an annual average of 221TfUh. The sector using most energy is the industry, but the share has decreased from 40 % in 1990 to 31 % in 2010. From 1990 to 2010 the growth rate has been highest in the transport sector. Half of the energy end-use was electricity in 20,10, 42 % was fossil fuels and 6 % was biomass. The electricity use has an annual increase of 0.8 % since 1990, but the last decade the annual increase is reduced to 0.14 %. The consumption of oil products has decreased in stationary end-use (heating) and increased in the transport sector. In ODYSSEE, an aggregate bottom-up energy efficiency index, ODEX, is calculated. This energy efficiency index aggregates the trends in the detailed bottom-up indicators in one single indicator. This ODEX has improved by 26 o/o from 1990 to 2010 or by 1.3 o/o per year. This means that energy efficiency policies and measures implemented since 1990 have contributed to a decrease in the energy use of 2010 of approximately 59 TWh. (Author)

  1. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  2. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  3. Measurement of alpha radioactivity and accumulated metals in the leaves of spinach plants grown using different fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides present in fertilizers affect the common people and farmers immensely. The study of natural radioactivity in plants and associated radiation exposure through the specific food materials is an important study. Keeping this in mind, a control study was carried out on plants grown in earthen pots having equal amounts of same type of soil, different types of fertilizers were added to the soil just before the plantation. For the measurement of alpha track densities (Tcm-2d-1) in leaves of spinach plants at different intervals of time, we used α- sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors. The radon presence of heavy metals in soil can affect the quality of food, groundwater and plant growth. (author)

  4. Identification of interaction sites between human betaA3- and alphaA/alphaB-crystallins by mammalian two-hybrid and fluorescence resonance energy transfer acceptor photobleaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ratna; Srivastava, Om P

    2009-07-01

    Our recent study has shown that betaA3-crystallin along with betaB1- and betaB2-crystallins were part of high molecular weight complex obtained from young, old, and cataractous lenses suggesting potential interactions between alpha- and beta-crystallins (Srivastava, O. P., Srivastava, K., and Chaves, J. M. (2008) Mol. Vis. 14, 1872-1885). To investigate this further, this study was carried out to determine the interaction sites of betaA3-crystallin with alphaA- and alphaB-crystallins. The study employed a mammalian two-hybrid method, an in vivo assay to determine the regions of betaA3-crystallin that interact with alphaA- and alphaB-crystallins. Five regional truncated mutants of betaA3-crystallin were generated using specific primers with deletions of N-terminal extension (NT) (named betaA3-NT), N-terminal extension plus motif I (named betaA3-NT + I), N-terminal extension plus motifs I and II (named betaA3-NT + I + II), motif III plus IV (named betaA3-III + IV), and motif IV (named betaA3-IV). The mammalian two-hybrid studies were complemented with fluorescence resonance energy transfer acceptor photobleaching studies using the above described mutant proteins, fused with DsRed (Red) and AcGFP fluorescent proteins. The results showed that the motifs III and IV of betaA3-crystallin were interactive with alphaA-crystallin, and motifs II and III of betaA3-crystallin primarily interacted with alphaB-crystallin. PMID:19401464

  5. L{sub i} ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, l) subshell X-ray production cross-sections and theirs emission ratio in Pb and Au for proton energy 1-2.5 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouziane, S [Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de Technologie Houari Boumediene, BP 32, El Alia, Bab Ezzouar 16111 Alger (Algeria); Amokrane, A [Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de Technologie Houari Boumediene, BP 32, El Alia, Bab Ezzouar 16111 Alger (Algeria); Toumert, I [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon, BP 399, Alger (Algeria)

    2006-05-15

    The L{sub i} ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, l) subshell X-ray production cross-sections for Pb and Au were measured at incident proton energy between 1 to 2.5 MeV. The obtained data are compared to available data given in Sokhi and Crumpton and Orlic and al. compilations. The given data are also compared with the predictions of ECPSSR model. The comparison shows a good agreement.

  6. Coefficient Alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotis Panayides

    2013-01-01

    Heavy reliance on Cronbach’s alpha has been standard practice in many validation studies. However, there seem to be two misconceptions about the interpretation of alpha. First, alpha is mistakenly considered as an indication of unidimensionality and second, that the higher the value of alpha the better. The aim of this study is to clarify these misconceptions with the use of real data from the educational setting. Results showed that high alpha values can be obtained in multidimensional scale...

  7. World Summary of $\\alpha_s$ (2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Bethke, Siegfried; Salam, Gavin P

    2015-01-01

    This is a preliminary update of the measurements of α s and the determination of the world average value of α s (M Z 2 ) presented in the 2013/2014 edition of the Review of Particle Properties [1]. A number of studies which became available since late 2013 provide new results for each of the (previously 5, now) 6 subclasses of measurements for which pre-average values of $\\alpha_s (M_Z^2)$ are determined.

  8. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  9. Experience gained through the intercalibration programme for low-level alpha-spectrometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past decade the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco has been engaged in organizing several intercalibration exercises of radionuclide measurements on various matrices of marine origin. The comparisons of the results obtained in different series of the intercalibration exercises show that, while the comparability of the plutonium measurements has considerably improved in recent years, the americium measurements do not yet compare favourably with those of plutonium. As a whole, the results of the present survey demonstrate that repeated intercalibration exercises of transuranic measurements, especially those for americium at low-levels, should still be continued in the future. These series of the intercalibration produced valuable reference materials for which probable concentrations of transuranic nuclides are known. The importance of intralaboratory analytical quality control by using these materials are emphasized for achieving sufficiently consistent and reliable results. (orig.)

  10. Neutrino Masses, Cosmological Parameters and Dark Energy from the Transmitted Flux in the Lyman-alpha Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Graziano; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Yeche, C.; Borde, A.; Rich, J.; Viel, M.; Lesgourgues, J.

    2013-01-01

    The signature left in quasar spectra by the presence of neutral hydrogen in the Universe allows one to constrain the sum of the neutrino masses with unprecedented sensitivity, with respect to laboratory experiments. At the forefront of elementary particle physics and cosmology, this may also shed a new light on the neutrino mass hierarchy, and on the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. In addition, constrains on cosmological parameters and on the dark energy equation of state can be derived, from a joint parameter estimation. This however requires a detailed modeling of the line-of-sight power spectrum of the transmitted flux in the Lyman-alpha forest on scales ranging from a few to hundreds of Mpcs, which in turns demands for the inclusion and careful treatment of cosmological neutrinos. In particular, since massive neutrinos are known to significantly alter structure formation, one needs to quantify their free-streaming effect consistently. We develop here a new hydrodynamical code which incorporates cold dark matter, gas, and is also able to reproduce the impact of massive neutrinos on the one-dimensional power spectrum with a novel technique. In synergy with corresponding experimental work from state-of-the-art surveys such as BOSS, and with upcoming or future large-scale-structure probes (e.g. Planck, Euclid), this will allow one to constrain the sum of the neutrino massses and the main cosmological parameters with unprecedented statistical significance. The theoretical study presented here will be combined with topological techniques to investigate dark energy and the expansion history of the Universe directly from the Lyman-alpha transmitted flux. The method will be also relevant for BigBOSS, which is expected to produce Lyman-alpha forest data along ~600,000 distant QSOs, and the data will be used to study the line-of-sight one-dimensional fluctuations.

  11. The measurement and modeling of alpha-particle-induced charge collection in dynamic memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis addresses the problem of α-particle-induced charge collection in high-density dynamic random access memories. A novel technique for the measurement of charge collection in high-density memory cells and bit lines due to α-particle strikes was developed. The technique involves D.C. tests on simple test structures with an α-particle source on the device package as a lid. The advantages of this new measurement technique are: the method allows for in-situ measurements of charge collection on both MOS capacitors and bit lines found in present-day memories; the on-chip measurement technique minimizes errors due to external probes loading the device under test; the measurements can be controlled by a personal computer, with the data being able to be reduced on the same machine. Results obtained using this new measurement technique show that the charge collection is found to depend upon test-structure size and the configuration of its neighbors. Results of two-dimensional simulations of charge flow along the surface of an MOS capacitor from current injection due to an α-particle strike indicate that a spatial potential variation of 0.5V may occur between the point of current injection and capacitor edge for a 1M dRAM capacitor

  12. Neutron energy measurements in emergency response applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Hornish, Michael; Wilde, Scott; Stampahar, Tom; Reed, Michael

    2009-08-01

    We present significant results in recent advances in the measurement of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of importance. At the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) of National Security Technologies, LLC, a series of materials, viz., liquid organic scintillator (LOS), Lithium Gadolinium Borate (LGB) or Li6Gd(BO3)3 in a plastic matrix, a recently developed crystal of Cesium Lithium Yttrium Chloride, Cs2LiYCl6: Ce (called CLYC)[1], and normal plastic scintillator (BC-408) with 3He tubes have been used to study their effectiveness as a portable neutron energy spectrometer. Comparisons illustrating the strengths of the various materials will be provided. Of these materials, LGB offers the ability to tailor its response to the neutron spectrum by varying the isotopic composition of the key constituents (Lithium, Gadolinium [Yttrium], and Boron). All three of the constituent elements possess large neutron capture cross section isotopes for highly exothermic reactions. These compounds of composition Li6Gd(Y)(BO3)3 can be activated by Cerium ions Ce3+. CLYC, on the other hand, has a remarkable gamma response in addition to superb neutron discrimination, comparable to that of Europium-doped Lithium Iodide (6LiI: Eu). Comparing these two materials, CLYC has higher light output (4500 phe/MeV) than that from 6LiI: Eu and shows better energy resolution for both gamma and neutron pulse heights. Using CLYC, gamma energy pulses can be discriminated from the neutron signals by simple pulse height separation. For the cases of both LGB and LOS, careful pulse shape discrimination is needed to separate the gamma energy signals from neutron pulses. Both analog and digital

  13. Measurement of the absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring product nuclei (daughter) activity increase or by studing its radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for determining absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring daughter product radioactive decay is presented. The separation method of UX from hexahydrated uranyl nitrate UO2(NO3)2 6H2O based on its dissolution in ethyl ether is described and the accuracy of this method is shown. The factors which accuate on total efficiency of a Geiger Mueller detector for beta particles are determined. The possibility to determine the mass of precursor element by daughter nuclei activity is shown. The results are compared with the one obtained by direct measurement of the mass (or number of atoms) of precursor radioactive substance and with theoretical values calculated for isotopes in secular equilibrium. (Author)

  14. A proposed direct measurement of cross section at Gamow window for key reaction $^{19}$F($p$,$\\alpha$)$^{16}$O in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars with a planned accelerator in CJPL

    CERN Document Server

    He, J J; Ma, S B; Hu, J; Zhang, L Y; Fu, C B; Zhang, N T; Lian, G; Su, J; Li, Y J; Yan, S Q; Shen, Y P; Hou, S Q; Jia, B L; Zhang, T; Zhang, X P; Guo, B; Kubono, S; Liu, W P

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) approved the Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics laboratory (JUNA) project, which aims at direct cross-section measurements of four key stellar nuclear reactions right down to the Gamow windows. In order to solve the observed fluorine overabundances in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, measuring the key $^{19}$F($p$,$\\alpha$)$^{16}$O reaction at effective burning energies (i.e., at Gamow window) is established as one of the scientific research sub-projects. The present paper describes this sub-project in details, including motivation, status, experimental setup, yield and background estimation, aboveground test, as well as other relevant reactions.

  15. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  16. 76 FR 74050 - Measured Building Energy Performance Data Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Measured Building Energy Performance Data Taxonomy... related to a measured building energy performance data taxonomy. DOE has created this measured building energy performance data taxonomy as part of its DOE Buildings Performance Database project....

  17. Detection of Alpha Particles and Low Energy Gamma Rays by Thermo-Bonded Micromegas in Xenon Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Yuehuan; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lin, Qing; Wang, Xiaolian; Ni, Kaixuan; Zhao, Tianchi

    2013-01-01

    Micromegas is a type of micro-pattern gaseous detector currently under R&D for applications in rare event search experiments. Here we report the performance of a Micromegas structure constructed with a micromesh thermo-bonded to a readout plane, motivated by its potential application in two-phase xenon detectors for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. The study is carried out in pure xenon at room temperature. Measurements with alpha particles from the Americium-241 source showed that gas gains larger than 200 can be obtained at xenon pressure up to 3 atm. Gamma rays down to 8 keV were observed with such a device.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 stimulate bone resorption in vivo as measured by urinary [3H]tetracycline excretion from prelabeled mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) have been shown to stimulate bone resorption in vitro. We have now investigated whether these cytokines also cause a similar action when administered in vivo. This was made possible by the adaptation of a newly developed technique that enables the continual assessment of bone resorption in vivo in mice by measuring urinary excretion of 3H from [3H]tetracycline-prelabeled animals. Experiments using maneuvers known to influence bone resorption, such as a change in dietary calcium or administration of parathyroid hormone or dichloromethylenebisphosphonate, indicate that the technique is reliable and sensitive in mice. Daily intravenous administration of either recombinant human or recombinant murine TNF-alpha, as well as subcutaneous administration of recombinant human IL-1 alpha, were found to stimulate bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was maximal within 2 days. Thus, exogenous TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha can stimulate bone resorption in vivo, suggesting that these cytokines may also exert a systemic effect on bone

  19. Feynman-alpha technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Akaho, E H K; Intsiful, J D K; Maakuu, B T; Nyarko, B J B

    2002-01-01

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-alpha technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the alpha-conventional method.

  20. Feynman-{alpha} technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akaho, E.H.K. E-mail: nnri@idngh.com; Intsiful, J.D.K.; Maakuu, B.T.; Anim-Sampong, S.; Nyarko, B.J.B

    2002-03-01

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-{alpha} technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the {alpha}-conventional method.

