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Sample records for alloys final subcontract

  1. Research on silicon-carbon alloys and interfaces. Final subcontract report, 15 February 1991--31 July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelson, J.R. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This report describes work performed to develop improved p-type wide-band-gap hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloy (a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x:}H) thin films and interfaces for the ``top junction`` in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-based p-i-n solar cells. We used direct current reactive magnetron sputtering to deposit undoped a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}H films with a Tauc band gap E{sub g} of 1.90 eV, a sub-band-gap absorption of 0.4 (at 1.2 eV), an Urbach energy of 55 MeV, an ambipolar diffusion length of 100 nm, an air-mass-one photoconductivity of 10{sup {minus}6}/{Omega}-cm, and a dark conductivity of 8{times} 1O{sup {minus}11}/{Omega}-cm. p{sup +}a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H films with a Tauc band gap of 1.85 eV have a dark conductivity of 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/{Omega}-cm and thermal activation energy of 0.28 eV. We used in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and post-growth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the relative roles of H and Si in the chemical reduction of SnO{sub 2} in the early stages of film growth. We used in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry to show that a-Si:H can be transformed into {mu}c-Si:H in a subsurface region under appropriate growth conditions. We also determined substrate cleaning and ion bombardment conditions which improve the adhesion of a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H films.

  2. Fuel grade ethanol by solvent extraction: Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedder, D.W.

    1987-04-01

    This report summarizes final results for ethanol recovery by solvent extraction and extractive distillation. At conclusion this work can be summarized as ethanol dehydration and recovery dilute fermentates is feasible using liquid/liquid extraction and extractive distillation. Compared to distillation, the economics are more attractive for less than 5 wt % ethanol. However, an economic bias in favor of SEED appears to exist even for 10 wt % feeds. It is of particular interest to consider the group extraction of ethanol and acetic acid followed by conversion to a mixture of ethanol and ethyl acetate. The latter species is a more valuable commodity and group extraction of inhibitory species is one feature of liquid/liquid extraction that is not easily accomodated using distillation. Upflow immobilized reactors offer the possibility of achieving high substrate conversion while also maintaining low metabolite concentrations. However, many questions remain to be answered with such a concept. 135 refs., 42 figs., 61 tabs.

  3. Subcontract Report: Final Report on Assessment of Motor Technologies for Traction Drives of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (Subcontract #4000080341)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fezzler, Raymond [BIZTEK Consulting, Inc.

    2011-03-01

    meet the targets. The interviews were supplemented with information from past Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports, previous assessments that were conducted in 2004, and literature on magnet technology. The results of the assessment validated the DOE strategy involving three parallel paths: (1) there is enough of a possibility that RE magnets will continue to be available, either from sources outside China or from increased production in China, that development of IPM motors using RE magnets should be continued with emphasis on meeting the cost target. (2) yet the possibility that RE magnets may become unavailable or too expensive justifies efforts to develop innovative designs for permanent magnet (PM) motors that do not use RE magnets. Possible other magnets that may be substituted for RE magnets include samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co), Alnico, and ferrites. Alternatively, efforts to develop motors that do not use PMs but offer attributes similar to IPM motors also are encouraged. (3) New magnet materials using new alloys or processing techniques that would be less expensive or have comparable or superior properties to existing materials should be developed if possible. IPM motors are by far the most popular choice for hybrid and EVs because of their high power density, specific power, and constant power-speed ratio (CPSR). Performance of these motors is optimized when the strongest possible magnets - i.e., RE neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets - are used.

  4. Subcontract 8699K0013-9Q. Final progress report, July 19, 1993--July 18, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1996-09-30

    A major activity in the subcontract was to provide theoretical and analytical support for experimental activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Reflecting changes in the laboratory organization, work was performed initially for Group P-14 and latter for the Agex Program Office. A second task was to develop, to supply and to support software in the areas of hydrodynamics, magnetohydrodynamics and electromagnetics. The programs are compatible with personal computers and allow simulations of experiments by laboratory personnel both on-site and in the field.

  5. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices. Final subcontract report, 16 January 1990--15 January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Yokimcus, T.A. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Inst. of Energy Conversion

    1993-08-01

    This report describes results and conclusions of the final phase (III) of a three-year research program on polycrystalline thin-film heterojunction solar cells. The research consisted of the investigation of the relationships between processing, materials properties, and device performance. This relationship was quantified by device modeling and analysis. The analysis of thin-film polycrystalline heterojunction solar cells explains how minority-carrier recombination at the metallurgical interface and at grain boundaries can be greatly reduced by the proper doping of the window and absorber layers. Additional analysis and measurements show that the present solar cells are limited by the magnitude of the diode current, which appears to be caused by recombination in the space charge region. Developing an efficient commercial-scale process for fabricating large-area polycrystalline, thin-film solar cells from a research process requires a detailed understanding of the individual steps in making the solar cell, and their relationship to device performance and reliability. The complexities involved in characterizing a process are demonstrated with results from our research program on CuInSe{sub 2}, and CdTe processes.

  6. Production of liquid fuels and chemicals by microalgae. Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, J.C.; Goebel, R.P.

    1985-03-01

    An overall objective of the project was to conceptually determine if simple open pond systems have application for the production of fuels from microalgae. To demonstrate the overall objective, work concentrated on showing the potential microalgal yields that are possible from an open pond system on a sustained basis. Furthermore, problems associated with this experimental system were documented and reported so that future endeavors shall benefit. Finally, operational costs were documented to permit preliminary economic analysis of the system. The major conclusions of this project can be summarized as follows: (1) Using two wildtype species in northern California a yearly average productivity of 15 gm/m/sup 2//day, or 24 tons/acre/yr can be obtained in water with TDS = 4 to 8 ppt. (2) This can probably be increased to 20 to 25 gm/m/sup 2//day or 32 to 40 tons/acre/y in southern California. (3) Productivity can probably be further increased by using competitive strains screened for low respiration rates, tolerances to high levels of dissolved oxygen, broad temperature optima, and resistance to photoinhibition. (4) In systems with randomized, turbulent mixing, productivity is independent of channel velocity at least for productivities up to 25 to 30 gm/m/sup 2//day and velocities from 1 to 30 cm/sec. (5) Storage product induction requires one to three days of growth in batch mode under n-depleted conditions. (6) Critical cost centers include CO/sub 2/ input, harvesting and system capital cost. (7) Media recycling, necessary for water conservation, has no adverse effects, at least in the short term for strains which do not excrete organics, and when the harvesting method is at least moderately effective for all algal forms which may be present. 8 refs., 28 figs., 56 tabs.

  7. Specific PVMaT R&D in CdTe Product Manufacturing: Final Subcontract Report, March 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohland, J.; McMaster, A.; Henson, S.; Hanak, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results of a 3+ year subcontract are presented. The research was conducted under Phase 5A2 of the subcontract. The three areas of effort in the subcontract were (1) manufacturing line improvements, (2) product readiness, and (3) environmental, safety, and health programs. The subcontract consisted of three phases, approximately 1 year each. Phase I included the development, design, and implementation of a high-throughput, low-cost lamination process. This goal was achieved using the support of key experts such as Automation and Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) to identify appropriate lamination equipment vendors, and material handling. Product designs were reviewed by Arizona State University Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory and Underwriters Laboratories. Modifications to the module designs were implemented to meet future testing requirements. A complete review of the Environmental, Health, and Safety programs was conducted, along with training by the Environmental Protection Agency (EP A) and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Work conducted during Phase II included the implementation of an improved potting procedure for the wiring junction. The design of the equipment focused on high-throughput, low-cost operations. During Phase III , First Solar made significant progress in three areas: Manufacturing Readiness; Product Performance; and Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S). First Solar's accomplishments in laser scribing significantly exceeded the stated goals. Innovations implemented during Phase III were made possible by adopting a new type of high-frequency, low-pulse-width laser, galvanometer-driven laser-beam system, and numerous advanced, automated, equipment features. Because of the greater than one order of magnitude increase in the throughput and laser life, a factor of two decrease in equipment cost, and complete automation, a major impact on lowering the cost of the PV product is anticipated.

  8. Identifying Electronic Properties Relevant to Improving the Performance and Stability of Amorphous Silicon Based Photovoltaic Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 27 November 2002--31 March 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, J. D.

    2005-11-01

    A major effort during this subcontract period has been to evaluate the microcrystalline Si material under development at United Solar Ovonics Corporation (USOC). This material is actually a hydrogenated nanocrystalline form of Si and it will be denoted in this report as nc-Si:H. Second, we continued our studies of the BP Solar high-growth samples. Third, we evaluated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys produced by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition growth process. This method holds some potential for higher deposition rate Ge alloy materials with good electronic properties. In addition to these three major focus areas, we examined a couple of amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) samples produced by the ECR method at Iowa State University. Our studies of the electron cyclotron resonance a-Ge:H indicated that the Iowa State a Ge:H material had quite superior electronic properties, both in terms of the drive-level capacitance profiling deduced defect densities, and the transient photocapacitance deduced Urbach energies. Also, we characterized several United Solar a Si:H samples deposited very close to the microcrystalline phase transition. These samples exhibited good electronic properties, with midgap defect densities slightly less than 1 x 1016 cm-3 in the fully light-degraded state.

  9. High Volume Manufacturing of Silicon-Film Solar Cells and Modules; Final Subcontract Report, 26 February 2003 - 30 September 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, J. A.; Culik, J. S.

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the PV Manufacturing R&D subcontract was to continue to improve AstroPower's technology for manufacturing Silicon-Film* wafers, solar cells, and modules to reduce costs, and increase production yield, throughput, and capacity. As part of the effort, new technology such as the continuous back metallization screen-printing system and the laser scribing system were developed and implemented. Existing processes, such as the silicon nitride antireflection coating system and the fire-through process were optimized. Improvements were made to the statistical process control (SPC) systems of the major manufacturing processes: feedstock preparation, wafer growth, surface etch, diffusion, and the antireflection coating process. These process improvements and improved process control have led to an increase of 5% relative power, and nearly 15% relative improvement in mechanical and visual yield.

  10. High-efficiency large-area CdTe panels. Final subcontract report, June 1987--July 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. [Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (USA)

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this three year effort has been to develop an improved materials technology and fabrication process for limited volume production of 1 ft{sup 2} and 4 ft{sup 2} CdS/CdTe photovoltaic modules. The module stability objective by the end of this three year subcontract was to develop techniques to provide ten year life exploration with no greater than 10% degradation. In order to achieve these efficiency and stability objectives, the research program has been separated into tasks including: (1) analysis and characterization of CdS/CdTe Devices; (2) performance optimization on small cells; (3) encapsulation and stability testing; and (4) module efficiency optimization. 27 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Device Physics of Thin-Film Polycrystalline Cells and Modules; Final Subcontract Report; 6 December 1993-15 March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sites, J. R. (Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, Colorado)

    1999-05-03

    This report describes work performed under this subcontract by Colorado State University (CSU). The results of the subcontract effort included progress in understanding CdTe and Cu(In1-xGax)Se2-based solar cells, in developing additional measurement and analysis techniques at the module level, and in strengthening collaboration within the thin-film polycrystalline solar-cell community. A major part of the CdTe work consisted of elevated-temperature stress tests to determine fabrication and operation conditions that minimize the possibility of long-term performance changes. Other CdTe studies included analysis of the back-contact junction, complete photon accounting, and the tradeoff with thin CdS between photocurrent gain and voltage loss. The Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 studies included work on the role of sodium in enhancing performance, the conditions under which conduction-band offsets affect cell performance, the transient effects of cycling between light and dark conditions, and detailed analysis of several individual series of cells. One aspect of thin-film module analysis has been addressing the differences in approach needed for relatively large individual cells made without grids. Most work, however, focused on analysis of laser-scanning data, including defect signatures, photocurrent/shunting separation, and the effects of forward bias or high-intensity light. Collaborations with other laboratories continued on an individual basis, and starting in 1994, collaboration was through the national R&D photovoltaic teams. CSU has been heavily involved in the structure and logistics of both the CdTe and CIS teams, as well as making frequent technical contributions in both areas.

  12. Final Report for PV Incubator Subcontract No. NAT-0-99013-01: June 14, 2010 - March 2, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosal, K.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of the subcontract is to scale up Semprius' novel micro-cell based modules to an annualized rate of 500 kW of receivers and 10 kW of modules, in support of the DOE 2020 Sunshot Initiative goals. The statement of work (SOW) was broken up into two Phases. Phase I was directed towards process development efforts towards addressing fundamental manufacturing metrics such as yield, die per wafer, automation and throughput. Phase II objectives are to scale to an annualized production rate of 500 kW of receivers and 10 kW of modules, while improving cell efficiency, module efficiency and transfer yield. Semprius has met all the technical milestones and deliverables for the contract. All subtasks were completed earlier than expected and the results exceeded the technical targets. In particular, 3J cell efficiency of 41.2% exceeded the target of 38%, module efficiency of 28.3% exceeded the target of 28% and transfer yield of 96.4% exceeds the target of 95%, with all tasks completed well ahead of schedule. Also, devices fabricated from 1st use GaAs substrates and substrates with two re-uses have been shown to be identical.

  13. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona: Phase 2, Construction, Subcontract documents: Appendix E, final report. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    This appendix discusses Phase II construction and subcontract documents uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. It contains the bid schedule, special conditions, specifications, and subcontract drawings.

  14. Innovative Approaches to Low-Cost Module Manufacturing of String Ribbon Si PV Modules; Final Subcontract Report, March 2002 - January 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanoka, J. I.

    2005-10-01

    As a result of this work, Evergreen Solar, Inc., is now poised to take String Ribbon technology to new heights. In the ribbon growth area, Project Gemini-the growth of dual ribbons from a single crucible-has reached or exceeded all the manufacturing goals set for it. This project grew from an R&D concept to a production pilot phase and finally to a full production phase, all within the span of this subcontract. A major aspect of the overall effort was the introduction of controls and instrumentation as in-line diagnostic tools. In the ribbon production area, the result has been a 12% increase in yields, a 10% increase in machine uptime, and the flattest ribbon ever grown at Evergreen. In the cell area, advances in process development and robotic handling of Gemini wafers have contributed, along with the advances in crystal growth, to a yield improvement of 6%. Particularly noteworthy in the cell area was the refinement of the no-etch process whereby the as-grown ribbon surface could be controlled sufficiently to allow this process to succeed as well as it has. This process obviates any need for wet chemistry or etching between ribbon growth and diffusion.

  15. Thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Final subcontract report, 1 November 1992--1 January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.D.; Bohn, R.G. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This report describes work to develop and optimize radio-frequency (rf) sputtering for the deposition of thin films of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and related semiconductors for thin-film solar cells. Pulsed laser physical vapor deposition was also used for exploratory work on these materials, especially where alloying or doping are involved, and for the deposition of cadmium chloride layers. The sputtering work utilized a 2-in diameter planar magnetron sputter gun. The film growth rate by rf sputtering was studied as a function of substrate temperature, gas pressure, and rf power. Complete solar cells were fabricated on tin-oxide-coated soda-lime glass substrates. Currently, work is being done to improve the open-circuit voltage by varying the CdTe-based absorber layer, and to improve the short-circuit current by modifying the CdS window layer.

  16. Fabrication of stable, large-area thin-film CdTe photovoltaic modules. Final subcontract report, May 10, 1991--February 28, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, T.X. [Solar Cells, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

    1995-06-01

    During the period of this subcontract, May 1991 through February 1995, Solar Cells, Inc. has developed and demonstrated a low-cost process to fabricate stable large-area cadmium telluride based thin-film photovoltaic modules. This report summarizes the final phase of the project which is concentrated on process optimization and product life tests. One of the major post-deposition process steps, the CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment, has been experimentally replaced with alternative treatments with vapor chloride or chlorine gas. Material and device qualities associated with alternative treatments are comparable or superior to those with the conventional treatment. Extensive experiments have been conducted to optimize the back-electrode structure in order to ensure long term device stability. Numerous small-area cells and minimodules have been subjected to a variety of stress tests, including but not limited to continuous light soak under open or short circuit or with resistive load, for over 10,000 hours. Satisfactory stability has been demonstrated on 48 cm{sup 2} and 64 cm{sup 2} minimodules under accelerated tests and on 7200 cm{sup 2} large modules under normal operating conditions. The conversion efficiency has also been significantly improved during this period. The total area efficiency of 7200 cm{sup 2} module has reached 8.4%, corresponding to a 60.3W normalized output; the efficiency of 64 cm{sup 2} minimodules and 1.1 cm{sup 2} cells has reached 10.5% (aperture area) and 12.4% (total area), respectively.

  17. Review and evaluation of immobilized algae systems for the production of fuels from microalgae. Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the use of immobilized algae systems. It was the finding that commercial immobilized algae systems are not in operation at this time but, with research, could certainly become so. The use of immobilized algae will depend on, as in all commercial systems, the economic value of the product. This paper reviews the technical feasibility of immobilization as it applies to algae. Finally, the economics of possible immobilized algal systems that would produce liquid fuels were investigated. It was calculated that an immobilized system would have 8.5 times the capital costs of a conventional microalgae culture system. Operational costs would be about equal, although there would be substantial savings of water with the immobilized system. A major problem with immobilizing algae is the fact that sunlight drives the system. At present, an immobilized algal system to mass produce lipids for use as a liquid fuel does not appear to be economically feasible. The major drawback is developing a low-cost system that obtains the same amount of solar energy as provided to a shallow 3 square mile pond while increasing the culture density by an order of magnitude. R and D to increase light availability and to develop low cost transparent tanks could increase the competitiveness of immobilized algal systems. 44 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surek, Thomas; Catalano, Anthony

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  19. EFG Technology and Diagnostic R&D for Large-Scale PV Manufacturing; Final Subcontract Report, 1 March 2002 - 31 March 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalejs, J.; Aurora, P.; Bathey, B.; Cao, J.; Doedderlein, J.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kubasti, J.; Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, S.; Xavier, G.

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this subcontract was to carry out R&D to advance the technology, processes, and performance of RWE Schott-Solar's wafer, cell, and module manufacturing lines, and help configure these lines for scaling up of edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) ribbon technology to the 50-100 MW PV factory level. EFG ribbon manufacturing continued to expand during this subcontract period and now has reached a capacity of 40 MW. EFG wafer products were diversified over this time period. In addition to 10 cm x 10 cm and 10 cm x 15 cm wafer areas, which were the standard products at the beginning of this program, R&D has focused on new EFG technology to extend production to 12.5 cm x 12.5 cm EFG wafers. Cell and module production also has continued to expand in Billerica. A new 12-MW cell line was installed and brought on line in 2003. R&D on this subcontract improved cell yield and throughput, and optimized the cell performance, with special emphasis on work to speed up wafer transfer, hence enhancing throughput. Improvements of wafer transfer processes during this program have raised cell line capacity from 12 MW to over 18 MW. Optimization of module manufacturing processes was carried out on new equipment installed during a manufacturing upgrade in Billerica to a 12-MW capacity to improve yield and reliability of products.

  20. Final Report - Subcontract B6183769

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bank, R. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-06-12

    During my visit to LLNL during July 5{15, 2016, we worked on linear system solvers. The two level hierarchical solver that initiated our study was developed to solve linear system arising from hp adaptive finite element calculations, and is implemented in the PLTMG software package, version 12 [1]. This preconditioner typically requires 3-20% of the space used by the stiffness matrix for higher order elements. It has multigrid like convergence rates for a wide variety of PDEs (self-adjoint positive definite elliptic equations, convection dominated convection-diffusion equations, and highly inde nite Helmholtz equations, among others). The convergence rate is not independent of the polynomial degree p as p ! 1, but but remains strong for p 9, which is the highest polynomial degree allowed in PLTMG, due to limitations of numerical quadrature formulae. A more complete description of the method and some numerical experiments illustrating its effectiveness appear in [2]. Like traditional geometric multilevel methods, this scheme relies on extensive knowledge of the underlying finite element space in order to construct both the smoother and the coarse grid correction components.

  1. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K.A. (ed.)

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaics Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The SERI subcontracted PV research and development represents most of the subcontracted R D that is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program. This report covers fiscal year (FY) 1990: October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. During FY 1990, the SERI PV program started to implement a new DOE subcontract initiative, entitled the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project.'' Excluding (PVMaT) because it was in a start-up phase, in FY 1990 there were 54 subcontracts with a total annualized funding of approximately $11.9 million. Approximately two-thirds of those subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of over $3.3 million. Cost sharing by industry added another $4.3 million to that $11.9 million of SERI PV subcontracted R D. The six technical sections of this report cover the previously ongoing areas of the subcontracted program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, and the University Participation Program. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs discuss approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1990, and future research directions. Another section introduces the PVMaT project and reports the progress since its inception in FY 1990. Highlights of technology transfer activities are also reported.

  2. 77 FR 59892 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Final Determination of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Final... mm to 5.0 mm. \\1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico: Affirmative Preliminary... on said entries.\\4\\ \\2\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico: Initiation of...

  3. Wetland Biomass Production: emergent aquatic management options and evaluations. A final subcontract report. [Includes a bibliography containing 686 references on Typha from biological abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, D.C.; Dubbe, D.R.; Garver, E.G.; Linton, P.J.

    1984-07-01

    The high yield potential and attractive chemical composition of Typha make it a particularly viable energy crop. The Minnesota research effort has demonstrated that total annual biomass yields equivalent to 30 dry tonnes/ha (13 tons/acre) are possible in planted stands. This compares with yields of total plant material between 9 and 16 dry tonnes/ha (4 to 7 tons/acre) in a typical Minnesota corn field. At least 50% of the Typha plant is comprised of a belowground rhizome system containing 40% starch and sugar. This high level of easily fermentable carbohydrate makes rhizomes an attractive feedstock for alcohol production. The aboveground portion of the plant is largely cellulose, and although it is not easily fermentable, it can be gasified or burned. This report is organized in a manner that focuses on the evaluation of the management options task. Results from stand management research performed at the University of Minnesota during 1982 and 1983 are integrated with findings from an extensive survey of relevant emergent aquatic plant research and utilization. These results and findings are then arranged in sections dealing with key steps and issues that need to be dealt with in the development of a managed emergent aquatic bio-energy system. A brief section evaluating the current status of rhizome harvesting is also included along with an indexed bibliography of the biology, ecology, and utilization of Typha which was completed with support from this SERI subcontract. 686 references, 11 figures, 17 tables.

  4. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    This interim report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for coating large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for coating inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. The final project report will feature an experimental evaluation of the performance of the two selected cladding techniques.

  5. Subcontracting Railway Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thommesen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    In several European countries, national railway operators have been dismantled and partly privatized to create new contractual relations where operations originally performed internally are now outsourced to several companies. Breaking up work across several independent organizational and commerc......In several European countries, national railway operators have been dismantled and partly privatized to create new contractual relations where operations originally performed internally are now outsourced to several companies. Breaking up work across several independent organizational...... railway infrastructure manager (InfraMan), whichis subcontracting maintenance tasks to other companies. InfraMan has implemented various central elements in managing their subcontractors. The latter are required to present a safety plan as part of their bid, they must be approved if they are to be awarded...... a contract, and the competencies of their employees working on the railway are controlled and provided by InfraMan. However, this regime faces a number of further challenges, including uncertainties related to the safety plans, contested responsibility for the education program, difficulties in controlling...

  6. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) -- formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  7. 76 FR 45509 - Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Circumstances Review: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico, 75 FR 67685 (November 3, 2010...: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico, 71 FR 27989 (May 15, 2006). Notification This notice... International Trade Administration Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Carbon...

  8. De-alloying and stress-corrosion cracking. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieradzki, K.

    1998-09-01

    This research program has had two major areas of focus that are related: (1) alloy corrosion and (2) the role of selective dissolution in the stress corrosion cracking of alloy systems. These interrelated issues were examined using model systems such as Ag-Au and Cu-Au by conventional electrochemical techniques, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS), ultrahigh speed digital photography of fracture events, and computer simulations. The STM and SANS work were specifically aimed at addressing a roughening transition known to occur in alloy systems undergoing corrosion at electrochemical potentials greater than the so-called critical potential. Analytical models of de-alloying processes including the roughening transition were developed that specifically include curvature effects that are important in alloy corrosion processes. Stress-corrosion experiments were performed on the same model systems using rapid optical and electrochemical techniques on 50 {micro}m--250 {micro}m thick sheets and small diameter wires. The primary goal of this work was to develop a fundamental understanding of the corrosion and electrochemistry of alloys and the stress-corrosion cracking processes these alloys undergo. Computer simulations and analytical work identified surface stress and an important parameter in environmentally assisted fracture. The major results of the research on this program since the summer of 1993 are briefly summarized.

  9. Research on defects and transport in amorphous-silicon-based semiconductors. Final subcontract report, 20 February 1991--19 April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, E.A.; Antoniadis, H.; Gu, Q.; Lee, J.K.; Wang, Q.; Zafar, S. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This report describes work on three individual tasks as follows. (1) Electron and hole drift measurements in a-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:H and a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H p-i-n solar cells. Multijunction solar cells incorporating modified band gap a-Si:H in a triple-junction structure are generally viewed as the most promising avenue for achieving an amorphous silicon-based solar call with 15% stabilized conversion efficiency. The specific objective of this task was to document the mobilities and deep-trapping mobility-lifetime products for electrons and holes in a-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:H and a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H alloys materials. (2) Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potential (V{sub bi}) in solar cells. V{sub bi} in a p-i-n solar call may be limiting the open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) in wide-band-gap cells (E{sub g} > 1.8 eV) currently under investigation as the top cell for 15% triple junction devices. The research addressed four issues that need to be resolved before the method can yield an error less than 0.1 V for V{sub bi}. The details are presented in this report. (3) Defect relaxation and Shockley-Read kinetics in a-Si:H. Quantitative modeling of solar cells is usually based on Shockley-Read kinetics.`` An important assumption of this approach is that the rate of emission of a photocarrier trapped on a defect is independent of quasi-Fermi level location.

  10. COST 507: Thermophysical properties of light metal alloys. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroma-Weiland, G.; Brandt, R.; Neuer, G.

    1994-02-15

    The thermophysical properties of Al-, Mg- and Ti-based light metal alloys have been studied by reviewing the literature published so far, evaluating the empirical results and by empirical investigations. The properties to the covered in the literature research are: thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion and electrical resistivity. The data have been stored in the factual data base THERSYST together with the results of experimental measurements supplied from participants of the COST 507-action (Group D). Altogether 1325 data-sets referring to 146 alloys have been stored. They have been uniformly represented and critically analyzed by means of the THERSYST program moduli. These numerical data cover a number of systems with variing chemical composition and thermal treatment. Partly large discrepancies especially of the thermal conductivity have been found for similar alloys. The problem of experimental uncertainities has been studied in detail by investigation of AA-8090 alloy (Al-2.5Li-1.1Cu). The thermophysical properties of monolithic alloy KS1275 (AlSi12CuNi) and metal matrix composite (KS1275 reinforced with Al2O3 short fibre) have been determined experimentally. (orig.)

  11. Improved Solar Cell Efficiency Through the Use of an Additive Nanostructure-Based Optical Downshifter: Final Subcontract Report, January 28, 2010 -- February 28, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtin, J.

    2011-05-01

    This final report summarizes all SpectraWatt's progress in achieving a boost in solar cell efficiency using an optical downshifter. Spectrawatt's downshifting technology is based on a nanostructured material system which absorbs high energy (short wavelength) light and reemits it at a lower energy (long wavelength) with high efficiency. This system has shown unprecedented performance parameters including near unity quantum yield and high thermal stability.

  12. Intermetallic alloys: patterns and complexity. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2001-11-07

    This report summarizes the research accomplishment of the P.I. and her collaborators. The major findings are (a) in the area of ordering in metallic alloys, the interplay between chemical and structural short-range order and (b) in the area of glassy dynamics in frustrated spin models. In the context of alloys, the development of a theoretical framework for incorporating the correlation between chemical and structural degrees of freedom has been a major accomplishment. The work on frustrated spin models has had a major impact on the understanding of the glass transition.

  13. Development of high-efficiency, thin-film CdTe solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 February 1992--30 November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Chou, H.C.; Kamra, S.; Bhat, A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes work performed by the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) to bring the polycrystalline CdTe cell efficiency a step closer to the practically achievable efficiency of 18% through fundamental understanding of detects and loss mechanisms, the role of chemical and heat treatments, and investigation of now process techniques. The objective was addressed by a combination of in-depth characterization, modeling, materials growth, device fabrication, and `transport analyses of Au/Cu/CdTe/CdS/SnO {sub 2} glass front-wall heterojunction solar cells. GiT attempted to understand the loss mechanism(s) in each layer and interface by a step-by-step investigation of this multilayer cell structure. The first step was to understand, quantify, and reduce the reflectance and photocurrent loss in polycrystalline CdTe solar calls. The second step involved the investigation of detects and loss mechanisms associated with the CdTe layer and the CdTe/CdS interface. The third stop was to investigate the effect of chemical and heat treatments on CdTe films and cells. The fourth step was to achieve a better and reliable contact to CdTe solar cells by improving the fundamental understanding. Of the effects of Cu on cell efficiency. Finally, the research involved the investigation of the effect of crystallinity and grain boundaries on Cu incorporation in the CdTe films, including the fabrication of CdTe solar calls with larger CdTe grain size.

  14. 48 CFR 2019.705-4 - Reviewing the subcontracting plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Subcontracting With Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, and Women-Owned Small Business Concerns 2019.705-4 Reviewing the subcontracting...

  15. 48 CFR 319.705-5 - Awards involving subcontracting plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Subcontracting With Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, and Women-Owned Small Business Concerns 319.705-5 Awards involving subcontracting...

  16. Impact of the De-Alloying Kinetics and Alloy Microstructure on the Final Morphology of De-Alloyed Meso-Porous Metal Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Lin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nano-textured porous metal materials present unique surface properties due to their enhanced surface energy with potential applications in sensing, molecular separation and catalysis. In this paper, commercial alloy foils, including brass (Cu85Zn15 and Cu70Zn30 and white gold (Au50Ag50 foils have been chemically de-alloyed to form nano-porous thin films. The impact of the initial alloy micro-structure and number of phases, as well as chemical de-alloying (DA parameters, including etchant concentration, time and solution temperature on the final nano-porous thin film morphology and properties were investigated by electron microscopy (EM. Furthermore, the penetration depth of the pores across the alloys were evaluated through the preparation of cross sections by focus ion beam (FIB milling. It is demonstrated that ordered pores ranging between 100 nm and 600 nm in diameter and 2–5 μm in depth can be successfully formed for the range of materials tested. The microstructure of the foils were obtained by electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD and linked to development of pits across the material thickness and surface during DA. The role of selective etching of both noble and sacrificial metal phases of the alloy were discussed in light of the competitive surface etching across the range of microstructures and materials tested.

  17. 78 FR 60850 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the... certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Brazil would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence... Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Brazil, 67 FR 55805 (August 30, 2002). \\2\\ See Initiation of...

  18. 76 FR 36089 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of the Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''), covering the period.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Following publication of Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From...

  19. 77 FR 34344 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of the Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''). The review covers...: Background Following Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results...

  20. 78 FR 35248 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final... order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (CWP) from the Republic of Korea (Korea) for the period... has been sold at less than normal value. \\1\\ See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From...

  1. 78 FR 34342 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results and Partial Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results and... duty order on certain circular welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico.\\1\\ This administrative review.... \\1\\ See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results and...

  2. 78 FR 28190 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Final Results of... carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Mexico. The period of review (POR) is October 1... (the Act). \\1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results...

  3. 77 FR 13545 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Final Results... duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Mexico.\\1\\ This review covers.... \\1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico: Notice of Preliminary Results...

  4. Rutgers University Subcontract B611610 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soundarajan, Sucheta [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Eliassi-Rad, Tina [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Gallagher, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pinar, Ali [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Given an incomplete (i.e., partially-observed) network, which nodes should we actively probe in order to achieve the highest accuracy for a given network feature? For example, consider a cyber-network administrator who observes only a portion of the network at time t and wants to accurately identify the most important (e.g., highest PageRank) nodes in the complete network. She has a limited budget for probing the network. Of all the nodes she has observed, which should she probe in order to most accurately identify the important nodes? We propose a novel and scalable algorithm, MaxOutProbe, and evaluate it w.r.t. four network features (largest connected component, PageRank, core-periphery, and community detection), five network sampling strategies, and seven network datasets from different domains. Across a range of conditions, MaxOutProbe demonstrates consistently high performance relative to several baseline strategies

  5. 48 CFR 30.607 - Subcontract administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Administration 30.607 Subcontract administration. When a negotiated CAS price adjustment or a determination of noncompliance is required at the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subcontract...

  6. 78 FR 59798 - Small Business Subcontracting: Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 125 RIN 3245-AG22 Small Business Subcontracting: Correction AGENCY: U.S. Small..., 2013 (78 FR 42391). The document amended SBA's regulations governing small business subcontracting...

  7. 76 FR 74749 - Small Business Subcontracting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... small business subcontracting plan is required, currently valued above $1.5 million for construction and... contracting officer is responsible for monitoring and evaluating small business subcontracting plan...; ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Parts 121 and 125 RIN 3245-AG22 Small Business...

  8. Theoretical Model for Volume Fraction of UC, 235U Enrichment, and Effective Density of Final U 10Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); McGarrah, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)

    2016-04-12

    The purpose of this document is to provide a theoretical framework for (1) estimating uranium carbide (UC) volume fraction in a final alloy of uranium with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo) as a function of final alloy carbon concentration, and (2) estimating effective 235U enrichment in the U 10Mo matrix after accounting for loss of 235U in forming UC. This report will also serve as a theoretical baseline for effective density of as-cast low-enriched U 10Mo alloy. Therefore, this report will serve as the baseline for quality control of final alloy carbon content

  9. Annual Report: Photovoltaic Subcontract Program FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K. A.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Subcontract Program of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. The PV Subcontract Program is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year 1990, this included more than 54 subcontracts with a total annualized funding of approximately $11.9 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities at a total funding of nearly $3.3 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, and the University Participation Program. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1990, and future research directions. Another section introduces the PVMaT project and reports on its progress.

  10. Scheduling and Subcontracting under Parallel Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rong-jun; TANG Guo-chun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study a model on joint decisions of scheduling and subcontracting,in which jobs(orders) can be either processed by parallel machines at the manufacturer in-house or subcontracted to a subcontractor.The manufacturer needs to determine which jobs should be produced in-house and which jobs should be subcontracted.Furthermore,it needs to determine a production schedule for jobs to be produced in-house.We discuss five classical scheduling objectives as production costs.For each problem with different objective functions,we give optimality conditions and propose dynamic programming algorithms.

  11. 13 CFR 125.3 - Subcontracting assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... feasible units, as appropriate, to facilitate small business participation; (ii) Conducting market research... attending pre-bid conferences; (iii) Soliciting small business concerns as early in the acquisition process... its subcontracting plan. (e) CMR Responsibilities. Commercial Market Representatives (CMRs) are...

  12. Chemical Frustration. A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Daniel C [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-23

    Final technical report for "Chemical Frustration: A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases" funded by the Office of Science through the Materials Chemistry Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  13. 48 CFR 1052.219-71 - Subcontracting Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subcontracting Plan. 1052... Subcontracting Plan. As prescribed in DTAR 1019.708-70(b), insert the following provision: Subcontracting Plan (MAR 2002) As part of its initial proposal, each large business offeror must submit a contracting...

  14. 48 CFR 219.705-4 - Reviewing the subcontracting plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The Small Business Subcontracting Program 219.705-4 Reviewing the subcontracting plan. (d) Challenge any subcontracting plan that... business goal of less than five percent must be approved one level above the contracting officer....

  15. 48 CFR 1852.219-73 - Small business subcontracting plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-73 Small business subcontracting plan. As prescribed in 1819.708-70(a), insert the following provision: Small Business Subcontracting Plan (MAY 1999) (a) This provision is not... contain FAR clause 52.219-9, “Small Business Subcontracting Plan.” The apparent low bidder must submit...

  16. Annual Report: Photovoltaic Subcontract Program FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K. A.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  17. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program. Annual report, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  18. 76 FR 61626 - Small Business Subcontracting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... purchased from a municipality) belong in the subcontracting base. Including electricity and other utilities..., sewer, and other services purchased from a municipality; and philanthropic contributions. Utility... that it used in preparing the bid or proposal, in the same amount and quality used in preparing and...

  19. 48 CFR 1652.244-70 - Subcontracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... all FEHB Program contracts based on cost analysis (experience-rated): Subcontracts (JUL 2005) (a) The... under FAR 52.215-2 “Audit and Records—Negotiations” if based on cost analysis or 48 CFR 1646.301 and... price analysis; (5) The subcontractor's current, complete, and accurate cost or pricing data and a...

  20. 48 CFR 2152.244-70 - Subcontracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and the Contractor's cost or price analysis; (5) The subcontractor's current, complete, and accurate cost or pricing data and Certificate of Current Cost or Pricing Data, if required by other contract... by this contract, when the cost of that portion of the subcontract that is charged the FEGLI...

  1. Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1990--30 April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, S P; Johnson, S X [Golden Photon, Inc., CO (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report describes work performed under a three-phase subcontract. The objectives of the program include (1) achievement of active-area efficiencies of greater than 14% on small cells; (2) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 13% on 0.09-m{sup 2} (1 ft{sup 2}) modules; (3) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 12.5% on 0.37-m{sup 2} (4 ft{sup 2}) modules; and achievement of greater than 20-year module life (based on life testing extrapolations) with no greater than 10% efficiency degradation. The results obtained and described herein include the following: (1) efficiencies of 12.7% were achieved on small-area devices; (2) 0.09-m{sup 2} (1 ft{sup 2}) modules achieved greater than 8% aperture-area efficiency, but work for further efficiency improvement was redirected toward the 0.37-M{sup 2} (4 if) modules; (3) 0.37-m{sup 2} (4 ft{sup 2}) modules achieved 26.5-W output, which calculates to 8.0% aperture-area efficiency; (4) consistent prototype production was focused on and substantially achieved within Phase 2; (5) life testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory showed no inherent stability problems with the CdTe technology, and the accuracy of module measurement was satisfactorily resolved; and (6) a ``cradle-to-cradle`` recycling program was begun based upon the philosophy that the establishment of such mechanisms will be required to ensure maximum recapture and recycling of all manufacturing waste materials and/or modules returned from the field.

  2. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich

  3. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich

  4. Formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment in Indian manufacturing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moreno-Monroy, A.I; Pieters, J; Erumban, A.A

    2014-01-01

    Using nationally representative survey dta of Indian manufacturing enterprises spanning the period 1995-2006, we analyze the link between formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment...

  5. Influence of thermal debinding on the final properties of Fe–Si soft magnetic alloys for metal injection molding (MIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Páez-Pavón, A.; Jiménez-Morales, A. [Dpto. Ciencia e Ing. de materiales e Ing. Química, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain); Santos, T.G. [UNIDEMI, Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica e Industrial, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Quintino, L. [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Torralba, J.M. [Dpto. Ciencia e Ing. de materiales e Ing. Química, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    Metal injection molding (MIM) may be used to produce soft magnetic materials with optimal mechanical and magnetic properties. Unlike other techniques, MIM enables the production of complex and small Fe–Si alloy parts with silicon contents greater than 3% by weight. In MIM process development, it is critical to design a proper debinding cycle not only to ensure complete removal of the binder system but also to obtain improved properties in the final part. This work is a preliminary study on the production of Fe-3.8Si soft magnetic parts by MIM using pre-alloyed powders and a non-industrialized binder. Two different heating rates during thermal debinding were used to study their effect on the final properties of the part. The final properties of the sintered parts are related to thermal debinding. It has been demonstrated that the heating rate during thermal debinding has a strong influence on the final properties of Fe–Si soft magnetic alloys. - Highlights: • The properties of MIM Fe-Si alloy are influenced by the debinding heating rate. • The slow debinding led to a lower porosity, lower oxygen content and grain growth. • The magnetization of the sintered samples improved after a slow thermal debinding.

  6. Identifying the Electronic Properties Relevant to Improving the Performance of High Band-Gap Copper Based I-III-VI2 Chalcopyrite Thin Film Photovoltaic Devices: Final Subcontract Report, 27 April 2004-15 September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, J. D.

    2008-08-01

    This report summarizes the development and evaluation of higher-bandgap absorbers in the CIS alloy system. The major effort focused on exploring suitable absorbers with significant sulfur alloying in collaboration with Shafarman's group at the Institute of Energy Conversion. Three series of samples were examined; first, a series of quaternary CuIn(SeS)2-based devices without Ga; second, a series of devices with pentenary Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 absorbers in which the Se-to-S and In-to-Ga ratios were chosen to keep the bandgap nearly constant, near 1.52 eV. Third, based on the most-promising samples in those two series, we examined a series of devices with pentenary Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 absorbers with roughly 25 at.% S/(Se+S) ratios and varying Ga fractions. We also characterized electronic properties of several wide-bandgap CuGaSe2 devices from both IEC and NREL. The electronic properties of these absorbers were examined using admittance spectroscopy, drive-level capacitance profiling, transient photocapacitance, and transient photocurrent optical spectroscopies. The sample devices whose absorbers had Ga fraction below 40 at.% and S fractions above 20 at.% but below 40% exhibited the best electronic properties and device performance.

  7. Influence of Nickel Particle Reinforcement on Cyclic Fatigue and Final Fracture Behavior of a Magnesium Alloy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure, tensile properties, cyclic stress amplitude fatigue response and final fracture behavior of a magnesium alloy, denoted as AZ31, discontinuously reinforced with nano-particulates of aluminum oxide and micron size nickel particles is presented and discussed. The tensile properties, high cycle fatigue and final fracture behavior of the discontinuously reinforced magnesium alloy are compared with the unreinforced counterpart (AZ31. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the dual particle reinforced magnesium alloy is marginally higher than of the unreinforced counterpart. However, the tensile strength of the composite is lower than the monolithic counterpart. The ductility quantified by elongation to failure over 0.5 inch (12.7 mm gage length of the test specimen showed minimal difference while the reduction in specimen cross-section area of the composite is higher than that of the monolithic counterpart. At the microscopic level, cyclic fatigue fractures of both the composite and the monolithic alloy clearly revealed features indicative of the occurrence of locally ductile and brittle mechanisms. Over the range of maximum stress and at two different load ratios the cyclic fatigue resistance of the magnesium alloy composite is superior to the monolithic counterpart. The mechanisms responsible for improved cyclic fatigue life and resultant fracture behavior of the composite microstructure are highlighted.

  8. Final Report: Sintered CZTS Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal Foil; July 26, 2011 - July 25, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leidholm, C.; Hotz, C.; Breeze, A.; Sunderland, C.; Ki, W.; Zehnder, D.

    2012-09-01

    This is the final report covering 12 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS)-based thin-film solar cells on flexible metal foil. Each of the first three quarters of the subcontract has been detailed in quarterly reports. In this final report highlights of the first three quarters will be provided and details will be given of the final quarter of the subcontract.

  9. 48 CFR 970.1907-1 - Subcontracting plan requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Small, Small Disadvantaged and Women-Owned Small Business Concerns 970.1907-1 Subcontracting plan requirements. Pursuant to the clause at 48 CFR 52.219-9, Small Business Subcontracting Plan, which is required for all management and...

  10. 48 CFR 970.5227-6 - Patent indemnity-subcontracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patent indemnity... for Management and Operating Contracts 970.5227-6 Patent indemnity—subcontracts. Insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts in accordance with 970.2702-3: Patent Indemnity—Subcontracts...

