WorldWideScience

Sample records for alloying materials science

  1. Combinatorial thin film materials science: From alloy discovery and optimization to alloy design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebhardt, Thomas, E-mail: gebhardt@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Music, Denis; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2012-06-30

    This paper provides an overview of modern alloy development, from discovery and optimization towards alloy design, based on combinatorial thin film materials science. The combinatorial approach, combining combinatorial materials synthesis of thin film composition-spreads with high-throughput property characterization has proven to be a powerful tool to delineate composition-structure-property relationships, and hence to efficiently identify composition windows with enhanced properties. Furthermore, and most importantly for alloy design, theoretical models and hypotheses can be critically appraised. Examples for alloy discovery, optimization, and alloy design of functional as well as structural materials are presented. Using Fe-Mn based alloys as an example, we show that the combination of modern electronic-structure calculations with the highly efficient combinatorial thin film composition-spread method constitutes an effective tool for knowledge-based alloy design.

  2. Fundamentals of radiation materials science metals and alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Was, Gary S

    2017-01-01

    The revised second edition of this established text offers readers a significantly expanded introduction to the effects of radiation on metals and alloys. It describes the various processes that occur when energetic particles strike a solid, inducing changes to the physical and mechanical properties of the material. Specifically it covers particle interaction with the metals and alloys used in nuclear reactor cores and hence subject to intense radiation fields. It describes the basics of particle-atom interaction for a range of particle types, the amount and spatial extent of the resulting radiation damage, the physical effects of irradiation and the changes in mechanical behavior of irradiated metals and alloys. Updated throughout, some major enhancements for the new edition include improved treatment of low- and intermediate-energy elastic collisions and stopping power, expanded sections on molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methodologies describing collision cascade evolution, new treatment of t...

  3. Mechanical alloying nanotechnology, materials science and powder metallurgy

    CERN Document Server

    El-Eskandarany, M Sherif

    2015-01-01

    This book is a detailed introduction to mechanical alloying, offering guidelines on the necessary equipment and facilities needed to carry out the process and giving a fundamental background to the reactions taking place. El-Eskandarany, a leading authority on mechanical alloying, discusses the mechanism of powder consolidations using different powder compaction processes. A new chapter will also be included on thermal, mechanically-induced and electrical discharge-assisted mechanical milling. Fully updated to cover recent developments in the field, this second edition also introduces new a

  4. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  5. Small-angle scattering in materials science - a short review of applications in alloys, ceramics and composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early days of small-angle scattering (SAS), this technique has been used to characterize the structure of solid materials on the nanometer scale. Some recent developments in this field will be reviewed, focusing on alloys, ceramics and (nano-) composite materials. The large field of SAS from polymeric systems will not be covered. Classical applications of SAS are the characterization of pores or precipitates in alloys, for instance. In more recent years, a range of new applications for X-ray SAS has emerged owing to the availability of more and more brilliant (synchrotron) X-ray sources. Examples include grazing-incidence SAXS, used increasingly to characterize nano-structured surfaces on semiconductors and also on other materials. The use of a narrow X-ray beam also allows the investigation of extremely inhomogeneous or hierarchically structured materials by scanning SAXS. In this approach, the specimen is moved step by step across an X-ray beam with a diameter of a few micrometers (or even less), collecting a SAXS pattern at each step. In neutron SAS, the systematic use of magnetic cross-sections has brought considerable progress in the study of magnetic nano-particles or nano-composites. Single crystalline or textured materials are being studied under several orientations with respect to the primary beam to yield three-dimensional (neutron or X-ray) SAS patterns. In many cases, SAS is combined with other techniques, such as electron microscopy, spectroscopy or mechanical characterization, the most elegant being an in-situ combination. A number of recent examples for the above-mentioned approaches will be given. (orig.)

  6. Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Science Program is structured so that NASA s headquarters is responsible for the program content and selection, through the Enterprise Scientist, and MSFC provides for implementation of ground and flight programs with a Discipline Scientist and Discipline Manager. The Discipline Working Group of eminent scientists from outside of NASA acts in an advisory capacity and writes the Discipline Document from which the NRA content is derived. The program is reviewed approximately every three years by groups such as the Committee on Microgravity Research, the National Materials Advisory Board, and the OBPR Maximization and Prioritization (ReMaP) Task Force. The flight program has had as many as twenty-six principal investigators (PIs) in flight or flight definition stage, with the numbers of PIs in the future dependent on the results of the ReMaP Task Force and internal reviews. Each project has a NASA-appointed Project Scientist, considered a half-time job, who assists the PI in understanding and preparing for internal reviews such as the Science Concept Review and Requirements Definition Review. The Project Scientist also insures that the PI gets the maximum science support from MSFC, represents the PI to the MSFC community, and collaborates with the Project Manager to insure the project is well-supported and remains vital. Currently available flight equipment includes the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) and Microgravity Science Glovebox. Ground based projects fall into one or more of several categories. Intellectual Underpinning of Flight Program projects include theoretical studies backed by modeling and computer simulations; bring to maturity new research, often by young researchers, and may include preliminary short duration low gravity experiments in the KC-135 aircraft or drop tube; enable characterization of data sets from previous flights; and provide thermophysical property determinations to aid PIs. Radiation Shielding and preliminary In

  7. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...

  8. Process Simulation Role in the Development of New Alloys Based on Integrated Computational Material Science and Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Roy, Shibayan [ORNL; Shyam, Amit [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    To accelerate the introduction of new materials and components, the development of metal casting processes requires the teaming between different disciplines, as multi-physical phenomena have to be considered simultaneously for the process design and optimization of mechanical properties. The required models for physical phenomena as well as their validation status for metal casting are reviewed. The data on materials properties, model validation, and relevant microstructure for materials properties are highlighted. One vehicle to accelerate the development of new materials is through combined experimental-computational efforts. Integrated computational/experimental practices are reviewed; strengths and weaknesses are identified with respect to metal casting processes. Specifically, the examples are given for the knowledge base established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and computer models for predicting casting defects and microstructure distribution in aluminum alloy components.

  9. Computational Materials Program for Alloy Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    The research program sponsored by this grant, "Computational Materials Program for Alloy Design", covers a period of time of enormous change in the emerging field of computational materials science. The computational materials program started with the development of the BFS method for alloys, a quantum approximate method for atomistic analysis of alloys specifically tailored to effectively deal with the current challenges in the area of atomistic modeling and to support modern experimental programs. During the grant period, the program benefited from steady growth which, as detailed below, far exceeds its original set of goals and objectives. Not surprisingly, by the end of this grant, the methodology and the computational materials program became an established force in the materials communitiy, with substantial impact in several areas. Major achievements during the duration of the grant include the completion of a Level 1 Milestone for the HITEMP program at NASA Glenn, consisting of the planning, development and organization of an international conference held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in August of 2002, finalizing a period of rapid insertion of the methodology in the research community worlwide. The conference, attended by citizens of 17 countries representing various fields of the research community, resulted in a special issue of the leading journal in the area of applied surface science. Another element of the Level 1 Milestone was the presentation of the first version of the Alloy Design Workbench software package, currently known as "adwTools". This software package constitutes the first PC-based piece of software for atomistic simulations for both solid alloys and surfaces in the market.Dissemination of results and insertion in the materials community worldwide was a primary focus during this period. As a result, the P.I. was responsible for presenting 37 contributed talks, 19 invited talks, and publishing 71 articles in peer-reviewed journals, as

  10. Materials science symposium 'materials science using accelerators'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The facility of the JAERI-Tokai tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to advancing heavy-ion sciences in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid-state physics and materials science, taking advantage of its prominent performance of heavy-ion acceleration. This facility was recently upgraded by changing the acceleration tubes and installing an ECR ion-source at the terminal. The radioactive nuclear beam facility (Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex, TRIAC) was also installed by the JAERI-KEK joint project. On this occasion, this meeting was held in order to provide a new step for the advancement of heavy-ion science, and to exchange information on recent activities and future plans using the tandem facility as well as on promising new experimental techniques. This meeting was held at Tokai site of JAERI on January 6th and 7th in 2005, having 24 oral presentations, and was successfully carried out with as many as 90 participants and lively discussions among scientists from all the fields of heavy-ion science, including solid-sate physics, nuclear physics and chemistry, and accelerator physics. This summary is the proceedings of this meeting. We would like to thank all the staffs of the accelerators section, participants and office workers in the Department of Materials Science for their support. The 24 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  11. Rudiments of materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Pillai, SO

    2007-01-01

    Writing a comprehensive book on Materials Science for the benefit of undergraduate courses in Science and Engineering was a day dream of the first author, Dr. S.O. Pillai for a long period. However, the dream became true after a lapse of couple of years. Lucid and logical exposition of the subject matter is the special feature of this book.

  12. Materials Sciences Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compilation and index of the ERDA materials sciences program is presented. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs

  13. Materials Sciences Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    A compilation and index of the ERDA materials sciences program is presented. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs. (GHT)

  14. Materials science and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, T.M.

    1995-10-01

    The science-based stockpile stewardship program emphasizes a better understanding of how complex components function through advanced computer calculations. Many of the problem areas are in the behavior of materials making up the equipment. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) can contribute to solving these problems by providing diagnostic tools to examine parts noninvasively and by providing the experimental tools to understand material behavior in terms of both the atomic structure and the microstructure. Advanced computer codes need experimental information on material behavior in response to stress, temperature, and pressure as input, and they need benchmarking experiments to test the model predictions for the finished part.

  15. Materials Science Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the Department of Energy in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research. The Director of this office is appointed by the President with Senate consent. The Director advises the Secretary on the physical research program; monitors the Department's R ampersand D programs; advises the Secretary on management of the laboratories under the jurisdiction of the Department, excluding those that constitute part of the nuclear weapon complex; and advises the Secretary on basic and applied research activities of the Department. The research covers a spectrum of scientific and engineering areas of interest to the Department of Energy and is conducted generally by personnel trained in the disciplines of Solid State Physics, Metallurgy, Ceramics, Chemistry, Polymers and Materials Science. The Materials Sciences Division supports basic research on materials properties and phenomena important to all energy systems. The aim is to provide the necessary base of materials knowledge required to advance the nation's energy programs. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1989 together with a convenient index to the Division's programs

  16. Volume 2: Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Silvia; EMC 2008 14th European Microscopy Congress

    2008-01-01

    Proceedings of the14th European Microscopy Congress, held in Aachen, Germany, 1-5 September 2008. Jointly organised by the European Microscopy Society (EMS), the German Society for Electron Microscopy (DGE) and the local microscopists from RWTH Aachen University and the Research Centre Jülich, the congress brings together scientists from Europe and from all over the world. The scientific programme covers all recent developments in the three major areas of instrumentation and methods, materials science and life science.

  17. Material science and solid state physics studies with positive muon spin precession. [fe(a1) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The hyperfine field on the muon, B sub hf, at interstitial sites in dilute Fe(Al) alloys was measured for four different concentrations of Al and as a function of temperature by the muon spin rotation method. The magnitude of B sub hf, which is negative, decreases at rates ranging from 0.09 + or - 0.03% per at.% Al at 200 K to an asymptotic limit of 0.35 + or - far above 440 K. This behavior shows that sites near the Al impurity are weakly repulsive to the muon, with an interaction potential of 13 + or - 3 meV. In order to fit the temperature dependence of the hyperfine field, it is necessary to hypothesize the existence of a small concentration of unidentified defects, possibly dislocations, which are attractive to the muon. Although the Al impurity acts as a non-magnetic hole in the Fe lattice, the observed decrease in B sub hf is only 35% of the decrease in the bulk magnetization. It is concluded that B sub hf is determined mainly by the enhanced screening of conduction electrons in Fe and Fe(Al). Since the influence of the Al impurity on the neighboring Fe monents is very small, most of the change in B sub hf is therefore attributed to the increase in conduction electron polarization of the Al impurity.

  18. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 2219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for aluminum 2219 alloy is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and joining techniques is developed.

  19. Lasers in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    This book covers various aspects of lasers in materials science, including a comprehensive overview on basic principles of laser-materials interactions and applications enabled by pulsed laser systems.  The material is organized in a coherent way, providing the reader with a harmonic architecture. While systematically covering the major current and emerging areas of lasers processing applications, the Volume provides examples of targeted modification of material properties achieved through careful control of the processing conditions and laser irradiation parameters. Special emphasis is placed on specific strategies aimed at nanoscale control of material structure and properties to match the stringent requirements of modern applications.  Laser fabrication of novel nanomaterials, which expands to the domains of photonics, photovoltaics, sensing, and biomedical applications, is also discussed in the Volume. This book assembles chapters based on lectures delivered at the Venice International School on Lasers...

  20. Panel 3 - material science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrao, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yip, Sidney [MIT

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades, NNSA's national security challenge has evolved, and the role of simulation and computation has grown dramatically. The process of certifying nuclear weapons performance has changed from one based on integrated tests to science-based certification in which underground nuclear tests have been replaced by large-scale simulations, appropriately validated with fundamental experimental data. Further, the breadth of national security challenges has expanded beyond stewardship of a nuclear deterrent to a broad range of global and asymmetric threats. Materials challenges are central to the full suite of these national security challenges. Mission requirements demand that materials perform predictably in extreme environments -- high pressure, high strain rate, and hostile irradiation and chemical conditions. Considerable advances have been made in incorporating fundamental materials physics into integrated codes used for component certification. On the other hand, significant uncertainties still remain, and materials properties, especially at the mesoscale, are key to understanding uncertainties that remain in integrated weapons performance codes and that at present are treated as empirical knobs. Further, additional national security mission challenges could be addressed more robustly with new and higher performing materials.

  1. 1. international spring school and symposium on advances in materials science; contributed papers. Proceedings. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first International Conference on Advances in Materials Science was held on 15-20 March, 1994 in Cairo. The specialists discussed advances in materials science formation, development and observation. The applications of materials science technique in the field of construction material, Moessbauer measurements, physico science, corrosion and mechanical alloying were discussed at the meeting. more than 700 papers were presented in the meeting

  2. Steels from materials science to structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sha, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Steels and computer-based modelling are fast growing fields in materials science as well as structural engineering, demonstrated by the large amount of recent literature. Steels: From Materials Science to Structural Engineering combines steels research and model development, including the application of modelling techniques in steels.  The latest research includes structural engineering modelling, and novel, prototype alloy steels such as heat-resistant steel, nitride-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel and low nickel maraging steel.  Researchers studying steels will find the topics vital to their work.  Materials experts will be able to learn about steels used in structural engineering as well as modelling and apply this increasingly important technique in their steel materials research and development. 

  3. Applications of neutron scattering in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It can be expected that the application of neutron scattering in materials science will become more widespread with increasing interaction between neutron scatterers and materials scientists. Several potential growth areas are identified, e.g., structural analysis of polycrystalline and multi-phase systems as well as amorphous substances; small-angle scattering analysis of extended defects such as vacancy clusters, precipitate zones, etc., including the kinetics of their formation, in crystalline and vitreous substances; and dynamic effects near phase transformations. Small-angle scattering methods are illustrated by two examples, the formation of voids in β'-NiAl and the decomposition of Al-Zn alloys. (author)

  4. Small-angle scattering in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-angle scattering (SAS) of X-rays (SAXS) or neutrons (SANS) are a powerful tools to investigate inhomogeneities in the size range from ∼ 1 nm to ∼ 100 nm. Typical examples in materials science are pores, precipitates in metal alloys or nano-particles in composites. Frequently, these inhomogeneities are not spherical and their alignment is not random, quite in contrast to many other applications of SAS. This requires the use of pinhole geometry and area detectors for the experimental set-up. The present paper focuses on evaluation techniques of two-dimensional (2D) SAS-patterns from some materials investigated by the authors, i.e. metal alloys, carbon composites, wood and bone. Although the examples shown are derived exclusively from SAXS measurements, most of them could stem from SANS measurements as well. (author)

  5. Introduction into modern materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is divided into the following headings: Preliminary remarks on mathematics, statistical mechanics, intermolecular interactions; gases and fluids - general fundamentals, liquids and solutions, crystals, metals and alloys, non-metallic solids, composites; thermodynamic properties, mechanical properties, electric conductivity, dielectric and magnetic properties, surface effects, and materials testing - an outline. (orig./MM) With 128 figs., 21 tabs

  6. Teaching materials science and engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bernhard Ilschner

    2003-06-01

    This paper is written with the intention of simulating discussion on teaching materials science and engineering in the universities. The article illustrates the tasks, priorities, goals and means lying ahead in the teaching of materials science and engineering for a sustainable future.

  7. Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This computer-generated image depicts the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1) being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) for placement in the Destiny laboratory module aboard the International Space Station. The rack is part of the plarned Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and is expected to include two furnace module inserts, a Quench Module Insert (being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center) to study directional solidification in rapidly cooled alloys and a Diffusion Module Insert (being developed by the European Space Agency) to study crystal growth, and a transparent furnace (being developed by NASA's Space Product Development program). Multi-user equipment in the rack is being developed under the auspices of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) and ESA. Key elements are labeled in other images (0101754, 0101830, and TBD).

  8. Nuclear technology and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current and expected problems in the materials of nuclear technology are reviewed. In the fuel elements of LWRs, cladding waterside corrosion, secondary hydriding and pellet-cladding interaction may be significant impediments to extended burnup. In the fuel, fission gas release remains a key issue. Materials issues in the structural alloys of the primary system include stress-corrosion cracking of steel, corrosion of steam generator tubing and pressurized thermal shock of the reactor vessel. Prediction of core behavior in severe accidents requires basic data and models for fuel liquefaction, aerosol formation, fission product transport and core-concrete interaction. Materials questions in nuclear waste management and fusion technology are briefly reviewed. (author)

  9. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the structure and properties of metals. This volume contains the two modules: structure of metals (bonding, common lattic types, grain structure/boundary, polymorphis, alloys, imperfections in metals) and properties of metals (stress, strain, Young modulus, stress-strain relation, physical properties, working of metals, corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, tritium/material compatibility)

  10. Moessbauer Spectroscopy in Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication in electronic form has been set up as proceedings of the conference dealing with applications of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in material science. Twenty-three abstracts and twenty-two presentations are included.

  11. Chemistry and Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research are growth, structure, and reactivity of surfaces and thin films; uranium research; physics and processing of metals; energetic materials; etc. The laboratory-directed R and D include director's initiatives and individual projects, and transactinium institute studies

  12. Weightless Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Gravity affects everything we do. Only in very recent years have we been able to carry out experiments in orbit around the Earth and see for the first time how things behave in its absence. This has allowed us to understand fundamental processes better and to design new materials using this knowledge. (Contains 6 figures.)

  13. FOREWORD: Focus on Combinatorial Materials Science Focus on Combinatorial Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikyo, Toyohiro

    2011-10-01

    About 15 years have passed since the introduction of modern combinatorial synthesis and high-throughput techniques for the development of novel inorganic materials; however, similar methods existed before. The most famous was reported in 1970 by Hanak who prepared composition-spread films of metal alloys by sputtering mixed-material targets. Although this method was innovative, it was rarely used because of the large amount of data to be processed. This problem is solved in the modern combinatorial material research, which is strongly related to computer data analysis and robotics. This field is still at the developing stage and may be enriched by new methods. Nevertheless, given the progress in measurement equipment and procedures, we believe the combinatorial approach will become a major and standard tool of materials screening and development. The first article of this journal, published in 2000, was titled 'Combinatorial solid state materials science and technology', and this focus issue aims to reintroduce this topic to the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials audience. It covers recent progress in combinatorial materials research describing new results in catalysis, phosphors, polymers and metal alloys for shape memory materials. Sophisticated high-throughput characterization schemes and innovative synthesis tools are also presented, such as spray deposition using nanoparticles or ion plating. On a technical note, data handling systems are introduced to familiarize researchers with the combinatorial methodology. We hope that through this focus issue a wide audience of materials scientists can learn about recent and future trends in combinatorial materials science and high-throughput experimentation.

  14. Setting science free from materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Rupert

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary science is based on the claim that all reality is material or physical. There is no reality but material reality. Consciousness is a by-product of the physical activity of the brain. Matter is unconscious. Evolution is purposeless. This view is now undergoing a credibility crunch. The biggest problem of all for materialism is the existence of consciousness. Panpsychism provides a way forward. So does the recognition that minds are not confined to brains. PMID:23906099

  15. Materials Science in Ancient Rome

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Two books, the "De Architectura" by Vitruvius and the "Naturalis Historia" by Pliny the Elder, give us a portrait of the Materials Science, that is, the knowledge of materials, in Rome at the beginning of the Empire. Here, I am reporting some very attractive contents that we can find in these books. The reader will see the discussion proposed in fours case studies: concretes, coatings, amorphous materials and colloidal crystals, to describe them in modern words.

  16. Neutrons for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discussion will be limited to applied materials research performed on a customer/contractor basis. The information obtained using neutrons must therefore compete both scientifically and financially with information obtained using other techniques, particularly electron microscopy, X-ray, NMR, infra-red and Raman spectroscopy. It will be argued that the unique nature of the information gained from neutrons often outweighs the undoubted difficulties of access to neutron beams. Examples are given. Small angle scattering has emerged as the neutron technique of widest application in applied materials research. The penetration of neutron beams through containment vessels, as well as through the sample, allows the measurement of 'in situ' time dependent experiments within a furnace, cryostat, pressure vessel or chemical reactor vessel. High resolution powder diffraction is another technique with wide applications. Structural studies are possible on increasing complex phases. The structure and volume fraction of minority phases can be measured at levels appreciably below that possible by X-ray diffraction. A rapidly growing field at present is the measurement of internal strains through the small shifts in lattice spacing. Inelastic scattering measurements exploit the unique property of neutrons to measure the orientations of vibrating molecules. (author)

  17. Neutrons for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discussion will be limited to applied materials research performed on a customer/contractor basis. The information obtained using neutrons must therefore compete both scientifically and financially with information obtained using other techniques, particular electron microscopy, X-ray, NMR, infra-red and Raman spectroscopy. It will be argued that the unique nature of the information gained from neutrons often outweighs the undoubted difficulties of access to neutron beams. Small-angle scattering has emerged as the neutron technique of widest application in applied materials research. The penetration of neutron beams through containment vessels, as well as through the sample, allows the measurement of in situ time-dependent experiments within a furnace, cryostat, pressure vessel or chemical reactor vessel. Examples will be given of small-angle scattering projects from the nuclear metallurgy, coal, oil, cement, detergent and plastics industries. High-resolution powder diffraction is another technique with wide applications. Structural studies are possible on increasingly complex phases. The structure and volume fraction of minority phase can be measured at levels appreciably below that possible by X-ray diffraction. A rapidly growing field at present is the measurement of internal strains through the small shifts in lattice spacing. Neutron diffraction is unique in being able to measure the full strain tensor from a specified volume within a bulk specimen. Inelastic scattering measurements exploit the unique property of neutrons to measure the orientations of vibrating molecules. Examples will be chosen from the field of catalysis where inelastic spectroscopy has revealed the nature of the bonding of hydrocarbon molecules. (author)

  18. Advanced batteries materials science aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Huggins, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Storage and conversion are critical components of important energy-related technologies. This title employs materials science concepts and tools to describe the features that control the behavior of advanced electrochemical storage systems. It focuses on the basic phenomena that determine the properties of the components.

  19. Materials Science with Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bernas, Harry

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces materials scientists and designers, physicists and chemists to the properties of materials that can be modified by ion irradiation or implantation. These techniques can help design new materials or to test modified properties; novel applications already show that ion-beam techniques are complementary to others, yielding previously unattainable properties. Also, ion-beam interactions modify materials at the nanoscale, avoiding the often detrimental results of lithographic or chemical techniques. Here, the effects are related to better-known quasi-equilibrium thermodynamics, and the consequences to materials are discussed with concepts that are familiar to materials science. Examples addressed concern semiconductor physics, crystal and nanocluster growth, optics, magnetism, and applications to geology and biology.

  20. Shape memory alloys as damping materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shape memory alloys are gaining an increased interest as passive as well as active damping materials. This damping ability when applied in structural elements can lead to a better noise control, improved life time and even better performance of the envisaged tools. By passive damping, it is understood that the material converts a significant part of unwanted mechanical energy into heat. This mechanical energy can be a (resonance) vibration, impact loading or shock waves. This high damping capacity finds its origin in the thermoelastic martensitic phase due to the hysteretic mobility of martensite-variants or different phase interfaces. The damping capacity increases with increasing amplitude of the applied vibration or impact and is almost frequency independent. Special interest exists moreover for damping extreme large displacements by applying the mechanical hysteresis performed during pseudoelastic loading. This aspect is nowadays very strongly studied as a tool for protecting buildings against earthquakes in seismic active regions. Active damping can be obtained in hybrid composites by controlling the recovery stresses or strains of embedded shape memory alloy wires. This controls the internal energy fo a structure which allows controlled modal modification and tuning of the dynamical properties of structural elements. But also impact damage, acoustic radiation, dynamic shape control can be actively controlled. As a consequence improved fatigue-resistance, better performance and a longer lifetime of the structural elements can be obtained. (orig.)

  1. Radiation material science at the INP AS RUz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the critical technologies, determining the national priority of USA and Russia the first place is taken by manufacturing new materials. It means synthesis and production of materials for electronics (micro- and nano-) and photonics, ceramics and nano-ceramics, composites, metals and alloys with particular properties, super-hard materials, bio-compatible materials, catalysts and membranes. Radiation solid state physics gave birth of many radiation technologies for obtaining unique new or modified materials. In the table lists the experimental results recently obtained at the INP AS RUz. The studies are supported by grants of STCU and Uzbekistan Center of Science and Technology

  2. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals

  3. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  4. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  5. Materials Sciences Division long range plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intent of this document is to provide a framework for programmatic guidance into the future for Materials Sciences. The Materials Sciences program is the basic research program for materials in the Department of Energy. It includes a wide variety of activities associated with the sciences related to materials. It also includes the support for developing, constructing, and operating major facilities which are used extensively but not exclusively by the materials sciences

  6. Materials data handbook, aluminum alloy 6061

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, J.; Weiss, V.

    1969-01-01

    Comprehensive compilation of technical data on aluminum alloy 6061 is presented in handbook form. The text includes data on the properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures and other pertinent information required for the design and fabrication of components and equipment utilizing this alloy.

  7. Improvements in manufacture of iridium alloy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding material in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyager 1 and 2, Galileo, and Ulysses spacecraft. This hardware was fabricated from small, 500-g drop-cast ingots. Porosity in these ingots and the resulting defects in the rolled sheets caused rejection of about 30% of the product. An improved manufacturing process was developed with the goal of substantially reducing the level of defects in the rolled sheets. The ingot size is increased to 10 kg and is produced by vacuum arc remelting. In addition, the ingot is hot extruded prior to rolling. Since implementation of the process in 1989, the average rate of rejection of the product has been reduced to below 10%

  8. High temperature magnetic balance for education : A basic investigation of the teaching materials for the material science education

    OpenAIRE

    Tokunaga, Toshihiko; Kasagi, Teruhiko; Maehara, Toshinobu; Tsutaoka, Takanori

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic properties of the several magnetic alloys and compounds were studied for the development of the teaching materials in the material science education by using a hand made high temperature magnetic balance. Magnetism treated were ferro-, para- and antiferromagnetism and magnetic phase transitions among them. Together with the data of resistivity, the possibility of the teaching materials concerning the material scie.nce education will he discussed.

  9. Nanoscale tomography in materials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Möbus

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In materials science, various techniques for three-dimensional reconstruction of microstructures have been applied successfully for decades, such as X-ray tomography and mechanical sectioning. However, in the last decade the family tree of methods has grown significantly. This is partly through advances in instrumentation. The introduction of the focused ion beam microscope and the transformation of transmission electron microscopy into a multipurpose analytical and structural tool have made major impacts. The main driving force for progress is perhaps the advent of nanotechnology with the need to achieve nanometer-scale resolution and the desire to get a real three-dimensional view of the nanoscale world.

  10. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects

  11. Understanding Materials Science History · Properties · Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hummel, Rolf E

    2005-01-01

    This introduction to materials science both for students of engineering and physics and for the interested general public examines not only the physical and engineering properties of virtually all kinds of materials, but also their history, uses, development, and some of the implications of resource depletion and recycling. It covers all topics on materials from an entirely novel perspective: the role materials have played throughout history in the development of humankind and technologies. Specifically, it shows the connection between the technical and the cultural, economic, ecological, and societal aspects of materials science. It aims to whet the appetite of its readers and inspire them to further explore the properties and applications of metals, alloys, ceramics, plastics, and electronic materials by presenting easily understandable explanations and entertaining historical facts. It is also intended to raise the reader’s awareness of their obligations to society as practicing engineers and scientists....

  12. FWP executive summaries: Basic energy sciences materials sciences programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    This report provides an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

  13. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys

  14. Shape memory alloys: New materials for future engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbogen, E.

    1988-01-01

    Shape memory is a new material property. An alloy which experiences relative severe plastic deformation resumes its original shape again after heating by 10 to 100 C. Besides simple shape memory, in similar alloys there is the second effect where the change in shape is caused exclusively by little temperature change. In pseudo-elasticity, the alloy exhibits a rubber-like behavior, i.e., large, reversible deformation at little change in tension. Beta Cu and beta NiTi alloys have been used in practice. The probability is that soon alloys based on Fe will become available. Recently increasing applications for this alloy were found in various areas of technology, even medical technology. A review with 24 references is given, including properties, production, applications and fundamental principles of the shape memory effect.

  15. Materials sciences programs, Fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in materials science topics important to the mission of the Department of Energy. The programmatic divisions under the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geosciences, and Energy Biosciences. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship among synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences subfields include: physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 517 research programs including 255 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 262 research grants (233 of which are at universities), and 29 Small Business Innovation Research Grants. Five cross-cutting indices located at the rear of this book identify all 517 programs according to principal investigator(s), materials, techniques, phenomena, and environment.

  16. Switchable Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) Thermal Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Shape memory alloys applies to a group of materials that demonstrate the ability to return to some previously defined shape when subjected to the appropriate...

  17. A model of 3D shape memory alloy materials

    OpenAIRE

    Aiki, Toyohiko

    2005-01-01

    It is a crucial step how to describe the relationship between the strain, the stress and the temperature field, when we consider the mathematical modelling for shape memory alloy materials. From the experimental results we know that the relationship can be described by the hysteresis operators. In this paper we propose a new system consisting of differential equations as a mathematical model for shape memory alloy materials occupying the three dimensional domain. The key of the modelling is t...

  18. Inertial Confinement Fusion Materials Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamza, A V

    2004-06-01

    Demonstration of thermonuclear ignition and gain on a laboratory scale is one of science's grand challenges. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is committed to achieving inertial confinement fusion (ICF) by 2010. Success in this endeavor depends on four elements: the laser driver performance, target design, experimental diagnostics performance, and target fabrication and target materials performance. This article discusses the current state of target fabrication and target materials performance. The first three elements will only be discussed insofar as they relate to target fabrication specifications and target materials performance. Excellent reviews of the physics of ICF are given by Lindl [Lindl 1998] and Lindl et al. [Lindl 2004]. To achieve conditions under which inertial confinement is sufficient to achieve thermonuclear burn, an imploded fuel capsule is compressed to conditions of high density and temperature. In the laboratory a driver is required to impart energy to the capsule to effect an implosion. There are three drivers currently being considered for ICF in the laboratory: high-powered lasers, accelerated heavy ions, and x rays resulting from pulsed power machines. Of these, high-powered lasers are the most developed, provide the most symmetric drive, and provide the most energy. Laser drive operates in two configurations. The first is direct drive where the laser energy impinges directly on the ICF capsule and drives the implosion. The second is indirect drive, where the energy from the laser is first absorbed in a high-Z enclosure or hohlraum surrounding the capsule, and the resulting x-rays emitted by the hohlraum material drives the implosion. Using direct drive the laser beam energy is absorbed by the electrons in the outer corona of the target. The electrons transport the energy to the denser shell region to provide the ablation and the resulting implosion. Laser direct drive is generally less efficient and more hydrodynamically unstable

  19. Complex metallic alloys as new materials for additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additive manufacturing processes allow freeform fabrication of the physical representation of a three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) data model. This area has been expanding rapidly over the last 20 years. It includes several techniques such as selective laser sintering and stereolithography. The range of materials used today is quite restricted while there is a real demand for manufacturing lighter functional parts or parts with improved functional properties. In this article, we summarize recent work performed in this field, introducing new composite materials containing complex metallic alloys. These are mainly Al-based quasicrystalline alloys whose properties differ from those of conventional alloys. The use of these materials allows us to produce light-weight parts consisting of either metal–matrix composites or of polymer–matrix composites with improved properties. Functional parts using these alloys are now commercialized. (review)

  20. Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects

  1. Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects.

  2. Investigations of mechanically alloyed nanocrystalline materials by microacoustic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubief, P.; Hunsinger, J. J.; Gaffet, E.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine whether yes or no, there is a difference between the physico-chemical properties of the nanocrystalline and the microcrystalline materials. This paper deals with the acoustical behavior of nanocrystalline materials which were prepared by ball- milling and mechanical alloying. Based on two specific techniques (acoustic microinterferometry and acoustic microechography), some of the mechanical properties (elastic ones) may be determined, related to a materials volume of about a few micrometers 3 (for the high frequency 600 MHz apparatus). Thus the mechanically alloyed powders (typically 200 micrometers in diameter), behave as massive materials in this range of frequency. The measurements are directly obtained on the grains and do not take into account the voids induced by further sinthering process. The result of such a micromechanical approach will be given for pure ball-milled elements (Fe) and for the supersaturated solid phase Fe(Si) obtained by mechanical alloying.

  3. The idea of material science virtual laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; R. Honysz

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article was written to describe the Material Science Virtual Laboratory. Presented laboratory is an open scientific, investigative, simulating and didactic medium helpful in the realisation of the scientific and didactic tasks in the field of material Science. This laboratory is implemented in the Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials of Silesian University of Technology in Gliwice, Poland.Design/methodology/approach: The laboratory is an aggregate of testers and t...

  4. Computational materials science: The emergence of predictive capabilities of material behaviour

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijay Kumar

    2003-06-01

    The availability of high performance computers and development of efficient algorithms has led to the emergence of computational materials science as the third branch of materials research complementing the traditional theoretical and experimental approaches. It has created new virtual realities in materials design that are either experimentally not realizable easily or are prohibitively expensive. The possibilities of doing calculations from first principles have led to predictive capabilities that open up new avenues of discovering novel materials with desired properties, understanding material behaviour on the nano- to the macroscopic scale and helping research in new frontiers that could interface between nano-materials and drug design, as well as in understanding biological systems. Here, we describe some significant recent developments related to alloy and steel design as well as the study of matter on the nano-scale — an area that has gained much prominence in current materials research.