  1. Study of $\\boldsymbol{(\\alpha,p)}$ and $\\boldsymbol{(\\alpha,n)}$ reactions with a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, M L; Almaraz-Calderon, S; Ayangeakaa, A D; Dickerson, C; Hoffman, C R; Jiang, C L; Kay, B P; Lai, J; Nusair, O; Pardo, R C; Santiago-Gonzalez, D; Talwar, R; Ugalde, C

    2016-01-01

    A large number of $(\\alpha,p)$ and $(\\alpha,n)$ reactions are known to play a fundamental role in nuclear astrophysics. This work presents a novel technique to study these reactions with the active target system MUSIC whose segmented anode allows the investigation of a large energy range of the excitation function with a single beam energy. In order to verify the method, we performed a direct measurements of the previously measured reactions $^{17}$O$(\\alpha,n)^{20}$Ne, $^{23}$Na$(\\alpha,p)^{26}$Mg, and $^{23}$Na$(\\alpha,n)^{26}$Al. These reactions were investigated in inverse kinematics using $^{4}$He gas in the detector to study the excitation function in the range of about 2 to 6 MeV in the center of mass. We found good agreement between the cross sections of the $^{17}$O$(\\alpha,n)^{20}$Ne reaction measured in this work and previous measurements. Furthermore we have successfully performed a simultaneous measurement of the $^{23}$Na$(\\alpha,p)^{26}$Mg and $^{23}$Na$(\\alpha,n)^{26}$Al reactions.

  2. Design of an alpha-particle counting system at a defined solid angle at Turkish atomic energy authority-Sarayköy nuclear research and training center (TAEK-SANAEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferinoğlu, Meryem; Yeltepe, Emin

    2015-12-01

    The design details of an alpha-particle counting set-up at a defined solid angle (ACS-DSA) constructed in Radionuclide Metrology Department at TAEK-SANAEM for use in the primary standardization of radioactive solutions and determination of nuclear decay data of alpha-particle emitters is presented. The counting system is designed such that the solid angle is very well-defined and directly traceable to the national standards. The design involves mechanical construction of different parts like the source chamber, various coaxial flanges, and circular diaphragms in front of the passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS®) detector, distance tubes, a digital caliper and a sliding piston to allow for different measurement configurations. All geometric configurations are easily changeable and characterisable with high accuracy which facilitates the solid angle calculation. A mixed alpha source was counted to check performance of assembled ACS-DSA system and good energy resolution and low peak tailing in the alpha energy spectrum was observed for small diaphragm apertures and far source-to-detector geometries.

  3. Charge-exchange limits on low-energy alpha-particle fluxes in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh; MacKinnon, Alec; Woods, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Lyman-alpha line of He ii at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary alpha particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He ii bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV/nucleon. We study ten events in total, including the gamma-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic...

  4. On the Analytic Estimation of Radioactive Contamination from Degraded Alphas

    CERN Document Server

    Kadel, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The high energy spectrum of alpha particles emitted from a single isotope uniformly contaminating a bulk solid has a flat energy spectrum with a high end cutoff energy equal to the maximal alpha kinetic energy ($T_{\\alpha}$) of the decay. In this flat region of the spectrum, we show the surface rate $r_b\\text{\\,(Bq/keV-cm}^{2})$ arising from a bulk alpha contamination $\\rho_b$ (Bq/cm$^3$) from a single isotope is given by $r_b =\\rho_b \\Delta R/ 4 \\Delta E $, where $\\Delta E = E_1-E_2>0\\ $ is the energy interval considered (keV) in the flat region of the spectrum and $\\Delta R = R_2-R_1$, where $R_2$ ($R_1$) is the amount of the bulk material (cm) necessary to degrade the energy of the alpha from $T_{\\alpha}$ to $E_2$ ($E_1$). We compare our calculation to a rate measurement of alphas from $^{147}$Sm, ($15.32\\%\\,\\pm\\,0.03\\%$ of Sm($nat$) and half life of $(1.06\\,\\pm\\,0.01)\\times\\,10^{11} \\text{yr}$, and find good agreement, with the ratio between prediction to measurement of $100.2\\%\\pm 1.6\\%\\,\\text{(stat)}\\pm...

  5. On-line plutonium measurement by alpha counting using a glass sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some cerium activated high purity silica glasses are good sensors for ionising particles counting. These sensors may be used for measuring concentrations in corrosive solutions which are typical in reprocessing operations. The thickness of the sensor has been reduced to minimize beta sensitivity. The thin sensor is hold by molecular adhesion to a thick glass mount which is soldered to the stainless steel sample cell

  6. Alpha-Glucosidase Enzyme Biosensor for the Electrochemical Measurement of Antidiabetic Potential of Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Mohiuddin, M.; D. Arbain; Islam, A. K. M. Shafiqul; M. S. Ahmad; Ahmad, M.N.

    2016-01-01

    A biosensor for measuring the antidiabetic potential of medicinal plants was developed by covalent immobilization of α-glucosidase (AG) enzyme onto amine-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-NH2). The immobilized enzyme was entrapped in freeze-thawed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) together with p-nitrophenyl-α-d-glucopyranoside (PNPG) on the screen-printed carbon electrode at low pH to prevent the premature reaction between PNPG and AG enzyme. The enzymatic reaction within the biosen...

  7. Indirect study of {sup 11}B(p,alpha{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 10}B(p,alpha){sup 7}Be reactions at astrophysical energies by means of the Trojan Horse Method: recent results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L.; Puglia, S.M.R.; Spitaleri, C.; Romano, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Del Santo, M. Gimenez; Carlin, N.; Munhoz, M. Gameiro [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universitade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cherubini, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Kiss, G.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Atomki, Debrecen (Hungary); Kroha, V. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Kubono, S. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); La Cognata, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Li Chengbo [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Department of Physics, Beijing (China); Pizzone, R.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Wen Qungang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Department of Physics, Beijing (China); Sergi, M.L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Szanto de Toledo, A. [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universitade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Wakabayashi, Y. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center - JAEA - Ibaraki (Japan); Yamaguchi, H. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Zhou Shuhua [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Department of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2010-03-01

    Nuclear (p,alpha) reactions destroying the so-called 'light-elements' lithium, beryllium and boron have been largely studied in the past mainly because their role in understanding some astrophysical phenomena, i.e. mixing-phenomena occurring in young F-G stars [A.M. Boesgaard et al., Astr. Phys. J, 991, 2005, 621]. Such mechanisms transport the surface material down to the region close to the nuclear destruction zone, where typical temperatures of the order of approx10{sup 6} K are reached. The corresponding Gamow energy E{sub 0}=1.22(Z{sub x}{sup 2}Z{sub X}{sup 2}T{sub 6}{sup 2}){sup 1/3} keV [C. Rolfs and W. Rodney, 'Cauldrons in the Cosmos', The Univ. of Chicago press, 1988] is about approx10 keV if one considers the 'boron-case' and replaces in the previous formula Z{sub x}=1, Z{sub X}=5 and T{sub 6}=5. Direct measurements of the two {sup 11}B(p,alpha{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 10}B(p,alpha){sup 7}Be reactions in correspondence of this energy region are difficult to perform mainly because the combined effects of Coulomb barrier penetrability and electron screening [H.J. Assenbaum, K. Langanke and C. Rolfs, Z. Phys., 327, 1987, 461]. The indirect method of the Trojan Horse (THM) [G. Baur et al., Phys. Lett. B, 178, 1986, 135; G. Calvi et al., Nucl. Phys. A, 621, 1997, 139; C. Spitaleri et al., Phys. Rev. C, 493, 1999, 206] allows one to extract the two-body reaction cross section of interest for astrophysics without the extrapolation-procedures. Due to the THM formalism, the extracted indirect data have to be normalized to the available direct ones at higher energies thus implying that the method is a complementary tool in solving some still open questions for both nuclear and astrophysical issues [S. Cherubini et al., Astr. Phys. J, 457, 1996, 855; C. Spitaleri et al., Phys. Rev. C, 63, 2001, 005801; C. Spitaleri et al., Phys. Rev. C, 63, 2004, 055806; A. Tumino et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, 2007, 252502; M. La Cognata et al., Phys

  8. Lyman Alpha Control

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Daniel Stefaniak

    2015-01-01

    This document gives an overview of how to operate the Lyman Alpha Control application written in LabVIEW along with things to watch out for. Overview of the LabVIEW code itself as well as the physical wiring of and connections from/to the NI PCI-6229 DAQ box is also included. The Lyman Alpha Control application is the interface between the ALPHA sequencer and the HighFinesse Wavelength Meter as well as the Lyman Alpha laser setup. The application measures the wavelength of the output light from the Lyman Alpha cavity through the Wavelength Meter. The application can use the Wavelength Meter’s PID capabilities to stabilize the Lyman Alpha laser output as well as switch between up to three frequencies.

  9. Some characteristics of the CR-39 solid state nuclear-track detector for protons and low energy alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results related to certain registration properties of the CR-39 solid state nuclear-track detector for charged particles are presented and discussed. The determination of the CR-39 chemical etching in NaOH and KOH solutions, comprising concentration (2-10N) and temperature effects (50-900C), showed the existence of an inverse proportion between the induction time and the temperature as well as the normal concentration of the solutions. The critical energy and the critical energy-loss rate of CR-39 track detectors for registration of protons were experimentally determined. A number of samples was exposed to 24MeV proton beams in the IEN-CNEN Cyclotron (CV-28), using a scattering chamber with a tantalum thin target and aluminium absorbers in contact with the samples in order to provide the required fluctuation in the scattered beam energy. From the mean track-diameter plotted against incident proton energy for 16h and 24h chemical etching (6.25 NaOH, 700C), and considering 1.5 μm as the minimum observable track-diameter, the values (21.0 + - 1.5) MeV and (22.5 + - 1.5) MeV were deduced, respectively, for the critical energy. From the calculated energy-loss rate versus energy curve, the critical energy-loss rate was evaluated as 24 + - 2 MeV.cm2/g. Finally, the CR-39 response for low energy alpha particles (E < = 6 MeV) was studied. It was demonstrated also that successive chemical etchings do not produce the same track geometry as obtained by means of a continuous revelation with the same total etching time. (Author)

  10. Alpha liquid-scintillation spectrometry used for the measurement of uranium/thorium-disequilibria in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the measurements of low-level radioactivity of natural samples. It is of interest to have a system with high counting efficiency. Alpha liquid-scintillation spectrometry is attractive, because it offers a 4 π geometry. Some chemical separation can be obtained using extractive scintillators. Due to quenching problems for natural samples, additional separation power is needed. A new sample preparation method was developed employing extraction chromatographic resin for measuring 238U, 234U, 232Th, 230Th, 228Th and 226Ra in soil samples, without using any uranium- or thorium-tracer for determining the chemical yields. This method was tested by analyzing the two different reference materials, IAEA-375, soil from Tschernobyl, as well as IAEA SDA-1, a deep-sea sediment with a high calcium content. For all analyzed radionuclides the recoveries were better than 90% with errors (confidence level of 95%) smaller than 5%. The minimal detectable concentration ranges between 0.2 and 0.8 Bq/kg, based on a one gram aliquot of sample and 80'000 seconds counting time. (orig.)

  11. Unique Physically Anchored Cryptographic Theoretical Calculation of the Fine-Structure Constant {\\alpha} Matching both the g/2 and Interferometric High-Precision Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rhodes, Charles Kirkham

    2010-01-01

    The fine-structure constant {\\alpha}, the dimensionless number that represents the strength of electromagnetic coupling in the limit of sufficiently low energy interactions, is the crucial fundamental physical parameter that governs a nearly limitless range of phenomena involving the interaction of radiation with materials. Ideally, the apparatus of physical theory should be competent to provide a calculational procedure that yields a quantitatively correct value for {\\alpha} and the physical basis for its computation. This study presents the first demonstration of an observationally anchored theoretical procedure that predicts a unique value for {\\alpha} that stands in full agreement with the best (~370 ppt) high-precision experimental determinations. In a directly connected cryptographic computation, the method that gives these results also yields the magnitude of the cosmological constant {\\Omega}{\\Lambda} in conformance with the observational data and the condition of perfect flatness ({\\Omega}{\\Lambda} +...

  12. Does the alpha cluster structure in light nuclei persist through the fusion process?

    CERN Document Server

    Vadas, J; Schmidt, J; Singh, Varinderjit; Haycraft, C; Hudan, S; deSouza, R T; Baby, L T; Kuvin, S A; Wiedenhover, I

    2015-01-01

    [Background] Despite the importance of light-ion fusion in nucleosynthesis, a limited amount of data exists regarding the de-excitation following fusion for such systems. [Purpose] To explore the characteristics of alpha emission associated with the decay of light fused systems at low excitation energy. [Method] Alpha particles were detected in coincidence with evaporation residues (ER) formed by the fusion of 18O and 12C nuclei. Both alpha particles and ERs were identified on the basis of their energy and time-of-flight. ERs were characterized by their energy spectra and angular distributions while the alpha particles were characterized by their energy spectra, angular distributions, and cross-sections. [Results] While the energy spectra and angular distributions for the alpha particles are well reproduced by statistical model codes, the measured cross-section is substantially underpredicted by the models. Comparison with similar systems reveals that the fundamental quantity for the alpha cross-section is Ec...

  13. Readout cross-talk for alpha-particle measurements in a pixelated sensor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations in Medici are performed to quantify crosstalk and charge sharing in a hybrid pixelated silicon detector. Crosstalk and charge sharing degrades the spatial and spectral resolution of single photon processing X-ray imaging systems. For typical medical X-ray imaging applications, the process is dominated by charge sharing between the pixels in the sensor. For heavier particles each impact generates a large amount of charge and the simulation seems to over predict the charge collection efficiency. This indicates that some type of non modelled degradation of the charge transport efficiency exists, like the plasma effect where the plasma might shield the generated charges from the electric field and hence distorts the charge transport process. Based on the simulations it can be reasoned that saturation of the amplifiers in the Timepix system might generate crosstalk that increases the charge spread measured from ion impact on the sensor

  14. Readout cross-talk for alpha-particle measurements in a pixelated sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlin, B.; Reza, S.; Krapohl, D.; Fröjdh, E.; Thungström, G.

    2015-05-01

    Simulations in Medici are performed to quantify crosstalk and charge sharing in a hybrid pixelated silicon detector. Crosstalk and charge sharing degrades the spatial and spectral resolution of single photon processing X-ray imaging systems. For typical medical X-ray imaging applications, the process is dominated by charge sharing between the pixels in the sensor. For heavier particles each impact generates a large amount of charge and the simulation seems to over predict the charge collection efficiency. This indicates that some type of non modelled degradation of the charge transport efficiency exists, like the plasma effect where the plasma might shield the generated charges from the electric field and hence distorts the charge transport process. Based on the simulations it can be reasoned that saturation of the amplifiers in the Timepix system might generate crosstalk that increases the charge spread measured from ion impact on the sensor.