  11. 48 CFR 852.236-80 - Subcontracts and work coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... coordination. 852.236-80 Section 852.236-80 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS....236-80 Subcontracts and work coordination. As prescribed in 836.574, insert the following clause: Subcontracts and Work Coordination (APR 1984) (a) Nothing contained in this contract shall be construed...

  12. 48 CFR 836.574 - Subcontracts and work coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... coordination. 836.574 Section 836.574 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Subcontracts and work coordination. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-80, Subcontracts and work coordination, in solicitations and contracts for construction expected to exceed the...

  13. 48 CFR 35.009 - Subcontracting research and development effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 35.009 Subcontracting research and development effort. Since the selection of R&D contractors is substantially based on... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subcontracting research...

  14. 48 CFR 52.219-9 - Small business subcontracting plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 52.219-9 Small business subcontracting plan. As prescribed in 19.708(b), insert the following clause: Small Business Subcontracting Plan (OCT 2010) (a) This clause does not apply to small business... business, and women-owned small business concerns. If the offeror is submitting an individual contract...

  15. 48 CFR 52.244-6 - Subcontracts for Commercial Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... clauses in subcontracts for commercial items: (i) 52.203-13, Contractor Code of Business Ethics and... Recovery Act. (iii) 52.219-8, Utilization of Small Business Concerns (MAY 2004) (15 U.S.C. 637(d)(2) and (3... subcontracts to small business concerns) exceeds $650,000 ($1.5 million for construction of any public...

  16. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process: health programs. Research and development report No. 53, Interim report No. 39. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 4: Industrial hygiene, clinical and toxicological programs. Final report of subcontract No. 10, June 1, 1976-June 9, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-01

    This report summarizes the toxicological studies on SRC-I materials completed under Subcontract No. 10 as part of the Health Programs under the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Process Contract during the total period of the subcontract, June 1, 1976 through June 9, 1978. The studies were conducted by Industrial Bio-Test Laboratories (IBT) as the subcontractor. A number of acute studies were completed on the products and intermediate streams as well as several subchronic studies. In addition, preliminary dose-ranging, or pilot, studies were completed. None of the materials exhibited high toxicities when administered orally, dermally, or by the inhalation route. Three of the materials proved to be severely or extremely irritating to the eyes. The pilot dermal and teratogenesis studies revealed some evidence of decreased viability in offspring and reduced fetal body weights. The subcontract was terminated for convenience on June 9, 1978 when it became apparent that IBT could not satisfactorily continue the studies.

  17. Process simulation and modeling for advanced intermetallic alloys. Final report, 1 September 1989-31 August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, H.J.

    1994-06-01

    This Final Report summarizes the technical effort for contract 'Process Simulation and Modeling for Advanced Intermetallic Alloys' undertaken under N0001489-J-3166 (RT Project Number: DU 89005) at Clemson University with H. J. Rack, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Metallurgy acting as Principal Investigator. The report contains two major parts, Phase Stability (Part 1) and High Temperature Deformation Processing (Part 2). Part 1 contains nine (9) papers describing the high temperature phase stability of Ti-Al-Nb and Ti-Al-V intermetallic alloys, primary attention being focused on the temperature regimes normally associated with deformation processing. Part 2 contains three (3) papers which demonstrate the utility of combining phase equilibria studies with Dynamic Material Modeling to simulate and model the high temperature deformation processing response of alpha + beta and alpha 2 + beta titanium alloys.

  18. 75 FR 9604 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Subcontracting Plans/Individual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... subcontracting plans/individual subcontract report. A request for public comments published in the Federal Register at 73 FR 21779 on April 22, 2008. No comments were received. Public comments are particularly... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Subcontracting Plans/Individual Subcontract Report...

  19. Influence of thermal debinding on the final properties of Fe-Si soft magnetic alloys for metal injection molding (MIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Pavón, A.; Jiménez-Morales, A.; Santos, T. G.; Quintino, L.; Torralba, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) may be used to produce soft magnetic materials with optimal mechanical and magnetic properties. Unlike other techniques, MIM enables the production of complex and small Fe-Si alloy parts with silicon contents greater than 3% by weight. In MIM process development, it is critical to design a proper debinding cycle not only to ensure complete removal of the binder system but also to obtain improved properties in the final part. This work is a preliminary study on the production of Fe-3.8Si soft magnetic parts by MIM using pre-alloyed powders and a non-industrialized binder. Two different heating rates during thermal debinding were used to study their effect on the final properties of the part. The final properties of the sintered parts are related to thermal debinding. It has been demonstrated that the heating rate during thermal debinding has a strong influence on the final properties of Fe-Si soft magnetic alloys.

  20. The evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, D.

    1992-10-26

    The use of metal alloy fuels in a PWR was investigated. It was found that it would be feasible and competitive to design PWRs with metal alloy fuels but that there seemed to be no significant benefits. The new technology would carry with it added economic uncertainty and since no large benefits were found it was determined that metal alloy fuels are not recommended. Initially, a benefit was found for metal alloy fuels but when the oxide core was equally optimized the benefit faded. On review of the optimization of the current generation of ``advanced reactors,`` it became clear that reactor design optimization has been under emphasized. Current ``advanced reactors`` are severely constrained. The AP-600 required the use of a fuel design from the 1970`s. In order to find the best metal alloy fuel design, core optimization became a central effort. This work is ongoing.

  1. Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Sandra; Garcés, Gerardo; Pérez, Pablo; Adeva, Paloma

    2014-07-01

    The Mg98.5Gd1Zn0.5 alloy produced by a powder metallurgy route was studied and compared with the same alloy produced by extrusion of ingots. Atomized powders were cold compacted and extruded at 623 K and 673 K (350 °C and 400 °C). The microstructure of extruded materials was characterized by α-Mg grains, and Mg3Gd and 14H-LPSO particles located at grain boundaries. Grain size decreased from 6.8 μm in the extruded ingot, down to 1.6 μm for powders extruded at 623 K (350 °C). Grain refinement resulted in an increase in mechanical properties at room and high temperatures. Moreover, at high temperatures the PM alloy showed superplasticity at high strain rates, with elongations to failure up to 700 pct.

  2. Shape memory alloy seals for geothermal applications. Final report. Report ESG-82-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friske, Warren H.; Schwartzbart, Harry

    1982-07-30

    A novel temperature-actuated seal for geothermal applications is under development. This program uses the shape memory property of nickel-titanium (Nitinol) alloys to achieve an improved seal in geothermal downhole pumps. Nitinol flange face seals and pump shaft seals have been designed, fabricated, and tested. It has been demonstrated that the shape memory effect of Nitinol alloys can be utilized to activate and maintain a leaktight seal in geothermal environments.

  3. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for Fe-base and refractory alloys. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-03-10

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels and refractory metal alloys. A new comprehensive theory to treat the multi-component thermodynamic equilibria in the gas phase for several coexisting solid phases was developed and used. Many different processes to deposit various types of coatings on several types of steels were developed: Cr-Si codeposition for low- or medium-carbon steels, Cr-Al codeposition on low-carbon steels to yield either a Kanthal-type composition (Fe-25Cr-4Al in wt.%) or else a (Fe, Cr){sub 3}Al surface composition. An Fe{sub 3}Al substrate was aluminized to achieve an FeAl surface composition, and boron was also added to ductilize the coating. The developmental Cr-lean ORNL alloys with exceptional creep resistance were Cr-Al coated to achieve excellent oxidation resistance. Alloy wires of Ni-base were aluminized to provide an average composition of Ni{sub 3}Al for use as welding rods. Several different refractory metal alloys based on Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb have been silicided, also with germanium additions, to provide excellent oxidation resistance. A couple of developmental Cr-Zr alloys were similarly coated and tested.

  4. Chemical Profiles of Microalgae with Emphasis on Lipids: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J. R.; Tillett, D. M.; Suen, Y.; Hubbard, J.; Tornabene, T. G.

    1986-02-01

    This final report details progress during the third year of this subcontract. The overall objective of this subcontract was two fold: to provide the analytical capability required for selecting microalgae strains with high energy contents and to develop fundamental knowledge required for optimizing the energy yield from microalgae cultures. The progress made towards these objectives during this year is detailed in this report.

  5. Grain refinement of permanent mold cast copper base alloys. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadayappan, M.; Thomson, J. P.; Elboujdaini, M.; Gu, G. Ping; Sahoo, M.

    2004-04-29

    Grain refinement behavior of copper alloys cast in permanent molds was investigated. This is one of the least studied subjects in copper alloy castings. Grain refinement is not widely practiced for leaded copper alloys cast in sand molds. Aluminum bronzes and high strength yellow brasses, cast in sand and permanent molds, were usually fine grained due to the presence of more than 2% iron. Grain refinement of the most common permanent mold casting alloys, leaded yellow brass and its lead-free replacement EnviroBrass III, is not universally accepted due to the perceived problem of hard spots in finished castings and for the same reason these alloys contain very low amounts of iron. The yellow brasses and Cu-Si alloys are gaining popularity in North America due to their low lead content and amenability for permanent mold casting. These alloys are prone to hot tearing in permanent mold casting. Grain refinement is one of the solutions for reducing this problem. However, to use this technique it is necessary to understand the mechanism of grain refinement and other issues involved in the process. The following issues were studied during this three year project funded by the US Department of Energy and the copper casting industry: (1) Effect of alloying additions on the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys and their interaction with grain refiners; (2) Effect of two grain refining elements, boron and zirconium, on the grain size of four copper alloys, yellow brass, EnviroBrass II, silicon brass and silicon bronze and the duration of their effect (fading); (3) Prediction of grain refinement using cooling curve analysis and use of this method as an on-line quality control tool; (4) Hard spot formation in yellow brass and EnviroBrass due to grain refinement; (5) Corrosion resistance of the grain refined alloys; (6) Transfer the technology to permanent mold casting foundries; It was found that alloying elements such as tin and zinc do not change the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys

  6. 48 CFR 19.705-5 - Awards involving subcontracting plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The Small Business Subcontracting Program 19.705-5... submit advisory recommendations to the contracting officer. Failure of the representative to respond in...

  7. 48 CFR 19.705-4 - Reviewing the subcontracting plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... business concerns as prime contractors or subcontractors in similar acquisitions; (2) Proven methods of involving small business concerns as subcontractors in similar acquisitions; and (3) The relative success of... REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The Small Business Subcontracting Program...

  8. Contract Pricing: Threshold for Analysis of Subcontract Proposals Not Clear

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    packages, valued at $255 million. If the 3Contract Pricing: Inadequate Subcontract Evaluations Often Lead to Higher Government Costo (GAO/NSIAD-9l-16 1, Apr...report. Other major contributors to this report are listed in appendix III . Sincerely yours, Paul F. Math Director, Research, Development, Acquisition...subcontractor cost or See comment 2. pricing data. FAR 15.804-2(a)(1)( iii ) states that any subcontract expected to exceed $100,000 _l/ requires the submission

  9. Molecular engineering of polymer alloys: A final report of results obtained on CRADA No. 1078

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curro, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schweizer, K.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Honeycutt, J.D. [BIOSYM Technologies, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made in the past three years on CRADA No. 1078, Molecular Engineering of Polymer Alloys. The thrust of this CRADA was to start with the basic ideas of PRISM theory and develop it to the point where it could be applied to modeling of polymer alloys. In this program, BIOSYM, Sandia and the University of Illinois worked jointly to develop the theoretical techniques and numerical formalisms necessary to implement the theoretical ideas into commercial software aimed at molecular engineering of polymer alloys. This CRADA focused on developing the techniques required to make the transition from theory to practice. These techniques were then used by BIOSYM to incorporate PRISM theory and other new developments into their commercial software.

  10. Photovoltaic module energy rating procedure. Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, C.M.; Newmiller, J.D. [Endecon Engineering (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This document describes testing and computation procedures used to generate a photovoltaic Module Energy Rating (MER). The MER consists of 10 estimates of the amount of energy a single module of a particular type (make and model) will produce in one day. Module energy values are calculated for each of five different sets of weather conditions (defined by location and date) and two load types. Because reproduction of these exact testing conditions in the field or laboratory is not feasible, limited testing and modeling procedures and assumptions are specified.

  11. Hawaii Integrated Biofuels Research Program: Final Subcontract Report, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This report is a compilation of studies done to develop an integrated set of strategies for the production of energy from renewable resources in Hawaii. Because of the close coordination between this program and other ongoing DOE research, the work will have broad-based applicability to the entire United States.

  12. Phase-change thermal energy storage: Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    The research and development described in this document was conducted within the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program. The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100{degree}C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500{degree}C in dish and central receiver systems. 12 refs., 119 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Atomistic studies of grain boundaries and heterophase interfaces in alloys and compounds. Final report, July 1987-August 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitek, Vaclav

    1998-08-01

    The overarching goal of the research supported by this grant was investigation of the structure and properties of interfaces in multicomponent systems by atomistic modeling. Initially, the research was devoted to studies of segregation to grain boundaries in binary disordered alloys. The next step was then studies of the structure and properties of grain boundaries in ordered compounds, specifically Ni3Al and NiAl, and grain boundary segregation in these compounds in the case of off-stoichiometry. Finally, the structure of Nb/sapphire interfaces, in particular the core configurations of the misfit dislocations, was studied.

  14. Development of Modular Subcontract Documents for Construction Projects%工程项目分包合同招标文件的模块化开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇强; 张水波

    2001-01-01

    论述在工程项目管理中分包合同与主合同之间的关系,提出用模块化的思想进行分包合同招标文件开发与管理的新思路,分析分包合同招标文件模块化开发的优点,最后指出工程分包合同招标文件编制应注意的问题。%This paper first discusses the relationship between subcontract and main contract, proposes the innovative method for developing subcontracting documents by modularization and analyzes the advantage of this method. Finally, some points that should be noted in preparation of subcontract documents are put forward.

  15. 77 FR 56709 - Proposed Information Collection (VA Subcontracting Report for Service Disabled Veteran-Owned...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... needed to collect information from subcontractors to compare information obtained from subcontracting...) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) ways to... collect information from subcontractors to compare information obtained from subcontracting...

  16. Alloy Thin-films and Surfaces for New Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprunger, P.T.

    2003-08-10

    Within the framework of a DOE National Laboratory/EPSCoR state partnership, investigations by researchers at Louisiana State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory were focused on revealing the unique nanophase properties of alloy thin-films and bimetallic surfaces. Employing a number of experimental preparation techniques and characterization probes (synchrotron-based angle-resolved and valence/core-level PES and variable-temperature STM/STS), the goal of this program was to elucidate of the interconnecting physical and chemical properties of a variety of alloy surfaces and thin-films, specifically, determining the correlation between atomic structure/composition, electronic structure, and catalytic/chemisorption properties of these nanoscale.

  17. Aging and Phase Stability Studies of Alloy 22 FY08 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, S G

    2008-04-03

    This report is a compilation of work done over the past ten years in support of phase stability studies of Alloy 22 for the Yucca Mountain Project and contains information previously published, reported, and referenced. Most sections are paraphrased here for the convenience of readers. Evaluation of the fabrication processes involved in the manufacture of waste containers is important as these processes can have an effect on the metallurgical structure of an alloy. Because material properties such as strength, toughness, aging kinetics and corrosion resistance are all dependent on the microstructure, it is important that prototypes be built and evaluated for processing effects on the performance of the material. Of particular importance are welds, which have an as-cast microstructure with chemical segregation and precipitation of complex phases resulting from the welding process. The work summarized in this report contains information on the effects of fabrication processes such as solution annealing, stress mitigation, heat-to-heat variability, and welding on the kinetics of precipitation, mechanical, and corrosion properties. For a waste package lifetime of thousands of years, it is impossible to test directly in the laboratory the behavior of Alloy 22 under expected repository conditions. The changes that may occur in these materials must be accelerated. For phase stability studies, this is achieved by accelerating the phase transformations by increasing test temperatures above those anticipated in the proposed repository. For these reasons, Alloy 22 characterization specimens were aged at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Aging Facilities for times from 1 hour up to 8 years at temperatures ranging from 200-750 C. These data as well as the data from specimens aged at 260 C, 343 C, and 427 C for 100,028 hours at Haynes International will be used for performance confirmation and model validation.

  18. The nexus between OSH and subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Isabel L

    2012-01-01

    Subcontracting of specialized functions to external companies (e.g. cleaning or maintenance) is actually very common within several industries. These external companies' are called contractors and their contracting is often designated as outsourcing. Frequently contractors involve other companies (the sub-contractors) to assist them in fulfilling the contract, resulting in a complex chain of organizations focused on interchange of work - the contracting chain. Therefore in the same work site can coexist workers form the client-company and workers from the contractors and/or subcontractors. Since contractors perform their job in client's facilities, they can be exposed to hazards that are unknown to them. On other hand, workers of the client company can also be exposed to hazardous situations derived from the work performed by the contractors. The paper discusses how adequate occupational safety and health conditions can be assured when dealing with this kind of dynamic labor networks. Two case-studies and several examples coming from international literature will be presented.

  19. 48 CFR 52.219-16 - Liquidated Damages-Subcontracting Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... clause in this contract entitled “Small Business Subcontracting Plan,” or willful or intentional action... contract entitled “Small Business Subcontracting Plan,” the Contractor shall pay the Government liquidated... following clause: Liquidated Damages—Subcontracting Plan (JAN 1999) (a) Failure to make a good faith...

  20. 48 CFR 552.219-72 - Preparation, Submission, and Negotiation of Subcontracting Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., and Negotiation of Subcontracting Plans. 552.219-72 Section 552.219-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.219-72 Preparation, Submission, and Negotiation of Subcontracting... Negotiation of Subcontracting Plans (JUN 2005) (a) An offeror, other than a small business concern,...

  1. 48 CFR 226.370-8 - Goals and incentives for subcontracting with HBCU/MIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... subcontracting with HBCU/MIs. 226.370-8 Section 226.370-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... subcontracting with HBCU/MIs. (a) In reviewing subcontracting plans submitted under the clause at FAR 52.219-9... included anticipated awards to HBCU/MIs in the small disadvantaged business goal; and (2) Consider whether...

  2. 77 FR 69626 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Subcontracting Plans/Individual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... regarding an extension to this clearance published in the Federal Register at 75 FR 9604, on March 3, 2010... Regulation; Information Collection; Subcontracting Plans/Individual Subcontract Report (SF-294) AGENCIES... previously approved information collection requirement concerning subcontracting plans/individual...

  3. 25 CFR 276.16 - Subgrants and subcontracts to non-profit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Subgrants and subcontracts to non-profit organizations... Subgrants and subcontracts to non-profit organizations. The uniform administrative requirements in this part... subgrants or subcontracts made to non-profit organizations....

  4. 48 CFR 252.219-7004 - Small business subcontracting plan (test program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.219-7004 Small business subcontracting plan... contract or subcontract. (b) The Offeror's comprehensive small business subcontracting plan and its... “Utilization of Small Business Concerns,” or (2) an approved plan required by this clause, shall be a...

  5. 48 CFR 852.219-9 - VA Small business subcontracting plan minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 852.219-9 VA Small business subcontracting plan minimum requirements. As prescribed in subpart 819.709, insert the following clause: VA Small Business Subcontracting Plan Minimum Requirements... plan, the minimum goals for award of subcontracts to service-disabled veteran-owned small...

  6. 48 CFR 2452.219-70 - Small business subcontracting plan compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of Provisions and Clauses 2452.219-70 Small business subcontracting plan compliance. As prescribed in 2419.708(d), insert the following provision: Small Business Subcontracting Plan Compliance (FEB 2006... the clause at FAR 52.219-9, Small Business Subcontracting Plan. (c) The government will...

  7. 48 CFR 652.219-70 - Department of State Subcontracting Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Subcontracting Goals. 652.219-70 Section 652.219-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE... Department of State Subcontracting Goals. As prescribed in 619.708-70, insert a provision substantially the same as follows: Department of State Subcontracting Goals (APR 2004) (a) The offeror shall provide...

  8. Forecast of contracting and subcontracting opportunities: Fiscal year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report describes procurement procedures and opportunities for small businesses with the Department of Energy (DOE). It describes both prime and subcontracting opportunities of $100,000 and above which are being set aside for 8(a) and other small business concerns. The report contains sections on: SIC codes; procurement opportunities with headquarters offices; procurement opportunities with field offices; subcontracting opportunities with major contractors; 8(a) contracts expiring in FY 1998; other opportunities to do business with DOE; management and operating contractors--expiration dates; Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) staff directory; and small business survey. This document will be updated quarterly on the home page.

  9. Machine casting of ferrous alloys. Final report, 30 June 1976--30 June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flemings, M.C.; Young, K.P.; Boylan, J.F.; Bye, R.L.; Santor, M.L.

    1977-06-01

    During this year the basic Rheocasting system, which was fully operational at the beginning of the year, was improved in various ways to increase reliability and productivity. Specific improvements were the addition of a reducing gas in the melting chamber, a shield gas extension nozzle and graphite inserts at the bottom of the Rheocaster to eliminate 'hot spots'. Large quantities of 304 and 440C stainless steel alloys were cast during this period (approximately 800 pounds of 304 and 2000 pounds of 440C) and smaller quantities of other materials were also Rheocast including M2 tool steel, and HS 31 Cobalt base superalloy. Improvements in details and automation of the Thixocasting process were also made during this period. Work subsequently concentrated on casting large quantities of stainless steel into various die materials in order to determine die life and to optimize that die life.

  10. Radiation behavior of high-entropy alloys for advanced reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, Peter K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Egami, Takeshi [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhang, Chuan [CompuTherm, LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Zhang, Fan [CompuTherm, LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-04-30

    In the first task, we have demonstrated the radiation damage and the recrystallization behaviors in multicomponent alloys through molecular-dynamics simulations. It is found that by alloying with atoms of different sizes, the atomic-level strain increases, and the propensity of the radiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transition increases as the defects cluster in the cascade body. Recrystallization of the radiation induced supercooled or glass regions show that by tuning the composition and the equilibrium temperature, the multicomponent alloys can be healed. The crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transitions predict the potential high radiation resistance in multicomponent alloys. In the second task, three types of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were fabricated from AlCoCrFeNi and AlCuCrFeNi quinary alloys. Hardness and reduced contact modulus were measured using nanoindentation tests. Heavy ion irradiation were performed using 10 MeV gold and 5 MeV nickel to study radiation effects. Al0.5CrCuFeNi2 shows phase separation upon the presence of copper. Both hardness and contact modulus exhibit the same trend as increasing the applied load, and it indicates that excessive free volume may alter the growth rate of the plastic zone. The as-cast Al0.1CoCrFeNi specimen undergone the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process and steady cooling rate which mitigate the quenching effect. The swelling behavior was characterized by the atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the swelling rate is approximately 0.02% dpa. Selected area diffraction (SAD) patters show irradiation-induced amorphization throughout the ion projected range. Within the peak damage region, an amorpous ring is observed, and a mixture of amorphous/ crystalline structure at deeper depth is found. The Al0.3CoCrFeNi HEAs shows good radiation resistance up to 60 peak dpa. No voids or dislocations are observed. The crystal structures remain face-centered-cubic (FCC) before and

  11. APPRAISAL OF FINAL TAILINGS APPLICABILITY FOR PROCESSING AND PRODUCTION OF MODIFIERS OF IRON-CARBON ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Panasugin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of rating of the galvanic final tailings applicability for further processing in the interests of needs of metallurgical production of the Republic Belarus is offered.

  12. Formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment in Indian manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Monroy, A.I.; Pieters, J.; Erumban, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Using nationally representative survey dta of Indian manufacturing enterprises spanning the period 1995-2006, we analyze the link between formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment. A novelty in our analysis is that this relationship is allowed to differ between modern and tradition

  13. 48 CFR 1644.170 - Policy for FEHB Program subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Negotiations” if based on cost analysis, and subject to the provisions of 48 CFR 1646.301 and 1652.246-70 “FEHB... Regulations (FAR) policies and procedures relating to competition and contract pricing for the acquisition of... at least 25 percent of the total subcontract's costs. The amount of the dollar charge to the FEHB...

  14. 48 CFR 941.201-71 - Use of subcontracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF UTILITY SERVICES Acquiring Utility Services 941.201-71 Use of... and/or sewerage at facilities owned or leased by DOE shall not be acquired under a subcontract arrangement, except as provided for at 970.4102-1 or if the prime contract is with a utility company....

  15. 40 CFR 35.938-9 - Subcontracts under construction contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contracts. 35.938-9 Section 35.938-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... Water Act § 35.938-9 Subcontracts under construction contracts. (a) The award or execution of... prime contractor under a formally advertised, competitively bid, fixed price construction...

  16. 77 FR 8808 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  17. 76 FR 15941 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2008, through October 31, 2009. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  18. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft. Final report, 1 December 1991-31 March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starke, E.A. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of the study `Aluminum-Based Materials for high Speed Aircraft` which had the objectives (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials and (2) to assess the materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT. The research team consisted of ALCOA, Allied-Signal, Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, Reynolds Metals and the University of Virginia. Four classes of aluminum alloys were investigated: (1) I/M 2XXX containing Li and I/M 2XXX with Li, (2) I/M 6XXX, (3) two P/M 2XXX alloys and (4) two different aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC). The I/M alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.0 aircraft and the P/M and MMC alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.4 aircraft. Design studies were conducted using several different concepts including skin/stiffener (baseline), honeycomb sandwich, integrally stiffened and hybrid adaptations (conventionally stiffened thin-sandwich skins). Alloy development included fundamental studies of coarsening behavior, the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates, and fracture toughness as a function of temperature were an integral part of this program. The details of all phases of the research are described in this final report.

  19. Characterization of hydrogen ingress in high-strength alloys. Final report, 15 September 1993-14 September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, B.G.

    1995-11-01

    The ingress of hydrogen (H) in various high-strength alloys was investigated with a view to characterizing their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement (HE). A potentiostatic pulse technique was applied to three Fe-base alloys (AerMet 100, H11, and A-286), two Cu-containing alloys (Be-Cu and alloy K-500), a superferritic stainless steel (Sea-Cure), and three Beta-Ti alloys (Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn, Beta-21S, and Beta-C) in 1 mol/L acetic acid-1 mol/L sodium acetate. The data were analyzed using a diffusion/trapping model to obtain the irreversible trapping constant (k) and H entry flux for each alloy. The order of the k values for AerMet 100, H11, and two high-strength steels previously studied (4340 and 18Ni) inversely parallels their threshold stress intensities for stress corrosion cracking. Likewise, the k values for the other alloys can be correlated with their observed resistances to HE according to the following groups: (1) alloy A-286,18Ni steel, H11, Be-Cu, and also alloy 718 from earlier work; (2) annealed/aged and direct aged alloy K-500; and (3) Ti alloys. The trapping characteristics of Sea-Cure could not be determined. However, the propensity of the S44660 alloy to undergo HE at cathodic protection potentials can be attributed to changes in the oxide that lead to a less restricted entry of H.

  20. 48 CFR 2019.705 - Responsibilities of the contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Subcontracting With Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, and Women-Owned Small Business Concerns...

  1. 48 CFR 319.705 - Responsibilities of the Contracting Officer under the subcontracting assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Subcontracting With Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, and Women-Owned Small Business Concerns...

  2. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices: Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1995 -- January 15, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, R W; Phillips, J E; Buchanan, W A; Eser, E; Hegedus, S S; McCandless, B E; Meyers, P V; Shafarman, W N [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The overall mission of the Institute of Energy Conversion is the development of thin film photovoltaic cells, modules, and related manufacturing technology and the education of students and professionals in photovoltaic technology. The objectives of this four-year NREL subcontract are to advance the state of the art and the acceptance of thin film PV modules in the areas of improved technology for thin film deposition, device fabrication, and material and device characterization and modeling, relating to solar cells based on CuInSe{sub 2} and its alloys, on a-Si and its alloys, and on CdTe. In the area of CuInSe{sub 2} and its alloys, EEC researchers have produced CuIn{sub 1-x}GaxSe{sub 2} films by selenization of elemental and alloyed films with H{sub 2}Se and Se vapor and by a wide variety of process variations employing co-evaporation of the elements. Careful design, execution and analysis of these experiments has led to an improved understanding of the reaction chemistry involved, including estimations of the reaction rate constants. Investigation of device fabrication has also included studies of the processing of the Mo, US and ZnO deposition parameters and their influence on device properties. An indication of the success of these procedures was the fabrication of a 15% efficiency CuIn{sub 1-x}GaxSe{sub 2} solar cell.

  3. 48 CFR 1519.705-70 - Synopsis of contracts containing Pub. L. 95-507 subcontracting plans and goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... containing Pub. L. 95-507 subcontracting plans and goals. 1519.705-70 Section 1519.705-70 Federal Acquisition... containing Pub. L. 95-507 subcontracting plans and goals. The synopsis of contract award, where applicable... and goals....

  4. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy; technical amendment. Final rule; technical amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a final rule in the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and designated special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. The effective date of the rule was November 2, 2009. The final rule was published with an inadvertent error in the codified section. This document corrects that error. This action is being taken to ensure the accuracy of the agency's regulations.

  5. 13 CFR 126.701 - Can these subcontracting percentages requirements change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Can these subcontracting percentages requirements change? 126.701 Section 126.701 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION HUBZONE PROGRAM Contract Performance Requirements § 126.701 Can these subcontracting percentages...

  6. 48 CFR 3419.705-2 - Determining the need for a subcontracting plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... subcontracting plan. 3419.705-2 Section 3419.705-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS AND SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS CONCERNS Subcontracting With Small Business and Small Disadvantaged Business Concerns 3419.705-2 Determining the need...

  7. Chemical thermodynamics of metallic alloy formation. Final report. [Na-K; Mg-Cd; NaCl-NaBr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.E.

    1951-12-01

    Methods and apparatus required in determining the heats of formation at 25/sup 0/C of sodium-potassium alloys, magnesium-cadmium alloys and sodium chloride-sodium bromide ionic solid solutions have been developed. Method for determining free energies of formation of magnesium-cadmium alloys at elevated temperatures has been developed. Apparatus for determining the specific heats of magnesium-cadmium alloys at low temperatures has been prepared. The heat of reaction of pure potassium with water was determined. Provisional values for the heats of formation of four sodium-potassium alloys were obtained. A density-composition curve for magnesium-cadmium alloys was constructed. Heats of formation of nine NaCl-NaBr solid solutions were measured and the data used to calculate thermodynamically the phase diagram describing the mutual solid solubility of the two salts. Lattice spacings of NaCl-NaBr solid solutions were determined by x-ray diffraction techniques and the results compared with Vegnard's Rule and the additivity rule for molar volumes. A theoretical study based upon the Born-Mayer model for ionic solids was made to attempt to account for the variation with composition of the energy and lattice spacings of the alkali halide solid solutions. Comparison of results for the NaCl-NaBr system with those obtained in a similar study of Fontell indicated some discrepancies which were removed by a retreatment of Fontell's data.

  8. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 9A. Subcontract information. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; water supply and civil engineering subcontracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    Volume 9A considers subcontract work done at the site involving hydrogeological studies with respect to water supply and geotechnical work with respect to the building foundations necessary based on boreholes drilled and the lithology of the area. (LTN)

  9. Fixed-Price Subcontracting for Decontamination and Decommissioning of Small Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, M. A.; Julius, J. F. K.; McKenna, M. K.

    2002-02-26

    Abandoned facilities were decontaminated and decommissioned in preparation for final remediation of Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facilities varied in age from approximately 5 years to more than 40 years, with radiological conditions ranging from clean to highly contaminated with fission products. A fixed-price subcontract (FPSC) was awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) Management and Integration (M&I) contractor for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of these facilities. Included in the FPSC scope were the following: preparation of pre-D&D regulatory documentation; demolition of surface structures to slab; stabilization of below-grade structures; waste management and disposal; and preparation of post-D&D regulatory documentation. Using stand-off techniques to the extent possible, building structures and ancillary equipment were prepared for demolition and demolished. A fixative coating system was used in conjunction with continuous water misting to control airborne contamination. Demolition waste consisted of two major streams: clean construction and demolition waste and low-level (radioactive) waste. The debris was size-reduced and packaged, again via remote means. At all times during the D&D, personnel safety, environmental compliance, and as low as reasonably achievable exposure considerations were paramount. Upon completion of D&D activities, each site was inspected and accepted by the M&I contractor. This project is a success story for fixed-price subcontracting of D&D work under DOE's M&I arrangement.

  10. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule classifying dental amalgam into class II, reclassifying dental mercury from class I to class II, and designating a special control to support the class II classifications of these two devices, as well as the current class II classification of amalgam alloy. The three devices are now classified in a single regulation. The special control for the devices is a guidance document entitled, "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy." This action is being taken to establish sufficient regulatory controls to provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of these devices. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for the devices.

  11. Forecast of contracting and subcontracting opportunities. Fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This forecast of prime and subcontracting opportunities with the U.S. Department of Energy and its MAO contractors and environmental restoration and waste management contractors, is the Department`s best estimate of small, small disadvantaged and women-owned small business procurement opportunities for fiscal year 1996. The information contained in the forecast is published in accordance with Public Law 100-656. It is not an invitation for bids, a request for proposals, or a commitment by DOE to purchase products or services. Each procurement opportunity is based on the best information available at the time of publication and may be revised or cancelled.

  12. Construction Tender Subcontract Selection using Case-based Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Due Luu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining competitive quotations from suitably qualified subcontractors at tender tim n significantly increase the chance of w1nmng a construction project. Amidst an increasingly growing trend to subcontracting in Australia, selecting appropriate subcontractors for a construction project can be a daunting task requiring the analysis of complex and dynamic criteria such as past performance, suitable experience, track record of competitive pricing, financial stability and so on. Subcontractor selection is plagued with uncertainty and vagueness and these conditions are difficul_t o represent in generalised sets of rules. DeciSIOns pertaining to the selection of subcontr:act?s tender time are usually based on the mtu1t1onand past experience of construction estimators. Case-based reasoning (CBR may be an appropriate method of addressing the chal_lenges of selecting subcontractors because CBR 1s able to harness the experiential knowledge of practitioners. This paper reviews the practicality and suitability of a CBR approach for subcontractor tender selection through the development of a prototype CBR procurement advisory system. In this system, subcontractor selection cases are represented by a set of attributes elicited from experienced construction estimators. The results indicate that CBR can enhance the appropriateness of the selection of subcontractors for construction projects.

  13. Final report on in-reactor tensile tests on OFHC - Copper and CuCrZr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N; Edwards, D.J.; Tähtinen, S.

    2004-01-01

    of uniaxial tensile tests on pure copper and a CuCrZr alloy in a fission reactor at 363 and 393K. In the following, we first describe the experiments and then present results illustrating the build up ofstress as a function of concurrently increasing strain and displacement dose level. Results on both pre...

  14. Final report on in-reactor creep-fatigue deformation behaviour of a CuCrZr alloy: COFAT 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Johansen, Bjørn Sejr; Tähtinen, S.

    The main objective of the present work was to determine experimentally the mechanical response and resulting microstructural changes in CuCrZr (HT1) alloy exposed concurrently to flux of neutrons and creep-fatigue cyclic loading directly in a fission reactor. Using specially designed test...

  15. Final report on characterization of physical and mechanical properties of copper and copper alloys before and after irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Tähtinen, S.

    2002-01-01

    The present report summarizes and highlights the main results of the work carried out during the last 5-6 years on effects of neutron irradiation on physical and mechanical properties of copper and copper alloys. The work was an European contribution toITER Research and Development programme...... amount of further effort is needed to find a realistic and optimum solution....

  16. Thin-film amorphous silicon alloy research partnership. Final technical progress report, 2 February 1995--28 February 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guha, S [United Solar Systems Corp., Troy, MI (United States)

    1998-05-01

    This report describes the status and accomplishments of work performed by United Solar Systems Corp. under this subcontract. Investigations were carried out on Ag/ZnO, Ag/TiO{sub 2}/ZnO and Ag/MgF{sub 2}/ZnO back reflectors to assess their suitability for use in cell structures. Arrays of high-efficiency component cells were made over 1-ft{sup 2} areas. Single-junction top cells were made with an average stabilized power density of 5.4 mW/cm{sup 2} measured under global AM1.5 illumination. Single-junction middle cells were optimized to give average stabilized power density of 3.6 mW/cm{sup 2} under global AM1.5 illumination with a cut-on filter with {lambda} > 530 nm. Arrays of high-efficiency triple-junction cells of 0.25-cm{sup 2} active area were fabricated over 1-ft{sup 2} area with average stabilized efficiency of 12% as measured under AM1.5 illumination. A triple-junction module of a 416-cm{sup 2} aperture area was fabricated with an initial efficiency of 11.7% and stabilized efficiency of 10.24%. A 922-cm{sup 2} aperture-area module exhibited an initial efficiency of 11.5%. The novel laser-drilling approach was used successfully to fabricate modules of 1-ft{sup 2} area with shadow loss of approximately 1%. Using this laser-drilling approach, an initial total-area efficiency of 11.5% was achieved in a triple-cell structure of 12.6 cm{sup 2} area. An initial total-area efficiency of 10.6% was achieved in a module of 300-cm{sup 2} area. Reliability studies based on NREL`s Interim Qualification Testing were carried out to confirm the suitability of the module encapsulation materials and processes. 29 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. Metastability and Delta-Phase Retention in Plutonium Alloys Final Report of LDRD Project 01-ERD-029

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J; Schwartz, A J; Blobaum, K M; Krenn, C R; Wall, M A; Wolfer, W G; Haslam, J J; Moore, K T

    2004-02-11

    The {delta} to {alpha}' phase transformation in Pu-Ga alloys is intriguing for both scientific and technological reasons. On cooling, the ductile fcc {delta}-phase transforms martensitically to the brittle monoclinic {alpha}'-phase at approximately -120 C (depending on composition). This exothermic transformation involves a 20% volume contraction and a significant increase in resistivity. The reversion of {alpha}' to {delta} involves a large temperature hysteresis beginning just above room temperature. In an attempt to better understand the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics responsible for these unusual features, we have investigated the {delta} {leftrightarrow} {alpha}' phase transformations in a Pu-0.6 wt% Ga alloy using a combination of experimental and modeling techniques.

  18. Textures in Strip-Cast Aluminum Alloys: Their On-Line Monitoring and Quantitative Effects on Formability. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, Chi-Sing

    2003-07-27

    Aluminum sheets produced by continuous casting (CC) provide energy and economic savings of at least 25 and 14 percent, respectively, over sheets made from conventional direct chill (DC) ingot casting and rolling. As a result of the much simpler production route in continuous casting, however, the formability of CC aluminum alloys is often somewhat inferior to that of their DC counterparts. The mechanical properties of CC alloys can be improved by controlling their microstructure through optimal thermomechanical processing. Suitable annealing is an important means to improve the formability of CC aluminum alloy sheets. Recrystallization of deformed grains occurs during annealing, and it changes the crystallographic texture of the aluminum sheet. Laboratory tests in this project showed that this texture change can be detected by either laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy or resonance EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) spectroscopy, and that monitoring this change allows the degree of recrystallization or the ''recrystallized fraction'' in an annealed sheet to be ascertained. Through a plant trial conducted in May 2002, this project further demonstrated that it is feasible to monitor the recrystallized state of a continuous-cast aluminum sheet in-situ on the production line by using a laser-ultrasound sensor. When used in conjunction with inline annealing, inline monitoring of the recrystallized fraction by laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy offers the possibility of feed-back control that helps optimize processing parameters (e.g., annealing temperature), detect production anomalies, ensure product quality, and further reduce production costs of continuous-cast aluminum alloys. Crystallographic texture strongly affects the mechanical anisotropy/formability of metallic sheets. Clarification of the quantitative relationship between texture and anisotropy/formability of an aluminum alloy will render monitoring and control of its

  19. Forecast of Contracting and Subcontracting Opportunities, Fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    Welcome to the US Department of Energy`s Forecast of Contracting and Subcontracting Opportunities. This forecast, which is published pursuant to Public Low 100--656, ``Business Opportunity Development Reform Act of 1988,`` is intended to inform small business concerns, including those owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals, and women-owned small business concerns, of the anticipated fiscal year 1995 contracting and subcontracting opportunities with the Department of Energy and its management and operating contractors and environmental restoration and waste management contractors. This document will provide the small business contractor with advance notice of the Department`s procurement plans as they pertain to small, small disadvantaged and women-owned small business concerns.Opportunities contained in the forecast support the mission of the Department, to serve as advocate for the notion`s energy production, regulation, demonstration, conservation, reserve maintenance, nuclear weapons and defense research, development and testing, when it is a national priority. The Department`s responsibilities include long-term, high-risk research and development of energy technology, the marketing of Federal power, and maintenance of a central energy data collection and analysis program. A key mission for the Department is to identify and reduce risks, as well as manage waste at more than 100 sites in 34 states and territories, where nuclear energy or weapons research and production resulted in radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination. Each fiscal year, the Department establishes contracting goals to increase contracts to small business concerns and meet our mission objectives.

  20. Formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment in Indian manufacturing: Author

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Using nationally representative survey data of Indian manufacturing enterprises spanning the period 1995–2006, we analyze the link between formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment. A novelty in our analysis is that this relationship is allowed to differ between modern and traditional segments of the informal sector. We show that formal sector subcontracting is positively related to employment growth only in the most modern segments of the informal sector. Increased subcontr...

  1. Final report on in-reactor uniaxial tensile deformation of pure iron and Fe-Cr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Huang, X.; Tähtinen, S.

    of materials used in the structural components of a fission or fusion reactor where the materials will be exposed concurrently to displacement damage and external and/or internal stresses. In an effort to evaluate and understand the dynamic response of materials under these conditions, we have recently...... performed a series of uniaxial tensile tests on Fe-Cr and pure iron specimens in the BR-2 reactor at Mol (Belgium). The present report first provides a brief description of the test facilities and the procedure used for performing the in-reactor tests. The results on the mechanical response of materials...... and deformed, irradiated and undeformed, post-irradiation deformed and the in-reactor deformed specimens are also described. During the in-reactor tests the specimens of both Fe-Cr alloy and pure iron deform in a homogeneous manner and do not exhibit the phenomenon of yield drop. An increase in the pre...

  2. Optimization of processing and modeling issues for thin film solar cell devices: Final report, February 3, 1997--September 1, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, R. W.; Phillips, J. E.; Shafarman, W. N.; Hegedus, S. S.; McCandless, B. E.

    2000-02-28

    This final report describes results achieved under a 20-month NREL subcontract to develop and understand thin-film solar cell technology associated to CuInSe{sub 2} and related alloys, a-Si and its alloys, and CdTe. Modules based on all these thin films are promising candidates to meet DOE's long-range efficiency, reliability and manufacturing cost goals. The critical issues being addressed under this program are intended to provide the science and engineering basis for the development of viable commercial processes and to improve module performance. The generic research issues addressed are: (1) quantitative analysis of processing steps to provide information for efficient commercial-scale equipment design and operation; (2) device characterization relating the device performance to materials properties and process conditions; (3) development of alloy materials with different bandgaps to allow improved device structures for stability and compatibility with module design; (4) development and improved window/heterojunction layers and contacts to improve device performance and reliability; and (5) evaluation of cell stability with respect to device structure and module encapsulation.