  5. Radiation materials science. V. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the papers of the international conference on radiation materials in Alushta, Ukraine in May 1990. The main topics are: basic research in radiation damage physics, a study of the structural materials for reactor cores; irradiation effect on reactor vessel, fuel, super- and semiconductor materials; investigation damage research methods

  6. Radiation materials science. V. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the papers of the international conference on radiation materials in Alushta, Ukraine in May 1990. The main topics are: basic research in radiation damage physics, a study of the structural materials for reactor cores; irradiation effect on reactor vessel, fuel, super- and semiconductor materials; investigation damage research methods

  7. Radiation materials science. V. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the papers of the international conference on radiation materials in Alushta, Ukraine in May 1990. The main topics are: basic research in radiation damage physics, a study of the structural materials for reactor cores; irradiation effect on reactor vessel, fuel, super- and semiconductor materials; investigation damage research methods

  8. Radiation materials science. V. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the papers of the international conference on radiation materials in Alushta, Ukraine in May 1990. The main topics are: basic research in radiation damage physics, a study of the structural materials for reactor cores; irradiation effect on reactor vessel, fuel, super- and semiconductor materials; investigation damage research methods

  9. Radiation materials science. V. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the papers of the international conference on radiation materials in Alushta, Ukraine in May 1990. The main topics are: basic research in radiation damage physics, a study of the structural materials for reactor cores; irradiation effect on reactor vessel, fuel, super- and semiconductor materials; investigation damage research methods

  10. The Science of Smart Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boohan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Over the last few decades, smart materials have become increasingly important in the design of products. Essentially, a smart material is one that has been designed to respond to a stimulus, such as a change in temperature or magnetic field, in a particular and useful way. This article looks at a range of smart materials that are relatively…

  11. Radiation materials science. V. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the papers of the international conference on radiation materials in Alushta, Ukraine in May 1990. The main topics are: basic research in radiation damage physics, a study of the structural materials for reactor cores; irradiation effect on reactor vessel, fuel, super- and semiconductor materials; investigation damage research methods

  12. Crystal growth and computational materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the international conference on advanced materials discusses the advances being made in the area of single crystals, their preparation and device development from these crystals and details of the progress that is taking place in the computational field relating to materials science. Computational materials science makes use of advanced simulation tools and computer interfaces to develop a virtual platform which can provide a model for real-time experiments. This book includes selected papers in topics of crystal growth and computational materials science. We are confident that the new concepts and results presented will stimulate and enhance progress of research on crystal growth and computational materials science. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  13. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the structure and properties of metals. This volume contains the following modules: thermal shock (thermal stress, pressurized thermal shock), brittle fracture (mechanism, minimum pressurization-temperature curves, heatup/cooldown rate limits), and plant materials (properties considered when selecting materials, fuel materials, cladding and reflectors, control materials, nuclear reactor core problems, plant material problems, atomic displacement due to irradiation, thermal and displacement spikes due to irradiation, neutron capture effect, radiation effects in organic compounds, reactor use of aluminum)

  14. Tungsten alloy research at the US Army Materials Technology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that recent research into tungsten heavy alloys at the U. S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL) has explored many areas of processing and process development. The recrystallization and respheroidization of tungsten grains in a heavily cold worked heavy alloy has been examined and resulted in the identification of a method of grain refinement. Another area of investigation has been lightly cold worked. It was determined that it was possible to increase the strength and hardness of the tungsten grains by proper hat treatment. MTL has been involved in the Army's small business innovative research (SBIR) program and several programs have been funded. Included among these are a method of coating the tungsten powders with the alloying elements and the development of techniques of powder injection molding of heavy alloys

  15. 3. Interindustry conference on reactor materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains abstracts on papers presented at the Third Interindustry Conference on Reactor Materials Science (Dimitrovgrad, 27-30 October 1992). The subject scope of the papers is a follows: fuel and fuel elements of power reactors; structural materials of fast breeder reactors and thermonuclear reactors; structural materials of WWER and RBMK type reactors; absorbers and moderators

  16. Forming analysis and application for aluminum-alloy material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Yuansheng

    2012-01-01

    The increase in car ownership brought about by energy shortages, and environmental crises became more acute. The most effective way to achieve energy saving and emission reduction of car is to improve engine efficiency. In addition to that, lightweight body is the key. Aluminum, magnesium alloy as significant materials of lightweight, and the application amount in the car body is a significant upward trend. However, there is high cost of material, with im- mature applied technology and a series of bottleneck problems. All of them affect general application of lightweight mate- rials. This paper focuses on forming process issues for aluminum, magnesium alloy and the solutions to achieve.

  17. Materials science for nuclear detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Peurrung

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of nuclear detection technology has led to a variety of research efforts that seek to accelerate the discovery and development of useful new radiation detection materials. These efforts aim to improve our understanding of how these materials perform, develop formalized discovery tools, and enable rapid and effective performance characterization. We provide an overview of these efforts along with an introduction to the history, physics, and taxonomy of radiation detection materials.

  18. Materials irradiation research in neutron science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Materials irradiation researches are planned in Neutron Science Research Program. A materials irradiation facility has been conceived as one of facilities in the concept of Neutron Science Research Center at JAERI. The neutron irradiation field of the facility is characterized by high flux of spallation neutrons with very wide energy range up to several hundred MeV, good accessibility to the irradiation field, good controllability of irradiation conditions, etc. Extensive use of such a materials irradiation facility is expected for fundamental materials irradiation researches and R and D of nuclear energy systems such as accelerator-driven incineration plant for long-lifetime nuclear waste. In this paper, outline concept of the materials irradiation facility, characteristics of the irradiation field, preliminary technical evaluation of target to generate spallation neutrons, and materials researches expected for Neutron Science Research program are described. (author)

  19. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Sciences Division constitutes one portion of a wide range of research supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1983 together with a convenient index to the program

  20. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the structure and properties of metals. This volume contains the two modules: structure of metals (bonding, common lattic types, grain structure/boundary, polymorphis, alloys, imperfections in metals) and properties of metals (stress, strain, Young modulus, stress-strain relation, physical properties, working of metals, corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, tritium/material compatibility).

  1. First principles phonon calculations in materials science

    OpenAIRE

    Togo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Phonon plays essential roles in dynamical behaviors and thermal properties, which are central topics in fundamental issues of materials science. The importance of first principles phonon calculations cannot be overly emphasized. Phonopy is an open source code for such calculations launched by the present authors, which has been world-widely used. Here we demonstrate phonon properties with fundamental equations and show examples how the phonon calculations are applied in materials science.

  2. Computational materials science: Nanoscale plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour....

  3. Neutron imaging in materials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutron imaging is a non-destructive technique that can reveal the interior of many materials and engineering components and also probe magnetic fields. Within the past few years, several new imaging modes have been introduced that extend the scope of neutron imaging beyond conventional neutron attenuation imaging, yielding both 2- and 3D information about properties and phenomena inaccessible until now. We present an overview of the most important advances in the application of neutron imaging in materials research with a focus on novel techniques such as energy-selective imaging, interferometric imaging with phase gratings, and polarized-neutron imaging. Examples given include the investigation of fluid dynamics in fuel cells, materials phases and structural heterogeneities, distribution of strains, and magnetic structures or phase transitions.

  4. Applicability of existing magnesium alloys as biomedical implant materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erinc, M.; Sillekens, W.H.; Mannens, R.G.T.M.; Werkhoven, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Being biocompatible and biodegradable, magnesium alloys are considered as the new generation biomedical implant materials, such as for stents, bone fixtures, plates and screws. A major drawback is the poor chemical stability of metallic magnesium; it corrodes at a pace that is too high for most pros

  5. Synchrotron radiation in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review on the several experimental techniques (XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, IRRS, etc...) which, utilizing of synchrotron radiation can be applied in glass structural studies, is presented. The major part of these techniques can be also used for studies of other materials such as polymers, metals, etc... (L.C.)

  6. NbAl Intelligent Material Through Mechanical Alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intelligent material of Nb-Al composite, is expected to produce intermetallics phase instantaneously upon collision with hypervelocity space debris to stop the crack propagation. Intermetallics-free MA powder with Nb dispersion in Al matrix is targeted. Nb-Al powders are mechanically alloyed using agate media. Mechanical alloying (MA) with agate media produced fine intermetallics-free powder of Nb dispersion in Al matrix. Intermetallics-free critical MA powder curve for agate media were established. The optimum critical agate MA powder of 200 rpm 132 hours had intelligent properties.

  7. The Materials Science of Superheroes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakalios, James

    2008-03-01

    While materials scientists don't typically consult comic books when selecting research topics, innovations first introduced in superhero adventures as fiction can sometimes find their way off the comic book page and into reality. As amazing as the Fantastic Four's powers is the fact that their costumes are undamaged when the Human Torch flames on or Mr. Fantastic stretches his elastic body. In shape memory materials, an external force or torque induces a structural change that is reversed upon warming. Smart fabrics used in hiking clothing expand at low temperatures, while other materials increase their porosity at higher temperatures, allowing body heat and water vapor to escape. Some polymers can be stretched to over twice their normal dimensions and return to their original state when annealed, a feature appreciated by Mr. Fantastic. In order to keep track of the Invisible Woman, the Fantastic Four's arch nemesis Dr. Doom employed sensors in the eye-slits of his armored face-plate, using the same physics underlying night vision goggles. Certain forms of blindness may be treated using an artificial retina consisting of silicon microelectrode arrays, surgically attached to the back of the eye, that transmit a voltage to the optic nerve proportional to the incident visible light intensity (one of the few positive applications of Dr. Doom's scheming). Spider-Man's wall crawling ability has been ascribed to the same van der Waals attractive force that gecko lizards employ through the millions of microscopic hairs on their toes. Scientists have recently developed ``gecko tape,'' consisting of arrays of fibers that provide a strong enough attraction to support a modest weight. Before this tape is able to support a person, however, major materials constraints must be overcome (if this product ever becomes commercially available, I for one will never wait for the elevator again!) All this, and the chemical composition of Captain America's shield, will be discussed.

  8. Neutron imaging in materials science

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay Kardjilov; Ingo Manke; André Hilger; Markus Strobl; John Banhart

    2011-01-01

    Neutron imaging is a non-destructive technique that can reveal the interior of many materials and engineering components and also probe magnetic fields. Within the past few years, several new imaging modes have been introduced that extend the scope of neutron imaging beyond conventional neutron attenuation imaging, yielding both 2- and 3D information about properties and phenomena inaccessible until now. We present an overview of the most important advances in the application of neutron imagi...

  9. Editorial: Defining materials science: A vision from APL Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacManus-Driscoll, Judith

    2014-07-01

    These are exciting times for materials science—a field which is growing more rapidly than any other physical science discipline. More than ever, the field is providing the vital link between science and engineering, between pure and applied. But what is the subject's definition and why is the field ballooning? I address these questions in the context of how APL Materials intends to play a role in advancing this important field. My introspective focus arises as we approach the first year anniversary of APL Materials.

  10. Diamond-cBN alloy: A universal cutting material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pei [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); High Pressure Science and Engineering Center and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); He, Duanwei, E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn; Kou, Zili; Li, Yong; Hu, Qiwei; Xu, Chao; Lei, Li; Wang, Qiming [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Xiong, Lun; Liu, Jing [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-09-07

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while cBN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and cBN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of transparent bulk diamond-cBN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-cBN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal cBN. High-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-cBN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.

  11. Materials Science and Technology Teachers Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieda, Karen J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Bliss, Mary; Pitman, Stan G.; Eschbach, Eugene A.

    2008-09-04

    The Materials Science and Technology (MST) Handbook was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in Richland, Washington, under support from the U.S. Department of Energy. Many individuals have been involved in writing and reviewing materials for this project since it began at Richland High School in 1986, including contributions from educators at the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory, Central Washington University, the University of Washington, teachers from Northwest Schools, and science and education personnel at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Support for its development was also provided by the U.S. Department of Education. This introductory course combines the academic disciplines of chemistry, physics, and engineering to create a materials science and technology curriculum. The course covers the fundamentals of ceramics, glass, metals, polymers and composites. Designed to appeal to a broad range of students, the course combines hands-on activities, demonstrations and long term student project descriptions. The basic philosophy of the course is for students to observe, experiment, record, question, seek additional information, and, through creative and insightful thinking, solve problems related to materials science and technology. The MST Teacher Handbook contains a course description, philosophy, student learning objectives, and instructional approach and processes. Science and technology teachers can collaborate to build the course from their own interests, strengths, and experience while incorporating existing school and community resources. The course is intended to meet local educational requirements for technology, vocational and science education.

  12. VAMAS tests of structural materials on aluminum alloy and composite material at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, T. [National Research Institute for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Evans, D. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    A Technical Working Area 17, cryogenic structural materials, has been organized in the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) to promote the prestandardization program on material properties tests of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials and alloys at liquid helium temperature. A series of international interlaboratory comparisons of both tensile and fracture toughness tests for aluminum alloy 2219 and compression and shear tests for composite material G-10CR were performed. Nine research institutes from seven nations have participated in this project. The results prove that there are few problems in cryogenic tensile tests for alloy materials. In compression and shear tests, the amount of data scatter was identified and further experiments are planned. This paper presents the program details and interim results of round robin tests.

  13. VAMAS tests of structural materials on aluminum alloy and composite material at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Technical Working Area 17, cryogenic structural materials, has been organized in the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) to promote the prestandardization program on material properties tests of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials and alloys at liquid helium temperature. A series of international interlaboratory comparisons of both tensile and fracture toughness tests for aluminum alloy 2219 and compression and shear tests for composite material G-10CR were performed. Nine research institutes from seven nations have participated in this project. The results prove that there are few problems in cryogenic tensile tests for alloy materials. In compression and shear tests, the amount of data scatter was identified and further experiments are planned. This paper presents the program details and interim results of round robin tests

  14. Materials Science Research Rack Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Shawn; Leman, John R.; Frazier, Natalie C.

    2013-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a research facility developed under a cooperative research agreement between NASA and ESA for materials science investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009 and currently resides in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. Since that time, MSRR has logged more than 1000 hours of operating time. The MSRR accommodates advanced investigations in the microgravity environment on the ISS for basic materials science research in areas such as solidification of metals and alloys. The purpose is to advance the scientific understanding of materials processing as affected by microgravity and to gain insight into the physical behavior of materials processing. MSRR allows for the study of a variety of materials, including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility with a modular design capable of supporting multiple types of investigations. The NASA-provided Rack Support Subsystem provides services (power, thermal control, vacuum access, and command and data handling) to the ESA-developed Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) that accommodates interchangeable Furnace Inserts (FI). Two ESA-developed FIs are presently available on the ISS: the Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) and the Solidification and Quenching Furnace (SQF). Sample Cartridge Assemblies (SCAs), each containing one or more material samples, are installed in the FI by the crew and can be processed at temperatures up to 1400C. ESA continues to develop samples with 14 planned for launch and processing in the near future. Additionally NASA has begun developing SCAs to

  15. Analysis of metals and alloys for improved material compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various metals and alloys are used in boilers and heat exchangers. Chemical and physical reactions occurring in the boiler may lead to destruction of materials of construction or to the formation of scales and sludge. Many of the problems associated with boilers can be minimised by suitable material selection. Analytical techniques play a vital role in this task. The use of conventional wet chemical methods are well established and yield accurate results for the assay of major constituents. The use of atomic absorption spectrophotometry has led to the development of elegant procedures for a convenient and rapid estimation of minor constituents without any need for separation of matrix elements. The various procedures developed at Analytical Chemistry Division for trace analysis metals and alloys are described in this paper with special reference to the analysis of steel and other nuclear materials. (author)

  16. High-entropy alloys as high-temperature thermoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators that efficiently recycle a large portion of waste heat will be an important complementary energy technology in the future. While many efficient TE materials exist in the lower temperature region, few are efficient at high temperatures. Here, we present the high temperature properties of high-entropy alloys (HEAs), as a potential new class of high temperature TE materials. We show that their TE properties can be controlled significantly by changing the valence electron concentration (VEC) of the system with appropriate substitutional elements. Both the electrical and thermal transport properties in this system were found to decrease with a lower VEC number. Overall, the large microstructural complexity and lower average VEC in these types of alloys can potentially be used to lower both the total and the lattice thermal conductivity. These findings highlight the possibility to exploit HEAs as a new class of future high temperature TE materials

  17. Materials Science Division progress report 1986-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report on the various Research and Developmental (R and D) activities carried out in the Materials Science Division during the period 1986-88. Most contributions have been presented in the form of abstracts and wherever possible results of several contributions on a related problem have been consolidated into one. The R and D activities covered the following areas: (1) quasicrystalline phase, (2) high temperature superconducting behaviour in metal oxides, (3) physics of colloidal suspensions, (4) behaviour of materials under high pressure, (5) radiation effects in complex alloy systems, (6) inert gas behaviour in metals, and production of crystals, particularly of volatile semiconducting compounds. The lists of publications by the members of the Division and seminars held during 1986-88 are given at the end of the report. (a uthor)

  18. Metallurgy, the Father of Materials Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of the discipline of materials science during the second half of the twentieth century is outlined. The concept emerged in the USA, almost simultaneously in an academic metallurgy department and in an avant-garde industrial research laboratory, and its development subsequently all over the world has been a joint enterprise involving universities, industrial laboratories and government establishments. The initial impetus came unambiguously from the well established discipline of physical metallurgy, but from the 1960s onwards, the input from solid-state physicists grew very rapidly, while materials chemistry is a later addition. Of all the many subdivisions of modern materials science, polymer science has been the slowest to fit under the umbrella of the broad discipline; its concepts are very different from those familiar to metallurgists. Two fields have contributed mightily to the creation of modern materials science: One is nuclear energy and, more specifically, the study of radiation damage, the other is the huge field of electronic and opto-electronic materials in which physics, chemistry and metallurgy are seamlessly combined.

  19. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described

  20. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  1. Material and information flows pertaining to aluminum alloy pipe distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Simić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the distribution flow of aluminum (Al alloy pipes, starting with the completion of the manufacturing process and final inspection. The proposed solution considers the use of bar-coded caps produced from recycled polymer materials that are placed on the ends of the tubes in order to achieve protection against potential changes in material properties and preserve the product quality. For the preparation of capped tube bundles for shipment from the manufacturer output storage to the customer input warehouse, a technical solution that enables correct and efficient Al alloy pipe handling is proposed, in terms of safety, security, reliability, financial feasibility and ecological viability, with optimal utilization of transport and storage.

  2. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Sciences Division supports basic research on materials properties and phenomena important to all energy systems. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1992 together with an index to the Division's programs. Recent publications from Division-sponsored panel meetings and workshops are listed. The body of the report is arranged under the following section headings: laboratories, grant and contract research, small business innovation research, major user facilities, other user facilities, funding levels, and index

  3. Equiatomic quaternary Heusler alloys: A material perspective for spintronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainsla, Lakhan; Suresh, K. G.

    2016-09-01

    Half-metallic ferromagnetic (HMF) materials show high spin polarization and are therefore interesting to researchers due to their possible applications in spintronic devices. In these materials, while one spin sub band has a finite density of states at the Fermi level, the other sub band has a gap. Because of their high Curie temperature (TC) and tunable electronic structure, HMF Heusler alloys have a special importance among the HMF materials. Full Heusler alloys with the stoichiometric composition X2YZ (where X and Y are the transition metals and Z is a sp element) have the cubic L21 structure with four interpenetrating fcc sublattices. When each of these four fcc sublattices is occupied by different atoms (XX'YZ), a quaternary Heusler structure with different structural symmetries (space group F-43m, #216) is obtained. Recently, these equiatomic quaternary Heusler alloys (EQHAs) with 1:1:1:1 stoichiometry have attracted a lot of attention due to their superior magnetic and transport properties. A special class of HMF materials identified recently is known as spin gapless semiconductors (SGS). The difference in this case, compared with HMFs, is that the density of states for one spin band is just zero at the Fermi level, while the other has a gap as in the case of HMFs. Some of the reported SGS materials belong to EQHAs family. This review is dedicated to almost all reported materials belonging to EQHAs family. The electronic structure and hence the physical properties of Heusler alloys strongly depend on the degree of structural order and distribution of the atoms in the crystal lattice. A variety of experimental techniques has been used to probe the structural parameters and degree of order in these alloys. Their magnetic properties have been investigated using the conventional methods, while the spin polarization has been probed by point contact Andreev reflection technique. The experimentally obtained values of saturation magnetization are found to be in

  4. The future research of material science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hironobu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), which was established on 1 April, consists of two institutes. One of these is Institute of Materials Structure Science. New research program in the new institute using synchrotron radiation, neutrons and muons are discussed. (author)

  5. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-01

    This report provides a compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs; the compilation is to assist administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into 7 sections: laboratory projects, contract research projects, small business innovation research, major user facilities, other user facilities, funding level distributions, and indexes.

  6. The future research of material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), which was established on 1 April, consists of two institutes. One of these is Institute of Materials Structure Science. New research program in the new institute using synchrotron radiation, neutrons and muons are discussed. (author)

  7. Uses of Computed Tomography in the NASA Materials Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, H. Peter; Gillies, Donald C.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has proved to be of inestimable use in providing a rapid evaluation of a variety of samples from Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) to electronic materials (Ge-Si alloys) to space grown materials such as meteorites. The system at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), because of its convenient geographical location, is ideal for examining samples immediately after returning to Earth. It also has the advantage of the choice of fluxes, and in particular the use of a radioactive cobalt source, which is basically monochromatic. This permits a reasonable measurement of density to be made from which chemical composition can be determined. Due to the current dearth of long duration space grown materials, the CT instrument has been used to characterize materials in preparation for flight, to determine thermal expansion values, and to examine long duration space grown materials, i.e. meteorites. The work will first describe the establishment of the protocol for obtaining the optimum density readings for any material. This will include both the effects of the hardware or instrumental parameters that can be controlled, and the techniques used to process the CT data. Examples will be given of the compositional variation along single crystals of germanium-silicon alloys. Density variation with temperature has been measured in preparation for future materials science experiments; this involved the fabrication and installation of a single zone furnace incorporating a heat pipe to ensure of high temperature uniformity. At the time of writing the thermal expansion of lead has been measured from room temperature to 900 C. Three methods are available. Digital radiography enable length changes to be determined. Prior to melting the sample is small than the container and the diameter change can be measured. Most critical, however, is the density change in solid, through the melting region, and in the liquid state. These data are needed for engineering purposes to aid

  8. Uses of Compted Tomography in the NASA Materials Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, H. Peter; Gillies, Donald C.

    2002-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has proved to be of inestimable use in providing a rapid evaluation of a variety of samples from Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) to electronic materials (Ge-Si alloys) to space grown materials such as meteorites. The system at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), because of its convenient geographical location, is ideal for examining samples before launch and immediately after returning to Earth. It also has the advantage of the choice of fluxes, and in particular the use of a radioactive cobalt source, which is basically monochromatic. This permits a reasonable measurement of density to be made from which chemical composition can be determined. Due to the current dearth of long duration space grown materials, the CT instrument has been used (1) to characterize materials in preparation for flight, (2) to determine thermal expansion values, and (3) to examine long duration space grown materials, i.e. meteorites. This work will first describe the establishment of the protocol for obtaining the optimum density readings for any material. This will include both the effects of the hardware or instrumental parameters that can be controlled, and the techniques used to process the CT data. Examples will be given of the compositional variation along single crystals of germanium-silicon alloys. Density variation with temperature has been measured in preparation for future materials science experiments; this involved the fabrication and installation of a single zone furnace incorporating a heat pipe to ensure high temperature uniformity. At the time of writing the thermal expansion of lead has been measured from room temperature to 900 C. Three methods are available. Digital radiography enables length changes to be determined. Prior to melting the sample is smaller than the container and the diameter change can be measured. Most critical, however, is the density change in solid, through the melting region, and in the liquid state. These data are needed

  9. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The facility of the JAERI tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to obtain plenty of fruitful results in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid state physics and materials science, taking an advantage of its prominent performances of heavy ion acceleration. The previous meeting held in 1999 also offered an opportunity to scientists from all over the heavy ion science fields, including nuclear physics, solid state physics and cross-field physics to have active discussions. This meeting included oral presentations with a new plan and with a new scope of fields expected from now on, as an occasion for opening the 21st century in heavy ion science. The 50 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Material Science and Engineering with Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penumadu, D.

    This chapter summarizes some of the results related to the use of neutron imaging (radiography and tomography) as applied to the broad area of materials science and engineering research. These include multi-phase flow visualization in metal casting techniques, energy-selective imaging of materials and its use for texture and stress imaging in polycrystalline materials, characterization of discrete particle systems, flow through porous media, and stroboscopic imaging. The importance of spatial resolution and neutron detector type for given engineering applications is also addressed.

  11. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The facility of the JAERI tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to advancing heavy ion science researches in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid state physics and materials science, taking advantage of its prominent performances in providing various heavy ions. This meeting, as well as the previous ones held twice, offered scientists from the fields of heavy ion science, including nuclear physics, solid-state physics and cross-field physics, an opportunity to have active discussions among them, as well as to review their research accomplishments in the last two years. Oral presentations were selected from a wider scope of prospective fields, expecting a new step of advancing in heavy ion science. Main topics of the meeting were the status of the JAERI-KEK joint project of developing a radioactive nuclear beam (RNB) facility and research programs related to the RNB. This meeting was held at Advanced Science Research Center in JAERI-Tokai on January 8th and 9th in 2003, and successfully carried out with as many as 190 participants and a lot of sincere discussions. The proceedings are presented in this report. The 51 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  12. Chemistry and Materials Science Strategic Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodie, K B; Mailhiot, C; Eaglesham, D; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Turpin, L S; Allen, P G

    2004-04-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's mission is as clear today as it was in 1952 when the Laboratory was founded--to ensure our country's national security and the safety and reliability of its nuclear deterrent. As a laboratory pursuing applied science in the national interest, we strive to accomplish our mission through excellence in science and technology. We do this while developing and implementing sound and robust business practices in an environment that emphasizes security and ensures our safety and the safety of the community around us. Our mission as a directorate derives directly from the Laboratory's charter. When I accepted the assignment of Associate Director for Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS), I talked to you about the need for strategic balance and excellence in all our endeavors. We also discussed how to take the directorate to the next level. The long-range CMS strategic plan presented here was developed with this purpose in mind. It also aligns with the Lab's institutional long-range science and technology plan and its 10-year facilities and infrastructure site plan. The plan is aimed at ensuring that we fulfill our directorate's two governing principles: (1) delivering on our commitments to Laboratory programs and sponsors, and (2) anticipating change and capitalizing on opportunities through innovation in science and technology. This will require us to attain a new level of creativity, agility, and flexibility as we move forward. Moreover, a new level of engagement in partnerships with other directorates across the Laboratory as well as with universities and other national labs will also be required. The group of managers and staff that I chartered to build a strategic plan identified four organizing themes that define our directorate's work and unite our staff with a set of common goals. The plan presented here explains how we will proceed in each of these four theme areas: (1) Materials properties and

  13. Understanding solids the science of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tilley, Richard J D

    2005-01-01

    A modern introduction to the subject taking a unique integrated approach designed to appeal to both science and engineering students. Covering a broad spectrum of topics, this book includes numerous up-to-date examples of real materials with relevant applications and a modern treatment of key concepts. The science bias allows this book to be equally accessible to engineers, chemists and physicists. * Carefully structured into self-contained bite-sized chapters to enhance student understanding * Questions have been designed to reinforce the concepts presented * Includes coverage of radioactivit

  14. Smart materials based on shape memory alloys: examples from Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have become increasingly attractive as embedded actuators in polymers yielding adaptive composite structures. In particular, SMA-elements have been used to actively or passively control shape, elastic modules, internal stress level and damping capacity of such smart composites. In the passive approach, copper-base SMA-plates can be used as temperature-sensitive damping elements, an interesting solution to improve the vibrational behaviour of alpine skis for example. Active materials are obtained by the integration of pre-strained Ni-Ti-base thin wires in polymer matrix composites enabling control of the vibrational behaviour through the recovery-stress tuning technique. In this paper, some results of national research programmes in Belgium and Switzerland, mainly concerning the damping capacity, are shown and a new European project entitled ''adaptive composites with embedded shape memory alloy wires'' is presented in which partners from Belgium, Germany, Greece, Great Britain and Switzerland are collaborating. (orig.)

  15. Surface analysis methods in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Sexton, Brett; Smart, Roger

    1992-01-01

    The idea for this book stemmed from a remark by Philip Jennings of Murdoch University in a discussion session following a regular meeting of the Australian Surface Science group. He observed that a text on surface analysis and applica­ tions to materials suitable for final year undergraduate and postgraduate science students was not currently available. Furthermore, the members of the Australian Surface Science group had the research experience and range of coverage of sur­ face analytical techniques and applications to provide a text for this purpose. A of techniques and applications to be included was agreed at that meeting. The list intended readership of the book has been broadened since the early discussions, particularly to encompass industrial users, but there has been no significant alter­ ation in content. The editors, in consultation with the contributors, have agreed that the book should be prepared for four major groups of readers: - senior undergraduate students in chemistry, physics, metallur...

  16. Brilliant Light in Life and Material Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Tsakanov, Vasili

    2007-01-01

    The present book contains an excellent overview of the status and highlights of brilliant light facilities and their applications in biology, chemistry, medicine, materials and environmental sciences. Overview papers on diverse fields of research by leading experts are accompanied by the highlights in the near and long-term perspectives of brilliant X-Ray photon beam usage for fundamental and applied research. The book includes advanced topics in the fields of high brightness photon beams, instrumentation, the spectroscopy, microscopy, scattering and imaging experimental techniques and their applications. The book is strongly recommended for students, engineers and scientists in the field of accelerator physics, X-ray optics and instrumentation, life, materials and environmental sciences, bio and nanotechnology.

  17. Materials Science Division second quarterly report for period ending March 15, 1975. [Gasification plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tevebaugh, A. D.; Weeks, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in material science studies for coal gasification plants, in particular for the BI-GAS process pilot plant, is reported. The results of slag corrosion tests of various refractories (compositions are given) are presented. The development and testing (by thermal cycling) of protective ceramic coatings on metals is described. The capability for several kinds of nondestructive testing is being developed and some results are reported. A major part of the effort involves the development of mathematical models of wear processes (erosion and corrosion) based on the elastic, plastic and fracture properties of materials and particle size, impact velocity, angle of impact, etc. Another major section involves the behavior of iron and nickel base alloys in the hostile environments expected with respect to oxidation, corrosion, sulfidation, carburization, nitridation and erosion. The investigation of a pipe failure is reported (stress corrosion cracking). (LTN)

  18. The materials science of protein aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D L; Lashuel, H. A.; Lee, K. Y. C.; Singh, R. R. R.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous human diseases are associated with conformational change and aggregation of proteins, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, prion diseases (such as mad cow disease), familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease), Huntington's, and type II (mature onset) diabetes. In many cases, it has been demonstrated that conformational change and aggregation can occur outside living cells and complex biochemical networks. Hence, approaches from materials and physical science ...

  19. Materials Sciences programs, fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. The report is divided into six sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Sections D and E have information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section F gives distribution of funding, and Section G has various indexes

  20. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. The report is divided into six sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research program, Section D has information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section E gives distributions of funding, and Section F has various indexes

  1. Materials sciences programs fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is primarily intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F describes other user facilities, G as a summary of funding levels and H has indices characterizing research projects.

  2. Materials sciences programs: Fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Science Division programs. This compilation is primarily intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F describes other user facilities, G as a summary of funding levels and H has indices characterizing research projects.

  3. Materials science. 10. compl. rev. ed.; Werkstoffwissenschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worch, Hartmut; Pompe, Wolfgang [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft; Schatt, Werner (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    This materials science textbook describes and explains the properties of materials using a standardized, scientific approach. It comprises the following chapters: 1. Materials in the solid state; 2. Transition into the solid state; 3. Phase transition in the solid state; 4. State diagrams; 5. Structures of materials; 6. Thermally activated processes (diffusion, crystal regeneration, recrystallisation); 7. Corrosion; 8. Mechanical phenomena (deformation etc.); 9. Physical phenomena (electric conductivity, superconductivity, etc.) [German] Dieses Lehrbuch zur Werkstoffwissenschaft befasst sich mit der Darstellung und Erklaerung der Eigenschaften von Werkstoffen auf der Grundlage einer einheitlichen, naturwissenschaftlich geleiteten Betrachtungsweise. Es ist in folgende Kapitel aufgeteilt: 1. Zustaende des festen Koerpers; 2. Uebergaenge in den festen Zustand; 3. Phasenumwandlung im festen Zustand; 4. Zustandsdiagramme; 5. Gefuege der Werkstoffe; 6. Thermisch aktivierte Vorgaenge (Diffusion, Kristallerholung und Rekristallisation); 7. Korrosion; 8. Mechanische Erscheinungen (Verformung, etc.); 9. Physikalische Erscheinungen (Elektrische Leitfaehigkeit; Supraleitung; etc.).

  4. Thermal Boundary Conductance: A Materials Science Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monachon, Christian; Weber, Ludger; Dames, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The thermal boundary conductance (TBC) of materials pairs in atomically intimate contact is reviewed as a practical guide for materials scientists. First, analytical and computational models of TBC are reviewed. Five measurement methods are then compared in terms of their sensitivity to TBC: the 3ω method, frequency- and time-domain thermoreflectance, the cut-bar method, and a composite effective thermal conductivity method. The heart of the review surveys 30 years of TBC measurements around room temperature, highlighting the materials science factors experimentally proven to influence TBC. These factors include the bulk dispersion relations, acoustic contrast, and interfacial chemistry and bonding. The measured TBCs are compared across a wide range of materials systems by using the maximum transmission limit, which with an attenuated transmission coefficient proves to be a good guideline for most clean, strongly bonded interfaces. Finally, opportunities for future research are discussed.

  5. Material science experiments at the ATLAS facility

    CERN Document Server

    Keinigs, R K; Atchison, W L; Bartsch, R R; Faehl, R J; Flower-Maudlin, E C; Hammerberg, J E; Holtkamp, D B; Kyrala, G A; Oro, D M; Parker, J V; Preston, D L; Removsky, R E; Scudder, D W; Sheehey, P T; Shlachter, J S; Taylor, A J; Tonks, D L; Turchi, P J; Chandler, E A

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Three experimental campaigns designed for fielding on the Atlas Pulsed Power Facility are discussed. The foci of these experiments are directed toward a better understanding of three material science issues; (1) strength at high strain and high strain rate, (2) friction at material interfaces moving at high relative velocities, and (3) material failure in convergent geometry. Atlas provides an environment for investigating these problems in parameter regimes and geometries that are inaccessible with standard techniques. For example, flow stress measurements of material strength using conventional Hopkinson bar experiments are limited to strain rates ~10/sup 4/ sec/sup -1/. Atlas will be capable of imploding metal shells to combined strains of 200% and strain rates >10/sup 6/ sec/sup -1/. Data obtained regimes is used to test different constitutive strength models used in several Los Alamos hydrocodes. Dynamic friction has been investigated for nearly 300 years, but a first...

  6. Numerical modeling in materials science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Rappaz, Michel; Deville, Michel

    2003-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts and methodologies related to the modelling of the complex phenomena occurring in materials processing. After a short reminder of conservation laws and constitutive relationships, the authors introduce the main numerical methods: finite differences, finite volumes and finite elements. These techniques are developed in three main chapters of the book that tackle more specific problems: phase transformation, solid mechanics and fluid flow. The two last chapters treat inverse methods to obtain the boundary conditions or the material properties and stochastic methods for microstructural simulation. This book is intended for undergraduate and graduate students in materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering and physics and for engineering professionals or researchers who want to get acquainted with numerical simulation to model and compute materials processing.

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering in materials science - an introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratzl, P. [Vienna Univ., Inst. fuer Materialphysik, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-12-31

    The basic principles of the application of small-angle neutron scattering to materials research are summarized. The text focusses on the classical methods of data evaluation for isotropic and for anisotropic materials. Some examples of applications to the study of alloys, porous materials, composites and other complex materials are given. (author) 9 figs., 38 refs.