  15. Alpha-Glucosidase Enzyme Biosensor for the Electrochemical Measurement of Antidiabetic Potential of Medicinal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, M.; Arbain, D.; Islam, A. K. M. Shafiqul; Ahmad, M. S.; Ahmad, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    A biosensor for measuring the antidiabetic potential of medicinal plants was developed by covalent immobilization of α-glucosidase (AG) enzyme onto amine-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-NH2). The immobilized enzyme was entrapped in freeze-thawed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) together with p-nitrophenyl-α- d-glucopyranoside (PNPG) on the screen-printed carbon electrode at low pH to prevent the premature reaction between PNPG and AG enzyme. The enzymatic reaction within the biosensor is inhibited by bioactive compounds in the medicinal plant extracts. The capability of medicinal plants to inhibit the AG enzyme on the electrode correlates to the potential of the medicinal plants to inhibit the production of glucose from the carbohydrate in the human body. Thus, the inhibition indicates the antidiabetic potential of the medicinal plants. The performance of the biosensor was evaluated to measure the antidiabetic potential of three medicinal plants such as Tebengau ( Ehretis laevis), Cemumar ( Micromelum pubescens), and Kedondong ( Spondias dulcis) and acarbose (commercial antidiabetic drug) via cyclic voltammetry, amperometry, and spectrophotometry. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) response for the inhibition of the AG enzyme activity by Tebengau plant extracts showed a linear relation in the range from 0.423-8.29 μA, and the inhibition detection limit was 0.253 μA. The biosensor exhibited good sensitivity (0.422 μA/mg Tebengau plant extracts) and rapid response (22 s). The biosensor retains approximately 82.16 % of its initial activity even after 30 days of storage at 4 °C.

  16. Alpha-Glucosidase Enzyme Biosensor for the Electrochemical Measurement of Antidiabetic Potential of Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, M; Arbain, D; Islam, A K M Shafiqul; Ahmad, M S; Ahmad, M N

    2016-12-01

    A biosensor for measuring the antidiabetic potential of medicinal plants was developed by covalent immobilization of α-glucosidase (AG) enzyme onto amine-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-NH2). The immobilized enzyme was entrapped in freeze-thawed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) together with p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (PNPG) on the screen-printed carbon electrode at low pH to prevent the premature reaction between PNPG and AG enzyme. The enzymatic reaction within the biosensor is inhibited by bioactive compounds in the medicinal plant extracts. The capability of medicinal plants to inhibit the AG enzyme on the electrode correlates to the potential of the medicinal plants to inhibit the production of glucose from the carbohydrate in the human body. Thus, the inhibition indicates the antidiabetic potential of the medicinal plants. The performance of the biosensor was evaluated to measure the antidiabetic potential of three medicinal plants such as Tebengau (Ehretis laevis), Cemumar (Micromelum pubescens), and Kedondong (Spondias dulcis) and acarbose (commercial antidiabetic drug) via cyclic voltammetry, amperometry, and spectrophotometry. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) response for the inhibition of the AG enzyme activity by Tebengau plant extracts showed a linear relation in the range from 0.423-8.29 μA, and the inhibition detection limit was 0.253 μA. The biosensor exhibited good sensitivity (0.422 μA/mg Tebengau plant extracts) and rapid response (22 s). The biosensor retains approximately 82.16 % of its initial activity even after 30 days of storage at 4 °C. PMID:26887579

  17. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, C W, E-mail: careyking@mail.utexas.edu [Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1100, Austin, TX 78712-0254 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. $/Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  18. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. $/Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  19. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C. W.

    2010-10-01

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. /Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  20. Measure of exposure of short-lived radon products using an alpha spectrometer for measuring indoor aerosol activity concentration and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new italian law introduces the regulation of occupational exposure to radon. To evaluate the inhalation of radon daughters by the workers a sampling device has been assembled with the aim of evaluation of unattached and aerosol attached radon daughters' fractions. The instrument, based on selection of the aerosuspended particles by means of a wire screen type battery and subsequent collection on a total filter, allows to describe the behaviour of both fractions using defined temporal pattern of collecting particles and counting them by alpha spectroscopy. A measurement campaign to test the radon daughter dichotomous spectrometer in comparison with a commercial Radon Working Level meter, has been performed in a research laboratory of central Italy affected by high radon concentrations. The radon concentration during the measurement campaign has been also measured. The equilibrium factor Feq ad the attachment factor fp have been evaluated during 3 days campaign. Using the measured mean parameters (radon concentration, Feq, fp) the dose evaluation for workers using dosimetric approach has been performed. A comparison between the epidemiologic approach, based on the radon concentration, and dosimetric approach is also presented

  1. Angular correlations and decay branching ratio for excited state of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) in reactions 7Li(alpha, alpha)7Li*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of differential cross-sections of alpha-particle inelastic scattering by 7Li nuclei and 7Li(alpha, alpha 6Li)n, 7Li(alpha, alpha alpha)t reactions have been performed at the energy Ea = 27,2 MeV. Probability of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) decay into 6Li + n channel has been determined from the ratio of cross-sections measured in kinematically complete and incomplete experiments. The large discrepancy of this value (P 0,49 ± 0,06) and of those obtained at the study of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) decay in binary reactions can be explained by the influence of Coulomb field of accompanied alpha-particle on the decay of near-threshold resonances in three-particle reactions

  2. Energy-loss measurements with heavy ions at relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the magnetic spectrometer SPES I at SATURNE, energy-loss measurements have been performed for projectiles of 40Ar (401 MeV/u), 36P (362 MeV/u), 15N (149 MeV/u), 11Li (131 MeV/u) and 8Li, 9Li (130 MeV/u) in carbon, aluminum and lead targets. The experimental results are compared to calculations based on a modified relativistic Bethe formula and to a semi-empirical formula using a Z2 scaling law for the stopping power and an effective charge parametrization for the heavy ions. (orig.)

  3. Prospects for measuring the $^{229}$Th isomer energy using a metallic magnetic microcalorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, G A; Sterba, J H; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C; Schumm, T

    2013-01-01

    The Thorium-229 isotope features a nuclear isomer state with extremely low energy. The currently most accepted energy value, $7.8 \\pm 0.5$\\,eV, was obtained from an indirect measurements using a NASA x-ray microcalorimeter with instrumental resolution (FWHM) of 26\\,eV. We study, how state-of-the-art magnetic metallic microcalorimeters with an energy resolution down to a few eV can be used to measure the isomer energy. Resolving the 29.18\\,keV doublet in the $\\gamma$-spectrum following the $\\alpha$-decay of Uranium-233, corresponding to the decay into the ground and isomer state, allows to measure the isomer transition energy without additional theoretical input parameters and increase the energy accuracy. We study the dependence of the attainable precision of this measurement on the signal and background count rates and the instrumental energy resolution. Assuming realistic experimental parameters corresponding to the currently available detector technology, we show that such a measurement is highly feasable.

  4. Alpha particle diagnostics using impurity pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have proposed using impurity injection to measure the energy distribution of the fast confined alpha particles in a reacting plasma. The ablation cloud surrounding the injected pellet is thick enough that an equilibrium fraction Fo∞(E) of the incident alphas should be neutralized as they pass through the cloud. By observing neutrals created in the large spatial region of the cloud which is expected to be dominated by the helium-like ionization state, e.g., Li+ ions, we can determine the incident alpha distribution dnHe2+/dE from the measured energy distribution of neutral helium atoms. Initial experiments were performed on TEXT in which we compared pellet penetration with our impurity pellet ablation model, and measured the spatial distribution of various ionization states in carbon pellet clouds. Experiments have recently begun on TFTR with the goal of measuring the alpha particle energy distribution during D-T operation in 1993--94. A series of preliminary experiments are planned to test the diagnostic concept. The first experiments will observe neutrals from beam-injected deuterium ions and the high energy 3He tail produced during ICH minority heating on TFTR interacting with the cloud. We will also monitor by line radiation the charge state distributions in lithium, boron, and carbon clouds

  5. Remote diagnostic of the hydrogen wall through measurements of the backscattered solar Lyman alpha radiation by Voyager 1/UVS in 1993-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Quémerais, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Sandel, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    We perform a new analysis of the Lyman alpha data obtained by Voyager 1 during the spatial scans in 1993-2003 while Voyager 1 was at 53-88 AU from the Sun. These data are the important source of information on the hydrogen distribution in the outer heliosphere. A sophisticated global kinetic-MHD model of the heliospheric interface and a radiative transfer model are used for the analysis. It is shown for the first time that the ratio of the Lyman alpha intensities detected in the downwind and upwind lines of sight in the outer heliosphere is sensitive to the configuration (peak value and location) of the hydrogen wall. The hydrogen wall is a source of Doppler-shifted backscattered Lyman alpha photons, so it can be seen from inside the heliosphere. Therefore, Voyager 1/ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) Lyman alpha data can be used for remote sensing of the hydrogen wall. We show that our current global model of the outer heliosphere, which is consistent with many other measurements including Lyman alpha data from both Voyager 1 and 2 in 1980-1993, provides a systematically larger downwind to upwind intensity ratio compared with the UVS data in 1993-2003. In order to decrease the ratio, a higher and/or closer hydrogen wall is needed.

  6. The measurement of CKM-angle $alpha$ using decays of $B^0_d \\ r ightarrow pi^+ pi^- pi^0$

    CERN Document Server

    Jacholkowska, A

    2000-01-01

    The preliminary study of the decay Bo->3pi to extract the CKM--angle alpha is presented. The theoretical background to the extraction of alpha using the decay Bo->3pi and its advantages over using the decay Bo->2pi are outlined. Studies of the selection of the decays Bo->3pi will be presented. In particular, the use of a discriminant variable to suppress background w ill be described. In addition,studies of the extraction of alpha are presented and the possible sensitivity after 1 and 5 years of LHC running are given.

  7. An sup 2 sup 6 Al target for (n,p) and (n,alpha) cross-section measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Ingelbrecht, C; Wagemans, J; Denecke, B; Altzitzoglou, T; Johnston, P

    2002-01-01

    The radionuclide sup 2 sup 6 Al plays an important role in astrophysics. It can be detected via the 1.8 MeV gamma-ray it emits, providing information on stellar nucleosynthesis processes using maps of the universe made by gamma-ray telescopes. In addition, the decay of sup 2 sup 6 Al to sup 2 sup 6 Mg in meteorites producing anomalous sup 2 sup 6 sup / sup 2 sup 4 Mg ratios gives clues to the origin of the solar system. New studies of the sup 2 sup 6 Al(n,p) sup 2 sup 6 Mg and sup 2 sup 6 Al(n,alpha) sup 2 sup 3 Na destruction mechanisms required an sup 2 sup 6 Al target containing significantly more sup 2 sup 6 Al than that previously used. This target was prepared by molecular plating from isopropanol onto a nickel foil substrate with a yield close to 100%. The total number of sup 2 sup 6 Al atoms, determined by gamma-spectrometry, was (2.6+-0.2)x10 sup 1 sup 7 , corresponding to 11.2+-1.0 mu g (expanded uncertainty, coverage factor k=2). The areal density was 0.37 mu g/cm sup 2. Measurements of (n,p) and (...

  8. Smartphone-based heart-rate measurement using facial images and a spatiotemporal alpha-trimmed mean filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J-S; Lin, K-W; Syue, J-L

    2016-04-29

    Currently, cardiovascular disease affects a relatively high proportion of the world's population. Thus, developing simple and effective methods for monitoring patients with cardiovascular disease is critical for research. Monitoring the heart rate of patients is a relatively simple and effective method for managing patients with this condition. For patients, the desired heart rate monitoring equipment should be portable, instantaneous, and accurate. Because smartphones have become the most prevalent mobile device, we utilized this technology as a platform for developing a novel heart-rate measurement system. Catering to the phenomenon of people using the front camera of their smartphones as a mirror, the proposed system was designed to analyze facial-image sequences captured using the front camera. A spatiotemporal alpha-trimmed mean filter was developed to estimate a user's heart rate quickly and accurately. The experimental results show that in addition to achieving these objectives, the developed system outperforms a similar personal computer-based system. In addition, the system performs effectively even when users are wearing glasses. Hence, the proposed system demonstrates practical value for people who must monitor their heart rate daily. PMID:27177107

  9. Energy and time of flight measurements of REX-ISOLDE stable beams using Si detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cantero, E D; Fraser, M A; Lanaia, D; Sosa, A; Voulot, D; Zocca, F

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present energy and time spectroscopy measurements for the stable beams of REX-ISOLDE obtained using Si detectors. By using an alpha source as a calibration reference, the absolute energy E of stable beam particles (A/q = 4) was determined in spectroscopy mode in the energy range 1 MeV < E < 8 MeV (0.30 MeV/u < E/A < 1.87 MeV/u). The time of flight of the beam particles (2.18 MeV/u < E/A < 2.27 MeV/u) was determined by installing identical Si detectors in two diagnostic boxes separated by 7.7 m. The results obtained with these two techniques are compared with the values obtained by dipole scans using a bending magnet. The measurements took place between January and February of 2013.

  10. Nature of Dark Energy and Polarization Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mainini, R; Bonometto, S A

    2003-01-01

    We discuss at which noise level measures of polarization on wide angular scales, together with anisotropy data, can fix DE parameters. Anisotropy--polarization correlations, at low-l, for RP models, are peculiar and similar to open models. Using a likelihood analysis, we show then that it can be possible to distinguish models with DE due to RP potentials from LCDM and other quintessence models, already with a pixel noise similar to the one MAP grants for anisotropy. This noise level may be not so far from the one achieved by the SPOrt experiment on polarization. On the contrary, fixing the energy scale \\Lambda for RP potentials or distinguishing between LCDM and other quintessence potentials requires a much lower pixel noise, that no planned polarization experiment is still able to achieve.

  11. Miniaturized Energy Spectrometer for Space Plasma Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes de Lima, Raphaela; Scime, Earl; Keesee, Amy; Lusk, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Taking advantage of technological developments in lithographic fabrication techniques over the past two decades, we have designed an ultra-compact plasma spectrometer that requires only low voltage power supplies, no microchannel plates, and has a high aperture area to instrument area ratio. The designed target is for ions in the 3- 20 keV range with a highly directional field of view. In addition to reducing mass, size, and voltage requirements, the new design will revolutionize the manufacturing process of plasma spectrometers, enabling large quantities of identical instruments to be manufactured at low individual unit cost. Such a plasma spectrometer is ideal for Heliophysics plasma investigations, particularly for small satellite and multi-spacecraft missions. Here we present initial measurements of the performance of the instrument components and designs of the electronics for the low energy threshold solid state detector. Work Support under NASA grant - NNX14AJ36G.