  3. Ab initio Based Modeling of Radiation Effects in Multi-Component Alloys: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dane Morgan

    2010-06-10

    The project began March 13, 2006, allocated for three years, and received a one year extension from March 13, 2009 to March 12, 2010. It has now completed 48 of 48 total months. The project was focused on using ab initio methods to gain insights into radiation induced segregation (RIS) in Ni-Fe-Cr alloys. The project had the following key accomplishments • Development of a large database of ab initio energetics that can be used by many researchers in the future for increased understanding of this system. For example, we have the first calculations showing a dramatic stabilization effect of Cr-Cr interstitial dumbbells in Ni. • Prediction of both vacancy and interstitial diffusion constants for Ni-Cr and Ni-Fe for dilute Cr and Fe. This work included generalization of widely used multifrequency models to make use of ab initio derived energetics and thermodynamics. • Prediction of qualitative trends of RIS from vacancy and interstitial mechanisms, suggesting the two types of defect fluxes drive Cr RIS in opposite directions. • Detailed kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of diffusion by vacancy mechanism in Ni-Cr as a function of Cr concentration. The results demonstrate that Cr content can have a significant effect on RIS. • Development of a quantitative RIS transport model, including models for thermodynamic factors and boundary conditions.

  4. 76 FR 44304 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Amended Final Results of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... ministerial error in the cash deposit rate assigned to the company. No rebuttal comments were received. Final..., instead, assigned to Hyundai HYSCO the cash deposit rate for other companies not selected for individual..., we do not assign that company a new cash deposit rate. Additionally, when the company had no...

  5. 40 CFR 35.4240 - What provisions must my group's TAG contractor comply with if it subcontracts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Section 35.4235 pertaining to contract provisions; and (h) Cost principles in 48 CFR part 31, the Federal... contractor comply with if it subcontracts? 35.4240 Section 35.4240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... with if it subcontracts? A TAG contractor must comply with the following provisions when...

  6. Small Business: Action Needed to Determine Whether DOD’s Comprehensive Subcontracting Plan Test Program Should Be Made Permanent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    contractor plants , divisions, or entire companies can yield administrative cost savings and enhance small business subcontracting opportunities...participant in the Test Program negotiates and reports on subcontracting goals and achievements for a specific fiscal year on a plant , division, or...Kristopher Keener (Assistant Director), Kathryn (Emily) Bond, Joe Hunter (Analyst-in-Charge), Cale Jones, Julia Kennon, Stephen V. Marchesani, Sylvia

  7. High-efficiency thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, January 20, 1995--January 19, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A D; Bohn, R G; Contreras-Puente, G [Toledo Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1996-05-01

    This annual report covers the second year of a 3-year NREL subcontract with the University of Toledo that is focused on improvements in efficiency for radio frequency (rf)-sputtered CdS/CdTe solar cells. In earlier work supported by NREL, the University of Toledo established the viability of two new deposition methods for CdS/CdTe solar cells by fabricating cells with efficiencies greater than 10% at air mass (AM) 1.5 on soda lime glass for all-sputtered cells and also for all-laser-deposited cells. Most of the effort has been placed on radio frequency sputtering (RFS) because it was judged to be more economical and more easily scaled to large-area deposition. However, laser physical vapor deposition (LPVD) has remained the method of choice for the deposition of CdCl{sub 2} layers and also for the exploration of new materials such as the ternary alloys including CdS{sub x} Te{sub 1{minus}x} and dopants such as Cu in ZnTe.

  8. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1991. Annual report, [October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) -- formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  9. Ensuring and improving corrosion resistance in high-alloy welds. Final report; Sicherung und Steigerung der Korrosionsbestaendigkeit hochlegierter Schweissverbindungen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-12-22

    The welding process of the two high-alloy austenitic steels X5CrNiMo17 12 2 (1.4404) and X1NiCrMoCuN25 20 5 (1.4539) and the subsequent maintenance of the welds were to be optimized. This comprised detailed investigations into the interdependence between welding technologies and surface treatment. Systematic investigations showed that even with optimized processes, welding involves considerable stress to the materials, leading to structural changes, higher intrinsic stress and tarnish layers. Investigations of surface finishing processes showed that the finishing process and tools have significant effect on corrosion. (orig.) [German] Das Forschungsvorhaben hatte zum Ziel, neben der Optimierung des Schweissprozesses der beiden hochlegierten austenitischen Staehle X5CrNiMo17 12 2 (1.4404) und X1NiCrMoCuN25 20 5 (1.4539), eine auf den Schweissprozess abgestimmte ''Nachsorge'' zu optimieren. Das heisst, dass die Zusammenhaenge zwischen der jeweiligen Schweisstechnologie und der Oberflaechennachbehandlung in ihrer Vielschichtigkeit grundlegend untersucht werden sollen. Es konnte anhand von systematischen schweisstechnischen und werkstofftechnischen Untersuchungen gezeigt werden, dass auch nach einer umfassenden Optimierung des Schweissprozesses das Schweissen fuer den Werkstoff eine erhebliche Beeinflussung darstellt. Es kommt zu Gefuegeveraenderungen, zur Erhoehung der Eigenspannungen und zur Ausbildung von Anlaufschichten. Diese durch das Schweissen bedingten Effekte ueben allesamt einen grossen Einfluss auf das Korrosionsverhalten aus. Weder durch die Optimierung der Schweissparameter (z. B. Streckenenergie) noch durch die Wahl der Art des zu verwendenen Schutz- bzw. Wurzelschutzgases kann die Ausbildung der Anlaufschichten und eine daraus resultierende Veraenderung der Korrosionsbestaendigkeit verhindert werden. Das Korrosionsverhalten laesst sich jedoch positiv z.B. durch die Art des Schutzgases bei Einhaltung der optimierten Schweissparameter

  10. Final Report on in-reactor creep-fatigue deformation behaviour of a CuCrZr alloy: COFAT 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.N. [Risoe National Lab. - DTU, Materials Research Dept., Roskilde (Denmark); Taehtinen, S.; Moilanen, P. [VTT Industrial Systems (Finland); Jacquet, P.; Dekeyser, J. [SCK-CEN, Reactor Technology Design Dept., Mol (Belgium); Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Reactor Technology Design Dept., Richland (United States); Li, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Materials Science and Technology Div., Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Stubbins, J.F. [Univ. of Illinois, Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, Urbane, Illinois (United States)

    2007-08-15

    At present, practically nothing is known about the deformation behaviour of materials subjected simultaneously to external cyclic force and neutron irradiation. The main objective of the present work is to determine experimentally the mechanical response and resulting microstructural changes in CuCrZr(HT1) alloy exposed concurrently to flux of neutrons and creep-fatigue cyclic loading directly in a fission reactor. Special experimental facilities were designed and fabricated for this purpose. A number of in-reactor creep-fatigue experiments were successfully carried out in the BR-2 reactor at Mol (Belgium). In the present report we first describe the experimental facilities and the details of the in-reactor creep-fatigue experiments carried out at 363 and 343K at a strain amplitude of 0.5% with hold-times of 10 and 100s, respectively. For comparison purposes, similar creep-fatigue tests were performed outside of the reactor. (i.e. in the absence of neutron irradiation). During in-reactor tests, the mechanical response was continuously registered throughout the whole test. The results are first presented in the form of hysteresis loops confirming that the nature of deformation during these tests was truly cyclic. The temporal evolution of the stress response in the specimens is presented in the form of the average maximum stress amplitude as a function of the number of cycles as well as a function of displacement dose accumulated during the tests. The results illustrate the nature and magnitude of cyclic hardening as well as softening as a function of the number of cycles and displacement dose. Details of the microstructure were investigated using TEM and STEM techniques. The fracture surface morphology was investigated using SEM technique. Both mechanical and microstructural results are briefly discussed. The main conclusion emerging from the limited amount of present results is that neither the irradiation nor the duration of the hold-time have any significant

  11. High-Strength Aluminum Casting Alloy for High-Temperature Applications (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Project No. 97-10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon alloy has been successfully developed at Marshall Space Flight Center that has a significant improvement in tensile strength at elevated temperatures (550 to 700 F). For instance, the new alloy shows in average tensile strength of at least 90 percent higher than the current 390 aluminum piston alloy tested at 500 F. Compared to conventional aluminum alloys, automotive engines using the new piston alloy will have improved gas mileage, and may produce less air pollution in order to meet the future U.S. automotive legislative requirements for low hydrocarbon emissions. The projected cost for this alloy is less than $0.95/lb, and it readily allows the automotive components to be cast at a high production volume with a low, fully accounted cost. It is economically produced by pouring molten metal directly into conventional permanent steel molds or die casting.

  12. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  13. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  14. Processing, physical metallurgy and creep of NiAl + Ta and NiAl + Nb alloys. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Contractor Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Viren M.

    1988-01-01

    Powder processed NiAl + Ta alloys containing 1, 2, and 4.5 at percent tantalum and NiAl + Nb alloys containing 1 and 2 at percent niobium were developed for improved creep properties. In addition, a cast alloy with 5 at percent tantalum was also studied. Hot extrusion parameters for processing alloys with 1 and 2 at percent of tantalum or niobium were designed. The NiAl + 4.5 at percent Ta alloy could be vacuum hot pressed successfully, even though it could not be extruded. All the phases in the multiphase alloys were identified and the phase transformations studied. The Ni2AlTa in NiAl + 4.5 at percent Ta alloy transforms into a liquid phase above 1700 K. Solutionizing and annealing below this temperature gives rise to a uniform distribution of fine second phase precipitates. Compressive creep properties were evaluated at 1300 K using constant load and constant velocity tests. In the higher strain rate region single phase NiAl + 1 at percent Ta and NiAl + 1 at percent Nb alloys exhibit a stress exponent of 5 characteristic of climb controlled dislocation creep. In slower strain rate regime diffusional creep becomes important. The two phase alloys containing 2 to 5 at percent Ta and 2 at percent Nb show considerable improvement over binary NiAl and single phase alloys. Loose dislocation networks and tangles stabilized by the precipitates were found in the as crept microstructure. The cast alloy which has larger grains and a distribution of fine precipitates shows the maximum improvement over binary NiAl.

  15. Formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment in Indian manufacturing : Author

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Monroy, Ana I; Pieters, Janneke; Erumban, Abdul Azeez

    2014-01-01

    Using nationally representative survey data of Indian manufacturing enterprises spanning the period 1995–2006, we analyze the link between formal sector subcontracting and informal sector employment. A novelty in our analysis is that this relationship is allowed to differ between modern and traditio

  16. 48 CFR 252.219-7003 - Small business subcontracting plan (DoD contracts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... subcontracting goal. (e) A mentor firm, under the Pilot Mentor-Protege Program established under Section 831 of... awarded— (1) Protege firms which are qualified organizations employing the severely handicapped; and (2) Former protege firms that meet the criteria in Section 831(g)(4) of Pub. L. 101-510. (f) The master...

  17. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... related to the examination of, or performance of various operations on, nuclear fuel rods, control... from nuclear reactors, which are performed in specialized facilities located away from commercial... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subcontracting for...

  18. 40 CFR 35.937-12 - Subcontracts under subagreements for architectural or engineering services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... architectural or engineering services. 35.937-12 Section 35.937-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.937-12 Subcontracts under subagreements for architectural or...) Section 35.937-6 (Cost and price considerations); (6) Section 35.937-7 (Profit); (7) Prohibition...

  19. 78 FR 17668 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Subcontracting Plans/Individual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE..., the ISR collects subcontract awards for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority... going down as the Government publishes rule that make the process less complex, more transparent,...

  20. Microstructural evolution and final properties of a cold-swaged multifunctional Ti–Nb–Ta–Zr–O alloy produced by a powder metallurgy route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, W., E-mail: wei.guo@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals (Australia); Quadir, M.Z., E-mail: mzquadir@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals (Australia); Electron Microscope Unit, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Moricca, S., E-mail: sam.moricca@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), NSW 2232 (Australia); Eddows, T., E-mail: tex@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), NSW 2232 (Australia); Ferry, M., E-mail: m.ferry@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Body centred cubic (BCC) β-phase multifunctional titanium alloys have been developed with a very unique combination of thermal and mechanical properties. In this investigation, a very low porosity Ti–36.8–Nb–2.7Zr–2.0Ta–0.44O (wt%) alloy was produced by powder sintering, hot forging, solution treatment and cold swaging. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the solution treated alloy revealed the presence of a small amount of ω-phase in a predominantly BCC β-phase matrix. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) of the swaged alloy revealed a highly elongated and fragmented microstructure, and a strong 〈110〉 fibre texture. TEM also revealed the existence of stress-induced twin lamella, dislocations and ω-phase. Consistent with previous studies on these types of alloys, the swaged alloy exhibited non-linear elasticity during tensile straining, low elastic modulus (45.4 GPa), high elastic limit (2.3%), high elongation to failure (8.1%), and a high yield strength (880 MPa) and tensile strength (940 MPa). The coefficient of thermal expansion was also low (∼5×10{sup −6} K{sup −1} between 50 and 300 °C) in this alloy.

  1. Aluminum-Scandium Alloys: Material Characterization, Friction Stir Welding, and Compatibility With Hydrogen Peroxide (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Proj. No. 04-14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Chen, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the development of several high-strength aluminum (Al) alloys that are compatible with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) propellant for NASA Hypersonic-X (Hyper-X) vehicles fuel tanks and structures. The yield strengths for some of these Al-magnesium-based alloys are more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254-H112 Al alloy, while maintaining excellent H2O2 compatibility similar to class 1 5254 alloy. The alloy development strategy is to add scandium, zirconium, and other transitional metals with unique electrochemical properties, which will not act as catalysts, to decompose the highly concentrated 90 percent H2O2. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for H2O2 long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloys using friction stir welding has also been explored. The new high-strength alloys could represent an enabling material technology for Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement.

  2. Screening for lipid yielding microalgae: activities for 1983. Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, W. H.; Tornabene, T. G.; Weissman, J.

    1984-04-01

    The SERI/DOE Aquatic Species Program is conducting a screening project, to select microalgae species and strains that are acceptable for liquid fuel production in outdoor culture. The emphases are on finding species that grow rapidly at high biomass density, in outdoor culture and produce large quantities of lipids. During 1983 over 100 species were isolated from saline waters at the California and Nevada deserts. Some of these species were characterized for growth response to various nutrients, temperatures, and salinities. Selected species were analyzed for lipid composition. Lipids were characterized into fractions, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, triglyceride, glycolipids, and phospholipids. The most promising species were tested for growth and monoculture sustainability in outdoor culture. Each section (microalgae selection, chemical profiles of microalgae, mass culture of macroalgae) was abstracted separately. 51 references, 8 figures, 14 tables.

  3. Screening and characterizing oleaginous microalgal species from the southeastern United States. Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, M.G.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to select and characterize promising algal species which tolerate high light intensities, temperature variations and accumulate lipids. Samples have been collected from freshwater and saltwater locations in the State of Alabama and intertidal regions of the Gulf of Mexico. Samples were screened through a multi-step process. Selected species: Cyclotella, Nitzschia, Chlorella, Scenedesmus and Ankistrodesmus, have been examined for growth requirements. Approximate cellular composition of these species was determined. This report describes accomplishments from February 1984 to January 1985. During this period, collection trips were made to Dauphin Island near the Alabama coast in the summer of 1984. Over sixty strains were isolated, and of these six were ranked as good growers. Two diatoms were isolated that are of particular interest because of their ability to accumulate high lipids. Cyclotella tolerates high temperatures (30/sup 0/-35/sup 0/C), grows at moderate salinities (15-25 parts per thousand), and with nitrogen stress accumulates 42% of its dry weight as lipid. Hantzschia is a large diatom that also grows well at elevated temperatures and full strength seawater. Hantzschia can accumulate as much as 66% of its dry weight as lipid. 29 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Final Report on Subcontract B605152. Multigrid Methods for Systems of PDEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brannick, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Xu, Jinchao [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-07

    The project team has continued with work on developing aggressive coarsening techniques for AMG methods. Of particular interest is the idea to use aggressive coarsening with polynomial smoothing. Using local Fourier analysis the optimal values for the parameters involved in defining the polynomial smoothers are determined automatically in a way to achieve fast convergence of cycles with aggressive coarsening. Numerical tests have the sharpness of the theoretical results. The methods are highly parallelizable and efficient multigrid algorithms on structured and semistructured grids in two and three spatial dimensions.

  5. Final Report for Subcontract B541028, Pore-Scale Modeling to Support "Pore Connectivity" Research Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R P

    2009-02-25

    This report covers modeling aspects of a combined experimental and modeling task in support of the DOE Science and Technology Program (formerly OSTI) within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Research Objectives The research for this project dealt with diffusive retardation: solute moving through a fracture diffuses into and out of the rock matrix. This diffusive exchange retards overall solute movement, and retardation both dilutes waste being released, and allows additional decay. Diffusive retardation involves not only fracture conductivity and matrix diffusion, but also other issues and processes: contaminants may sorb to the rock matrix, fracture flow may be episodic, a given fracture may or may not flow depending on the volume of flow and the fracture's connection to the overall fracture network, the matrix imbibes water during flow episodes and dries between episodes, and so on. The objective of the project was to improve understanding of diffusive retardation of radionuclides due to fracture / matrix interactions. Results from combined experimental/modeling work were to (1) determine whether the current understanding and model representation of matrix diffusion is valid, (2) provide insights into the upscaling of laboratory-scale diffusion experiments, and (3) help in evaluating the impact on diffusive retardation of episodic fracture flow and pore connectivity in Yucca Mountain tuffs. Questions explored included the following: (1) What is the relationship between the diffusion coefficient measured at one scale, to that measured or observed at a different scale? In classical materials this relationship is trivial; in low-connectivity materials it is not. (2) Is the measured diffusivity insensitive to the shape of the sample? Again, in classical materials there should be no sample shape effect. (3) Does sorption affect diffusive exchange in low-connectivity media differently than in classical media? (4) What is the effect of matrix saturation on the effective diffusivity? Is it different for low-connectivity media than for classical media? (5) In addition to changing the matrix saturation (and thereby the diffusion coefficient), the wetting/drying cycles drive water into, and then out of, the matrix. How do these mass flow cycles affect the long-term exchange of solutes between the fracture and the matrix? Can it be treated as a simple increase in effective diffusivity? Is it a local or a global effect? Is the effect different in low-connectivity media? The modeling portion of this project primarily focused on how diffusion varies with pore connectivity, and it also connected the experimental work to theory.

  6. Efficiency Improvement of Crystalline Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 January 2002 - 30 September 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, E. R.

    2007-11-01

    UC-Berkeley study of transition metal related defects in PV-grade mc-Si to understand their pathways into solar cells; chemical state/distribution; interaction with structural defects; defect engineering.

  7. Post-Lamination Manufacturing Process Automation for Photovoltaic Modules: Final Subcontract Report, April 1998 - April 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlan, M. J.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Miller, D. C.; Moore, S. B.; Hogan, S. J.

    2002-11-01

    This report describes the automated systems developed for PV module assembly and testing processes after lamination. These processes are applicable to a broad range of module types, including those made with wafer-based and thin-film solar cells. Survey data and input from module manufacturers gathered during site visits were used to define system capabilities and process specifications. Spire completed mechanical, electrical, and software engineering for four automation systems: a module edge trimming system, the SPI-TRIM 350; an edge sealing and framing system, the SPI-FRAMER 350; an integrated module testing system, the SPI-MODULE QA 350; and a module buffer storage system, the SPI-BUFFER 350. A fifth system for junction-box installation, the SPI-BOXER 350, was nearly completed during the program. A new-size solar simulator, the SPI-SUN SIMULATOR 350i, was designed as part of the SPI-MODULE QA 350. This simulator occupies minimal production floor space, and its test area is large enough to handle most production modules. The automated systems developed in this program are designed for integration to create automated production lines.

  8. Luminescent solar concentrator development: Final subcontract report, 1 June 1982-31 December 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, P.S.; Parent, C.R.

    1987-04-01

    An investigation of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) was begun by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Owens-Illinois, Inc., in 1978. Experimental and theoretical results of that investigation are summarized in this report. An assessment of the LSC technology was compiled to provide a concise description to guide future research in this field. Since 1978, tremendous progress was made in the development of this device as a practical nonimaging concentrator for achieving solar concentration ratios on the order of 10X. The two most important technical achievements appear to be first, the understanding that dye self-absorption of radiated energy is not as serious a problem as originally thought; and second, the demonstration that organic dyes in polymeric hosts are capable of surviving outdoors in bright sunlight for years without serious degradation. System efficiencies approaching 4% have been achieved for photovoltaic conversion and theoretical efficiencies on the order of 9% appear feasible for large-area devices.

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Bid schedule, special conditions, specifications, and subcontract drawings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This volume contains: bidding requirements; terms and conditions; specifications for Division 1 -- general requirements; specifications for Division 2 -- sitework; specifications for Divisions 5 -- metals; subcontract drawings, (general, Union Carbide processing site, North Continent processing site, and Burro Canyon disposal site).

  10. A survey of the literature on challenges to safety posed by outsourcing or subcontracting of critical tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thommesen, Jacob; Andersen, Henning Boje; Øien, Knut

    The purpose of this document is to report on a review of the literature on the relation between safety and outsourcing or subcontracting. The review seeks to identify the problems and solutions that have been identified and described in the literature concerning outsourcing and subcontracting....... The report, being the first of three reports that comprise Deliverable D1.4.1, describes results of an extensive review of the literature that has been referenced in science and engineering databases....

  11. Evaluation of a diffusion/trapping model for hydrogen ingress in high-strength alloys. Final technical report, November 1988-November 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, B.G.

    1990-11-14

    The objective of this research was to obtain the hydrogen ingress and trapping characteristics for a range of microstructures and so identify the dominant type of irreversible trap in different alloys. A diffusion/trapping model was used in conjunction with a potentiostatic pulse technique to study the ingress of hydrogen in three precipitation-hardened alloys (Inconel 718, Incoloy 925, and 18Ni maraging steel), two work-hardened alloys (Inconel 625 and Hastelloy C-276), titanium (pure and grade 2), and copper-enriched AISI 4340 steel in 1 mol/L acetic acid-1 mol/L sodium acetate containing 15 ppm arsenic oxide. In all cases except pure titanium, the data were shown to fit the interface-control form of the model and values were determined for the irreversible trapping constants (k) and the flux of hydrogen into the alloys. The density of irreversible trap defects were calculated from k and generally found to be in close agreement with the concentration of a specific heterogeneity in each alloy. Moreover, the trapping constants for the alloys were found to be consistent with their relative susceptibilities to hydrogen embrittlement.

  12. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1994--January 15, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Buchanan, W.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Shafarman, W.N. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Inst. of Energy Conversion

    1995-06-01

    This report describes results achieved during the second phase of a four year subcontract to develop and understand thin film solar cell technology related to a-Si and its alloys, CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2}, and CdTe. Accomplishments during this phase include, development of equations and reaction rates for the formation of CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} films by selenization, fabrication of a 15% efficient CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} cell, development of a reproducible, reliable Cu-diffused contact to CdTe, investigation of the role of CdTe-CdS interdiffusion on device operation, investigation of the substitution of HCl for CdCl{sub 2} in the post-deposition heat treatment of CdTe/CdS, demonstration of an improved reactor design for deposition of a-Si films, demonstration of improved process control in the fabrication of a ten set series of runs producing {approximately}8% efficient a-Si devices, demonstration of the utility of a simplified optical model for determining quantity and effect of current generation in each layer of a triple stacked a-Si cell, presentation of analytical and modeling procedures adapted to devices produced with each material system, presentation of baseline parameters for devices produced with each material system, and various investigations of the roles played by other layers in thin film devices including the Mo underlayer, CdS and ZnO in CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} devices, the CdS in CdTe devices, and the ZnO as window layer and as part of the back surface reflector in a-Si devices. In addition, collaborations with over ten research groups are briefly described. 73 refs., 54 figs., 34 tabs.

  13. The advantages of Low Pressure Carburizing in the Heat Treatment Subcontracting Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guy PRUNEL; Bruno STAUDER

    2004-01-01

    Low Pressure Carburizing (LPC) was introduced in the 90's in the western Europe Heat Treatment business,mainly for in-house applications where it was especially appreciated for carburizing of transmission parts. However the success of the LPC units installed for gears carburizing in the automotive industry has hindered the development of the process in other fields - like subcontracting business -, where its advantages deserve to be enlightened.After a brief review of the principle of the process, the interest of its classical application to transmission parts is described,underlining peculiarly the reduction of the distortion observed when LPC is associated with high pressure gas quenching.Then the less-known advantages of the LPC process, like the high accuracy and reproducibility of the results, the modeling possibility and the simulation easiness, the case-depth uniformity and the full flexibility of the units are considered,showing how they can be beneficial to subcontracting business.

  14. Strengthening mechanisms, creep, and fatigue processes in dispersion-hardened niobium alloy. Final scientific report, 1 Feb 89-31 Jan 92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, A.K.; Gibeling, J.C.

    1992-04-20

    The creep and fatigue properties of pure Nb and Nb-l%Zr alloy were investigated. A model was developed based on the migration of subgrain boundary that can explain the anomalous primary creep transients found in Nb-l%Zr alloy, due to coarsening of subgrain structure. TEM investigations confirmed that such subgrain coarsening occurs during primary creep of Nb-l%Zr. Baseline low cycle fatigue studies of Nb and Nb-l%Zr were completed. Cyclic hardening is observed and there is a microplastic plateau in Nb. The Nb-1%Zr is stronger in cyclic deformation than Nb, with little influence of strain rate. The deformation in the alloy at both high and low strain rates is controlled by the interaction between gliding edge dislocation and solute atoms.

  15. 管庄的土地转包%Subcontract of Land in Guanzhuang Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管兵

    2004-01-01

    Through an analysis of the effects of out-for-work in a village in Guanzhuang, a natural village in the southeast of Henan province, the author focuses its study of “Nongmingong” on the sending place, and thinks it meaningful in learning of the process of civilization, although it is less concerned in the current study of “Nongmingong”. The author thinks subcontract of land is the key point to study the effects of out-for-work, and analyzes this issue as following: First, the peasants of Guanzhuang can be divided into three kinds : earthbound peasants, amphibian peasants and earth-free peasants, according to their roles in the practice of subcontract of land .Secondly, nowadays, earth-free peasants play as the main role in the effects of subcontract of land in Guanzhuang.Thirdly, can earth-bound peasants who rent others' land prominently increase their incomes depending on land, can earth-free peasants work more steadily in cities, and what is the future of the amphibian peasants?

  16. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  17. Design & Implementation of Company Database for MME Subcontracting Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, Benedek

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to introduce the software stack designed and implemented by me, during my student project. The report includes both the project description, the requirements set against the solution, the already existing alternatives for solving the problem, and the final solution that has been implemented. Reading this document you may have a better understanding of what I was working on for eleven weeks in the summer of 2016.

  18. Influence of the final temperature of investment healting on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro César Garcia Oliveira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to evaluate the influence of the temperature of investment healting on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy casting. Were obtained for the tensile strength test dumbbell rods that were invested in the Rematitan Plus investment and casting in the Discovery machine cast. Thirty specimens were obtained, fiftten to the CP Titanium and fifteen to the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, five samples to each an of the three temperatures of investment: 430ºC (control group, 480ºC and 530ºC. The tensile test was measured by means of a universal testing machine, MTS model 810, at a strain of 1.0 mm/min. After the tensile strenght test the specimens were secctioned, embedded and polished to hardness measurements, using a Vickers tester, Micromet 2100. The means values to tensile tests to the temperatures 430ºC, 480 and 530: CP Ti (486.1 - 501.16 - 498.14 -mean 495.30 MPa and Ti-6Al-4V alloy (961.33 - 958.26 - 1005.80 - mean 975.13 MPa while for the Vickers hardness the values were (198.06, 197.85, 202.58 - mean 199.50 and (352.95, 339.36, 344.76 - mean 345.69, respectively. The values were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Tukey,s Test that indicate differences significant only between the materials, but not between the temperature, for both the materias. It was conclued that increase of the temperature of investment its not chance the tensile strength and the Vickers hardness of the CP Titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  19. Influence of cooling after homogenisation and reheating to extrusion on extrudability and final properties of AA 6063 and AA6082 alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajac, S. [Swedish Inst. for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Bengtsson, B. [Sapa Technology, Finspang (Sweden); Joensson, C. [Sapa AB, Finspang (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    The influence of cooling conditions after homogenisation and preheating conditions to extrusion temperature have been investigated on AA 6063 and AA 6082 aluminium alloys with regard to the Mg{sub 2}Si particle development and their effect on flow stress at the extrusion temperature and hot ductility as well as hardness after ageing. Both continuous and isothermal cooling (step-cooling) were investigated in combination with fast induction heating and slow gas heating of the billet prior to extrusion. (orig.)

  20. Final report on characterization of physical and mechanical properties of copper and copper alloys before and after irradiation. (ITER R and D Task no. T213)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.N.; Taehtinen, S. [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland)

    2001-12-01

    The present report summarizes and highlights the main results of the work carried out during the last 5 - 6 years on effects of neutron irradiation on physical and mechanical properties of copper and copper alloys. The work was an European contribution to ITER Research and Development programme and was carried out by the Associations Euratom - Risoe and Euratom - Tekes. Details of the investigations carried out within the framework of the present task and the main results have been reported in various reports and journal publication. On the basis of these results some conclusions are drawn regarding the suitability of a copper alloy for its use in the first wall and divertor components of ITER. It is pointed out that the present work has managed only to identify some of the critical problems and limitations of the copper alloys for their employment in the hostile environment of 14 MeV neutrons. A considerable amount of further effort is needed to find a realistic and optimum solution. (au)

  1. A novel Fe–Cr–Nb matrix composite containing the TiB{sub 2} neutron absorber synthesized by mechanical alloying and final hot isostatic pressing (HIP) in the Ti-tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litwa, Przemysław [Department of Advanced Materials and Technologies, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Perkowski, Krzysztof [Department of Nanotechnology, Institute of Ceramics and Building Materials, Postępu 9, 02-676 Warsaw (Poland); Zasada, Dariusz [Department of Advanced Materials and Technologies, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Kobus, Izabela; Konopka, Gustaw [Department of Nanotechnology, Institute of Ceramics and Building Materials, Postępu 9, 02-676 Warsaw (Poland); Czujko, Tomasz [Department of Advanced Materials and Technologies, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Varin, Robert A., E-mail: robert.varin@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2016-07-25

    The Fe–Cr–Ti-Nb elemental powders were mechanically alloyed/ball milled with TiB{sub 2} and a small quantity of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic to synthesize a novel Fe-based alloy-ceramic powder composite that could be processed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) for a perceived potential application as a neutron absorber in nuclear reactors. After ball milling for the 30–80 h duration relatively uniform powders with micrometric sizes were produced. With increasing milling time a fraction of TiB{sub 2} particles became covered with the much softer Fe-based alloy which resulted in the formation of a characteristic “core-mantel” structure. For the final HIP-ing process the mechanically alloyed powders were initially uniaxially pressed into rod-shaped compacts and then cold isostatically pressed (CIP-ed). Subsequently, the rod-shaped compacts were placed in the Ti-tubing and subjected to hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1150 °C/200 MPa pressure. The HIP-ing process resulted in the formation of the near-Ti and intermediate diffusional layers in the microstructure of HIP-ed samples which formed in accord with the Fe-Ti binary phase diagram. Those layers contain the phases such as α-Ti (HCP), the FeTi intermetallic and their hypo-eutectoid mixtures. In addition, needle-like particles were formed in both layers in accord with the Ti-B binary phase diagram. Nanohardness testing, using a Berkovich type diamond tip, shows that the nanohardness in the intermediate layer areas, corresponding to the composition of the hypo-eutectoid mixture of Ti-FeTi, equals 980.0 (±27.1) HV and correspondingly 1176.9 (±47.6) HV for the FeTi phase. The nanohardness in the sample's center in the areas with the fine mixture of Fe-based alloy and small TiB{sub 2} particles equals 1048.3 (±201.8) HV. The average microhardness of samples HIP-ed from powders milled for 30 and 80 h is 588 HV and 733 HV, respectively. - Highlights: • A Fe–Cr–Nb-based composite with TiB{sub 2} neutron

  2. Amorphous silicon batch process cost analysis. Annual subcontract report, 11 March 1991--28 February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whisnant, R.A. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Sherring, C. [Sherring Energy Associates, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the development of baseline manufacturing cost data to assist PVMaT monitoring teams in assessing current and future subcontracts, which an emphasis on commercialization and production. A process for the manufacture of a single-junction, large-area, a Si module was modeled using an existing Research Triangle Institute (RTI) computer model. The model estimates a required, or breakeven, price for the module based on its production process and the financial structure of the company operating the process. Sufficient detail on cost drivers is presented so the relationship of the process features and business characteristics can be related to the estimated required price.

  3. REVIEW ON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.Yaug; J.P.Li; J.X.Zhang; G.W.Lorimer; J.Robson

    2008-01-01

    The current research and development of magnesium alloys is summarized. Several aspects of magnesium alloys are described: cast Mg alloy, wrought Mg alloy, and novel processing. The subjects are discussed individually and recommendations for further study arc listed in the final section.

  4. High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon Alloy Based Solar Cells and Modules; Final Technical Progress Report, 30 May 2002--31 May 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    2005-10-01

    The principal objective of this R&D program is to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for development of high-efficiency hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon-germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) related thin-film multijunction solar cells and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. Our strategy has been to use the spectrum-splitting triple-junction structure, a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, to improve solar cell and module efficiency, stability, and throughput of production. The methodology used to achieve the objectives included: (1) explore the highest stable efficiency using the triple-junction structure deposited using RF glow discharge at a low rate, (2) fabricate the devices at a high deposition rate for high throughput and low cost, and (3) develop an optimized recipe using the R&D batch large-area reactor to help the design and optimization of the roll-to-roll production machines. For short-term goals, we have worked on the improvement of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloy solar cells. a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H are the foundation of current a-Si:H based thin-film photovoltaic technology. Any improvement in cell efficiency, throughput, and cost reduction will immediately improve operation efficiency of our manufacturing plant, allowing us to further expand our production capacity.

  5. Materials problems in fluidized-bed combustion systems. Appendix 3. Evaluation of boiler alloy specimens at Foster Wheeler Development Corporation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoruso, G.V.; Apblett, A.R. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) portion of a metallurgical investigation conducted to assess the corrosion behavior of various ferritic, austenitic, and nickel-base alloys which were exposed in a coal-burning fluidized bed test facility at nominal temperatures of 1000/sup 0/F, 1200/sup 0/F, 1400/sup 0/F, 1550/sup 0/F, and 1650/sup 0/F for 1000 and 2000 hour test exposure periods. The alloys included Corten, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, 405 SS, E-Brite 26-1, 310 SS, 329 SS, 347 SS, 22-13-5, 21-6-9, Incoloy 800, Manaurite 36X, Inconel 690, and RA 333. The investigation included material precharacterization studies and post-test metallurgical evaluations involving deposit/scale thickness measurements, selective chemical/microprobe analyses, specimen surface recession measurements, determination of depths of dealloying and corrosive constituent penetrations, grain-size determinations, hardness surveys, macro and microscopic examinations and study/recording of microstructural changes resulting as a consequence of test exposure.

  6. Solar production of industrial process steam ranging in temperature from 300/sup 0/F to 550/sup 0/F (Phase I). Volume 2. Appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-30

    This volume contains the following appendices: (1) equipment requisitions, (2) instrument list, (3) mechanical subcontract requisition, (4) electrical subcontract requisition, (5) site preparation and subcontract requisition, (6) building subcontract requisition, and (7) job specifications. (MOW)

  7. 75 FR 34260 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; FAR Case 2005-040, Electronic Subcontracting Reporting System (eSRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... been certified by the Small Business Administration as small disadvantaged businesses), women-owned... certified by the Small Business Administration as small disadvantaged businesses), women-owned small...) and women- owned small business subcontracting data, as specified in part 19: SF 294,......

  8. 48 CFR 212.570 - Applicability of certain laws to contracts and subcontracts for the acquisition of commercially...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... laws to contracts and subcontracts for the acquisition of commercially available off-the-shelf items..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS Applicability of Certain Laws to the Acquisition of Commercial Items 212.570 Applicability of certain laws to contracts...

  9. 24 CFR 964.320 - HUD Policy on training, employment, contracting and subcontracting of public housing residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TENANT OPPORTUNITIES IN PUBLIC HOUSING Family Investment Centers (FIC) Program § 964.320 HUD Policy on... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HUD Policy on training, employment, contracting and subcontracting of public housing residents. 964.320 Section 964.320 Housing and...

  10. 48 CFR 970.1907 - Subcontracting with Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business and Woman-Owned Small Business...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Business, Small Disadvantaged Business and Woman-Owned Small Business Concerns. 970.1907 Section 970.1907... MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Small, Small Disadvantaged and Women-Owned Small Business Concerns 970.1907 Subcontracting with Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business and Woman-Owned Small...

  11. 48 CFR 927.404 - Rights in technical data in subcontracts. (DOE coverage-paragraphs (g), (k), (l), and (m))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in subcontracts. (DOE coverage-paragraphs (g), (k), (l), and (m)) 927.404 Section 927.404 Federal...—paragraphs (g), (k), (l), and (m)) (g)(4) Contractors are required by paragraph (d)(3) of the clause at FAR... confidentiality, and reasonable royalties, is then left to the negotiation of the parties. (m) Access...

  12. Creep rupture strength and creep behavior of low-activation martensitic OPTIFER alloys. Final report; Das Zeitstandfestigkeits- und Kriechverhalten der niedrigaktivierenden martensitischen OPTIFER-Legierungen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirra, M.; Falkenstein, A.; Heger, S.; Lapena, J. [ITN-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain). Programa de Materiales

    2001-07-01

    The creep rupture strength and creep experiments performed on low-activation OPTIFER alloys in the temperature range of 450-700 C shall be summarized in the present report. Together with the reference alloy of the type 9.5Cr1W-Mn-V-Ta, W-free variants (+Ge) with a more favorable activation and decay behavior shall be studied. Their smaller strength values are compensated by far better toughness characteristics. Of each development line, several batches of slightly varying chemical composition have been investigated over service lives of up to 40,000 h. Apart from the impact of a reference thermal treatment at a hardening temperature of 1075 C and an annealing temperature of 750 C, the influence of reduced hardening temperatures (up to 950 C) has been determined. A long-term use at increased temperatures (max. 550 C-20,000 h) produces an aging effect with strength being decreased in the annealed state. To determine this aging effect quantitatively, creep rupture experiments have been performed using specimens that were subjected to variable types of T/t annealing (550 -650 C, 330-5000 h). Based on all test results, minimum values for the 1% time-strain limit and creep rupture in the T range of 400-600 C can be given as design curves for 20,000 h. The minimum creep rates obtained from the creep curves recorded as a function of the experimental stress yield the stress exponent n (n=Norton) for the individual test temperatures. Creep behavior as a function of the test temperature yields the values for the effective activation energy of creeping Q{sub K}. The influence of a preceding temperature transient up to 800 C ({<=}Ac{sub 1b}) or 840 C (>Ac{sub 1b}) with subsequent creep rupture tests at 500 C and 550 C, respectively, shall be described. The results obtained for the OPTIFER alloys shall be compared with the results achieved for the Japanese 2% W-containing F82H-mod. alloy. (orig.) [German] Die Zeitstandfestigkeits- und Kriechversuche an den niedrigaktivierenden

  13. Lessons learned from the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste subcontract and ESH&Q liability assessment process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N.J.

    1995-03-01

    Hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and disposal contracts were first consolidated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1992 by EG&G Idaho, Inc. At that time, disposition of Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste, Toxic Substance Control Act waste, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act hazardous substances and contaminated media, and recyclable hazardous materials was consolidated under five subcontracts. The wastes were generated by five different INEL M&O contractors, under the direction of three different Department of Energy field offices. The consolidated contract reduced the number of facilities handling INEL waste from 27 to 8 qualified treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, with brokers specifically prohibited. This reduced associated transportation costs, amount and cost of contractual paperwork, and environmental liability exposure. EG&G reviewed this approach and proposed a consolidated hazardous waste subcontract be formed for the major EG&G managed DOE sites: INEL, Mound, Rocky Flats, Nevada Test Site, and 10 satellite facilities. After obtaining concurrence from DOE Headquarters, this effort began in March 1992 and was completed with the award of two master task subcontracts in October and November 1993. In addition, the effort included a team to evaluate the apparent awardee`s facilities for environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) and financial liability status. This report documents the evaluation of the process used to prepare, bid, and award the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and/or disposal subcontracts and associated ESH&Q and financial liability assessments; document the strengths and weaknesses of the process; and propose improvements that would expedite and enhance the process for other DOE installations that used the process and for the re-bid of the consolidated subcontract, scheduled for 1997.

  14. LDRD final report on synthesis of shape-and size-controlled platinum and platinum alloy nanostructures on carbon with improved durability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, John Allen; Garcia, Robert M.; Song, Yujiang; Moreno, Andres M.; Stanis, Ronald J.

    2008-10-01

    This project is aimed to gain added durability by supporting ripening-resistant dendritic platinum and/or platinum-based alloy nanostructures on carbon. We have developed a new synthetic approach suitable for directly supporting dendritic nanostructures on VXC-72 carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The key of the synthesis is to creating a unique supporting/confining reaction environment by incorporating carbon within lipid bilayer relying on a hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. In order to realize size uniformity control over the supported dendritic nanostructures, a fast photocatalytic seeding method based on tin(IV) porphyrins (SnP) developed at Sandia was applied to the synthesis by using SnP-containing liposomes under tungsten light irradiation. For concept approval, one created dendritic platinum nanostructure supported on CB was fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for durability examination via potential cycling. It appears that carbon supporting is essentially beneficial to an enhanced durability according to our preliminary results.

  15. NREL photovoltaic subcontract reports: Abstracts and document control information, 1 August 1991--31 July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    This report contains document control information and abstracts for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontracted photovoltaic program publications. It also lists source information on additional publications that describe US Department of Energy (DOE) PV research activities. It is not totally exhaustive, so it lists NREL contacts for requesting further information on the DOE and NREL PV programs. This report covers the period from August 1, 1991, through July 31, 1992. The purpose of continuing this type of publication is to help people keep abreast of specific PV interests, while maintaining a balance on the costs to the PV program. The information in this report is organized under PV technology areas: Amorphous silicon research; polycrystalline thin films (including copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and thin-film silicon); crystalline materials and advanced concepts (including silicon, gallium arsenide, and other group III-V materials); and PV manufacturing technology development (which may include manufacturing information for various types of PV materials).

  16. Structural thermodynamics of alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Manenc, Jack

    1973-01-01

    Technical progress has for a very long time been directly dependent on progress in metallurgy, which is itself connected with improvements in the technology of alloys. Metals are most frequently used in the form of alloys for several reasons: the quantity of pure metal in its native state in the earth's crust is very limited; pure metals must be extracted from ores which are themselves impure. Finally, the methods of treatment used lead more easily to alloys than to pure metals. The most typical case is that of iron, where a pure ore may be found, but which is the starting point for cast iron or steel, alloys of iron and carbon. In addition, the properties of alloys are in general superior to those of pure metals and modem metallurgy consists of controlling these properties so as to make them conform to the requirements of the design office. Whilst the engineer was formerly compelled to adapt his designs and constructions to the materials available, such as wood, stone, bronze, iron, cast iron and ordinary st...

  17. 48 CFR 12.504 - Applicability of certain laws to subcontracts for the acquisition of commercial items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (except for the types of subcontracts listed at 47.504(d)). (2) 15 U.S.C. 644(d), Requirements relative to... American Vessels of Government Personnel and Certain Cargo (see Subpart 47.5) (except for the types of... U.S.C. 254(d) and 10 U.S.C. 2306a, Truth in Negotiations Act (see subpart 15.4). (3) 41 U.S.C....