  8. The idea of material science virtual laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This article was written to describe the Material Science Virtual Laboratory. Presented laboratory is an open scientific, investigative, simulating and didactic medium helpful in the realisation of the scientific and didactic tasks in the field of material Science. This laboratory is implemented in the Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials of Silesian University of Technology in Gliwice, Poland.Design/methodology/approach: The laboratory is an aggregate of testers and training simulators, placed in the virtual reality and created in various languages and the programming techniques, which represents the properties, functionality and manual principles of real equipment installed and accessible in the real laboratories of scientific universities.Findings: Application of the equipment, that is practically imperishable, cheap in exploitation and easy in the use encourages students and scientific workers to independent audits and experiments in situations, where the possibilities of their execution in the real investigative laboratory will be limited because of the high material costs, difficult access to real equipment or the possible risk of his damage. Practical implications: The use possibilities of the virtual laboratory are practically unrestricted; it can be a base for any studies, course or training programme.Originality/value: The project of the virtual laboratory corresponds with the global tendency for expand the investigative and academic centres about the possibilities of training and experiments performance with use of the virtual reality. This enriches investigation and education programmes of the new abilities reserved so far exclusively for effecting only on real equipment

  9. Molecular forensic science of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxides materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, process history, or transport of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science required to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensics science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  10. Molecular forensic science of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO2+x. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxides materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, process history, or transport of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science required to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensics science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  11. The science of superconductivity and new materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have set as the objective of this symposium the full-scale evaluation of the present state of research and development in the theoretical fields of superconductivity and new materials; two fields which the entire world's attention is focused and which a great number of researchers are presently putting in their maximum efforts. Their symposium consists of two workshops respectively dealing with superconductivity and new materials. It is needless to say that physical science and material development move forward hand in hand. And they see a recent tendency worldwide that inventions and discoveries in both science and technology are touted fashionably as news topics. The search for new materials that have high critical temperature for use in the field of developing superconductivity has become the focus of social attention around the world. Yet they must not forget that the true important lies in the fundamental study of the mechanism of superconductivity and of its applications. The quantum leap of the Industrial Revolution in England brought forth increased productivity through the development of new technology and locomotive power, eventually leading to the establishment of a new production system, and subsequently, an industrial society in which we live now

  12. Progress in the materials science of silicene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its freestanding, yet hypothetical form, the Si counterpart of graphene called silicene is predicted to possess massless Dirac fermions and to exhibit an experimentally accessible quantum spin Hall effect. Such interesting electronic properties are not realized in two-dimensional (2D) Si honeycomb lattices prepared recently on metallic substrates where the crystal and hybrid electronic structures of these ‘epitaxial silicene’ phases are strongly influenced by the substrate, and thus different from those predicted for isolated 2D structures. While the realization of such low-dimensional Si π materials has hardly been imagined previously, it is evident that the materials science behind silicene remains challenging. In this contribution, we will review our recent results that lead to an enhanced understanding of epitaxial silicene formed on diboride thin films, and discuss the remaining challenges that must be addressed in order to turn Si 2D nanostructures into technologically interesting nanoelectronic materials. (focus issue review)

  13. Positron Annihilation Technique is a Powerful Nuclear Technique in Material Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Annihilation Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (PADPS) is a nondestructive technique used in material science. Electrical measurements are one of the oldest techniques used also in material science. This paper aimed to discuss the availability of using both PADPS and electrical measurements as diagnostic techniques to detect the defects in a set of plastically deformed 5454 wrought aluminum alloy. The results of the positron annihilation measurements and the electrical measurements were analyzed in terms of the two-state trapping model. This model can be used to investigate both defect and dislocation densities of the samples under investigation. Results obtained by both nuclear and electrical techniques have been reported

  14. The Mars Science Laboratory Organic Check Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Von der Heydt, Max O.; Mogensen, Claus T.; Canham, John; Harpold, Dan N.; Johnson, Joel; Errigo, Therese; Glavin, Daniel P.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-09-01

    Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover carries a set of five external verification standards in hermetically sealed containers that can be sampled as would be a Martian rock, by drilling and then portioning into the solid sample inlet of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite. Each organic check material (OCM) canister contains a porous ceramic solid, which has been doped with a fluorinated hydrocarbon marker that can be detected by SAM. The purpose of the OCM is to serve as a verification tool for the organic cleanliness of those parts of the sample chain that cannot be cleaned other than by dilution, i.e., repeated sampling of Martian rock. SAM possesses internal calibrants for verification of both its performance and its internal cleanliness, and the OCM is not used for that purpose. Each OCM unit is designed for one use only, and the choice to do so will be made by the project science group (PSG).

  15. Perspective: Materials informatics and big data: Realization of the "fourth paradigm" of science in materials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ankit; Choudhary, Alok

    2016-05-01

    Our ability to collect "big data" has greatly surpassed our capability to analyze it, underscoring the emergence of the fourth paradigm of science, which is data-driven discovery. The need for data informatics is also emphasized by the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI), further boosting the emerging field of materials informatics. In this article, we look at how data-driven techniques are playing a big role in deciphering processing-structure-property-performance relationships in materials, with illustrative examples of both forward models (property prediction) and inverse models (materials discovery). Such analytics can significantly reduce time-to-insight and accelerate cost-effective materials discovery, which is the goal of MGI.

  16. Materials Sciences programs. Fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs. The report is divided into five sections. Section A contains all laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section D shows distribution of funding, and Section E has various indices

  17. Annual report, Materials Science Branch, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, S. [ed.

    1993-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Materials Science Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid State Theory, Solid State Spectroscopy, and Program Management. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  18. Materials Sciences Programs. Fiscal Year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is primarily intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into six sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Sections D and E have information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section F gives distribution of funding, and Section G has various indexes

  19. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tandem accelerator established at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in 1982 has been one of the most prominent electrostatic accelerators in the world. The accelerator has been serving for many researches planned by not only JAERI staff but also researchers of universities and national institutes. After the completion of the tandem booster in 1993, four times higher beam energy became available. These two facilities, the tandem accelerator and the booster, made great strides in heavy ion physics and a lot of achievements have been accumulated until now. The research departments of JAERI were reformed in 1998, and the accelerators section came under the Department of Materials Science. On this reform of the research system, the symposium 'Heavy Ion Science in Tandem Energy Region' was held in cooperation with nuclear and solid state physicists although there has been no such symposium for many years. The symposium was expected to stimulate novel development in both nuclear and solid state physics, and also interdisciplinary physics between nuclear and solid state physics. The 68 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Squeeze Casting Method Of AI-Si Alloy For Piston Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AI-Si alloy is an alloy used as piston material. This alloys could be as AI-Si hypereutectic alloy (Si content more than 12.5 % wt.), as AI-Si eutectic alloy (Si cuntent 12.5 % wt, and as AI-Si hypoeutectic alloy (Si content less than 12.5 % wt.). The synthesize of AI-Si alloy piston generally using the technique of gravity casting in a dies. This method is causing high porousity. By using the squeeze technique, amount ofporousity in AI-Si alloy is possibly reduced and the density of this alloy should be higher. The other factors such as alloying elements of AI-Si alloy (Mg. Cu, Zn) would increase the mechanical properties especially the hardness. The focuses of this research are the microstructure and the maximum hardness during the heat treatment of AI-Si alloy which was added by alloying elments. The result of hardness at test shows the maximum hardness at 94.7 kg/mm2 obtained at aging temperature of 210oC for hours with homogenous dendritic microstructure

  1. Investigations on high-temperature corrosion of commercial materials and model alloys in simulated waste and biomass combustion environments

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The motivation of this work was to find cost-effective and corrosion resistant alloys as alternatives to commercial materials, which meet the requirements in waste incineration and biomass combustion power plants. As commercial materials low- and high-alloyed steels and a Nickel-based alloy were investigated. The model alloys were 9%Cr-alloys modified with nickel, aluminium and silicon, and binary iron-aluminides with max. 40 at.% Al. In the exposure experiments, the materials were covered wi...

  2. A new direction in mathematics for materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first volume of the SpringerBriefs in the Mathematics of Materials and provides a comprehensive guide to the interaction of mathematics with materials science. The anterior part of the book describes a selected history of materials science as well as the interaction between mathematics and materials in history. The emergence of materials science was itself a result of an interdisciplinary movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Materials science was formed by the integration of metallurgy, polymer science, ceramics, solid state physics, and related disciplines. We believe that such historical background helps readers to understand the importance of interdisciplinary interaction such as mathematics–materials science collaboration. The middle part of the book describes mathematical ideas and methods that can be applied to materials problems and introduces some examples of specific studies—for example, computational homology applied to structural analysis of glassy materials, stochastic models for ...

  3. Smart materials based on shape memory alloys: examples from Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotthardt, R.; Scherrer, P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique; Stalmans, R. [Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Katholieke Univ. Leuven, Heverlee (Belgium)

    2000-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have become increasingly attractive as embedded actuators in polymers yielding adaptive composite structures. In particular, SMA-elements have been used to actively or passively control shape, elastic modules, internal stress level and damping capacity of such smart composites. In the passive approach, copper-base SMA-plates can be used as temperature-sensitive damping elements, an interesting solution to improve the vibrational behaviour of alpine skis for example. Active materials are obtained by the integration of pre-strained Ni-Ti-base thin wires in polymer matrix composites enabling control of the vibrational behaviour through the recovery-stress tuning technique. In this paper, some results of national research programmes in Belgium and Switzerland, mainly concerning the damping capacity, are shown and a new European project entitled ''adaptive composites with embedded shape memory alloy wires'' is presented in which partners from Belgium, Germany, Greece, Great Britain and Switzerland are collaborating. (orig.)

  4. Corrosion and compatibility of structural materials in liquid lead alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes investigations of the behavior of structural materials in both eutectic lead alloys, Pb-17Li as the liquid breeder within the European WCLL-concept for Fusion Reactors and Pb-55Bi as a possible spallation target and coolant of future Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) for the transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products from nuclear waste. Ferritic-martensitic steels of the 8-10 wt.-% Cr type are considered as structural materials for the use in liquid Pb-17Li at temperatures up to 500degC. Steels like MANET I, Optifer, F82H-mod. and EUROFER are investigated in the flowing liquid metal over a long period of time. Due to the specific physical chemistry of Pb-17Li, dissolution corrosion is the major corrosion mechanism of iron-based alloys. No oxide formation on steel surfaces can occur due to the very low oxygen potential in Pb-17Li. Therefore, only coatings could be a solution to minimize corrosion effects, at medium (500degC) and higher operational temperatures (650degC) of advanced blanket concepts. Ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels are considered as potential structural materials for ADS application, too. But the high nickel solubility in Pb-55Bi limits the use of unprotected austenitic steels to temperatures of about 400degC. Because of the much higher oxygen potential of Pb-55Bi, a totally different strategy of minimizing corrosion must be applied. By using active oxygen control, a desired oxygen activity (concentration) will be adjusted in the liquid metal via gas phase equilibrium. If the oxygen activity of the liquid metal is set in the right 'window' of the corresponding thermodynamic properties, a controlled formation of oxide layers on the steel surfaces will be found. These in-situ formed oxides can act as corrosion barriers and make the use of high-nickel alloys possible, even at temperatures of around 600degC. (author)

  5. Gender Equity in Materials Science and Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angus Rockett

    2008-12-01

    At the request of the University Materials Council, a national workshop was convened to examine 'Gender Equity Issues in Materials Science and Engineering.' The workshop considered causes of the historic underrepresentation of women in materials science and engineering (MSE), with a goal of developing strategies to increase the gender diversity of the discipline in universities and national laboratories. Specific workshop objectives were to examine efforts to level the playing field, understand implicit biases, develop methods to minimize bias in all aspects of training and employment, and create the means to implement a broadly inclusive, family-friendly work environment in MSE departments. Held May 18-20, 2008, at the Conference Center at the University of Maryland, the workshop included heads and chairs of university MSE departments and representatives of the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (DOE-BES), and the national laboratories. The following recommendations are made based on the outcomes of the discussions at the workshop. Many or all of these apply equally well to universities and national laboratories and should be considered in context of industrial environments as well. First, there should be a follow-up process by which the University Materials Council (UMC) reviews the status of women in the field of MSE on a periodic basis and determines what additional changes should be made to accelerate progress in gender equity. Second, all departments should strengthen documentation and enforcement of departmental procedures such that hiring, promotion, compensation, and tenure decisions are more transparent, that the reasons why a candidate was not selected or promoted are clear, and that faculty are less able to apply their biases to personnel decisions. Third, all departments should strengthen mentoring of junior faculty. Fourth, all departments must raise awareness of gender biases

  6. Application of synchrotron radiation in material Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years many synchrotron radiation facilities are built around the world. The properties of this radiation, it's intensity and tuneability, are leading to exciting new experiments in chemistry, physics, biology and material sciences. In X-ray crystallographic studies, data can be collected on very small samples of only a few microns in size and time as short as one millisecond. Other techniques allow us to probe the local structures of impurities in technologically important materials. In the present paper unique properties of synchrotron radiation will be described. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopic techniques are now routinely used for materials characterization. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopic techniques have been applied to study the local structural environment of host and dopant cations in complex systems. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy is useful to determine the valence state of different cations. To examine the local structure around different cations Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is the most appropriate technique. A review of these methodologies and the results on Yba/sub 2/ Cu/sub 3-x/ Sb/sub x/O/sub 7/, and SrFe/sub 1-x/ Nb/sub x/O/sub 3/ (where x = 0.0 and 0.5) will be presented. The Synchrotron light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (SESAME) is under construction in jordan, Pakistan in one of the member states of SESAME project, therefore a brief review of SESAME will be presented. (author)

  7. Computed Tomography Support for Microgravity Materials Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Engel, H. Peter; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    parameters automatically. Results of initial tests on low melting point elements such as gallium, indium and tin will be presented, and the intent is to proceed to compounds such as InSb, HgCdTe and CdTe. Alloys such as Pb-Sb (PI - Poirier, U AZ) and Cu-Al (PI - Trivedi, Ames Lab.), which are the subjects of flight experiments, will also be examined. The second application is the conversion of measured density values directly to composition. This was successfully done with the mercury cadmium telluride alloys grown on the second and fourth United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-2 and USMP-4) missions by Lehoczky. CdTe values along the length of the boules were obtained at KSC prior to cutting the sample, and could have been obtained prior to its removal from the cartridge and ampoule. Examples of the data obtained will be shown. It is anticipated that several of the materials science PIs will avail themselves of the technique described, initially for determining densities prior to flight, and then to acquire early quantitative data on the compositional variation within their samples.

  8. Surface segregation in binary alloy first wall candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been studying the conditions necessary to produce a self-sustaining stable lithium monolayer on a metal substrate as a means of creating a low-Z film which sputters primarily as secondary ions. It is expected that because of the toroidal field, secondary ions originating at the first wall will be returned and contribute little to the plasma impurity influx. Aluminum and copper have, because of their high thermal conductivity and low induced radioactivity, been proposed as first wall candidate materials. The mechanical properties of the pure metals are very poorly suited to structural applications and an alloy must be used to obtain adequate hardness and tensile strength. In the case of aluminum, mechanical properties suitable for aircraft manufacture are obtained by the addition of a few at% Li. In order to investigate alloys of a similar nature as candidate structural materials for fusion machines we have prepared samples of Li-doped aluminum using both a pyro-metallurgical and a vapor-diffusion technique. The sputtering properties and surface composition have been studied as a function of sample temperature and heating time, and ion beam mass. The erosion rate and secondary ion yield of both the sputtered Al and Li have been monitored by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Auger analysis providing information on surface segregation, depth composition profiles, and diffusion rates. The surface composition ahd lithium depth profiles are compared with previously obtained computational results based on a regular solution model of segregation, while the partial sputtering yields of Al and Li are compared with results obtained with a modified version of the TRIM computer program. (orig.)

  9. Improved Damage Resistant Composite Materials Incorporating Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Jeffrey S. N.; Rogers, Craig A.

    1996-01-01

    Metallic shape memory alloys (SMA) such as nitinol have unique shape recovery behavior and mechanical properties associated with a material phase change that have been used in a variety of sensing and actuation applications. Recent studies have shown that integrating nitinol-SMA actuators into composite materials increases the composite material's functionality. Hybrid composites of conventional graphite/epoxy or glass/epoxy and nitinol-SMA elements can perform functions in applications where monolithic composites perform inadequately. One such application is the use of hybrid composites to function both in load bearing and armor capacities. While monolithic composites with high strength-to-weight ratios function efficiently as loadbearing structures, because of their brittle nature, impact loading can cause significant catastrophic damage. Initial composite failure modes such as delamination and matrix cracking dissipate some impact energy, but when stress exceeds the composite's ultimate strength, fiber fracture and material perforation become dominant. One of the few methods that has been developed to reduce material perforation is hybridizing polymer matrix composites with tough kevlar or high modulus polyethynylene plies. The tough fibers increase the impact resistance and the stiffer and stronger graphite fibers carry the majority of the load. Similarly, by adding nitinol-SMA elements that absorb impact energy through the stress-induced martensitic phase transformation, the composites' impact perforation resistance can be greatly enhanced. The results of drop-weight and high velocity gas-gun impact testing of various composite materials will be presented. The results demonstrate that hybridizing composites with nitinol-SMA elements significantly increases perforation resistance compared to other traditional toughening elements. Inspection of the composite specimens at various stages of perforation by optical microscope illustrates the mechanisms by which

  10. Molecular forensic science analysis of nuclear materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Dallas David

    Concerns over the proliferation and instances of nuclear material in the environment have increased interest in the expansion of nuclear forensics analysis and attribution programs. A new related field, molecular forensic science (MFS) has helped meet this expansion by applying common scientific analyses to nuclear forensics scenarios. In this work, MFS was applied to three scenarios related to nuclear forensics analysis. In the first, uranium dioxide was synthesized and aged at four sets of static environmental conditions and studied for changes in chemical speciation. The second highlighted the importance of bulk versus particle characterizations by analyzing a heterogeneous industrially prepared sample with similar techniques. In the third, mixed uranium/plutonium hot particles were collected from the McGuire Air Force Base BOMARC Site and analyzed for chemical speciation and elemental surface composition. This work has identified new signatures and has indicated unexpected chemical behavior under various conditions. These findings have lead to an expansion of basic actinide understanding, proof of MFS as a tool for nuclear forensic science, and new areas for expansion in these fields.

  11. Advanced materials for nuclear reactor systems: Alloys by design to overcome past limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced materials have the potential to improve reactor performance via increased safety margins, design flexibility, and fast reactor economics and overcome traditional limitations. Increased strength and creep resistance can give greater design margins leading to improved safety margins, longer lifetimes, and higher operating temperatures, thus enabling greater flexibility. Improved mechanical performance may also help reduce the plant capital cost for new reactors both by reducing the required commodities (with concomitant reductions in welding, quality assurance and fabrication costs) and through design simplifications. However, successful implementation requires considerable development and licensing effort. Modern materials science tools such as computational thermodynamics and multiscale radiation damage computational models in conjunction with rapid science-guided experimental validation may offer the potential for a dramatic reduction in the time period to develop and qualify structural materials. There are many requirements for all nuclear reactor structural materials, regardless of the exact design or purpose. All requirements for a materials use in an advanced fast reactor system must be considered and carefully weighed. These factors may include material availability and cost, ease of fabrication and joining, long-term stability, mechanical performance, thermal properties, neutronics, corrosion and compatibility performance, radiation tolerance, and code qualification status. Only through careful evaluation of all factors and a thorough trade analysis will the most promising candidate materials be chosen for further development. It is important to note that there is no ideal material that is best for each of the considerations listed. Indeed, all candidate materials have advantages and limitations. The most promising alloys, which allow the best performance, are also the least technically mature and will require the most substantial effort. These

  12. Medipix3 CT for material sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innovative detector systems for non-destructive material analysis and for medical diagnosis are an important development to improve the performance and the quality of examination methods. For a number of years now photon-counting X-ray detectors are being developed to process incoming X-ray photons as single events. These detectors facilitate a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than conventional, non-photon-counting, scintillator based detector systems, which detect X-ray photons indirectly through conversion into visible light. The Medipix is a pixelated photon counting semiconductor detector which features adjustable energy thresholds allowing energy selective, multispectral X-ray imaging. The Medipix chip is under continued development by the ''Medipix2 Collaboration'' and ''Medipix3 Collaboration'' at CERN. The Medipix electronic offers 256 × 256 pixels with a pixel pitch of 55 × 55 μm2 and can be hybridized with different sensor materials like Si, CdTe or GaAs. The newest member of the Medipix family is the Medipix3 (ASIC in 0.13 μm CMOS technology) providing up to eight separate 12-bit counters per pixel. It offers a couple of different working modes, which are useful for X-ray imaging applications. A Medipix3 CT X-ray measuring station was built up for small animal X-ray imaging and non-destructive material analysis. The combination of the low energy threshold (∼ 4 keV) of the Medipix3 with its multispectral capability enables tomographic investigations on objects with low absorption contrast. The advantage of photon counting, multispectral detectors like Medipix3 for material sciences will be presented here as well as a comparison with a scintillator based CT.

  13. Materials Science Research Rack Onboard the International Space Station Hardware and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, John R.; Frazier, Natalie C.; Johnson, Jimmie

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a research facility developed under a cooperative research agreement between NASA and ESA for materials science investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009, and is currently installed in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. Since that time, MSRR has performed virtually flawlessly, logging more than 620 hours of operating time. The MSRR accommodates advanced investigations in the microgravity environment on the ISS for basic materials science research in areas such as solidification of metals and alloys. The purpose is to advance the scientific understanding of materials processing as affected by microgravity and to gain insight into the physical behavior of materials processing. MSRR allows for the study of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility with a modular design capable of supporting multiple types of investigations. Currently the NASA-provided Rack Support Subsystem provides services (power, thermal control, vacuum access, and command and data handling) to the ESA developed Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) which accommodates interchangeable Furnace Inserts (FI). Two ESA-developed FIs are presently available on the ISS: the Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) and the Solidification and Quenching Furnace (SQF). Sample-Cartridge Assemblies (SCAs), each containing one or more material samples, are installed in the FI by the crew and can be processed at temperatures up to 1400 C. Once an SCA is installed, the experiment can be run by automatic command or science conducted via

  14. Broadband Phonon Scattering in PbTe-based Materials Driven Near the Peierls Phase Transition by Strain or Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana; Murphy, Ronan; Murray, Eamonn; Fahy, Stephen

    Efficient thermoelectric energy conversion is highly desirable as 60% of the consumed energy is wasted as heat. Low lattice thermal conductivity is one of the key factors leading to high thermoelectric efficiency of a material. However, the major obstacle in the design of such materials is the difficulty in efficiently scattering phonons across the frequency spectrum. Using first principles calculations, we predict that driving PbTe materials close to a Peierls-like phase transition could be a powerful strategy to solve this problem. We illustrate this concept by applying tensile [001] strain to PbTe and its alloys with another rock-salt IV-VI material, PbSe; and by alloying PbTe with a IV-VI Peierls-distorted material, GeTe. This induces extremely soft optical modes, which increase acoustic-optical phonon coupling and decrease phonon lifetimes at all frequencies. We show that PbTe, Pb(Se,Te) and (Pb,Ge)Te alloys driven near the phase transition in the described manner could have the lattice thermal conductivity considerably lower than that of PbTe. The proposed concept may open new opportunities for the development of more efficient thermoelectric materials. This work was supported by Science Foundation Ireland and the Marie-Curie Action COFUND under Starting Investigator Research Grant 11/SIRG/E2113.

  15. Focuses of material science development in recent years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing

    2011-01-01

    Materials science is an interdisciplinary field applying the properties of matter to various areas of science and engineering.This scientific field investigates the relationship between the structure of materials at atomic or molecular scales and their macroscopic properties.It incorporates elements of applied physics and chemistry.With significant media attention focused on nanoscience and nanotechnology in recent years,materials science has been propelled to the forefront at many universities.Materials science encompasses various classes of materials,including electronic materials,functional ceramics,magnesium,material and processes for flat-panel displays,eco/environmental materials,sustainable energy materials,transportation materials,electronic packaging materials,etc.

  16. Division of Materials Science (DMS) meeting presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, C.F.; Weber, M.J.

    1982-11-08

    Materials preparation techniques are listed. Materials preparation capabilities are discussed for making BeF/sub 2/ glasses and other materials. Materials characterization techniques are listed. (DLC)

  17. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, FY 1994. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research include surface science, fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals, energetic materials, etc. The laboratory directed R and D include director`s initiatives, individual projects, and transactinium science studies.

  18. From Materials Science to Vacuum Microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beams using heated tungsten filaments as sources, have found application in instruments ranging from electron microscopes and vacuum tubes to television monitors and CRT displays. However, silicon based devices have nearly replaced vacuum tubes, field electron emitters are used extensively in electron optical instruments, and other display technologies are replacing CRTs. Recently, processing methods have evolved to fabricate large arrays of micron scale vacuum tubes, using field emitters. Such devices are collectively identified as vacuum microelectronics with applications ranging from flat panel displays to microwave sources. Individual sources also have been configured into miniature electron optical columns, with applications in lithography or imaging. Many of these new 'devices' are silicon based and others use metal field emitters. Thin coatings of Si C, diamond-like materials, or metal silicides on silicon are also attractive. Since most field emitters are needle shaped, they may also be characterized individually, thereby becoming sources for field emission microscopy (FEM), field-ion microscopy (FIM) or atom probe studies (AP). Individual needles also make excellent specimens for High resolution electron microscopy (HREM). Vacuum microelectronics thus provide an unusual opportunity to obtain fundamental data on the same specimens that can be used as devices. This bridge from fundamental materials science to device application will be described specific examples. 8 figs

  19. Transients in the composition of material sputtered from alloy targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, H.H.; Stenum, B.; Soerensen, T.; Whitlow, H.J. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Physics)

    1984-03-01

    Material sputtered with 20-320 keV Ar/sup +/ ions from the binary alloy CuPt, Ni/sub 5/Pt and NiPt has been collected sequentially on thin carbon foils. The composition of the collected material was analyzed by Rutherford backscattering to reveal transients in the composition of the sputtered flux. In the beginning Cu and Ni were preferentially ejected. These results, together with earlier data for AgAu and Cu/sub 3/Au, where Ag and Cu were preferentially ejected, show the lighter element to be preferentially emitted during the transient, but particularly the results for Cu/sub 3/Au and Ni/sub 5/Pd suggest that a native oxide layer may play a substantial role, although only for the case of Cu/sub 3/Au did such an oxide have a sufficient thickness to be revealed by Rutherford backscattering. Measurements have further been carried out for pure copper bombarded with 45 keV Bi/sup +/ ions. Here, the bismuth re-emission reaches a steady-state a factor of 10 faster than the copper yield, a fact which again may be related to oxygen-driven surface segregation. 39 refs.

  20. Development of a new β Ti alloy with low modulus and favorable plasticity for implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, S X; Feng, X J; Yin, L X; Liu, X Y; Ma, M Z; Liu, R P

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important development directions of the Ti and its alloys is the applications in medical field. Development of new Ti alloys with low elastic modulus and/or favorable biocompatibility plays an important role for promoting its application in medical field. In this work, a new β Ti alloy (Ti-31Nb-6Zr-5Mo, wt.%) was designed for implant material using d-electron alloy design method. Microstructure and tensile properties of the designed alloy after hot rolling (HR) and solution followed by aging treatments (SA) were investigated. Results show that the designed alloy is composed of single β phase. However, microstructural analysis shows that the β phase in the designed alloy separates into Nb-rich and Nb-poor phase regions. The Nb-rich regions in HR specimen are typical elongated fiber texture, but are equiaxed particles with several micrometers in SA specimen. Tensile results show that the designed alloy has low Young's modulus of 44 GPa for HR specimen and 48 GPa for SA specimen which are very close to the extreme of Young's modulus of bulk titanium alloys. At the same time, the designed alloy has favorable plasticity in term of elongation of 26.7% for HR specimen and 20.6% for SA specimen, and appropriate tensile strength over 700 MPa. In short, the designed alloy has low elastic modulus close to that of bone and favorable plasticity and strength which can be a potential candidate for hard tissue replacements. PMID:26838858

  1. Pulsed Neutron Powder Diffraction for Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accelerator-based neutron diffraction began in the end of 60's at Tohoku University which was succeeded by the four spallation neutron facilities with proton accelerators at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan), Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos Laboratory (USA), and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). Since then, the next generation source has been pursued for 20 years, and 1MW-class spallation neutron sources will be appeared in about three years at the three parts of the world: Japan, UK and USA. The joint proton accelerator project (J-PARC), a collaborative project between KEK and JAEA, is one of them. The aim of the talk is to describe about J-PARC and the neutron diffractometers being installed at the materials and life science facility of J-PARC. The materials and life science facility of J-PARC has 23 neutron beam ports and will start delivering the first neutron beam of 25 Hz from 2008 May. Until now, more than 20 proposals have been reviewed by the review committee, and accepted proposal groups have started to get fund. Those proposals include five polycrystalline diffractometers: a super high resolution powder diffractometer (SHRPD), a 0.2%-resolution powder diffractometer of Ibaraki prefecture (IPD), an engineering diffractometers (Takumi), a high intensity S(Q) diffractometer (VSD), and a high-pressure dedicated diffractometer. SHRPD, Takumi and IPD are being designed and constructed by the joint team of KEK, JAEA and Ibaraki University, whose member are originally from the KEK powder group. These three instruments are expected to start in 2008. VSD is a super high intensity diffractometer with the highest resolution of Δd/d = 0.3%. VSD can measure rapid time-dependent phenomena of crystalline materials as well as glass, liquid and amorphous materials. The pair distribution function will be routinely obtained by the Fourier transiformation of S(Q) data. Q range of VSD will be as wide as 0.01 A-1-1. IPD is fully

  2. Tantalum-niobium-alloys as electrolyte capacitor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamdawalla, N.; Ettmayer, P.; Leuprecht, R.; Aschenbrenner, W.; Bildstein, H.

    1986-07-01

    The properties of Na-Nb-alloys with respect to their use in electrolytic foil condensers were examined by measuring the etching factor, the formability of Ta-Nb foils and the residual current of Ta-Nb alloy wires used for contact leads. Alloys with Nb contents up to 25 wt.-% can be used instead of unalloyed Ta without loss of quality. If the etching and forming procedures were optimized for different compositions, the use of alloys with up to 50 wt.-% Nb for capacitors might be feasible.

  3. Materials Data Science: Current Status and Future Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalidindi, Surya R.; De Graef, Marc

    2015-07-01

    The field of materials science and engineering is on the cusp of a digital data revolution. After reviewing the nature of data science and Big Data, we discuss the features of materials data that distinguish them from data in other fields. We introduce the concept of process-structure-property (PSP) linkages and illustrate how the determination of PSPs is one of the main objectives of materials data science. Then we review a selection of materials databases, as well as important aspects of materials data management, such as storage hardware, archiving strategies, and data access strategies. We introduce the emerging field of materials data analytics, which focuses on data-driven approaches to extract and curate materials knowledge from available data sets. The critical need for materials e-collaboration platforms is highlighted, and we conclude the article with a number of suggestions regarding the near-term future of the materials data science field.

  4. FWP executive summaries: basic energy sciences materials sciences and engineering program (SNL/NM).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, George A.; Simmons, Jerry A.

    2006-07-01

    This report presents an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences and Engineering Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. A general programmatic overview is also presented.

  5. Review on the EFDA programme on tungsten materials technology and science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All the recent DEMO design studies for helium cooled divertors utilize tungsten materials and alloys, mainly due to their high temperature strength, good thermal conductivity, low erosion, and comparably low activation under neutron irradiation. The long-term objective of the EFDA fusion materials programme is to develop structural as well as armor materials in combination with the necessary production and fabrication technologies for future divertor concepts. The programmatic roadmap is structured into four engineering research lines which comprise fabrication process development, structural material development, armor material optimization, and irradiation performance testing, which are complemented by a fundamental research programme on 'Materials Science and Modeling'. This paper presents the current research status of the EFDA experimental and testing investigations, and gives a detailed overview of the latest results on fabrication, joining, high heat flux testing, plasticity, modeling, and validation experiments.

  6. Review on the EFDA programme on tungsten materials technology and science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieth, M., E-mail: Michael.rieth@imf.fzk.de [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boutard, J.L. [EFDA-Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Dudarev, S.L. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Ahlgren, T. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Antusch, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baluc, N. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Barthe, M.-F. [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Universite d' Orleans, Polytech ou Faculte des Sciences, Avenue du Parc Floral, BP 6749, 45067 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Becquart, C.S. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Ciupinski, L. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Correia, J.B. [IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Domain, C. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Fikar, J. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Fortuna, E. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Fu, C.-C. [CEA, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Saclay (France); Gaganidze, E. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe (Germany); Galan, T.L. [Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Materials Science and Engineering, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Rosales, C. [CEIT, San Sebastian (Spain); Gludovatz, B. [OAW, Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Leoben (Austria); Greuner, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Heinola, K. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-10-01

    All the recent DEMO design studies for helium cooled divertors utilize tungsten materials and alloys, mainly due to their high temperature strength, good thermal conductivity, low erosion, and comparably low activation under neutron irradiation. The long-term objective of the EFDA fusion materials programme is to develop structural as well as armor materials in combination with the necessary production and fabrication technologies for future divertor concepts. The programmatic roadmap is structured into four engineering research lines which comprise fabrication process development, structural material development, armor material optimization, and irradiation performance testing, which are complemented by a fundamental research programme on 'Materials Science and Modeling'. This paper presents the current research status of the EFDA experimental and testing investigations, and gives a detailed overview of the latest results on fabrication, joining, high heat flux testing, plasticity, modeling, and validation experiments.

  7. Chemistry and materials science progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Research is reported in the areas of surface science, fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals, energetic materials, transactinide materials and properties and other indirectly related areas of weapons research.

  8. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program

  9. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

  10. "Sweet Science": Romantic Materialism and the New Sciences of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Amanda Jo

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation on late Enlightenment poetics and the history of the biomedical sciences unfolds a lapsed possibility near the historical beginnings of the division of labor between literary and scientific representation. Against the pressure, then and now, to treat the culture of science as context or antithesis to literary production, I recover a countervailing epistemology that cast poetry as a privileged technique of empirical inquiry: a knowledgeable practice whose figurative work brou...

  11. SR{mu}CT in materials science at the beamline HARWI II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Haibel, Astrid; Donath, Tilman; Bayraktar, Funda S.; Riekehr, Stefan; Kocak, Mustafa; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The synchrotron radiation based micro tomography is a powerful imaging tool in the wide range of materials science. Compared to laboratory X-ray sources the micro tomography at a synchrotron allows to visualize non-destructively high and low absorbing materials without any beam hardening effect and with a very high density resolution. The beamline HARWI II operated by the GKSS Research Centre in cooperation with Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg is designed for materials science experiments using hard X-rays. A fixed-exit monochromator provides a highly intense, monochromatic X-ray beam in the energy range between 15 and 200 keV. This large range of photon energies, the spatial resolution down to 3 {mu}m and the high density resolution are important for microtomographic applications. The advantages of the beamline are demonstrated for absorption contrast tomography study of crack propagation within laser welded Al-Alloy T-Joints.