  12. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario.

  13. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario

  14. HUBBLE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use 21 Hubble parameter versus redshift data points from Simon et al., Gaztañaga et al., Stern et al., and Moresco et al. to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving dark energy cosmologies. The inclusion of the eight new measurements results in H(z) constraints more restrictive than those derived by Chen and Ratra. These constraints are now almost as restrictive as those that follow from current Type Ia supernova (SNIa) apparent magnitude versus redshift data, which now more carefully account for systematic uncertainties. This is a remarkable result. We emphasize, however, that SNIa data have been studied for a longer time than the H(z) data, possibly resulting in a better estimate of potential systematic errors in the SNIa case. A joint analysis of the H(z), baryon acoustic oscillation peak length scale, and SNIa data favors a spatially flat cosmological model currently dominated by a time-independent cosmological constant but does not exclude slowly evolving dark energy.

  15. A marginal measure of energy efficiency: The shadow value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economists are well aware of the importance of marginal versus average measures of energy efficiency. Yet in the energy literature, there is no consensus on the appropriate method for defining and measuring energy efficiency. This paper sets out the shadow value of energy as a proper and meaningful marginal energy efficiency index. A restricted profit function is used to model the shadow value. We explore four scenarios to characterize and evaluate the shadow value of energy; a within country comparison of different production processes with different energy requirements, a comparison of different countries with different resource endowment, a government policy to impose a tax to alter the shadow value to address environmental issues and a within country comparison of externalities arising from two sources of energy. A comparative static analysis is carried out to sign the functional arguments defined for the shadow value. - Highlights: • The energy shadow value is developed as a marginal economic measure of energy efficiency. • The energy shadow value is decomposed to study factors impacting energy efficiency. • The energy shadow value provides allocative information on optimal energy use against average measure of energy productivity. • The advantages of the shadow value as a marginal measure of energy efficiency is evaluated within and between countries. • Social energy shadow value addresses energy consumption externality and tax policies impact in measuring energy efficiency

  16. With the alpha-cluster model to explain the change of separating energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lun-Dong; GUO Jian-You; FANG Xiang-Zheng

    2009-01-01

    It was supposed that, the nucleus was composed of α -cluster, pn-pair, and nn-pair. The reciprocity of the α-cluster, pn-pair, and nn-pair caused the regular change of the separating energy to separate the nn-pair in the exotic nuclei. The regular change was that the separating energy was high behind low to separate the nn-pair in the light and exotic nuclei. This phenomenon must had more profound physical meaning.

  17. Measurement of multi-jet production cross sections, the strong coupling constant alphas and jet properties with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The production of multi­jet final states at hadron colliders probes pQCD at several mass scales. The processes can also be used to probe the gluon density function of the proton. The ATLAS collaboration has measured the production of 4­jets final states in in 20.3 /fb of data collected at a center­of­mass energy of 8 TeV. The measurements have been performed differentially as a function of a variety of kinematic and topological observables, amongst others the rapidity separation between the leading two jets. The results are compared with state­of­the­art theory calculations at NLO in pQCD, with the predictions of several MC generators as well as resummation calculations by in the HEJ approximation. The collaboration has also used multi­jets events in data taken at an effective integrated luminosity of 158 /pb at a center­of­mass energy of 7 TeV to measure the transverse energy correlation and its asymmetry and derive a measurement of the strong coupling constant. The average charge and the multiplic...

  18. Cross-section measurement for the 10B(n, alpha)7Li reaction at 4.0 and 5.0 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohui; Guo, Li'an; Cao, Rongtai; Zhang, Jiaguo; Chen, Jinxiang

    2008-10-01

    Cross-sections of the (10)B(n, alpha)(7)Li reaction were measured at En=4.0 and 5.0 MeV. A gridded ionization chamber (GIC) was used as charged particle detector. Neutrons were produced through the D(d, n)(3)He reaction with a deuterium gas target. Experiments were performed at the 4.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of Peking University. Cross-section data of the (238)U(n, f) reaction were employed as standard. The measured cross-sections of the (10)B(n, alpha)(7)Li reaction at 4.0 and 5.0 MeV are 211+/-17 and 169+/-14 mb, respectively, and they are compared with existing results of measurements and evaluations. PMID:18387305

  19. Improving the measurement of the CKM phase $\\phi_2 = \\alpha$ in $B \\to \\pi \\pi$ and $B \\to \\rho \\rho$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Gronau, Michael

    2016-01-01

    CP-violating asymmetries in $B \\to \\pi \\pi$ and $B \\to \\rho \\rho$ decays can help specify the weak phase $\\phi_2 = \\alpha$ of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-% Maskawa (CKM) matrix. We discuss the impact of improved measurements of these processes such as will be available in the near future, finding special value in better measurement of the time-dependent CP violation parameter $S_{00}$ in $B^0 \\to \\pi^0 \\pi^0$ and $B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0$. Reducing the errors on $B \\to \\rho \\rho$ measurements by a factor of two can potentially lead to an error in $\\phi_2 = \\alpha$ just above $2^\\circ$, at which level isospin-breaking corrections must be considered.

  20. The intergalactic medium thermal history at redshift z=1.7--3.2 from the Lyman alpha forest: a comparison of measurements using wavelets and the flux distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Garzilli, A; Kim, T -S; Leach, S; Viel, M

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the redshift interval z=1.7--3.2 by studying the small-scale fluctuations in the Lyman alpha forest transmitted flux. We apply a wavelet filtering technique to eighteen high resolution quasar spectra obtained with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES), and compare these data to synthetic spectra drawn from a suite of hydrodynamical simulations in which the IGM thermal state and cosmological parameters are varied. From the wavelet analysis we obtain estimates of the IGM thermal state that are in good agreement with other recent, independent wavelet-based measurements. We also perform a reanalysis of the same data set using the Lyman alpha forest flux probability distribution function (PDF), which has previously been used to measure the IGM temperature-density relation. This provides an important consistency test for measurements of the IGM thermal state, as it enables a direct comparison of the constraints obtained using t...

  1. Measuring Short-term Energy Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Ensuring energy security has been at the centre of the IEA mission since its inception, following the oil crises of the early 1970s. While the security of oil supplies remains important, contemporary energy security policies must address all energy sources and cover a comprehensive range of natural, economic and political risks that affect energy sources, infrastructures and services. In response to this challenge, the IEA is currently developing a Model Of Short-term Energy Security (MOSES) to evaluate the energy security risks and resilience capacities of its member countries. The current version of MOSES covers short-term security of supply for primary energy sources and secondary fuels among IEA countries. It also lays the foundation for analysis of vulnerabilities of electricity and end-use energy sectors. MOSES contains a novel approach to analysing energy security, which can be used to identify energy security priorities, as a starting point for national energy security assessments and to track the evolution of a country's energy security profile. By grouping together countries with similar 'energy security profiles', MOSES depicts the energy security landscape of IEA countries. By extending the MOSES methodology to electricity security and energy services in the future, the IEA aims to develop a comprehensive policy-relevant perspective on global energy security. This Brochure provides and overview of the analysis and results. Readers interested in an in-depth discussion of methodology are referred to the MOSES Working Paper.

  2. Almost Redundant Components in the 3 alpha Faddeev Equation for the Buck, Friedlich and Wheatly alpha alpha Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M

    2004-01-01

    The 3 alpha orthogonality condition model using the Pauli-forbidden bound states of the Buck, Friedlich and Wheatly alpha alpha potential can yield a compact 3 alpha ground state with a large binding energy, in which a small admixture of the redundant components can never be eliminated.

  3. Analysis of alpha-cluster transfer in 16O + 12C and 12C + 16O at energies near Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to track the phenomenon of α-cluster transfer mechanism at low energies 1.25, 1.5 and 1.75 MeV/n, close to the Coulomb barrier energy for 12C(16O, 12C)16O and 16O(12C, 16O)12C nuclear systems. The measurements of the angular distribution show a significant increase in the differential cross section at large angles due to alpha-transfer mechanism. The optical model code SPI-GENOA could be used effectively for fitting the experimental data with the theoretical predictions nearly up to angle 90o, where the differential cross section decreases steadily with increasing the scattering angle. For the second hemisphere, at angles greater than 100o, there is a large increase in cross section due to the contribution of α-transfer mechanism, and the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) method could be used effectively for fitting the experimental data with the theoretical predictions at this region using (DWUCK5) code.

  4. Considerations for selecting energy measurement equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that with natural gas energy determination becoming an integral part of the transmission and distribution business in today's market, companies are placing increased emphasis on choosing the correct measuring device. Most current contracts have a Btu specification and many others use MMBtu instead of gas volume. Here is what happens at the burner tip. The following is the exothermic reaction of methane and oxygen (80 to 95% of natural gas): CH4 + 2O2 → CO2 + 2H2O + Heat (1010 Btu/cf)1 for the case of ethane (up to 3% of natural gas): 2C2H6 + 702 → 4CO2 + 6H2O + Heat (1769 Btu/cf)1 and for the case of propane (usually up to 0.55, except where propane/air peak shaving is used): C3H8 + 5O2 → 3CO2 + 4H2O + Heat (2516 Btu/cf)1. Since natural gas is a mixture of these three hydrocarbons plus small amounts of other compounds, these three chemical reactions account for 90 to 99% of the heat generated when the gas is burned. However, one mole (a mole is a standard number of molecules, (6.023 x 1023, Avogadro's number)) of propane will generate over twice the heat of one mole of methane (CH4 = 1010 Btu/cf vrs C3H8 = 2516 Btu/cf at 60 degrees F and 4 14.696 psia). A small error in the heavier or longer chain hydrocarbon components of natural gas leads to a larger error in the Btu calculation. Consequently, a small shift in the composition of any component can affect the heating value of a cubic foot of carefully measured gas

  5. Implementation and Rejection of Industrial Steam System Energy Efficiency Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therkelesen, Peter; McKane, Aimee

    2013-05-01

    Steam systems consume approximately one third of energy applied at U.S. industrial facilities. To reduce energy consumption, steam system energy assessments have been conducted on a wide range of industry types over the course of five years through the Energy Savings Assessment (ESA) program administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). ESA energy assessments result in energy efficiency measure recommendations that are given potential energy and energy cost savings and potential implementation cost values. Saving and cost metrics that measure the impact recommended measures will have at facilities, described as percentages of facility baseline energy and energy cost, are developed from ESA data and used in analyses. Developed savings and cost metrics are examined along with implementation and rejection rates of recommended steam system energy efficiency measures. Based on analyses, implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics: payback period and measure implementation cost as a percentage of facility baseline energy cost (implementation cost percentage). Stated reasons for rejecting recommended measures are primarily based upon economic concerns. Additionally, implementation rates of measures are not only functions of savings and cost metrics, but time as well.

  6. E2 contribution to the /sup 12/C(. cap alpha. ,. gamma. )/sup 16/O reaction at stellar energies in a coupled channel approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funck, C.; Langanke, K.; Weiguny, A.

    1985-02-28

    The E2 part of the /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O capture process at stellar energies is calculated in a microscopically founded coupled channel approach based on the rotational model of Tamura. At the astrophysically most effective energy we obtain an S-factor for E2 capture of Ssub(E2)(300 keV)=0.10 MeV b.

  7. E2 contribution to the /sup 12/C(. alpha. ,. gamma. )/sup 16/O reaction at stellar energies in a coupled channel approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funck, C.; Langanke, K.; Weiguny, A.

    1985-02-28

    The E2 part of the /sup 12/C(..alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O capture process at stellar energies is calculated in a microscopically founded coupled channel approach based on the rotational model of Tamura. At the astrophysically most effective energy we obtain an S-factor for E2 capture of Ssub(E2)(300 keV) = 0.10 MeV b. (orig.).

  8. Measuring protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard N

    2014-03-15

    The method of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative approach that can be used to detect Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The use of FLIM to measure the FRET that results from the interactions between proteins labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs) inside living cells provides a non-invasive method for mapping interactomes. Here, the use of the phasor plot method to analyze frequency domain (FD) FLIM measurements is described, and measurements obtained from cells producing the 'FRET standard' fusion proteins are used to validate the FLIM system for FRET measurements. The FLIM FRET approach is then used to measure both homologous and heterologous protein-protein interactions (PPI) involving the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). C/EBPα is a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, and localizes to heterochromatin where it interacts with the heterochromatin protein 1 alpha (HP1α). The FLIM-FRET method is used to quantify the homologous interactions between the FP-labeled basic leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα. Then the heterologous interactions between the C/EBPa BZip domain and HP1a are quantified using the FRET-FLIM method. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. PMID:23806643

  9. Measuring energy security. A conceptual note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frondel, Manuel; Schmidt, Christoph M.

    2008-11-06

    Along with the oil price, concerns about the security of energy supply have soared once again in recent years.Yet, more than 30 years after the OPEC oil embargo in 1973, energy security still remains a diffuse concept. This paper conceives a statistical indicator that aims at characterizing the energy supply risk of nations that are heavily dependent on energy imports. Our indicator condenses the bulk of empirical information on the imports of fossil fuels originating from a multitude of export countries as well as data on the indigenous contribution to the domestic energy supply into a single parameter. Applying the proposed concept to empirical energy data on Germany and the U.S. (1980-2004), we find that there is a large gap in the energy supply risks between both countries, with Germany suffering much more from a tensed energy supply situation today than the U.S. (orig.)

  10. Energy resolution for alpha particles in liquid argon doped with allene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge response of liquid argon doped with small quantities of allene (C3H4) to α-particles has been studied. The addition of allene increased the amount of collected charge through photoionization and greatly improved the energy resolution of the incident α-particles. The noise subtracted resolution was 1.4% FWHM at the best with 4 ppm allene doped liquid argon. (orig.)

  11. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of $K\\alpha$ transition energies in beryllium-like argon

    CERN Document Server

    Yerokhin, V A; Fritzsche, S

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations have been performed for the energy levels of the low-lying and core-excited states of beryllium-like argon, Ar$^{14+}$. These calculations include the one-loop QED effects as obtained by two different methods, the screening-potential approach as well as the model QED operator approach. The calculations are supplemented by a systematic estimation of uncertainties of theoretical predictions.