  18. Aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  19. The Organized Foundation of Administrative Subcontract%行政包干的组织基础

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张静

    2014-01-01

    As a response to the issue of the origin of “administrative subcontract”in China ,different from the“cost measuring” explanation , this paper suggests that the roots of the subcontracting system could be found in the body of the administrative organization ,its own characteristics and historical ties . Due to its multi‐roles , its multi‐centered organizational form , and its dependence on organizational implement tool ,the government system has gradually developed a flexible and adaptable way which is capable of employing the above‐mentioned organizational environment to perform tasks .This has made it different from a single bureaucratic system . Taking advantage of the self‐evident control power ,“administrative subcontract system” manages to gather organizations with different goals and interests by means of acquiescence , exchange and invisible authorization ,which ends up forming a mixed system of governance we can see today . Therefore , the structure of government administrative system , its internal organizational relationships and its multi‐roles , is the cornerstone based on which the sub‐contracting system comes into being .%回应“行政包干”的缘起问题,针对“成本衡量”说,本文建议从行政机体本身的特性和历史关系,说明发包制的存在。由于政府的多元角色、多中心控制权的组织关系以及对执行工具的依赖,政府系统逐渐发展出具有灵活适应性的、不同于单一科层体系的、能够利用上述组织环境的方法,来推进任务的执行。“行政包干制”顺势于不言自明的控制权范围,通过默许、交换和隐形授权,将目标和利益不同的组织容纳于一体,形成了今天治理体系中混合共生的形态。因此,政府行政体系的组成结构、其内部真实的组织关系和多元角色是发包制产生的基石。

  20. Fundamental Research and Development for Improved Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, March 2002 - July 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.

    2007-11-01

    This report summarizes the progress made by Georgia Tech in the 2002-2006 period toward high-efficiency, low-cost crystalline silicon solar cells. This program emphasize fundamental and applied research on commercial substrates and manufacturable technologies. A combination of material characterization, device modeling, technology development, and complete cell fabrication were used to accomplish the goals of this program. This report is divided into five sections that summarize our work on i) PECVD SiN-induced defect passivation (Sections 1 and 2); ii) the effect of material inhomogeneity on the performance of mc-Si solar cells (Section 3); iii) a comparison of light-induced degradation in commercially grown Ga- and B-doped Czochralski Si ingots (Section 4); and iv) the understanding of the formation of high-quality thick-film Ag contacts on high sheet-resistance emitters (Section 5).

  1. Final Report for PV Incubator Subcontract No. NAT-7-77015-05: October 19, 2007 - July 30, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, N.

    2012-04-01

    The Solar America Initiative (SAI) is intended to provide numerous technological routes towards a lower levelized cost of solar-generated electricity (LCOE). MicroLink's planned contribution towards the SAI is to provide a method of lowering the cost of GaAs-based solar cells, which are a major contributor to the cost of concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules. MicroLink's unique approach is to use an epitaxial liftoff (ELO) process to completely remove the active solar cell from the substrate while preserving the performance and yield of the cell. The substrate accounts for approximately half the cost of conventional, multijunction GaAs-based solar cells. By using ELO, the substrate can be reused several times for additional solar cell growths, thereby reducing the cost of multijunction solar cells by up to 50%. The achievement of high efficiency has significantly increased the acceptance of MicroLink Devices as a future supplier of high-efficiency dual-junction and IMM (inverted metamorphic) triple-junction ELO solar cells. MicroLink entered the SAI program with a 10% efficiency GaAs solar cell (1-sun AM 1.5) and finished the program with an NREL-verified IMM triple-junction ELO solar cell (1-sun AM 1.5).

  2. High Performance Packaging Solutions for Low Cost, Reliable PV Modules: Final Subcontract Report, 26 May 2005 - 30 November 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keotla, B. M.; Marinik, B. J.

    2009-06-01

    During this research effort, Dow Corning Corporation has addressed the PV manufacturing goals of: (i) improving PV manufacturing processes and equipment; (ii) accelerating manufacturing cost reductions of PV modules; (iii) increasing commercial product performance and reliability; and (iv) scaling up U.S. manufacturing capacity.

  3. Final Report for PV Incubator Subcontract No. NEU-0-99010-09: March 29, 2010 - March 28, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, N.

    2012-04-01

    MicroLink has developed a process technology that will enable the manufacture of high-efficiency, low-cost, multijunction solar cells for use in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) applications. The multijunction cells were fabricated using a novel low-temperature wafer bonding process. A triple-junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge tandem solar cell with efficiency of 30% at 1 sun AM1.5 illumination was fabricated by wafer bonding a dual-junction InGaP/GaAs cell to a single-junction Ge cell. Temperature cycling over the range -25 degrees C to +40 degrees C resulted in no degradation of cell performance. Triple junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge cells were mounted onto ceramic carriers and tested at concentrations up to 300 suns.

  4. Reliable, Low-Cost Distributed Generator/Utility System Interconnect: Final Subcontract Report, November 2001-March 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.; Li, L.; Zhou, R.; Garces, L.; Dame, M.

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the detailed study and development of new GE anti-islanding controls for two classes of distributed generation. One is inverter-interfaced, while the other is synchronous machine interfaced.

  5. Automated Manufacturing of High Efficiency Modules: Final Subcontract Technical Status Report, 21 March 2005 - 31 August 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, D.; Jester, T.; Bunea, G.

    2008-02-01

    SunPower Corp. describes its research to develop low-cost, next-generation SunPower modules with 30-year warranties and at least 50% higher energy production per area relative to today's typical multicrystalline Si modules.

  6. NREL photovoltaic subcontract reports: Abstracts and document control information, 1 August 1992--31 July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report contains document control information and abstracts for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) program publications. It also lists source information on additional publications that describe US Department of Energy (DOE) PV research activities. It is not totally exhaustive, so it lists NREL contacts for requesting further information on the DOE and NREL PV programs. This report covers the period from August 1, 1992, through July 31, 1993. This report is published periodically, with the previous one covering the period from August 1, 1991, through July 31, 1992. The purpose of continuing this type of publication is to help keep people abreast of specific PV interests, while maintaining a balance on the costs to the PV program. The information in this report is organized under PV technology areas: Amorphous Silicon Research; Polycrystalline Thin Films (including copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and thin-film silicon); Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts (including silicon, gallium arsenide, and other group III-V materials); PV Manufacturing Technology Development (which may include manufacturing information for various types of PV materials).

  7. Microstructures and properties of aluminum die casting alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. M. Makhlouf; D. Apelian; L. Wang

    1998-10-01

    This document provides descriptions of the microstructure of different aluminum die casting alloys and to relate the various microstructures to the alloy chemistry. It relates the microstructures of the alloys to their main engineering properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, fatigue life, impact resistance, wear resistance, hardness, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. Finally, it serves as a reference source for aluminum die casting alloys.

  8. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...

  9. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation and properties of bulk amorphous quarternary Mg-based alloys and the influence of additional elements on the ability of the alloy to form bulk amorphous. The main goal is to find a Mg-based alloy system which shows both high strength to weight ratio...... and a low glass transition temperature. The alloys were prepared by using a relatively simple technique, i.e. rapid cooling of the melt in a copper wedge mould. The essential structural changes that are achieved by going from the amorphous to the crystalline state through the supercooled liquid state...... are discussed in this paper. On the basis of these measurements phase diagrams of the different systems were constructed. Finally, it is demonstrated that when pressing the bulk amorphous alloy onto a metallic dies at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region, the alloy faithfully replicates the surface...

  10. Wetting behavior of alternative solder alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Vianco, P.T.; Hernandez, C.L.; Rejent, J.A.

    1993-07-01

    Recent economic and environmental issues have stimulated interest in solder alloys other than the traditional Sn-Pb eutectic or near eutectic composition. Preliminary evaluations suggest that several of these alloys approach the baseline properties (wetting, mechanical, thermal, and electrical) of the Sn-Pb solders. Final alloy acceptance will require major revisions to existing industrial and military soldering specifications. Bulk alloy and solder joint properties are consequently being investigated to validate their producibility and reliability. The work reported in this paper examines the wetting behavior of several of the more promising commercial alloys on copper substrates. Solder wettability was determined by the meniscometer and wetting balance techniques. The wetting results suggest that several of the alternative solders would satisfy pretinning and surface mount soldering applications. Their use on plated through hole technology might be more difficult since the alloys generally did not spread or flow as well as the 60Sn-40Pb solder.

  11. Final report for TMX-U systems support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This final report is for the TMX-U RF systems development subcontract with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program was initiated on July 1, 1983 and extended through September 30, 1985. This program was concerned with the development of RF systems to meet the objectives of the TMX-U mirror program at LLNL. To accomplish this the following areas were studied during the course of this contract: (1) Ion Cyclotron Heating, (2) Electron Cyclotron Heating, (3) Drift Pumping, (4) Plasma Modeling, (5) Neutral Beam Heating, and (6) Neutral Gas transport and fueling. The key results of these activities are reported.

  12. Modeling dissolution in aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Tracie Lee

    2005-07-01

    alloys when compared with published experimental results. The influence of inter-particle spacing is examined and shown to have a significant effect on dissolution kinetics. Finally, the impact of multiple particles of various sizes interacting in an aluminum matrix is investigated. It is shown that smaller particles dissolve faster, as expected, but influence the dissolution of larger particles through soft-impingement, even after the smaller particles have disappeared.

  13. Microstructural characterization of an irradiated RERTR-6 U-7Mo/AA4043 alloy dispersion fuel plate specimen blister-tested to a final temperature of 500 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Gan, Jian; Miller, Brandon D.; Robinson, Adam B.; Madden, James W.; Ross Finlay, M.; Moore, Glenn; Medvedev, Pavel; Meyer, Mitch

    2017-05-01

    The Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, in the past called the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is developing low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels for application in research and test reactors. U-Mo alloy dispersion fuel is one type being developed. Blister testing has been performed on different fuel plate samples to determine the margin to failure for fuel plates irradiated to different fission densities. Microstructural characterization was performed using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy on a sample taken from a U-7Mo/AA4043 matrix dispersion fuel plate irradiated in the RERTR-6 experiment that was blister-tested up to a final temperature of 500 °C. The results indicated that two types of grain/cell boundaries were observed in the U-7Mo fuel particles, one with a relatively low Mo content and fission gas bubbles and a second type enriched in Si, due to interdiffusion from the Si-containing matrix, with little evidence of fission gas bubbles. With respect to the behavior of the major fission gas Xe, a significant amount of the Xe was still observed within the U-7Mo fuel particle, along with microns into the AA4043 matrix. For the fuel/matrix interaction layers that form during fabrication and then grow during irradiation, they change from the as-irradiated amorphous structure to one that is crystalline after blister testing. In the AA4043 matrix, the original Si-rich precipitates, which are typically observed in as-irradiated U-Mo dispersion fuel, get consumed due to interdiffusion with the U-7Mo fuel particles during the blister test. Finally, the fission gas bubbles that were originally around 3 nm in diameter and resided on a fission gas superlattice (FGS) in the intragranular regions of as-irradiated U-7Mo fuel grew in size (up to ∼20 nm diameter) during blister testing and, in many areas, are no longer organized as a superlattice.

  14. The NASA Plan: To award eight percent of prime and subcontracts to socially and economically disadvantaged businesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    It is NASA's intent to provide small disadvantaged businesses, including women-owned, historically black colleges and universities and minority education institutions the maximum practicable opportunity to receive a fair proportion of NASA prime and subcontracted awards. Annually, NASA will establish socioeconomic procurement goals including small disadvantaged business goals, with a target of reaching the eight percent level by the end of FY 1994. The NASA Associate Administrators, who are responsible for the programs at the various NASA Centers, will be held accountable for full implementation of the socioeconomic procurement plans. Various aspects of this plan, including its history, are discussed.

  15. 48 CFR 252.209-7004 - Subcontracting with firms that are owned or controlled by the government of a terrorist country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subcontracting with firms that are owned or controlled by the government of a terrorist country. 252.209-7004 Section 252.209-7004 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION...

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  17. Zirconium alloys produced by recycling zircaloy tunings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamba, N.S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catálisis y Petroquímica, INCAPE (FIQ, UNL–CONICET), Santiago del Estero 2829, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Carbajal-Ramos, I.A. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, CNEA e Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Ulla, M.A.; Pierini, B.T. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catálisis y Petroquímica, INCAPE (FIQ, UNL–CONICET), Santiago del Estero 2829, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Gennari, F.C., E-mail: gennari@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atómico Bariloche, CNEA e Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2013-11-25

    Highlights: •Zr–Ti alloys were successfully produced by two-step procedure. •Zircaloy tunings were used as a valuable source of Zr. •Zircaloy tunings and Ti powders was milled under hydrogen to produce hydride powders. •Hydride powders were decomposed by heating at 900 °C to synthesize the Zr-based alloy. •The procedure could be extended to the production of other Zr-based alloys. -- Abstract: Zircaloy chips were recycled to successfully produce Zr–Ti alloys with bcc structure and different compositions. The procedure developed involves two steps. First, the reactive mechanical alloying (RMA) of the zircaloy tunings and Ti powders was performed to produce metal hydride powders, with a high refinement of the microstructure and a Zr–Ti homogeneous composition. Second, the metal hydride powders were thermally decomposed by heating up to 900 °C to synthesize the Zr-based alloy with a selected composition. The change in the nature of the powders from ductile to brittle during milling avoids both cold working phenomena between the metals and the use of a control agent. A minimum milling time is necessary to produce the solid solution with the selected composition. The microstructure and structure of the final alloys obtained was studied. The present procedure could be extended to the production of Zr-based alloys with the addition of other metals different from Ti.

  18. SERI photovoltaic subcontract reports: 1989 abstracts and document control information, March 1, 1987 to February 29, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, S.

    1990-04-01

    Document control information and abstracts for SERI Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch publications resulting from SERI's subcontracted PV research is presented. The information is presented for reports published and distributed during fiscal year (FY) 1989. In the past, copies of the subcontractor reports were distributed to a broad spectrum of researchers in the field of photovoltaics at a considerable cost to the program. In an attempt to reduce costs and ensure that all researchers receive those current publications that are of specific interest to them, these publications are outlined and organized by technology, on a regular basis. Subsequent reports are expected to be distributed quarterly. A list of additional publications and sources is included herein to provide the photovoltaic community with other sources of information.

  19. MAPPING FLOW LOCALIZATION PROCESSES IN DEFORMATION OF IRRADIATED REACTOR STRUCTURAL ALLOYS - FINAL REPORT. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program No. MSF99-0072. Period: August 1999 through September 2002. (ORNL/TM-2003/63)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, K.

    2003-09-26

    Metals that can sustain plastic deformation homogeneously throughout their bulk tend to be tough and malleable. Often, however, if a metal has been hardened it will no longer deform uniformly. Instead, the deformation occurs in narrow bands on a microscopic scale wherein stresses and strains become concentrated in localized zones. This strain localization degrades the mechanical properties of the metal by causing premature plastic instability failure or by inducing the formation of cracks. Irradiation with neutrons hardens a metal and makes it more prone to deformation by strain localization. Although this has been known since the earliest days of radiation damage studies, a full measure of the connection between neutron irradiation hardening and strain localization is wanting, particularly in commercial alloys used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Therefore, the goal of this project is to systematically map the extent of involvement of strain localization processes in plastic deformation of three reactor alloys that have been neutron irradiated. The deformation processes are to be identified and related to changes in the tensile properties of the alloys as functions of neutron fluence (dose) and degree of plastic strain. The intent is to define the role of strain localization in radiation embrittlement phenomena. The three test materials are a tempered bainitic A533B steel, representing reactor pressure vessel steel, an annealed 316 stainless steel and annealed Zircaloy-4 representing reactor internal components. These three alloys cover the range of crystal structures usually encountered in structural alloys, i.e. body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and close-packed hexagonal (cph), respectively. The experiments were conducted in three Phases, corresponding to the three years duration of the project. Phases 1 and 2 addressed irradiations and tensile tests made at near-ambient temperatures, and covered a wide range of neutron fluences

  20. Preparation Methods and Properties of PdCu Alloy Membrane for Hydrogen Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiaoliang; MA Guang; LI Jin; ZHANG Ke

    2012-01-01

    Pd and Pd alloy membranes are of increasing interest for hydrogen separation and purification due to their good thermal stability,high permeability and perfect selectivity.PdCu alloy (60wt% Pd) membranes have similar hydrogen permeability compared with PdAg alloy; meanwhile,it is cheaper than PdAg alloy.Furthermore,it has been reported that PdCu membrane has better resistance to poisoning and deactivation by H2S impurity.This paper reviews the properties and manufacturing methods of PdCu alloy membrane,finally,introduced some achievement made by us on PdCu alloy membrane.

  1. Translating VDM to Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausdahl, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    . Traditionally, theorem provers are used to prove that specifications are correct but this process is highly dependent on expert users. Alternatively, model finding has proved to be useful for validation of specifications. The Alloy Analyzer is an automated model finder for checking and visualising Alloy...... specifications. However, to take advantage of the automated analysis of Alloy, the model-oriented VDM specifications must be translated into a constraint-based Alloy specifications. We describe how a sub- set of VDM can be translated into Alloy and how assertions can be expressed in VDM and checked by the Alloy...

  2. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibler, Lisa Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Characterization and Performance

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  3. Project on New Domestic Zirconium Alloy Fuel Assembly Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Pei-sheng; ZHANG; Ai-min

    2012-01-01

    <正>The objectives of the project is to conduct irradiation at research reactor for small fuel assembly with domestic new zirconium alloy, and then to carry out post irradiation examination, and finally to acquire

  4. Electroplated solder alloys for flip chip interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annala, P.; Kaitila, J.; Salonen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Flip chip mounting of bare dice is gaining widespread use in microelectronics packaging. The main drivers for this technology are high packaging density, improved performance at high frequency, low parasitic effects and potentially high reliability and low cost. Many companies have made significant efforts to develop a technology for bump processing, bare die testing and underfill encapsulation to gain the benefit of all potential advantages. We have focussed on low cost bumping of fully processed silicon wafers to develop a flexible scheme for various reflow requirements. The bumping process is based on galvanic plating from an alloy solution or, alternatively, from several elemental plating baths. Sputtered Mo/Cu or Cr/Cu is used as a wettable base for electroplating. Excess base metal is removed by using the bumps as an etching mask. Variation of the alloy composition or the layer structure, allows the adjustment of the bump reflow temperature for the specific requirements of the assembly. Using binary tin-lead and ternary tin-lead-bismuth alloys, reflow temperatures from 100 °C (bismuth rich alloys) to above 300 °C (lead rich alloys) can be covered. The influence of the plating current density on the final alloy composition has been established by ion beam analysis of the plated layers and a series of reflow experiments. To control the plating uniformity and the alloy composition, a new cup plating system has been built with a random flow pattern and continuous adjustment of the current density. A well-controlled reflow of the bumps has been achieved in hot glycerol up to the eutectic point of tin-lead alloys. For high temperature alloys, high molecular weight organic liquids have been used. A tensile pull strength of 20 g per bump and resistance of 5 mΩ per bump have been measured for typical eutectic tin-lead bumps of 100 μm in diameter.

  5. Comparative studies on ultrasonic, friction, laser and resistance pressure welding of NiTi shape memory alloys with high-alloy steels. Final report; Vergleichende Untersuchungen zum Ultraschall-, Reib-, Laserstrahl- und Widerstandspressschweissen von NiTi-Shape-Memory-Metall mit hochlegierten Staehlen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuckschwerdt, K.

    2000-04-01

    The suitability of different welding techniques for welding of NiTi shape memory alloys with high-alloy steel (C12CrNi17-7, X5CrNiNb19-9, X20Cr13) was investigated. The quality of the welds was analyzed using mechanical-technological, fractographic, metallographic and electron microscopy analysis. [German] Ziel dieses Forschungsvorhabens ist es, die Eignung der einzelnen Schweissverfahren fuer das Fuegen von NiTi-Formgedaechtnislegierungen mit hochlegiertem Stahl (X12CrNi17-7, X5CrNiNb19-9, X20Cr13) darzustellen und zu beurteilen. Die Qualitaet der Fuegeverbindungen wird mit Hilfe mechanisch-technologischer, fraktographischer, metallographischer und elektronenmikroskopischer Untersuchungen bewertet.

  6. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  7. Turbine Blade Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  8. Predictions of titanium alloy properties using thermodynamic modeling tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Xie, F.-Y.; Chen, S.-L.; Chang, Y. A.; Furrer, D.; Venkatesh, V.

    2005-12-01

    Thermodynamic modeling tools have become essential in understanding the effect of alloy chemistry on the final microstructure of a material. Implementation of such tools to improve titanium processing via parameter optimization has resulted in significant cost savings through the elimination of shop/laboratory trials and tests. In this study, a thermodynamic modeling tool developed at CompuTherm, LLC, is being used to predict β transus, phase proportions, phase chemistries, partitioning coefficients, and phase boundaries of multicomponent titanium alloys. This modeling tool includes Pandat, software for multicomponent phase equilibrium calculations, and PanTitanium, a thermodynamic database for titanium alloys. Model predictions are compared with experimental results for one α-β alloy (Ti-64) and two near-β alloys (Ti-17 and Ti-10-2-3). The alloying elements, especially the interstitial elements O, N, H, and C, have been shown to have a significant effect on the β transus temperature, and are discussed in more detail herein.

  9. Cast iron-base alloy for cylinder/regenerator housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Stewart L.; Simmons, Harold E.; Woulds, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    NASACC-1 is a castable iron-base alloy designed to replace the costly and strategic cobalt-base X-40 alloy used in the automotive Stirling engine cylinder/generator housing. Over 40 alloy compositions were evaluated using investment cast test bars for stress-rupture testing. Also, hydrogen compatibility and oxygen corrosion resistance tests were used to determine the optimal alloy. NASACC-1 alloy was characterized using elevated and room temperature tensile, creep-rupture, low cycle fatigue, heat capacity, specific heat, and thermal expansion testing. Furthermore, phase analysis was performed on samples with several heat treated conditions. The properties are very encouraging. NASACC-1 alloy shows stress-rupture and low cycle fatigue properties equivalent to X-40. The oxidation resistance surpassed the program goal while maintaining acceptable resistance to hydrogen exposure. The welding, brazing, and casting characteristics are excellent. Finally, the cost of NASACC-1 is significantly lower than that of X-40.

  10. New Developments of Ti-Based Alloys for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ti-based alloys are finding ever-increasing applications in biomaterials due to their excellent mechanical, physical and biological performance. Nowdays, low modulus β-type Ti-based alloys are still being developed. Meanwhile, porous Ti-based alloys are being developed as an alternative orthopedic implant material, as they can provide good biological fixation through bone tissue ingrowth into the porous network. This paper focuses on recent developments of biomedical Ti-based alloys. It can be divided into four main sections. The first section focuses on the fundamental requirements titanium biomaterial should fulfill and its market and application prospects. This section is followed by discussing basic phases, alloying elements and mechanical properties of low modulus β-type Ti-based alloys. Thermal treatment, grain size, texture and properties in Ti-based alloys and their limitations are dicussed in the third section. Finally, the fourth section reviews the influence of microstructural configurations on mechanical properties of porous Ti-based alloys and all known methods for fabricating porous Ti-based alloys. This section also reviews prospects and challenges of porous Ti-based alloys, emphasizing their current status, future opportunities and obstacles for expanded applications. Overall, efforts have been made to reveal the latest scenario of bulk and porous Ti-based materials for biomedical applications.

  11. New Developments of Ti-Based Alloys for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhua; Yang, Chao; Zhao, Haidong; Qu, Shengguan; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Ti-based alloys are finding ever-increasing applications in biomaterials due to their excellent mechanical, physical and biological performance. Nowdays, low modulus β-type Ti-based alloys are still being developed. Meanwhile, porous Ti-based alloys are being developed as an alternative orthopedic implant material, as they can provide good biological fixation through bone tissue ingrowth into the porous network. This paper focuses on recent developments of biomedical Ti-based alloys. It can be divided into four main sections. The first section focuses on the fundamental requirements titanium biomaterial should fulfill and its market and application prospects. This section is followed by discussing basic phases, alloying elements and mechanical properties of low modulus β-type Ti-based alloys. Thermal treatment, grain size, texture and properties in Ti-based alloys and their limitations are dicussed in the third section. Finally, the fourth section reviews the influence of microstructural configurations on mechanical properties of porous Ti-based alloys and all known methods for fabricating porous Ti-based alloys. This section also reviews prospects and challenges of porous Ti-based alloys, emphasizing their current status, future opportunities and obstacles for expanded applications. Overall, efforts have been made to reveal the latest scenario of bulk and porous Ti-based materials for biomedical applications. PMID:28788539

  12. 再论行政发包制:对评论人的回应%Rethinking Administrative Subcontract:Reply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周黎安

    2014-01-01

    This piece serves as a response to the comments on my paper“Administrative Subcontract” made by Zhou Xueguang ,Zhang Jing ,Cao Zhenghan ,and Feng Shizheng .My reply focuses both on their critical comments and suggestions . Our differences center on such issues as the definition , content ,and causes of administrative subcontract system ,the definition and implications of ruling risks ,and authority allocation between the principal and the agent .In the reply I try to clarify the confusions and explain the reasons why we differ in these matters and indicate my stance . Following the commentators’ critical comments and suggestions ,I also discuss the possibilities and directions for further improvement of the administrative subcontract theory . In the conclusion ,I propose three criteria for a good theory and highlight the importance of interdisciplinary academic exchange and interaction in developing a good theory .%本文对周雪光、张静、曹正汉和冯仕政四位教授的评论文章进行了回应。笔者的回应侧重在各位评论人提出的带有批判性质的意见和建议上。笔者和评论人的分歧主要集中在行政发包制的界定、内涵和形成原因、统治风险的内涵和影响、发包人和承包人的权力配置等问题上,对于这些问题,笔者试图做进一步的澄清和解释。鉴于评论人的批评建议,本文也讨论了行政发包制未来可以进一步扩展和完善的领域。最后,笔者提出了一个好的理论的三个标准,并讨论了跨学科交流对于发展好理论的重要意义。

  13. Optimization of Phase-Engineered a-Si:H-Based Multi-Junction Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, October 2001-July 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronski, C. R.; Collins, R. W.; Podraza, N. J.; Vlahos, V.; Pearce, J. M.; Deng, J.; Albert, M.; Ferreira, G. M.; Chen, C.

    2006-08-01

    The scope of the work under this subcontract has involved investigating engineered improvements in the performance and stability of solar cells in a systematic way, which included the following four tasks: (1) Materials research and device development; (2) Process improvement directed by real time diagnostics; (3) Device loss mechanisms; and (4) Characterization strategies for advanced materials Our work has resulted in new and important insights into the deposition of a-Si:H-based materials, as well as into the nature of the Staebler-Wronski Effect (SWE). Presumably, many of these insights will be used by industrial partners to develop more systematic approaches in optimizing solar cells for higher performance and stability. This effort also cleared up several serious misconceptions about the nature of the p-layer in cells and the SWE in materials and cells. Finally, the subcontract identified future directions that should be pursued for greater understanding and improvement.

  14. F-Alloy: An Alloy Based Model Transformation Language

    OpenAIRE

    Gammaitoni, Loïc; Kelsen, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Model transformations are one of the core artifacts of a model-driven engineering approach. The relational logic language Alloy has been used in the past to verify properties of model transformations. In this paper we introduce the concept of functional Alloy modules. In essence a functional Alloy module can be viewed as an Alloy module representing a model transformation. We describe a sublanguage of Alloy called F-Alloy that allows the specification of functional Alloy modules. Module...

  15. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  16. Thin film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, 23 July 1990--31 October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bohn, R. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to develop to vacuum-based growth techniques for CdTe thin-film solar cells: (1) laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD) and (2) radio-frequency (rf) sputtering. The LDPVD process was successfully used to deposit thin films of CdS, CdTe, and CdCl{sub 2}, as well as related alloys and doped semiconductor materials. The laser-driven deposition process readily permits the use of several target materials in the same vacuum chamber and, thus, complete solar cell structures were fabricated on SnO{sub 2}-coated glass using LDPVD. The rf sputtering process for film growth became operational, and progress was made in implementing it. Time was also devoted to enhancing or implementing a variety of film characterization systems and device testing facilities. A new system for transient spectroscopy on the ablation plume provided important new information on the physical mechanisms of LDPVD. The measurements show that, e.g., Cd is predominantly in the neutral atomic state in the plume but with a fraction that is highly excited internally ({ge} 6 eV), and that the typical neutral Cd translational kinetic energies perpendicular to the target are 20 eV and greater. 19 refs.

  17. High strength alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  18. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  19. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  20. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouvetakis, John

    2013-01-03

    The project addressed the need for improved multijunction solar cells as identified within the Solar America Initiative program. The basic Ge/InGaAs/InGaP triple-junction structure that has led to record commercial efficiencies remains unoptimized due to excess current in the germanium component. Furthermore, its deployment cannot be scaled up to terawatt-level applications due to bottlenecks related to germanium's cost and abundance. The purpose of the program was to explore new strategies developed at Arizona State University to deposit germanium films on much cheaper silicon substrates, largely eliminating the germanium bottleneck, and at the same time to develop new materials that should lead to an improvement in multijunction efficiencies. This included the ternary alloy SiGeSn, which can be inserted as a fourth junction in a Ge/SiGeSn/InGaAs/InGaP structure to compensate for the excess current in the bottom cell. Moreover, the possibility of depositing materials containing Sn on Si substrates created an opportunity for replacing the bottom Ge cell with a GeSn alloy, which, combined with new III-V alloys for the top cells, should enable 4-junction structures with perfectly optimized band gaps. The successes of the program, to be described below, has led to the developments of new strategies for the growth of high-quality germanium films on Si substrates and to a widespread recognition that SiGeSn is likely to play a significant role in future generations of high-efficiency devices, as demonstrated by new research and intellectual property efforts by major US industrial players.

  1. X-ray microscope assemblies. Final report and metrology report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnpfennig, T.F.

    1981-04-13

    This is the Final Report and Metrology Report prepared under Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Subcontract 9936205, X-ray Microscope Assemblies. The purpose of this program was to design, fabricate, and perform detailed metrology on an axisymmetric grazing-incidence x-ray microscope (XRMS) to be used as a diagnostic instrument in the Lawrence Livermore Laser Fusion Program. The optical configuration chosen for this device consists of two internally polished surfaces of revolution: an hyperboloid facing the object; and a confocal, co-axial elliposid facing the image. This arrangement is known as the Wolter Type-I configuration. The grazing angle of reflection for both surfaces is approximately 1/sup 0/. The general optical performance goals under this program were to achieve a spatial resolution in the object plane in the soft x-ray region of approximately 1 micron, and to achieve an effective solid collecting angle which is an appreciable fraction of the geometric solid collecting angle.

  2. Synthesis of Al/Al sub 3 Ti two-phase alloys by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, S.; Chen, S.R.; Schwarz, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    We have mechanically alloyed mixtures of elemental powders to prepare fine-grain two-phase A1/A1{sub 3}Ti powders at the compositions A1-20at% Ti and Al-10at% Ti. Hexane was used to prevent agglomeration of the powder during MA. Carbon from the decomposition of the hexane was incorporated in the powder. It reacted with Ti to form a fine dispersion of carbides in the final hot-pressed compact. We consolidated the mechanically alloyed powders by hot-pressing. Yield strength and ductility were measured in compression. At 25{degree}C, the compressive yield strengths were 1.25 and 0.6 GPa for the A1-20at% Ti and Al-10at% Ti alloys, respectively. The ductility of the A1-10at% Ti alloy exceeded 20% for 25 < T < 500{degree}C. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Oxidation mechanisms for alloys in single-oxidant gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, D.P.

    1981-03-01

    Scales formed on alloys invariably contain the alloy constituents in a ratio different from that in the alloy, owing to the differing thermodynamic tendencies of the alloy components to react with the oxidant and to differences in diffusion rates in scale and alloy phases. This complex interrelationship between transport rates and the thermodynamics of the alloy-oxidant system can be analyzed using multicomponent diffusion theory when transport-controlled growth of single or multi-layered scales occurs. In particular, the superimposition of the diffusion data on an isothermal section of the appropriate phase diagram indicates the likely morphologies of the reaction products, including the sequence of phases found in the scale, the occurrence of internal oxidation and the development of an irregular metal/scale interface. The scale morphologies on alloys are also time-dependent: there is an initial transient stage, a steady state period, and a final breakdown, the latter often related to mechanical influences such as scale adherence, spallation, thermal or mechanical stresses and void formation. Mechanical influences have a more devastating effect in alloy oxidation due to the changes in alloy surface composition during the steady state period.

  4. A new paradigm for heat treatment of alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ustinovshikov, Y., E-mail: ust@ftiudm.ru

    2014-11-25

    Highlights: • The sign of the ordering energy in alloys varies with the temperature. • Each temperature of heating leads to formation of its characteristic microstructure. • Quenching of alloys is a totally unnecessary and useless operation. - Abstract: The article considers the consequences in the field of heat treatment of alloys that could follow the introduction of the concept of phase transition ordering-phase separation into common use. By example of the Fe{sub 50}Cr{sub 50} alloy, industrial carbon tool steel and Ni{sub 88}Al{sub 12} alloy, it is shown that this transition occurs at a temperature, which is definite for each system, that the change of the sign of the chemical interaction between component atoms reverses the direction of diffusion fluxes in alloys, which affects changes in the type of microstructures. The discovery of this phase transition dramatically changes our understanding of the solid solution, changes the ideology of alloy heat treatment. It inevitably leads to the conclusion about the necessity of carrying out structural studies with the help of TEM in order to adjust the phase diagrams of the systems where this phase transition has been discovered. Conclusions have been made that quenching of alloys from the so-called region of the solid solution, which is usually performed before tempering (aging) is a completely unnecessary and useless operation, that the final structure of the alloy is formed during tempering (aging) no matter what the structure was before this heat treatment.

  5. New developments in rapidly solidified magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.K. [Allied-Signal, Inc., Morristown, NJ (United States); Chang, C.F. [Allied-Signal, Inc., Morristown, NJ (United States); Raybould, D. [Allied-Signal, Inc., Morristown, NJ (United States); King, J.F. [Magnesium Elektron Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom); Thistlethwaite, S. [Magnesium Elektron Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1992-12-31

    In the present paper, we will examine the new developments in the rapidly solidified Mg-Al-Zn-Nd (EA55RS) alloy. We shall first briefly review the process scale-up currently employed for producing rapidly solidified magnesium alloys in large quantities, and then discuss the effect of billet size and processing parameters on the mechanical properties of various mill product forms such as extrusions and sheets. The superplastic behavior of EA55RS extrusions and rolled sheets are also discussed. Finally, some results on magnesium metal-matrix composites using rapidly solidified EA55RS matrix powders and SiC particulates are presented. (orig.)

  6. Studies of the AA2519 Alloy Hot Rolling Process and Cladding with EN AW-1050A Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Płonka B.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility of plastic forming by hot rolling of the AA2519 aluminium alloy sheets and cladding these sheets with a layer of the EN AW-1050A alloy. Numerous hot-rolling tests were carried out on the slab ingots to define the parameters of the AA2519 alloy rolling process. It has been established that rolling of the AA2519 alloy should be carried out in the temperature range of 400-440°C. Depending on the required final thickness of the sheet metal, appropriate thickness of the EN AW-1050A alloy sheet, used as a cladding layer, was selected. As a next step, structure and mechanical properties of the resulting AA2519 alloy sheets clad with EN AW-1050A alloy was examined. The thickness of the coating layer was established at 0,3÷0,5mm. Studies covered alloy grain size and the core alloy-cladding material bond strength.

  7. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  8. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  9. Non-H{sub 2}Se, ultra-thin CIS devices. Annual subcontract report, 10 March 1992--9 November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahoy, A.E.; Britt, J.; Kiss, Z. [Energy Photovoltaics, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1993-02-01

    This report describes work done during Phase I of a 3-phase, cost- shared contract. Objective of the subcontract is to demonstrate 12% total-area efficiency copper indium diselenide (CIS) solar cells and 50-W CIS modules average at least 8 W/ft{sup 2} in the third year. At the end of Phase I, EPV delivered to NREL a 1.1 cm{sup 2} CIS cell with an active area efficiency of 10.5%. the corresponding total-area efficiency is 7.9%.

  10. The motivation of subcontracted workers: a never-ending paradox La motivación de los trabajadores subcontratados. Una paradoja incesante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Marcela Bustamente Salazar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Certain considerations come about the subcontracted workers motivation when the Strategic Human Resource Management is used as a point of reference for diverse analysis. This article shows two faces of Human Resource Management. On one hand, the article indicates how important worker motivation has been for Human Resource Management and its direct association with worker productivity and efficacy. On the other hand, it points out the increasing importance that subcontracting has had as an alternative that allows companies the flexibilization and minimization of labor costs. Even though a structural contradiction comes up in this context, subcontracting seems to strive for feelings of affiliation and pride of belonging which are key elements to motivate the personnel. Apart from the literature review, the study was based on an ethnographic methodology of executives, contractors and subcontracted workers; and the results aim to contribute to streams of Organizational Theory and Human Resource Management.En el artículo se presentan consideraciones acerca de la motivación de los trabajadores subcontratados, en el marco de referencia de la “Gestión Humana Estratégica”. Se exponendos facetas de la administración de personal: por un lado, lo importante que ha sido lamotivación de los trabajadores para la Gestión Humana, como también la asociacióndirecta de esta con la productividad y la eficacia. Por otra parte, el auge creciente que hatenido la subcontratación como alternativa que permite a las empresas la flexibilizacióny minimización de sus costos laborales. Sin embargo, en este contexto, aparece unacontradicción estructural: la subcontratación parece atentar contra los sentimientos deafiliación y pertenencia organizacional, elementos claves para la motivación del personal.Además de la revisión documental, se llevó a cabo un trabajo etnometodológico conejecutivos, contratistas y empleados subcontratados. Los

  11. High throughput manufacturing of thin-film CdTe photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 16 November 1993--15 November 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandwisch, D W [Solar Cells, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes work performed by Solar Cells, Inc. (SCI), under a 3-year subcontract to advance SCI`s PV manufacturing technologies, reduce module production costs, increase module performance, and provide the groundwork for SCI to expand its commercial production capacities. SCI will meet these objectives in three phases by designing, debugging, and operating a 20-MW/year, automated, continuous PV manufacturing line that produces 60-cm {times} 120-cm thin-film CdTe PV modules. This report describes tasks completed under Phase 1 of the US Department of Energy`s PV Manufacturing Technology program.

  12. High-throughput manufacturing of thin-film CdS/CdTe photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 16 September 1996--15 January 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandwisch, D.W. [Solar Cells, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is recognized as one of the leading materials for low-cost photovoltaic modules. Solar Cells, Inc., has developed this technology and is scaling its pilot production capabilities to a multi-megawatt level. The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract supports these efforts. Activities during the third phase of the program concentrated on process development, equipment design and testing, quality assurance, ES and H programs, and large-scale next-generation coating-system prototype development. These efforts broadly addressed the issues of the manufacturing process for producing thin-film, monolithic CdS/CdTe photovoltaic modules.

  13. THE MOTIVATION BEHIND SUBCONTRACTING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LARGE FIRMS AND SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES IN THE MOTOR VEHICLE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY IN KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Auko Okatch

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The motivation behind subcontracting relationships in the motor vehicle manufacturing The purpose of this study was to determine internal and external constraints to subcontracting arrangements between large firms and small and medium enterprises (SMEs in the motor vehicle manufacturing industry in Kenya in order to establish the reasons for the gap in those arrangements. The sector was chosen for the study because of the government’s selection of the sector to promote subcontracting arrangements between small and medium enterprises and large firms in Kenya. Secondly, the sector was chosen because of the complexity of the motor vehicle industry with one motor vehicle comprising about 10,000 component parts, all of which would be difficult for one company to manufacture in-house. The research was mainly qualitative but quantitative data was also used. Content analysis approach was used to analyze the qualitative data and descriptive statistics to analyze the quantitative data. Data was collected from two of the three motor vehicle assembles in Kenya, nine out of thirteen franchise holders and 66 of the 72 component parts suppliers who are mainly small and medium enterprises. The results indicate that the level of subcontracting that takes place in the motor vehicle manufacturing industry is minimal. This is motivated mainly by a desire to remain in the good books of the government. The big enterprises are not willing to buy component parts from local suppliers and especially not local SME suppliers mainly due to the inability of the SMEs to supply quality products to schedule, lack of local suppliers for certain parts, the proliferation of makes and models and competition from imported second hand vehicles from Japan and Europe. The proliferation of makes and models also requires frequent technological changes which both assemblers and SMEs owners find difficult to keep up with. The study recommends that the government should reduce the age of

  14. Areva subcontracts in Japan the noble part of the Finnish EPR; Areva sous-traite au Japon la partie noble de l'EPR finlandais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jemain, A

    2004-02-01

    Areva, the French energy group, will subcontract the manufacturing of the reactor vessel and cover of the European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) which will be built in Finland. These components will be manufactured in Japan by Mitsubishi and not by Areva's Chalon/Saint-Marcel factory. The reason is the overburden of work and the lack of room and of machining equipment in the French factory. Also, the turbine and alternator are not built by Alstom, but by Siemens (Germany). (J.S.)

  15. High-efficiency, thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, 20 January 1994--19 January 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.D.; Bohn, R.G.; Rajakarunanayake, Y. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report describes work performed to develop and optimize the process of radio frequency (RF) sputtering for the fabrication of thin-film solar cells on glass. The emphasis is on CdTe-related materials including CdTe, CdS, ZnTe, and ternary alloy semiconductors. Pulsed laser physical vapor deposition (LPVD) was used for exploratory work on these materials, especially where alloying or doping are involved, and for the deposition of cadmium chloride layers. For the sputtering work, a two-gun sputtering chamber was implemented, with optical access for monitoring temperature and growth rate. We studied the optical and electrical properties of the plasmas produced by two different kinds of planar magnetron sputter guns with different magnetic field configurations and strengths. Using LPVD, we studied alloy semiconductors such as CdZnTe and heavily doped semiconductors such as ZnTe:Cu for possible incorporation into graded band gap CdTe-based photovoltaic devices.

  16. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  17. Structure and properties of stir-cast zinc alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeHuy, H.; Blain J.; Masounave, J.; Bata, G.L. (Industrial Materials Research Institute, Boucherville, P.Q. (Canada))

    Stir casting (or rheocasting) of ZA-27 zinc alloys was investigated experimentally. By vigorously agitating the alloys during cooling, the dendrites that were forming were fragmented giving a unique structure composed of spherical and rosette shaped particles suspended in the remaining liquid. Under high shear rates ({center dot}{gamma} = 300s{sup {minus}1} or more) the slurries with primary particle concentrations as high as 60% displayed viscosities as low as 20 poises and could easily be casted. The effects of processing variables such as shearing and cooling rates and casting temperatures were studied. Their relative importance on the rheological and microstructural behavior of the stir cast alloys are discussed. Results from viscosity measurements on slurries show that non-dendritical ZA-27 alloys obey a power law fluid model. Finally, results from mechanical and compressive studies carried out on solidified slurries are discussed and compared to conventional casted and wrought alloy properties.