  12. Corrosion properties of cladding materials from Zr1Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion behaviour was observed of the Zr1Nb alloy in hot water and superheated steam and the effects of impurity content, of the purity of the corrosion environment and of the heat treatment of the alloy were studied on the alloy corrosion resistance. Also studied were the absorption of hydrogen by the alloy and its behaviour in reactor situations. It was ascertained that the alloy has a good corrosion resistance up to a temperature of 350 degC. The corrosion resistance is reduced by the presence of nitrogen above 50 to 70 ppm and of carbon above 50 to 90 ppm. A graphic representation is given of the dependence of corrosion resistance on the temperature of annealing, the nitrogen content of the alloy and the time of the action of hot water or steam, as well as the dependence of the hydrogen content in the alloy on the peripheral tension of the cladding in hot water both in non-active environment and at irradiation with a neutron flux of approximately 1020 n/cm2. (J.B.)

  13. Quantitative estimation of structure homogeneity of mechanically alloyed dispersion-strengthened composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of quantitative estimation of microstructure homogeneity of mechanical alloyed composite materials is proposed. As an indicator of satisfactory degree of microstructure homogeneity a value of variation coefficient of 10% is accepted.

  14. New water-soluble metal working fluids additives from phosphonic acid derivatives for aluminum alloy materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Ichitaro; Tomoda, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Shoji

    2007-01-01

    Water-soluble metal working fluids are used for processing of aluminum alloy materials. This short paper describes properties of new additives for water-soluble cutting fluids for aluminum alloy materials. Some alkyldiphosphonic acids were prepared with known method. Amine salts of these phosphonic acids showed anti-corrosion property for aluminum alloy materials. However, they have no hard water tolerance. Monoesters of octylphosphonic acid were prepared by the reaction of octylphosphonic acid dichloride with various alcohols in the presence of triethylamine. Amine salts of monoester of octylphosphonic acid with diethyleneglycol monomethyl ether, ethyleneglycol monomethyl ether and triethyleneglycol monomethyl ether showed both of a good anti-corrosion property for aluminum alloy materials and hard water tolerance. PMID:17898459

  15. Chemistry and Materials Science, 1990--1991. [Second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, T.T.; Bruner, J.M.; McElroy, L.A. [eds.

    1991-12-31

    This 2-year (FY 1990-91) contains 49 technical articles in ten sections: research sampler, metals and alloys, energetic materials, chemistry and physics of advanced materials, bonding and reactions at surfaces and interfaces, superconductivity, energy R and D, waste processing and management, characterization and analysis, and facilities and instrumentation. Two more sections list department personnel, their publications etc., consultants, and summary of department budgets. The articles are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  16. On the Choice of Tool Material in Friction Stir Welding of Titanium Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Settineri, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process patented in 1991 by TWI; initially adopted to weld aluminum alloys, is now being successfully used also for magnesium alloys, copper and steels. The wide diffusion the process is having is due to the possibility to weld both materials traditionally considered difficult to be welded or "unweldable" by traditional fusion welding processes due to peculiar thermal and chemical material properties, and complex geometries as sandwich stru...

  17. Sol-gel derived nanocomposite materials for corrosion protection of aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Helmut K.; Müller, Peter; Dittfurth, Carola; Albayrak, Sener; Puhl, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Thermally curable nanocomposite coating materials have been developed to seal and protect copper-containing aluminium alloys against corrosion. The coating material was prepared via the sol-gel-process starting from epoxy functionalised silanes, nanoscaled silica and organic diole crosslinker. This coating matrix was additionally supplied with a varying content of cerium oxide (1-20 wt.%). The corrosion protective efficiency of these coatings was investigated on aluminium alloys Al 6013-T6 an...

  18. PREFACE: Tsukuba International Conference on Materials Science 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijima, Masashi; Ohshima, Kenichi; Kojima, Seiji; Nagasaki, Yukio; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Kim, Hee Young; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Nakamura, Junji; Yamamoto, Yohei; Goto, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Tsukuba International Conference on Materials Science (TICMS) was held from 28th August to 6th September, 2013 for the celebration of 40th year anniversary of the University of Tsukuba. The conference was organized by the Division of Materials Science, in cooperation with the Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, and Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science. The purpose of the conference was to provide a unique forum for researchers and students working in various fields of materials science, which have been progressing so rapidly that no single society could cover. The conference consists of following seven workshops to cover various fields. The organizing committee believed that the conference gave all participants new insights into the widespread development of materials science and enhanced the circulation, among them, of information released at the conference. The organizers are grateful for the financial support from University of Tsukuba. This volume contains 25 selected papers from invited and contributed papers, all of which have been screened on the basis of the standard review process of the program committee. The editors express their thanks to those authors who contributed the papers published in this proceedings, which reflects the scientific value of the conference. Nov. 20, 2013 Seiji Kojima, Prof. Dr. Chair, Division of Materials Science Chair, Doctoral Program in Materials Science TICMS 2013 (http://www.ticonfms.tsukuba.ac.jp/) Workshop list The 13th Japan-Korea Joint Workshop on Materials Science Summer School of Biomaterials Science The Japan-Korea Joint Workshop on Shape Memory and Superelastic Technologies The 2nd Workshop on THz Radiation from Intrinsic Josephson Junctions The 3rd German-Japan Nanoworkshop TICMS and IWP Joint Workshop on Conjugated Polymers International Workshop on Science and Patents (IWP) 2013

  19. Materials science with SR using x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some examples of applications of synchrotron radiation to materials science demonstrate the importance of microstructure information within structural as well as functional materials in order to control their properties and quality as designed for industrial purposes. To collect such information, x-ray imaging in quasi real time is required in either the microradiographic mode or the diffraction (in transmission) mode. New measurement technologies based on imaging are applied to polycrystalline materials, single crystal materials and multilayered device materials to illustrate what kind of synchrotron radiation facility is most desirable for materials science and engineering. (author)

  20. Screening test results on potential alternate alloys for VHTGR applications. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Electric is working to define and develop the materials technology which will be required for advanced very High Temperature Gas Reactors operating at primary coolant temperatures up to 9500C. The most promising application which has been identified is providing process heat for the reforming of methane. Earlier work had identified Inconel 617 and Alloy 800H as the best of the commercially available alloys for the reformer components. Since these alloys were identified, additional alloys have been developed which may offer improved performance over the above reference reformer alloys. This report presents the results obtained to date on four possible alternate alloys, Nimonic 86, Sanicro 32X, SSS-113-MA, and X 8 NiCrMoNb 16 16, which are being evaluated by General Electric for thermal stability and compatibility with HTGR helium environments. The thermal stabilities of Nimonic 86, Sanicro 32X, and X 8 NiCrMoNb 16 16 have been shown to be good out to maximum exposure times and temperatures of 6000 hours and 9500C, respectively. The thermal stability, as measured by room temperature impact strength, and post exposure ductility of the Japanese developmental alloy SSS-113-MA have been shown to be poor. Measured impact strengths and ductilities below 15 ft-lbs and 10%, respectively, have been observed for this alloy. No conclusions regarding the helium compatibility of the alloys can be made at this time because of the limited data available

  1. Lithium alloys and metal oxides as high-capacity anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Progress in lithium alloys and metal oxides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries is reviewed. •Electrochemical characteristics and lithium storage mechanisms of lithium alloys and metal oxides are summarized. •Strategies for improving electrochemical lithium storage properties of lithium alloys and metal oxides are discussed. •Challenges in developing lithium alloys and metal oxides as commercial anodes for lithium-ion batteries are pointed out. -- Abstract: Lithium alloys and metal oxides have been widely recognized as the next-generation anode materials for lithium-ion batteries with high energy density and high power density. A variety of lithium alloys and metal oxides have been explored as alternatives to the commercial carbonaceous anodes. The electrochemical characteristics of silicon, tin, tin oxide, iron oxides, cobalt oxides, copper oxides, and so on are systematically summarized. In this review, it is not the scope to retrace the overall studies, but rather to highlight the electrochemical performances, the lithium storage mechanism and the strategies in improving the electrochemical properties of lithium alloys and metal oxides. The challenges and new directions in developing lithium alloys and metal oxides as commercial anodes for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries are also discussed

  2. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Mechanical Science Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of mechanical components and mechanical science. The handbook includes information on diesel engines, heat exchangers, pumps, valves, and miscellaneous mechanical components. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the construction and operation of mechanical components that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  3. General and special engineering materials science. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report about general and special engineering materials science is the result of lectures given by the authors in two terms in 1982 at Instituto Balseiro, San Carlos de Bariloche, the graduated college of the Universidad de Cuyo and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Republica Argentina. These lectures were organised in the frame of the project ''nuclear engineering'' (ARG/78/020) of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Some chapters of the report are written in English, others in Spanish. The report is subdivided into three volumes: Volume I treats general engineering materials science in 4 capital chapters on the structure of materials, the properties of materials, materials technology and materials testing and investigation supplemented by a selected detailed chapter about elasticity plasticity and rupture mechanics. Volume II concerns special engineering materials science with respect to nuclear materials under normal reactor operation conditions including reactor clad and structural materials, nuclear fuels and fuel elements and nuclear waste as a materials viewpoint. Volume III - also concerning special engineering materials science - considers nuclear materials with respect to off-normal (''accident'') reactor operation conditions including nuclear materials in loss-of-coolant accidents and nuclear materials in core melt accidents. (orig.)

  4. High Porosity Alumina as Matrix Material for Composites of Al-Mg Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sophisticated industry and technologies require higher and higher assumptions against mechanical strength and surface hardness of ceramic reinforced metal alloys and metal matrix composites. Applying the well-known alumina powders by dry pressing technology and some special pore-forming additives and sintering technology the authors have successfully developed a new, high porosity alumina matrix material for composites of advenced Al-Mg alloys. The developed new matrix material have higher than 30% porosity, with homogenous porous structure and pore sizes from few nano up to 2–3 mm depending on the alloys containments. Thanks to the used materials and the sintering conditions the authors could decrease the wetting angles less than 90° between the high porosity alumina matrix and the Al-Mg alloys. Applied analytical methods in this research were laser granulometry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Digital image analysis was applied to microscopy results, to enhance the results of transformation

  5. The use of historical materials in elementary science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Gilliland-Swetland, Anne J.

    2001-07-01

    Science educators have stressed in recent years the importance of providing students with an historical understanding of the development of scientific knowledge. Although many approaches have been suggested for building historical understanding of science, historical source materials have often been deemed too difficult to use with elementary school students. This article reports on a case study that used archival and contemporary source materials in project activities, such as photographs and field notes, to engage students in the processes of data generation, selection, annotation, and evaluation. The curricular science activities of one elementary classroom with 29 fourth and fifth grade students are decribed and analyzed as they build and use archives of historical and contemporary naturalist materials. The article concludes with a discussion of the feasibility and benefits of using historical source materials within elementary science education, as well as the implications for selecting and preparing historical source materials in digital format for use in elementary education.

  6. Piezoelectric materials and devices applications in engineering and medical sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Vijaya, M S

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric Materials and Devices: Applications in Engineering and Medical Sciences provides a complete overview of piezoelectric materials, covering all aspects of the materials starting from fundamental concepts. The treatment includes physics of piezoelectric materials, their characteristics and applications. The author uses simple language to explain the theory of piezoelectricity and introduce readers to the properties and design of different types of piezoelectric materials, such as those used in engineering and medical device applications.This book: Introduces various types of dielect

  7. Science of materials. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research program includes studies of the microchemistry, microstructure, deformation, corrosion and fracture of metals, ceramics and alloy materials, of the hydrogen embrittlement of metals, the mechanism of heat transfer across interfacts, catalytic properties of surfaces, and erosion of surfaces by fluid suspended particles. The structure of liquids, polymers and disordered solids is under investigation with emphasis on molecular interactions and bonding, on ionic conduction, phase transitions and radiation damage. Ferro- and pyro-electric materials with potential for solar energy applications are under development. The study of optical properties includes the mechanism of luminescence, the design of molecular photoreceptors, and new semiconductor materials for photovoltaic devices

  8. Science of materials. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The research program includes studies of the microchemistry, microstructure, deformation, corrosion and fracture of metals, ceramics and alloy materials, of the hydrogen embrittlement of metals, the mechanism of heat transfer across interfacts, catalytic properties of surfaces, and erosion of surfaces by fluid suspended particles. The structure of liquids, polymers and disordered solids is under investigation with emphasis on molecular interactions and bonding, on ionic conduction, phase transitions and radiation damage. Ferro- and pyro-electric materials with potential for solar energy applications are under development. The study of optical properties includes the mechanism of luminescence, the design of molecular photoreceptors, and new semiconductor materials for photovoltaic devices.

  9. Laser-assisted development of titanium alloys: the search for new biomedical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Amelia; Gupta, Dheeraj; Vilar, Rui

    2011-02-01

    Ti-alloys used in prosthetic applications are mostly alloys initially developed for aeronautical applications, so their behavior was not optimized for medical use. A need remains to design new alloys for biomedical applications, where requirements such as biocompatibility, in-body durability, specific manufacturing ability, and cost effectiveness are considered. Materials for this application must present excellent biocompatibility, ductility, toughness and wear and corrosion resistance, a large laser processing window and low sensitivity to changes in the processing parameters. Laser deposition has been investigated in order to access its applicability to laser based manufactured implants. In this study, variable powder feed rate laser cladding has been used as a method for the combinatorial investigation of new alloy systems that offers a unique possibility for the rapid and exhaustive preparation of a whole range of alloys with compositions variable along a single clad track. This method was used as to produce composition gradient Ti-Mo alloys. Mo has been used since it is among the few elements biocompatible, non-toxic β-Ti phase stabilizers. Alloy tracks with compositions in the range 0-19 wt.%Mo were produced and characterized in detail as a function of composition using microscale testing procedures for screening of compositions with promising properties. Microstructural analysis showed that alloys with Mo content above 8% are fully formed of β phase grains. However, these β grains present a cellular substructure that is associated to a Ti and Mo segregation pattern that occurs during solidification. Ultramicroindentation tests carried out to evaluate the alloys' hardness and Young's modulus showed that Ti-13%Mo alloys presented the lowest hardness and Young's modulus (70 GPa) closer to that of bone than common Ti alloys, thus showing great potential for implant applications.

  10. The materiality of materials and artefacts used in science classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowie, Bronwen; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Moreland, Judy

    2015-01-01

    between materials as natural objects in this world and artefacts as manmade objects. We are aware that in a classroom material objects and artefacts shape, and are shaped by classroom practice through the way they selectively present scientific explanations. However, materials and artefacts have no...... as fossils, plant samples and artefacts like test tubes, worksheets and digital tools along with written inscriptions produced during interactions and that served as artefacts in subsequent interactions (Roehl, 2012). Data sources Data were generated via classroom observation using video, student...... but thought about means and ends of artefacts/ materials. They explored artefacts/materials and how they could be used and through this exemplified materiality in the objects. More deliberate and focused attention to what constitutes materiality can support collaboration and communication to support...

  11. Materials science for solar energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Granqvist, CG

    1991-01-01

    Rapid advances in materials technology are creating many novel forms of coatings for energy efficient applications in solar energy. Insulating heat mirrors, selective absorbers, transparent insulation and fluorescent concentrators are already available commercially. Radiative cooling, electrochromic windows and polymeric light pipes hold promise for future development, while chemical and photochemical processes are being considered for energy storage. This book investigates new material advances as well as applications, costs, reliability and industrial production of existing materials. Each c

  12. 2005 Research Briefs : Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2005-05-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  13. 2003 research briefs : Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2003-08-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems and Materials Modeling and Computational Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  14. 2004 research briefs :Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  15. Phase-contrast imaging with an x-ray grating interferometer in materials science using noncoherent synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Ogurreck, Malte; Riekehr, Stefan; Haibel, Astrid; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany); Donath, Tilman; David, Christian [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Pfeiffer, Franz [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Phase-contrast imaging with a hard X-ray grating interferometer is used to increase contrast for weak absorbing materials. It is a well established imaging method to visualize soft tissue in many medical and biological applications. Here we present the approach of using this method in the field of materials science, especially in imaging of new light-weight materials like magnesium and aluminium alloys. We show that more information from a single X-ray projection image can be gained by combining the different contrasts obtained by this imaging method simultaneously. This information can be used to optimize advanced joining techniques for such materials.

  16. Dissolution of Plutonium Scrub Alloy and Anode Heel Materials in H-Canyon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H-Canyon has a ''gap'' in dissolver operations during the last three months of FY03. One group of material to be processed during the gap is pre-existing scrub alloy material. There are 14 cans of material containing approximately 3.8 kilograms of plutonium. Of the 14 cans, it was anticipated that four cans contain salts, two cans contain anode heel materials, and eight cans contain scrub alloy buttons. H-Canyon desires to process the materials using a flowsheet similar to the SS and C (sand, slag and crucible) dissolution flowsheet used in F-Canyon. The materials will be loaded into carbon steel cans and then placed into aluminum metal charging bundles. Samples were sent to Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for characterization and flowsheet testing -- four MSE salts, two anode heels, and seven scrub alloy buttons. SRTC dissolved and characterized each of the samples. Two of them, originally thought to be MSE salts, were found to be graphite mold materials and were unsuitable for processing in H-Canyon. Characterization studies confirmed that the identification of the remaining items as MSE salts, scrub alloy buttons, and anode heel materials was correct. The MSE salts and anode heels solids are comprised primarily of plutonium, potassium, sodium and chloride. Both the MSE salts and anode heels left behind small amounts of residual solids. The scrub alloy buttons are comprised primarily of plutonium and aluminum. The solids dissolve readily with light, effervescent gas generation at the material surface and only trace amounts of NOx generation. Of the seven button samples, four dissolved completely. Two button samples contained small amounts of tantalum that did not dissolve. The last of the seven scrub alloy samples left a trace amount of residual plutonium solids. It is anticipated that the presence of undissolved fissile material is a function of where the sample was located relative to the button surface

  17. The Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanism of Alloy 600 Steam Generator Tubes: Materials Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem is that intergranular (IG) cracking of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys occurs even in Ar with no corrosion or oxidation of grain boundaries being accompanied. This fact suggests that IG cracking has nothing to do with grain boundary (GB) corrosion or oxidation. This fact cast a doubt about the current notion that applied stresses are required to initiate IG cracking or PWSCC. These facts indicate that PWSCC is closely related to internal factors of materials, not to external factors such as grain boundary oxidation or corrosion or applied stresses. Given that austenitic alloys including Alloy 600 are a kind of solid solution alloys with alloying elements dissolved in the matrix as solutes, ordering of alloying elements of Fe, Cr and Ni occur in Alloy 600 during exposure to reactor operating condition. We suggest that atomic ordering is the main internal factor to govern PWSCC or IG cracking of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys because lattice contraction due to atomic ordering induces internal stresses which are large enough to cause GB cracking. The aim of this work is to provide experimental evidence for our suggestion. To this end, water quenching (WQ) or air cooling (AC) or furnace cooling (FC) was applied respectively to Alloy 600 after solution treatment at 1095 .deg. C for 0.5h to make Alloy 600 with either disorder (DO) or different degrees of short range order, respectively. Alloy 600 showed lattice contraction upon aging at 400 .deg. C whose extent increased with increasing cooling rate: the water-quenched (WQ) Alloy 600 exhibited the largest amount of lattice contraction than the furnace-cooled (FC) or air-cooled (AC) one. Yonezawa's experiments have indeed shown that the WQ-Alloy 600 with the largest amount of lattice contraction upon aging at 400 .deg. C is the most susceptible to PWSCC when compared to the AC- or FC-Alloy 600 with the lesser amount of lattice contraction. These observations demonstrate, for the first time, that PWSCC of Alloy 600 is

  18. Proceedings of the international conference on material science: abstract volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials Science is an interdisciplinary field applying the properties of matter to various areas of science and engineering. This scientific field investigates the relationship between the structure of materials at atomic or molecular scales and their macroscopic properties. In the recent years, materials science has been propelled to the forefront at many universities and research institutions due to the significant advancement on nanoscience and nanotechnology. ICMS-2013 will cover a wide range of interdisciplinary and current research topics related to material science. Research on advanced materials includes nanomaterials, bio-nanomaterials, zero bandgap materials, composites, surface engineering, tissue engineering and biomaterials etc. These materials have numerous applications in electronics, biotechnology, medicine and energy harvesting. The importance of nano-science and nanotechnology has been well documented by both industrial and academic communities worldwide. It is believed that breakthroughs in nano-science and technology will change all aspects of human life in such diverse areas as, electronic devices, energy, biomedicine, sensing, environment, and security etc. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  19. Reversible motion of twin boundaries in AZ31 alloy and new design of magnesium alloys as smart materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, Peter; Ostapovets, Andriy; Jäger, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 56, APR (2014), s. 509-516. ISSN 0261-3069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GPP108/12/P054 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnesium alloy * twinning * texture * smart material Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.501, year: 2014

  20. PWSCC crack growth rate of alloy 690 to simulate actual plant material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the PWSCC crack growth rate of domestically produced alloy 690, alloy 690 materials were obtained from two companies which supply materials that are used in actual plants. PWSCC crack growth rates of cold worked alloy TT690 were measured under simulated PWR primary water conditions. The crack growth rates of 20% cold-worked alloy TT690 from both companies were less than 5×10-11 m/s, and the crack growth rates were not as fast as reported from Bettis. Also it was observed that there was up to about 2.5 times difference in the crack growth rates of TT690 of the two companies. (author)

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of ductile aluminium alloy manufactured by recycled materials

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, HL; Ji, SX; Watson, D.; M. White; Fan, ZY

    2014-01-01

    The present paper introduces the microstructure and mechanical properties of the Al-Mg- Si-Mn alloy made by recycled materials, in which the impurity levels of iron are mainly concerned. It is found that the increased Fe content reduces the ductility and yield strength but slightly increases the UTS of the diecast alloy. The tolerable Fe content is 0.45wt.%, at which the recycled alloys are still able to produce castings with the mechanical properties of yield strength over 140MPa, UTS over 2...

  2. First Materials Science Research Rack Capabilities and Design Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D.; King, R.; Cobb, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The first Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) will accommodate dual Experiment Modules (EM's) and provide simultaneous on-orbit processing operations capability. The first international Materials Science Experiment Module for the MSRR-1 is an international cooperative research activity between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the European Space Agency's (ESA) European Space Research and Technology Center. (ESTEC). This International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) will contain the Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) developed by ESA as an Experiment Module. The MSL Experiment Module will accommodate several on-orbit exchangeable experiment-specific Module Inserts. Module Inserts currently planned are a Quench Module Insert, Low Gradient Furnace, Solidification with Quench Furnace, and Diffusion Module Insert. The second Experiment Module for the MSRR-1 configuration is a commercial device supplied by MSFC's Space Products Department (SPD). It includes capabilities for vapor transport processes and liquid metal sintering. This Experiment Module will be replaced on-orbit with other NASA Materials Science EMs.

  3. Biological issues in materials science and engineering: Interdisciplinarity and the bio-materials paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.

    2006-07-01

    Biological systems and processes have had, and continue to have, important implications and applications in materials extraction, processing, and performance. This paper illustrates some interdisciplinary, biological issues in materials science and engineering. These include metal extraction involving bacterial catalysis, galvanic couples, bacterial-assisted corrosion and degradation of materials, biosorption and bioremediation of toxic and other heavy metals, metal and material implants and prostheses and related dental and medical biomaterials developments and applications, nanomaterials health benefits and toxicity issue, and biomimetics and biologically inspired materials developments. These and other examples provide compelling evidence and arguments for emphasizing biological sicences in materials science and engineering curricula and the implementation of a bio-materials paradigm to facilitate the emergence of innovative interdisciplinarity involving the biological sciences and materials sciences and engineering.

  4. Interrelation of material microstructure, ultrasonic factors, and fracture toughness of two phase titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The pivotal role of an alpha-beta phase microstructure in governing fracture toughness in a titanium alloy, Ti-662, is demonstrated. The interrelation of microstructure and fracture toughness is demonstrated using ultrasonic measurement techniques originally developed for nondestructive evaluation and material property characterization. It is shown that the findings determined from ultrasonic measurements agree with conclusions based on metallurgical, metallographic, and fractographic observations concerning the importance of alpha-beta morphology in controlling fracture toughness in two phase titanium alloys.

  5. Aluminium Alloy-Based Metal Matrix Composites: A Potential Material for Wear Resistant Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rupa Dasgupta

    2012-01-01

    Aluminium alloy-based metal matrix composites (AMMCs) have been by now established themselves as a suitable wear resistant material especially for sliding wear applications. However, in actual practice engineering components usually encounter combination of wear types. An attempt has been made in the present paper to highlight the effect of dispersing SiC in 2014 base alloy adopting the liquid metallurgy route on different wear modes like sliding, abrasion, erosion, and combinations of wear m...

  6. Materials science of graphene: a flagship perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hernandez, Mar; Coleman, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Driving the superlative properties of mechanically exfoliated graphene to real world applications requires a large effort to develop synthetic routes providing cost effective high quality materials. It can also be agreed, that when it comes to reality, one should not refer just to Graphene but ‘Graphenes’ as each synthesis method renders a material characterized by different properties. Recently, Graphene and other 2D materials scalable synthesis methods have provided improved materials at highly competitive costs. However, a long way is ahead to approach the properties of mechanically exfoliated materials. Also, as a scalable method succeeds and it is indeed upscaled for industrial production, new characterization protocols and metrics have to be devised to enable efficient on line quality control of the produced materials. Significant advances can be reported recently in the synthesis of high quality graphene although a shift towards other 2D materials research is clearly observed. An overview of the progress made by several groups in WP ‘ Materials‘ of the Graphene Flagship is given.

  7. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Martin H; Mehta, Vivek A; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  8. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H. Pham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti, and cobalt-chrome (CoCr. These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation.

  9. Computational materials science: Predictions of pinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruch, Patrycja; Ghosez, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    A multiscale model has been implemented that provides accurate predictions of the behaviour of ferroelectric materials in electric fields, and might aid efforts to design devices such as sensors and digital memory. See Letter p.360

  10. STRAIN CORRELATIONS IN ALLOY 690 MATERIALS USING ELECTRON BACKSCATTER DIFFRACTION AND VICKERS HARDNESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-03-09

    High chromium, nickel-base Alloy 690 exhibits an increased resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environments over lower chromium alloy 600. As a result, Alloy 690 has been used to replace Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing, reactor pressure vessel nozzles and other pressure boundary components. However, recent laboratory crack-growth testing has revealed that heavily cold-worked Alloy 690 materials can become susceptible to SCC. To evaluate reasons for this increased SCC susceptibility, detailed characterizations have been performed on as-received and cold-worked Alloy 690 materials using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and Vickers hardness measurements. Examinations were performed on cross sections of compact tension specimens that were used for SCC crack growth rate testing in simulated PWR primary water. Hardness and the EBSD integrated misorientation density could both be related to the degree of cold work for materials of similar grain size. However, a microstructural dependence was observed for strain correlations using EBSD and hardness which should be considered if this technique is to be used for gaining insight on SCC growth rates

  11. Environmental issues in materials science and engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Fidancevska, Emilija

    2013-01-01

    Тhe industrial engineering consumes of materials and is dependent on a continuous supply of them. Increasing population and living standards cause the consumption rate to grow - something it cannot do forever. Finding ways to use materials more efficiently is a prerequisite for a sustainable future. Recent global attention to the issues and challenges of sustainable development is forcing industries to conduct self-assessments to identify where they stand within the framework for ...

  12. Materials science: Like cartilage, but simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties.......The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties....

  13. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Martin H.; Mehta, Vivek A.; Alexander Tuchman; Hsieh, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common ...

  14. Automotive Friction Materials: from Experience to Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yafei Lu

    2000-01-01

    An optimizing friction material formulation technique based on Golden Section and Relational Grade Analysis was developed. Approach 2 of this technique was tested by using 7 ingredients including 2 fibers, 4 fillers and 1 binder as raw materials. By doing 19 formulations, an optimizing one (BU18)was obtained with stableμ and averageμ = 0.451 and wear = 3.46 wt %.

  15. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 4 covers articles on single crystal compound semiconductors and complex polycrystalline materials. The book discusses narrow gap semiconductors and solid state batteries. The text then describes the advantages of hot-pressed microcrystalline compacts of oxygen-octahedra ferroelectrics over single crystal materials, as well as heterostructure junction lasers. Solid state physicists, materials scientists, electrical engineers, and graduate students studying the subjects being discussed will find the book invaluable.

  16. Electronic materials high-T(sub c) superconductivity polymers and composites structural materials surface science and catalysts industry participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The fifth year of the Center for Advanced Materials was marked primarily by the significant scientific accomplishments of the research programs. The Electronics Materials program continued its work on the growth and characterization of gallium arsenide crystals, and the development of theories to understand the nature and distribution of defects in the crystals. The High Tc Superconductivity Program continued to make significant contributions to the field in theoretical and experimental work on both bulk materials and thin films and devices. The Ceramic Processing group developed a new technique for cladding YBCO superconductors for high current applications in work with the Electric Power Research Institute. The Polymers and Composites program published a number of important studies involving atomistic simulations of polymer surfaces with excellent correlations to experimental results. The new Enzymatic Synthesis of Materials project produced its first fluorinated polymers and successfully began engineering enzymes designed for materials synthesis. The structural Materials Program continued work on novel alloys, development of processing methods for advanced ceramics, and characterization of mechanical properties of these materials, including the newly documented characterization of cyclic fatigue crack propagation behavior in toughened ceramics. Finally, the Surface Science and Catalysis program made significant contributions to the understanding of microporous catalysts and the nature of surface structures and interface compounds.

  17. Using Federally Funded Curricular Materials to meet Next Geneartion Science Standards in Earth System Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) describe teaching and learning goals for Earth system science at all levels of K-12, including elementary, middle school, and high school. Teachers must consider science and engineering practices, cross-cutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. The National Science Foundation and other federal organizations have supported the development of reformed curricular materials at the K-12 level for many years. Although developed before the adoption of NGSS, many of these Earth system science resources are, in fact, NGSS congruent. Such resources include those developed by TERC, SERC, EDC, NASA, NOAA, USGS, and others. This session features NGSS congruent materials, carefully examining and dissecting the performance expectations that embody these materials. It also shares a process of tagging these materials via NSTA's, NGSS portal guidelines.

  18. Thermodynamic Analysis on Interaction between MoltenTi Alloys and Oxide Molding Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been built up for the interactions between molten Ti alloys and oxide molding materials in the way of decomposition and solution of molding materials, then the influences on the reaction free energy changes have been calculated and discussed.

  19. Tribological properties of amorphous alloys and the role of surfaces in abrasive wear of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The research approach undertaken by the authors relative to the subject, and examples of results from the authors are reviewed. The studies include programs in adhesion, friction, and various wear mechanisms (adhesive and abrasive wear). The materials which have been studied include such ceramic and metallic materials as silicon carbide, ferrites, diamond, and amorphous alloys.

  20. Surface physics of materials materials science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Blakely, J M

    2013-01-01

    Surface Physics of Materials presents accounts of the physical properties of solid surfaces. The book contains selected articles that deal with research emphasizing surface properties rather than experimental techniques in the field of surface physics. Topics discussed include transport of matter at surfaces; interaction of atoms and molecules with surfaces; chemical analysis of surfaces; and adhesion and friction. Research workers, teachers and graduate students in surface physics, and materials scientist will find the book highly useful.

  1. Surface properties of aluminum alloy as material for ultrahigh vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of aluminum alloy (2017 alloy) for the vacuum chambers of TRISTAN were studied. Machining, electric discharge machining and chemical polishing were made successively on the samples of the 2017 alloy. The observation of surface state, the analysis of surface composition and high temperature desorption experiment were performed. The measurement of surface roughness with a probe, the observation with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the measurement of surface roughness factor (SRF) were carried out as the study of the surface state. The analysis of surface composition was made by the Auger electron spectrometry. It was found that the surfaces of samples treated by discharge machining were rough and have thick oxide layer. When chemical polishing was applied to these samples, the surfaces became smooth, and the oxide layer became thin. By heating the samples to raise the temperature, the desorption of H2O, CO and CO2 was caused. The amount of desorption was in close relation with the SRF. (Kato, T.)

  2. Recent progress in R and D on tungsten alloys for divertor structural and plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten materials are candidates for plasma-facing components for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the DEMOnstration power plant because of their superior thermophysical properties. Because these materials are not common structural materials like steels, knowledge and strategies to improve the properties are still under development. These strategies discussed here, include new alloying approaches and microstructural stabilization by oxide dispersion strengthened as well as TiC stabilized tungsten based materials. The fracture behavior is improved by using tungsten laminated and tungsten wire reinforced materials. Material development is accompanied by neutron irradiation campaigns. Self-passivation, which is essential in case of loss-of-coolant accidents for plasma facing materials, can be achieved by certain amounts of chromium and titanium. Furthermore, modeling and computer simulation on the influence of alloying elements and heat loading and helium bombardment will be presented

  3. Use of muons beams in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One presents a review on the use of the μSR spectroscopy in studies of the physical and chemical properties of materials: physical metallurgy, electronic and magnetic properties of solids, kinetics of chemical reactions, free radicals, molecules of biological interest

  4. Understanding structural conservation through materials science:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuster-López, Laura; Krarup Andersen, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties and the structure of materials are key elements in understanding how structural interventions in conservation treatments affect cultural heritage objects. In this context, engineering mechanics can help determine the strength and stability found in art objects as it can prov...

  5. Understanding solids: the science of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tilley, Richard J. D.

    2013-01-01

    This edition contains new sections on the use of computing methods to solve materials problems and has been thoroughly updated to include the many developments and advances made in the past 10 years, e.g.  batteries, solar cells, lighting technology, laser...

  6. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr alloy used as dental implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Alexander E; Molotnikov, Andrey; Lapovok, Rimma; Zeller, Rolf; Berner, Simon; Habersetzer, Philippe; Dalla Torre, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Zr alloys have recently started to receive a considerable amount of attention as promising materials for dental applications. This work compares mechanical properties of a new Ti-15Zr alloy to those of commercially pure titanium Grade4 in two surface conditions - machined and modified by sand-blasting and etching (SLA). As a result of significantly smaller grain size in the initial condition (1-2µm), the strength of Ti-15Zr alloy was found to be 10-15% higher than that of Grade4 titanium without reduction in the tensile elongation or compromising the fracture toughness. The fatigue endurance limit of the alloy was increased by around 30% (560MPa vs. 435MPa and 500MPa vs. 380MPa for machined and SLA-treated surfaces, respectively). Additional implant fatigue tests showed enhanced fatigue performance of Ti-15Zr over Ti-Grade4. PMID:27258932

  7. Low Energy Electron Microscopy in Materials Science

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk; Konvalina, Ivo; Matsuda, K.; Mikmeková, Eliška; Pokorná, Zuzana; Walker, Christopher

    Chiang Mai : Chiang Mai University, 2015. s. 20. [International Conference on the Physical Properties and Application of Advanced Materials (ICPMAT) /10./. 17.11.2015-21.11.2015, Chiang Mai] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : low energy electrons * contrast in scanning electron microscope * transmission mode in SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  8. Titanium–35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez de Andrade, Dennia; Marotta Reis de Vasconcellos, Luana; Chaves Silva Carvalho, Isabel; Ferraz de Brito Penna Forte, Lilibeth; Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia de [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Falchete do Prado, Renata, E-mail: renatafalchete@hotmail.com [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dalcy Roberto dos; Alves Cairo, Carlos Alberto [Division of Materials, Air and Space Institute, CTA, Praça Mal. do Ar Eduardo Gomes, 14, São José dos Campos 12904-000, SP (Brazil); Rodarte Carvalho, Yasmin [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium–niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti–35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150 μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti–35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti–35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti–35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy is effective in producing porous biomaterials. • Ti–35Nb alloy improved mineralized matrix formation. • Porous surface favored a multidirectional pattern of cell spreading. • Porous surface Ti–35Nb alloy appears to be more favorable to bone formation than existing alloys.