  12. A new approach of a global alpha-optical model potential at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modelling of various astrophysical processes involves large scale network calculations, whose input data are the reaction rates at appropriate temperatures. Due to the lack of experimental reaction cross section data at energies in the Gamow windows for most of the nuclei, either stable or unstable, it is necessary to predict the reaction cross section and thermonuclear rates by theoretical models. Theoretical estimates of α-induced reaction rates within the framework of the statistical model of Hauser-Feshbach remain highly uncertain in many nuclear astrophysics applications, such as the α- or p-process nucleosynthesis, a new global α-optical potential is proposed in order to take into account the strong energy dependence and nuclear structure effects affecting the potential. The new parametrization used to describe the imaginary part of the interaction is shown to improve the predictions of the α-particle transmission factors of relevance in the Hauser-Feshbach model and to reproduce well the experimental reaction data at energies of relevance in astrophysical conditions. (authors)

  13. Design of a Quality Control Program for the Measurement of Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Activities (LMPR-CIEMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with international standards, general requirements for testing laboratories have to include a quality system for planning, implementing, and assessing the work performed by the organization and for carrying out required quality assurance and quality control. The purpose of internal laboratory quality control is to monitor performance, identify problems, and initiate corrective actions. This report describes the internal quality control to monitor the gross alpha and beta activities determination. Identification of specific performance indicators, the principles that govern their use and statistical means of evaluation are explained. Finally, calculation of alpha and beta specific activities, uncertainties and detection limits are performed. (Author) 10 refs.

  14. Discussion on importance of e+e- pair emission in the 12C(alpha, gamma)16O capture reaction below 1.9 MeV energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross section of the direct E0 pair emission has meaningful contribution to the total cross section of the 12C(alpha, gamma)16O reaction at low energy <= 1.9 MeV . E0 resonance emission and internal pair conversion have significant effect to the total cross section of the 12C(alpha, gamma)16O reaction. In this paper e+e- paired emission has been focused on taking into account the angular correlation. E0 contribution is also significant in a presence of E1 and E2 transition, therefore e+e- pair emission may not be neglected and has a significant effect on the total cross section in the case of the 12C(alpha, gamma)16O reaction.

  15. Measurement of the -3 keV resonance in the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction and its influence on the synthesis of s-process nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Sparta, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); and others

    2012-11-20

    The {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction is the neutron source for the main component of the s-process, responsible of the production of most nuclei in the mass range 90 < A < 204. It is active inside the helium-burning shell in asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures < 10{sup 8} K, corresponding to an energy interval where the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O is effective of 140 - 230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in {sup 17}O, giving rise to a steep increase of the S-factor. Notwithstanding that it plays a crucial role in astrophysics, no direct measurements exist. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the {sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,n{sup 16}O)d quasi-free reaction to achieve an experimental estimate of such contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM as well as the n-partial width, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy in the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O study. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140 - 230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach.

  16. On the analytic estimation of radioactive contamination from degraded alphas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadel, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    The high energy spectrum of alpha particles emitted from a single isotope uniformly contaminating a bulk solid has a flat energy spectrum with a high end cutoff energy equal to the maximal alpha kinetic energy (Tα) of the decay. In this flat region of the spectrum, we show the surface rate rb (Bq keV-1cm-2) arising from a bulk alpha contamination ρb (Bq cm-3) from a single isotope is given by rb =ρb Δ R/ 4 Δ E , where Δ E = E1-E2>0 is the energy interval considered (keV) in the flat region of the spectrum and Δ R = R2-R1, where R2 (R1) is the amount of the bulk material (cm) necessary to degrade the energy of the alpha from Tα to E2 (E1). We compare our calculation to a rate measurement of alphas from 147Sm, (15.32 ± 0.03% of Sm(nat) and half life of (1.06 ± 0.01)× 1011 yr [1]), and find good agreement, with the ratio between prediction to measurement of 100.2%± 1.6% (stat)± 2.1% (sys). We derive the condition for the flat spectrum, and also calculate the relationship between the decay rate measured at the surface for a [near] surface contamination with an exponential dependence on depth and a second case of an alpha source with a thin overcoat. While there is excellent agreement between our implementation of the sophisticated Monte Carlo program SRIM [2] and our intuitive model in all cases, both fail to describe the measured energy distribution of a 148Gd alpha source with a thin (~200μg cm-2) Au overcoat. We discuss possible origins of the disagreement and suggest avenues for future study.

  17. Verification procedures to ensure consistent energy measurements / Luke Andrew Meijsen

    OpenAIRE

    Meijsen, Luke Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The majority of energy conservation measures (ECM) implemented by South African Energy Service Companies (ESCOs), are funded by the Eskom Demand Side Management (DSM) initiative. In 2013 Eskom reported a total DSM savings of 595 MW. To measure this effect power usage data needs to be recorded. A slight variance with the accuracy of measurement will however have a significant impact on the reported savings. It is therefore of critical importance to ensure consistent energy measurements through...

  18. Separation of reaction mechanisms at low energy. Study of the reactions: {sup 27}Al(d,p) {sup 28}Al, {sup 24}Mg(d,p) {sup 25}Mg, and {sup 24}Mg(d, {alpha}) {sup 22}Na; Sur la separation des mecanismes de reaction a basse energie. Etude des reactions: {sup 27}Al(d,p) {sup 28}Al, {sup 24}Mg(d,p) {sup 25}Mg, et {sup 24}Mg(d, {alpha}) {sup 22}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mermaz, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    The two sets of angular distributions of (d,p) reactions on Al and Mg, measured between 2 and 6 MeV, have given the possibility to test, in analysing the statistical fluctuations of cross-section, the validity of the separation of their mean values in two parts, one 'direct', another given by the statistical mechanism. With the same method of analysis we have studied excitation functions for several alpha groups of the reaction {sup 24}Mg(d, {alpha}) {sup 22}Na and given an evidence for an intermediate structure for the alpha channel leading to the 3. excited state of {sup 22}Na. The angular distribution of the wide resonance at 15.9 MeV in {sup 26}Al has been obtained. (author) [French] Les deux ensembles de distributions angulaires des reactions (d,p) sur Al et Mg, mesures entre 2 et 6 MeV, nous ont permis, en analysant les fluctuations statistiques de sections efficaces, de verifier la possibilite de la separation de leurs valeurs moyennes en deux composantes: l'une 'directe', l'autre due au mecanisme statistique. Avec la meme methode d'analyse nous avons etudie les fonctions d'excitation des premiers groupes alpha de la reaction {sup 24}Mg(d,{alpha}) {sup 22}Na et mis en evidence une structure intermediaire pour la voie de reaction aboutissant au 3eme niveau de {sup 22}Na. Nous avons obtenu la distribution angulaire de la resonance large situee a une energie d'excitation de 15,9 MeV dans {sup 26}Al. (auteur)

  19. A multi-region multi-energy formalism for the Feynman-alpha formulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A formalism of N regions and M groups for the Feynman-α method is introduced. • Using a space-energy cell notation the expressions are simplified significantly. • A simple way to incorporate the detectors in the system is used. • The results have been verified by a Monte Carlo simulation in a two-region case. - Abstract: The stochastic transport equation, describing the dynamics in time of the neutron population in a nuclear system, is used to gain expressions for the higher moments of the neutron population in a sub-critical system. Such expressions are the bone structure of the so called Feynman-α method to analyze noise experiments, aimed to determine the reactivity of sub-critical systems. In the present study, a general formalism for the stochastic transport equation in an N regions system, under the M energy groups approximation will be introduced. In particular, expressions for the Feynman variance to mean (or the Feynman-Y function) under the above mentioned restriction will be sought by using the steady state mode of the solution

  20. Measurement of electro-sprayed 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes using 4{pi}-alpha spectrometry. Application to environmental samples; Spectrometrie alpha 4{pi} de sources d'actinides realisees par electronebulisation. Developpement et optimisation d'un protocole applique au mesurage des isotopes 238 et 239+240 du plutonium dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charmoille-Roblot, M. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dept. de Protection de l' Environnement (DPRE), 92 (France)]|[Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-07-01

    A new protocol for plutonium deposition using the electro-spray technique coupled with 4{pi}-{alpha} spectrometry is proposed to improve the detection limit, shorten the counting time. In order to increase the detection efficiency, it was proposed to measure 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes electro-sprayed deposit simultaneously on both sides of the source support, that must be as transparent as possible to alpha-emissions, in a two-alpha detectors chamber. A radiochemical protocol was adapted to electro-spray constraints and a very thin carbon foil was selected for 4{pi} -alpha spectrometry. The method was applied to a batch of sediment samples and gave the same results as an electrodeposited source measured using conventional alpha spectrometry with a 25 % gain on counting time and 10 % on plutonium 238 detection limit. Validation and application of the technique have been made on reference samples. (author)

  1. Household preferences for energy-saving measures : A conjoint analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, Wouter; Steg, Linda; Vlek, Charles; Wiersma, Gerwin

    2003-01-01

    Studies on household energy use generally focus on social and psychological factors influencing the acceptability of energy-saving measures. However, the influence of physical characteristics of energy-saving measures on their acceptability is largely ignored. In this study, preferences for differen

  2. Dynamics of energy distribution in three channel alpha helix protein based on Davydov’s ansatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faozan; Alatas, Husin [Theoretical Physics Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Sciences Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia, 16680 faozan@ipb.ac.id (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    An important aspect of many biological processes at molecular level is the transfer and storage mechanism of bioenergy released in the reaction of the hydrolysis of Adenosinetriphosphate (ATP) by biomacromolecule especially protein. Model of Soliton Davydov is a new break-through that could describe that mechanism. Here we have reformulated quantum mechanical the Davydov theory, using least action principle. Dynamical aspect of the model is analyzed by numerical calculation. We found two dynamical cases: the traveling and pinning soliton that we suggest they are related to the energy transfer and storage mechanism in the protein. Traveling and pinning soliton can be controlled by strength of coupling. In 3- channel approach, we found the breather phenomena in which its frequency is determined by interchannel coupling parameter.

  3. Procedure for Measuring and Reporting Commercial Building Energy Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barley, D.; Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This procedure is intended to provide a standard method for measuring and characterizing the energy performance of commercial buildings. The procedure determines the energy consumption, electrical energy demand, and on-site energy production in existing commercial buildings of all types. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks to evaluate performance and verify that performance targets have been achieved.

  4. Measurements of lineal energy spectra for the BNCT test beam of THOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2.5 cm tissue-equivalent Rossi type proportional counter was fabricated at St Andrews University and used in this study. Boron-doped and non-boron chambers were performed to measure the lineal energy spectra of a test epithermal neutron beam, built for the research of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR). Measurements were made using standard microdosimetry equipment, including a low pressure gas flow system, low noise charge sensitive preamplifier, linear amplifier, multi-channel analyzer, and americium-241 calibration alpha source. Chambers were positioned at different depths in an acrylic phantom. Lineal energy spectra were determined for several gas pressures to simulate various cell sizes. Spectra of the boron-doped chamber are dominated by a peak at ∼200 keV/μm corresponding to the traversal of alpha particles and lithium recoils through the chamber. Peaks in the non-boron spectra correspond to gamma-rays, recoil protons, and fast neutrons. (author)

  5. 基于PDA&MCU的便携式α测量系统%A Portable Alpha Measurement System Based on PDA&MCU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成毅; 周传文; 庹先国; 王磊; 李哲; 宋茜茜

    2011-01-01

    It introduces a portable alpha measurement system based on the PDA&MCU. The system employs a system - on - a - chip( SOC) single chip as the Micro - Control Unit ( MCU). A pulse obtained from PIPS is preamplifier using sensitive charge and transmitted to signal regulate circuit. Then energy spectrum data can be received by α spectrum software in PDA using Bluetooth communication. This software integrate functions such as real - time α activity display, α spectrum display, automatic peak search, peak area calculation, energy calibration, peak identification and nuclide recognition. This instrument has the characteristics like lightweight, low power consumption, good stability, high energy resolution, data displayed and processing without a computer. It can be used to quickly analysis α contamination on the spot.%介绍一种基于PDA&MCU构架的便携式α测量系统,以SOC单片机为主MCU,将钝化离子注入硅半导体探测器(PIPS)得到的α脉冲经电荷灵敏前置放大后传给信号调理电路,并将能谱数据以数据包的形式通过蓝牙通讯传给PDA上开发的α谱测量应用软件.该软件主要实现α放射性活度实时显示、α谱显示、自动寻峰、谱线加亮、峰面积计算、能量刻度、谱峰识别、核素识别等功能.该仪器具有轻便、功耗低、稳定性好、能量分辨率高,可脱离计算机进行数据显示与处理等特点,能够很好应用于现场应急α污染快速测量分析.

  6. Calibration of sources for alpha spectroscopy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the calibration methodology for measuring the total alpha activity of plane and thin sources with the Alpha Spectrometer for Silicon Detector in the Nuclear Measures and Dosimetry laboratory at IEAv/CTA. (author)

  7. Resting alpha activity predicts learning ability in alpha neurofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenya eNan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals differ in their ability to learn how to regulate the alpha activity by neurofeedback. This study aimed to investigate whether the resting alpha activity is related to the learning ability of alpha enhancement in neurofeedback and could be used as a predictor. A total of 25 subjects performed 20 sessions of individualized alpha neurofeedback in order to learn how to enhance activity in the alpha frequency band. The learning ability was assessed by three indices respectively: the training parameter changes between two periods, within a short period and across the whole training time. It was found that the resting alpha amplitude measured before training had significant positive correlations with all learning indices and could be used as a predictor for the learning ability prediction. This finding would help the researchers in not only predicting the training efficacy in individuals but also gaining further insight into the mechanisms of alpha neurofeedback.

  8. Measuring chemical evolution and gravitational dependence of \\alpha using ultraviolet Fe V and Ni V transitions in white-dwarf spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ong, A; Flambaum, V V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the details of the ab initio high-precision configuration interaction and many-body perturbation theory calculations that were used in a previous work to place limits on the dependence of the fine-structure constant, alpha, on the gravitational field of the white-dwarf star G191-B2B. These calculations were combined with laboratory wavelengths and spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to obtain limits on the gravitational alpha-dependence using Fe V and Ni V transitions. The uncertainty in these results are dominated by the uncertainty in the laboratory wavelengths. In this work we also present ab initio calculations of the isotopic shifts of the Fe V transitions. We show that improved laboratory spectra will enable determination of the relative isotope abundances in Fe V to an accuracy ~20%. Therefore this work provides a strong motivation for new laboratory measurements.