  18. Designation and development of biomedical Ti alloys with finer biomechanical compatibility in long-term surgical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhen-Tao; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Tian, Yu-Xing; Cheng, Jun; Ma, Xi-Qun; Liu, Han-Yuan; Wang, Chang

    2014-09-01

    Developing the new titanium alloys with excellent biomechanical compatibility has been an important research direction of surgical implants materials. Present paper summarizes the international researches and developments of biomedical titanium alloys. Aiming at increasing the biomechanical compatibility, it also introduces the exploration and improvement of alloy designing, mechanical processing, microstructure and phase transformation, and finally outlines the directions for scientific research on the biomedical titanium alloys in the future.

  19. Hydrogenation properties of Mg-Al alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the properties of Mg-Al alloys in relation to hydrogen storage are reviewed. The main topics of this paper are materials preparation, hydrogen capacity, thermodynamics of hydride formation, and the kinetics of hydride formation and decomposition. Hydrogenation of Mg-Al leads...... to disproportionation with the formation of magnesium hydride and metallic aluminum as the final product. Experimental evidence renders this process reversible. It is observed that the enthalpy of hydride formation of magnesium is lowered upon alloying with Al due to a slightly endothermic disproportionation reaction....... Further, it is found that the kinetics of hydrogenation, as well dehydrogenation, may be significantly improved by alloying compared to pure Mg. The expense of these improvements of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation properties is a lower gravimetric hydrogen density in the hydrogenated product, (C) 2008...

  20. Microstructure and Service Properties of Copper Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polok-Rubiniec M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This elaboration shows the effect of combined heat treatment and cold working on the structure and utility properties of alloyed copper. As the test material, alloyed copper CuTi4 was employed. The samples were subjected to treatment according to the following schema: 1st variant – supersaturation and ageing, 2nd variant – supersaturation, cold rolling and ageing. The paper presents the results of microstructure, hardness, and abrasion resistance. The analysis of the wipe profile geometry was realized using a Zeiss LSM 5 Exciter confocal microscope. Cold working of the supersaturated solid solution affects significantly its hardness but the cold plastic deformation causes deterioration of the wear resistance of the finally aged CuTi4 alloy.

  1. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  2. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  3. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  4. Studies of marine macroalgae: saline desert water cultivation and effects of environmental stress on proximate composition. Final subcontract report. [Gracilaria tikvahiae; Ulva lactuca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.; DeBusk, T.A.; Peterson, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    The results presented in this report address the growth potential of marine macroalgae cultivated in desert saline waters, and the effects of certain environmental stresses (e.g., nitrogen, salinity, and temperature) on the proximate composition of several marine macroalgae. Two major desert saline water types were assayed for their ability to support the growth of Gracilaria, Ulva, and Caulerpa. Both water types supported short term growth, but long term growth was not supported. Carbohydrate levels in Gracilaria were increased by cultivation under conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and low nitrogen and phosphorous availability. Data suggests that it may be possible to maximize production of useful proximate constituents by cultivating the algae under optimum conditions for growth, and then holding the resulting biomass under the environmental conditions which favor tissue accumulation of the desired storage products. 16 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Development of a fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) for reducing the cost of photovoltaic wafers. Final subcontract report, 9 January 1991--14 April 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, F. [Crystal Systems, Inc., Salem, MA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    This report examines a wafer slicing technique developed by Crystal Systems, Inc. that reduces the cost of photovoltaic wafers. This fixed, abrasive slicing technique (FAST) uses a multiwire bladepack and a diamond-plated wirepack; water is the coolant. FAST is in the prototype production stage and reduces expendable material costs while retaining the advantages of a multiwire slurry technique. The cost analysis revealed that costs can be decreased by making more cuts per bladepack and slicing more wafers per linear inch. Researchers studied the degradation of bladepacks and increased wirepack life. 21 refs.

  6. Development of large-area monolithically integrated silicon-film{trademark} photovoltaic modules. Final subcontract report, May 1, 1991--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, R.B.; Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E. [AstroPower, Inc., Newark, DE (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this program is to develop Silicon Film{trademark} Product III into a low-cost, stable solar cell for large-scale terrestrial power applications. The Product III structure is a thin (<100 {mu}m) polycrystalline layer of silicon on a durable, insulating, ceramic substrate. The insulating substrate allows the silicon layer to be isolated and metallized to form a monolithically interconnected array of solar cells. High efficiency is achieved by the use of light trapping and passivated surfaces. This project focused on the development of five key technologies associated with the monolithic sub-module device structure: (1) development of the film deposition and growth processes; (2) development of the low-cost ceramic substrate; (3) development of a metallurgical barrier technology; (4) development of sub-element solar cell processing techniques; and (5) development of sub-module (isolation and interconnection) processes. This report covers the development approaches and results relating to these technologies. Significant progress has been made in the development of all of the related technologies. This is evidenced by the fabrication of a working 12.0 cm{sup 2} prototype sub-module consisting of 7 elements and testing with an open circuit voltage of 3.9 volts, a short circuit current of 35.2 mA and a fill factor of 63% and an overall efficiency of 7.3%. Another significant result achieved is a 13.4% (NREL verified), 1.0 cm{sup 2} solar cell fabricated from material deposited and grown on a graphite cloth substrate. The significant technological hurdle of the program was and remains the low quality of the photovoltaic layer which is caused by contamination of the photovoltaic layer from the low-cost ceramic substrate by trace impurities found in the substrate precursor materials. The ceramic substrate and metallurgical barrier are being developed specifically to solve this problem.

  7. Low-cost manufacturing of the point focus concentrating module and its key component, the Fresnel lens. Final subcontract report, 31 January 1991--6 May 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifee, T.; Konnerth, A. III [Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) has been developing point-focus concentrating PV modules since 1986. SKI is currently in position to manufacture between 200 to 600 kilowatts annually of the current design by a combination of manual and semi-automated methods. This report reviews the current status of module manufacture and specifies the required approach to achieve a high-volume manufacturing capability and low cost. The approach taken will include process development concurrent with module design for automated manufacturing. The current effort reviews the major manufacturing costs and identifies components and processes whose improvements would produce the greatest effect on manufacturability and cost reduction. The Fresnel lens is one such key component. Investigating specific alternative manufacturing methods and sources has substantially reduced the lens costs and has exceeded the DOE cost-reduction goals. 15 refs.

  8. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  9. Research on polycrystalline thin-film submodules based on CuInSe{sub 2} materials. Final subcontract report, 11 November 1990--30 June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arya, R; Fogleboch, J; Kessler, J; Russell, L; Skibo, S; Wiedeman, S [Solarex Corp., Newtown, PA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes work performed in development of CIS-based photovoltaic (PV) products. The activity began with developing manufacturable deposition methods for all required thin-film layers and developing and understanding processes using those methods. It included demonstrating the potential for high conversion efficiency and followed with developing viable methods for module segment formation and interconnection. These process steps were integrated to fabricate monolithic CIS-based submodules. An important result of this program is the basis of understanding established in developing this material for PV applications, which is necessary to address issues of manufacturability and cost-which were recognized early in the program as being determined by successful solutions to issues of yield, reproducibility, and control as much as by material and energy costs, conversion efficiency, and process speed. Solarex identified at least one absorber formation process that is very robust to shunt formation from pinholes or point defects, tolerant of variation in processing temperature and elemental composition, and is capable of producing high conversion efficiency. This program also allowed development and scale-up of processes for the deposition of all other substrate, heterojunction buffer, and window layers and associated scribing/module formation operations to 1000-CM{sup 2} size. At the completion of this program, Solarex has in place most of the necessary elements to begin the transition to pilot operation of CIS manufacturing activities.

  10. Large-Scale PV Module Manufacturing Using Ultra-Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 April 2002--28 February 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Narayanan, M.

    2006-07-01

    The major objectives of this program were to continue advances of BP Solar polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology. The Program included work in the following areas. (1) Efforts in the casting area to increase ingot size, improve ingot material quality, and improve handling of silicon feedstock as it is loaded into the casting stations. (2) Developing wire saws to slice 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers on 290-..mu..m-centers. (3) Developing equipment for demounting and subsequent handling of very thin silicon wafers. (4) Developing cell processes using 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers that produce encapsulated cells with efficiencies of at least 15.4% at an overall yield exceeding 95%. (5) Expanding existing in-line manufacturing data reporting systems to provide active process control. (6) Establishing a 50-MW (annual nominal capacity) green-field Mega-plant factory model template based on this new thin polycrystalline silicon technology. (7) Facilitating an increase in the silicon feedstock industry's production capacity for lower-cost solar-grade silicon feedstock..

  11. Low-cost CuInSe{sub 2} submodule development. Final subcontract report, 9 July 1990--31 January 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basol, B.M.; Kapur, V.K.; Halani, A.; Leidholm, C. [International Solar Electric Technology, Inglewood, CA (United States)

    1992-10-01

    Aim of this project is development and demonstration of processing steps necessary for fabrication of high efficiency CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells and sub-modules by the two-stage technique (also called the selenization method.) During this period, we have optimized the processing parameters of this method and demonstrated CuInSe{sub 2}/CdS/ZnO devices with a 1{endash}4 cm{sup 2} area and up to 12.4% active area efficiency. We have also developed a novel approach for the preparation of Cu/In precursors that improved the stoichiometric and morphological uniformity in these films. We have developed processing steps and tooling for handling up to 1 ft{sup 2} size substrates and as a result of these efforts demonstrated our first monolithically integrated sub-module of 1 ft{sup 2} area. 16 figs, 1 tab, 15 refs.

  12. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1991--31 August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatasubramanian, R. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The ``cycled`` organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  13. Innovative sputtering techniques for CIS and CdTe submodule fabrication. Annual subcontract report, 1 September 1991--31 August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, J.M.; Misra, M.S.; Lanning, B. [Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver, CO (United States). Astronautics Group

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work done during Phase 1 of the subject subcontract. The subcontract was designed to study innovative deposition techniques, such as the rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering system and electrodeposition for large-area, low-cost copper indium diselenide (CIS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) devices. A key issue for photovoltaics (PV) in terrestrial and future space applications is producibility, particularly for applications using a large quantity of PV. Among the concerns for fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV, such as CIS and CdTe, are production volume, cost, and minimization of waste. Both rotating cylindrical magnetron (C-Mag{trademark}) sputtering and electrodeposition have tremendous potential for the fabrication of polycrystalline thin-film PV due to scaleability, efficient utilization of source materials, and inherently higher deposition rates. In the case of sputtering, the unique geometry of the C-Mae facilitates innovative cosputtering and reactive sputtering that could lead to greater throughput reduced health and safety risks, and, ultimately, lower fabrication cost. Electrodeposited films appear to be adherent and comparable with low-cost fabrication techniques. Phase I involved the initial film and device fabrication using the two techniques mentioned herein. Devices were tested by both internal facilities, as well as NREL and ISET.

  14. Two cases of methyl alcohol intoxication by sub-chronic inhalation and dermal exposure during aluminum CNC cutting in a small-sized subcontracted factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jia; Lim, Key Hwan; Ryu, Dong-Ryeol; Lee, Hyang Woon; Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Seoung-Wook; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Jung-Choi, Kyunghee; Kim, Hyunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Methyl alcohol poisoning has been mainly reported in community. Two cases of methyl alcohol poisoning occurred in a small-sized subcontracted factory which manufactured smartphone parts in Korea. One young female patient presented with dyspnea and visual disturbance. Another young male patient presented with visual disturbance and myalgia. They treated with sodium bicarbonate infusion and hemodialysis for metabolic acidosis. In addition, he received ethyl alcohol per oral treatment. Her and his urinary methyl alcohol concentration was detected as 7.632 mg/L, 46.8 mg/L, respectively, although they were treated hemodialysis. Results of the working environment measurement showed that the concentration of methyl alcohol (1030.1-2220.5 ppm) in the air exceeded the time weighted average (200 ppm). They were diagnosed with optic neuropathy due to methyl alcohol poisoning and still have visual impairment. Workers who hired as dispatched employees in a small-sized subcontracted factory were exposed to high concentrations of methyl alcohol. The workplace had poor ventilation system. In addition, workers did not wear proper personal protect equipment. Working environment measurement and annual chekups for workers were not performed. They were in a blind spot to occupational safety and health. More attention is needed to protect vulnerable workers' health.

  15. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  16. Mg based alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, S. [Univ. de Santiago de Chile (Chile). Fac. de Ingenieria; Garcia, G.; Serafini, D.; San Martin, A.

    1999-07-01

    In the present work, we studied the production of magnesium alloys, of stoichiometry 2Mg + Ni, by mechanical alloying (MA) and the behavior of the alloys under hydrogen in a Sievert`s type apparatus. The elemental powders were milled under argon atmosphere in a Spex 8000 high energy ball mill. The milled materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Only minimum amounts of the Mg{sub 2}Ni intermetallic compound was obtained after 22 h of milling time. Most of the material was sticked to the inner surface of the container as well as to the milling balls. Powders milled only for 12 hours transforms to the intermetallic at around 433 K. Effects of the MA on the hydrogen absorption kinetics were also studied. (orig.) 10 refs.

  17. FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Mark W; McDaniel, Anthony; Schweighardt, Frank K

    2003-05-23

    In this program the teams at Penn State University (PSU), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), DCH Technology (DCHT), and Air Products and Chemicals Inc. (APCI), have aggressively pursued engineering solutions to eliminate barriers to solid-state chemiresistor hydrogen sensor technology. The metallurgical effects of alloying palladium with nickel have been shown to prevent phase transitions in the thin films at high H2 overpressures, making the devices more suitable for IOF process conditions. We investigated the use of thin, semi-permeable membranes that protect the catalytic surface from poisoning or other undesirable surface reactions that would otherwise reduce sensitivity or operability in harsh IOF process environments. The results of this project have provided new insight into the effects of metallurgy and protective coatings on device behavior, and open new avenues for research in this field. Commercialization of this sensor technology could be easily achieved, although not yet realized. The benefits to society, once this technology is commercialized, is a dramatic cost and energy savings to the industry, which employs these sensors. In addition, the fundamental understandings gained in this program could have an impact on both cost and safety in the future hydrogen economy utilizing hydrogen fuel cells and hydrogen storage.

  18. Subcontracting relations and their effects on safety and security in two firms: SNCF and GrDF; Les relations de sous-traitance et leurs effets sur la surete et la securite dans deux entreprises: SNCF et GrDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponnet, Marie

    2011-07-04

    Because of economical processes that tend to move the frontiers of firms salaried relations of uncertain status are found coexisting inside the very same working world. From a qualitative investigation mixing employees' interviews and observations made on SNCF and GrDF working sites our research offers to think about the relations linking subcontracting, maintenance, safety and security. Considering subcontracting as a particular way for professional bodies to be associated allows us to wonder about its effects within a same firm (the 'integrated' subcontracting) as much as between a principal and a provider. Our thesis shows that when change occurs inside the organization - like the creation of new committees of experts or the reorganizing of an old service - security and safety can be impacted because thus professional bodies tend to be reconfigured while modifications affect practices, professional identities and work division. The relations between subcontractors and principal are complicated and their consequences depend from the context they are placed in, determined by a combination of various characteristics such as the confidence level, the available time, the reputation, the position occupied by the subcontractor. Our investigation makes clear that there is no direct link between subcontracting, security and safety. Their effects, in spite of their reality, are submitted to the altering mediation of legal factors (related to economic national and European issues) and concern the working organization as well as the professional identities. (author)

  19. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  20. Influence of time of annealing on anneal hardening effect of a cast CuZn alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Nestorović Svetlana; Ivanić Lj.; Marković Desimir

    2003-01-01

    Investigated cast copper alloy containing 8at%Zn of a solute. For comparison parallel specimens made from cast pure copper. Copper and copper alloy were subjected to cold rolling with different a final reduction of 30,50 and 70%. The cold rolled copper and copper alloy samples were isochronally and isothermally annealed up to recrystallization temperature. After that the values of hardness, strength and electrical conductivity were measured and X-ray analysis was performed. These investigatio...

  1. SURFACE MELTING OF ALUMINIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Veit, S.; Albert, D; Mergen, R.

    1987-01-01

    The wear properties of aluminium base alloys are relatively poor. Laser surface melting and alloying has proved successful in many alloy systems as a means of significantly improving the surface properties. The present work describes experiments designed to establish the scope of laser treatment of aluminium alloys. Aluminium does not absorb CO2 laser light as well as other metals which necessitated first a general study of absorption caotings. Aluminium alloys offer fewer opportunities than ...

  2. Analysis of niobium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, T A

    1968-09-01

    An ion-exchange method was applied to the analysis of synthetic mixtures representing various niobium-base alloys. The alloying elements which were separated and determined include vanadium, zirconium, hafnium, titanium, molybdenum, tungsten and tantalum. Mixtures containing zirconium or hafnium, tungsten, tantalum and niobium were separated by means of a single short column. Coupled columns were employed for the resolution of mixtures containing vanadium, zirconium or titanium, molybdenum, tungsten and niobium. The separation procedures and the methods employed for the determination of the alloying elements in their separate fractions are described.

  3. Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

  4. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  5. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high Ti content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of Ti and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of Ti alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is presented.

  6. Alloy Selection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-02-01

    Software will Predict Corrosion Rates to Improve Productivity in the Chemical Industry. Many aspects of equipment design and operation are influenced by the choice of the alloys used to fabricate process equipment.

  7. Strength of Hard Alloys,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partial replacement of titanium carbide by tantalum carbide in three-phase WC-TiC-Co alloys tends to have a favorable effect on mechanical properties such as fatigue strength under bending and impact durability.

  8. First Everlasting Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨仲言

    1994-01-01

    There′s new alloy that apparently just won′t give up. When a pin was scraped along it the equivalent of one million times, the alloy-made of zirconium, palladium, and ruthenium—displayed no net loss of surface material. When astonished researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology(NIST) persevered with a five-million-cycle wear test, they got the same result.

  9. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  10. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  11. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TIbased electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  12. Integrated Guidelines for Management of Alloy 600 Locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Kyung-Hwan; Chung, Hansub; Yang, Jun-Seog; Lee, Kyoung-Soo [KHNP-Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The locations experiencing PWSCC include steam generator tubes, pressurizer instrumental nozzles, control rod driving mechanism(CRDM) penetration nozzles, reactor outlet nozzles, and bottom mounted instrumental(BMI) nozzles. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.(KHNP) has developed integrated guidelines for management of alloy 600 locations and the guidelines are under review by the regulator. The guidelines consist of alloy 600 location database, inspection program, maintenance/preventive maintenance method, and finally water chemistry management for PWSCC mitigation. In this paper, the detailed contents are presented. The integrated guidelines collected all relevant information on the management of alloy 600 locations. This information may be useful for establishing the most effective preventive maintenance strategies by prioritization in addition to maintenance strategies. Table II summarize maintenance strategies for alloy 600 locations.

  13. Modelling Eutectic Growth in Unmodified and Modified Near-Eutectic Al-Si Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Taylor, John A.

    2013-01-01

    growth parameters from the literature that depend on the type of modification (unmodified, Na-modified or Sr-modified) are used to describe differences in growth of the alloys. Modelling results are compared with solidification experiments where an Al-12.5wt%Si alloy was cast in unmodified, Na modified...... and Sr modified forms. The model confirms experimental observations of how modification and alloy composition influence nucleation, growth and finally the size of eutectic cells in the alloys. Modelling results are used to explain how cooling conditions in the casting act together with the nuclei density...

  14. ON DEVELOPMENT OF OPTIMAL METALLURGICAL PROCESS FOR PREPARATION OF A NEW GENERATION OF INTERMETALLIC ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viliam Hrnčiar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermetallic TiAl based alloys are used in extreme conditions, e.g. high temperature, aggressive atmosphere and combined high temperature mechanical loading. The contribution deals with development and optimization of plasma melting metallurgical process in new developed crystallizer with rotational and axial movement of melt, for preparation of new intermetallic alloys based on Ti-(45-48Al-(1-10Ta (at.%. The melting process parameters and their influence to final microstructure and properties of alloys are discussed. The aim of this work is to produce alloys with lower number of technological steps necessary to achieve chemical composition, homogeneity and purity as well.

  15. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells.......In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells....

  16. Impact toughness of laser alloyed aluminium AA1200 alloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4kW Nd:YAG laser and impact resistance of the alloys was investigated. The alloying powders were a mixture of Ni, Ti and SiC in different proportions. Surfaces reinforced...

  17. INVESTIGATION OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS MACHINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berat Barıs BULDUM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Magnesium alloy developments have traditionally been driven by industry requirements for lightweight materials to operate under increasingly demanding conditions. Magnesium alloys have always been attractive to designers due to their low density, only two thirds that of aluminium and its alloys [1]. The element and its alloys take a big part of modern industry needs. Especially nowadays magnesium alloys are used in automotive and mechanical (trains and wagons manufacture, because of its lightness and other features. Magnesium and magnesium alloys are the easiest of all metals to machine, allowing machining operations at extremely high speed. All standard machining operations such as turning, drilling, milling, are commonly performed on magnesium parts.

  18. Thermodynamics-Based Computational Design of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidemenopoulos, G. N.; Katsamas, A. I.; Kamoutsi, H.

    2010-04-01

    Alloying additions of Sc and Zr raise the yield strength of Al-Mg alloys significantly. We have studied the effects of Sc and Zr on the grain refinement and recrystallization resistance of Al-Mg alloys with the aid of computational alloy thermodynamics. The grain refinement potential has been assessed by Scheil-Gulliver simulations of solidification paths, while the recrystallization resistance (Zener drag) has been assessed by calculation of the precipitation driving forces of the Al3Sc and Al3Zr intermetallics. Microstructural performance indices have been derived, used to rank several alloy composition variants, and finally select the variant with the best combination of grain refinement and recrystallization resistance. The method can be used, with certain limitations, for a thermodynamics-based design of Al-Mg and other alloy compositions.

  19. Selective dissolution in binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Carol Rene

    Corrosion is an important issue in the design of engineering alloys. De-alloying is an aspect of alloy corrosion related to the selective dissolution of one or more of the components in an alloy. The work reported herein focuses on the topic of de-alloying specific to single-phase binary noble metal alloy systems. The alloy systems investigated were gold-silver and gold-copper. The onset of a bulk selective dissolution process is typically marked by a critical potential whereby the more reactive component in the alloy begins dissolving from the bulk, leading to the formation of a bi-continuous solid-void morphology. The critical potential was investigated for the entire composition range of gold-silver alloys. The results presented herein include the formulation of an expression for critical potential as a function of both alloy and electrolyte composition. Results of the first investigation of underpotential deposition (UPD) on alloys are also presented herein. These results were implemented as an analytical tool to provide quantitative measurements of the surface evolution of gold during de-alloying. The region below the critical potential was investigated in terms of the compositional evolution of the alloy surface. Below the critical potential, there is a competition between the dissolution of the more reactive alloying constituent (either silver or copper) and surface diffusion of gold that serves to cover dissolution sites and prevent bulk dissolution. By holding the potential at a prescribed value below the critical potential, a time-dependent gold enrichment occurs on the alloy surface leading to passivation. A theoretical model was developed to predict the surface enrichment of gold based on the assumption of layer-by-layer dissolution of the more reactive alloy constituent. The UPD measurements were used to measure the time-dependent surface gold concentration and the results agreed with the predictions of the theoretical model.

  20. Modelling of composition and phase changes in multiphase alloys due to growth of an oxide layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijdam, T.J. [Materials Innovation Institute (M2i) and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Sloof, W.G. [Materials Innovation Institute (M2i) and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: w.g.sloof@tudelft.nl

    2008-10-15

    A coupled thermodynamic-kinetic oxidation model is presented for the selective, external oxidation of the most reactive alloy constituent of a multicomponent multiphase alloy. The model computes the composition depth profiles of the alloy constituents in the alloy as well as the evolution in the phase fractions in the alloy as function of oxidation time. The applicability of the model is illustrated through several examples. For the isothermal and cyclic oxidation of single- and two-phase binary alloys excellent agreement was obtained between the numerical calculations and the corresponding analytical solutions. For the isothermal oxidation of two {gamma}+{beta} NiCrAl alloys with different initial volume fractions of the {beta} phase, very good agreement was obtained between experimentally and calculated composition depth profiles. Finally, the effect of alloying additions on the phase evolution in the alloy was studied for the isothermal oxidation of freestanding MCrAlY (M = Ni, Co) coatings. It is shown that for a similar bulk Al and Cr content in the coating, the concentration profiles of Al in the coating after oxidation can be significantly affected by alloying with elements like Co, Ta and Re. Consequently, the multicomponent and multiphase character of the MCrAlY coating has to be taken into account when performing lifetime studies.

  1. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  2. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Peter [Houston, TX; Koh, Shirlaine [Houston, TX; Mani, Prasanna [Houston, TX; Ratndeep, Srivastava [Houston, TX

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  3. Etching Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Extrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanliang

    2014-11-01

    The etching treatment is an important process step in influencing the surface quality of anodized aluminum alloy extrusions. The aim of etching is to produce a homogeneously matte surface. However, in the etching process, further surface imperfections can be generated on the extrusion surface due to uneven materials loss from different microstructural components. These surface imperfections formed prior to anodizing can significantly influence the surface quality of the final anodized extrusion products. In this article, various factors that influence the materials loss during alkaline etching of aluminum alloy extrusions are investigated. The influencing variables considered include etching process parameters, Fe-rich particles, Mg-Si precipitates, and extrusion profiles. This study provides a basis for improving the surface quality in industrial extrusion products by optimizing various process parameters.

  4. Shape Memory Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deexith Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are metals that "remember" their original shapes. SMAs are useful for such things as actuators which are materials that "change shape, stiffness, position, natural frequency, and other mechanical characteristics in response to temperature or electromagnetic fields" The potential uses for SMAs especially as actuators have broadened the spectrum of many scientific fields. The study of the history and development of SMAs can provide an insight into a material involved in cutting-edge technology. The diverse applications for these metals have made them increasingly important and visible to the world. This paper presents the working of shape memory alloys , the phenomenon of super-elasticity and applications of these alloys.

  5. Neutron absorbing alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Masayuki

    1998-12-04

    The neutron absorbing alloy of the present invention comprises Ti or an alloy thereof as a mother material, to which from 2 to 40% by weight of Hf and Gd within a range of from 4 to 50% by weight in total are added respectively. Ti is excellent in specific strength, corrosion resistance and workability, and produces no noxious intermetallic compound with Hf and Gd. In addition, since the alloy can incorporate a great quantity of Hf and Gd, a neutron absorbing material having excellent neutron absorbing performance than usual and excellent in specific strength, corrosion resistance and workability can be manufactured conveniently and economically not by a special manufacturing method. (T.M.)

  6. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloyed Burn-resistant Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ping-ze; XU Zhong; HE Zhi-yong; ZHANG Gao-hui

    2004-01-01

    Conventional titanium alloy may be ignited and burnt under high temperature, high pressure and high gas flow velocity condition. In order to avoid this problem, we have developed a new kind of burn-resistant titanium alloy-double glow plasma surface alloying burn-resistant titanium alloy. Alloying element Cr, Mo, Cu are induced into the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-l.5Zr-0.25Si substrates according to double glow discharge phenomenon, Ti-Cr ,Ti-Mo, Ti-Cu binary burn-resistant alloy layers are formed on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-l.5Zr-0.25Si alloys. The depth of the surface burn-resistant alloy layer can reach to above 200 microns and alloying element concentration can reach 90%.Burn-resistant property experiments reveal that if Cr concentration reach to 14%, Cu concentration reach to 12%, Mo concentration reach to 10% in the alloying layers, ignition and burn of titanium alloy can be effectively avoided.

  7. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloyed Burn-resistant Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGPing-ze; XUZhong; HEZhi-yong; ZHANGGao-hui

    2004-01-01

    Conventional titanium alloy may be ignited and burnt under high temperature, high pressure and high gas flow velocity condition. In order to avoid this problem, we have developed a new kind of burn-resistant titanium alloy-double glow plasma surface alloying burn-resistant titanium alloy. Alloying element Cr, Mo, Cu are induced into the Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-1.5Zr-0.25Si substrates according to double glow discharge phenomenon, Ti-Cr ,Ti-Mo, Ti-Cu binary burn-resistant alloy layers are formed on the surface of Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-1.5Zr-0.25Si alloys. The depth of the surface burn-resistant alloy layer can reach to above 200 microns and alloying element concentration can reach 90%. Burn-resistant property experiments reveal that if Cr concentration reach to 14%, Cu concentration reach to 12%, Mo concentration reach to 10% in the alloying layers, ignition and burn of titanium alloy can be effectively avoided.

  8. Implemented organisation for subcontracting companies involved in the maintenance of the French nuclear stock - Sheet nr 39; Organisation mise en place pour les entreprises prestataires de la maintenance du parc nucleaire francais - Fiche No. 39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-30

    Every year, some 20,000 subcontracted salaried employees are mobilised for maintenance operations in the French nuclear reactors. Subcontracting is an answer to different needs: specific abilities, the short delay for maintenance during which a reactor is stopped, and which requires a very important contribution of labour, and specialised labour for some interventions. The document evokes a rigorous selection and certification process, and indicates the different specific training which are organised for anyone intervening in a nuclear power plant. It outlines that radiation protection and safety arrangements are the same for all (dosimetry), and that some measurements are performed on some temporary workers. Some data shows that these controls are efficient and that safety is improving

  9. High temperature solder alloys for underhood applications: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, J.A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Drewien, C.A.; Yost, F.G.; Sackinger, S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weiser, M.W. [Johnson-Mathey Electronics Corp., Spokane, WA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    In this continued study, the microstructural evolution and peel strength as a function of thermal aging were evaluated for four Sn-Ag solders deposited on double layered Ag-Pt metallization. Additionally, activation energies for intermetallic growth over the temperature range of 134 to 190{degrees}C were obtained through thickness measurements of the Ag-Sn intermetallic that formed at the solder-metallization interface. It was found that Bi-containing solders yielded higher activation energies for the intermetallic growth, leading to thicker intermetallic layers at 175 and 190{degrees}C for times of 542 and 20.5 hrs, respectively, than the solders free of Bi. Complete reaction of the solder with the metallization occurred and lower peel strengths were measured on the Bi-containing solders. In all solder systems, a Ag-Sn intermetallic thickness of greater than {approximately}7 {mu}m contributed to lower peel strength values. The Ag-Sn binary eutectic composition and the Ag-Sn-Cu ternary eutectic composition solders yielded lower activation energies for intermetallic formation, less microstructural change with time, and higher peel strengths; these solder systems were resilient to the effects of temperatures up to 175{degrees}C. Accelerated isothermal aging studies provide useful criteria for recommendation of materials systems. The Sn-Ag and Sn-Ag-Cu eutectic compositions should be considered for future service life and reliability studies based upon their performance in this study.

  10. Pemilihan Bahan Alloy Untuk Konstruksi Gigitiruan

    OpenAIRE

    Medila Dahlan

    2008-01-01

    Pada kedokteran gigi bahan alloy sangat banyak digunakan dalam segala bidang. Dalam pembuatan konstruksi gigitiman biasanya digunakan alloy emas, alloy kobalt kromium, alloy nikei kromium dan alloy stainless steel sebagai komponen gigitiman kerangka logam serta pembuatan mahkota dan jembatan. Pemilihan bahan alloy dapat dilakukan berdasarkan sifat yang dimiiiki oleh masing-masing bahan alloy sehingga akan didapat hasil konstmksi gigitiruan yang memuaskan. Pada pemakaiannya didaiam mulut...

  11. Strip Casting of High Performance Structural Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S S Park; J G Lee; Nack J Kim

    2004-01-01

    There exists a great need for the development of high performance alloys due to increasing demands for energy conservation and environmental protection. Application of strip casting shows a strong potential for the improvement of properties of existing alloys and also for the development of novel alloy systems with superior properties. The present paper reviews our Center's activities in the development of high performance alloys by strip casting. Examples include (1) Al alloys, (2) wrought Mg alloys, and (3) bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys.

  12. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of

  13. Creep of FINEMET alloy at amorphous to nanocrystalline transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Csach, K.; Miškuf, J.; Juríková, A.; Ocelík, V.

    2009-01-01

    The application of FINEMET-type materials with specific magnetic properties prepared by the crystallization of amorphous alloys is often limited by their brittleness. The structure of these materials consists of nanosized Fe-based grains surrounded with amorphous phase. Then the final macroscopic

  14. Creep of FINEMET alloy at amorphous to nanocrystalline transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Csach, K.; Miškuf, J.; Juríková, A.; Ocelík, V.

    2009-01-01

    The application of FINEMET-type materials with specific magnetic properties prepared by the crystallization of amorphous alloys is often limited by their brittleness. The structure of these materials consists of nanosized Fe-based grains surrounded with amorphous phase. Then the final macroscopic me

  15. Texture Evolution During Wire Drawing of Mg-RE Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterton, Mark; Robson, Joseph; Henry, Dominic

    Additions of rare-earth (RE) elements to extruded magnesium alloys can lead to a weaker texture and the emergence of a new "RE-texture" component. Understanding the formation of this component after extrusion is difficult because the final microstructure is often either partly or fully dynamically recrystallized.

  16. Determination Principle and Management Control on Subcontracting Management of Construction Enterprise%施工企业工程分包确定原则与管理控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程文香; 范贵隆; 李宜忠

    2012-01-01

    目前,水利水电工程分包施工已是一种工程施工的方案,分包管理则是一个现代企业所必须具备的,其对分包的管理好坏,直接影响到企业的形象和利益.如何更好地做好分包工作的管理工作,最大限度地发挥分包施工的优势,最大能力地规避分包施工中的风险,是未来水利水电工程建设市场竞争的核心.详细介绍了工程分包确定原则和管理控制,并就分包管理中存在的问题进行探讨,并提出解决措施.%At present, construction subcontracting of construction of water conservancy and hydropower project is a construction program. Subcontracting management is necessary for all the modem enterprise, and its management of sub-quality directly affects corporation image and interests. How to do better management of subcontracting and maximize the advantages of sub-construction and the capacity to avoid the risk of sub-construction is the core for the future water conservancy and hydropower project construction market competition. The determination principle and management control are introduced, and some problems in the subcontracting management are discussed and the suggestions are given to solve these problems.

  17. GTS Duratek, phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-10-26

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the final report on testing performed by GTS Duratek Inc. in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The report contains description of the tests, observations, test data and some analysis of the data as it pertains to application of this technology for LLW vitrification. The document also contains summaries of the melter offgas reports issued as separate documents for the 100 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-028) and for the 1000 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-029).

  18. Synthesis and composition evolution of bimetallic Pd Pt alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Guoqiang; Shi, Honglan; Xing, Yangchuan

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports a study on the synthesis of Pd-Pt alloy nanoparticles and composition evolution of the alloys. The synthesis involves Pd and Pt acetylacetonate as the metal precursors and trioctylphosphine (TOP) as the solvent. Thermal decomposition of the Pd-TOP complex resulted in Pd nanoparticles, while substitution of Pt in the Pt-TOP complex by Pd allowed formation of the Pd-Pt alloys. It was observed that the Pd-Pt nanoparticles formed at the very beginning in the synthesis process are Pd rich with various nanoparticle sizes ranging from 1.5 to 25 nm in diameter. These nanoparticles averaged out through a digestive ripening process and reached a final size of 3.5 nm in about 10 min. The alloy compositions evolved throughout the synthesis process and only reached the preset Pd to Pt ratio of the precursors in 120 min. It was found that Pt acetylacetonate alone in TOP cannot produce Pt nanoparticles, which was attributed to the formation of a Pt-TOP complex and a strong coordination of Pt to the phosphine. This observation led us to propose an atomic exchange process between the Pt-TOP complex and the Pd atoms at the nanoparticle surface. As a result, the alloy formation process is limited by a substitution and diffusion rate of the Pt atoms at the surface of the alloy nanoparticles.

  19. Study on Quality Control for the Outsourcing of Acquisitioning and Catalogu-ing Subcontract of University Library%高校图书馆采编业务外包的质量控制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋月

    2016-01-01

    文章研究了高校图书馆图书采编业务外包的起因,以及采编业务外包对高校图书馆业务的影响,提出有效控制采编业务外包质量的3个途径:正确选择书商、提升外包编目人员素质以及加强编目外包质量的监控,上述措施有效地控制了采编业务外包质量。%In this paper, the cause of the outsourcing of acquisitioning and cataloguing subcontract of university li-brary and its effect on university library were investigated. Three ways to effectively controlling quality of the outsourcing of acquisitioning and cataloguing subcontract was given, that is correct selection of bookseller, upgrad-ing the personnel quality of outsourcing and strengthening the quality control of cataloguing subcontract. All these can effectively control quality of the outsourcing services.

  20. Pareto-optimal alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bligaard, Thomas; Johannesson, Gisli Holmar; Ruban, Andrei;

    2003-01-01

    and the cost. In this letter we present a database consisting of the lattice parameters, bulk moduli, and heats of formation for over 64 000 ordered metallic alloys, which has been established by direct first-principles density-functional-theory calculations. Furthermore, we use a concept from economic theory...

  1. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...

  2. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  3. The in-situ Ti alloying of aluminum alloys and its application in A356 alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This research has investigated the in-situ Ti alloying of aluminum alloys and its application to A356 alloys and wheels through the evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties, The results showed that stable titanium content can be obtained by adding a small quantity of TiO2 into electrolyte of pure aluminum. Under this approach, a greater than 95% absorptivity of titanium was achieved, and the microstructure of the specimens was changed to fine equiaxed grains from coarse columnar grains in the pure aluminum. In comparison with the tradition A356 alloys and wheels, the corresponding microstructure in the testing A356 alloys and wheels was finer. Although the tensile strength was similar between the testing and the tradition A356 alloys and wheels, the ductility of the former (testing) is superior to that of the later (tradition), leading to an excellent combination of strength and ductility from the testing alloys and wheels.

  4. The in-situ Ti alloying of aluminum alloys and its application in A356 alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongxia LIU

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This research has investigated the in-situ Ti alloying of aluminum alloys and its application to A356 alloys and wheels through the evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties. The results showed that stable titanium content can be obtained by adding a small quantity of TiO2 into electrolyte of pure aluminum. Under this approach, a greater than 95% absorptivity of titanium was achieved, and the microstructure of the specimens was changed to fineequiaxed grains from coarse columnar grains in the pure aluminum. In comparison with the tradition A356 alloys and wheels, the corresponding microstructure in the testing A356 alloys and wheels was finer. Although the tensile strength was similar between the testing and the tradition A356 alloys and wheels, the ductility of the former (testing is superior to that of the later (tradition, leading to an excellent combination of strength and ductility from the testing alloys and wheels.

  5. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  6. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Matthew; Weitz, David A.; Lu, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Phase Separation (BCAT-5-PhaseSep) experiment will photograph initially randomized colloidal samples onboard the ISS to determine their resulting structure over time. This allows the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-PhaseSep studies collapse (phase separation rates that impact product shelf-life); in microgravity the physics of collapse is not masked by being reduced to a simple top and bottom phase as it is on Earth.

  7. Development of Zirconium alloys (for pressure tubes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kwon, Sang Chul; Choo, Ki Nam; Jung, Chung Hwan; Yim, Kyong Soo; Kim, Sung Soo; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Kim, Kyong Ho; Cho, Hae Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, S. K.; Kim, M. H. [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, S. I [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, I. S. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this research is to set up the basic technologies for the evaluation of pressure tube integrity and to develop improved zirconium alloys to prevent pressure tube failures due to DHC and hydride blister caused by excessive creep-down of pressure tubes. The experimental procedure and facilities for characterization of pressure tubes were developed. The basic research related to a better understanding of the in-reactor performances of pressure tubes leads to noticeable findings for the first time : the microstructural effect on corrosion and hydrogen pick-up behavior of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, texture effect on strength and DHC resistance and enhanced recrystallization by Fe in zirconium alloys and etc. Analytical methodology for the assessment of pressure tubes with surface flaws was set up. A joint research is being under way with AECL to determine the fracture toughness of O-8 at the EOL (End of Life) that had been quadruple melted and was taken out of the Wolsung Unit-1 after 10 year operation. In addition, pressure tube with texture controlled is being made along with VNINM in Russia as a joint project between KAERI and Russia. Finally, we succeeded in developing 4 different kinds of zirconium alloys with better corrosion resistance, low hydrogen pickup fraction and higher creep strength. (author). 121 refs., 65 tabs., 260 figs

  8. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  9. Tungsten carbide laser alloying of a low alloyed steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Mihai; Taca, Mihaela

    1996-10-01

    Laser alloying is a way to change the composition of metal surfaces in order to improve their corrosion-resistance, high-temperature strength and hardness. The results of a structural and phase analysis of a tungsten carbide based surface layer prepared by laser alloying of a low carbon steel substrate are presented. Structure, phase composition and microhardness of surface alloyed layers have been investigated. The surface of the samples exhibited a thin layer with a different chemical and phase composition. An increase in alloyed surface hardness and wear-resistance was observed.

  10. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  11. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  12. Materials data handbook, Inconel alloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, J.; Weiss, V.

    1967-01-01

    Materials data handbook on Inconel alloy 718 includes data on the properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures and other pertinent engineering information required for the design and fabrication of components and equipment utilizing this alloy.

  13. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  14. High-temperature Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Gogia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of high-temperature titanium alloys has contributed significantly to the spectacular progress in thrust-to-weight ratio of the aero gas turbines. This paper presents anoverview on the development of high-temperature titanium alloys used in aero engines and potential futuristic materials based on titanium aluminides and composites. The role of alloychemistry, processing, and microstructure, in determining the mechanical properties of titanium alloys is discussed. While phase equilibria and microstructural stability consideration haverestricted the use of conventional titanium alloys up to about 600 "C, alloys based on TiPl (or,, E,AINb (0, TiAl (y, and titaniumltitanium aluminides-based composites offer a possibility ofquantum jump in the temperature capability of titanium alloys.

  15. Research Leading to High Throughput Manufacturing of Thin-Film CdTe PV Modules: Annual Subcontract Report, September 2004--September 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, R. C.

    2006-04-01

    Specific overall objectives of this subcontract are improvement in baseline field performance of manufactured CdTe PV modules while reducing environmental, health and safety risk in the manufacturing environment. Project objectives focus on four broad categories: (1) development of advanced front-contact window layers, (2) improved semiconductor film deposition, (3) development of improved accelerated life test procedures that indicate baseline field performance, and (4) reduction of cadmium-related environmental, health and safety risks. First Solar has significantly increased manufacturing capacity from less than 2 MW/yr to more than 20 MW/yr, while increasing the average module total-area power conversion efficiency from 7% to >9%. First Solar currently manufactures and sells 50-65-W thin-film CdTe PV modules at a rate of about 1.9 MW/month. Sales backlog (booked sales less current inventory divided by production rate) is more than a year. First Solar is currently building new facilities and installing additional equipment to increase production capacity by 50 MW/yr; the additional capacity is expected to come on line in the third quarter of 2006.

  16. 论建设工程项目专业分包的前期管理%On Management of Specialized Subcontract at Initial Stage of Construction Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓幸

    2012-01-01

    As the competition in the domestic construction market is becoming increasingly fierce, profit margins are narrowed; specialized division of labor has been one of the characters of the industry itself. To improve the competitiveness of the construction company, the paper points out that the focus should be on improving the professional and technical standard as well as management level. The paper elaborates on the problems existing at the initial stage of the specialized subcontract which were easily overlooked and proposes measures to tackle the problems.%国内建筑市场竞争日益激烈,利润空间扁平化,分工专业化已是行业本身特点之一。施工企业在这种市场环境下若想提高自身生存能力,提高企业竞争力,其关注焦点应集中于提高专业技术水平和管理水平。针对建设工程项目专业分包前期易忽视的问题进行阐述,并提出拟采取的手段。

  17. Porosity of porous Al alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two porosity models of porous Al alloys with different pore types (ball and polygon shape) were established. The experimental results coincide well with theoretical computations. The porosity of Al alloys (Prc) consists of three parts, porosity caused by preform particles (Prp), additional porosity (Pra), and porosity caused by solidification shrinkage (Prs). Prp is the main part of Prc while Pra is the key for fabricating porous Al alloys successfully in spite of its little contribution to Prc.