  9. Titanium–35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium–niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti–35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150 μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti–35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti–35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti–35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy is effective in producing porous biomaterials. • Ti–35Nb alloy improved mineralized matrix formation. • Porous surface favored a multidirectional pattern of cell spreading. • Porous surface Ti–35Nb alloy appears to be more favorable to bone formation than existing alloys

  10. Chemistry and Materials Science 2004 Annual Report, Preview Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, S; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Rennie, G

    2005-05-16

    Thriving from change is a constant element at LLNL. Through our commitment to scientific accomplishments, we have met the challenges posed by our evolving missions in 2004. It is the scientific breakthroughs that substantiate our strategic directions. Investments based on our strategic directions are bearing fruit, as illustrated in this preview of the 2004 Annual Report. We describe how our science is built around a strategic plan with four organizing themes: {sm_bullet} Materials properties and performance under extreme conditions {sm_bullet} Chemistry under extreme conditions and chemical engineering in support of national-security programs {sm_bullet} Science supporting national objectives at the intersection of chemistry, materials science, and biology {sm_bullet} Applied nuclear science for human health and national security We are particularly pleased with achievements within the 'intersection of chemistry, materials science, and biology,' an emerging area of science that may reshape the landscape of our national-security mission. CMS continues to have an unambiguous role both as a technology leader and as a partner for all of the four theme areas. We look forward to expanding the frontiers of science and continuing our partnership with the worldwide scientific community, as we firmly respond to the changing environment with agility and flexibility.

  11. Learning about materials science and technology by deconstructing modern products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsewell, Andy

    processes have been chosen in their manufacture i.e. deconstruct modern products. Suitable items can easily be found in personal communication and entertainment, including all manner of sports goods. Further, the current pace of materials product development ensures that using these objects to focus......Get the attention of young engineering students, interest and inspire them. Encourage them to think about materials science and technology by looking at the consumer products and gadgets that interest them. Analyse what modern products are constructed of, and how and why the materials and the...... teaching encourages and demands constant modernisation of the course and the materials being presented. A consideration of material and process selection for components in a modern product can be a dynamic starting point for a course on materials science and engineering; providing inspiration and showing...

  12. [Bio-tribological properties of dental prosthesis made of nitriding titanium alloy material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Luo, Jingcong; Qin, Tingwu; Li, Juan; Feng, Jielin; Huang, Wei; He, Xin

    2004-04-01

    Titanium alloy material (TC4) samples were treated with nitriding technique. The dynamic friction and wear behavior of the modified layer were examined on a reciprocating sliding rig in artificial saliva. Microhardness, depth profile and wear mechanisms were investigated by means of MVK-H12, TALYSURF6, XPS and microscopy. The results demonstrate that after being treated with nitriding technique the titanium alloy material (TC4) has better tribological behavior and up-graded wear resistance. The wear mechanism involves adhesion. PMID:15143554

  13. Energy storage improvement through material science approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brandon Joseph

    A need for improved energy storage is apparent for the improvement of our society. Lithium ion batteries are one of the leading energy storage technologies being researched today. These batteries typically utilize coupled reduction/oxidation reactions with intercalation reactions in crystalline metal oxides with lithium ions as charge carriers to produce efficient and high power energy storage options. The cathode material (positive electrode) has been an emphasis in the recent research as it is currently the weakest link of the battery. Several systems of cathode materials have been studied with different structures and chemical makeup, all having advantages and disadvantages. One focus of the research presented below was creating a low cost and high performance cathode material by creating a composite of the low cost spinel structured LiMn2O4 and the higher capacity layered structure materials. Two compositional diagrams were used to map out the composition space between end members which include two dimensional layer structured LiCoO 2, LiNiO2, LiNi0.8Co0.2O2 and three dimensional spinel structured LiMn2O4. Several compositions in each composition map were electrochemically tested and structurally characterized in an attempt to discover a high performance cathode material with a lower cost precursor. The best performing composition in each system shows the desired mixed phase of the layered and spinel crystal structures, yielding improved performance versus the individual end member components. The surrounding compositions were then tested in order to find the optimum composition and performance. The best performing composition was 0.2LiCoO 2•0.7LiNi0.8Co0.2O2•0.1LiMn 2O4 and yielded a specific capacity of 182mAh/g. Another promising area of chemical energy storage is in the storage of hydrogen gas in chemical hydrides. Hydrogen gas can be used as a fuel in a variety of applications as a viable method for storing and transporting energy. Currently, the

  14. E-learning on the example of materials science

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; F. Brom

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of this article is to present the use of the Moodle educational platform in teaching Fundamentals of Materials Science and Metal Materials in the Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials at Silesian University of Technology in Gliwice, and to analyse the efficacy of e-learning as the means of introducing education within a traditional model.Design/methodology/approach: This article contains the description of learning within the mixed mode, which is education ...

  15. Object-Oriented Heterogeneous Database for Materials Science

    OpenAIRE

    David Hansen; David Maier; James Stanley; Jonathan Walpole

    1992-01-01

    As a part of the scientific database research underway at the Oregon Graduate Institute, we are collaborating with materials scientists in the research and development of an extensible modeling and computation environment for materials science. Materials scientists are prolific users of computers for scientific research. Modeling techniques and algorithms are well known and refined, and computerized databases of chemical and physical property data abound. However, applications are typically d...

  16. Science and technology of thermochromic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, J.H. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Willett, R.D. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1990-12-31

    The color of a substance in general depends upon its state and upon the external forces it experiences, both past and present. One of the simplest methods of attempting to change the state of a material is to vary its temperature. Thermochromism is a noticeable dependence of the color of a substance on temperature. This is thus one of the easier chromogenic effects to detect. Since the changes triggered by temperature variation often are indicative of the effects that can be induced by other means, it is convenient to use the observation of thermochromism as an indication of the possible existence of other chromogenic behavior. Reversibility is an important factor to be considered for thermochromic materials. A compound which decomposes as it is heated may be totally irreversible or may be irreversible because a product of chemical change is removed and not replaced. For reversible systems, long term stability is important, although there are many uses in which stability over a few thermal cycles are adequate for the purpose. The possibility of an indefinitely large number of cycles is frequently limited by secondary and side reactions that may be present. There are a number of excellent reviews of the subject of thermochromism. The following sections of this chapter give an overview of the research done in polymeric, organic, and metal containing systems, as well as a summary of applications development, in the past two years. 165 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Smart material using fiber Bragg grating transducers and shape memory alloy actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Cobo, Luis; Quintela Incera, Antonio; Cobo García, Adolfo; López Higuera, José Miguel

    2012-01-01

    A structure based on a smart material and a PID control loop is presented in this paper. A glass fiber reinforced plastic material is instrumented with Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) and Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuators. The smart material and the smart structure are both successfully checked by being subjected to different operational conditions at the laboratory. Very good responses are obtained under both slow and quicker varying conditions.

  18. Development Approach for the Accommodation of Materials Science Research for the Materials Science Research Facility on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D. A.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) is a modular facility comprised of autonomous Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR's) for research in the microgravity environment afforded by the International Space Station (ISS). The initial MSRF concept consists of three Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR-1, MSRR-2, and MSRR-3) which will be developed for a phased deployment beginning on the third Utilization Flight (UF-3). The facility will house materials processing apparatus and common subsystems required for operating each device. Each MSRR is a stand alone autonomous rack and will be comprised of either on-orbit replaceable Experiment Modules, Module Inserts, investigation unique apparatus, and/or multiuser generic processing apparatus. Each MSRR will support a wide range of materials science themes in the NASA research program and will use the ISS Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS). MSRF is being developed for the United States Laboratory Module and will provide the apparatus for satisfying near-term and long-range Materials Science Discipline goals and objectives.

  19. Unravelling the materials genome: Symmetry relationships in alloy properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Research strategy for Accelerated Metallurgy project is outlined. ► Surprising symmetry among atomic, nanoscale and mechanical properties. ► Generalisation of Ashby diagrams via principal component analysis. ► Atomic-related properties can be described with linear regression. ► Mechanical properties modelled via Kocks–Mecking-type physical method. -- Abstract: Metals and alloys have been indispensable for technological progress, but only a fraction of the possible ternary systems (combinations of three elements) is known. Statistical inference methods combined with physical models are presented to discover new systems of enhanced properties. It is demonstrated that properties originating from atomic-level interactions can be described employing a linear regression analysis, but properties incorporating microstructural and thermal history effects require a balance between physical and statistical modelling. In spite of this, there is a remarkable degree of symmetry among all properties, and by employing a principal components analysis it is shown that ten properties essential to engineering can be described well in a three dimensional space. This will aid in the discovery of novel alloying systems

  20. Development of cladding materials composed of alloys with high compatibility to each corrosive environment on pressure boundaries in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure boundary materials used in severe corrosive nuclear environments were developed by means of new alloy designs for attaining the sufficient thermodynamical stability against both heavy irradiations and chemical attacks. Type F5 stainless steel with high austenite phase stability and nickel base silicide dispersed alloy so-called the HWI alloy with the high wear corrosion resistance were developed for core materials in water cooling type nuclear reactors. Three kind of alloys, namely, type 304ULC(EB-SAR), nickel base Cr-W-Si alloy so-called the RW alloy and niobium base alloys which have each different oxidation potential region on these application were developed for vessel materials used in nitric acid environments on reprocessing plants of spent nuclear fuels. The corrosion resistance and the workability of these alloys were improved markedly by means of the electron beam melting for removing harmful impurities in alloy matrixes and the thermomechanical treatment so-called SAR for modifying micro-structures. For improving all-round properties required for pressure boundary materials, cladding technologies between corrosion resistant materials and heat resistant materials were developed by means of diffusion bonding and hydro-isostatic pressing. These cladding process were optimized by both experimentally and theoretically. (author)

  1. General and special engineering materials science. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report about general and special engineering materials science is the result of lectures given by the authors in two terms in 1982 at Instituto Balseiro, San Carlos de Bariloche, the graduated college of the Universidad de Cuyo and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Republica Argentina. These lectures were organised in the frame of the project ''nuclear engineering'' (ARG/78/020) of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Some chapters of the report are written in English, others in Spanish. The report is subdivided into three volumes. The present volume II concerns special engineering materials science with respect to nuclear materials under normal reactor operation conditions including 1. reactor clad and structural materials, 2. nuclear fuels and fuel elements, 3. nuclear waste as a materials viewpoint. (orig./IHOE)

  2. General and special engineering materials science. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report about general and special engineering materials science is the result of lectures given by the authors in two terms in 1982 at Instituto Balseiro, San Carlos de Bariloche, the graduated college of the Universidad de Cuyo and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Republica Argentina. These lectures were organised in the frame of the project ''nuclear engineering'' (ARG/78/020) of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Some chapters of the report are written in English, others in Spanish. The report is subdivided into three volumes. The present volume III concerns special engineering materials science and considers nuclear materials with respect to off-normal (''accident'') reactor operation conditions including nuclear materials in loss-of-coolant accident and nuclear materials in core melt accidents. (orig./IHOE)

  3. Contribution of Frenkel's theory to the development of materials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović V.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The original and comprehensive research of Yakov Ilich Frenkel in physics and physical chemistry of condensed states, nuclear physics, electrodynamics, science of sintering has significantly contributed to the development of modern scientific knowledge and his scientific ideas are still an inspiration to many scientists. Having in mind the wealth of scientific ideas he had in the research of electroconductivity in metals, crystal structure imperfections and phase transitions and in founding the science of sintering, the contribution of individual theories of Frenkel of significance to materials science are presented in this paper.

  4. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  5. Titanium-35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Dennia Perez; de Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis; Carvalho, Isabel Chaves Silva; Forte, Lilibeth Ferraz de Brito Penna; de Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia; Prado, Renata Falchete do; Santos, Dalcy Roberto Dos; Cairo, Carlos Alberto Alves; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte

    2015-11-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium-niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti-35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti-35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti-35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti-35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. PMID:26249625

  6. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric Global Research, Schnectady, NY (United States)

    2014-12-30

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding materials both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to

  7. A Study on the Material Reliability of a Ni Alloy Electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the occasional occurrences of a localized corrosion such as a SCC and pitting in steam generator tubing(Alloy 600), the degraded tube is removed from service and fixed by a plugging leading to a significant economical loss. Otherwise, a degraded steam generator tube is repaired for re-use. Apart from the typical sleeving method by introducing welding and mechanical expansions which causes a residual stress in the parent tube, an electrodeposition inside a tube does not induce a parent tube deformation and hence a significant residual stress. For a successful electrodeposition inside a tube, many processes should be developed. Among these processes, an anode to be installed inside a tube, a degreasing condition to remove any dirt and grease, an activation condition for a surface oxide elimination, a strike layer forming condition to be adhered tightly between the electroforming layer and the parent tube and a condition for an electroforming layer should be established. Through a combination of these various process parameters, the desired material properties can be accomplished. For an application in a plant, it should be noted that a material reliability of the electrodeposit concerned with a variation of a material property as a function of the electrodeposit position in the vertical direction of a tube is also very important. It is natural that a Ni alloy electrodeposition is selected as a proper electrodeposition system because Alloy 600 is mainly composed of nickel and a nickel electroplating has been widely studied to improve a corrosion resistance, and the mechanical and magnetic properties. Moreover, a Ni alloy electrodeposition process can be used for a PWSCC mitigation of various components including a steam generator tube because a Ni alloy electrodeposit shows an excellent SCC resistance. This work is related to an anode development for an electrodeposition inside a tube and a variation of material properties of the Ni alloy electrodeposits formed

  8. Radiation Resistance Studies of Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys was investigated. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were insensitive to proton fluences below 1E12 sq cm. The parameters of the irradiated cells were restored with annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below lE14 sq cm require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  9. Palladium-rare-earth metal alloys-advanced materials for hydrogen power engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    used by foreign companies) by a factor of 1.5-2; it is 3.6-4.7 m3/m2 hMPa0.5 at 300-600℃, respectively.The alloys exhibiting the high hydrogen-permeability combined with the high mechanical properties shows promise as materials for diffusion hydrogen purification devices whose productivity reaches tens thousands nm3/h.

  10. Molybdenum and molybdenum alloys as materials for high temperature furnaces and hot isostatic presses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenbrenner, W.; Palme, R.

    1983-04-01

    Owing to their excellent high-temperature properties molybdenum and the molybdenum alloy TZM are used as materials for high-temperature furnaces and hot isostatic presses. The setup and the function of the high-temperature furnaces and hot isostatic presses and their applications are described.

  11. Photovoltaic semiconductor materials based on alloys of tin sulfide, and methods of production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lany, Stephan

    2016-06-07

    Photovoltaic thin-film materials comprising crystalline tin sulfide alloys of the general formula Sn.sub.1-x(R).sub.xS, where R is selected from magnesium, calcium and strontium, as well as methods of producing the same, are disclosed.

  12. Standard and reference materials for marine science, revised edition, 1993

    OpenAIRE

    IOC for UNESCO

    1993-01-01

    This is the third edition of the catalog of reference materials suited for use in marine science, originally compiled in 1986 for NOAA, IOC and UNEP. The catalog lists close to 2,000 reference materials from sixteen producers and contains information about their proper use, sources, availability, and analyte concentrations. Indices are included for elements, isotopes, and organic compounds, as are cross references to CAS registry numbers, alternate names, and chemical structures of selected o...

  13. Learning about materials science and technology by deconstructing modern products

    OpenAIRE

    Horsewell, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Get the attention of young engineering students, interest and inspire them. Encourage them to think about materials science and technology by looking at the consumer products and gadgets that interest them. Analyse what modern products are constructed of, and how and why the materials and the processes have been chosen in their manufacture i.e. deconstruct modern products. Suitable items can easily be found in personal communication and entertainment, including all manner of sports goods. Fur...

  14. Materials Science Division activity report 1991-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report gives an account of the various research and developmental activities carried out at the Materials Science Division of the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam during 1991-93. It also gives a summary of the results of the research activities, describes the experimental facilities and also list the publications

  15. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY '95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately

  16. Polymerization Simulator for Introductory Polymer and Material Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirdon, William M.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes how molecular simulation of polymerization reactions can be used to enrich introductory polymer or material science courses to give students a deeper understanding of free-radical chain and stepwise growth polymerization reactions. These simulations have proven to be effective media for instruction that do not require material…

  17. Japanese R&D on new cast alloys and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, H.W.

    1996-05-01

    On the basis of observations of the JTEC team, it appears that Japanese universities and research institutes are leading long-term R&D thrusts for development of new materials casting technologies. Significant efforts include amorphous metals, intermetallics, application of MHD in continuous casting of steel, and energy efficient furnace technology. Industrial R&D seems focused more on process improvements than on new product technologies, but significant efforts in new cast materials included cast metal matrix composites, materials substitutions for thinner wall products, and advanced ceramic products for foundry industry applications.

  18. Hydriding and Dehydriding Characteristics of Mechanically Alloyed LaMg17Ni Composite Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李谦; 蒋利军; 林勤; 周国治; 詹峰; 郑强; 魏秀英

    2003-01-01

    A composite material with the nominal composition LaMg17Ni was synthesized by mechanical alloying and the hydriding/dehydriding (H/D) behaviors of this material were studied at several temperatures. This material has a hydrogen storage capacity (5.76% H2, mass fraction) lower than conventionally alloyed La2Mg17 (6.63% H2, mass fraction) without activation but shows a superior hydriding/dehydriding kinetic property. At 523 K it absorbed 4.97% (mass fraction) in less than 1 min, approximately 100 times faster than La2Mg17 alloy under the same conditions. This attractive kinetic property of the alloy can be ascribed to the catalytic action of Mg2Ni, LaH2 and La as well as the multiphase structure formed in the preparation processes. The relationships between the equilibrium plateau pressure and the temperature can be expressed as lgpeq=-2797/T+4.267 (553 K≤T≤623 K) for hydriding and lgpeq=-3957/T+6.063(553 K≤T≤623 K) for dehydriding.

  19. Effect of Alloying Interlayer on Interfacial Bond Strength of CuW/CuCr Integral Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of Fe alloying interlayers with different content on microstructures and mechanical properties of dissimilar CuW/CuCr joints prepared by sintering-infiltration method were studied. Microhardness (HV) and tensile tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the resulting joints. Additionally, optical, scanning electron microscopy examinations and energy dispersive spectrometry elemental analyses were applied to determine the interfacial characteristics of CuW/CuCr integral materials. The results show element Fe in the alloying interlayers is mostly diffused to the Cu-W composite side, the Cu/W interphase has achieved the metallurgical bond, and the CuW/CuCr integrated material with Cu-5wt%Fe alloy interlayer exhibits higher interfacial bond strength. However, when the Fe content in the interlayers is above 5wt%, the W skeletons near the interface are dissolved and eroded by element Fe addition, the amount of eutectic phase is increased and the microhardness on copper matrix is decreased for the Cu-Cr alloy side near the interlayer, and the interfacial strength of CuW/CuCr integrated materials is also decreased.

  20. Materials for construction and civil engineering science, processing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Margarido, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This expansive volume presents the essential topics related to construction materials composition and their practical application in structures and civil installations. The book's diverse slate of expert authors assemble invaluable case examples and performance data on the most important groups of materials used in construction, highlighting aspects such as nomenclature, the properties, the manufacturing processes, the selection criteria, the products/applications, the life cycle and recyclability, and the normalization. Civil Engineering Materials: Science, Processing, and Design is ideal for practicing architects; civil, construction, and structural engineers, and serves as a comprehensive reference for students of these disciplines. This book also: ·       Provides a substantial and detailed overview of traditional materials used in structures and civil infrastructure ·       Discusses properties of natural and synthetic materials in construction and materials' manufacturing processes ·  �...

  1. An accurate, fast and stable material model for shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shape memory alloys possess several features that make them interesting for industrial applications. However, due to their complex and thermo-mechanically coupled behavior, direct use of shape memory alloys in engineering construction is problematic. There is thus a demand for tools to achieve realistic, predictive simulations that are numerically robust when computing complex, coupled load states, are fast enough to calculate geometries of industrial interest, and yield realistic and reliable results without the use of fitting curves. In this paper a new and numerically fast material model for shape memory alloys is presented. It is based solely on energetic quantities, which thus creates a quite universal approach. In the beginning, a short derivation is given before it is demonstrated how this model can be easily calibrated by means of tension tests. Then, several examples of engineering applications under mechanical and thermal loads are presented to demonstrate the numerical stability and high computation speed of the model. (paper)

  2. Review of PWSCC and mitigation management strategies of Alloy 600 materials of PWRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seong Sik

    2013-11-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 penetration nozzles in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was reported in the control rod drive mechanism (CRDM), pressurizer instrumentation, and pressurizer heater sleeves. Recently, two cases of boric acid precipitation that indicated leaking of the primary cooling water were reported on the bottom head surface of the steam generators (SGs) in Korea. PWSCC crack indication in CRDM was also detected in a Korea plant. It is necessary to set up a rigid maintenance and inspection guidelines for the components. The PWSCC history of Alloy 600 penetration nozzles of PWRs and maintenance strategies are reviewed based upon the open literature and some experiences in Korea. The inspection requirements, repair techniques such as material changes, the isolation, weld overlays, stress improvements, water chemistry changes are reviewed. Management strategies for the Alloy 600 nozzles are also described.

  3. Review of PWSCC and mitigation management strategies of Alloy 600 materials of PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seong Sik, E-mail: sshwang@kaeri.re.kr

    2013-11-15

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 penetration nozzles in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was reported in the control rod drive mechanism (CRDM), pressurizer instrumentation, and pressurizer heater sleeves. Recently, two cases of boric acid precipitation that indicated leaking of the primary cooling water were reported on the bottom head surface of the steam generators (SGs) in Korea. PWSCC crack indication in CRDM was also detected in a Korea plant. It is necessary to set up a rigid maintenance and inspection guidelines for the components. The PWSCC history of Alloy 600 penetration nozzles of PWRs and maintenance strategies are reviewed based upon the open literature and some experiences in Korea. The inspection requirements, repair techniques such as material changes, the isolation, weld overlays, stress improvements, water chemistry changes are reviewed. Management strategies for the Alloy 600 nozzles are also described.

  4. Review of PWSCC and mitigation management strategies of Alloy 600 materials of PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 penetration nozzles in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was reported in the control rod drive mechanism (CRDM), pressurizer instrumentation, and pressurizer heater sleeves. Recently, two cases of boric acid precipitation that indicated leaking of the primary cooling water were reported on the bottom head surface of the steam generators (SGs) in Korea. PWSCC crack indication in CRDM was also detected in a Korea plant. It is necessary to set up a rigid maintenance and inspection guidelines for the components. The PWSCC history of Alloy 600 penetration nozzles of PWRs and maintenance strategies are reviewed based upon the open literature and some experiences in Korea. The inspection requirements, repair techniques such as material changes, the isolation, weld overlays, stress improvements, water chemistry changes are reviewed. Management strategies for the Alloy 600 nozzles are also described

  5. Aging characteristics of short glass fiber reinforced ZA-27 alloy composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S. C.; Girish, B. M.; Satish, B. M.; Kamath, R.

    1998-12-01

    Aging characteristics of short glass fiber reinforced ZA-27 alloy composite materials have been evaluated in the present study. The liquid metallurgy technique was used to fabricate the composites, in which preheated short glass fibers were introduced into the ZA-27 alloy melt above its liquidus temperature. The aging temperature employed was 125 °C for 6, 12,18, and 24 h. The aged alloy (no fibers) reached the peak hardness after 18 h, while the composites (regardless of filler content) reached the same hardness in 12 h. It is hypothesized that the aging treatment of a composite improves the strength of the interface between the short fibers and the matrix. This is confirmed by the tensile fractograph analysis, which indicates that at a given aging temperature, the composites aged for 18 h exhibit short fibers that remain attached to the metal matrix, while those aged for 6 h undergo debonding.

  6. Micro-scale mechanics of the surface-nanocrystalline Al-alloy material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yueguang; ZHU Chen; WU Xiaolei

    2004-01-01

    Based on the microscopic observations and measurements, the mechanical behavior of the surface-nanocrystallized Al-alloy material at microscale is investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the experimental research, the compressive stress-strain curves and the hardness depth curves are measured. In the theoretical simulation, based on the material microstructure characteristics and the experimental features of the compression and indentation, the microstructure cell models are developed and the strain gradient plasticity theory is adopted. The material compressive stress-strain curves and the hardness depth curves are predicted and simulated. Through comparison of the experimental results with the simulation results, the material and model parameters are determined.

  7. Biomimetics in materials science self-healing, self-lubricating, and self-cleaning materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nosonovsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetics in Materials Science provides a comprehensive theoretical and practical review of biomimetic materials with self-healing, self-lubricating and self-cleaning properties. These three topics are closely related and constitute rapidly developing areas of study. The field of self-healing materials requires a new conceptual understanding of this biomimetic technology, which is in contrast to traditional  engineering processes such as wear and fatigue.  Biomimetics in Materials Science is the first monograph to be devoted to these materials. A new theoretical framework for these processes is presented based on the concept of multi-scale structure of entropy and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, together with a detailed review of the available technology. The latter includes experimental, modeling, and simulation results obtained on self-healing/lubricating/cleaning materials since their emergence in the past decade. Describes smart, biomimetic materials in the context of nanotechnology, biotechnology, an...

  8. Degradation mode survey candidate titanium-base alloys for Yucca Mountain project waste package materials. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is evaluating materials from which to fabricate high-level nuclear waste containers (hereafter called waste packages) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their very good corrosion resistance in aqueous environments titanium alloys are considered for container materials. Consideration of titanium alloys is understandable since about one-third (in 1978) of all titanium produced is used in applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance. Consequently, there is a considerable amount of data which demonstrates that titanium alloys, in general, but particularly the commercial purity and dilute α grades, are highly corrosion resistant. This report will discuss the corrosion characteristics of Ti Gr 2, 7, 12, and 16. The more highly alloyed titanium alloys which were developed by adding a small Pd content to higher strength Ti alloys in order to give them better corrosion resistance will not be considered in this report. These alloys are all two phase (α and β) alloys. The palladium addition while making these alloys more corrosion resistant does not give them the corrosion resistance of the single phase α and near-α (Ti Gr 12) alloys

  9. Degradation mode survey candidate titanium-base alloys for Yucca Mountain project waste package materials. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1997-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is evaluating materials from which to fabricate high-level nuclear waste containers (hereafter called waste packages) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their very good corrosion resistance in aqueous environments titanium alloys are considered for container materials. Consideration of titanium alloys is understandable since about one-third (in 1978) of all titanium produced is used in applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance. Consequently, there is a considerable amount of data which demonstrates that titanium alloys, in general, but particularly the commercial purity and dilute {alpha} grades, are highly corrosion resistant. This report will discuss the corrosion characteristics of Ti Gr 2, 7, 12, and 16. The more highly alloyed titanium alloys which were developed by adding a small Pd content to higher strength Ti alloys in order to give them better corrosion resistance will not be considered in this report. These alloys are all two phase ({alpha} and {beta}) alloys. The palladium addition while making these alloys more corrosion resistant does not give them the corrosion resistance of the single phase {alpha} and near-{alpha} (Ti Gr 12) alloys.

  10. Neutron irradiation test of copper alloy/stainless steel joint materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a study about the joint technology of copper alloy and stainless steel for utilization as cooling piping in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Al2O3-dispersed strengthened copper or CuCrZr was jointed to stainless steel by three kinds of joint methods (casting joint, brazing joint and friction welding method) for the evaluation of the neutron irradiation effect on joints. A neutron irradiation test was performed to three types of joints and each copper alloy. The average value of fast neutron fluence in this irradiation test was about 2 x 1024n/m2(E>1 MeV), and the irradiation temperature was about 130degC. As post-irradiation examinations, tensile tests, hardness tests and observation of fracture surface after the tensile tests were performed. All type joints changed to be brittle by the neutron irradiation effect like each copper alloy material, and no particular neutron irradiation effect due to the effect of joint process was observed. On the casting and friction welding, hardness of copper alloy near the joint boundary changed to be lower than that of each copper alloy by the effect of joint procedure. However, tensile strength of joints was almost the same as that of each copper alloy before/after neutron irradiation. On the other hand, tensile strength of joints by brazing changed to be much lower than CuAl-25 base material by the effect of joint process before/after neutron irradiation. Results in this study showed that the friction welding method and the casting would be able to apply to the joint method of piping in ITER. This report is based on the final report of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA). (author)

  11. Irradiation Tests of Alloy 690 Steam Generator Tube Material of the SMART in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor (SMART) is one of the most advanced SMRs. The Korean government decided to obtain the standard design approval on SMART from the Korean licensing authority by 2011. Because the SMART steam generators are located inside the reactor vessel, the degradation of the fracture toughness of the Alloy 690 heat exchanger tube should be clearly determined for a design lifetime neutron fluence. However, the neutron irradiation characteristics of the alloy are barely known. Therefore, an irradiation plan of the Alloy 690 materials to obtain the neutron irradiation characteristics of the alloy using the HANARO irradiation capsules was planned. The target of fast neutron fluence of Alloy 690 was determined to be 1x1018 n/cm2, 1x1019 n/cm2, and 1x1020 n/cm2 (E>1.0 MeV), considering the maximum lifetime neutron fluence of 1.1x1018 n/cm2 of the SMART steam generator. To obtain these neutron fluences, three different irradiation capsules were scheduled and successfully irradiated in the OR5 and CT test holes of the HANARO. The target of irradiation temperature of the specimens was determined as 250 ± 10 .deg. C, considering the operating temperature of 247 .deg. C∼282 .deg. C of the steam generator tube having the highest neutron fluence. Generally, the neutron irradiation degradation effect appears more clearly in a lower temperature. The obtained material properties of the irradiated Alloy 690 specimens will be very valuable to acquire the standard design approval of SMART from the Korean licensing authority

  12. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, first half FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains sections on: Fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals; interfaces, adhesion, and bonding; energetic materials; plutonium research; synchrotron radiation-based materials science; atomistic approach to the interaction of surfaces with the environment: actinide studies; properties of carbon fibers; buried layer formation using ion implantation; active coherent control of chemical reaction dynamics; inorganic and organic aerogels; synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels; structural transformation and precursor phenomena in advanced materials; magnetic ultrathin films, surfaces, and overlayers; ductile-phase toughening of refractory-metal intermetallics; particle-solid interactions; electronic structure evolution of metal clusters; and nanoscale lithography induced chemically or physically by modified scanned probe microscopy

  13. Perspective: Codesign for materials science: An optimal learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lookman, Turab; Alexander, Francis J.; Bishop, Alan R.

    2016-05-01

    A key element of materials discovery and design is to learn from available data and prior knowledge to guide the next experiments or calculations in order to focus in on materials with targeted properties. We suggest that the tight coupling and feedback between experiments, theory and informatics demands a codesign approach, very reminiscent of computational codesign involving software and hardware in computer science. This requires dealing with a constrained optimization problem in which uncertainties are used to adaptively explore and exploit the predictions of a surrogate model to search the vast high dimensional space where the desired material may be found.

  14. The effect of α-alumina particles on the properties of EN AC-44200 Al alloy based composite materials

    OpenAIRE

    J.W. Kaczmar; A. Kurzawa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The unreinforced EN AC-44200 aluminium alloy is characterized by the medium mechanical properties and the purpose of performed investigations was improvement of mechanical properties of this alloy by introducing stable ceramic α-alumina particles.Design/methodology/approach: The composite materials were manufactured by squeeze casting of porous ceramic preforms characterized by the open porosities of 90%, 80%, 70% and 60% with the liquid EN AC- 44200 aluminum alloy. The composite mat...

  15. Nature of science in instruction materials of science through the model of educational reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizah, Nur; Mudzakir, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The study was carried out to reconstruct the science teaching materials charged view of the nature of science (VNOS). This reconstruction process using the Model of Educational Reconstruction (MER), which is the framework for research and development of science education as well as a guide for planning the teaching of science in the schools is limited in two stages, namely: content structure analysis, and empirical studies of learners. The purpose of this study is to obtain a pre-conception of learners and prospective scientists to the topic of the nature of the material and utilization. The method used to descriptive with the instruments is guidelines for interviews for 15 students of class VIII, text analysis sheet, sheet analysis of the concept, and the validation sheet indicators and learning objectives NOS charged on cognitive and affective aspects. The results obtained in the form of pre-conceptions of learners who demonstrate almost 100% of students know the types of materials and some of its nature, the results of the scientist's perspective on the topic of the nature of the material and its use, as well as the results of the validation indicators and learning objectives charged NOS and competencies PISA 2015 cognitive and affective aspects with CVI value of 0.99 and 1.0 after being validated by five experts. This suggests that the indicators and the resulting learning objectives feasible and can proceed to the reconstruction of teaching materials on the topic of material properties and utilization.

  16. Elements of informatics for combinatorial solid-state materials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, S.; Ohnishi, T.; Lippmaa, M.; Koinuma, H.

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of using combinatorial techniques for materials science studies is to achieve higher experimental throughput than what is possible when samples are synthesized and characterized one at a time. The instrumentation needed for performing high-throughput synthesis and characterization has seen rapid development in recent years. The software tools needed to connect all parts of the materials development process are still largely lacking. In this paper we discuss the requirements of a combinatorial informatics system for materials science experiments. Specifically, we focus on solid-state thin film synthesis. We also describe an implementation of such a system that is based on widely-available open-source software. The system offers features such as remote access via a Web browser, an electronic notebook-style Web interface, automatic upload of new measurement or processing results and rapid preview of experimental data.

  17. Materials science research at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kvick, A

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Science Beamline ID11 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France is dedicated to research in materials science notably employing diffraction and scattering techniques. Either an in-vacuum undulator with a minimum gap of 5 mm or a 10 kW wiggler giving high-flux monochromatic X-rays generates the synchrotron radiation in the energy range 5-100 keV. The dominant research is in the area of time-resolved diffraction, powder diffraction, stress/strain studies of bulk material, 3D mapping of grains and grain interfaces with a measuring gauge down approx 5x5x50 mu m, and microcrystal diffraction. A variety of CCD detectors are used to give time-resolution down to the millisecond time regime.

  18. Innovation Study for Materials Science Laboratory Management, Supported by Knowledge Science Tools : Five Cross-Disciplinary Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuruoka, Hiroyuki; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Nakamori, Yoshiteru

    2007-01-01

    It has become a topical and widely accepted argument that innovation is the key to revitalizing competitiveness of a country, company and university. As a graduate university having the School of Knowledge Science, and the School of Materials Science, we have organized to make “innovation studies” for Materials Science Laboratory, supported by Knowledge Science tools with collaboration of these two schools as 5 cross-disciplinary projects. Knowledge Science side has provided knowledge tools, ...