  9. Energy Dependence of Air Fluorescence Yield measured by AIRFLY

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M

    2007-01-01

    In the fluorescence detection of ultra high energy (> 10**18 eV) cosmic rays, the number of emitted fluorescence photons is assumed to be proportional to the energy deposited in air by shower particles. We have performed measurements of the fluorescence yield in atmospheric gases excited by electrons over energies ranging from keV to hundreds of MeV in several accelerators. We found that within the measured energy ranges the proportionality holds at the level of few %.

  10. Cross Section Measurement for the 95Mo(n,alpha)92Zr Reaction at 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guohui [Peking University; Wu, Hao [Peking University; Zhang, Jiaguo [Peking University; Liu, Jiaming [Peking University; Yin, Yuxiang [Peking University; Chen, Jinxiang [Peking University; Gledenov, Youri Mikhailovich [ORNL; Sedysheva, M. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Khuukhenkhuu, G [National University of Mongolia; Koehler, Paul Edward [ORNL; Szalanski, P. [University of Lodz

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of cross sections of the {sup 95}Mo(n, {alpha}){sup 92}Zr reaction at E{sub n} = 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 MeV were carried out at the 4.5 MV Van de Graaff of Peking University, China. A twin gridded ionization chamber and two large-area {sup 95}Mo samples were adopted. Fast neutrons were produced through the D(d, n){sup 3}He reaction by using a deuterium gas target. A small {sup 238}U fission chamber was employed for absolute neutron flux determination. Present data are compared with existing evaluations and measurement.

  11. Cross section measurement for the (95)Mo(n, alpha)(92)Zr reaction at 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohui; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Jiaguo; Liu, Jiaming; Yin, Yuxiang; Chen, Jinxiang; Gledenov, Yu M; Sedysheva, M V; Khuukhenkhuu, G; Koehler, P E; Szalanski, P J

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of cross sections of the (95)Mo(n, alpha)(92)Zr reaction at E(n)=4.0, 5.0 and 6.0MeV were carried out at the 4.5MV Van de Graaff of Peking University, China. A twin gridded ionization chamber and two large-area (95)Mo samples were adopted. Fast neutrons were produced through the D(d, n)(3)He reaction by using a deuterium gas target. A small (238)U fission chamber was employed for absolute neutron flux determination. Present data are compared with existing evaluations and measurement. PMID:19811925

  12. New High-Precision Measurement of the Reaction Rate of the 18O(p,alpha)15N Reaction via THM

    CERN Document Server

    La Cognata, M; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Irgaziev, B; Tribble, R E; Banu, A; Cherubini, S; Coc, A; Crucilla, V; Goldberg, V Z; Gulino, M; Kiss, G G; Lamia, L; Chengbo, L; Mrazek, J; Pizzone, R G; Puglia, S M R; Rapisarda, G G; Romano, S; Sergi, M L; Tabacaru, G; Trache, L; Trzaska, W; Tumino, A

    2009-01-01

    The 18O(p,alpha)15N reaction rate has been extracted by means of the Trojan-Horse method. For the first time the contribution of the 20-keV peak has been directly evaluated, giving a value about 35% larger than previously estimated. The present approach has allowed to improve the accuracy of a factor 8.5, as it is based on the measured strength instead of educated guesses or spectroscopic measurements. The contribution of the 90-keV resonance has been determined as well, which turned out to be of negligible importance to astrophysics.

  13. Energy performance contracting - energy saving potential of selected energy conservation measures (ECM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, M. (Dansk Energi Analyse A/S, Frederiksberg (Denmark)); Langkilde, G.; Olesen, Bjarne W. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, ICIEE, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Moerck, O. (Cenergia Energy Consultants, Herlev (Denmark)); Sundman, O. (DONG Energy, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Engelund Thomsen, K. (Aalborg Univ., SBi, Hoersholm (Denmark))

    2008-09-15

    This report has been developed under the research project 'Etablering af grundlag for energitjenester i Danmark' (project number: ENS-33031-0185) under the Danish research programme - EFP. The objective of this project has been to contribute to the utilisation of the large potential for energy conservations in the building sector within the public, industry and service sectors through the development of a better basis for decision making for both the Energy Service Companies (ESCOes) and the building owners. The EU directive on Energy Service Contracting points at the buildings as the area where the biggest potential market for energy services and energy efficiency improvements are. The EFP-project has two parts: (1) A Danish part and (2) participation in the international cooperation project 'Holistic Assesment Tool-Kit on Energy Efficient Retrofit Measures for Government Buildings (EnERGo)', Annex 46 under the IEA R and D program 'Energy Conservation In Buildings And Community Systems' (ECBCS). This report describes the Danish contributions to the IEA projects subtask B, which has a primary objective to develop a database of energy conservation measures (ECM) with descriptions and performance characteristics of these. (au)

  14. Uncertainty Estimation Improves Energy Measurement and Verification Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Travis; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2014-05-14

    Implementing energy conservation measures in buildings can reduce energy costs and environmental impacts, but such measures cost money to implement so intelligent investment strategies require the ability to quantify the energy savings by comparing actual energy used to how much energy would have been used in absence of the conservation measures (known as the baseline energy use). Methods exist for predicting baseline energy use, but a limitation of most statistical methods reported in the literature is inadequate quantification of the uncertainty in baseline energy use predictions. However, estimation of uncertainty is essential for weighing the risks of investing in retrofits. Most commercial buildings have, or soon will have, electricity meters capable of providing data at short time intervals. These data provide new opportunities to quantify uncertainty in baseline predictions, and to do so after shorter measurement durations than are traditionally used. In this paper, we show that uncertainty estimation provides greater measurement and verification (M&V) information and helps to overcome some of the difficulties with deciding how much data is needed to develop baseline models and to confirm energy savings. We also show that cross-validation is an effective method for computing uncertainty. In so doing, we extend a simple regression-based method of predicting energy use using short-interval meter data. We demonstrate the methods by predicting energy use in 17 real commercial buildings. We discuss the benefits of uncertainty estimates which can provide actionable decision making information for investing in energy conservation measures.

  15. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H.W.

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of {alpha}-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on {alpha}-particle loss has led to a better understanding of {alpha}-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing {alpha}-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90{degree} lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an {alpha}-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized {alpha}-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  16. Broadening alpha registration energy range of 250 μm polycarbonate detectors by a single 50 Hz–HV ECE method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our recent studies on efficient detection of nitrogen and helium ions in a plasma focus device and alpha particles in 1 mm thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTD) by 50 Hz–HV ECE method in PEW (potassium hydroxide, ethanol, water mixture) solution at 26 °C for 10 h proved having promising results. In order to further study the characteristics of the method and extend the applications, studies were performed by using 250 μm PCTDs by 50 Hz–HV method instead of commonly applied 2 kHz–800 V or similar conditions. Alpha detection efficiency, mean track diameter, detection energy range, lower and upper registration energy thresholds and track shapes as well as background track density and diameters were studied by varying field conditions, ECE durations and alpha energies. The efficiency, meantrack diameter and background in general increased as high voltage and ECE duration increased. The optimum ECE conditions were determined to be 50 Hz–2 kV in PEW solution at 26 °C for 2–3 h. The 50 Hz–2 kV method provides some unique characteristics compared to 2 kHz–800 V in terms of having a higher efficiency in a broader efficient registration energy range ∼300 keV to ∼4.5 MeV, smaller track diameters and thus capability to detect higher fluencies of charged particle at the cost of a relatively higher background. Further research is in progress on alpha registration studies. - Highlights: • Alpha particle tracks were studied in 250 μm PC applying 50 Hz–HV ECE method. • Efficiency and diameter were determined versus field conditions, duration and energy. • Efficiency, diameter and background density increase as HV and ECE duration increase. • Alphas of ∼300 keV to ∼4.5 MeV were detected with efficiency up to ∼70% at the Bragg peak. • Some characteristics of 50 Hz–2 kV and 2 kHz–800 V methods are compared

  17. Measuring the Energy Savings from Tree Shade

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, Joe

    2013-01-01

    The energy savings from tree shade coincide with peak electricity demand during summer months, creating an opportunity for utilities to use tree protection policies as demand side management tools. We apply a quasi-experimental research design to identify the change in residential energy caused by tree removals using three unique micro-level datasets from Gainesville, Florida. These datasets include (i) a twelve year panel of monthly household electricity billing data for 30,000 homes service...

  18. Alpha fetoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal alpha globulin; AFP ... Greater than normal levels of AFP may be due to: Cancer in testes , ovaries, biliary (liver secretion) tract, stomach, or pancreas Cirrhosis of the liver Liver cancer ...

  19. DCARR: a spectrograph for measuring low-energy x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DCARR, the Differential Critical Angle Reflection Refraction detector system, is described. This detector was designed to measure low-energy x rays, 500 to 5000 eV, with a high degree of resolution, 250 eV. DCARR was developed because these low-energy measurements are of interest in the diagnostics of x-radiation in nuclear tests and available equipment could not make measurements at this low an energy in field tests. DCARR is a versatile piece of equipment that can also be used as a laboratory tool, such as in measuring the low-energy x rays emitted by lasers and various x-ray machines

  20. Study of the Nuclear Transparency in $\\alpha$ + A Reactions at Energies $\\geq$ 12 GeV/nucleon

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The question about transparency is crucial for heavy ion reaction studies. If the transparency is low at 10-15 GeV per nucleon then very large baryon densities can be achieved in this energy range, maybe enough to produce quark-gluon plasma in U+U collisions. We propose to measure, event by event, pseudo-rapidity and multiplicity distributions of singly charged relativistic particles (@b~$>$~0.7) globally and in selected regions of rapidity as well as multiplicities of recoiling protons (30-400~Me charged nuclear fragments. These studies will explore general features of @a+A reactions at energies @$>$~12~GeV/nucleon. The main goal of the experiment is to measure the transparency of nuclear matter in this energy range. The detector will be nuclear emulsion.

  1. The feasibility of ambulatory biosensor measurement of salivary alpha amylase: Relationships with self-reported and naturalistic psychological stress

    OpenAIRE

    Robles, Theodore F.; Shetty, Vivek; Zigler, Corwin M.; Glover, Dorie A.; Elashoff, David; Murphy, Debra; Yamaguchi, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in biosensor technology allow point-of-use reporting of salivary alpha amylase (sAA) levels while approaching the precision and accuracy of conventional laboratory-based testing. We deployed a portable prototype sAA biosensor in 54 healthy, male dental students during a low stress baseline and during final exams. At baseline, participants completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). At baseline and the exam week, participants provided saliva samples at 10 AM, 1 PM, and 5 P...

  2. Circular polarization measurements of Lyman-[alpha] radiation from the decay of the 2[sup 2]P[sub j] states of hydrogen excited by 54. 4 eV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sile Nic Chormaic; Slevin, J. (Saint Patrick' s Coll., Maynooth (Ireland)); Chwirot, S. (Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, Torun (Poland). Inst. Fizyki)

    1993-01-14

    New coincidence measurements are reported for the circular polarization of Lyman-[alpha] radiation resulting from the decay of 2[sup 2]P[sub j] states excited by electron impact at an incident energy of 54.4 eV in a range of scattering angles from 5[sup o] [<=] [theta][sub e] [<=] 40[sup o]. The data were obtained using a recently developed efficient polarization analyser for this spectral line and the statistical significance of the data is much better than for previously reported measurements. The data are analysed to yield values for the coherence parameter P[sup +] and show that spin exchange interactions play a significant, if unexpected, role in the dynamic range investigated. (author).

  3. SiC Schottky Diode Detectors for Measurement of Actinide Concentrations from Alpha Activities in Molten Salt Electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, we have designed a 4H-SiC Schottky diode detector device in order to monitor actinide concentrations in extreme environments, such as present in pyroprocessing of spent fuel. For the first time, we have demonstrated high temperature operation of such a device up to 500 °C in successfully detecting alpha particles. We have used Am-241 as an alpha source for our laboratory experiments. Along with the experiments, we have developed a multiscale model to study the phenomena controlling the device behavior and to be able to predict the device performance. Our multiscale model consists of ab initio modeling to understand defect energetics and their effect on electronic structure and carrier mobility in the material. Further, we have developed the basis for a damage evolution model incorporating the outputs from ab initio model in order to predict respective defect concentrations in the device material. Finally, a fully equipped TCAD-based device model has been developed to study the phenomena controlling the device behavior. Using this model, we have proven our concept that the detector is capable of performing alpha detection in a salt bath with the mixtures of actinides present in a pyroprocessing environment.

  4. Operational Limitations for Demolition of a Highly Alpha-Contaminated Building ? Modeled Versus Measured Air and Surface Activity Concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha-emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha-contaminated building, 232-Z, included a pre-demolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Post-demolition modeling was also conducted based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of the 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimation of emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures

  5. OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA-CONTAMINATED BUILDING- MODELED VERSUS MEASURED AIR and SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures

  6. SiC Schottky Diode Detectors for Measurement of Actinide Concentrations from Alpha Activities in Molten Salt Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windl, Wolfgang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Blue, Thomas [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-01-28

    In this project, we have designed a 4H-SiC Schottky diode detector device in order to monitor actinide concentrations in extreme environments, such as present in pyroprocessing of spent fuel. For the first time, we have demonstrated high temperature operation of such a device up to 500 °C in successfully detecting alpha particles. We have used Am-241 as an alpha source for our laboratory experiments. Along with the experiments, we have developed a multiscale model to study the phenomena controlling the device behavior and to be able to predict the device performance. Our multiscale model consists of ab initio modeling to understand defect energetics and their effect on electronic structure and carrier mobility in the material. Further, we have developed the basis for a damage evolution model incorporating the outputs from ab initio model in order to predict respective defect concentrations in the device material. Finally, a fully equipped TCAD-based device model has been developed to study the phenomena controlling the device behavior. Using this model, we have proven our concept that the detector is capable of performing alpha detection in a salt bath with the mixtures of actinides present in a pyroprocessing environment.