  18. Multicomponent and High Entropy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cantor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes some underlying principles of multicomponent and high entropy alloys, and gives some examples of these materials. Different types of multicomponent alloy and different methods of accessing multicomponent phase space are discussed. The alloys were manufactured by conventional and high speed solidification techniques, and their macroscopic, microscopic and nanoscale structures were studied by optical, X-ray and electron microscope methods. They exhibit a variety of amorphous, quasicrystalline, dendritic and eutectic structures.

  19. New approaches for high-efficiency solar cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedair, S M; El-Masry, N A [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes the activities carried out in this subcontract. These activities cover, first the atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) growth of GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP at fairly low growth temperatures. This was followed by using ALE to achieve high levels of doping both n-type and p-type required for tunnel junctions (Tj) in the cascade solar cell structures. Then the authors studied the properties of AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions and their performances at different growth conditions. This is followed by the use of these tunnel junctions in stacked solar cell structures. The effect of these tunnel junctions on the performance of stacked solar cells was studied at different temperatures and different solar fluences. Finally, the authors studied the effect of different types of black surface fields (BSF), both p/n and n/p GaInP solar cell structures, and their potential for window layer applications. Parts of these activities were carried in close cooperation with Dr. Mike Timmons of the Research Triangle Institute.

  20. Investigations on detonation shock dynamics and related topics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    1993-11-01

    This document is a final report that summarizes the research findings and research activities supported by the subcontract DOE-LANL-9-XG8-3931P-1 between the University of Illinois (D. S. Stewart Principal Investigator) and the University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory, M-Division). The main focus of the work has been on investigations of Detonation Shock Dynamics. A second emphasis has been on modeling compaction of energetic materials and deflagration to detonation in those materials. The work has led to a number of extensions of the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) and its application as an engineering design method for high explosive systems. The work also enhanced the hydrocode capabilities of researchers in M-Division by modifications to CAVEAT, an existing Los Alamos hydrocode. Linear stability studies of detonation flows were carried out for the purpose of code verification. This work also broadened the existing theory for detonation. The work in this contract has led to the development of one-phase models for dynamic compaction of porous energetic materials and laid the groundwork for subsequent studies. Some work that modeled the discrete heterogeneous behavior of propellant beds was also performed. The contract supported the efforts of D. S. Stewart and a Postdoctoral student H. I. Lee at the University of Illinois.

  1. Duct and cladding alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  2. Shape memory alloy actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  3. Analysis of laser alloyed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, D.C.; Augustyniak, W.M.; Buene, L.; Draper, C.W.; Poate, J.M.

    1981-04-01

    Surface alloys of precious metals have many advantages over bulk alloys, the most obvious of which is cost reduction due to the reduced consumption of precious metal. There are several techniques for producing surface alloys. In this paper the laser irradiation technique is presented. The following lasers: CW CO/sub 2/, Q-switched Nd-YAG, frequency double Q-switched Nd-YAG, and pulsed ruby were used to irradiate and melt thin solid films of precious metals on metal substrates. This causes the surfaces to melt to a depth of approximately 10,000A. Alloying then takes place in the liquid phase where most metals are miscible. The high quench rates obtainable by this method of melting can result in the forming of metastable alloys. This melting and regrowth process is well understood and has been discussed in the literature over the last few years. This paper deals with two binary alloy systems, Au-Ni and Pd-Ti. Surface alloys of Au-Ni with a wide range of concentrations have been produced by laser irradiation of thin Au films on Ni. These films have been analyzed using Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and channeling. Many thin film metals other than Au have also been successfully alloyed using these methods. An example of a potential application is the laser surface alloying of Pd to Ti for corrosion passivation.

  4. On the shock response of the magnesium alloy Elektron 675

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Paul; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Siviour, Clive; Wielewski, Euan

    2011-06-01

    Alloying elements such as aluminium, zinc or rare-earths allow precipitation hardening of magnesium (Mg). The low densities of such strengthened Mg alloys have led to their adoption as aerospace materials and (more recently) they are being considered as armour materials. Consequently, understanding their response to high-strain rate loading is becoming increasingly important. Here, the plate-impact technique was employed to measure longitudinal stress evolution in armour-grade wrought Mg-alloy Elektron 675 under 1D shock loading. The strength and spall behaviour was interrogated, with an estimate made of the material's Hugoniot elastic limit. Finally, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were employed to investigate post-shock microstructural changes.

  5. Diffusion and surface alloying of gradient nanostructured metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbo Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gradient nanostructures (GNSs have been optimized in recent years for desired performance. The diffusion behavior in GNS metals is crucial for understanding the diffusion mechanism and relative characteristics of different interfaces that provide fundamental understanding for advancing the traditional surface alloying processes. In this paper, atomic diffusion, reactive diffusion, and surface alloying processes are reviewed for various metals with a preformed GNS surface layer. We emphasize the promoted atomic diffusion and reactive diffusion in the GNS surface layer that are related to a higher interfacial energy state with respect to those in relaxed coarse-grained samples. Accordingly, different surface alloying processes, such as nitriding and chromizing, have been modified significantly, and some diffusion-related properties have been enhanced. Finally, the perspectives on current research in this field are discussed.

  6. Composition and bandgap-graded semiconductor alloy nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiujuan; Ning, C Z; Pan, Anlian

    2012-01-03

    Semiconductor alloy nanowires with spatially graded compositions (and bandgaps) provide a new material platform for many new multifunctional optoelectronic devices, such as broadly tunable lasers, multispectral photodetectors, broad-band light emitting diodes (LEDs) and high-efficiency solar cells. In this review, we will summarize the recent progress on composition graded semiconductor alloy nanowires with bandgaps graded in a wide range. Depending on different growth methods and material systems, two typical nanowire composition grading approaches will be presented in detail, including composition graded alloy nanowires along a single substrate and those along single nanowires. Furthermore, selected examples of applications of these composition graded semiconductor nanowires will be presented and discussed, including tunable nanolasers, multi-terminal on-nanowire photodetectors, full-spectrum solar cells, and white-light LEDs. Finally, we will make some concluding remarks with future perspectives including opportunities and challenges in this research area.

  7. Aluminum alloy impact sparkling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dudyk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cast machine parts are widely used in many branches of industry. A very important issue is gaining the appropriate knowledge relating to the application of castings in places of explosion risks including but not limited to mining, chemical industry and rescue works. A possibility of explosion risks occurrence following the impact sparkling of the cast metal parts is still not solved problem in scientific research. In relation to this issue, in this article, the results of the study are presented, and relating to the tendency to impact sparkling of the aluminium alloys used in machine building. On the grounds of the results obtained, it was demonstrated that the registered impact sparkles bunches of feathers from the analyzed alloys: AlSi7Mg, (AK7; AlSi9Mg, (AK9; AlSi6Cu4, (AK64 and AlSi11, (AK11 show significant differences between each other. The quantitative analysis of the temperature distribution and nuclei surface area performed on the example of the alloy AK9 (subjected to defined period of corrosion allows for the statement that they are dangerous in conditions of explosion risk. Following this fact, designers and users of machine parts made from these materials should not use them in conditions where the explosive mixtures occur.

  8. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueland, Stian M.; Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-05-23

    Copper-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit excellent shape memory properties in single crystalline form. However, when they are polycrystalline, their shape memory properties are severely compromised by brittle fracture arising from transformation strain incompatibility at grain boundaries and triple junctions. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys (oSMAs) are microstructurally designed SMA structures in which the total surface area exceeds the total grain boundary area, and triple junctions can even be completely absent. Here it is shown how an oligocrystalline structure provides a means of achieving single crystal-like SMA properties without being limited by constraints of single crystal processing. Additionally, the formation of oSMAs typically involves the reduction of the size scale of specimens, and sample size effects begin to emerge. Recent findings on a size effect on the martensitic transformation in oSMAs are compared and a new regime of heat transfer associated with the transformation heat evolution in these alloys is discussed. New results on unassisted two-way shape memory and the effect of loading rate in oSMAs are also reported. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Microstructure and Fatigue Characteristic of AM60B Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mehrzadi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes and reviews the findings of our research on AM60B magnesium alloy conducted in past 8 years. It essentially covers three categories: microstructural study, environmental effect, and fatigue crack growth rate of AM60B. The experimental and numerical studies on the influence of casting defects on this particular material’s properties are reviewed in the first part. It has been shown that the non-uniform solidification of the casting results in variations of the microstructure in different layers (skin and core of the alloy which affects the mechanical properties in those regions. Moreover, the influence of microstructure on fatigue crack initiation and propagation response of the alloy is presented. The influence of several casting defects on the failure mechanism of the material are also numerically analyzed and discussed. The influence of elevated and cold temperatures on the fatigue response of the alloy is reviewed in the second part. Our findings show that the temperature does not have a significant effect on the number of cycles to failure. However, but at some stress level, this effect cannot be dismissed. The fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR response of the alloy at a wide range of stress ratios is also investigated in the last part. The FCGR of the alloy showed a noticeable dependency on the stress ratio. A model is proposed for estimating the FCGR of the alloy, which could provide a good prediction of alloy’s FCGR over a wide range of negative and positive stress ratios. The integrity of the new model is also compared against other models. Finally, the influence of compressive loading on fatigue life of the specimens under constant and random amplitude cyclic loading is investigated experimentally.

  10. Summary of Prior Work on Joining of Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Ian G [ORNL; Tatlock, Gordon J [ORNL; Badairy, H. [University of Liverpool; Chen, C-L. [University of Liverpool

    2009-08-01

    There is a range of joining techniques available for use with ODS alloys, but care should be exercised in matching the technique to the final duty requirements of the joint. The goal for joining ODS alloys is a joint with no local disruption of the distribution of the oxide dispersion, and no significant change in the size and orientation of the alloy microstructure. Not surprisingly, the fusion welding processes typically employed with wrought alloys produce the least satisfactory results with ODS alloys, but some versions, such as fusion spot welding, and the laser and electron-beam welding technologies, have demonstrated potential for producing sound joints. Welds made using solid-state spot welding reportedly have exhibited parent metal properties. Thus, it is possible to employ processes that result in significant disruption of the alloy microstructure, as long as the processing parameters are adjustment to minimize the extent of or influence of the changes in the alloy microstructure. Selection among these joining approaches largely depends on the particular application and component configuration, and an understanding of the relationships among processing, alloy microstructure, and final properties is key. Recent developments have resulted in friction welding evolving to be a prime method for joining ODS sheet products, and variants of brazing/diffusion bonding have shown excellent promise for use with tubes and pipes. The techniques that come closest to the goal defined above involve solid-state diffusion bonding and, in particular, it has been found that secondary recrystallization of joints made by pulsed plasma-assisted diffusion can produce the desired, continuous, large alloy grain structure through the joint. Such joints have exhibited creep rupture failure at >82% of the load needed to fail the monolithic parent alloy at 1000 C.

  11. Triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms: rational synthesis with high-efficiency for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Luo, Zhimin; Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Xiao; Tan, Chaoliang; Li, Hai; Zhang, Hua; Xue, Can

    2014-09-01

    We report the generation of triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms through a rationally designed synthetic strategy based on silver nanoprisms as sacrificial templates. The galvanic replacement between Ag nanoprisms and H2PdCl4 along with co-reduction of Ag+/Pd2+ is responsible for the formation of final prismatic Ag-Pd alloy nanostructures. Significantly, these Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms exhibited superior electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared with the commercial Pd/C catalyst. Such a high catalytic activity is attributed to not only the alloyed Ag-Pd composition but also the dominant {111} facets of the triangular Ag-Pd nanoprisms. This work demonstrates the rational design of bimetallic alloy nanostructures with control of selective crystal facets that are critical to achieve high catalytic activity for fuel cell systems.We report the generation of triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms through a rationally designed synthetic strategy based on silver nanoprisms as sacrificial templates. The galvanic replacement between Ag nanoprisms and H2PdCl4 along with co-reduction of Ag+/Pd2+ is responsible for the formation of final prismatic Ag-Pd alloy nanostructures. Significantly, these Ag-Pd alloy nanoprisms exhibited superior electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared with the commercial Pd/C catalyst. Such a high catalytic activity is attributed to not only the alloyed Ag-Pd composition but also the dominant {111} facets of the triangular Ag-Pd nanoprisms. This work demonstrates the rational design of bimetallic alloy nanostructures with control of selective crystal facets that are critical to achieve high catalytic activity for fuel cell systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03600j

  12. 锑合金化在镁合金中的应用%Application of Antimony Alloying in Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛孟启; 刘劲松; 李子全; 闫明阳; 孙颖迪; 黄敏; 陈可; 刘亚妮

    2012-01-01

    The latest research progress in magnesium alloys containing antimony in recent years is discussed Effects of antimony additions on the cast-ability, microstructure, tensile properties, creep behavior, damping properties and corrosion resistance of Mg-Al and Mg-Zn based alloys are summarized. Finally, some further research orientations of magnesium alloys containing Sb in the present study are suggested.%综述了近年来含锑镁合金的研究进展,总结了锑元素对Mg-Al和Mg-Zn系镁合金铸造性能、金相组织、力学性能、蠕变性能、阻尼性能、耐蚀性能6方面的影响.最后,展望了含锑镁合金的研究方向.

  13. ALLOY DESIGN AND PROPERTY EVALUATION OF TI ALLOY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The XRD analysis indicates that the crystal structure and mechanical properties are sensitive to Sn concentration. ... composites and ceramics, are being explored for use as biomaterials ... ALLOY OF TI-MO-NB-SN ALLOY FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS ..... Almeida, C. A. “Least Square Unit Cell Refinement”. Program ...

  14. Radiation Effects in Refractory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, Steven J.; Wiffen, F. W.

    2004-02-01

    In order to achieve the required low reactor mass per unit electrical power for space reactors, refractory alloys are essential due to their high operating temperature capability that in turn enables high thermal conversion efficiencies. One of the key issues associated with refractory alloys is their performance in a neutron irradiation environment. The available radiation effects data are reviewed for alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Nb and Ta. The largest database is associated with Mo alloys, whereas Re, W and Ta alloys have the least available information. Particular attention is focused on Nb-1Zr, which is a proposed cladding and structural material for the reactor in the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) project. All of the refractory alloys exhibit qualitatively similar temperature-dependent behavior. At low temperatures up to ~0.3TM, where TM is the melting temperature, the dominant effect of radiation is to produce pronounced radiation hardening and concomitant loss of ductility. The radiation hardening also causes a dramatic decrease in the fracture toughness of the refractory alloys. These low temperature radiation effects occur at relatively low damage levels of ~0.1 displacement per atom, dpa (~2×1024 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV). As a consequence, operation at low temperatures in the presence of neutron irradiation must be avoided for all refractory alloys. At intermediate temperatures (0.3 to 0.6 TM), void swelling and irradiation creep are the dominant effects of irradiation. The amount of volumetric swelling associated with void formation in refractory alloys is generally within engineering design limits (>10 dpa). Very little experimental data exist on irradiation creep of refractory alloys, but data for other body centered cubic alloys suggest that the irradiation creep will produce negligible deformation for near-term space reactor applications.

  15. The wear resistance of cobalt free hard surfaced alloys in nuclear power conditions. Literary survey; Kobolttivapaiden pinnoitteiden kulumiskestaevyys ydinvoimalaitosolosuhteissa. Kirjallisuusselvitys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosonen, A.M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-07-01

    Cobalt based alloys are widely used in nuclear power plants despite of the resulting increase of the activity level in primary circuit. The other remarkable source of cobalt is construction materials, in which cobalt is as an impurity element. This report presents the research results from work done in England, USA, Canada, Japan, Sweden and France during the last few years. For example EPRI has funded the research of iron based NOREM surfacing alloys. In Japan iron based CORELOY and Cobaless surfacing alloys as well as ceramic coatings have been investigated. There are plenty of promising results from new cobalt free surfacing alloys in comparison with Stellite 6. The final approvement can be done only when these surfacing alloys have been used in real size valves. When evaluating the behaviour of cobalt free alloys in real circumstances one has to take into account especially the type, size and design of a valve and the welding method. (orig.) (25 refs.).

  16. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, M.H., E-mail: marie-helene.mathon@cea.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrut, M., E-mail: mikael.perrut@onera.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Poirier, L., E-mail: poirier@nitruvid.com [Bodycote France and Belgium, 9 r Jean Poulmarch, 95100 Argenteuil (France); Ratti, M., E-mail: mathieu.ratti@snecma.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hervé, N., E-mail: nicolas.herve@cea.fr [CEA, DRT, LITEN, F38054 Grenoble (France); Carlan, Y. de, E-mail: yann.decarlan@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-01-15

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH{sub 2} powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy.

  17. Metallographic preparation of Zn-21Al-2Cu alloy for analysis by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, M G; Martínez-Flores, E E; Torres-Villaseñor, G; Escalera, M Dolores

    2014-08-01

    Samples of Zn-21Al-2Cu alloy (Zinalco) that will be heavily deformed were prepared using five different manual mechanical metallographic methods. Samples were analyzed before tensile testing using the orientation imaging microscopy-electron backscatter diffraction (OIM-EBSD) technique. The effect of type and particle size during the final polishing stages for this material were studied in order to identify a method that produces a flat, damage free surface with a roughness of about 50 nm and clean from oxide layers, thereby producing diffraction patterns with high image quality (IQ) and adequate confidence indexes (CI). Our results show that final polishing with alumina and silica, as was previously suggested by other research groups for alloys that are difficult to prepare or alloys with low melting point, are not suitable for manual metallographic preparation of this alloy. Indexes of IQ and CI can be used to evaluate methods of metallographic preparation of samples studied using the OIM-EBSD technique.

  18. Microstructure and texture evolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy during rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The production of magnesium alloy sheets normally involves several processing stages including hot rolling, cold rolling and intermediate annealing. The microstructure and texture evolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets in different processing states were investigated by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. It is found that the microstructure of hot-rolled sheets is dominated by recrystallized equiaxed grains, while that of cold-rolled sheets is dominated by deformation twins. With final annealing applied on the cold-rolled sheets, fine recrystallization grains are obtained and ductility of the samples is increased. It is also found that the texture of magnesium alloy sheets prefers the basal texture, and other compositions of texture are relatively weak. Moreover,final annealing does not significantly affect texture distribution. The results of this study provide useful guidelines for optimizing the processing of magnesium alloys.

  19. Properties of laser alloyed surface layers on magnesium base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galun, R.; Weisheit, A.; Mordike, B.L. (Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik)

    1998-01-01

    The investigations have shown that laser surface alloying is a promising process to improve the wear and corrosion properties of magnesium base alloys without affecting the initial bulk properties like the low density. With an alloying element combination of aluminium and nickel the wear rate in the scratch test was reduced by 90% compared to untreated pure magnesium. Additionally the corrosion resistance was improved by laser alloying with this element combination. Because of distortion or crack formation in the case of large area treatments, the laser alloying should be limited to the treatment of smaller areas. In the near future this process could be an interesting alternative to surface coating or to a partially reinforcement with ceramic fibres or particles. (orig.)

  20. Structure dependence of the dynamic Young modulus, G modulus and the attenuation in high temperature forged alloys and cast alloys. Final report. [IN 100; IN 617; IN 713LC; IN 738LC; IN 738 LC DS; IN 800 H; IN 907; IN 939; Nimonic 75; Nimonic 90; Udimet 500; Udimet 720; MA 6000 DS; MA 754; MAR M247; MAR M002 mod; CMSX 2; CMSX 6; B1914 DS; X3CrNi18 9; X22CrMoV12 1; FSX414]. Gefuegeabhaengigkeit des dynamischen E-Moduls, G-Moduls und der Daempfung bei hochwarmfesten Schmiede- und Gusslegierungen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, P.; Kuhn, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    This work consists of two parts. The first part reports on the measurement of the elastic properties and the thermal expansion coefficients of selected, technically important high temperature alloys (as e.g. cast alloys and forged alloys, directionally solidified alloys, single crystals) in the temperature range of 20deg C to 1200deg C. The orientation dependence and the structure dependence of these characteristics are of special interest especially in this study. The second part reports on investigations of selected materials with regard to the quantitative relationships between the elastic properties of single-phase single crystals and multiphase single crystals, directionally solidified alloys as well as polycrystals without und with texture, in the temperature range of 20deg C to 1200deg C. The limiting value concept and the phase mixing rules are used for the evaluation. (orig./MM) With 133 figs., 18 tabs., 322 refs.

  1. Thermal Aging Effects on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consists of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, is now being widely used as the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing material for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its mechanical property, thermal expansion coefficient, and corrosion resistance. The heat affected zone (HAZ) on Alloy 600 which is formed by welding process is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al. crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions [3]. And according to Z.P. Lu et al. CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. To predict the life time of components, there is a model which can calculate the effective degradation years (EDYs) of the material as a function of operating temperature. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects the hardness of dissimilar metal weld from the fusion boundary to Alloy 600 base metal and the residual strain at Alloy 600 heat affected zone. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. The hardness, measured by Vickers hardness tester, peaked near the fusion boundary between Alloy 182 and Alloy 600, and it decreases as the picked point goes to Alloy 600 base metal. Even though the formation of precipitate such as Cr carbide, thermal aging doesn't affect the value and the tendency of hardness because of reduced residual stress. According to kernel average misorientation mapping, residual strain decreases when the material thermally aged. And finally, in 30 years simulated specimen, the high residual strain almost disappears. Therefore, the influence of residual strain on primary water stress corrosion cracking can be diminished when the material undergoes thermal aging.

  2. Effects of Palladium Content, Quaternary Alloying, and Thermomechanical Processing on the Behavior of Ni-Ti-Pd Shape Memory Alloys for Actuator Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen

    2008-01-01

    these alloys during repeated actuation were investigated. Finally, the effect of quaternary alloying on the thermal stability of NiTiPdX alloys is determined via thermal cycling of the materials to increasing temperatures under load. It was found that solid solution additions of platinum and gold resulted in about a 30 C increase in upper use temperature compared to the baseline NiTiPd alloy, providing an added measure of over-temperature protection.

  3. Formal Safety and Security Assessment of an Avionic Architecture with Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Brunel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach based on Alloy to formally model and assess a system architecture with respect to safety and security requirements. We illustrate this approach by considering as a case study an avionic system developed by Thales, which provides guidance to aircraft. We show how to define in Alloy a metamodel of avionic architectures with a focus on failure propagations. We then express the specific architecture of the case study in Alloy. Finally, we express and check properties that refer to the robustness of the architecture to failures and attacks.

  4. Corrosion behavior of Mg and Mg-Zn alloys in simulated body fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jia-cheng; WU Sha; QIAO Li-ying; WANG Yong

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of Mg and Mg-Zn in simulated body fluid was studied.The mass loss of pure Mg,Mg-Zn-Zr and Mg-Zn-Zr-Y in simulated body fluid was measured using photovoltaic scale meter.Corrosion rate was determined through electrochemical tests.Finally,the corrosion mechanism was tbermodynamically studied.The results show that the corrosion rate decreases with the lapse of time for both pure Mg and Mg alloys.The purer the alloy,the borer the corrosion resistance exhibits.The corrosion behavior of Mg alloy is improved by the addition of trace Y.

  5. Mechanical alloying of Fe-Mn and Fe-Mn-Si

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The ball milling of Fe-24Mn and Fe-24Mn-6Si mixed powders has been performed by the high energy ball milling technique.By employing X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer measurements.The ccmposition evolution during the milling process has been investigated.The results indicate the formation of paramagnetic Fe-Mn or Fe-Mn-Si alloys with a metastable fcc phase as final products.which imply that the Fe and Mn proceed a co-diffusion meenanism through the surface of fragmented powders.The thermal stability and composition evolution of the as-milled alloys were discussed comparing with the bulk alloy,.

  6. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  7. Electron Theory in Alloy Design

    CERN Document Server

    Pettifor, DG

    1992-01-01

    Presents recent developments in electron theory which have impacted upon the search for novel alloys with improved mechanical or magnetic properties. The ten chapters outline the ability of electron theory to make quantitative predictions (such as heats of formation, planar fault energies, shear moduli and magnetic anisotropy), and to provide simplifying concepts for understanding trends in alloy behaviour.

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Hot Pressed Cu-Sn Powder Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nassef

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu-Sn based alloy powders with additives of elemental Pb or C were densified by hot pressing technique. The influence of densifying on the properties of the hot pressed materials was investigated. The properties, such as the hardness, compressive strength, and wear resistance of these materials, were determined. The hot pressed Cu-Sn specimens included intermetallic/phases, which were homogeneously distributed. The presence of graphite improved the wear resistance of Cu-Sn alloys three times. Similarly, the presence of lead improved the densification parameter of Cu-Sn alloys three times. There was no significant difference in the mechanical behavior associated with the addition of Pb to the Cu-Sn alloys, although Cu-Pb alloys showed considerably higher ultimate strength and higher elongation. The Cu-Sn-C alloys had lower strength compared with those of Cu-Sn alloys. Evidence of severe melting spots was noticed in the higher magnifications of the compression fracture surface of 85% Cu-10% Sn-5% C and 80% Cu-10% Sn-10% Pb alloys. This was explained by the release of load at the final event of the fracture limited area.

  9. Study of microstructure in vanadium–palladium alloys by X-ray diffraction technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Ghosh; S K Chattopadhyay; A K Meikap; S K Chatterjee; P Chatterjee

    2007-10-01

    Present study considers microstructural characterization of vanadium-based palladium (V–Pd) alloys, which are widely used in marine environment due to their high corrosion resistance. The X-ray diffraction line profile analysis (XRDLPA) have been used to assess the microstructure in body centred cubic (bcc) V–Pd alloys having four different nominal compositions in wt.%. X-ray diffraction line broadening analysis on V–Pd alloys has been performed by using different methods like the Warren–Averbach, double-Voigt and Rietveld methods. Finally microstructural defect parameters such as domain size (), r.m.s. microstrain 〈 2 〉1/2, twin fault ('), spacing fault () and deformation stacking fault () were evaluated in these alloys by Fourier line shape analysis using Rietveld method in which the X-ray diffraction profiles of these alloys were described by the pseudo-Voigt function to fit the experimental data. From analysis it has been observed that twin fault, ', and the spacing fault, , are totally absent in these bcc alloy systems because the twin fault, ', has been observed to be either negative or very small (within experimental error limit) for these alloy systems and the spacing fault, , appears to be negative. This analysis also revealed that the deformation stacking fault, , is significantly present in this alloy system and increases with Pd content.

  10. Review on long-period stacking-ordered structures in Mg-Zn-RE alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of high-strength magnesium alloys is focused on the role of the strengthening phases with a novel long-period stacking-ordered (LPSO) structure. This review detailed the main factors influencing the formation of LPSO phases, including alloying ele-ments, preparation methods, and heat treatments. Furthermore, process control in structure types, formation and transformation behavior, strengthening and toughening mechanisms of the LPSO phase were discussed. Finally, the current problems ...

  11. Mo-Si alloy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this task is to develop new-generation corrosion-resistant Mo-Si intermetallic alloys as hot components in advanced fossil energy conversion and combustion systems. The initial effort is devoted to Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3}-base (MSB) alloys containing boron additions. Three MSB alloys based on Mo-10.5Si-1.1B (wt %), weighing 1500 g were prepared by hot pressing of elemental and alloy powders at temperatures to 1600{degrees}C in vacuum. Microporosities and glassy-phase (probably silicate phases) formations are identified as the major concerns for preparation of MSB alloys by powder metallurgy. Suggestions are made to alleviate the problems of material processing.

  12. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.; Farkas, D.; Labdon, M. B.; Nagaswami, N.; Pregger, B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was determined. The following major elements were studied: (1) identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements; (2) development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients; (3) development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase change materials; and (4) identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. Several eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase change media.

  13. Basic studies of 3-5 high efficiency cell components. Annual subcontract report, 15 August 1989--14 August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Pierret, R.F.; Carpenter, M.S.; Chuang, H.L.; Dodd, P.E.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M.E.; Lush, G.B.; Stellwag, T.B. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This project`s objective is to improve our understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research itself consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell ``building blocks`` such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project`s goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. This report describes our progress during the fifth and final year of the project. During the past five years, we`ve teamed a great deal about heavy doping effects in p{sup +} and n{sup +} GaAs and have explored their implications for solar cells. We have developed an understanding of the dominant recombination losses in present-day, high-efficiency cells. We`ve learned to appreciated the importance of recombination at the perimeter of the cell and have developed techniques for chemically passivating such edges. Finally, we`ve demonstrated that films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are suitable for high-efficiency cell research.

  14. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  15. DC Electric Arc Furnace Application for Production of Nickel-Boron Master Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Murat; Tasyürek, Kerem Can; Bugdayci, Mehmet; Turan, Ahmet; Yücel, Onuralp

    2017-09-01

    In this study, nickel-boron (Ni-B) alloys were produced via a carbothermic reduction starting from boric acid (H3BO3) with high-purity nickel oxide (NiO), charcoal, and wood chips in a direct current arc furnace. In electric arc furnace experiments, different starting mixtures were used, and their effects on the chemical compositions of the final Ni-B alloys were investigated. After the reduction and melting stages, Ni-B alloys were obtained by tapping from the bottom of the furnace. The samples from the designated areas were also taken and analyzed. The chemical composition of the final alloys and selected samples were measured with wet chemical analysis. The Ni-B alloys had a composition of up to 14.82 mass% B. The phase contents of the final alloys and selected samples were measured using x-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD data helped predict possible reactions and reaction mechanisms. The material and energy balance calculations were made via the XRD Rietveld and chemical compositions. Nickel boride phases started to form 600 mm below the surface. The targeted NiB phase was detected at the tapping zone of the crucible (850-900 mm depth). The energy consumption was 1.84-4.29 kWh/kg, and the electrode consumption was 10-12 g/kg of raw material charged.

  16. Determination of water movement in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain using chloride, bromide, and chlorine isotopes as environmental tracers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-31

    This report, prepared by Hydro Geo Chem staff for Los Alamos National Laboratory, summarizes work conducted by the company under Subcontract 9-XG1-N3993-1. The ultimate objective of this work is to characterize the movement of subsurface water in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Data produced under this contract is to be used by the US Department of Energy in its Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) to help determine hydrologic flows that may affect the performance of a potential nuclear waste repository. The data may be used in the licensing proceedings, and certain quality assurance procedures have thus been required. The work has focussed on measuring the distribution of environmental tracers-chlorine-36, chlorine, and bromine-and on evaluating the depth to which these conservative solutes have percolated in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. The following discussion summarizes progress made on the tasks outlined in the original Scope of Work. Details of this work and all data acquired by Hydro Geo Chem for this subcontract have been systematically organized in logbooks and laboratory notebooks. These documents have been structured to make it easy to trace the analytical history of a sample, from time of receipt to the final analytical results.

  17. 不耐烦行为生产库存系统最优生产和分包控制%Optimal Production and Subcontracting Control in a Production-Inventory System with Impatient Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王康周; 江志斌; 李娜; 李国威

    2012-01-01

    We present the optimal production and subcontracting control in a production-inventory system with balking. If there are backorders and the estimated waiting time is greater than the maximum delay he expected, an arriving customer may refuse to place the order and leave system immediately. Manager regulates system by two thresholds, base stock level and base subcontracting level. We model the dynamics of the system as a Markov chain and then give the numerical analysis. We find that, for the systems with strategic customers, subcontracting may enhance profit even though subcontracting cost is higher than lost sales cost. Managerial insights are proposed lastly.%研究了具有止步行为不耐烦顾客的生产库存系统的生产和分包控制问题.当顾客到达时,若有订单积压,则有部分顾客由于预期等待时间过长而放弃购买后离开系统,形成订单损失成本.在综合考虑订单收益和各种成本的基础上,企业通过基本库存水平和基本分包水平两个阈值对系统进行控制,以实现整体利润最大.建立了系统的Markov模型,得到系统稳态概率和性能指标,证明了最优库存水平和最优分包阈值的存在性及取值范围,并设计了搜索算法.利用他们对系统进行了数值分析.我们发现,基本库存基本分包控制策略下的系统性能优于基本库存策略下的系统性能.而且,即使当生产分包成本大于订单损失成本时,企业选择生产分包仍有可能获得收益.

  18. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of CdTe for high efficiency thin film PV devices: Annual subcontract report, 26 January 1999--25 January 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, P. V.; Kee, R.; Wolden, C.; Kestner, J.; Raja, L.; Kaydanov, V.; Ohno, T.; Collins, R.; Fahrenbruch, A.

    2000-05-30

    ITN's three year project Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) of CdTe for High Efficiency Thin Film PV Devices has the overall objectives of improving thin film CdTe PV manufacturing technology and increasing CdTe PV device power conversion efficiency. CdTe deposition by APCVD employs the same reaction chemistry as has been used to deposit 16% efficient CdTe PV films, i.e., close spaced sublimation, but employs forced convection rather than diffusion as a mechanism of mass transport. Tasks of the APCVD program center on demonstration of APCVD of CdTe films, discovery of fundamental mass transport parameters, application of established engineering principles to the deposition of CdTe films, and verification of reactor design principles which could be used to design high throughput, high yield manufacturing equipment. Additional tasks relate to improved device measurement and characterization procedures that can lead to a more fundamental understanding of CdTe PV device operation and ultimately to higher device conversion efficiency and greater stability. Under the APCVD program, device analysis goes beyond conventional one-dimensional device characterization and analysis toward two dimension measurements and modeling. Accomplishments of the second year of the APCVD subcontract include: deposition of the first APCVD CdTe; identification of deficiencies in the first generation APCVD reactor; design, fabrication and testing of a ``simplified'' APCVD reactor; deposition of the first dense, adherent APCVD CdTe films; fabrication of the first APCVD CdTe PV device; modeling effects of CdSTe and SnOx layers; and electrical modeling of grain boundaries.

  19. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  20. About Alloying of Aluminum Alloys with Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    An attempt is made to advance Elagin's principles of alloying of aluminum alloys with transition metals (TM) such as Mn, Cr, Zr, Ti, V with allowance for the ternary equilibrium and metastable Al - TM - TM phase diagrams. The key moments in the analysis of the phase diagrams are the curves (surfaces) of joint solubility of TM in aluminum, which bound the range of the aluminum solid solution. It is recommended to use combinations of such TM (two and more), the introduction of which into aluminum alloys widens the phase range of the aluminum solid solution.

  1. Isothermal Aging Precipitate of TB17 Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Zhe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM, X-Ray Diffraction(XRD and Optical Microscope(OMwere employed to investigate the aging precipitation behavior of a new type of ultra-high strength TB17 titanium alloy. The results show that during heat solution treated in the β phase field followed by aging the secondary α phase is nucleated, precipitated and grew on the β phase matrix,and the precipitated phase is lamellar structure which has burgers relation with the matrix. The secondary α phase content is increased rapidly and finally reach a steady-state as aging time increased and the final product of aging consists of α phase and β phase. there is a good linearity relationship between the content of secondary α phase and the hardness of age hardening. The TB17 titanium alloy isothermal phase transformation kinetics can be described by JMAK equation.

  2. 76 FR 62040 - Pure Magnesium From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Third Sunset...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ..., the Russian Federation and Ukraine; Notice of Amended Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair..., thorium, zirconium and rare earths. Excluded from the scope of the order are alloy primary magnesium (that...

  3. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  4. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  5. Density of Liquid Ni-Cr Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The density of liquid Ni-Cr alloy was measured by a modified sessile drop method. The density of liquid Ni-Cr alloywas found to decrease with increasing temperature and Cr concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of liquidNi-Cr alloy increases with increasing the Cr concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of Ni-Cr alloy determinedin the present work shows a positive deviation from the linear molar volume.

  6. Mechanically Alloyed High Entropy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, G.; Adrian, M. M.; Csaki, I.; Popescu, C. A.; Mitrică, D.; Vasile, S.; Carcea, I.

    2016-08-01

    In the last years high entropy alloys have been investigated due to their high hardness, high temperature stability and unusual properties that make these alloys to have significant interest. In comparison with traditional alloys that are based on two or three major elements, this new generation alloys consists at least of 5 principal elements, with the concentration between 5 and 35 at.%. The present paper reports synthesis of high entropy alloys (HEA) and high entropy composites (HEC) synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA). The equiatomic AlCrFeNiMn matrix was used for creating the HEA matrix, starting from elemental powders and as reinforcing material for composites was used pure graphite. The mechanical alloying process was carried out at different duration, in a high energy planetary ball mill, under argon atmosphere. The elemental powders alloying began after '5 hours of milling and was complete after 40 hours. The mechanical alloyed matrix and composite was pressed and heat treated under argon protection. The elemental powers were investigated for physical - technological properties, and by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Phase pressing operation was realized with a hydraulic press and the applied pressure was progressive. The sintering process was carried out at 850°C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction revealed that the MA process resulted in solid solutions formation and also revealed body- centred cubic (BCC) and face-centred cubic (FCC) structures with average grain size around 40 nm. In addition, nanoscale particles were highlighted by scanning electron microscopy, as well as the homogeneity of the chemical composition of the matrix and composite that was confirmed by EDX microanalysis. It was noted that HEA matrix and HEA composites were processed with a high degree of compaction and with a quite large capacity of mixed powder densification (around 70%).

  7. Selection of High Performance Alloy for Gas Turbine Blade Using Multiphysics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Khawaja

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the extensive increase in the utilization of energy resources in the modern era, the need of energy extraction from various resources has pronounced in recent years. Thus comprehensive efforts have been made around the globe in the technological development of turbo machines where means of energy extraction is energized fluids. This development led the aviation industry to power boost due to better performing engines. Meanwhile, the structural conformability requirements relative to the functional requirements have also increased with the advent of newer, better performing materials. Thus there is a need to study the material behavior and its usage with the idea of selecting the best possible material for its application. In this work a gas turbine blade of a small turbofan engine, where geometry and aerodynamic data was available, was analyzed for its structural behavior in the proposed mission envelope, where the engine turbine is subjected to high thermal, inertial and aerodynamic loads. Multiphysics Finite Element (FE linear stress analysis was carried out on the turbine blade. The results revealed the upper limit of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS for the blade. Based on the limiting factor, high performance alloys were selected from the literature. The two most recommended alloy categories for gas turbine blades are NIMONIC and INCONEL from where total of 21 types of INCONEL alloys and 12 of NIMONIC alloys, available on commercial bases, were analyzed individually to meet the structural requirements. After applying selection criteria, four alloys were finalized from NIMONIC and INCONEL alloys for further analysis. On the basis of stress-strain behavior of finalized alloys, the Multiphysics FE nonlinear stress analysis was then carried out for the selection of the individual alloy by imposing a restriction of Ultimate Factor of Safety (UFOS of 1.33 and yield strength. Final selection is made keeping in view other factors

  8. Rapidly solidified aluminum alloy powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S.S.; Chun, B.S.; Won, C.W.; Lee, B.S.; Kim, H.K.; Ryu, M. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Antolovich, S.D. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Miniaturization and weight reduction are becoming increasingly important in the fabrication of vehicles. In particular, aluminum-silicon alloys are the logical choice for automotive parts such as pistons and cylinders liners because of their excellent wear resistance and low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, it is difficult to produce aluminum-silicon alloys with silicon contents greater than 20 wt% via ingot metallurgy, because strength is drastically reduced by the coarsening of primary silicon particles. This article describes an investigation of rapid solidification powder metallurgy techniques developed in an effort to prevent coarsening of the primary silicon particles in aluminum-silicon alloys.

  9. Alloying and Casting Furnace for Shape Memory Alloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The concept in the proposed project is to create a melting, alloying and casting furnace for the processing titanium based SMA using cold crucible techniques. The...

  10. Alloy design for intrinsically ductile refractory high-entropy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Saad; Shafeie, Samrand; Hu, Qiang; Ahlström, Johan; Persson, Christer; Veselý, Jaroslav; Zýka, Jiří; Klement, Uta; Guo, Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Refractory high-entropy alloys (RHEAs), comprising group IV (Ti, Zr, Hf), V (V, Nb, Ta), and VI (Cr, Mo, W) refractory elements, can be potentially new generation high-temperature materials. However, most existing RHEAs lack room-temperature ductility, similar to conventional refractory metals and alloys. Here, we propose an alloy design strategy to intrinsically ductilize RHEAs based on the electron theory and more specifically to decrease the number of valence electrons through controlled alloying. A new ductile RHEA, Hf0.5Nb0.5Ta0.5Ti1.5Zr, was developed as a proof of concept, with a fracture stress of close to 1 GPa and an elongation of near 20%. The findings here will shed light on the development of ductile RHEAs for ultrahigh-temperature applications in aerospace and power-generation industries.

  11. Pore structure and mechanical properties of directionally solidified porous aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komissarchuk Olga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous aluminum alloys produced by the metal-gas eutectic method or GASAR process need to be performed under a certain pressure of hydrogen, and to carry over melt to a tailor-made apparatus that ensures directional solidification. Hydrogen is driven out of the melt, and then the quasi-cylindrical pores normal to the solidification front are usually formed. In the research, the effects of processing parameters (saturation pressure, solidification pressure, temperature, and holding time on the pore structure and porosity of porous aluminum alloys were analyzed. The mechanical properties of Al-Mg alloys were studied by the compressive tests, and the advantages of the porous structure were indicated. By using the GASAR method, pure aluminum, Al-3wt.%Mg, Al-6wt.%Mg and Al-35wt.%Mg alloys with oriented pores have been successfully produced under processing conditions of varying gas pressure, and the relationship between the final pore structure and the solidification pressure, as well as the influences of Mg quantity on the pore size, porosity and mechanical properties of Al-Mg alloy were investigated. The results show that a higher pressure of solidification tends to yield smaller pores in aluminum and its alloys. In the case of Al-Mg alloys, it was proved that with the increasing of Mg amount, the mechanical properties of the alloys sharply deteriorate. However, since Al-3%Mg and Al-6wt.%Mg alloys are ductile metals, their porous samples have greater compressive strength than that of the dense samples due to the existence of pores. It gives the opportunity to use them in industry at the same conditions as dense alloys with savings in weight and material consumption.

  12. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPt High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Orlando; Noebe, Ronald; Biles, Tiffany; Garg, Anita; Palczer, Anna; Scheiman, Daniel; Seifert, Hans Jurgen; Kaufman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Pt additions substituted for Ni in NiTi alloys are known to increase the transformation temperature of the alloy but only at fairly high Pt levels. However, until now only ternary compositions with a very specific stoichiometry, Ni50-xPtxTi50, have been investigated and then only to very limited extent. In order to learn about this potential high-temperature shape memory alloy system, a series of over twenty alloys along and on either side of a line of constant stoichiometry between NiTi and TiPt were arc melted, homogenized, and characterized in terms of their microstructure, transformation temperatures, and hardness. The resulting microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the phase compositions quantified by energy dispersive spectroscopy."Stoichiometric" compositions along a line of constant stoichiometry between NiTi to TiPt were essentially single phase but by any deviations from a stoichiometry of (Ni,Pt)50Ti50 resulted in the presence of at least two different intermetallic phases, depending on the overall composition of the alloy. Essentially all alloys, whether single or two-phase, still under went a martensitic transformation. It was found that the transformation temperatures were depressed with initial Pt additions but at levels greater than 10 at.% the transformation temperature increased linearly with Pt content. Also, the transformation temperatures were relatively insensitive to alloy stoichiometry within the range of alloys examined. Finally, the dependence of hardness on Pt content for a series of Ni50-xPtxTi50 alloys showed solution softening at low Pt levels, while hardening was observed in ternary alloys containing more than about 10 at.% Pt. On either side of these "stoichiometric" compositions, hardness was also found to increase significantly.