  19. Mold Materials For Permanent Molding of Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F Wallace; David Schwam; Wen Hong dxs11@po.cwru.edu

    2001-09-14

    A test that involves immersion of the potential mod materials for permanent molds has been developed that provides a thermal cycle that is similar to the experienced during casting of aluminum in permanent molds. This test has been employed to determine the relative thermal fatigue resistance of several different types of mold materials. Four commercial mold coatings have been evaluated for their insulating ability, wear resistance and roughness. The results indicate that composition and structure of the mold materials have considerable effect on their thermal fatigue cracking behavior. Irons with a gray iron structure are the most prone to thermal fatigue cracking followed by compacted graphite irons with the least thermal fatigue cracking of the cast irons experienced by ductile iron. The composition of these various irons affects their behavior.

  20. An Interdisciplinary Program in Materials Science at James Madison University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Chris

    2008-03-01

    Over the past decade a core group of faculty at James Madison University has created an interdisciplinary program in materials science that provides our students with unique courses and research experiences that augment the existing, high-quality majors in physics and astronomy, chemistry and biochemistry, geology and environmental science, mathematics and statistics, and integrated science and technology. The university started this program by creating a Center for Materials Science whose budget is directly allocated by the provost. This source of funds acts as seed money for research, support for students, and a motivating factor for each of the academic units to support the participation of their faculty in the program. Courses were created at the introductory and intermediate level that are cross-listed by the departments to encourage students to enroll in them as electives toward their majors. Furthermore, the students are encouraged to participate in undergraduate research in materials since this is the most fundamental unifying theme across the disciplines. This talk will cover some of the curricular innovations that went into the design of the program to make it successful, examples of faculty and student research and how that feeds back into the classroom, and success stories of the interactions that have developed between departments because of this program. Student outcomes and future plans to improve the program will also be discussed.

  1. Hybrid modelling methods in materials science - selected examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Sitek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents selected examples of application of computational tools, including artificial intelligence methods to solve examples of tasks in the area of materials science. (i Selection method of steel grade with required hardenability; (ii Modelling of CCT diagrams for engineering and constructional steels; (iii Application of neural networks for selection of steel with the assumed hardness after cooling from the austenitising temperature; (iv Designing of high-speed steels chemical compositionDesign/methodology/approach: In the paper been applied a hybrid approach that combined application of various mathematical tools including artificial neural networks, linear regression and genetic algorithms to solve selected tasks from the area of materials science.Findings: Computer modelling and simulation make improvement of engineering materials properties possible, as well as prediction of their properties, even before the materials are fabricated, with the significant reduction of expenditures and time necessary for their investigation and application. Methods used in hybrid systems are complementary and disadvantages of one method are compensated by the advantages of another method.Practical implications: Solutions presented in the work, based on using the adequate material models may feature an interesting alternative in designing of the new materials with the required properties. The practical aspect has to be noted, resulting form the developed models, which may successfully replace the above mentioned technological investigations, consisting in one time selection of the chemical composition and heat treatment parameters and experimental verification of the newly developed materials to check of its properties meet the requirements.Originality/value: The presented approach to new materials design assumes the maximum possible limitation of carrying out the indispensable experiments, to take advantage of the existing experimental

  2. Use of Intermetallic Alloys as Reactive Materials for Warhead Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jürgen Evers; Thomas M.Klapötke

    2015-01-01

    With this communication we want to suggest the system ZrW2 ,a high-density and very hard intermetallic compound that reacts/burns highly exothermic with air at high temperature.This intermetallic phase should provide a very suitable reactive material for warhead applications.

  3. Virtual examinations of alloying elements influence on alloy structural steels mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; R. Honysz

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper introduces analysis results of selected alloying elements influence on mechanical properties of alloy structural steels for quenching and tempering.Design/methodology/approach: Investigations were performed in virtual environment with use of materials science virtual laboratory. Virtual investigations results were verified in real investigative laboratory.Findings: Materials researches performed with use of material science virtual laboratory in range of determining the mec...

  4. Development of a new reactor fuel material: thermal properties of U-Th-Zr-H alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examinations on the U-Th-Zr-H alloys were carried out in order to develop new hydride fission reactor fuel material, in terms of thermal desorption, thermal expansion, thermal diffusivities and in-pile irradiation properties. As a result, it was shown that the U-Th-Zr-H can be a candidate as a new nuclear reactor fuel. The alloys at high temperature can hold hydrogen at higher capacity compared to the U-Zr-H alloys now in use in the TRIGA type reactors, without disintegration. Irradiation examination of the specimens in the JMTR, Japan Material Test Reactor of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, was performed up to 7.4 x 1023 n/m2 neutron irradiation, exhibiting excellent results. Thermal diffusivity measurements on the hydrogenated and un hydrogenated specimens exhibited a favorable thermal properties at elevated temperature. Further, the thermal expansion property measurement was done on the same specimens, both hydrogenated and un hydrogenated U-Th-Zr alloys by using a high temperature dilatometer. The determination of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) over elevated temperatures and differences in the thermal behaviours among the specimens are presented. Finally, future R and D items of this type nuclear fuel are discussed. (author)

  5. Basic and Applied Materials Science Research Efforts at MSFC Germane to NASA Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Presently, a number of investigations are ongoing that blend basic research with engineering applications in support of NASA goals. These include (1) "Pore Formation and Mobility (PFMI) " An ISS Glovebox Investigation" NASA Selected Project - 400-34-3D; (2) "Interactions Between Rotating Bodies" Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) Project - 279-62-00-16; (3) "Molybdenum - Rhenium (Mo-Re) Alloys for Nuclear Fuel Containment" TD Collaboration - 800-11-02; (4) "Fabrication of Alumina - Metal Composites for Propulsion Components" ED Collaboration - 090-50-10; (5) "Radiation Shielding for Deep-Space Missions" SD Effort; (6) "Other Research". In brief, "Pore Formation and Mobility" is an experiment to be conducted in the ISS Microgravity Science Glovebox that will systematically investigate the development, movement, and interactions of bubbles (porosity) during the controlled directional solidification of a transparent material. In addition to promoting our general knowledge of porosity physics, this work will serve as a guide to future ISS experiments utilizing metal alloys. "Interactions Between Rotating Bodies" is a CDDF sponsored project that is critically examining, through theory and experiment, claims of "new" physics relating to gravity modification and electric field effects. "Molybdenum - Rhenium Alloys for Nuclear Fuel Containment" is a TD collaboration in support of nuclear propulsion. Mo-Re alloys are being evaluated and developed for nuclear fuel containment. "Fabrication of Alumina - Metal Composites for Propulsion Components" is an ED collaboration with the intent of increasing strength and decreasing weight of metal engine components through the incorporation of nanometer-sized alumina fibers. "Radiation Shielding for Deep-Space Missions" is an SD effort aimed at minimizing the health risk from radiation to human space voyagers; work to date has been primarily programmatic but experiments to develop hydrogen-rich materials for shielding are

  6. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz De La Rubia, T; Fluss, M J; Rath, K; Rennie, G; Shang, S; Kitrinos, G

    2006-08-08

    In 1952, we began laboratory operations in the barracks building of the Naval Air Station with approximately 50 employees. Today, the Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS) Directorate is a major organization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 500 employees who continue to contribute to our evolving national security mission. For more than half a century, the mission of the Laboratory revolved primarily around nuclear deterrence and associated defense technologies. Today, Livermore supports a broad-based national security mission, and our specialized capabilities increasingly support emerging missions in human health and energy security. In the future, CMS will play a significantly expanded role in science and technology at the intersection of national security, energy and environment, and health. Our world-class workforce will provide the science and technology base for radically innovative materials to our programs and sponsors. Our 2005 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Organized into two major sections-research themes and dynamic teams, this report focuses on achievements arising from earlier investments that address future challenges. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national security mission. Research Themes: (1) Materials Properties and Performance under Extreme Conditions--We are developing ultrahard nanocrystalline metals, exploring the properties of nanotubes when exposed to very high temperatures, and engineering stronger materials to meet future needs for materials that can withstand extreme conditions. (2) Chemistry under Extreme Conditions and Chemical Engineering to Support National-Security Programs--Our recent

  7. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate 2005 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1952, we began laboratory operations in the barracks building of the Naval Air Station with approximately 50 employees. Today, the Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS) Directorate is a major organization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 500 employees who continue to contribute to our evolving national security mission. For more than half a century, the mission of the Laboratory revolved primarily around nuclear deterrence and associated defense technologies. Today, Livermore supports a broad-based national security mission, and our specialized capabilities increasingly support emerging missions in human health and energy security. In the future, CMS will play a significantly expanded role in science and technology at the intersection of national security, energy and environment, and health. Our world-class workforce will provide the science and technology base for radically innovative materials to our programs and sponsors. Our 2005 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Organized into two major sections-research themes and dynamic teams, this report focuses on achievements arising from earlier investments that address future challenges. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national security mission. Research Themes: (1) Materials Properties and Performance under Extreme Conditions--We are developing ultrahard nanocrystalline metals, exploring the properties of nanotubes when exposed to very high temperatures, and engineering stronger materials to meet future needs for materials that can withstand extreme conditions. (2) Chemistry under Extreme Conditions and Chemical Engineering to Support National-Security Programs--Our recent

  8. Erosion resistance in a stationary arc of powder materials on the base of heat resisting alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minakova, R.V.; Kostenetskaya, L.I.; Krusanova, A.P.; Kukhtikov, V.A.; Smirnov, A.V.; Lugovskaya, E.S. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Materialovedeniya)

    1983-08-01

    Comparison investigations of some properties of the Mo-Cu, Mo-Ni(Co)-Cu materials and the W-Cu, W-Ni-Cu compositions used at the present time as well as contact pairs prepared from them is conducted. It is shown that electroerosion wear of the contacts is connected not only with the material properties but also with features of structural changes in the working layer under effect of arc discharge. It is shown also that directed alloying with respect to the origin of phase transition in the electrode material and the medium effect during current commutation promotes electroerosion resistance.

  9. Computational Materials Science and Chemistry: Accelerating Discovery and Innovation through Simulation-Based Engineering and Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Glotzer, Sharon [University of Michigan; McCurdy, Bill [University of California Davis; Roberto, Jim [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-07-26

    This report is based on a SC Workshop on Computational Materials Science and Chemistry for Innovation on July 26-27, 2010, to assess the potential of state-of-the-art computer simulations to accelerate understanding and discovery in materials science and chemistry, with a focus on potential impacts in energy technologies and innovation. The urgent demand for new energy technologies has greatly exceeded the capabilities of today's materials and chemical processes. To convert sunlight to fuel, efficiently store energy, or enable a new generation of energy production and utilization technologies requires the development of new materials and processes of unprecedented functionality and performance. New materials and processes are critical pacing elements for progress in advanced energy systems and virtually all industrial technologies. Over the past two decades, the United States has developed and deployed the world's most powerful collection of tools for the synthesis, processing, characterization, and simulation and modeling of materials and chemical systems at the nanoscale, dimensions of a few atoms to a few hundred atoms across. These tools, which include world-leading x-ray and neutron sources, nanoscale science facilities, and high-performance computers, provide an unprecedented view of the atomic-scale structure and dynamics of materials and the molecular-scale basis of chemical processes. For the first time in history, we are able to synthesize, characterize, and model materials and chemical behavior at the length scale where this behavior is controlled. This ability is transformational for the discovery process and, as a result, confers a significant competitive advantage. Perhaps the most spectacular increase in capability has been demonstrated in high performance computing. Over the past decade, computational power has increased by a factor of a million due to advances in hardware and software. This rate of improvement, which shows no sign of

  10. Ultrafast electron microscopy in materials science, biology, and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of pump-probe experiments to study complex transient events has been an area of significant interest in materials science, biology, and chemistry. While the emphasis has been on laser pump with laser probe and laser pump with x-ray probe experiments, there is a significant and growing interest in using electrons as probes. Early experiments used electrons for gas-phase diffraction of photostimulated chemical reactions. More recently, scientists are beginning to explore phenomena in the solid state such as phase transformations, twinning, solid-state chemical reactions, radiation damage, and shock propagation. This review focuses on the emerging area of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which comprises ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). The topics that are treated include the following: (1) The physics of electrons as an ultrafast probe. This encompasses the propagation dynamics of the electrons (space-charge effect, Child's law, Boersch effect) and extends to relativistic effects. (2) The anatomy of UED and DTEM instruments. This includes discussions of the photoactivated electron gun (also known as photogun or photoelectron gun) at conventional energies (60-200 keV) and extends to MeV beams generated by rf guns. Another critical aspect of the systems is the electron detector. Charge-coupled device cameras and microchannel-plate-based cameras are compared and contrasted. The effect of various physical phenomena on detective quantum efficiency is discussed. (3) Practical aspects of operation. This includes determination of time zero, measurement of pulse-length, and strategies for pulse compression. (4) Current and potential applications in materials science, biology, and chemistry. UEM has the potential to make a significant impact in future science and technology. Understanding of reaction pathways of complex transient phenomena in materials science, biology, and chemistry will provide fundamental

  11. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 1 presents articles about junction electroluminescence; metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) physics; ion implantation in semiconductors; and electron transport through insulating thin films. The book describes the basic physics of carrier injection; energy transfer and recombination mechanisms; state of the art efficiencies; and future prospects for light emitting diodes. The text then discusses solid state spectroscopy, which is the pair spectra observed in gallium phosphide photoluminescence. The extensive studies

  12. Materials Sciences Programs. Fiscal Year 1980, Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a convenient compilation index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs and is divided into Sections A and B, listing all the projects, Section C, a summary of funding levels, and Section D, an index

  13. Neutron scattering treatise on materials science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kostorz, G

    1979-01-01

    Treatise on Materials Science and Technology, Volume 15: Neutron Scattering shows how neutron scattering methods can be used to obtain important information on materials. The book discusses the general principles of neutron scattering; the techniques used in neutron crystallography; and the applications of nuclear and magnetic scattering. The text also describes the measurement of phonons, their role in phase transformations, and their behavior in the presence of crystal defects; and quasi-elastic scattering, with its special merits in the study of microscopic dynamical phenomena in solids and

  14. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metal injection molded Ti-Nb binary alloys as biomedical material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Chang, Keke; Ebel, Thomas; Qian, Ma; Willumeit, Regine; Yan, Ming; Pyczak, Florian

    2013-12-01

    The application of titanium (Ti) based biomedical materials which are widely used at present, such as commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V, are limited by the mismatch of Young's modulus between the implant and the bones, the high costs of products, and the difficulty of producing complex shapes of materials by conventional methods. Niobium (Nb) is a non-toxic element with strong β stabilizing effect in Ti alloys, which makes Ti-Nb based alloys attractive for implant application. Metal injection molding (MIM) is a cost-efficient near-net shape process. Thus, it attracts growing interest for the processing of Ti and Ti alloys as biomaterial. In this investigation, metal injection molding was applied to the fabrication of a series of Ti-Nb binary alloys with niobium content ranging from 10wt% to 22wt%, and CP-Ti for comparison. Specimens were characterized by melt extraction, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Titanium carbide formation was observed in all the as-sintered Ti-Nb binary alloys but not in the as-sintered CP-Ti. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns revealed that the carbides are Ti2C. It was found that with increasing niobium content from 0% to 22%, the porosity increased from about 1.6% to 5.8%, and the carbide area fraction increased from 0% to about 1.8% in the as-sintered samples. The effects of niobium content, porosity and titanium carbides on mechanical properties have been discussed. The as-sintered Ti-Nb specimens exhibited an excellent combination of high tensile strength and low Young's modulus, but relatively low ductility. PMID:23994942

  15. Effect of the reactive element addition on the alumina scale growth in high temperature material alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FeAl and FeCrAl high temperature material alloys exhibit the oxidation resistance at high temperatures due to the protective alumina scale formed on their surfaces. Small additions of reactive elements on these high temperature alloys have shown the considerable improvements in high temperature oxidation behaviour. In this paper, the effect of yttrium reactive element additions to alumina protective scale growth on the surface of FeAl and FeCrAl high temperature alloys has been discussed. The yttrium reactive element was added on surface of FeAl samples by using ion implantation techniques with variation of ion dose on the order of 1,015 ion/cm2 and the ion energy of 100 keV, and on the surface of FeCrAl samples with ion dose of 1,017 ion/cm2 and the ion energy of 85 keV. Oxidation test of the FeAl samples was done in dry oxygen media on the temperature of 850°C with many times of thermal cycling, while the FeCrAl samples was oxidized on the temperature of 950°C and 1,100°C, and the characterization of elemental composition of the samples were done by using SEM-EDAX techniques. It is also discussed the influence of small additions of hafnium and cerium reactive elements on the high temperature alloys. Based on this study was obtained that the implantation of reactive elements on the surface of the FeAl and FeCrAl high temperature material alloys influence the growth of alumina scale and to increase its high temperature oxidation average around 160%. (author)

  16. First Materials Science Research Facility Rack Capabilities and Design Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, S.; Higgins, D.; Kitchens, L.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) is the primary facility for U.S. sponsored materials science research on the International Space Station. MSRR-1 is contained in an International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) equipped with the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) for the best possible microgravity environment. MSRR-1 will accommodate dual Experiment Modules and provide simultaneous on-orbit processing operations capability. The first Experiment Module for the MSRR-1, the Materials Science Laboratory (MSL), is an international cooperative activity between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the European Space Agency's (ESA) European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC). The MSL Experiment Module will accommodate several on-orbit exchangeable experiment-specific Module Inserts which provide distinct thermal processing capabilities. Module Inserts currently planned for the MSL are a Quench Module Insert, Low Gradient Furnace, and a Solidification with Quench Furnace. The second Experiment Module for the MSRR-1 configuration is a commercial device supplied by MSFC's Space Products Development (SPD) Group. Transparent furnace assemblies include capabilities for vapor transport processes and annealing of glass fiber preforms. This Experiment Module is replaceable on-orbit. This paper will describe facility capabilities, schedule to flight and research opportunities.

  17. SAW surfacing of low-alloyed steel with super-ferrite additional material

    OpenAIRE

    Klimpel, A; T. Kik; J. Górka; A. Czupryński; P. Sitarz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: of these researches was to investigate influence of heat input in SAW surfacing of low-alloyed steel with super-ferrite filler material on quality of deposits.Design/methodology/approach: the quality of single and multilayer, stringer beads was assessed by metallographic examinations, stresses measurements and hardness tests.Findings: due to the fact that it was used at automated surfacing stand, the analysis of properties of the deposits was performed for single and multilayer, str...

  18. Composite materials based on porous ceramic preform infiltrated by aluminium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, A.; A. J. Nowak; M. Kremzer; L.A. Dobrzański

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this project is the optimization of manufacturing technology of the ceramic preforms basedon Al2O3 powder manufactured by the pressure infiltration method with liquid metal alloy.Design/methodology/approach: Ceramic preforms were manufactured by the method of sintering of ceramicpowder. The preform material consists of powder Condea Al2O3 CL 2500, however, as the forming factor ofthe structure of canals and pores inside the ceramic agglomerated framework the carbon fibers...

  19. Wear behaviour of composite materials based on 2024 Al-alloy reinforced with δ alumina fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W. Kaczmar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Wear improvement of aluminum matrix composite materials reinforced with alumina fibres, was investigated. The effects of the applied pressure and T6 heat treatment on wear resistance were determined.Design/methodology/approach: Wear tests were carried out on pin-on disc device at constant sliding velocity and under three pressures, which in relation to diameter of specimens corresponds to pressures of 0.8 MPa, 1.2 MPa and 1.5 MPa. To produce composite materials porous performs were prepared. They are characterized by the suitable permeability and good strength required to resist stresses arising during squeeze casting process. Performs exhibited semi-oriented arrangement of fibres and open porosity enabled producing of composite materials 10% (in vol.% of Al2O3 fibres (Saffil.Findings: In comparison with T6 heat treated monolithic 2024 aluminium alloy composites revealed slightly better resistance under lower pressure. Probably, during wear process produced hard debris containing fragments of alumina fibres are transferred between surfaces and strongly abrade specimens. Under smaller pressures wear process proceeded slowly and mechanically mixed layer MML was formed.Research limitations/implications: Reinforcing of 2024 aluminium alloy could be inefficient for wear purposes. Remelting and casting of wrought alloy could deteriorate its properties. Interdendrite porosities and coarsening of grains even after squeeze casting process were observed.Practical implications: Aluminum casting alloys can be locally reinforced to improve hardness and wear resistance under small pressures.Originality/value: Investigations are valuable for persons, what are interested in aluminum cast composite materials reinforced with ceramic fibre performs.

  20. New materials: Fountainhead for new technologies and new science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustum, Roy

    1993-01-01

    The role of materials as the benchmark technologies which give epochs of human history their names continues into the present. The discovery of new materials has nearly always been the source of new materials science, and frequently of new technologies. This paper analyzes the actual processes by which new materials are synthesized, i.e. whether driven by serendipitous observations, new knowledge is pulled by the market, or integrated into a technological thrust. This analysis focuses on modern ceramic materials discoveries, since World War 2 and uses 45 years experience in materials synthesis in the author's own laboratory as case studies. A dozen different families of materials or processes are involved: hydrothermal reactions; sol-gel processing; clays and zeolites; electroceramics; zero expansion ceramics; diamond films; and radioactive waste host phases. Nanocomposite concepts introduced by the author a decade ago offer an entire, large, new class of materials which will dominate synthesis for the next period. The future of materials research for the next 25 years cannot be extrapolated from the past 25 years. We are near the asymptote for materials utilization in most metals. Likewise we are approaching saturation in improvement of many useful properties. Justifying much further 'basic' R/D for incremental improvement in civilian-oriented industries will not be easy. In materials synthesis, the near-term future is sure to emphasize not new phases, but tailored micro- and nanocomposites for chemical, electrical, optical, and magnetic uses. Unexpected new discoveries such as the Lanxide process may offer rarer chances for step function advances. The new structure of knowledge management will rely less on local research than on integration of worldwide inputs. Better scientific and technological opportunities will lie in designing knowledge intensive materials to meet the new environmental and conservation goals, and the human needs of the very large numbers at

  1. Mineral Surface Reactivity in teaching of Science Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    In the last fifty years, science materials issues has required the study of air pollution, water and soil to prevent and remedy the adverse effects of waste originating from anthropogenic activity and the development of new energies and new materials. The teaching of this discipline has been marked by lectures on general lines, materials, disciplines, who explained biased objects of reality, but often forgot the task of reconstruction and integration of such visions. Moving from that model, otherwise quite static, to a dynamic relational model, would in our view, a real revolution in education. This means taking a systematic approach to complex both in interpreting reality and in favor when learning. Children relationships are as important or more than single objects, and it is to discover fundamental organizational principles of phenomena we seek to interpret or in other words, find the pattern that connects. Thus, we must work on relationships and also take into account the relation between the observer and the observed. Educate about relationships means that studies should always be considered within a framework of probabilities, not absolute certainties. This model of systemic thinking, dealing with complexity, is a possibility to bring coherence to our educational work, because the complexity is not taught, complexity is live, so that complex thinking is extended (and fed) in a form educate complex. It is the task of teaching to help people move from level to level of decision reviews. This means that systems thinking should be extended in a local action, action that engages the individual and the environment. Science Materials has emerged as a discipline of free choice for pupils attending chemical engineering which has been assigned 6.0 credits. The chemical engineer's professional profile within the current framework is defined as a professional knowledge as a specialization technical / functional, working in a learning organization and the formation of

  2. The characteristics of laser welded magnesium alloy using silver nanoparticles as insert material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishak, M., E-mail: mahadzir@ump.edu.my [University Malaysia Pahang, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, 26600 Pekan, Pahang Darul Makmur (Malaysia); Maekawa, K., E-mail: mae@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Ibaraki University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Yamasaki, K., E-mail: kyama@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Ibaraki University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2012-02-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag nanoparticles are used as insert material for welding Mg alloy with laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the microstructure and mechanical properties of welded Mg alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nananoparticle promote grain refinement to the weld structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer nanoparticle produces high weld efficiency and mechanical properties. - Abstract: This paper describes the characteristics of the laser welding of thin-sheet magnesium alloys using silver (Ag) nanoparticles as an insert material. The experiment was conducted using nanoparticles with 5 nm and 100 nm diameters that were welded with a Nd:YAG laser. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the specimens welded using inserts with different sizes of nanoparticles and without an insert material, were examined. Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) analysis was conducted to confirm the existence of Ag in the welded area. The introduction of the Ag nanoparticle insert promoted large area of fine grain and broadened the acceptable range of scanning speed parameters compared to welds without an insert. Welds with 5 nm nanoparticles yielded the highest fracture load of up to 818 N while the lowest fracture load was found for weld specimens with 100 nm nanoparticles. This lower fracture load was due to larger voids and a smaller throat length, which contributed to a lower fracture load when using larger nanoparticles.

  3. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from July 1, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) Ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) Powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) Rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) Discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  4. Mapping Chemical Selection Pathways for Designing Multicomponent Alloys: an informatics framework for materials design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Srikant; Broderick, Scott R.; Zhang, Ruifeng; Mishra, Amrita; Sinnott, Susan B.; Saxena, Surendra K.; Lebeau, James M.; Rajan, Krishna

    2015-12-01

    A data driven methodology is developed for tracking the collective influence of the multiple attributes of alloying elements on both thermodynamic and mechanical properties of metal alloys. Cobalt-based superalloys are used as a template to demonstrate the approach. By mapping the high dimensional nature of the systematics of elemental data embedded in the periodic table into the form of a network graph, one can guide targeted first principles calculations that identify the influence of specific elements on phase stability, crystal structure and elastic properties. This provides a fundamentally new means to rapidly identify new stable alloy chemistries with enhanced high temperature properties. The resulting visualization scheme exhibits the grouping and proximity of elements based on their impact on the properties of intermetallic alloys. Unlike the periodic table however, the distance between neighboring elements uncovers relationships in a complex high dimensional information space that would not have been easily seen otherwise. The predictions of the methodology are found to be consistent with reported experimental and theoretical studies. The informatics based methodology presented in this study can be generalized to a framework for data analysis and knowledge discovery that can be applied to many material systems and recreated for different design objectives.

  5. Living in a material world: Development and evaluation of a new materials science course for non-science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, Gregory John

    This study was designed to discover if there is a difference in the scientific attitudes and process skills between a group of students who were instructed with Living in a Material World and groups of students in non-science majors sections of introductory biology, chemistry, and geology courses at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM). Each of the four courses utilized different instructional techniques. Students' scientific attitudes were measured with the Scientific Attitudes Inventory (SAI II) and their knowledge of science process skills were measured with the Test of Integrated Process Skills (TIPS II). The Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) was also administered to determine if the cognitive levels of students are comparable. A series of four questionnaires called Qualitative Course Assessments (QCA) were also administered to students in the experimental course to evaluate subtle changes in their understanding of the nature and processes of science and attitudes towards science. Student responses to the QCA questionnaires were triangulated with results of the qualitative instruments, and students' work on the final project. Results of the GALT found a significant difference in the cognitive levels of students in the experimental course (PSC 190) and in one of the control group, the introductory biology (BSC 107). Results of the SAI II and the TIPS II found no significant difference between the experimental group and the control groups. Qualitative analyses of students' responses to selected questions from the TIPS II, selected items on the SAI II, QCA questionnaires, and Materials that Fly project reports demonstrate an improvement in the understanding of the nature and processes of science and a change to positive attitude toward science of students in the experimental group. Students indicated that hands-on, inquiry-based labs and performance assessment were the most effective methods for their learning. These results indicate that science

  6. Composite materials based on porous ceramic preform infiltrated by aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of this project is the optimization of manufacturing technology of the ceramic preforms basedon Al2O3 powder manufactured by the pressure infiltration method with liquid metal alloy.Design/methodology/approach: Ceramic preforms were manufactured by the method of sintering of ceramicpowder. The preform material consists of powder Condea Al2O3 CL 2500, however, as the forming factor ofthe structure of canals and pores inside the ceramic agglomerated framework the carbon fibers Sigrafil C10M250 UNS were used. Then ceramic preforms were infiltrated with liquid EN AC – AlSi12 aluminum alloy.Stereological and structure investigations of obtained composite materials were made on light microscope.Findings: It was proved that developed technology of manufacturing of composite materials with the pore ceramicAl2O3 infiltration ensures expected structure and can be used in practice.Practical implications: The developed technology allows to obtain method’s elements locally reinforced andcomposite materials with precise shape mapping.Originality/value: The received results show the possibility of obtaining the new composite materials being thecheaper alternative for other materials based on the ceramic fibers.

  7. Teleconferences and Audiovisual Materials in Earth Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, L. M.

    2007-05-01

    Unidad de Educacion Continua y a Distancia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoaca 04510 Mexico, MEXICO As stated in the special session description, 21st century undergraduate education has access to resources/experiences that go beyond university classrooms. However in some cases, resources may go largely unused and a number of factors may be cited such as logistic problems, restricted internet and telecommunication service access, miss-information, etc. We present and comment on our efforts and experiences at the National University of Mexico in a new unit dedicated to teleconferences and audio-visual materials. The unit forms part of the geosciences institutes, located in the central UNAM campus and campuses in other States. The use of teleconference in formal graduate and undergraduate education allows teachers and lecturers to distribute course material as in classrooms. Course by teleconference requires learning and student and teacher effort without physical contact, but they have access to multimedia available to support their exhibition. Well selected multimedia material allows the students to identify and recognize digital information to aid understanding natural phenomena integral to Earth Sciences. Cooperation with international partnerships providing access to new materials and experiences and to field practices will greatly add to our efforts. We will present specific examples of the experiences that we have at the Earth Sciences Postgraduate Program of UNAM with the use of technology in the education in geosciences.

  8. Components of abstracts in materials science and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Šauperl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the structure of abstracts in Slovenian and international journals in the field of materials and technology. The aim of the study was to analyze the adherence of the abstracts published in Materials and Technology (MIT and Materials Science and Technology (MST to two different instructions for the preparation of abstracts (scheme based on ISO 214:1976 and Spanring system. 25 abstracts from each journal were divided into sentences. We tried to place the sentences into one of the categories of the above mentioned schemes. The research was a part of the postgraduate study in the Department of Library and Information Science and Book Studies (Faculty of Arts, Ljubljana in September and October 2008. There are no important differences between MIT and MST. Spanring system seems more appropriate for the field of materials and technology. The place and the time of the research should be added to abstracts and the Hu-bit category should be distributed into two parts: Hu-M (method and Hu-R (results. The recommended Spanring system should be harmonized with authors, who publish in these serials and the effect of the instructions should be analyzed, too.

  9. Aluminium EN AC-AlSi12 alloy matrix composite materials reinforced by Al2O3 porous preforms

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, A.; M. Kremzer; L.A. Dobrzański,

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to elaborate the method of manufacturing of composite materials based on porous ceramic preforms infiltrated by eutectic aluminium alloy.Design/methodology/approach: The material for investigations was fabricated by pressure infiltration method of ceramic porous preforms. The eutectic aluminium alloy EN AC – AlSi12 was use as a matrix while as reinforcement were used ceramic preforms fabricated by sintering of Al2O3 Alcoa CL 2500 powder with addition of po...

  10. Nickel and its alloys as perspective materials for intermediate temperature steam electrolysers operating on proton conducting solid acids as electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2012-01-01

    Several stainless steels, nickel-based alloys, Ta-coated stainless steel, niobium, nickel, platinum and gold were evaluated as possible materials for use in the intermediate temperature water electrolysers. The corrosion resistance was measured in molten KH2PO4 as simulated conditions correspondi...... material for bipolar plates and cell housing. It was shown, that nickel, high-nickel alloys and austenitic stainless steels containing small amounts of Ti have high corrosion resistance in this media. © The Electrochemical Society....

  11. Preparations and properties of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This short review describes various types of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials. It is concerned with synthetic additives classified according to their functional groups; silicone compounds, carboxylic acids and dibasic acids, esters, Diels-Alder adducts, various polymers, nitrogen compounds, phosphoric esters, phosphonic acids, and others. Testing methods for water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials are described for a practical application in a laboratory. PMID:18075217

  12. Structure and service properties of parts with coatings obtained with the help of electrospark alloying by powder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of metallographic, X-ray phase and X-ray spectral microanalysis of electrospark coatings, made of powder materials on St45, 35KhGSL and 14Kh17N2A steels, VTL-1 nickel alloy and VT9, VT20 titanium alloys,, are presented. A principle possibility to make coatings of oxides (Al2O3, ZrO2) is shown. Comparative wear tests show the prospects of electrospark formation of coatings of powder materials

  13. Microstructural refinement of hyper-eutectic Al?Si?Fe?Mn cast alloys to produce a recyclable wrought material

    OpenAIRE

    Umezawa, Osamu; Nakamoto, Munefumi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kenta; Kumai, Shinji

    2005-01-01

    Although the cascade of material flow is presently suitable for the aluminum recycling, a better utilization of secondary alloys is required. In order to establish an upgradeable recycling design for developing wrought products from secondary aluminum alloys, a fine distribution of the primary phases in hyper-eutectic Al?Si?Fe?Mn cast materials has been achieved. Two novel processes were adopted. One was repeated thermomechanical treatment (RTMT), which involves a repetition of a multi-step c...

  14. Fatigue and material characteristics of a hot-formed AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Chang-Min; Hor, Kwang-Ho; Nahm, Seung-Hoon; Suh, Min-Soo

    2015-03-01

    Magnesium alloys are known to be hard-forming materials at room temperature owing to their material structure. This study analyzes the optimal temperature conditions of warm-forming and the forming process by using a high-pressure laminating test and FM analysis, respectively. The effect of temperatures on the fatigue limit was examined from the collected specimens by analyzing the material properties after the fatigue test. The material formed at a temperature of 230°C shows occasional defects, but the best forming quality was obtained at 270°C. The optimal temperature for the forming process was found to be 250°C considering the material quality and thermal efficiency. The overall fatigue life of specimens decreases with an increase in the processing temperature. The fatigue limit of AZ31 formed at 250°C was approximately 100 MPa after 106 cycles.

  15. Influence of boron impurity in aluminium alloy construction material at criticality of RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluations of criticality benchmark cores of RB reactor are prepared in 1999-2001 for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project. It was shown that the greatest contribution to uncertainty of the calculations and experimental data for criticality arose from uncertainty of contents of boron impurity in Yugoslav produced aluminium alloy (YuAl) of reactor construction material. Study of that particular issue was carried out in recent years and the results are shown in this paper with recommendation that new value for boron concentration in the YuAl material composition has to be used in criticality calculation, based on results of experimental and calculation evaluations. (author)

  16. Wettability in the liquid Cu-Ag alloy – fireproof material – gas phase system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Siwiec

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, results of wettability studies on the liquid metal – fireproof material – gas phase system using copper and Cu-Ag alloys as well as typical fireproof materials, i.e. aluminium oxide, magnesium oxide and graphite, are presented. Contact angle measurements were conducted at 1 373–1 573 K by means of a high-temperature microscope coupled with a camera and a computer equipped with a program for recording and analysing images. For the measurements, the sessile drop method was used.