  7. Improved system measures output energy of pyrotechnic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortly, E. M.

    1966-01-01

    System for measuring the output energy of pyrotechnic devices discharges the reaction products into a test chamber. It measures the radiant heat output from a pinhole aperture as well as internal pressure changes on a common time base.

  8. Relativistic nuclear recoil corrections to the energy levels of hydrogen-like and high Z lithium like atoms in all orders in $\\alpha$Z

    CERN Document Server

    Artemiev, A N; Yerokhin, V A

    1995-01-01

    The relativistic nuclear recoil corrections to the energy levels of low-laying states of hydrogen-like and high Z lithium-like atoms in all orders in \\alpha Z are calculated. The calculations are carried out using the B-spline method for the Dirac equation. For low Z the results of the calculation are in good agreement with the \\alpha Z -expansion results. It is found that the nuclear recoil contribution, additional to the Salpeter's one, to the Lamb shift (n=2) of hydrogen is -1.32(6)\\,kHz. The total nuclear recoil correction to the energy of the (1s)^{2}2p_{\\frac{1}{2}}-(1s)^{2}2s transition in lithium-like uranium constitutes -0.07\\,eV and is largely made up of QED contributions.

  9. Biophysical analysis of the dose-dependent overdispersion and the restricted linear energy transfer dependence expressed in dicentric chromosome data from alpha-irradiated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data for the induction of dicentric chromosomes in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human T lymphocytes by 241Am alpha-particles obtained by Schmid et al. have been analyzed in the light of biophysical theory. As usual in experiments with alpha-particles, the relative variance of the intercellular distribution of the number of aberrations per cell exceeds unity, and the multiplicity of the aberrations per particle traversal through the cell is understood as the basic effect causing this overdispersion. However, the clearly expressed dose dependence of the relative variance differs from the dose-independent relative variance predicted by the multiplicity effect alone. Since such dose dependence is often observed in experiments with alpha-particles, protons, and high-energy neutrons, the interpretation of the overdispersion needs to be supplemented. In a new, more general statistical model, the distribution function of the number of aberrations is interpreted as resulting from the convolution of a Poisson distribution for the spontaneous aberrations with the overdispersed distributions for the aberrations caused by intratrack or intertrack lesion interaction, and the fluctuation of the cross-sectional area of the cellular chromatin must also be considered. Using a suitable mathematical formulation of the resulting dose-dependent overdispersion, the mean number λ1 of the aberrations produced by a single particle traversal through the cell nucleus and the mean number λ2 of the aberrations per pairwise approach between two alpha-particle tracks could be estimated. Coefficient α of the dose-proportional yield component, when compared between 241Am alpha-particle irradiation and 137Cs gamma-ray exposure, is found to increase approximately in proportion to dose-mean restricted linear energy transfer, which indicates an underlying pairwise molecular lesion interaction on the nanometer scale. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Beta measurements at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed a two-step process to characterize the current beta measurement practices at DOE facilities. PNL issued a survey questionnaire on beta measurement practices to DOE facilities and reported the results. PNL measured beta doses and spectra at seven selected DOE facilities and compared selected measurement techniques in the facility environment. This report documents the results of the radiation field measurements and the comparison of measurement techniques at the seven facilities. Data collected included beta dose and spectral measurements at seven DOE facilities that had high beta-to-gamma ratios (using a silicon surface barrier spectrometer, a plastic scintillator spectrometer, and a multielement beta dosimeter). Other dosimeters and survey meters representative of those used at DOE facilities or under development were also used for comparison. Field spectra were obtained under two distinct conditions. Silicon- and scintillation-based spectrometer systems were used under laboratory conditions where high beta-to-gamma dose ratios made the beta spectra easier to observe and analyze. In the second case, beta spectrometers were taken into actual production and maintenance areas of DOE facilities. Analyses of beta and gamma spectra showed that 234Th- /sup 234m/Pa, 231Th, 137Cs, and 90Sr/90Y were the major nuclides contributing to beta doses at the facilities visited. Beta doses from other fission products and 60Co were also measured, but the potential for exposure was less significant. 21 refs., 64 figs., 18 tabs

  11. Review on alpha sub s at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Wicke, D

    2000-01-01

    To measure the strong coupling alpha sub s from event shape observables two ingredients are necessary: a perturbative prediction containing the dependence of observables on alpha sub s and a description of the hadronisation process to match the perturbative prediction with the hadronic data. As perturbative prediction O(alpha sup 2 sub s), NLLA and combined calculations are available. Beside the well known Monte-Carlo based models also analytical predictions, so called power corrections, exist to describe the hadronisation. Advantages and disadvantages of the different resulting methods for determining the strong coupling and its energy dependence will be discussed, the newest DELPHI results will be presented, and an overview of the LEP results will be included.

  12. Use achromatic beam line for Hall C beam energy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several different methods to measure accelerator beam energy, for example, from frequency spectrum measurement and calculation of orbit length from accurate measurement of magnetic field in a reference dipole magnet from high precision floating wire analogue, and from detecting the synchrotron radiation emitted from kicker magnets. In this report an achromatic spectrometer method combined with calibrating a reference magnet and determining the deflection angle of spectrometer is proposed. The similar method will be used to measure beam energy in Bates Linear Accelerator Center, a 10-3 accuracy of beam energy measurement is expected

  13. Low energy houses - measured and calculated; Lavenergihuse - maalt og beregnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.M. [BYG-DTU, Lyngby (Denmark); Engelund Thomsen, K. [By og Byg, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    2002-07-01

    This article summarizes measurement results from 7 low energy houses build in 6 different countries in connection with the IEA Task 13 project: Advanced Solar Low Energy Buildings. The objective of the project was to design and build low energy houses with a total energy consumption of approximately 25% of the energy consumption level in standard houses. Each individual participating country has been responsible for developing a measuring programme for documentation of the house's energy consumption, indoor climate, etc. The measurement results from the 7 low energy houses show that it is possible to reduce the total energy consumption with 60% compared with standard houses. Furthermore, it has been proven that problems with high temperature and bad indoor climate in highly insulated houses can be solved, if solutions are sought in the planning phase. (BA)

  14. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  15. High Energy Measurement of the Deuteron Photodisintegration Differential Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elaine Schulte

    2002-05-01

    New measurements of the high energy deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section were made at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia. Two experiments were performed. Experiment E96-003 was performed in experimental Hall C. The measurements were designed to extend the highest energy differential cross section values to 5.5 GeV incident photon energy at forward angles. This builds upon previous high energy measurements in which scaling consistent with the pQCD constituent counting rules was observed at 90 degrees and 70 degrees in the center of mass. From the new measurements, a threshold for the onset of constituent counting rule scaling seems present at transverse momentum approximately 1.3 GeV/c. The second experiment, E99-008, was performed in experimental Hall A. The measurements were designed to explore the angular distribution of the differential cross section at constant energy. The measurements were made symmetric about 90 degrees

  16. Measuring the sustainability of energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today's energy policies are characterised by a contradictory position. In theory, there is a clear will to respond to emerging threats, e.g. evidence of man-made climate change, irresponsible use of limited resources, geopolitical discrepancies with unbalanced satisfaction of vital needs. In practice, decision making is dominated by economic competitiveness and maximization of short-term profit. The use of fossil fuels is unbroken and still increasing. A recent Green Paper concluded that the EU countries have to reduce growing structural weaknesses by limiting dependence on fuel imports and to give priority to energy systems that do not emit global warming gases. (authors)

  17. Holographic Dark Information Energy: Predicted Dark Energy Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Paul Gough

    2013-01-01

    Several models have been proposed to explain the dark energy that is causing universe expansion to accelerate. Here the acceleration predicted by the Holographic Dark Information Energy (HDIE) model is compared to the acceleration that would be produced by a cosmological constant. While identical to a cosmological constant at low redshifts, z 1, reaching a maximum difference of 2.6 ± 0.5% around z ~ 1.7...

  18. Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

  19. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  20. Measuring energy efficiency in the United States` economy: A beginning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Energy efficiency is a vital component of the Nation`s energy strategy. One of the Department of Energy`s missions are to promote energy efficiency to help the Nation manage its energy resources. The ability to define and measure energy efficiency is essential to this objective. In the absence of consistent defensible measures, energy efficiency is a vague, subjective concept that engenders directionless speculation and confusion rather than insightful analysis. The task of defining and measuring energy efficiency and creating statistical measures as descriptors is a daunting one. This publication is not a final product, but is EIA`s first attempt to define and measure energy efficiency in a systematic and robust manner for each of the sectors and the United States economy as a whole. In this process, EIA has relied on discussions, customer reviews, in-house reviews, and seminars that have focused on energy efficiency in each of the sectors. EIA solicits the continued participation of its customers in further refining this work.

  1. Implications of energy efficiency measures in wheat production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Aurich, Andreas; Ziegler, T.; Scholz, L.;

    The economic and environmental effect of energy saving measures were analyzed for a typical wheat production system in Germany. The introduction of precision farming, reduced nitrogen fertilization and improved crop drying technologies proved to be efficient measures for enhancing energy efficiency...

  2. Upgrade of Beam Energy Measurement System at BEPC-II

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jian-Yong; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Guo, Di-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Li; Liu, Bai-Qi; Achasov, M N; Krasnov, A A; Muchnoi, N Yu; Pyata, E E; Mamoshkina, E V; Harris, F A

    2015-01-01

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance and profit for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. Many advanced techniques and precise instruments are employed to realize the highly accurate measurement of positron/electron beam energy. During five year's running period, in order to meet the requirement of data taking and improve the capacity of measurement itself, the upgradation of system is continued, which involve the component reformation of laser and optics subsystem, replacement of view-port of the laser to vacuum insertion subsystem, the purchase of electric cooling system for high purity germanium detector, and the improvement of data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrading of system guarantees the smooth and efficient measuring of beam energy at BEPC-II and accommodates the accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III.

  3. ALPHA-2: the sequel

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    While many experiments are methodically planning for intense works over the long shutdown, there is one experiment that is already working at full steam: ALPHA-2. Its final components arrived last month and will completely replace the previous ALPHA set-up. Unlike its predecessor, this next generation experiment has been specifically designed to measure the properties of antimatter.   The ALPHA team lower the new superconducting solenoid magnet into place. The ALPHA collaboration is working at full speed to complete the ALPHA-2 set-up for mid-November – this will give them a few weeks of running before the AD shutdown on 17 December. “We really want to get some experience with this device this year so that, if we need to make any changes, we will have time during the long shutdown in which to make them,” says Jeffrey Hangst, ALPHA spokesperson. “Rather than starting the 2014 run in the commissioning stage, we will be up and running from the get go.&...

  4. Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high nθ can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

  5. Alpha Resonant States in 13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C reaction was used to investigate alpha resonant states in 13C up to 15 MeV of excitation. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique. An energy resolution of 50 keV was obtained. Several narrow alpha resonant states not previously measured were detected, in particular the one at the (3α+n) threshold populated by an L = 2 transfer, revealing a 9Be+α component for the 1/2- cluster state candidate at this threshold. Experimental angular distributions are presented in comparison with DWBA predictions.

  6. Energy Intake Estimates of Respondent-Measured Alcoholic Beverages

    OpenAIRE

    Tujague, Jennifer; Kerr, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to demonstrate a methodology for estimating detailed energy intake from alcoholic beverages. Methods: Participants were 315 monthly drinkers who completed a drink-measuring exercise. Energy intake from alcohol and non-alcohol ingredients was calculated for all beverages consumed. Results: Measured alcoholic beverages had on average 140 kilocalories, with 26% of the energy coming from non-alcohol ingredients. The average monthly kilocalorie intake, from all alcoh...

  7. Robust Estimation of Cronbach's Alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Christmann, A.; Van Aelst, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Cronbach’s alpha is a popular method to measure reliability, e.g. in quantifying the reliability of a score to summarize the information of several items in question- naires. The alpha coefficient is known to be non-robust. We study the behavior of this coefficient in different settings to identify situations, which can easily occur in practice, but under which the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient is extremely sensitive to violations of the classical model assumptions. Furthermore,...

  8. Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses

    OpenAIRE

    Min LIU; Wang, Ning; Li, Zhuxia; Zhang, Fengshou

    2010-01-01

    The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

  9. Energy relaxation in graphene and its measurement with supercurrent

    OpenAIRE

    Voutilainen, J.; Fay, A.; Häkkinen, P.; Viljas, J. K.; Heikkilä, T. T.; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2011-01-01

    We study inelastic energy relaxation in graphene for low energies to find out how electrons scatter with acoustic phonons and other electrons. By coupling the graphene to superconductors, we create a strong dependence of the measured signal, i.e., critical Josephson current, on the electron population on different energy states. Since the relative population of high- and low-energy states is determined by the inelastic scattering processes, the critical current becomes an effective probe for ...

  10. Energy relaxation in graphene and its measurement with supercurrent

    OpenAIRE

    Voutilainen, J.; Fay, A.; Häkkinen, P.; Viljas, J. K.; Heikkilä, T. T.; Hakonen, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    We study inelastic energy relaxation in graphene for low energies to find out how electrons scatter with acoustic phonons and other electrons. By coupling the graphene to superconductors, we create a strong dependence of the measured signal, i.e.,\\ critical Josephson current, on the electron population on different energy states. Since the relative population of high- and low-energy states is determined by the inelastic scattering processes, the critical current becomes an effective probe for...