  13. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida, A.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable highstrength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO2 laser. This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloys, over the last years.

    En el presente trabajo se estudia la aleación superficial mediante láser de aluminio con metales de transición. El cromo y el molibdeno son particularmente interesantes porque producen aleaciones de alta resistencia y por el bajo coeficiente de difusión y solución sólida en aluminio. Para producir estas aleaciones se ha seguido un procedimiento desarrollado en dos partes. En primer lugar, el material se alea usando una baja velocidad de procesado y en segundo lugar la estructura se modifica mediante un refinamiento posterior. Este procedimiento se ha empleado en la producción de aleaciones Al-Cr, Al-Mo y Al-Nb mediante aleación con láser de CO2 de polvos de Cr, Mo o Nb en aluminio y la aleación 7175. Este trabajo es una revisión del desarrollado en el Instituto Superior Técnico de Lisboa en los últimos años.

  14. Design and analysis of microalgal open pond systems for the purpose of producing fuels: A subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, J.C.; Goebel, R.P.

    1987-04-01

    The designs and systems developed include many innovative concepts and experiments, including the design and operation of a low-cost system. Cost-effectiveness is realized by minimizing capital costs of the system and achieving efficient use of inputs. Extensive engineering analysis of carbonation, mixing, and harvesting subsystems has elucidated both the lowest cost, most efficient options and the essential parameters needed to construct, test, and evaluate these subsystems. The use of growth ponds sealed with clay and lined with crushed rock results in construction cost savings of 50% over ponds lined with synthetic membranes. In addition a low-cost but efficient design allows improvements in technology to have maximum impact on final product cost reductions. In addition to the innovations in low-cost construction, the operational efficiency of the design is both higher and more feasible than that attained by any previous system concept of comparable scale. The water analysis has led to operational specifications that minimize water use and virtually eliminate losses of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. The carbon dioxide injection system is designed for 95% efficiency, but is still low in cost. The construction of a large-scale, covered anaerobic lagoon to recycle carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus has not been attempted at the scale analyzed here. Yet efficient recycling is essential for achieving economic affordability. 23 refs., 21 figs., 53 tabs.

  15. Metallic alloy stability studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    The dimensional stability of candidate cryogenic wind tunnel model materials was investigated. Flat specimens of candidate materials were fabricated and cryo-cycled to assess relative dimensional stability. Existing 2-dimensional airfoil models as well as models in various stages of manufacture were also cryo-cycled. The tests indicate that 18 Ni maraging steel offers the greatest dimensional stability and that PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel is the most stable of the stainless steels. Dimensional stability is influenced primarily by metallurgical transformations (austenitic to martensitic) and manufacturing-induced stresses. These factors can be minimized by utilization of stable alloys, refinement of existing manufacturing techniques, and incorporation of new manufacturing technologies.

  16. Lead telluride alloy thermoelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. LaLonde

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to use solid-state thermoelectrics for waste heat recovery has reinvigorated the field of thermoelectrics in tackling the challenges of energy sustainability. While thermoelectric generators have decades of proven reliability in space, from the 1960s to the present, terrestrial uses have so far been limited to niche applications on Earth because of a relatively low material efficiency. Lead telluride alloys were some of the first materials investigated and commercialized for generators but their full potential for thermoelectrics has only recently been revealed to be far greater than commonly believed. By reviewing some of the past and present successes of PbTe as a thermoelectric material we identify the issues for achieving maximum performance and successful band structure engineering strategies for further improvements that can be applied to other thermoelectric materials systems.

  17. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, L. del, E-mail: leire.del-campo@cnrs-orleans.f [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Perez-Saez, R.B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.e [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Gonzalez-Fernandez, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Planta de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Gonzalez-Martin, P. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Parque empresarial San Fernando, Avda. Castilla 2, 28830 San Fernando de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Tello, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-01-21

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 {mu}m), sample temperature (200-650 {sup o}C) and emission angle (0-85{sup o}) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  18. Brazing titanium structures. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pressly, H.B.

    1977-03-01

    A vacuum furnace brazing process using Ag-5A1-0.5Mn brazing alloy has been developed for joining titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V structures. Lap-shear strengths of the braze joints and the effects of the brazing thermal cycle on the tensile and bending properties of mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy sheet are reported. Nondestructive test methods were evaluated for detecting defects in these braze joints.

  19. Effects of homogenization on microstructures and properties of a new type Al-Mg-Mn-Zr-Ti-Er alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, L.Z., E-mail: helizi@epm.neu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004, Liaoning (China); Li, X.H. [Chalco Ruimin Corporation, Limited, Fuzhou 350015 (China); Liu, X.T.; Wang, X.J.; Zhang, H.T.; Cui, J.Z. [Key Lab of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004, Liaoning (China)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: These new type alloys are very potential for increased use in aerospace and automobile industries. However, most of published reports have focused on the effects of Cu, Sc, Zr, Ag, rare metals and Si additions, Portevin-LeChatelier effect, corrosion properties, friction stir welding and superplasticity in 5000-series aluminum alloy, few investigated on Er and stepped homogenization on the precipitation of dispersoids in Al-Mg-Mn alloy. The purpose of this work was to study the effects of Er and homogenization treatment on mechanical properties and microstructural evolution in new type Al-Mg-Mn-Er alloy. - Abstract: Microstructural evolutions and mechanical properties of Al-Mg-Mn-Zr-Ti-Er alloy after homogenization were investigated in detail by optical microscope (OM), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), transmission electronic microscope (TEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) and tensile test. A maximum tensile strength is obtained when the alloy homogenized at 510 deg. C for 16 h. With increasing preheating temperature (200-400 deg. C), the strength of the alloy finial homogenized at 490 deg. C for 16 h increases. When the preheating temperature is {>=}300 deg. C, the strengths of the two-step homogenized alloys are higher than those of the single homogenized alloys. The preheating stage plays an important role in the microstructures and properties of the final homogenized alloy. Many fine (Mn,Fe)Al{sub 6} precipitates when the preheating temperature is 400 deg. C. ErAl{sub 3} phase cannot be observed during preheating stage. Plenty of fine (Mn,Fe)Al{sub 6} and ErAl{sub 3} precipitate in finial homogenized alloy when the preheating temperature is {>=}300 deg. C. The Al-Mg-Mn-Zr-Ti-Er alloy is effectively strengthened by substructure and dispersoids of (Mn,Fe)Al{sub 6} and ErAl{sub 3}.

  20. Fabrication, magnetostriction properties and applications of Tb-Dy-Fe alloys: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-juan Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As an excellent giant-magnetostrictive material, Tb-Dy-Fe alloys (based on Tb0.27-0.30Dy0.73-0.70Fe1.9-2 Laves compound can be applied in many engineering fields, such as sonar transducer systems, sensors, and micro-actuators. However, the cost of the rare earth elements Tb and Dy is too high to be widely applied for the materials. Nowadays, there are two different ways to substitute for these alloying elements. One is to partially replace Tb or Dy by cheaper rare earth elements, such as Pr, Nd, Sm and Ho; and the other is to use non-rare earth elements, such as Co, Al, Mn, Si, Ce, B, Be and C, to substitute Fe to form single MgCu2-type Laves phase and a certain amount of Re-rich phase, which can reduce the brittleness and improve the corrosion resistance of the alloy. This paper systemically introduces the development, the fabrication methods and the corresponding preferred growth directions of Tb-Dy-Fe alloys. In addition, the effects of alloying elements and heat treatment on magnetostrictive and mechanical properties of Tb-Dy-Fe alloys are also reviewed, respectively. Finally, some possible applications of Tb-Dy-Fe alloys are presented.

  1. Opportunities and challenges for the biodegradable magnesium alloys as next-generation biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenjiang

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, biodegradable magnesium alloys emerge as a new class of biomaterials for tissue engineering and medical devices. Deploying biodegradable magnesium-based materials not only avoids a second surgical intervention for implant removal but also circumvents the long-term foreign body effect of permanent implants. However, these materials are often subjected to an uncontrolled and fast degradation, acute toxic responses and rapid structural failure presumably due to a localized, too rapid corrosion process. The patented Mg-Nd-Zn-based alloys (JiaoDa BioMg [JDBM]) have been developed in Shanghai Jiao Tong University in recent years. The alloy series exhibit lower biodegradation rate and homogeneous nanophasic degradation patterns as compared with other biodegradable Mg alloys. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests using various types of cells indicate excellent biocompatibility of JDBM. Finally, bone implants using JDBM-1 alloy and cardiovascular stents using JDBM-2 alloy have been successfully fabricated and in vivo long-term assessment via implantation in animal model have been performed. The results confirmed the reduced degradation rate in vivo, excellent tissue compatibility and long-term structural and mechanical durability. Thus, this novel Mg-alloy series with highly uniform nanophasic biodegradation represent a major breakthrough in the field and a promising candidate for manufacturing the next generation biodegradable implants.

  2. Effect of Repeated Firings of Porcelain on Bond Strength of Two Base Metal Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerami Panah F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of oxides on the surface of the metal are proven to contribute to the formation of strong bonding. However, The base metal alloys are expected to exhibit more oxidation than high gold alloys, increase in oxide layer thickness due to repeated firing in them can reduce the bond strength. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of repeated porcelain firing on the bond strength of two base metal alloys (Minalux and Verabond II. Sixteen metal plates (20x5x0.5 from each alloy were cast and prepared according to the manufacturers' instruction. Porcelain with uniform thickness (Imm was applied on the middle one third of metal plates. After this stage, each alloy group divided to three subgroups. Group I was fired for the second time to form the final glaze, group II and III were fired two and four more times respectively. Specimens were subjected to 3-point flexural test in a digital tritest machine. Results showed no significant differences between bond strength of two alloys. Also results showed repeated firing had no significant effect on bond strength. Due to these findings, this study support similarity of two alloys (Minalux and Verabond II in their bond strength with porcelain.

  3. Non-isothermal precipitation behaviors of Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys with different Zn contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, M.X., E-mail: mingxingguo@skl.ustb.edu.cn; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X.K.; Zhang, J.S.; Zhuang, L.Z.

    2016-07-04

    The non-isothermal precipitation behaviors of Al–Mg–Si–Cu alloys with different Zn contents were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, hardness measurement and high resolution transmission electron microscope characterization. The results show that Zn addition has a significant effect on the GP zone dissolution and precipitation of Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys. And their activation energies change with the changes of Zn content and aging conditions. Precipitation kinetics can be improved by adding 0.5 wt% or 3.0 wt%Zn, while be suppressed after adding 1.5 wt%Zn. The Mg-Si precipitates (GP zones and β″) are still the main precipitates in the Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys after heated up to 250 °C, and no Mg-Zn precipitates are observed in the Zn-added alloy due to the occurrence of Mg-Zn precipitates reversion. The measured age-hardening responses of the alloys are corresponding to the predicted results by the established precipitation kinetic equations. Additionally, a double-hump phenomenon of hardness appears in the artificial aging of pre-aged alloy with 3.0 wt% Zn addition, which resulted from the formation of pre-β″ and β″ precipitates. Finally, the precipitation mechanism of Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys with different Zn contents was proposed based on the microstructure evolution and interaction forces between Mg, Si and Zn atoms.

  4. Production and fabrication of vanadium alloys for the radiative divertor program of DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.; Trester, P.W.

    1997-04-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been selected for use in the manufacture of a portion of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor upgrade. The production of a 1200-kg ingot of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, and processing into final sheet and rod product forms suitable for components of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor structure, has been completed at Wah Chang (formerly Teledyne Wah Chang) of Albany, Oregon (WCA). Joining of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been identified as the most critical fabrication issue for its use in the RD Program, and research into several joining methods for fabrication of the RD components, including resistance seam, friction, and electron beam welding, is continuing. Preliminary trials have been successful in the joining of V-alloy to itself by electron beam, resistance, and friction welding processes, and to Inconel 625 by friction welding. An effort to investigate the explosive bonding of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy to Inconel 625 has also been initiated, and results have been encouraging. In addition, preliminary tests have been completed to evaluate the susceptibility of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy to stress corrosion cracking in DIII-D cooling water, and the effects of exposure to DIII-D bakeout conditions on the tensile and fracture behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy.

  5. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Borided CoCrMo Alloy Immersed in Hanks' Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Becerra, G.; Mejía-Caballero, I.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.; Palomar-Pardavé, M.; Romero-Romo, M.; Pérez-Pasten-Borja, R.; Campos-Silva, I.

    2017-02-01

    New results about the corrosion resistance of borided CoCrMo alloy exposed to the Hanks' solution during different days were estimated by means of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. The CoB-Co2B coating was developed on the surface of the borided alloy using the powder-pack boriding process at 1223 K during 6 h of exposure. The corrosion resistance of the borided cobalt alloy was evaluated by the fitting of suitable equivalent electrical circuits using Nyquist and Bode plots to obtain the electrochemical parameters; the results were compared with the CoCrMo (non-borided) alloy. The samples (borided and non-borided) were characterized by the scanning electron microscopy and by the energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry techniques to determine the elemental chemical composition developed on the surface of the materials. In addition, the reaction products formed on the surface of the borided CoCrMo alloy exposed to the Hanks' solution after the tenth day of immersion were analyzed by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of the borided cobalt alloy was affected (or reduced) by the presence of B2S3 and CrPO4 clusters formed on the material's surface. Finally, the electrochemical reactions developed during the immersion of the borided cobalt alloy on the tenth day of exposure were proposed according to the XPS results.

  6. CREEP AND CREEP-FATIGUE OF ALLOY 617 WELDMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Jill; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2014-08-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) may be joined to piping or other components by welding. Creep-fatigue deformation is expected to be a predominant failure mechanism of the IHX1 and thus weldments used in its fabrication will experience varying cyclic stresses interrupted by periods of elevated temperature deformation. These periods of elevated temperature deformation are greatly influenced by a materials’ creep behavior. The nickel-base solid solution strengthened alloy, Alloy 617, is the primary material candidate for a VHTR-type IHX, and it is expected that Alloy 617 filler metal will be used for welds. Alloy 617 is not yet been integrated into Section III of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, however, nuclear component design with Alloy 617 requires ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code qualification. The Code will dictate design for welded construction through significant performance reductions. Despite the similar compositions of the weldment and base material, significantly different microstructures and mechanical properties are inevitable. Experience of nickel alloy welds in structural applications suggests that most high temperature failures occur at the weldments or in the heat-affected zone. Reliably guarding against this type of failure is particularly challenging at high temperatures due to the variations in the inelastic response of the constituent parts of the weldment (i.e., weld metal, heat-affected zone, and base metal) [ref]. This work focuses on the creep-fatigue behavior of nickel-based weldments, a need noted during the development of the draft Alloy 617 ASME Code Case. An understanding of Alloy 617 weldments when subjected to this important deformation mode will enable determination of the appropriate design parameters associated with their use. Specifically, the three main areas emphasized are the performance reduction due to a weld discontinuity in terms of the reduced number of

  7. Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Johannes; Trebin, Hans-Rainer; Kiselev, Alexander; Rapp, Dennis-Michael

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The method was combined with a two-temperature model to describe the interaction between the laser beam, the electrons, and the atoms. As a first step, electronic parameters for the alloys had to be found and the model developed originally for pure metals had to be generalized to multilayers. The modifications were verified by computing melting depths and ablation thresholds for pure Al and Ni. Here known data could be reproduced. The improved model was applied to the alloys Al_3Ni, AlNi and AlNi_3. While melting depths and ablation thresholds for AlNi behave unspectacular, sharp drops at high fluences are observed for Al_3Ni and AlNi_3. In both cases, the reason is a change in ablation mechanism from phase explosion to vaporization. Furthermore, a phase transition occurs in Al_3Ni. Finally, Al layers of various thicknesses on a Ni substrate have been simulated. Above threshold, 8 nm Al films are ablated as a whole while 24 nm Al films are only partially removed. Below threshold, alloying with a mixture gradient has been observed in the thin layer system.

  8. Effect of silicon on oxidation of Ni-15Al alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; NIU Yan; WU Wei-tao

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation of binary Ni-Al alloy containing 15% (mole fraction, the same below if not mentioned)Al (Ni-15Al), and of a ternary alloy with the same Al content but also containing 4% Si (Ni-4Si-15Al) has been studied at 1 000 ℃ under 1.0× 105Pa O2 to examine the effect of the addition of Si on the oxidation of Ni-15Al. Oxidation of Ni-15Al produces a duplex scale composed of an outer NiO layer and an inner layer riched in Al2O3. On the contrary, Ni-4Si-15Al forms an external alumina layer directly in contact with the alloy presenting only trace of NiO and the Ni-Al spinel. As a result, the kinetics of Ni-15Al shows a fast initial stage followed by two subsequent parabolic stages with decreasing rate constants, while Ni-4Si-15Al presents essentially a single nearly-parabolic behavior with a rate constant similar to that of the final stage of Ni-15Al. Therefore, the addition of 4% Si significantly reduces the oxidation rate during the initial stage by preventing the formation of Ni-riched scales and promoting an earlier development of an exclusive external alumina layer on the alloy surface.

  9. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  10. A BACTERIA FORAGING ALGORITHM FOR SOLVING INTEGRATED MULTI-PERIOD CELL FORMATION AND SUBCONTRACTING PRODUCTION PLANNING IN A DYNAMIC CELLULAR MANUFACTURING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The bacteria foraging algorithm (BFA is a new computation technique inspired by the social foraging behaviour of Escherichia coli (E. coli bacteria. Since the introduction of the BFA by Kevin M. Passino, there have been many challenges in employing this algorithm to problems other than those for which the algorithm was proposed. This research aims to apply this emerging optimisation algorithm to develop a mixed-integer programming model for designing cellular manufacturing systems (CMSs, and production planning in dynamic environments. In dynamic environments, product mix and part demand vary under multi-period planning horizons. Thus the best-designed cells for one period may not be adequate for subsequent periods, requiring their reconstruction. The advantages of the proposed model are as follows: consideration of batch inter-cell and intra-cell material handling by assuming the sequence of operations, allowing for alternative process plans for part types, and consideration of machine copying, with an emphasis on the effect of trade-offs between production and outsourcing costs. The goal is to minimise the sum of the machines’ constant and variable costs, inter-cell and intra-cell material handling costs, reconstruction costs, partial subcontracting costs, and inventory carrying costs. In addition, a newly-developed BFA-based optimisation algorithm has been compared with the branch and bound algorithm. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm performs better than related works.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die ‘bacteria foraging algorithm’ (BFA is ‘n berekeningstegniek gebaseeer op die sosiale soekgedrag van Escherichia coli (E. coli bakterieë. Sedert die bekendstelling van BFA was daar talle uitdagings oor toepassings van die algoritme op ander probleme as dié waarvoor dit ontwikkel is. Dié navorsing poog om deur toepassing van die algoritme ‘n gemengde heelgetalprogrammeringmodel te ontwikkel vir die

  11. Fe-15Ni-13Cr austenitic stainless steels for fission and fusion reactor applications - Part 1: Effects of minor alloying elements on precipitate phases in melt products and implication in alloy fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E. H.; Mansur, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to develop alloys for fission and fusion reactor applications, 28Fe-15Ni-13Cr base alloys were fabricated by adding various combinations of the minor alloying elements, Mo, Ti, C, Si, P, Nb, and B. The results showed that a significant fraction of undesirable residual oxygen was removed as oxides when Ti, C, and Si were added. Accordingly, the concentrations of the latter three essential alloying elements were reduced also. Among these elements, Ti was the strongest oxide former, but the largest oxygen removal (over 80%) was observed when carbon was added alone without Ti, since gaseous CO boiled off during melting. This paper recommends an alloy melting procedure to mitigate solute losses while reducing the undesirable residual oxygen. In this work, 14 different types of precipitate phases were identified. Compositions of precipitate phases and their crystallographic data are documented. Finally, stability of precipitate phases was examined in view of Gibbs free energy of formation.

  12. Transport Phenomena During Equiaxed Solidification of Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckermann, C.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in modeling of transport phenomena during dendritic alloy solidification is reviewed. Starting from the basic theorems of volume averaging, a general multiphase modeling framework is outlined. This framework allows for the incorporation of a variety of microscale phenomena in the macroscopic transport equations. For the case of diffusion dominated solidification, a simplified set of model equations is examined in detail and validated through comparisons with numerous experimental data for both columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth. This provides a critical assessment of the various model assumptions. Models that include melt flow and solid phase transport are also discussed, although their validation is still at an early stage. Several numerical results are presented that illustrate some of the profound effects of convective transport on the final compositional and structural characteristics of a solidified part. Important issues that deserve continuing attention are identified.

  13. Non newtonian annular alloy solidification in mould

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraga, Nelson O.; Garrido, Carlos P. [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, La Serena (Chile); Castillo, Ernesto F. [Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-08-15

    The annular solidification of an aluminium-silicon alloy in a graphite mould with a geometry consisting of horizontal concentric cylinders is studied numerically. The analysis incorporates the behavior of non-Newtonian, pseudoplastic (n=0.2), Newtonian (n=1), and dilatant (n=1.5) fluids. The fluid mechanics and heat transfer coupled with a transient model of convection diffusion are solved using the finite volume method and the SIMPLE algorithm. Solidification is described in terms of a liquid fraction of a phase change that varies linearly with temperature. The final results make it possible to infer that the fluid dynamics and heat transfer of solidification in an annular geometry are affected by the non-Newtonian nature of the fluid, speeding up the process when the fluid is pseudoplastic. (orig.)

  14. Influence of time of annealing on anneal hardening effect of a cast CuZn alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestorović Svetlana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigated cast copper alloy containing 8at%Zn of a solute. For comparison parallel specimens made from cast pure copper. Copper and copper alloy were subjected to cold rolling with different a final reduction of 30,50 and 70%. The cold rolled copper and copper alloy samples were isochronally and isothermally annealed up to recrystallization temperature. After that the values of hardness, strength and electrical conductivity were measured and X-ray analysis was performed. These investigations show that anneal hardening effect at alloys was attained under recrystallization temperature in the temperature range of 180-3000C, followed with an increase in hardness. The amount of strengthening increase with increasing degree of prior cold work. Also the X-ray analysis show the change of lattice parameter during annealing when anneal hardening effect was attained.

  15. Structure of (alpha + beta)-titanium alloys subjected to laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivasishin, O.M.; Markovskii, P.E.; Svechnikov, V.L.; Krasavin, A.P.; Oshkaderov, S.P. (Institut Metallofiziki, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR))

    1990-02-01

    The structure of surface layers formed in the industrial (alpha + beta)-titanium alloys subjected to pulse-laser treatment with energy density of 5 J/mm is examined. It is shown that as the temperature in the alloys increases, the following sequence of processes occurs: nondiffusion alpha-to-beta transformation; the diffusion redistribution of alloying components in the chemically inhomogeneous beta-phase; and melting and homogenization of the melt. The effect of the initial state of alloys and elastic stresses on the final structure is examined. It is established that the laser treatment with melting, combined with subsequent annealing in the (alpha + beta) region, makes it possible to create the dispersed high-strength state in the surface layer. 11 refs.

  16. Influence of degree of deformation in rolling on anneal hardening effect of a cast copper alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Svetlana Nestorovic; Desimir Markovic; Ljubica Ivanic

    2003-10-01

    This paper reports results of investigations carried out on a cast copper alloy containing 8 at.% Al. The alloy, and pure copper for the sake of comparison, were subjected to cold rolling with a final reduction of 30, 50 or 70%. The cold rolled copper and copper alloy samples were isochronally and isothermally annealed up to the recrystallization temperature. The hardness, strength and electrical conductivity were measured and X-ray and DSC analyses performed. Anneal hardening effect was observed in the alloy in the temperature range 180–300°C, followed by an increase in the electrical conductivity. The amount of strengthening increases with increasing degree of prior cold work. The X-ray analysis shows a change in the lattice parameter during annealing when anneal hardening effect was observed. The DSC analysis shows the exothermic character of this effect.

  17. Thixoforming of an automotive part in A390 hypereutectic Al-Si alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapranos, P.; Kirkwood, D.H.; Atkinson, H.V.;

    2003-01-01

    Hypereutectic aluminium–silicon alloys offer the possibility of an in situ natural composite (the silicon acting as the reinforcing phase) with properties that make them attractive for a number of automotive applications. However, conventional casting techniques result in excessive growth...... of the silicon particles in the melt, which adversely affect the mechanical properties. Thixoforming allows hypereutectic Al–Si alloys containing 40–50% fraction liquid to be shaped into complex near net shape components, whilst keeping the silicon particle size quite fine. This paper describes the development...... of a series of hypereutectic alloys based on the A390 composition (17%Si, 5%Cu, 0.5%Mg), their thixoforming, their resulting microstructures and mechanical properties. Finally the thixoforming of an automotive component using an A390 alloy is also described....

  18. Development of Laser Surface Technologies for Anti-Corrosion on Magnesium Alloys: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rujian; Guan, Yingchun; Zhu, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have been increasingly used in industries and biomaterial fields due to low density, high specific strength and biodegradability. However, poor surface-related properties are major factors that limit their practical applications. This paper mainly focuses on laser-based anti-corrosion technologies for Mg alloys, beginning with a brief review of conventional methods, and then demonstrates the feasibility of laser surface technologies including laser surface melting (LSM), laser surface alloying (LSA), laser surface cladding (LSC) and laser shock peening (LSP) in achieving enhancement of corrosion resistance. The mechanism and capability of each technique in corrosion resistance is carefully discussed. Finally, an outlook of the development of laser surface technology for Mg alloy is further concluded, aiming to serve as a guide for further research both in industry applications and biomedical devices.

  19. Recycling high density tungsten alloy powder by oxidization-reduction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆森; 陈立宝; 贺跃辉; 黄伯云

    2002-01-01

    The processes of directly recycling high density tungsten alloy by oxidation-reduction technique were investigated. The particle size of recycled powder is fine, and the shape of powder particle is regular when the final reduction temperature is 850℃, in which the average size of the tungsten alloy particles reduced is about 1.5μm. The average size of the alloy particles increase to 6μm and 9μm when increasing the reduction temperature to 900℃ and 950℃, respectively. However, if the reduction temperature is higher than 900℃, the surface feature of powder is complicated. Increasing reduction temperature from 900℃ to 950℃, the content of oxygen of recycled powder decreases from 0.2314% to 0.1700%, and powder particles grow slightly. It has been also found that the chemical composition of the recycled alloy powder is the same as the initial powder.

  20. Reactive wetting of Ti-6Al-4V alloy by molten Al 4043 and 6061 alloys at 600-700 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Qiaoli; Li, Fuxiang; Jin, Peng; Yu, Weiyuan [Lanzhou Univ. of Technology (China). State Key Lab. of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Non-ferrous Metal

    2017-06-15

    Wetting of Ti-6Al-4V alloy by two industrial grade Al alloys (i.e., Al 6061 and 4043 alloys) was studied using the sessile drop method at 600-700 C under high vacuum. Al/Ti-6Al-4V is a typical reactive wetting system with good final wettability accompanied by the formation of precursor film which is actually an extended reaction layer. The formation mechanism for the precursor film is ''subcutaneous infiltration''. The small amount of alloying element Si in the alloys can cause significant segregation at the liquid/solid interface which satisfies the thermodynamic condition. The wetting behavior can be described by the classic reaction product control models, and Ti{sub 7}Al{sub 5}Si{sub 12} decomposition and Al{sub 3}Ti formation correspond to the two spreading stages. The small difference in alloying elements in Al 6061 and 4043 resulted in distinctly different interface structures, formation of precursor film and spreading dynamics, especially for the Si segregation at the interface.

  1. Phase Stability, Kinetic Diagrams and Diffusion Path in High Temperature Oxidation of Binary Solid-Solution Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan NIU; F. Gesmundo

    2003-01-01

    The phase diagrams of ternary systems involving two metal components and one oxidant are considered first, the limitations to their use is discussed in relation to the high temperature oxidation of binary alloys. Kinetic diagrams,which are useful to predict the conditions for the stability of the two mutually insoluble oxides as the external scale, are then calculated on the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic data concerning both the alloys and the oxides, assuming the validity of the parabolic rate law. A combination of the two types of diagrams provides a more detail information about the oxidation behavior of binary alloys. The calculation of the diffusion paths, which relate the oxidant pressure to the composition of the system in terms of the alloy components both in the alloy and in the scale during an initial stage of the reaction in the presence of the parabolic rate law, is finally developed.

  2. Properties of Porous TiNbZr Shape Memory Alloy Fabricated by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Isostatic Pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L. W.; Chung, C. Y.; Tong, Y. X.; Zheng, Y. F.

    2011-07-01

    In the past decades, systematic researches have been focused on studying Ti-Nb-based SMAs by adding ternary elements, such as Mo, Sn, Zr, etc. However, only arc melting or induction melting methods, with subsequent hot or cold rolling, were used to fabricate these Ni-free SMAs. There is no work related to powder metallurgy and porous structures. This study focuses on the fabrication and characterization of porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr (at.%) shape memory alloys produced using elemental powders by means of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing. It is found that the porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr alloys prepared by the HIP process exhibit a homogenous pore distribution with spherical pores, while the pores have irregular shape in the specimen prepared by conventional sintering. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the solid solution-treated Ti-22Nb-6Zr alloy consists of both β phase and α″ martensite phase. Morphologies of martensite were observed. Finally, the porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr SMAs produced by both MA and HIP exhibit good mechanical properties, such as superior superelasticity, with maximum recoverable strain of ~3% and high compressive strength.

  3. Magnesium-based biodegradable alloys: Degradation, application, and alloying elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorielov, Maksym; Husak, Eugenia; Solodivnik, Alexandr; Zhdanov, Sergii

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, the paradigm about the metal with improved corrosion resistance for application in surgery and orthopedy was broken. The new class of biodegradable metal emerges as an alternative for biomedical implants. These metals corrode gradually with an appropriate host response and release of corrosion products. And it is absolutely necessary to use essential metals metabolized by hosting organism with local and general nontoxic effect. Magnesium serves this aim best; it plays the essential role in body metabolism and should be completely excreted within a few days after degradation. This review summarizes data from Mg discovery and its first experimental and clinical application of modern concept of Mg alloy development. We focused on biodegradable metal application in general surgery and orthopedic practice and showed the advantages and disadvantages Mg alloys offer. We focused on methods of in vitro and in vivo investigation of degradable Mg alloys and correlation between these methods. Based on the observed data, a better way for new alloy pre-clinical investigation is suggested. This review analyzes possible alloying elements that improve corrosion rate, mechanical properties, and gives the appropriate host response.

  4. Kinetics of aluminum lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletcher, Ben A.

    2009-12-01

    Aluminum lithium alloys are increasingly used in aerospace for their high strength-to-weight ratio. Additions of lithium, up to 4.2 wt% decrease the alloy density while increasing the modulus and yield strength. The metastable, second phase Al3Li or delta' is intriguing, as it remains spherical and coherent with the matrix phase, alpha, well into the overaged condition. Small interfacial strain energy allows these precipitates to remain spherical for volume fractions (VV ) of delta' less than 0.3, making this alloy system ideal for investigation of late-stage coarsening phenomena. Experimental characterization of three binary Al-Li alloys are presented as a critical test of diffusion screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy is used to image the precipitates directly using the centered dark-field technique. Images are analyzed autonomously within a novel Matlab function that determines the center and size of each precipitate. Particle size distribution, particle growth kinetics, and maximum particle size are used to track the precipitate growth and correlate with the predictions of screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. This project is the first extensive study of Al-Li alloys, in over 25 years, applying modern transmission electron microscopy and image analysis techniques. Previous studies sampled but a single alloy composition, and measured far fewer precipitates. This study investigates 3 alloys with volume fractions of the delta precipitates, VV =0.1-0.27, aged at 225C for 1 to 10 days. More than 1000 precipitates were sampled per aging time, creating more statistically significant data. Experimental results are used to test the predictions based on diffusion screening theory and multi-particle aging simulations. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  5. The distribution trends and site preferences of alloying elements in precipitates within a Zr alloy: A combined first-principles and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, B.F., E-mail: bfluan@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wang, J.M.; Qiu, R.S.; Tao, B.R.; He, W.J. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhang, X.Y.; Liu, R.P. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Liu, Q., E-mail: qingliu@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2016-09-05

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM-EDS) technique and first-principles calculation are jointly utilized to investigate the distribution trends and site preferences of alloying elements in the precipitates within Zr-1.0Cr-0.4Fe-0.4Mo-0.4Bi alloy. Based on selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results, the precipitates within the studied alloy are confirmed to be ZrCr{sub 2}-based Laves phase with FCC (C15) type structure. The STEM-EDS elemental mapping is acquired to clarify the distribution trends of alloying elements in precipitates, i.e. Fe>Mo>Bi. To better verify this distribution behavior, substitutional formation energies and equilibrium concentrations of ternary alloying elements in ZrCr{sub 2} Laves phase are calculated by first-principles. The calculated results show a good consistence with the STEM-EDS results. In addition, the site preferences of ternary alloying elements in ZrCr{sub 2} Laves phase are predicted by the calculation of transfer energies. Finally, the reasons accounting for different distribution trends and site preferences of alloying elements in ZrCr{sub 2} Laves phase are discussed in terms of density of states, which attributed to the pseudogap effect and hybridizations between atoms. - Highlights: • Clarified the distribution trends of Fe>Mo>Bi in precipitates by STEM-EDS. • Verified the experimental results by first-principles calculation. • Predicted the site preferences of alloying elements by first-principles calculation. • Hybridization and pseudogap lead to the strong distribution and site preferences.

  6. Alloy hardening and softening in binary molybdenum alloys as related to electron concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of hafnium, tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, osmium, iridium, and platinum on hardness of molybdenum. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary molybdenum alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to molybdenum, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons that molybdenum failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and alloy hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and molybdenum.

  7. Alloys developed for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuki, Eddy Agus; Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Muhammad, Fadhli

    2017-01-01

    Alloys used for high temperatures applications require combinations of mechanical strength, microstructural stability and corrosion/oxidation resistance. Nickel base superalloys have been traditionally the prime materials utilized for hot section components of aircraft turbine engines. Nevertheless, due to their limited melting temperatures, alloys based on intermetallic compounds, such as TiAl base alloys, have emerged as high temperature materials and intensively developed with the main aim to replace nickel based superalloys. For applications in steam power plants operated at lower temperatures, ferritic high temperature alloys still attract high attention, and therefore, development of these alloys is in progress. This paper highlights the important metallurgical parameters of high temperature alloys and describes few efforts in the development of Fe-Ni-Al based alloys containing B2-(Fe,Ni)Al precipitates, oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) ferritic steels and titanium aluminide based alloys include important protection system of aluminide coatings.

  8. Effects of various Mg-Sr master alloys on microstructural refinement of ZK60 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effects of various Mg-Sr master alloys (conventional as-cast, rapidly-solidified, rolled and solutionized) on microstructural refinement of ZK60 magnesium alloy were investigated. The results indicate that the refinement efficiency of various Mg-Sr master alloys in ZK60 alloy is different. The rolled Mg-Sr master alloy is found to have relatively higher refinement efficiency than the conventional as-cast, solutionized and rapidly-solidified Mg-Sr master alloys. After being treated with the rolled Mg-Sr master alloy, the ZK60 alloy obtains the minimum average grain size of 33 μm. The difference of various Mg-Sr master alloys in refinement efficiency might be related to the initial microstructure change of various Mg-Sr master alloys.

  9. Laser cladding of titanium alloy coating on titanium aluminide alloy substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐子文; 黄正; 阮中健

    2003-01-01

    A new diffusion bonding technique combined with laser cladding process was developed to join TiAl alloy to itself and Ti-alloys. In order to enhance the weldability of TiAl alloys, Ti-alloy coatings were fabricated by laser cladding on the TiAl alloy. Ti powder and shaped Ti-alloy were respectively used as laser cladding materials. The materials characterization was carried out by OM, SEM, EDS and XRD analysis. The results show that the laser cladding process with shaped Ti-alloy remedy the problems present in the conventional process with powder, such as impurities, cracks and pores. The diffusion bonding of TiAl alloy with Ti-alloy coating to itself and Ti-alloy was carried out with a Gleeble 1500 thermal simulator. The sound bonds of TiAl/TiAl, TiAl/Ti were obtained at a lower temperature and with shorter time.

  10. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuur, Edward [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Luo, Yiqi [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This final grant report is a continuation of the final grant report submitted for DE-SC0006982 as the Principle Investigator (Schuur) relocated from the University of Florida to Northern Arizona University. This report summarizes the original project goals, as well as includes new project activities that were completed in the final period of the project.

  11. Shape memory alloys. Ultralow-fatigue shape memory alloy films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chluba, Christoph; Ge, Wenwei; Lima de Miranda, Rodrigo; Strobel, Julian; Kienle, Lorenz; Quandt, Eckhard; Wuttig, Manfred

    2015-05-29

    Functional shape memory alloys need to operate reversibly and repeatedly. Quantitative measures of reversibility include the relative volume change of the participating phases and compatibility matrices for twinning. But no similar argument is known for repeatability. This is especially crucial for many future applications, such as artificial heart valves or elastocaloric cooling, in which more than 10 million transformation cycles will be required. We report on the discovery of an ultralow-fatigue shape memory alloy film system based on TiNiCu that allows at least 10 million transformation cycles. We found that these films contain Ti2Cu precipitates embedded in the base alloy that serve as sentinels to ensure complete and reproducible transformation in the course of each memory cycle. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Shape memory alloy flexures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellouard, Yves; Clavel, Reymond

    2003-07-25

    Flexures are used in precision engineering where highly accurate, wear-free, smooth and repeatable motion is desired. Flexures are based on deformation of material to achieve a motion between elastically joined parts. They are used in a variety of precision mechanisms such as high-resolution balances or high accuracy optical positioning stages. Shape memory alloys (SMA) are an attractive option in designing flexures. Superelastic flexures can withstand larger deformations for the same weight as a conventional flexure. In addition, the damping properties of SMA, controllable through the phase transformation, offer new design opportunities for adaptive compliant mechanisms. The martensitic phase transformation can also be used to shift the natural frequency of flexures adding useful functionalities such as vibration rejection. This paper presents design principles of SMA flexures based on non-linear beam theory. Results show a good agreement between measured and predicted data. In addition, experimental results on phase transformation effects on damping behavior are also presented. Both, natural-frequency shift and increased damping were observed in bulk-micro machined flexures using the R-phase transformation. These results demonstrate the feasibility of natural-frequency-tunable flexures.

  13. Zinc alloy enhances strength and creep resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machler, M. [Fisher Gauge Ltd., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Fishercast Div.

    1996-10-01

    A family of high-performance ternary zinc-copper-aluminum alloys has been developed that provides higher strength, hardness, and creep resistance than the traditional zinc-aluminum alloys Zamak 3, Zamak 5, and ZA-8. Designated ACuZinc, mechanical properties comparable to those of more expensive materials make it suitable for high-load applications and those at elevated temperatures. This article describes the alloy`s composition, properties, and historical development.

  14. Thermomechanical behavior of comercial yellow gold alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš G. Djordjević

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of science and technology, in the late 19th century, began the research and application of new alloys for making jewelry. By adding different amounts of Cu and Ag alloy of Au, as well as adding some new elements (Zn, alloys were obtained with different color spectrum (from red to yellow and different technological and metallurgical characteristics. This paper aims to show thermomechanical behavior of commercial yellow Au alloys for making jewelry.

  15. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  16. Mechanical Properties of the TiAl IRIS Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Thomas; Monchoux, Jean-Philippe; Thomas, Marc; Deshayes, Christophe; Couret, Alain

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study of the mechanical properties at room and high temperature of the boron and tungsten containing IRIS alloy (Ti-48Al-2W-0.08B at. pct). This alloy was densified by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The resultant microstructure consists of small lamellar colonies surrounded by γ regions containing B2 precipitates. Tensile tests are performed from room temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C). Creep properties are determined at 973 K (700 °C)/300 MPa, 1023 K (750 °C)/120 MPa, and 1023 K (750 °C)/200 MPa. The tensile strength and the creep resistance at high temperature are found to be very high compared to the data reported in the current literature while a plastic elongation of 1.6 pct is preserved at room temperature. A grain size dependence of both ductility and strength is highlighted at room temperature. The deformation mechanisms are studied by post-mortem analyses on deformed samples and by in situ straining experiments, both performed in a transmission electron microscope. In particular, a low mobility of non-screw segments of dislocations at room temperature and the activation of a mixed-climb mechanism during creep have been identified. The mechanical properties of this IRIS alloy processed by SPS are compared to those of other TiAl alloys developed for high-temperature structural applications as well as to those of similar tungsten containing alloys obtained by more conventional processing techniques. Finally, the relationships between mechanical properties and microstructural features together with the elementary deformation mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Grain Constraint and Size Effects in Shape Memory Alloy Microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueland, Stian Melhus

    Shape memory alloys exhibit interesting and useful properties, such as the shape memory effect and superelasticity. Among the many alloy families that have been shown to exhibit shape memory properties the ones based on copper are interesting because they are relatively inexpensive and show excellent properties when made as single crystals. However, the performance ofthese alloys is severely compromised by the introduction of grain boundaries, to the point where they are too poor for commercial applications. This thesis studies the mechanical properties of fine Cobased wires with a bamboo microstructure, i.e., where triple junctions are absent and grain boundaries run perpendicular to the wire axis. These microwires are not single crystals, but their microstructure is not as complex as that of polycrystals either: we call this new class of shape memory alloys oligocrystals. This thesis seeks to better understand the relationship between microstructure and properties in these alloys through a combination of mechanical testing, in situ experiments and modeling. First, in situ scanning electron microscopy, together with finite element modeling, is used to understand the role of grain constraint on the martensitic transformation. Grain constraints are observed to be much less severe in oligocrystalline wires as compared to polycrystals. Oligocrystalline microwires are then thermomechanically tested and shown to exhibit excellent properties that approach those of single crystals. Next, property evolution during cycling is investigated, revealing training effects as well as fatigue life and fracture. Finally, size effects in damping and transformation morphology are studied and it is shown that a transition from a many-domain to a single domain martensite morphology takes place when the wire diameter is decreased. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

  18. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  19. Improved thermal treatment of aluminum alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, F. H.

    1968-01-01

    Newly developed tempering treatment considerably increases the corrosion resistance of 7075-T6 alloy and concomitantly preserves its yield strength. The results of tests on samples of the alloy subjected to the above treatments show that when the overaging period is 12 hours /at 325 degrees F/, the alloy exhibits a yield strength of 73,000 psi.

  20. Impact toughness of laser surface alloyed Aluminium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4kW Nd:YAG laser and the impact resistance of the alloys was investigated. The alloying powders were a mixture of Ni, Ti and SiC in different proportions. Surfaces reinforced...

  1. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...

  2. Influence of ambient temperature and AC magnetic field on damping behavior of Fe-13Cr-2.5Mo alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong-gang; Li, Ning; Shen, Bao-luo; Hua, Hong-xing

    2007-07-01

    The damping behaviors of Fe-13Cr-2.5Mo alloy at ambient temperatures and the AC magnetic field are tested with the improved reversal torsion machine. The precipitations distributing in the annealed alloy are also observed with SEM. The results show that because the defections decrease during the annealing treatment, causing a higher damping capacity of this alloy. This damping drops linearly to 63% when the ambient temperature changes from 23 °C to 500 °C, resulting from the gradual decrease of ferromagnetism. On the other hand, the AC magnetic field causes the damping capacity to drop sharply, and finally it reaches a much lower level.