  17. Particle-solid interactions and 21st century materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic physics that governs the interaction of energetic ion beams with solids has its roots in the atomic and nuclear physics of the last century. The central formalism of Jens Lindhard, describing the 'particle-solid interaction', provides a valuable quantitative guide to statistically meaningful quantities such as energy loss, ranges, range straggling, channeling effects, sputtering coefficients, and damage intensity and profiles. Modern materials modification (nanoscience, solid state dynamics) requires atomic scale control of the particle-solid interaction. Two recent experimental examples are discussed: (1) the control of the size distribution of nanocrystals formed in implanted materials and (2) the investigation of the site-specific implantation of hydrogen into silicon. Both cases illustrate unique solid-state configurations, created by ion implantation, that address issues of current materials science interest

  18. Rare earth-Mg-Ni-based hydrogen storage alloys as negative electrode materials for Ni/MH batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → State-of-the-art of new R-Mg-Ni-based hydrogen storage electrode alloys is reviewed. → Electrode performances of the R-Mg-Ni-based alloys depend strongly on the stoichiometric ratio, alloy components and microstructure. → Optimized alloy compositions contain mainly metallic elements of La, Mg, Ni, Co, Mn and Al. → Pulverization of particles and oxidation/corrosion of active components are responsible for the fast capacity degradation. → Low-Co or Co-free R-Mg-Ni-based electrode alloys should be developed. - Abstract: This review is devoted to new rare earth-Mg-Ni-based (R-Mg-Ni-based) hydrogen storage alloys that have been developed over the last decade as the most promising next generation negative electrode materials for high energy and high power Ni/MH batteries. Preparation techniques, structural characteristics, gas-solid reactions and electrochemical performances of this system alloy are systematically summarized and discussed. The improvement in electrochemical properties and their degradation mechanisms are covered in detail. Optimized alloy compositions with high discharge capacities, good electrochemical kinetics and reasonable cycle lives are described as well. For their practical applications in Ni/MH batteries, however, it is essential to develop an industrial-scale homogeneous preparation technique, and a low-cost R-Mg-Ni-based electrode alloy (low-Co or Co-free) with high discharge capacity, long cycle life and good kinetics.

  19. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Kelly, Robert G.; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1986, the NASA-Langley Research Center has sponsored the NASA-UVa Light Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program at the University of Virginia (UVa). The fundamental objective of the LA2ST program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures. The LA2ST program has aimed to product relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The scope of the LA2ST Program is broad. Research areas include: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, (3) Mechanics of materials for Aerospace Structures, and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures. A substantial series of semi-annual progress reports issued since 1987 documents the technical objectives, experimental or analytical procedures, and detailed results of graduate student research in these topical areas.

  20. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  1. Prospects and problems using vanadium alloys as a structural material of the first wall and blanket of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanadium-based alloys are most promising as low activation structural materials for DEMO. It was previously established that high priority is to be given to V-alloys of the V-Ti-Cr system as structural materials of a tritium breeding blanket and the first wall of a fusion reactor. However, there is some uncertainty in selecting a specific element ratio between the alloy components in this system. This is primarily explained by the fact that the properties of V-alloys are dictated not only by the ratio between the main alloying elements (here Ti and Cr), but also by impurities, both metallic and oxygen interstitials. Based on a number of papers today one can say that V-Ti-Cr alloys with insignificant variations in the contents of the main constituents within 5-10 mass% Ti and 4-6 mass% Cr must be taken as a base for subsequent optimization of chemical composition and thermomechanical working. However, the database is obviously insufficient to assess the ecological acceptability (activation), physical and mechanical properties, corrosion and irradiation resistance and, particularly, the commercial production of alloys. Therefore, there is a need for comprehensive studies of promising V-alloys, namely V-4Ti-4Cr and V-10Ti-5Cr. (orig.)

  2. Recent trends in physics of material science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Shrivastava, Keshav; Akhtar, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the recent trends in Computational Physics, Nano-physics and Devices Technology. Numerous modern devices with very high accuracy, are explored In conditions such as longevity and extended possibilities to work in wide temperature and pressure ranges, aggressive media, etc. This edited volume presents 32 selected papers  of the 2013 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics . The book is divided into three  scientific Sections: (i) Computational Physics, (ii) Nanophysics and Technology, (iii) Devices and Systems and is addressed to Professors, post-graduate students, scientists and engineers taking part in R&D of nano-materials, ferro-piezoelectrics, computational Physics and devices system, and also different devices based on broad applications in different areas of modern science and technology.

  3. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Akira; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Suehiro (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    The facility of the JAERI tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to obtain plenty of fruitful results in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid state physics and materials science, taking an advantage of its prominent performances of heavy ion acceleration. The previous meeting held in 1999 also offered an opportunity to scientists from all over the heavy ion science fields, including nuclear physics, solid state physics and cross-field physics to have active discussions. This meeting included oral presentations with a new plan and with a new scope of fields expected from now on, as an occasion for opening the 21st century in heavy ion science. The 50 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. Dead lithium phase investigation of Sn-Zn alloy as anode materials for lithium ion battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ZhaoWen; HU SheJun; HOU XianHua; RU Qiang; YU HongWen; ZHAO LingZhi; LI WeiShan

    2009-01-01

    In this work, based on First-principle plane wave pseudo-potential method, we have carried out an in-depth study on the possible dead lithium phase of Sn-Zn alloy as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Through investigation, we found that the phases LixSn4Zn4(x = 2, 4, 6, 8) contributed to reversible capacity, while the phases LixSn4Zns-(x-4)(x = 4.74, 7.72) led to capacity loss due to high formation energy, namely, they were the dead lithium phases during the charge/discharge process. And we come up with a new idea that stable lithium alloy phase with high lithiation formation energy (dead lithium phase) can also result in high loss of active lithium ion, besides the traditional expression that the formation of solid electrolyte interface film leads to high capacity loss.

  5. Estimation of improved productivity based on materials substitution in high temperature applications. Use of alloy ASTM A-335 P91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ECOPETROL-ICP was carried out an evaluation of the mechanical and micro structural properties of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo alloy, ASTM A-335 Gr. P91, finding higher strength mechanical properties, allowable stresses and creep rupture strength, than the conventional 9 Cr-1 Mo alloy, ASTM A-335 Gr. P9, recommending the alloy P91 as substitute tube material in the radiation zone of the Visbreaking heater of Cartagena's refinery (furnace in revamping process). The results obtained permit a thickness reduction of radiation tubes of material P91 close to 25% and increase the internal volume tube over up 8%, which is a parameter to consider in improving productivity and efficiency process. Also would be obtained a significant savings cost in the material among 5 and 10%. Additionally, expectations of both design and remaining useful life would be seen extensively favored with this change of alloy

  6. Chemistry and Materials Science Department annual report, 1988--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, R.J.; Sugihara, T.T.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W. [eds.

    1989-12-31

    This is the first annual report of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) Department. The principal purpose of this report is to provide a concise summary of our scientific and technical accomplishments for fiscal years 1988 and 1989. The report is also tended to become part of the archival record of the Department`s activities. We plan to publish future editions annually. The activities of the Department can be divided into three broad categories. First, C&MS staff are assigned by the matrix system to work directly in a program. These programmatic assignments typically involve short deadlines and critical time schedules. A second category is longer-term research and development in technologies important to Laboratory programs. The focus and direction of this technology-base work are generally determined by programmatic needs. Finally, the Department manages its own research program, mostly long-range in outlook and basic in orientation. These three categories are not mutually exclusive but form a continuum of technical activities. Representative examples of all three are included in this report. The principal subject matter of this report has been divided into six sections: Innovations in Analysis and Characterization, Advanced Materials, Metallurgical Science and Technology, Surfaces and Interfaces, Energetic Materials and Chemical Synthesis, and Energy-Related Research and Development.

  7. The Science of Materials: from Materials Discovered by Chance to Customized Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Bréchet, Yves; Haroche, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the ages, humans have applied knowledge and know-how to master materials. They have gone from materials encountered by chance available in their environment to customized materials designed to meet multi-criteria specifications. Today, owing particularly to digital modelling on different scales, we are able to design high-performance materials, combining various classes of materials, in controlled geometries and dimensions. These innovation strategies – architectured or bio-inspire...

  8. 1. international spring school and symposium on advances in materials science; invited lectures. Proceedings. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1 st international conference on advances in materials science was held on 15-20 March, 1994 in cairo. The specialist discussed material science formation, development and observation. The application of advances in material science technique in the field of atomic energy, structure design, microelectronic structure were discussed at the meeting. more than 400 papers were presented in the meeting

  9. Calibration and Finite Element Implementation of an Energy-Based Material Model for Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Philipp; Hackl, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations are a powerful tool to analyze the complex thermo-mechanically coupled material behavior of shape memory alloys during product engineering. The benefit of the simulations strongly depends on the quality of the underlying material model. In this contribution, we discuss a variational approach which is based solely on energetic considerations and demonstrate that unique calibration of such a model is sufficient to predict the material behavior at varying ambient temperature. In the beginning, we recall the necessary equations of the material model and explain the fundamental idea. Afterwards, we focus on the numerical implementation and provide all information that is needed for programing. Then, we show two different ways to calibrate the model and discuss the results. Furthermore, we show how this model is used during real-life industrial product engineering.

  10. The Materials Science beamline upgrade at the Swiss Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, P R; Meister, D; Leake, S J; Lange, M; Bergamaschi, A; Böge, M; Calvi, M; Cancellieri, C; Casati, N; Cervellino, A; Chen, Q; David, C; Flechsig, U; Gozzo, F; Henrich, B; Jäggi-Spielmann, S; Jakob, B; Kalichava, I; Karvinen, P; Krempasky, J; Lüdeke, A; Lüscher, R; Maag, S; Quitmann, C; Reinle-Schmitt, M L; Schmidt, T; Schmitt, B; Streun, A; Vartiainen, I; Vitins, M; Wang, X; Wullschleger, R

    2013-09-01

    The Materials Science beamline at the Swiss Light Source has been operational since 2001. In late 2010, the original wiggler source was replaced with a novel insertion device, which allows unprecedented access to high photon energies from an undulator installed in a medium-energy storage ring. In order to best exploit the increased brilliance of this new source, the entire front-end and optics had to be redesigned. In this work, the upgrade of the beamline is described in detail. The tone is didactic, from which it is hoped the reader can adapt the concepts and ideas to his or her needs. PMID:23955029

  11. Materials Sciences Programs. Fiscal Year 1980, Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    This report provides a convenient compilation index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs and is divided into Sections A and B, listing all the projects, Section C, a summary of funding levels, and Section D, an index (the investigator index is in two parts - laboratory and contract research).

  12. Technical Education Outreach in Materials Science and Technology Based on NASA's Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, James A.

    2003-01-01

    The grant NAG-1 -2125, Technical Education Outreach in Materials Science and Technology, based on NASA s Materials Research, involves collaborative effort among the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC), Norfolk State University (NSU), national research centers, private industry, technical societies, colleges and universities. The collaboration aims to strengthen math, science and technology education by providing outreach related to materials science and technology (MST). The goal of the project is to transfer new developments from LaRC s Center for Excellence for Structures and Materials and other NASA materials research into technical education across the nation to provide educational outreach and strengthen technical education. To achieve this goal we are employing two main strategies: 1) development of the gateway website and 2) using the National Educators Workshop: Update in Engineering Materials, Science and Technology (NEW:Updates). We have also participated in a number of national projects, presented talks at technical meetings and published articles aimed at improving k-12 technical education. Through the three years of this project the NSU team developed the successful MST-Online site and continued to upgrade and update it as our limited resources permitted. Three annual NEW:Updates conducted from 2000 though 2002 overcame the challenges presented first by the September 11,2001 terrorist attacks and the slow U.S. economy and still managed to conduct very effective workshops and expand our outreach efforts. Plans began on NEW:Update 2003 to be hosted by NASA Langley as a part of the celebration of the Centennial of Controlled Flight.

  13. Living in a Materials World: Materials Science Engineering Professional Development for K-12 Educators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne Seifert; Louis Nadelson

    2011-06-01

    Advances in materials science are fundamental to technological developments and have broad societal impacs. For example, a cellular phone is composed of a polymer case, liquid crystal displays, LEDs, silicon chips, Ni-Cd batteries, resistors, capacitors, speakers, microphones all of which have required advances in materials science to be compacted into a phone which is typically smaller than a deck of cards. Like many technological developments, cellular phones have become a ubiquitous part of society, and yet most people know little about the materials science associated with their manufacture. The probable condition of constrained knowledge of materials science was the motivation for developing and offering a 20 hour fourday course called 'Living in a Materials World.' In addition, materials science provides a connection between our every day experiences and the work of scientists and engineers. The course was offered as part of a larger K-12 teacher professional development project and was a component of a week-long summer institute designed specifically for upper elementary and middle school teachers which included 20 hour content strands, and 12 hours of plenary sessions, planning, and collaborative sharing. The focus of the institute was on enhancing teacher content knowledge in STEM, their capacity for teaching using inquiry, their comfort and positive attitudes toward teaching STEM, their knowledge of how people learn, and strategies for integrating STEM throughout the curriculum. In addition to the summer institute the participating teachers were provided with a kit of about $300 worth of materials and equipment to use to implement the content they learned in their classrooms. As part of this professional development project the participants were required to design and implement 5 lesson plans with their students this fall and report on the results, as part of the continuing education course associated with the project. 'Living in a

  14. Materials Science Constraints on the Development of Aluminium Reduction Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metson, James; McIntosh, Grant; Etzion, Ronny

    The Hall-Heroult process for the production of Aluminium metal is some 125 years old. The process is energy constrained by the need to shed around half of the (electrical) energy supplied to the cell as waste heat. The molten cryolite electrolyte is sufficiently aggressive that the only reliable method of protecting the side wall of the cell is to maintain a frozen layer of electrolyte at the hot face of the sidewall. Thus the lack of a cryolite resistant sidewall is but one of several materials science constraints which still limit the energy efficiency of the process. An inert anode and non-consumable cathode are also significant challenges which limit cell life and energy efficiency. Thus there are major challenges in both materials development and new conceptual cell designs to improve the efficiency of this process.

  15. 10th International School of Materials Science and Technology : Intercalation in Layered Materials "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    1986-01-01

    This volume is prepared from lecture notes for the course "Intercalation in Layered Materials" which was held at the Ettore Majorana Centre for Scientific Culture at Erice, Sicily in July, 1986, as part of the International School of Materials Science and Tech­ nology. The course itself consisted of formal tutorial lectures, workshops, and informal discussions. Lecture notes were prepared for the formal lectures, and short summaries of many of the workshop presentations were prepared. This volume is based on these lecture notes and research summaries. The material is addressed to advanced graduate students and postdoctoral researchers and assumes a background in basic solid state physics. The goals of this volume on Intercalation in Layered Materials include an introduc­ tion to the field for potential new participants, an in-depth and broad exposure for stu­ dents and young investigators already working in the field, a basis for cross-fertilization between workers on various layered host materials...

  16. Multiscale paradigms in integrated computational materials science and engineering materials theory, modeling, and simulation for predictive design

    CERN Document Server

    Runge, Keith; Muralidharan, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge concepts, paradigms, and research highlights in the field of computational materials science and engineering, and provides a fresh, up-to-date perspective on solving present and future materials challenges. The chapters are written by not only pioneers in the fields of computational materials chemistry and materials science, but also experts in multi-scale modeling and simulation as applied to materials engineering. Pedagogical introductions to the different topics and continuity between the chapters are provided to ensure the appeal to a broad audience and to address the applicability of integrated computational materials science and engineering for solving real-world problems.

  17. International Conference on Materials Science and Technology (ICMST 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Ginson P.

    2015-02-01

    FROM THE CONVENOR'S DESK The Department of Physics, St. Thomas College Pala, is highly privileged to organize an International Conference on Materials Science and Technology (ICMST 2012) during 10-14 June 2012, and as Convenor of the conference it is with legitimate pride and immense gratitude to God that I remember the most enthusiastic responses received for this from scientists all over the world. In a time of tremendous revolutionary changes in Materials Science and Technology, it is quite in keeping with the tradition of a pioneering institute that St. Thomas College is, to have risen to the occasion to make this conference a reality. We have no doubt that this proved to be a historic event, a real breakthrough, not only for us the organizers but also for all the participants. A conference of this kind provides a nonpareil, a distinctly outstanding platform for the scholars, researchers and the scientists to discuss and share ideas with delegates from all over the world. This had been most fruitful to the participants in identifying new collaborations and strengthening existing relations. That experts of diverse disciplines from across the world were sitting under one roof for five days, exchanging views and sharing findings, was a speciality of this conference. The event has evoked excellent responses from all segments of the Materials Science community worldwide. 600 renowned scholars from 28 countries participated in this. We were uniquely honoured to have Prof. C.N.R. Rao, Chairman, Scientific Advisory Council to the Prime Minister of India, to inaugurate this conference. May I take this opportunity to thank all those who have contributed their valuable share, diverse in tone and nature, in the making of this conference. My whole hearted gratitude is due to the international and national members of the advisory committee for their valuable guidance and involvement. I place on record my heartfelt gratitude to our sponsors. I am sure that this conference has

  18. Biomass conversion. The interface of biotechnology, chemistry and materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskar, Chinnappan [Myongji Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology; Baskar, Shikha [Uttarakhand Technical Univ. (India). THDC Inst. of Hydropower Engineering and Technology, Tehri; Dhillon, Ranjit S. (eds.) [Punjab Aricultural Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-11-01

    Gives state-of-the-art of biomass conversion plus future development. Connects the applications into the fields of biotechnology, microbiology, chemistry, materials science. Written by international experts. The consumption of petroleum has surged during the 20th century, at least partially because of the rise of the automobile industry. Today, fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas provide more than three quarters of the world's energy. Unfortunately, the growing demand for fossil fuel resources comes at a time of diminishing reserves of these nonrenewable resources. The worldwide reserves of oil are sufficient to supply energy and chemicals for only about another 40 years, causing widening concerns about rising oil prices. The use of biomass to produce energy is only one form of renewable energy that can be utilized to reduce the impact of energy production and use on the global environment. Biomass can be converted into three main products such as energy, biofuels and fine chemicals using a number of different processes. Today, it is a great challenge for researchers to find new environmentally benign methodology for biomass conversion, which are industrially profitable as well. This book focuses on the conversion of biomass to biofuels, bioenergy and fine chemicals with the interface of biotechnology, microbiology, chemistry and materials science. An international scientific authorship summarizes the state-of-the-art of the current research and gives an outlook on future developments.

  19. FOREWORD: Some thoughts about Jürgen Hafner's work in computational materials science Some thoughts about Jürgen Hafner's work in computational materials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Volker

    2011-10-01

    Jürgen Hafner started in the early 1970s with pseudopotential calculations on the structures and properties of sp-bonded metals, improving on work done elsewhere [1]. This expanded in four directions: transition metals, molten metals, magnetism and alloys, and combinations of these. As well as electronic structure calculations, he helped to advance the statistical mechanical classical theory of liquids for the molten metals [2]. In magnetism he was one of the pioneers of calculations with non-collinear spins [3, 4]. As well as simple (solid and molten) alloys, he also treated materials with strong chemical interaction such as sulphides and liquids such as arsenic and tellurium [5, 6]. All this fed into two directions which dominated much of his work for many years, namely the theory of glassy metals [7] and that of quasicrystals [8]. One notable result in the latter was to show that it was possible to construct hypothetical materials for which the quasicrystalline state is indeed the lowest energy structure. This displaced the established wisdom of the time that quasicrystals were necessarily metastable forms. In more recent years he has turned to calculations in surface science [9, 10], including catalysis of chemical reactions on surfaces [11, 12]. What really brought Jürgen first to my attention was that he had managed to do a better job than we had of calculations with the new approach of pseudopotentials, particularly regarding the screening part of the calculation. This is very important in alloys where there is a large difference in the electron density in the two types of atom due to their different volumes or valences such as in the phase diagram and structure of LiK or KPb [5, 13]. We have been in contact over many years including one close collaboration and I always learned something new in talking with Jürgen. In the late 1970s in Cambridge we performed phonon calculations on models of amorphous silicon [14], to see if these could distinguish between

  20. Yield Asymmetry Design of Magnesium Alloys by Integrated Computational Materials Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dongsheng; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Ahzi, Said

    2013-11-01

    Deformation asymmetry of magnesium alloys is an important factor on machine design in automobile industry. Represented by the ratio of compressive yield stress (CYS) against tensile yield stress (TYS), deformation asymmetry is strongly related to microstructure, characterized by texture and grain size. Modified intermediate phi-model, a polycrystalline viscoplasticity model, is used to predict the deformation behavior of magnesium alloys with different grain sizes. Validated with experimental results, integrated computational materials engineering is applied to find out the route in achieving desired asymmetry by thermomechanical processing. In some texture, for example, rolled texture, CYS/TYS is smaller than 1 under different loading directions. In some texture, for example, extruded texture, asymmetry is large along normal direction. Starting from rolled texture, the asymmetry will increased to close to 1 along rolling direction after compressed to a strain of 0.2. Our model shows that grain refinement increases CYS/TYS. Besides texture control, grain refinement can also optimize the yield asymmetry. After the grain size decreased to a critical value, CYS/TYS reaches to 1 since CYS increases much faster than TYS. By tailoring the microstructure using texture control and grain refinement, it is achievable to optimize yield asymmetry in wrought magnesium alloys.

  1. Iodide titanium - perspective material for shape memory alloys and hydrogen-resistant alloys for heat-exchange equipment of nuclear power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents the results of investigations aimed at assessment of furnace charge materials impact on stoichiometry of shape memory alloy (TH1 grade) on the basis of nickelide titanium. It is shown that highly pure iodide titanium of TI grade and electrolytic nickel of H-0 grade are the most appropriate precursors for generation of nickelide titanium with fixed temperature of shape recovery. Iodide titanium, if used as furnace charge component in the process of melting of hydrogen-resistant α-alloys for heat-exchange equipment of nuclear power installations, will contribute to the increase of major devices service life.

  2. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate Annual Report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T; Shang, S P; Kitrinos, G A; Fluss, M; Westbrook, C; Rennie, G

    2004-04-21

    Evolving challenges and solid accomplishments define the year 2003 for us. Our scientific breakthroughs validate our strategic directions and reaffirm our critical role in fulfilling the Laboratory's missions. Our growth continues in new research projects and significant new programmatic support. Our mission is clear: to enable the Laboratory to accomplish its primary mission through excellence in the chemical and materials sciences. The directorate's common theme and determination has remained constant: Deliver on our commitments, while anticipating and capitalizing on opportunities through innovation in science and technology. In this, the 2003 Annual Report, we describe how our science is built around a strategic plan with four organizing themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Our strategic plan is synergistic with the Laboratory's Long-Range Science and Technology Plan, which identifies six areas of institutional research and development strategy. This 2003 CMS Annual Report is organized into two major sections: research themes and dynamic teams. The research-theme section addresses challenges, achievements, and new frontiers within each of the four research themes. The dynamic-teams section illustrates the directorate's organizational structure of divisions, centers, and institutes that supports a team environment across disciplinary and institutional boundaries. The research presented gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with the institutional strategy. Our organizational structure offers an environment of collaborative problem-solving opportunities, an environment that attracts and retains the best and the brightest from across the Laboratory and around the world.

  3. Soleil a new powerful tool for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first photons delivered by the third generation synchrotron source SOLEIL will be soon available for the scientific community. In this context, this paper presents an overview of the potentialities offered by this new machine for the study of materials. The outstanding brilliance of the SOLEIL source will enable to reduce by several orders of magnitude the data collection time for most of the synchrotron techniques (X-ray absorption spectroscopy - EXAFS, wide and small angle X-ray scattering - WAXS and SAXS, X-ray diffraction -XRD, photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopy-XPS and PEEM, etc.) thus allowing an operando approach of catalysis processes. The spatial resolution, from a few micrometers to sub micrometer scale, accessible by micro-diffraction and micro-spectroscopy in the wavelength range from the far IR to the hard X-rays, will provide spatial distributions of different elements (atomic and chemical state selectivity) in a material, from the working heterogeneous catalyst to the reservoir rocks. The reactivity of surfaces and nano-particles exposed to controlled gas fluxes will be studied by several in situ techniques. Finally the combination of different synchrotron techniques (diffraction, absorption and fluorescence X) and the access to complementary information obtained through the simultaneous combination of these techniques with those routinely applied in Materials Science, such as UV-Vis or Raman spectroscopy, will offer enlarged capabilities for the operando characterization of materials. (authors)

  4. Transmission electron microscopy a textbook for materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, David B

    1996-01-01

    Electron microscopy has revolutionized our understanding the extraordinary intellectual demands required of the mi­ of materials by completing the processing-structure-prop­ croscopist in order to do the job properly: crystallography, erties links down to atomistic levels. It now is even possible diffraction, image contrast, inelastic scattering events, and to tailor the microstructure (and meso structure ) of materials spectroscopy. Remember, these used to be fields in them­ to achieve specific sets of properties; the extraordinary abili­ selves. Today, one has to understand the fundamentals ties of modem transmission electron microscopy-TEM­ of all of these areas before one can hope to tackle signifi­ instruments to provide almost all of the structural, phase, cant problems in materials science. TEM is a technique of and crystallographic data allow us to accomplish this feat. characterizing materials down to the atomic limits. It must Therefore, it is obvious that any curriculum in modem mate­ be use...

  5. Development of materials science by Ab initio powder diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structure is most important information to understand properties and behavior of target materials. Technique to analyze unknown crystal structures from powder diffraction data (ab initio powder diffraction analysis) enables us to reveal crystal structures of target materials even we cannot obtain a single crystal. In the present article, three examples are introduced to show the power of this technique in the field of materials sciences. The first example is dehydration/hydration of the pharmaceutically relevant material erythrocycin A. In this example, crystal structures of two anhydrous phases were determined from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and their different dehydration/hydration properties were understood from the crystal structures. In the second example, a crystal structure of a three dimensional metal-organic-framework prepared by a mechanochemical reaction was determined from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data and the reaction scheme has been revealed. In the third example, a crystal structure of a novel oxide-ion conductor of a new structure family was determined from synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data which gave an important information to understand the mechanism of the oxide-ion conduction. (author)

  6. Ballistic impact properties of mixed multi-layered amorphous surface alloyed materials fabricated by high-energy electron-beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to investigate ballistic impact properties of multi-layered amorphous surface alloyed materials fabricated by high-energy electron-beam irradiation. The mixture of Zr-based amorphous alloy powders and LiF+MgF2 flux powders was deposited on a Ti alloy substrate, and then electron beam was irradiated on this powder mixture to fabricate an one-layered surface alloyed material. On top of this layer, the powder mixture was deposited again and then irradiated with electron beam whose beam current was decreased to fabricate the multi-layered surface alloyed material. In the mixed multi-layered surface alloyed materials fabricated with LM1 alloy powders and LM2 or LM10 alloy powders, the surface region consisted of amorphous phases, together with a small amount of crystalline particles, whereas the center region was complicatedly composed of amorphous phases, crystallized phases, and dendritic β phases. Since the surface region mostly composed of amorphous matrix was quite hard, the alloyed materials sufficiently blocked the travel of a projectile. When cracks formed at the surface region propagated into the center region, the formation of many cracks or debris was accelerated, which could beneficially work for absorbing the ballistic impact energy, thereby leading to the higher ballistic impact properties than the surface alloyed materials fabricated with LM1 or LM2 alloy powders

  7. Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Pandurangan, B.; Ochterbeck, J. M.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Reynolds, A. P.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Workpiece material flow and stirring/mixing during the friction stir welding (FSW) process are investigated computationally. Within the numerical model of the FSW process, the FSW tool is treated as a Lagrangian component while the workpiece material is treated as an Eulerian component. The employed coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian computational analysis of the welding process was of a two-way thermo-mechanical character (i.e., frictional-sliding/plastic-work dissipation is taken to act as a heat source in the thermal-energy balance equation) while temperature is allowed to affect mechanical aspects of the model through temperature-dependent material properties. The workpiece material (AA5059, solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened aluminum alloy) is represented using a modified version of the classical Johnson-Cook model (within which the strain-hardening term is augmented to take into account for the effect of dynamic recrystallization) while the FSW tool material (AISI H13 tool steel) is modeled as an isotropic linear-elastic material. Within the analysis, the effects of some of the FSW key process parameters are investigated (e.g., weld pitch, tool tilt-angle, and the tool pin-size). The results pertaining to the material flow during FSW are compared with their experimental counterparts. It is found that, for the most part, experimentally observed material-flow characteristics are reproduced within the current FSW-process model.

  8. Crevice corrosion resistance of high alloyed materials in 3.5 % NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alar, Vesna; Stojanovic, Ivan; Simunovic, Vinko [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture; Novak, Tomislav [NMP Produkt Ltd., Nedelisce (Croatia)

    2014-06-15

    The effects of applied torque on the corrosion behaviour of W.-Nr. 1.4404 and 1.4462 stainless steels and W.-Nr. 2.4605 and 2.4858 nickel alloys with crevices were investigated using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method. Crevice corrosion (material-to-polytetrafluoroethylene) was tested in 3.5 % NaCl solution at 22 C. The corroded surface was examined using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate similar trends in susceptibility to crevice corrosion with increasing torque. Among the four specimens, the W.-Nr. 1.4404 is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion. (orig.)

  9. Zirconium and hafnium and their alloys - materials for nuclear engineering and their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium is very suitable as a structural material in reactor engineering due to its very small neutron cross section, while hafnium, with its large cross section, is used for absorption purposes. After a short historical survey, deposits, reserves and extraction are gone into, and the present metallurgical techniques to prepare the pure metal and its alloys are described. The production of semifinished products for use in the nuclear industry is described, and the properties required for the various structural parts are discussed. The main emphasis is on zirconium, while hafnium is mentioned only when there are basic differences from zirconium. (orig./GSC)

  10. Microstructural Evolution of Alloy Powder for Electronic Materials with Liquid Miscibility Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuma, I.; Saegusa, T.; Takaku, Y.; Wang, C. P.; Liu, X. J.; Kainuma, R.; Ishida, K.

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure of powders that are applicable for electronic materials were studied for some systems in which there is a liquid miscibility gap. The characteristic morphologies of an egg-like core type and a uniform second-phase dispersion are shown in relation to the phase diagram, where thermodynamic calculations are a powerful tool for alloy design and the prediction of microstructure. Typical examples of microstructural evolution and properties of Pb-free solders and Ag-based micropowders with high electrical conductivity produced by a gas-atomizing method are presented.

  11. Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys as smart materials for micro-positioning devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Hubert

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the field of microrobotics, actuators based on smart materials are predominant because of very good precision, integration capabilities and high compactness. This paper presents the main characteristics of Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys as new candidates for the design of micromechatronic devices. The thermo-magneto-mechanical energy conversion process is first presented followed by the adequate modeling procedure required to design actuators. Finally, some actuators prototypes realized at the Femto-ST institute are presented, including a push-pull bidirectional actuator. Some results on the control and performances of these devices conclude the paper.

  12. Wear mechanisms of fibre reinforced composite materials based on 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Naplocha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Determination of fibre reinforcement influence on wear rate and wear mechanisms were examined. Moreover, effect of fibre orientation and specimen pressure on the counterpart were analyzed.Design/methodology/approach: Composite materials based on 2024 and 7075 aluminium alloys were reinforced with 10-20 vol. % of alumina Saffil fibres and additionally choosen specimens with graphite fibres. Wear tests were carried out on pin-on-disc device where the specimens were pressed to the cast iron counterpart with forces corresponding to pressures of 0.8, 1.2 and 1.5 MPa.Findings: Wear mass loss for composite materials reinforced only with Saffil Al2O3 fibres decreased with increase of fibre content in the matrix. The largest wear rate in relation to the unreinforced alloy exhibited composites containing 20 vol. % of Saffil Al2O3 fibres, tested under the largest applied pressure of 1.5 MPa. The graphite fibres enhance the wear resistance of composite materials under all applied pressures. The lubricant medium originated form worn graphite fibres prevented composite from seizure and adhesive wear.Research limitations/implications: Fragmented alumina fibres acting as loose debris can enhance the wear rate both composite and iron counterpart. At high volume of graphite fibres produced preform possess low strength caused by weak joints between fibres.Practical implications: Composite 2024 and 7075 materials reinforced with hybrid preforms produced from alumina and graphite fibres exhibit good wear resistance.Originality/value: Manufactured composite materials will be considered as the friction materials for the high duty brakes.

  13. Materials science virtual laboratory as an example of the computer aid in materials engineering

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; R. Honysz

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the presented article is to describe the material science virtual laboratory, which is an open scientific, investigative, simulating and didactic medium for the realization of the didactic and educational tasks performed by traditional and e-learning methods.Design/methodology/approach: The laboratory is an aggregate of testers and training simulators, placed in the virtual reality and created in various languages and the programming techniques, which represents the pr...

  14. A relatively inert material for casting uranium and uranium alloys. [Tribocor 532N(50Nb-30Ti-20W)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, L.R.; Holcombe, C.E.; Swartout, W.M.; Thompson, K.A.

    1986-09-05

    Uranium and uranium alloys are typically induction melted in graphite crucibles under vacuum; but because of the chemical reactivity of the metal and the alloy constituents with graphite, crucibles must be protected with a nonreactive coating. Over the years several metal oxides have been used as protective coatings with varying degrees of success. A material that resists chemical activity, that is not wetted by the uranium or alloys, reduces carbon contamination, and is heat conductive would be a desirable alternative to the carbon crucibles with protective coatings. In this study a new material produced by Fansteel, Tribocor 532N, is examined as a possible replacement for graphite. It is a surface-nitrided 50% Nb-30% Ti-20% W alloy. It has many desirable features, such as good heat conductivity and easy toolability; it has been found to be fairly unreactive to uranium and two other alloys that were studied, although one alloy did show some interaction. Results of this study indicates a high potential for this new material. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Materials Properties Database for Selection of High-Temperature Alloys and Concepts of Alloy Design for SOFC Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z Gary; Paxton, Dean M.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2002-11-24

    To serve as an interconnect / gas separator in an SOFC stack, an alloy should demonstrate the ability to provide (i) bulk and surface stability against oxidation and corrosion during prolonged exposure to the fuel cell environment, (ii) thermal expansion compatibility with the other stack components, (iii) chemical compatibility with adjacent stack components, (iv) high electrical conductivity of the surface reaction products, (v) mechanical reliability and durability at cell exposure conditions, (vii) good manufacturability, processability and fabricability, and (viii) cost effectiveness. As the first step of this approach, a composition and property database was compiled for high temperature alloys in order to assist in determining which alloys offer the most promise for SOFC interconnect applications in terms of oxidation and corrosion resistance. The high temperature alloys of interest included Ni-, Fe-, Co-base superal

  16. Properties and Potential of Two (ni,pt)ti Alloys for Use as High-temperature Actuator Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebe, Ronald; Gaydosh, Darrell; Padula, Santo, II.; Garg, Anita; Biles, Tiffany; Nathal, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure, transformation temperatures, basic tensile properties, shape memory behavior, and work output for two (Ni,Ti)Pt high-temperature shape memory alloys have been characterized. One was a Ni30Pt20Ti50 alloy (referred to as 20Pt) with transformation temperatures above 230 C and the other was a Ni20Pt30Ti50 alloy (30Pt) with transformation temperatures about 530 C. Both materials displayed shape memory behavior and were capable of 100% (no-load) strain recovery for strain levels up to their fracture limit (3-4%) when deformed at room temperature. For the 20Pt alloy, the tensile strength, modulus, and ductility dramatically increased when the material was tested just about the austenite finish (A(sub f)) temperature. For the 30Pt alloy, a similar change in yield behavior at temperatures above the A(sub f) was not observed. In this case the strength of the austentite phase was at best comparable and generally much weaker than the martensite phase. A ductility minimum was also observed just below the A(sub s) temperature in this alloy. As a result of these differences in tensile behavior, the two alloys performed completely different when thermally cycled under constant load. The 20Pt alloy behaved similar to conventional binary NiTi alloys with work output due to the martensite-to-austenite transformation initially increasing with applied stress. The maximum work output measured in the 20Pt alloy was nearly 9 J/cu cm and was limited by the tensile ductility of the material. In contrast, the martensite-to-austenite transformation in the 30Pt alloy was not capable of performing work against any bias load. The reason for this behavior was traced back to its basic mechanical properties, where the yield strength of the austenite phase was similar to or lower than that of the martensite phase, depending on temperature. Hence, the recovery or transformation strain for the 30Pt alloy under load was essentially zero, resulting in zero work output.