  11. ICT energy efficiency in higher education. Continuous measurement and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ter Hofte, H. [Novay, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Power consumption of information and communications technology (ICT) is rising rapidly worldwide. Reducing (the growth in) energy demand helps to achieve sustainability goals in the area of energy resource depletion, energy security, economy, and ecology. Various governments and industry consortia have set out policies and agreements to reduce the (growth in) demand for energy. In the MJA3 agreements in the Netherlands, various organizations, including all 14 universities and 39 universities of applied sciences pledged to achieve 30% increase in energy efficiency in 2020 compared to 2005. In this report, we argue that using the number of kilowatt-hours of final electricity used for ICT per enrolled student per day (kWh/st/d), should be used as the primary metric for ICT energy efficiency in higher education. For other uses of electricity than ICT in higher education, we express electricity use in kilowatthours per person per day (kWh/p/d). Applying continuous monitoring and management of ICT energy is one approach one could take to increase ICT energy efficiency in education. In households, providing direct (i.e. real-time) feedback about energy use typically results in 5-15% energy savings, whereas indirect feedback (provided some time after consumption occurs), results in less energy savings, typically 0-10%. Continuous measurement of ICT electricity use can be done in a variety of ways. In this report, we distinguish and describe four major measurement approaches: (1) In-line meters, which require breaking the electrical circuit to install the meter; (2) clamp-on-meters, which can be wrapped around a wire; (3) add-ons to existing energy meters, which use analog or digital ports of existing energy meters; (4) software-only measurement, which uses existing network interfaces, protocols and APIs. A measurement approach can be used at one or more aggregation levels: at building level (to measure all electrical energy used in a building, e.g. a datacenter); at

  12. Alpha cluster states in light nuclei populated through the (6Li,d) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borello-Lewin, Thereza; Rodrigues, M.R.D.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Rodrigues, C.L.; Souza, M.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F. [Universita di Catania (Italy). Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Lab. Nazionali del Sud; Ukita, Gilberto Mitsuo [Universidade de Santo Amaro (UNISA), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Psicologia

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The alpha cluster correlation is an important concept in the nuclear physics of light nuclei. The main purpose of the research program in progress is the investigation of the alpha clustering phenomenon in (x{alpha}) and(x{alpha}+{nu}) nuclei through the ({sup 6}Li,d) alpha transfer reaction. In fact, there is scarce experimental information on the subject, in particular associated with resonant states predicted near (x{alpha}) and (x{alpha}+{nu}) thresholds. Measurements of the {sup 12},{sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,d) {sup 16},{sup 17}O reactions, at an incident energy of 25.5 MeV, have been performed employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge Split-Pole facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique. The work is under way and an experimental energy resolution of 30 keV was obtained. Near the (4{alpha}) breakup threshold in {sup 16}O, three narrow alpha resonances, not previously measured, were detected, revealing important {alpha} + {sup 12}C(G.S.) components. One of these resonances corresponds to the known 0{sup +} state at 15.1 MeV[5] of excitation that has probably, according to Funaki et al., the gas like configuration of the 4{alpha} condensate state, with a very dilute density and a large component of {alpha} + {sup 12}C(Hoyle) configuration. As was already mentioned, our experimental information points to the necessity of including the {alpha} + {sup 12}C(G.S.) component in the wave function. (author)

  13. $\\alpha_s$ review (2016)

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2016-01-01

    The current world-average of the strong coupling at the Z pole mass, $\\alpha_s(m^2_{Z}) = 0.1181 \\pm 0.0013$, is obtained from a comparison of perturbative QCD calculations computed, at least, at next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy, to a set of 6 groups of experimental observables: (i) lattice QCD "data", (ii) $\\tau$ hadronic decays, (iii) proton structure functions, (iv) event shapes and jet rates in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (v) Z boson hadronic decays, and (vi) top-quark cross sections in p-p collisions. In addition, at least 8 other $\\alpha_s$ extractions, usually with a lower level of theoretical and/or experimental precision today, have been proposed: pion, $\\Upsilon$, W hadronic decays; soft and hard fragmentation functions; jets cross sections in pp, e-p and $\\gamma$-p collisions; and photon F$_2$ structure function in $\\gamma\\,\\gamma$ collisions. These 14 $\\alpha_s$ determinations are reviewed, and the perspectives of reduction of their present uncertainties are discussed.

  14. Catalogue of Energy Efficiency Measures for France: descriptive fact sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ADEME wished to learn about existing effective energy efficiency measures implemented outside of France, whether cross-sectoral or targeted at a specific sector (industry, transport, buildings or agriculture). The objective of this survey was to determine whether any of these measures could be applied in France, with the goal of holding down the growth of energy consumption. This survey has led to the writing of a catalog of 53 two-page fact sheets describing the measures identified as interesting for France. These measures were analysed via classic criteria of evaluation such as cost-efficiency or impact, allowing to highlight the most successful measures for the French territory

  15. X-ray resonant photoexcitation: line widths and energies of K{\\alpha} transitions in highly charged Fe ions

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, J K; Epp, S W; Steinbrügge, R; Beilmann, C; Brown, G V; Eberle, S; Graf, A; Harman, Z; Hell, N; Leutenegger, M; Müller, A; Schlage, K; Wille, H -C; Yavas, H; Ullrich, J; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo

    2013-01-01

    Photoabsorption by and fluorescence of the K{\\alpha} transitions in highly charged iron ions are essential mechanisms for X-ray radiation transfer in astrophysical environments. We study photoabsorption due to the main K{\\alpha} transitions in highly charged iron ions from heliumlike to fluorinelike (Fe 24+...17+) using monochromatic X-rays around 6.6 keV at the PETRA III synchrotron photon source. Natural linewidths were determined with hitherto unattained accuracy. The observed transitions are of particular interest for the understanding of photoexcited plasmas found in X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei.

  16. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena. PMID:25166975

  17. Deduction arithmetic of continuous measurement the radon daughters potential energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to continuous measurement the radon daughters potential energy, the deduction arithmetic is presented. And the theoretical formula, coefficient, calculation error, method of sampling and measurement, condition of calibration are given. The calculation error of this method is less than 4%. This method is suitable for environmental measurement for it's high sensitivity when sampling with low flow rate. (authors)

  18. A Bragg curve counter with an active cathode to improve the energy threshold in fragment measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a Bragg curve counter (BCC) equipped with an active cathode to extend the energy acceptance to lower energies than for a conventional BCC to measure differential cross-sections of fragment production reactions induced by tens of MeV protons. The signal from the active cathode providing the timing signal of fragment incidence and the time difference signal between the cathode and anode gives information on the fragment range in the BCC on the basis of electron drift time. Utilization of the range information made possible identification of fragments less than 0.5 MeV/u that is lower than the identification threshold of a conventional BCC technique. After investigations on fundamental properties of a newly constructed BCC using heavy ion beams and alpha-particles, this method was applied successfully to a fragment production measurement for 70 MeV proton-induced reactions on carbon. With this technique, the energy threshold of the BCC was improved without introducing an additional detector or energy loss

  19. Development of alpha spectroscopy method with solid state nuclear track detector using aluminium thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwaikat, N., E-mail: ndwaikat@kfupm.edu.sa [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, College of Sciences, Department of Physics, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-10-15

    This work presents the development of alpha spectroscopy method with Solid-state nuclear track detectors using aluminum thin films. The resolution of this method is high, and it is able to discriminate between alpha particles at different incident energy. It can measure the exact number of alpha particles at specific energy without needing a calibration of alpha track diameter versus alpha energy. This method was tested by using Cf-252 alpha standard source at energies 5.11 MeV, 3.86 MeV and 2.7 MeV, which produced by the variation of detector -standard source distance. On front side, two detectors were covered with two Aluminum thin films and the third detector was kept uncovered. The thickness of Aluminum thin films was selected carefully (using SRIM 2013) such that one of the films will block the lower two alpha particles (3.86 MeV and 2.7 MeV) and the alpha particles at higher energy (5.11 MeV) can penetrate the film and reach the detectors surface. The second thin film will block alpha particles at lower energy of 2.7 MeV and allow alpha particles at higher two energies (5.11 MeV and 3.86 MeV) to penetrate and produce tracks. For uncovered detector, alpha particles at three different energies can produce tracks on it. For quality assurance and accuracy, the detectors were mounted on thick enough copper substrates to block exposure from the backside. The tracks on the first detector are due to alpha particles at energy of 5.11 MeV. The difference between the tracks number on the first detector and the tracks number on the second detector is due to alpha particles at energy of 3.8 MeV. Finally, by subtracting the tracks number on the second detector from the tracks number on the third detector (uncovered), we can find the tracks number due to alpha particles at energy 2.7 MeV. After knowing the efficiency calibration factor, we can exactly calculate the activity of standard source. (Author)

  20. Nuclear data measurement program for fusion energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy, a program has been under way for the past seven years to meet the high-priority nuclear data needs of the Office of Fusion Energy. Ten laboratories now participate in this program and provide experimental data on low energy charged-particle reaction cross sections including the basic fusion reactions, neutron scattering and emission data, cross sections for charged-particle emission and helium production, and standards data. This measurement program also emphasizes the development of new tools to meet future needs for data measurements and for more reliable calculations of the required nuclear data

  1. Determination of $\\alpha_s$ from Hadronic Event Shapes in $e^+ e^-$ Annihilation at $192 \\le \\sqrt{s} \\le 208$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Ewers, A; Extermann, Pierre; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S V; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the structure of high energy hadronic events recorded by the L3 detector at sqrt(s)>192 GeV. The distributions of several event shape variables are compared to resummed O(alphaS^2) QCD calculations. We determine the strong coupling constant at three average centre-of-mass energies: 194.4, 200.2 and 206.2 GeV. These measurements, combined with previous L3 measurements at lower energies demonstrate the running of alphaS as expected in QCD and yield alphaS(mZ) = 0.1227 +- 0.0012 +- 0.0058, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the second is theoretical.

  2. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  3. A twin ionization chamber setup as detector for light charged particles with energies around 1 MeV applied to the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) sup 7 Li reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Göpfert, A; Bax, H

    2000-01-01

    The setup and operating conditions of a gridded twin ionization chamber with sample change facility to study light charged particle properties in the 1 MeV region is described. Detailed studies of different grid geometries in connection with the choice of an eligible counting gas mixture and the applied high voltage have been performed. Due to the high overall amplification of the small electrical chamber signals obtained from such low-energy particles, special filters have been developed in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Timing properties of the chamber signals are discussed in detail. Information available from chamber signals and encoding methods are elucidated by spectra of alpha particles created by sup 2 sup 3 sup 4 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U spontaneous alpha decay. The detector permits the independent and simultaneous measurement of energy and angular distribution of particles in both sides of the chamber. Finally, preliminary results and related analysis methods will be presented for the...

  4. Mitigation technologies and measures in energy sector of Kazakstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilifosova, O.; Danchuk, D.; Temertekov, T. [and others

    1996-12-31

    An important commitment in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change is to conduct mitigation analysis and to communicate climate change measures and policies. In major part reducing CO{sub 2} as well as the other greenhouse gas emissions in Kazakstan, can be a side-product of measures addressed to increasing energy efficiency. Since such measures are very important for the national economy, mitigation strategies in the energy sector of Kazakstan are directly connected with the general national strategy of the energy sector development. This paper outlines the main measures and technologies in energy sector of Kazakstan which can lead to GHG emissions reduction and presents the results of current mitigation assessment. The mitigation analysis is addressed to energy production sector. A baseline and six mitigation scenarios were developed to evaluate the most attractive mitigation options, focusing on specific technologies which have been already included in sustainable energy programs. According to the baseline projection, Kazakstan`s CO{sub 2} emissions will not exceed their 1990 level until 2005. The potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction is estimated to be about 11 % of the base line emission level by the end of considered period (in 2020). The main mitigation options in the energy production sector in terms of mitigation potential and technical and economical feasibility include rehabilitation of thermal power plants aimed to increasing efficiency, use of nuclear energy and further expansion in the use of hydro energy based on small hydroelectric power plants.

  5. Security of Energy Supply - Indicators for Measuring Vulnerability and Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an era of increasing globalization, secure and affordable energy supplies are an essential requirement for economies to work, much less develop and grow in the long term. The present study, Energy security of supply - indicators for measuring vulnerability and risk, develops a broad methodical assessment concept to raise awareness among policy makers and the public regarding the vulnerability of energy supplies to potential energy crises. It explores the different aspects of vulnerability, from the primary energy level to energy infrastructure (storage, networks, power plant parks) to the efficiency and cost of energy consumption for end users. The individual characteristics of the formal concept were quantitatively evaluated for several OECD regions (Germany, UK, Sweden, Poland, Italy, France and the US) using a comprehensive empirical database and reduced to a single indicator for assessing energy supply vulnerability. Part of the database comprises historical observations for the period between 1978 and 2007.(author).

  6. Measurement of the liquid scintillator nonlinear energy response to electron

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fei-Hong; Hu, Wei; Yang, Ma-Sheng; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Jun; Zhou, Li

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinearity of the liquid scintillator energy response is a key to measuring the neutrino energy spectrum in reactor neutrino experiments such as Daya Bay and JUNO. We measured in laboratory the nonlinearity of the Linear Alkyl Benzene based liquid scintillator, which is used in Daya Bay and will be used in JUNO, via Compton scattering process. By tagging the scattered gamma from the liquid scintillator sample simultaneously at seven angles, the instability of the system was largely cancelled. The accurately measured nonlinearity will improve the precision of the $\\theta_{13}$, $\\Delta m^2$, and reactor neutrino spectrum measurements at Daya Bay.

  7. Measurement of cross sections for the 147Sm(n, alpha)144Nd reaction at 5.0 and 6.0 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohui; Zhang, Jiaguo; Guo, Li'an; Wu, Hao; Chen, Jinxiang; Tang, Guoyou; Gledenov, Yu M; Sedysheva, M V; Khuukhenkhuu, G; Szalanski, P J

    2009-01-01

    Cross sections of the (147)Sm(n, alpha)(144)Nd reaction were measured at En=5.0 and 6.0MeV. A twin gridded ionization chamber was used as a charged particle detector and two large area (147)Sm(2)O(3) samples placed back to back were employed. Experiments were performed at the 4.5MV Van de Graaff accelerator of Peking University. Neutrons were produced through the D(d, n)(3)He reaction with a deuterium gas target. Absolute neutron flux was determined by a small (238)U fission chamber. Present cross-section data are compared with existing results of evaluations and measurements. PMID:18707895

  8. ILC Beam Energy Measurement by means of Laser Compton Backscattering

    OpenAIRE

    Muchnoi, N.; Schreiber, H. J.; Viti, M

    2008-01-01

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered $\\gamma$-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitiv...

  9. Studies of energetic confined alphas using the pellet charge exchange diadgnostic on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from recent DT experiments on TFIR to measure the energy distribution and radial density profile of fast confined alphas with the use of Li pellets and neutral particle analysis are presented. When a pellet is injected into the plasma, a toroidally extended ablation cloud is formed that travels with the pellet. A small fraction of the fusion alphas incident on the cloud are converted to helium neutrals as a result of electron capture processes. The escaping energetic helium neutrals are analyzed and detected by the neutral particle analyzer. Radially resolved energy spectra of trapped confined alphas in 0.5-2 MeV range and radial