  3. Orientation Dependence of Cracking in Hot-Dip Zn-Al-Mg Alloy Coatings on a Sheet Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. B.; Kim, I. G.; Kim, S. G.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, T. C.; Oh, M. S.; Kim, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating a basic cause of cracking in hot-dip Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings on an extra deep drawing quality sheet steel. The electron backscattering diffraction technique was employed to examine the crystallographic planes of the cracks generated before and after bending deformation of the coated steel sheets. It was clarified that the occurrence of cracking in the Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings absolutely depends on the orientation of the primary Zn and eutectic Zn alloy phases. Finally, a cracking mechanism was proposed on the basis of the anisotropy of thermal expansion and the Young's modulus in the phases constituting the coatings.

  4. Investigation on Formation Mechanism of Irregular Shape Porosity in Hypoeutectic Aluminum Alloy by X-Ray Real Time Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hengcheng; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Yuna; Fan, Ran; Wang, Qigui; Pan, Ye

    2012-08-01

    The formation mechanism of irregular shape porosity in hypoeutectic aluminum silicon alloy (A356) was investigated by X-ray real time observation on porosity evolution during solidification and re-melting. Porosity in the hypoeutectic aluminum A356 alloy with high hydrogen content (>0.3 mL/100 g Al) first forms in the liquid as small spherical gas bubbles, then expands along with the pressure drop in the mushy zone due to shrinkage and lack of feeding, and finally deforms into irregular morphology by the impingement of aluminum dendrite network. Degassing is a key to eliminate porosity in aluminum alloy castings.

  5. Final Focus Test Stand final report

    CERN Document Server

    Jeremie, A; Burrows, P

    2013-01-01

    Future Linear colliders will need particle beam sizes in the nanometre range. The beam also needs to be stable all along the beam line and especially at the Final Focus section. A dedicated Final Focus test stand has been used for this study and is comprised of several sub-parts. First there is the Stabilisation/Isolation system with sensors and actuators stabilizing down to sub-nanometre level. Then the Magnet itself needs to comply with very specific design constraints. In addition to the mechanical items, the beam can be stabilized acting on the trajectory directly and Beam-based controls have been developed and tested on different accelerator facilities.

  6. Palladium-rare-earth metal alloys-advanced materials for hydrogen power engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen of no less than 99. 999 % (vol. fraction) purity is a principal power media of hydrogen power engineering. A single method for the preparation of high purity hydrogen consists in its separation from vapour-gas mixtures via the selective diffusion of hydrogen through a palladium membrane. The rate of hydrogen diffusion and the strength and stability during the operation in aggressive gases are important characteristics of palladium membranes. The increase in the strength, plasticity, and hydrogen-permeability of membrane alloys can be reached by alloying palladium with the formation of solid solutions.The formation of wide ranges of palladium-rare-earth metal (REM) solid solutions is an interesting feature of palladium. Earlier, we have shown that the alloying of Pd with REM substantially increases the rate of hydrogen diffusion and markedly increases the strength of palladium on retention of the adequate plasticity.In this work, we have studied alloys of the Pd-Y and Pd-Y-Me systems. It was shown that the following conditions should be satisfied to prepare high-quality alloys exhibiting high service properties: (1)the use of high-purity components (whose purity is no less than 99.95%, mass fraction), in particular,high-purity Y prepared by vacuum distillation, and (2) holding the reached purity for the final product.For this purpose, we suggested a cycle of manufacturing operations including the preparation of a vacuumtight foil of 50 (m thick as the final stage.The hydrogen-permeability of the alloys was measured at different temperatures and hydrogen pressures. The instability of operation of binary Pd-Y alloys w alloying the composition with a Ⅷ Group metal. For example, the alloy of the optimum composition Pd-8Y-Me in the annealed state exhibits the following mechanical properties: HV= 75 kg/mm2 , σu = 58 kg/mm2 , and δ= 20%. Its hydrogen-permeability (QH2) measured as a function of the temperature exceeds that of the Pd-23Ag alloy (that is widely

  7. The electrostatic-alloy bonding technique used in MEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; CHEN Wei-ping

    2006-01-01

    Electrostatic-alloy bonding of silicon wafer with glass deposited by Au to form Si/Au-glass water,and bonding of Si/Au-glass with silicon wafer were researched during fabrication of pressure sensors.The silicon wafer and glass wafer with an Au film resistor were bonded by electrostatic bonding,and then Si-Au alloy bonding was formed by annealing at 400℃ for 2 h.The air sealability of the cavity after bonding was finally tested using the N2 filling method.The results indicate that large bond strength was obtained at the bonding interface.This process was used in fabricating a pressure sensor with a sandwich structure.The results indicate that the sensor presented better performances and that the bonding techniques can be used in MEMS packaging.

  8. Development of rheometer for semi-solid highmelting point alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Wen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A rheometer for semi-solid high-melting point alloys was developed based on the principle of a double-bucket rheometer, with which the solidifying of semi-solid high-melting point alloy melt could be effectively controlled by the control of temperature and the outer force-field; and different microstructures have also been obtained. This rheometer can be used to investigate the rheological behavior under different conditions by changing the Theological parameters. By way of full-duplex communication between the computer and each sensor, automatic control of the test equipment and real- timemeasurement of rheological parameters were realized. Finally, the influencing factors on torque are also quantitatively analyzed.

  9. Investigation on a Roman copper alloy artefact from Pompeii (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Pietro; Baraldi, Cecilia; Ferrari, Giorgia; Foca, Giorgia; Marchetti, Andrea; Tassi, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    A selection of samples, obtained from a particular copper-alloy domestic artefact of Roman style from Pompeii, has been analysed by using different techniques (IR, Raman, SEM-EDX, FAAS), in order to investigate the chemical nature and composition of the metals utilised for such manufacturing pieces. The surface analysis of the bright red metallic microfragments conducted by different analytical techniques, emphasises the presence of pure unalloyed copper and confirms the absence of other metallic species on the upper layers. On the contrary, the mapping analysis of the section of the laminar metal of the investigated sample shows a consistent enrichment in tin content. Finally, destructive analysis by FAAS confirms that the artefact looks like a bronze metal alloy, with a medium Sn content of about 6.5%.

  10. Development of rheometer for semi-solid highmelting point alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen; XING Shu-min; ZHANG Lin; ZHANG Mi-lian; ZHANG Hai-ying

    2005-01-01

    A rheometer for semi-solid high-melting point alloys was developed based on the principle of a double-bucket rheometer, with which the solidifying of semi-solid high-melting point alloy melt could be effectively controlled by the control of temperature and the outer force-field; and different microstructures have also been obtained. This rheometer can be used to investigate the rheological behavior under different conditions by changing the rheological parameters. By way of full-duplex communication between the computer and each sensor, automatic control of the test equipment and real- time measurement of rheological parameters were realized. Finally, the influencing factors on torque are also quantitatively analyzed.

  11. Material and information flows pertaining to aluminum alloy pipe distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Simić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the distribution flow of aluminum (Al alloy pipes, starting with the completion of the manufacturing process and final inspection. The proposed solution considers the use of bar-coded caps produced from recycled polymer materials that are placed on the ends of the tubes in order to achieve protection against potential changes in material properties and preserve the product quality. For the preparation of capped tube bundles for shipment from the manufacturer output storage to the customer input warehouse, a technical solution that enables correct and efficient Al alloy pipe handling is proposed, in terms of safety, security, reliability, financial feasibility and ecological viability, with optimal utilization of transport and storage.

  12. Laser Metal Deposition of the Intermetallic TiAl Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marc; Malot, Thierry; Aubry, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    Laser metal deposition of the commercial intermetallic Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy was investigated. A large number of experiments were conducted under controlled atmosphere by changing the processing parameters to manufacture a series of beads, thin walls, and massive blocks. Optimal process parameters were successfully found to prevent cracking which is generally observed in this brittle material due to built-up residual stresses during fast cooling. These non-equilibrium cooling conditions tend to generate ultra-fine and metastable structures exhibiting high microhardness values, thus requiring post-heat treatments. The latter were successfully used to restore homogeneous lamellar or duplex microstructures and to relieve residual stresses. Subsequent tensile tests enabled us to validate the soundness and homogeneity of the Intermetallic TiAl alloy. Finally, a higher mechanical performance was achieved for the LMD material with respect to cast+HIP and EBM counterparts.

  13. Corrosion-resistant nickel-base alloys for gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.W.; Hulsizer, W.R.

    1976-08-01

    Laboratory corrosion screening procedures used during the past ten years in developing nickel-base superalloys for gas turbine applications are described. Hot salt corrosion tests have included crucible and salt shower exposures. Reproducible techniques were established and alloy composition effects defined, leading to development of M313, IN-587, a IN-792. Correlations have been made with corrosion results in burner rigs, and engine experience confirming anticipated behavior is now becoming available. During this work a number of limitations of these accelerated laboratory tests were uncovered; these are discussed. Finally, brief descriptions of the states of development of alloy MA 755E (an oxide dispersion-strengthened superalloy) and IN-939 (a cast 23 percent chromium superalloy) are outlined as examples of advanced corrosion resistant, high strength materials of the future.

  14. Process capability improvement through DMAIC for aluminum alloy wheel machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, G. V. S. S.; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Babu, B. Surendra

    2017-07-01

    This paper first enlists the generic problems of alloy wheel machining and subsequently details on the process improvement of the identified critical-to-quality machining characteristic of A356 aluminum alloy wheel machining process. The causal factors are traced using the Ishikawa diagram and prioritization of corrective actions is done through process failure modes and effects analysis. Process monitoring charts are employed for improving the process capability index of the process, at the industrial benchmark of four sigma level, which is equal to the value of 1.33. The procedure adopted for improving the process capability levels is the define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) approach. By following the DMAIC approach, the C p, C pk and C pm showed signs of improvement from an initial value of 0.66, -0.24 and 0.27, to a final value of 4.19, 3.24 and 1.41, respectively.

  15. Method for the production of strongly adhesive films on titanium and titanium alloys with a metallization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the spray-application of a strongly adhesive, thick antifriction layer on titanium and titanium alloys is proposed. The titanium/titanium alloy component to be coated is first subjected to cleaning in a pickling bath with reducing additives and sand-blasting, then coated with an intermediate layer of nickel, after which the final layer is applied. The formation of TiNi at the interface ensures strong bonding of the antifriction layer.

  16. Fluorimetric determination of uranium in zirconium and zircaloy alloys; Determinacion fluorimetrica de uranio en aleaciones de zirconio y zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta L, E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: eal@nuclear.inin.mx

    1991-05-15

    The objective of this procedure is to determine microquantities of uranium in zirconium and zircaloy alloys. The report also covers the determination of uranium in zirconium alloys and zircaloy in the range from 0.25 to 20 ppm on 1 g of base sample of radioactive material. These limit its can be variable if the size of the used aliquot one is changed for the final determination of uranium. (Author)

  17. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured palladium-based alloy electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Arindam

    Low temperature fuel cells like proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are expected to play a crucial role in the future hydrogen economy, especially for transportation applications. These electrochemical devices offer significantly higher efficiency compared to conventional heat engines. However, use of exotic and expensive platinum as the electrocatalyst poses serious problems for commercial viability. In this regard, there is an urgent need to develop low-platinum or non-platinum electrocatalysts with electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) superior or comparable to that of platinum. This dissertation first investigates non-platinum, palladium-based alloy electrocatalysts for ORR. Particularly, Pd-M (M = Mo and W) alloys are synthesized by a novel thermal decomposition of organo-metallic precursors. The carbon-supported Pd-M (M = Mo, W) electrocatalyts are then heat treated up to 900°C in H2 atmosphere and investigated for their phase behavior. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements reveal that the alloying of Pd with Mo or W significantly enhances the catalytic activity for ORR as well as the stability (durability) of the electrocatalysts. Additionally, both the alloy systems exhibit high tolerance to methanol, which is particularly advantageous for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The dissertation then focuses on one-pot synthesis of carbon-supported multi-metallic Pt-Pd-Co nanoalloys by a rapid microwave-assisted solvothermal (MW-ST) method. The multi-metallic alloy compositions synthesized by the MW-ST method show much higher catalytic activity for ORR compared to their counterparts synthesized by the conventional borohydride reduction method. Additionally, a series of Pt encapsulated Pd-Co nanoparticle electrocatalysts are synthesized by the MW-ST method and characterized to understand their phase behavior, surface composition, and electrocatalytic activity for ORR. Finally, the dissertation

  18. The Effect of Toluene Solution on the Hydrogen Absorption of the Mg-Ti Alloy Prepared by Synthetic Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Suwarno

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and characterization of the Mg–Ti alloy have been carried out through a mechanical alloying technique under toluene solution. The Mg and Ti powders are milled for 10, 20, and 30 h in a high energy ball mill. The milled alloys are then hydrided at a temperature of 300 oC in order to investigate the possibility used for hydrogen storage materials. The refinement analyses of the x-ray diffraction patterns show that mechanical alloying of the Mg–Ti powders under toluene solution results in the formation of the TiH2 and Mg2Ti phases. Quantitative analyses indicate that the mass fractions of the TiH2 and Mg2Ti phases are 62.90 % and 30.60 %, while the value for Mg and Ti amount to 2.6 wt% and 1.25 wt%. On hydriding at a temperature of 300 oC, the milled powders are transformed into Mg2TiH4, TiH2 and γ-MgH2 phases with the mass fractions of 25.48 wt%, 64.0 wt%, and 10.52 wt%, respectively. Microstructure analyses show that before milling the shape of particle is mostly a ball shape, after 30 h of milling the shape of particles changes into polygonal shape, and upon hydriding the shape of particles changes from a polygonal shape into an irregular one. The final composition of the specimen after hydriding exhibits that Mg-Ti alloy can be promoted as a hydrogen storage material.

  19. Cassini's Grand Finale: The Final Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda; Edgington, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint collaboration between NASA, ESA and the Italian Space Agency, is approaching its last year of operations after nearly 12 years in orbit around Saturn. Cassini will send back its final bits of unique data on September 15th, 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Before that time Cassini will continue its legacy of exploration and discovery with 12 close flybys of Titan in 2016 and 2017 that will return new science data as well as sculpt the inclinations and periods of the final orbits. Even though all of our close icy satellite flybys, including those of Enceladus, are now completed, numerous Voyager-class flybys (summer solstice approaches. In November 2016 Cassini will transition to a series of orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring. These 20 orbits will include close flybys of some tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. The 126th and final close flyby of Titan will propel Cassini across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale, starting in April 2017, is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost rings and the upper atmosphere of the planet providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. Cassini will be the first spacecraft to explore this region. These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles, composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet, winds in the outer layers of Saturn's atmosphere, and the mass distribution in the rings. Probing the magnetic field will give insight into the nature of the magnetic dynamo, telling us: why the

  20. Thermal Fatigue Behaviour of Co-Based Alloy Coating Obtained by Laser Surface Melt-Casting on High Temperature Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal fatigue behaviour of C o-based alloy coating obtained by laser surface melt-casting on the high tempe rature alloy GH33 was studied. The results show that after each time of thermal cycling, the final residual stress was formed in the melt-casting layer which is attributed to the thermal stress and structural stress. Through the first 50 times of thermal cycling, the morphology of coating still inherits the laser casting one, but the dendrites get bigger; After the second 50 times of thermal cycling, corrosion pits emerge from coating, and mostly in the places where coating and substrate meet. The fatigue damage type of coating belongs to stress corrosi on.

  1. Current research situation of titanium alloys in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys possess excellent comprehensive properties, and they are widely used in many fields. China pays great attentions to the research on new titanium alloys. This paper mainly reviews the research on new Ti alloys in China, for example, high strength and high toughness Ti alloys, burn resistant Tialloys, high temperature Ti alloys, low cost Ti alloys and so on.New basic theories on Ti alloys developed in China in recent years are also reviewed.

  2. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  3. High strength, tough alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  4. Alloy 718 for Oilfield Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBarbadillo, John J.; Mannan, Sarwan K.

    2012-02-01

    Alloy 718 (UNS N07718) was developed for use in aircraft gas turbine engines, but its unique combination of room-temperature strength and aqueous corrosion resistance made it a candidate for oilfield fasteners, valves, drill tools, and completion equipment. As well environments became more severe, stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement failures in production equipment drove the evolution of the composition and microstructure that distinguish today's oilfield-grade 718 from aerospace grades. This paper reviews the development of the grade and its applications and describes some of its unique characteristics, testing, and manufacturing methods as well as newer alloys designed for high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) conditions.

  5. Bulk nano-crystalline alloys

    OpenAIRE

    T.-S. Chin; Lin, C. Y.; Lee, M.C.; R.T. Huang; S. M. Huang

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) Fe–B–Y–Nb–Cu, 2 mm in diameter, were successfully annealed to become bulk nano-crystalline alloys (BNCAs) with α-Fe crystallite 11–13 nm in size. A ‘crystallization-and-stop’ model was proposed to explain this behavior. Following this model, alloy-design criteria were elucidated and confirmed successful on another Fe-based BMG Fe–B–Si–Nb–Cu, 1 mm in diameter, with crystallite sizes 10–40 nm. It was concluded that BNCAs can be designed in general by the proposed cr...

  6. Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Annual subcontract report, 1 July 1990--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. [Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

  7. The Densification of Molybdenum and Molybdenum Alloy Powders Using Hot Isostatic Pressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCB-TR-85025 00 THE DENSIFICATION OF MOLYBDENUM (n AND MOLYBDENUM ALLOY POWDERS USING HOT ISOSTATIC PRESSING J. BARRANCO I. AHMAD S...ISOSTATIC PRESSING Final 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(o) . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(e) J. Barranco , I. Ahmad, S. Isserow, and R. Warenchak

  8. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  9. Alloy softening in binary iron solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine softening and hardening behavior in 19 binary iron-alloy systems. Microhardness tests were conducted at four temperatures in the range 77 to 411 K. Alloy softening was exhibited by 17 of the 19 alloy systems. Alloy softening observed in 15 of the alloy systems was attributed to an intrinsic mechanism, believed to be lowering of the Peierls (lattice friction) stress. Softening and hardening rates could be correlated with the atomic radius ratio of solute to iron. Softening observed in two other systems was attributed to an extrinsic mechanism, believed to be associated with scavenging of interstitial impurities.

  10. Surface Tension Calculation of Undercooled Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the Butler equation and extrapolated thermodynamic data of undercooled alloys from those of liquid stable alloys, a method for surface tension calculation of undercooled alloys is proposed. The surface tensions of liquid stable and undercooled Ni-Cu (xNi=0.42) and Ni-Fe (xNi=0.3 and 0.7) alloys are calculated using STCBE (Surface Tension Calculation based on Butler Equation) program. The agreement between calculated values and experimental data is good enough, and the temperature dependence of the surface tension can be reasonable down to 150-200 K under the liquid temperature of the alloys.

  11. An introduction to surface alloying of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Hosmani, Santosh S; Goyal, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    An Introduction to Surface Alloying of Metals aims to serve as a primer to the basic aspects of surface alloying of metals. The book serves to elucidate fundamentals of surface modification and their engineering applications. The book starts with basics of surface alloying and goes on to cover key surface alloying methods, such as carburizing, nitriding, chromizing, duplex treatment, and the characterization of surface layers. The book will prove useful to students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, as also to researchers and practitioners looking for a quick introduction to surface alloying.

  12. Development of vehicle magnetic air conditioner (VMAC) technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschneidner, Karl A., Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Jiles, David; Zimm, Carl B.

    2001-08-28

    The objective of Phase I was to explore the feasibility of the development of a new solid state refrigeration technology - magnetic refrigeration - in order to reduce power consumption of a vehicle air conditioner by 30%. The feasibility study was performed at Iowa State University (ISU) together with Astronautics Corporation of America Technology Center (ACATC), Madison, WI, through a subcontract with ISU.

  13. Development of High-Performance Cast Crankshafts. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Mark E [General Motors, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop technologies that would enable the production of cast crankshafts that can replace high performance forged steel crankshafts. To achieve this, the Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the new material needs to be 850 MPa with a desired minimum Yield Strength (YS; 0.2% offset) of 615 MPa and at least 10% elongation. Perhaps more challenging, the cast material needs to be able to achieve sufficient local fatigue properties to satisfy the durability requirements in today’s high performance gasoline and diesel engine applications. The project team focused on the development of cast steel alloys for application in crankshafts to take advantage of the higher stiffness over other potential material choices. The material and process developed should be able to produce high-performance crankshafts at no more than 110% of the cost of current production cast units, perhaps the most difficult objective to achieve. To minimize costs, the primary alloy design strategy was to design compositions that can achieve the required properties with minimal alloying and post-casting heat treatments. An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) based approach was utilized, rather than relying only on traditional trial-and-error methods, which has been proven to accelerate alloy development time. Prototype melt chemistries designed using ICME were cast as test specimens and characterized iteratively to develop an alloy design within a stage-gate process. Standard characterization and material testing was done to validate the alloy performance against design targets and provide feedback to material design and manufacturing process models. Finally, the project called for Caterpillar and General Motors (GM) to develop optimized crankshaft designs using the final material and manufacturing processing path developed. A multi-disciplinary effort was to integrate finite element analyses by engine designers and geometry-specific casting

  14. Production and fabrication of vanadium alloys for the radiative divertor program of DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.

    1997-08-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been selected for use in the manufacture of a portion of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor upgrade. The production of a 1200-kg ingot of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, and processing into final sheet and rod product forms suitable for components of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor Program (RDP), has been completed by Wah Chang (formerly Teledyne Wah Chang) of Albany, Oregon (WCA). CVN impact tests on sheet material indicate that the material has properties comparable to other previously-processed V-4Cr-4Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti alloys. Joining of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been identified as the most critical fabrication issue for its use in the RDP, and research into several joining methods for fabrication of the RDP components, including resistance seam, friction, and electron beam welding, and explosive bonding is being pursued. Preliminary trials have been successful in the joining of V-alloy to itself by resistance, friction, and electron beam welding processes, and to Inconel 625 by friction welding. In addition, an effort to investigate the explosive bonding of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy to Inconel 625, in both tube-to-bar and sheet-to-sheet configurations, has been initiated, and results have been encouraging.

  15. The effect of phosphorus on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ATI 718Plus alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Minqing, E-mail: minqingw@yahoo.com [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Advanced High Temperature Materials, Beijing 100081 (China); Du, Jinhui; Deng, Qun [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Advanced High Temperature Materials, Beijing 100081 (China); Tian, Zhiling [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhu, Jing, E-mail: jzhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-02-25

    Since the discovery in the 1990s of the abnormal improvement produced by phosphorus in the stress rupture and creep life of Inconel 718 (hereafter referred to as 718), a great deal of additional research followed. However, the mechanism of the action of phosphorous in 718 is still in question. This paper details an experimental study that was intended to determine how phosphorus acts upon the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ni–Fe based alloy 718Plus. The results show that phosphorus has little effect on the strength and ductility of alloy 718Plus, but can significantly improve the stress rupture life. Phase constituents such as the δ and γ′ phases were quantitatively analyzed using electrolytic phase isolation and micro-chemical and XRD analysis as the phosphorous content of the alloy was increased. A full atom mapping of the distribution of phosphorus in the 718Plus alloy was quantitatively determined using APT (Atom Probe Tomography) technique. The results showed that there is no significant segregation of phosphorus at the γ′/γ and γ′/γ′ interface, but it significantly segregates at the grain boundaries and δ/γ interface. It was found that phosphorus is extremely depleted in the δ phase, which is believed to inhibit δ-phase precipitation by preventing δ phase nucleation and growth in the 718Plus alloy. Finally, the influence of phosphorus on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the 718Plus alloy was discussed.

  16. A study of weldability and fracture modes in electron beam weldments of AZ series magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, C.-T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China) and System Manufacturing Center, Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 90008-14, Sanxia 237, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: joseph.mse92g@nctu.edu.tw; Chao, C.-G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: c_g_chao@hotmail.com; Liu, T.-F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: coe@cc.nctu.edu.tw; Wang, C.-C. [Graduate School of Industrial Design and Architecture, Shih-Chien University, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: zcwang@mail.usc.edu.tw

    2006-11-05

    Given the growing need for environmental protection and lightweight construction, electron beam welding (EBW) is becoming the most important welding technology because it can compensate for the poor formability of magnesium alloys. This paper examines interactions between the properties of three AZ series magnesium alloys and welding conditions. The EBW process can yield four kinds of defect in a weld: cavities, the heat-affected zone (HAZ), undercuts, and root concavities. These defects obviously induce stress concentrations in the weld, and may seriously damage its strength. Additionally, the distribution of precipitates ({gamma} phase, Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}) in the fusion zone (FZ) changes from a relatively small number of scattered particles to a dense population of dendrites as the Al content of the magnesium alloy increases. Under excessive tensile stress, alloy weldments break in one of two fracture modes: an irregular FZ fracture, or a regular HAZ fracture. AZ31B usually exhibits the former mode and AZ91D the latter, while AZ61A exhibits each mode half the time. The overall weldability, which depends on the random distribution of these precipitates and defects, is found to be greatest for the AZ61A alloy. The best process window, on the other hand, is found for the AZ91D alloy. Finally, we obtain optimum parameters for the EBW process and empirical formulae for the weldment strength as a function of these parameters. These results are closely related to each other.

  17. Microestrutural evolution in a CuZnAl shape memory alloy: kinetics and morphological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Sanguinetti Ferreira

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The microstructural evolution of the CuZnAl shape memory alloys was studied by indirect techniques relating to the atomic migration rate of grain boundaries. Addition elements were used in a Cu-15,5Zn-8,0Al alloy to provide a comparison with the same alloy without microelement additions. The alloys were melted in an induction furnace of 24 kVA. After casting, the bulk samples of the alloys were homogenized. Then they were solution treated and hot-rolled followed by water-quenching to initiate the recrystallization. Finally, annealing produced at different temperature ranges was made in different samples in order to establish a law for the grain growth. Following the heat treatments, all annealed samples were examined by statistical metallography and the grain sizes were measured. After measurements, the same empirical law of grain growth was found for the different alloys and the ln [D-Do] x 1/T diagrams were plotted in order to establish the kinetic behavior. Based on the estimated values of the activation energy, important conclusions were obtained concerning the addition elements.

  18. 60NiTi Alloy for Tribological and Biomedical Surface Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingole, Sudeep

    2013-06-01

    60NiTi is an alloy with 60 wt% of nickel (Ni) and 40 wt% of titanium (Ti). This alloy was developed in the 1950s at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory (NOL) along with 55NiTi (55 wt% of Ni and 45 wt% of Ti). Both of these alloys exhibit the shape memory effect to different extents. The unique properties of 60NiTi, which are suitable for surface engineering (tribological) applications, are enumerated here. With appropriate heat treatment, this alloy can achieve high hardness (between Rc 55 and Rc 63). It has very good corrosion resistance and is resilient. Machinable before its final heat treatment, this alloy can be ground to fine surface finish and to tight dimensions. At one time, due to the popularity and wider applications of 55NiTi, the study of 60NiTi suffered. Recently, 60NiTi alloy gained some technological advantages due to advanced materials synthesis processes and progress in surface engineering. A feasibility study of 60NiTi bearings for space application has shown promise for its further development and suitability for other tribological applications. This report focuses on an overview of the properties and potential tribological and biomedical applications of 60NiTi.

  19. Ultrafine-Grained Precipitation Hardened Copper Alloys by Swaging or Accumulative Roll Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Altenberger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand in the industry for conductive high strength copper alloys. Traditionally, alloy systems capable of precipitation hardening have been the first choice for electromechanical connector materials. Recently, ultrafine-grained materials have gained enormous attention in the materials science community as well as in first industrial applications (see, for instance, proceedings of NANO SPD conferences. In this study the potential of precipitation hardened ultra-fine grained copper alloys is outlined and discussed. For this purpose, swaging or accumulative roll-bonding is applied to typical precipitation hardened high-strength copper alloys such as Corson alloys. A detailed description of the microstructure is given by means of EBSD, Electron Channeling Imaging (ECCI methods and consequences for mechanical properties (tensile strength as well as fatigue and electrical conductivity are discussed. Finally the role of precipitates for thermal stability is investigated and promising concepts (e.g. tailoring of stacking fault energy for grain size reduction and alloy systems for the future are proposed and discussed. The relation between electrical conductivity and strength is reported.

  20. Microstructure and property characterization of a modified zinc-base alloy and comparison with bearing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, B. K.; Patwardhan, A. K.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    1998-02-01

    The microstructure and physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of a modified zinc-base alloy have been characterized. In order to assess its utility as a bearing alloy, its properties have also been compared with those of a similarly processed conventional zinc-base alloy and a leaded-tin bronze (conforming to ZA27 and SAE 660 specifications, respectively) used for bearing applications. The modified zinc-base alloy shows promise in terms of better elevated-temperature strength and wear response at higher sliding speeds relative to the conventional zinc-base alloy. Interestingly, the wear behavior (especially the seizure pressure) of the modified alloy was also comparable to that of the bronze specimens at the maximum sliding speed, and was superior at the minimum sliding speed. The modified alloy also attained lower density and better hardness. Alloy behavior has been linked to the nature and type of the alloy microconstituents.

  1. Applications of shape memory alloys in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, M.; Suzuki, Y. [Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan). R and D Labs.

    2000-07-01

    In Japan, a first application of shape memory TiNi alloy was a moving flap in an air-conditioner which was developed as sensing function of shape memory alloy at Matsushista Electric Industrial Co. Then, shape memory utilized in a coffee maker, an electric rice-cooker, a thermal mixing valve and etc. were commercialized in Japan. And brassiere wires, a guide wire for medical treatment, an antenna for portable telephone and others were commercialized utilizing superelasticity. At the same time with these commercial products, there was not only progress in fabrication technology to effect accurate transformation temperature, but also the discovery of small hysteresis alloy such as R-phase or TiNiCu alloy and low transformation temperature alloy such as TiNiFe, TiNiV and TiNiCo alloys. Therefore the shape memory alloy market has expanded widely to electric appliances, automobile, residence, medical care and otherfield today. (orig.)

  2. High Damping Alloys and Their Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuxing Yin

    2000-01-01

    Damping alloys show prospective applications in the elimination of unwanted vibrations and acoustic noise. The basic definitions and characterization methods of damping capacity are reviewed in this paper. Several physical mechanisms controlled by the alloy microstructure are responsible for the damping behavior in the damping alloys. Composite, dislocation, ferromagnetic and planar defect types are commonly classified for the alloys, which show the different damping behavior against temperature, frequency of vibration,amplitude of vibration and damping modes. Development of practically applicable damping alloys requires the higher mechanical properties and adequate workability, besides the high damping capacity. A new Mn-Cu damping alloy, named as M2052 alloy, is recently developed with possible industrial applications.

  3. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; Payer, J H

    2006-01-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nanometers per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  4. Paracrystalline property of high-entropy alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoqing Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Atomic structure models of six-component high-entropy alloys with body-centered cubic structure are successfully built according to the principle of maximum entropy for the first time. The lattice distortion parameters g of seven typical high-entropy alloys are calculated. From the optimized lattice configuration of high-entropy alloys, we show that these alloys are ideal three-dimensional paracrystals. The formation mechanism, structural feature, mechanical property, and application prospect of high-entropy alloys are discussed in comparison with the traditional alloys. The novel properties of body-centered cubic high-entropy alloys are attributed to the failure of dislocation deformation mechanism and the difficulty of directed particle diffusion.

  5. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  6. Mechanism-Based Modeling of Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking (HEAC) in High Strength Alloys for Marine Applications: Prediction of Monel K-500 HEAC for Select Environmental and Mechanical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    activation energies (-40 kJ/mol). Moreover, possible trapping sites will differ for precipitation hardened fee Ni-based alloys compared to ferrous ...FINAL REPORT Mechanism-Based Modeling of Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking (HEAC) in High Strength Alloys for Marine Applications: Prediction...the microscopic scale to enable threshold and crack growth rate predictions in Ni-based alloys which differ substantially from high strength steels

  7. Dynamic behavior and microstructural evolution during moderate to high strain rate hot deformation of a Fe-Ni-Cr alloy (alloy 800H)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Di, Hongshuang; Zhang, Jiecen; Yang, Yaohua

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to fundamentally understand the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H at moderate to high strain rate using hot compression tests and propose nucleation mechanism associated with dynamic crystallization (DRX). We firstly investigated the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H with industrial scale strain rates using hot compression tests and adiabatic correction was performed to correct as-measured flow curves. Secondly, a Johnson-Cook model was established by using the corrected data and could give a precise prediction of elevated temperature flow stress for the studied alloy. Finally, the nucleation mechanism of DRX grains at high strain rates was studied. The results showed that the predominant nucleation mechanism for DRX is the formation of "bulge" at parent grain boundary. Additionally, the fragmentation of original grain at low deformation temperatures and the twinning near the bulged regions at high deformation temperatures also accelerate the DRX process.

  8. Phase and magnetic studies of the high-energy alloyed Ni–Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiraskova, Y., E-mail: jirasko@ipm.cz [Institute of Physics of Materials, AS CR, Žižkova 22, CZ-616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Bursik, J.; Turek, I.; Hapla, M. [Institute of Physics of Materials, AS CR, Žižkova 22, CZ-616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Titov, A.; Zivotsky, O. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology Centre, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, CZ-708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • The mechanically alloyed Ni–Fe system is studied by a number of methods. • Three-stage alloying results in a formation of Ni{sub 3}Fe. • Magnetic properties and particle interactions reflect the changes in composition. - Abstract: A report on the systematic study of the changes in the phase composition, morphology, and magnetic properties of the Fe–Ni alloy is presented. Structure studies based on the X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the step-wise alloying by high energy ball milling for time up to 6000 min proceeds in three stages: (i) solid state diffusion of Ni into bcc-Fe, (ii) the ongoing diffusion of Ni into bcc-Fe and simultaneous diffusion of Fe into fcc-Ni, and (iii) structural transformation of bcc-FeNi into fcc-NiFe and final formation of the Ni{sub 3}Fe phase. Except for ferromagnetic phases, a small contribution of the paramagnetic component is detected by Mössbauer spectrometry. The alloying process is accompanied by an initial rapid decrease in crystallite size followed by a sluggish decrease down to the mean final size of 12 nm. The changes in the grain size and phase compositions are reflected in magnetic characteristics. The results yielded from the Henkel graphs confirm a dominance of the negative particle interactions.

  9. Investigation of the Precipitation Behavior in Aluminum Based Alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Khushaim, Muna S.

    2015-11-30

    ternary Al-Li-Cu alloys. Atom probe tomography and statistical testing are combined to investigate the fine scale segregation effects of dilute solutes in aluminum alloys. The optimum application of atom probe tomography in a wide range of materials is enabled by the integration of a laser pulse mode in the atom probe analysis. However, the nature of the laser mechanism used during atom probe tomography analyses is still debated. Systematic investigation of the microstructural change of δ′(Al3Li) precipitates influenced by different pulsed laser energies are used to describe the important phenome associated with the laser pulse mode. In this study, atom probe tomography presented a series of snapshots during in-situ reversion of ′(Al3Li) precipitates, initiated by laser irradiation, using different laser energies for the first time. An estimation method to investigate real sample temperatures during laser-APT analyses using an interface reaction itself as a probe has been proposed. Finally, the considerable potential of aluminum liquid is demonstrated as a powerful synthesis solvent of important intermetallic phases such as: Mg2Si, Al2Mg and CaMgSi .The atom probe tomography technique is utilized to characterize the intermediate reaction steps of the flux-grown intermetallic phases. The study proposed a direct approach to investigate the involved reactions during the formation of the synthesized intermetallic phase.

  10. Development of Zn50 Brazing Alloy for Joining Mild Steel to Mild Steel (SAE1018

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Nwigbo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work has developed new brazing alloys for joining mild steel to mild steel (SAE1018 at a lower temperature. The alloys blends and error analysis were done by experimental design software (Design Expert 8.0.7.1. Design of experiments was done by Scheffe quadratic mixture method. The liquidus temperatures were predicted by calculation of phase diagrams of the alloying metals. The brazing alloys were produced by gravity technique and melted using silicon carbide graphite crucible. The quality of the brazing alloys was analyzed by optical microscopy (OM, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. Brazed joints were produced by torch method with a commercial flux. Brazing temperatures (liquidus were tracked by a digital infrared/laser pyrometer. Some mechanical properties studied were tensile strength and hardness. Finally, brazed joints produced from the developed brazing alloys were compared to that produced from muntz brass. Six (6 brazing alloys were successfully developed. Zinc and manganese were the main components, to which were added; 3 to 4 %wt silver and 11 to15 %wt modifying element. The microstructure showed a typical eutectic structure with zinc-rich phase distributed uniformly in the matrix with a combination of different sizes of dendrite, rounded blocks of compounds and hypoeutectic structures. AAS results indicated minimal out-gassing of zinc and FT-IR results indicated very low presence of atmospheric gas. The range of brazing temperature for best results was recorded from 690.90 to 735.10 0C. The joints produced from the developed brazing alloys had acceptable strengths with improved stress-strain behaviour compared to muntz brass.

  11. Formation of the BiAg2 surface alloy on lattice-mismatched interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Fattah, Z. M.; Lutz, P.; Piquero-Zulaica, I.; Lobo-Checa, J.; Schiller, F.; Bentmann, H.; Ortega, J. E.; Reinert, F.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the growth of a monolayer-thick BiAg2 surface alloy on thin Ag films grown on Pt(111) and Cu(111). Using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) we show that the surface structure of the 1/3 ML Bi/x -ML Ag/Pt(111) system (x ≥2 ) is strongly affected by the annealing temperature required to form the alloy. As judged from the characteristic (√{3 }×√{3 } )R 30∘ LEED pattern, the BiAg2 alloy is partially formed at room temperature. A gentle, gradual increase in the annealing temperatures successively results in the formation of a pure BiAg2 phase, a combination of that phase with a (2 ×2 ) superstructure, and finally the pure (2 ×2 ) phase, which persists at higher annealing temperatures. These results complement recent work reporting the (2 ×2 ) as a predominant phase, and attributing the absence of BiAg2 alloy to the strained Ag/Pt interface. Likewise, we show that the growth of the BiAg2 alloy on similarly lattice-mismatched 1 and 2 ML Ag-Cu(111) interfaces also requires a low annealing temperature, whilst higher temperatures result in BiAg2 clustering and the formation of a BiCu2 alloy. The demonstration that the BiAg2 alloy can be formed on thin Ag films on different substrates presenting a strained interface has the prospect of serving as bases for technologically relevant systems, such as Rashba alloys interfaced with magnetic and semiconductor substrates.

  12. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  13. Hydrostatic extrusion of magnesium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillekens, W.H.; Bohlen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with the capabilities and limitations of the hydrostatic extrusion process for the manufacturing of magnesium alloy sections. Firstly, the process basics for the hydrostatic extrusion of materials in general and of magnesium in particular are introduced. Next, some recent research

  14. Gold color in dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, T

    1997-01-01

    This article will help the dental laboratory with alloy selection by exploring how the relationship among color, ductility and strength applies to gold and how color can be quantified. Because higher quality materials translate into higher profits, upselling to the dentist and patient is also discussed.

  15. Ultrasonic processing of aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.

    2013-01-01

    The research in ultrasonic processing for metallurgical application shows a promising influence on improving casting properties of aluminium alloys. The principle of ultrasonic processing is introduction of acoustic waves with a frequency higher than 17 kHz into liquid metal. Several promising

  16. Superb nanocrystalline alloys for plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ With high rigidity and antiwear performance,nanocrystalline metals and their alloys can find wide applications in surface protection.However, the existence of grain boundaries often leads to erosive micro-batteries which accelerate the process of corrosion.Therefore, it has already become a key issue for surface engineering researchers to find nano materials with higher lubricating, anticorrosion and antiwear capacities.

  17. Microstructure and thermal stability of mechanically alloyed Al3Ti/Al alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林建国; 魏浩岩; 黄正

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure stability of Al3Ti/Al alloy prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) was investigated in the simulating environment in which they may be used. The results show that the MA alloy possesses fine microstructure (the grain size is about 0.5  μm). After cycling loaded followed by heat exposure at 350  ℃ for 24  h, no microstructure coarsening of the alloy occurred, which means that the Al3Ti/Al alloy behaves good microstructure stability at high temperature. The compression yield strength of the alloy reaches up to 247  MPa at 350  ℃.

  18. Effect of magnesium content on the semi solid cast microstructure of hypereutectic aluminum-silicon alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat-Ardakan, Alireza

    2009-12-01

    out. The results are in good agreement with the FACTSAGE results confirming the reduction of eutectic formation temperature with addition of Mg up to 4.2% and nearly the same temperature for 6 and 10% Mg alloys. Finally, the hardness of the A390 and the 6 and 10% Mg alloys was evaluated for conventionally cast samples and after T6 heat treatment. As expected, the high Mg content alloys showed higher hardness values compared to the A390 alloy. This is a significant finding because A390 is used in high wear resistance applications at medium or elevated temperature. Therefore, the A390 alloy with higher Mg addition can improve the wear resistance of this alloy. The reason for the increased in hardness of Mg can be attributed to the modification of eutectic silicon in the matrix, the presence of eutectic Mg2 Si in the matrix as well as the increase of solid fraction of primary phases from 6.1% for A390 to 12.2% for the 10% Mg alloy. The T6 heat treatment increased the value of hardness for all samples. However, contrary to the as-cast samples, the hardness of A390 alloy in T6 condition shows higher increase than the high Mg alloys. This phenomenon can be attributed to the precipitation hardening of alpha-Al phase during the heat treatment. Since the matrix of A390 consists of more alpha-Al phase when compared to the high Mg content alloys, the increases in hardness of A390 alloy is more significant.

  19. Microstructure and mechanical property change of dissimilar metal welds Alloy 600 - Alloy 182 - A508 Gr. 3 according to thermal aging effect at 400 .deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To prevent such critical matters above mentioned, investigation about degradation mechanism of materials by thermal aging should be conducted. However, there are no sufficient studies on this field. Therefore, the final goal of this study is to investigate microstructure along the DMW undergone thermal aging process. Firstly, in order to get a reference data for further comparison analysis which is expected to show degradation mechanism of the weld joint, un-heated weld joint was investigated with several instruments, Vickers hardness tester, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). Detail instrumental analysis in Alloy 600 - Alloy 182 - A508 Gr. 3 DMW joint were performed in order to investigate microstructure and mechanical properties of material. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. Alloy 182 has austenitic dendrite structure which is formed by heat flow during welding process. Type-II boundaries were observed at the interface between Alloy 182 and A508 Gr. 3. Chemical composition shows rapid transition at the interface which makes 3000 µm of chromium dilution zone. Microstructure of A508 Gr. 3 was investigated from the interface between Alloy 182 to base metal.

  20. Metalcasting competitiveness research. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwonka, T.S.

    1994-08-01

    This report comprises eleven separate reports: prediction of non- metallic particle distribution, electromagnetic separation of inclusions from molten Al alloy, clean steel castings, waste stream identification and treatment, elastic wave lithotripsy for removal of ceramic from investment castings, metal penetration in sand molds, mold-metal interface gas composition, improved Alloy 718, specifications for iron oxide additions to no-bake sands, criteria functions for defect prediction, and computer-aided cooling curve analysis.