  17. Non-Structured Materials Science Data Sharing Based on Semantic Annotation

    OpenAIRE

    HU Changjun; Ouyang, Chunping; Wu, Jinbin; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Chongchong

    2009-01-01

    The explosion of non-structured materials science data makes it urgent for materials researchers to resolve the problem of how to effectively share this information. Materials science image data is an important class of non-structured data. This paper proposes a semantic annotation method to resolve the problem of materials science image data sharing. This method is implemented by a four-layer architecture, which includes ontology building, semantic annotation, reasoning service, and applicat...

  18. Trends in the Use of Supplementary Materials in Environmental Science Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Jeremy; Sprague, Nancy R.

    2014-01-01

    Our research examined the use of supplementary materials in six environmental science disciplines: atmospheric sciences, biology, fisheries, forestry, geology, and plant sciences. Ten key journals were selected from each of these disciplines and the number of supplementary materials, such as data files or videos, in each issue was noted over a…

  19. Corrosion phenomena of alloys and electrode materials in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedenkopf, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffe und Verfahren der Energietechnik; Bischoff, M.M. [MTU-Friedrichshafen GmbH, - Neue Technologien - ZEB -, Muenchen (Germany); Wochner, T. [MTU-Friedrichshafen GmbH, Abt. TQZ, Friedrichshafen (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of different alloys and the electrical conductivity of the growing corrosion scales was investigated under simulated and real molten carbonate fuel cell conditions. The corrosion of the usually used NiO cathode material was also investigated. In several exposure tests in oxidizing atmospheres, the FeCrMnNi steel 1.3965 showed a higher corrosion resistance to the aggressive carbonate media than the FeCrNi alloy 1.4404 (SS316L). This superior corrosion resistance is explained by the formation of a mixed (Fe,Ni,Mn){sub x}Cr{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} spinel layer, which reduces the outward diffusion of iron ions more than the mixed (Fe,Ni)Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel formed on austenitic FeCrNi steels. Oxide debris, which spalls off the current collectors, was investigated by XRD. The corrosion scales spalled off mainly at the curved area of the current collector and not at the cathode/current collector interface. The debris was strongly magnetic and consisted of several, in some cases lithiated iron oxides, whereby {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite), {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (maghemite) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) formed most of the debris. The investigations of the electrical conductivity of the corrosion scales have shown that the electrical conductivity is limited by the inner, Cr-containing oxide of the multi-layered corrosion scale. Cr-rich alloys which contain more than 20 wt.% Cr showed extremely high ohmic resistance of the corrosion scale, much higher than that of alloys containing less than 20 wt.% Cr due to the formation of highly conductive mixed spinel layers. Small additions of Al in the alloy increased the ohmic resistance of the corrosion scale by many orders of magnitude. Corrosion tests in the fuel environment showed, that common uncoated stainless steels are not suitable for the use as anodic current collectors.

  20. Remote Monitoring and Controlling of a Material Science Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattanapong KURDTHONGMEE

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The computer industry’s remarkable ability to integrate more transistors into a small area of silicon is increasing the intelligence of our devices and simultaneously decreasing their cost and power consumption. In addition, the proliferation of wired and wireless networking spurred by the development of the world-wide web and demands for mobile access are enabling low-cost connectivity among computing devices. It is now possible to connect every computing device into a true world-wide web that connects the physical world of sensors and actuators to the virtual world of our information utilities and services. This paper examines an application of an integration of the intelligent chip with the network connectivity into a material science experiment designed to study the sorption of woods. The intelligence and network connectivity infrastructures of the system eliminate laborious tasks previously required during experiment control and data collection processes.

  1. Development of a New Ferrous Aluminosilicate Refractory Material for Investment Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chen; Jones, Sam; Blackburn, Stuart

    2012-12-01

    Investment casting is a time-consuming, labour intensive process, which produces complex, high value-added components for a variety of specialised industries. Current environmental and economic pressures have resulted in a need for the industry to improve current casting quality, reduce manufacturing costs and explore new markets for the process. Alumino-silicate based refractories are commonly used as both filler and stucco materials for ceramic shell production. A new ceramic material, norite, is now being produced based on ferrous aluminosilicate chemistry, having many potential advantages when used for the production of shell molds for casting aluminum alloy. This paper details the results of a direct comparison made between the properties of a ceramic shell system produced with norite refractories and a typical standard refractory shell system commonly used in casting industry. A range of mechanical and physical properties of the systems was measured, and a full-scale industrial casting trial was also carried out. The unique properties of the norite shell system make it a promising alternative for casting aluminum based alloys in the investment foundry.

  2. Heavy ion irradiation effects in Zr excel alloy pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium Excel alloy (Zr-3.5wt.%Sn-0.8%Nb-0.8%Mo) is the candidate material for pressure tubes in the Generation-IV CANDU® Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) design. Changes in microstructure induced by neutron irradiation are known to have important consequences on the in-reactor deformation behavior. The in-situ ion irradiation technique has been employed to elucidate the irradiation damage in dual phase Zr-excel alloy (~60% hcp alpha and ~40% bcc beta). 1 MeV Kr ion irradiation experiments were conducted at different temperatures ranging from 100oC-400oC. Damage microstructures have been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy in both the alpha and beta phases at different temperatures after a maximum dose of 10 dpa. Several new observations including irradiation induced omega (ω) phase precipitation have been reported. The ω/β orientation relationship was determined by the detailed analysis of selected area diffraction patterns. In-situ irradiation provided an opportunity to observe the nucleation and growth of basal plane c-component loops. It has been shown that under Kr ion irradiation the c-loops start to nucleate and grow above a threshold dose, as has been observed for neutron irradiation. Furthermore, the role of temperature, material composition and pre-irradiation microstructure has been discussed in detail. (author)

  3. A local quasicontinuum method for 3D multilattice crystalline materials: Application to shape-memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quasicontinuum (QC) method, in its local (continuum) limit, is applied to materials with a multilattice crystal structure. Cauchy–Born (CB) kinematics, which accounts for the shifts of the crystal motif, is used to relate atomic motions to continuum deformation gradients. To avoid failures of CB kinematics, QC is augmented with a phonon stability analysis that detects lattice period extensions and identifies the minimum required periodic cell size. This approach is referred to as Cascading Cauchy–Born kinematics (CCB). In this paper, the method is described and developed. It is then used, along with an effective interaction potential (EIP) model for shape-memory alloys, to simulate the shape-memory effect and pseudoelasticity in a finite specimen. The results of these simulations show that (i) the CCB methodology is an essential tool that is required in order for QC-type simulations to correctly capture the first-order phase transitions responsible for these material behaviors, and (ii) that the EIP model adopted in this work coupled with the QC/CCB methodology is capable of predicting the characteristic behavior found in shape-memory alloys. (paper)

  4. Optimisation of the rivet joints of the CFRP composite material and aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Czulak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The project included analysis of strain, cracking, and failure of riveted joints of plate elements madefrom the carbon-fibre-reinforced plastics (CFRP and from the 6061 aluminium alloy.Design/methodology/approach: The modelled static tensile strength test carried out for the plates from CFRPand from the 6061 aluminium alloy joined with the steel rivet. Computer simulation was carried out with IDEASsoftware package employing the FEM.Findings: Simulations using the mesh with a bigger number of FEM elements do not yield better accuracy ofcalculations and do not improve convergence with the results of laboratory experiments. Only the calculationtime gets longer. Computer simulation has also show that the type of contacts employed between elementsaffects the results significantly.Research limitations/implications: For the composite materials, joints between materials and computersimulation examinations are planed.Practical implications: Results obtained for the mesh with 4 and 5 FEM elements are the closest to the resultsof laboratory experiments, which is confirmed by the strain plot. Simulations using the mesh with a biggernumber of FEM elements do not yield better accuracy of calculations and do not improve convergence with theresults of laboratory experiments. Only the calculation time gets longer. Computer simulation has show that thetype of contacts employed between elements affects the results significantly.Originality/value: The paper presents influence of fibre mesh closeness on convergence of the results with laboratorytests. Simulation results were collected and compared with the laboratory static tensile strength tests results.

  5. Length-Scale Effects and Material Models at Numerical Simulations of Nanoindentation of A Metallic Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolov N.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Some specially designed metallic alloys crystallize during process of rapid quenching which aims their amorphization. Nevertheless, change in their mechanical properties could be seen compared to these obtained during conventional technological regimes of cooling. That attracts the attention in this elaboration. Full 3-D numerical simulations of nanoindentation process of two material models are performed. The models reflect equivalent elastic and different plastic material properties. The plastic behaviour of the first one is subjected to yield criterion of Dracker-Prager and this of the second one to yield criterion of Mises. The reported numerical results depending on the nanoindentation scale length of 1000 nanometers, suggest different adequacy of the two yield criteria to the data obtained experimentally with a Zr-Al-Cu-Ni-Mo alloy. It could be speculated that the different effects developed depending on the indenter travel of 1000 nanometers and taken into account in the two yield criteria stand behind this fact and determinate three structural levels of plastic deformation.

  6. Improvement of Ti-plasma coating on Ni-Ti shape memory alloy applying to implant materials and its evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilizing of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy for implant materials has been world-widely studied. it is, however, known that Ni-Ti alloy is easily attacked by chloride ion contained in body liquid. To prevent Ni dissolution, the authors tried to coat the alloy surface with titanium metal by means of plasma-spray coating method. The plasma coating films resulted in rather accelerating pitting corrosion because of their high porosity. Therefore, sealing of the porous films was required. In order to solve this problem and satisfy prolonged lifetime in the body, the authors tried to use the vacuum evaporation technique of titanium metal. Two types of Ti vacuum evaporation procedures were employed. The one was to cover a thin film on Ni-Ti alloy surface prior to massive Ti plasma spray coating. The other was to first coat plasma spray films on Ni-Ti alloy and then to cover them with vacuum evaporation films of Ti. Protective ability against pitting corrosion was examined by electrochemical polarization measurement in physiological solution and the coating films were characterized by microscopic and SEM observation and EPMA analysis. Vacuum evaporation thin films could not protect Ni-Ti alloy from pitting corrosion. In the case of plasma spray coating over the Ti vacuum evaporation thin film, the substrate Ni-Ti alloy could not be better protected. On the contrary, vacuum evaporation of Ti over the porous plasma spray coating layer remarkably improved corrosion protective performance

  7. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of the study "Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft" which had the objectives (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials and (2) to assess the materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT. The research team consisted of ALCOA, Allied-Signal, Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, Reynolds Metals and the University of Virginia. Four classes of aluminum alloys were investigated: (1) I/M 2XXX containing Li and I/M 2XXX without Li, (2) I/M 6XXX, (3) two P/M 2XXX alloys, and (4) two different aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC). The I/M alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.0 aircraft and the P/M and MMC alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.4 aircraft. Design studies were conducted using several different concepts including skin/stiffener (baseline), honeycomb sandwich, integrally stiffened and hybrid adaptations (conventionally stiffened thin-sandwich skins). Alloy development included fundamental studies of coarsening behavior, the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates, and fracture toughness as a function of temperature were an integral part of this program. The details of all phases of the research are described in this final report.

  8. Novel metallic alloys as phase change materials for heat storage in direct steam generation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Maestre, J.; Iparraguirre-Torres, I.; Velasco, Z. Amondarain; Kaltzakorta, I.; Zubieta, M. Merchan

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is one of the key electricity production renewable energy technologies with a clear distinguishing advantage: the possibility to store the heat generated during the sunny periods, turning it into a dispatchable technology. Current CSP Plants use an intermediate Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF), thermal oil or inorganic salt, to transfer heat from the Solar Field (SF) either to the heat exchanger (HX) unit to produce high pressure steam that can be leaded to a turbine for electricity production, or to the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. In recent years, a novel CSP technology is attracting great interest: Direct Steam Generation (DSG). The direct use of water/steam as HTF would lead to lower investment costs for CSP Plants by the suppression of the HX unit. Moreover, water is more environmentally friendly than thermal oils or salts, not flammable and compatible with container materials (pipes, tanks). However, this technology also has some important challenges, being one of the major the need for optimized TES systems. In DSG, from the exergy point of view, optimized TES systems based on two sensible heat TES systems (for preheating of water and superheating vapour) and a latent heat TES system for the evaporation of water (around the 70% of energy) is the preferred solution. This concept has been extensively tested [1, 2, 3] using mainly NaNO3 as latent heat storage medium. Its interesting melting temperature (Tm) of 306°C, considering a driving temperature difference of 10°C, means TES charging steam conditions of 107 bar at 316°C and discharging conditions of 81bar at 296°C. The average value for the heat of fusion (ΔHf) of NaNO3 from literature data is 178 J/g [4]. The main disadvantage of inorganic salts is their very low thermal conductivity (0.5 W/m.K) requiring sophisticated heat exchanging designs. The use of high thermal conductivity eutectic metal alloys has been recently proposed [5, 6, 7] as a feasible alternative. Tms

  9. Alloy Films Deposited by Electroplating as Precursors for Protective Oxide Coatings on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Metallic Interconnect Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Christopher; Gemmen, R.S.; Cross, Caleb

    2006-10-01

    The successful development of stainless steel interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) may be the materials breakthrough that makes SOFC technology truly commercial. Many of the ferritic stainless steels, however, suffer from a relatively high area specific resistance (ASR) after long exposure times at temperature and the Cr in the native oxide can evaporate and contaminate other cell components. Conductive coatings that resist oxide scale growth and chromium evaporation may prevent both of these problems. In the present study electrochemical deposition of binary alloys followed by oxidation of the alloy to form protective and conductive oxide layers is examined. Results are presented for the deposition of Mn/Co and Fe/Ni alloys via electroplating to form a precursor for spinel oxide coating formation. Analysis of the alloy coatings is done by SEM, EDS and XRD.

  10. Corrosion damageability of irradiated alloy SAV-1 the principal constructive material of the WWR-K reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of corrosion stability of SAV-2 alloy in dependence of the neutron irradiation dose and post-radiation ageing are cited. In capacity of the examination objects the displacer of control rods of the WWR-K reactor that has been operated in the reactor core from 1968 up to 1997 and then 6 years has situated in the water of the fuel storage pool. For study of the alloy corrosion stability change in dependence of structural status the irradiated materials annealings at 75, 100, 125, and 200 deg. C during 1 h with following cooling in the water were carried out. Corrosion testing were carried out in the chlorine containing medium (0.1NFeCl3) with use of chemical and electrochemical methods. The hypothesis about SAV-1 alloy corrosion stability correlation with the alloy ageing process and structural component type is discussed

  11. Advances in materials science, metals and ceramics division. Triannual progress report, June-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning the magnetic fusion energy program; the laser fusion energy program; geothermal research; nuclear waste management; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) research; diffusion in silicate minerals; chemistry research resources; and chemistry and materials science research

  12. Numerical simulation in material science: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective is here to describe the main simulation techniques currently used in material science. After a presentation of the concepts of modelling and simulation, of their objectives and uses, of the issue of simulation scale, and of means of numeric simulation, the author addresses simulations performed at a nano-scopic scale: 'ab-initio' methods, molecular dynamics, examples of applications of ab-initio methods to energy issues or to the study of surface properties of nano-materials. The next chapter addresses various Monte Carlo methods (Metropolis, atomic kinetics, objects kinetics, transport with the simulation of particle trajectories, generation of random numbers). The next parts address simulations performed at a mesoscopic scale (simulation and microstructure, phase field methods, dynamics of discrete dislocations, homogeneous chemical kinetics) and at a macroscopic scale (medium discretization with the notion of mesh, simulation of structure mechanics and of fluid behaviour). The issues of code coupling and scale coupling are then discussed. The last part proposes an overview of virtual metallurgy and modelling of industrial processes (welding, vacuum arc re-fusion, rolling, forming)

  13. A materials science vision of extracellular matrix mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, N.; Steele, J. A. M.; Fratzl, P.; Stevens, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    From an engineering perspective, skeletal tissues are remarkable structures because they are lightweight, stiff and tough, yet produced at ambient conditions. The biomechanical success of skeletal tissues is largely attributable to the process of biomineralization — a tightly regulated, cell-driven formation of billions of inorganic nanocrystals formed from ions found abundantly in body fluids. In this Review, we discuss nature's strategies to produce and sustain appropriate biomechanical properties in mineralizing (by the promotion of mineralization) and non-mineralizing (by the inhibition of mineralization) tissues. We review how perturbations of biomineralization are controlled over a continuum that spans from the desirable (or defective in disease) mineralization of the skeleton to pathological cardiovascular mineralization, and to mineralization of bioengineered constructs. A materials science vision of mineralization is presented with an emphasis on the micro- and nanostructure of mineralized tissues recently revealed by state-of-the-art analytical methods, and on how biomineralization-inspired designs are influencing the field of synthetic materials.

  14. Applications of intense pulsed ion beam to materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to being initially developed as an energy driver for an inertial confinement fusion, an intense, pulsed, light-ion beam (LIB) has been found to be applied to materials science. If a LIB is used to irradiate targets, a high-density ''ablation'' plasma is produced near the surface since the range of the LIB in materials is very short. Since the first demonstration of quick preparation of thin films of ZnS by an intense, pulsed, ion-beam evaporation (IBE) using the LIB-produced ablation plasma, various thin films have been successfully prepared, such as of ZnS:Mn, YBaCuO, BaTiO3, cubic BN, SiC, ZrO2, ITO, B, C, and apatite. Some of these data will be presented in this paper, with its analytic solution derived from a one-dimensional, hydrodynamic, adiabatic expansion model for the IBE. The temperature will be deduced using ion-flux signals measured by a biased ion collector. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the experiment and the simulation. High-energy LIB implantation to make chemical compounds and the associated surface modification are also discussed

  15. The application of the Kelvin probe in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports on the application of the Kelvin probe in materials science and in particular on the study of metal and semiconductor surfaces in both ambient and UHV environments. The concept of the work function φ and its importance as a parameter in materials science is discussed in the context of novel technological applications. The various methods to determine the work function are reviewed. The main measurement technique used here - the Kelvin probe - is described in detail. The Kelvin probe measures local work function differences between a conducting sample and a reference tip in a non-contact, truly non-invasive way over a wide temperature range. However, it is an inherently relative technique and does not provide an absolute work function if the work function of the tip (φtip) is not known. Therefore, a novel technique has been developed to measure φtip with the Kelvin probe via the photoelectric effect, thus combining the advantages of both methods to provide the absolute work function of the sample surface. High and low work function surfaces were generated as target materials for a novel ion source based on hyperthermal surface ionisation: oxidised rhenium exhibits the highest work function of 7.15eV at a temperature of ∼900K whereas the lowest work function of ∼2.54eV was measured on lanthanum hexaboride, LaB6. The process of thermal and hyperthermal surface ionisation (SI, HSI) as well as the generation of hyperthermal molecular beams is discussed and a model of the surface ionisation process is developed to estimate its efficiency. Experimental data of SI and HSI are presented. The application of the Kelvin probe for the detection of defects and impurities in semiconductors, namely iron contamination, is demonstrated via two methods based on the measurement of the surface photovoltage. We find that both methods yield a lower surface potential and surface charge for iron contaminated wafers compared to a clean sample and therefore can be

  16. Material flow and microstructural evolution during friction stir spot welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, W. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Mishra, R.S., E-mail: rajiv.mishra@unt.edu [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Carlson, B.; Verma, R.; Mishra, R.K. [General Motors R and D Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Material flow and local texture evolution during friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of AZ31 magnesium alloy was characterized by varying tool rotation rates. Texture at various locations of the welded region was measured using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Material flow is significantly influenced by tool rotation rate with a conical step spiral pin tool, and FSSW introduces a unique basal fiber texture in the welded region. Results indicate that local texture evolution is dominated by shear deformation through material flow. The tool shoulder applies both shear and compressive deformation to the upper region material; however, the rotating pin introduces only shear deformation to the adjacent material. As the tool rotation rate increases, the effect of both tool shoulder and pin becomes more prominent by introducing a higher degree of basal pole tilt with respect to the initial rolling texture at the periphery of the pin, but less tilt in the upper region beneath the tool shoulder undersurface. The equiaxed fine grain structure in the stir zone appears to result from the twinning-induced dynamic recrystallization and discontinuous dynamic recrystallization.

  17. Modelling of residual stresses in valves Norem hard-facing alloys: a material characterization issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replacement of cobalt-based hard-facing alloys (Stellite) is of high interest within the topic of reduction of human radiation exposure during field-work. Iron-based hard-facing alloys, such as Norem, are considered as good replacement candidates. Their wear characteristics are known to be quite equivalent to Stellite but are counter-balanced by lack of feedback in the field, especially about their resistance/toughness to brutal thermal shocks (60 C - 280 C for primary water). Norem alloys show a solid-solution strengthened austenitic dendrites matrix with a continuous network of eutectic and non-eutectic carbides at the grain boundaries. Toughness evaluation also requires information about residual stresses due to the welding (deposition) process: this work aims at furnishing tools for this purpose. First part of the work involved a microstructural study in order to compare the as-received material to other Norem samples previously observed in EDF's works and literature. A characterization of the different phase evolutions after heating and fast cooling of Norem is then made, in order to characterize whether metallurgical aspects have to be considered in the mechanical part during welding modelling: it appears that no strong solid-solid phase transformation may occur in welding situation. Tensile characterization is then performed on bulk PTAW (Plasma Transferred Arc Welding) specimens. A simplified welding simulation is eventually conducted on different axis-symmetric geometry and on real valve geometry in order to define a representative sample that will be used for further investigation on residual stresses. (authors)

  18. Rapid theory-guided prototyping of ductile Mg alloys: from binary to multi-component materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zongrui; Friák, Martin; Sandlöbes, Stefanie; Nazarov, Roman; Svendsen, Bob; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    In order to identify a method allowing for a fast solute assessment without lengthy ab initio calculations, we analyze correlations and anti-correlation between the {{{I}}}1 stacking fault energies ({{{I}}}1SFEs), which were shown to be related to the macroscopic ductility in Mg alloys, and five material parameters of 18 different elemental solutes. Our analysis reveals that the atomic volume V of pure solutes, their electronegativity ν and bulk modulus B are either linearly or logarithmically related to the {{{I}}}1 SFE. Comparing the impact of solutes with that of yttrium (that increases the ductility in Mg) we propose a single numerical quantity (called yttrium similarity index, YSI) that is based on these inter-relations. Subsequently, we evaluate this new figure of merit for 76 elements from the periodic table of elements in search for solutes reducing the {{{I}}}1 SFE. Limiting ourselves first to binary Mg alloys, we hardly find any alternative solutes providing similar {{{I}}}1{SFE} reduction as that due to rare-earth (RE) additions. Therefore, we extended our search to ternary Mg alloys. Assuming that the physical properties of solute combinations can be represented by their average values, 2850 solute combinations were checked and 133 solute pairs (not including any RE elements) have been found to have a YSI larger than 0.85. Quantum-mechanical calculations have been subsequently performed for 11 solute pairs with YSIs higher than 0.95 and they were all found to reduce the {{{I}}}1{SFE} in excellent agreement with the predictions based on the YSI.

  19. Chemical Frustration. A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Daniel C [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-23

    Final technical report for "Chemical Frustration: A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases" funded by the Office of Science through the Materials Chemistry Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Influence of cooling rates on properties of pre-alloyed PM materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper focuses on microstructural and mechanical properties of pre-alloyed Astaloy CrL and CrM sintered steels with high addition of carbon.Design/methodology/approach: The main objective of the present work was to establish the effect of cooling rates on the microstructure and properties such as: Charpy impact test, microhardness, wear resistance (disk on disk test were evaluated depending on chemical composition. Compacts containing low amounts of chromium, molybdenum and high amount of graphite were sintered in a vacuum furnace at 1120ºC in vacuum atmosphere and rapidly cooled in nitrogen with two different rates. Then compacts were tempered in vacuum, and cooled in nitrogen. Obtained samples were analysed by light optical microscopy (LOM for microstructure observation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM with EDS for chemical composition.Findings: Sinter hardening is a cost-effective process that consists of sintering and heat treatment in one step, so it minimizes the number of processing steps. It is known that the cooling rate following sintering greatly affect material microstructure, which determine the final properties of sinter-hardened materials. The objective was to understand how sintering conditions influence the development of microstructures and thereby control mechanical properties of materials.Practical implications: Changing the amount of graphite element and cooling rates, will affect the amount of ferrite, perlite, martensite and bainite in the microstructure. Further tests should be carried out in order to examine different cooling rates.Originality/value: Sinter-hardening of CrL and CrM pre-alloyed powders with addition of graphite was investigated to study cooling mechanism.

  1. The intrinsic disorder related alloy scattering in ZrNiSn half-Heusler thermoelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hanhui; Wang, Heng; Fu, Chenguang; Liu, Yintu; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic structural disorder dramatically affects the thermal and electronic transport in semiconductors. Although normally considered an ordered compound, the half-Heusler ZrNiSn displays many transport characteristics of a disordered alloy. Similar to the (Zr,Hf)NiSn based solid solutions, the unsubstituted ZrNiSn compound also exhibits charge transport dominated by alloy scattering, as demonstrated in this work. The unexpected charge transport, even in ZrNiSn which is normally considered fully ordered, can be explained by the Ni partially filling interstitial sites in this half-Heusler system. The influence of the disordering and defects in crystal structure on the electron transport process has also been quantitatively analyzed in ZrNiSn1-xSbx with carrier concentration nH ranging from 5.0 × 10(19) to 2.3 × 10(21) cm(-3) by changing Sb dopant content. The optimized carrier concentration nH ≈ 3-4 × 10(20) cm(-2) results in ZT ≈ 0.8 at 875K. This work suggests that MNiSn (M = Hf, Zr, Ti) and perhaps most other half-Heusler thermoelectric materials should be considered highly disordered especially when trying to understand the electronic and phonon structure and transport features. PMID:25363573

  2. Study of a chromia-forming alloy behavior as interconnect material for High Temperature Vapor Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In High Temperature Vapor Electrolysis (HTVE) system, the materials chosen for the inter-connectors should have a good corrosion behaviour in air and in H2-H2O mixtures at 800 C, and keep a high electronic conductivity over long durations as well. In this context, the first goal of this study was to evaluate a commercial ferritic alloy (the K41X alloy) as interconnect for HTVE application. Oxidation tests in furnace and in microbalance have therefore been carried out in order to determine oxidation kinetics. Meanwhile, the Area Specific Resistance (ASR) was evaluated by Contact Resistance measurements performed at 800 C. The second objective was to improve our comprehension of chromia-forming alloys oxidation mechanism, in particular in H2/H2O mixtures. For that purpose, some specific tests have been conducted: tracer experiments, coupled with the characterization of the oxide scale by PEC (Photo-Electro-Chemistry). This approach has also been applied to the study of a LaCrO3 perovskite oxide coating on the K41X alloy. This phase is indeed of high interest for HTVE applications due to its high conductivity properties. This latter study leads to further understanding on the role of lanthanum as reactive element, which effect is still under discussion in literature.In both media at 800 C, the scale is composed of a Cr2O3/(Mn,Cr)3O4 duplex scale, covered in the case of H2-H2O mixture by a thin scale made of Mn2TiO4 spinel. In air, the growth mechanism is found to be cationic, in agreement with literature. The LaCrO3 coating does not modify the direction of scale growth but lowers the growth kinetics during the first hundreds hours. Moreover, with the coating, the scale adherence is favored and the conductivity appears to be slightly higher. In the H2-H2O mixture, the growth mechanism is found to be anionic. The LaCrO3 coating diminishes the oxidation kinetics. Although the scale thickness is about the same in both media, the ASR parameter is one order of magnitude

  3. Improving the quality of innovative science teaching materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelhof, H.M.C.; Krüger, J.

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of scientists of different fields is working together in interdisciplinary subjects. For school science it is difficult to bring these interdisciplinary developments into the classroom. Pupils thus get an outdated view of science and of possibilities in science and technology fo

  4. Material modelling for creep-age forming of aluminium alloy 7B04

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Aaron C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the creep-ageing behaviour of a peak-aged aluminium alloy 7B04 under different tensile loads at 115oC and subsequently modelling it for creep-age forming (CAF applications. Mechanical properties and microstructural evolutions of creep-aged specimens were investigated. The material was modelled using a set of unified constitutive equations, which not only captures the material's creep deformation but also takes into account yield strength contributions from solid solution hardening, age hardening and dislocation hardening during creep-ageing. A possible application of the present work is demonstrated by implementing the determined material model into a commercial finite element analysis solver via a user-defined subroutine for springback prediction of creep-age formed plates. A good agreement is observed between the simulated springback values and experimental results. This material model now enables further investigations of 7B04 under various CAF scenarios to be conducted inexpensively via computational modelling.

  5. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science progress report summary of selected research and development topics, FY97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains summaries of research performed in the Chemistry and Materials Science division. Topics include Metals and Ceramics, High Explosives, Organic Synthesis, Instrument Development, and other topics.

  6. AlSi17Cu5Mg alloy as future material for castings of pistons for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piątkowski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents chosen properties and microstructure of AlSi17Cu5Mg alloy as future material for casting pistons in automotive industry. Tests were conducted to elaborate technology of preparation, assessment of crystallisation parameters and shaping the primary structure of the silumin with the aim to improve the working parameters and the functioning efficiency in cylinder-piston system. Refinement of Si crystals, achieved due to overheating above the temperature Tliq. causes that the alloy reaches satisfactory properties in working chamber of the engine are optimised. Such condition of material characteristics causes that hypereutectic silumins, for chosen applications in transport, may serve as an alternative to Al - Si alloys of hypoeutectic and near - eutectic type.

  7. Characterization of excel alloy pressure tube material for CANDU SCW reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase transformation temperatures, aging response, and creep rupture strength of Zr alloy Excel (Zr- 3.5%Sn- 0.8%Nb- 0.8%Mo) pressure tube material were investigated. The α → α+β and α+β → β transus temperatures were found to be in the range of 600-690 °C and 962-975 °C respectively. Precipitation hardening was observed in the microstructures water-quenched from high in the α+β or β regions followed by aging at 400-500 °C for 1 hr. The results of creep-rupture experiments at 400 °C suggest that a fully martensitic and aged microstructure has better creep properties at high stress levels (>700 MPa) and a microstructure obtained by air-cooling from high in the α+β region shows good creep properties at lower stresses (<560 MPa). (author)

  8. Obtaining Material Data for Heat Treatment Simulation of Casr Alloy Parts with Unified Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellini, Anna; Thorborg, Jesper; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work, which is part of the IDEAL (Integrated Development Routes for Optimized Cast Aluminium Components) project, financed by the EU in frame work 6 and born in collaboration with the automobile and foundry industries, is to simulate creep behavior of aluminum cast samples....... As an example, the analysis of several tests performed at various temperatures and strain rates on a particular aluminum alloy, is presented as well. Furthermore, the one dimensional code developed during this project is illustrated and a simulation is run using the material data obtained through the...... mentioned experimental study. The results obtained for the simulation of tensile tests and of creep tests are compared with experimental curves, showing a good agreement....

  9. Biologically-Induced Micropitting of Alloy 22, a Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of potential microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) on candidate packaging materials for nuclear waste containment are being assessed. Coupons of Alloy 22, the outer barrier candidate for waste packaging, were exposed to a simulated, saturated repository environment (or microcosm) consisting of crushed rock (tuff) from the Yucca Mountain repository site and a continual flow of simulated groundwater for periods up to five years at room temperature and 30 C. Coupons were incubated with YM tuff under both sterile and non-sterile conditions. Surfacial analysis by scanning electron microscopy of the biotically-incubated coupons show development of both submicron-sized pinholes and pores; these features were not present on either sterile or untreated control coupons. Room temperature, biotically-incubated coupons show a wide distribution of pores covering the coupon surface, while coupons incubated at 30 C show the pores restricted to polishing ridges

  10. Composition of sputtered material from CuNi alloy during Xe + ion sputtering at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Shigeyuki; Shimizu, Hazime; Ichimura, Singo

    1995-04-01

    Polycrystalline CuNi alloys were sputtered by 3 kV Xe + ions at elevated temperatures to analyze the ion-beam-induced diffusion. The time evolution of the composition of the sputtered materials from the start of the sputtering was measured by TOF-SNMS (time-of-flight sputtered neutral mass spectrometry). During removal of the Gibbsian segregation layer of copper, the sputtered flux consisted of almost only copper atoms. Then, the copper content gradually decreased due to the formation of a sputter-induced copper-depleted surface layer, and reached an almost steady state with still higher copper content than the bulk composition. From the temperature dependence of the composition at the quasi-steady state the activation energy of copper transportation through a high diffusivity path was derived to be 54 kJ mol -1 (0.56 eV). The high diffusivity path was assigned to copper diffusion through grain boundaries.

  11. Educational teaching materials for nuclear science: A proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been made clear and possible that problems met in teaching nuclear topics can be remedied with much care and attention to the application of the experimental photographs converted into a classroom science teaching device; a proposal which was conducted at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Under Methodology, materials that comprised the experimentation process were provided with simplicity and clarity. Introductions on how to carry out the experiments were logically arranged so as to ensure systematic execution and organization of experimental processes. The inclusion of the experimental set ups were also manifested and of the experimental results (developed photos) presented in a manner suitably good for learners. Determination of the sequential models of the study was reflected, highlighted and specifically simplified as appropriate as possible. Further results and discussions were not shown but can be proposed and suggested that as to further application of the device, peak area spectral measurement and nuclide identification of irradiated samples can be made possible using DSA-1000 Digital Spectrum Analyzer System for countries equipped with ''high touch'' apparatus and facility as spiral basis for concept development. Production and dissemination of photographs can be realized for schools far beyond to cope and afford to buy these expensive laboratory and experimental facility to perform the same task. (author)

  12. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Akira; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Suehiro [eds.

    2000-01-01

    The tandem accelerator established at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in 1982 has been one of the most prominent electrostatic accelerators in the world. The accelerator has been serving for many researches planned by not only JAERI staff but also researchers of universities and national institutes. After the completion of the tandem booster in 1993, four times higher beam energy became available. These two facilities, the tandem accelerator and the booster, made great strides in heavy ion physics and a lot of achievements have been accumulated until now. The research departments of JAERI were reformed in 1998, and the accelerators section came under the Department of Materials Science. On this reform of the research system, the symposium 'Heavy Ion Science in Tandem Energy Region' was held in cooperation with nuclear and solid state physicists although there has been no such symposium for many years. The symposium was expected to stimulate novel development in both nuclear and solid state physics, and also interdisciplinary physics between nuclear and solid state physics. The 68 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors (Workshop Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors'' was convened to determine the degree to which an increased effort in modeling and simulation could help bridge the gap between the data that is needed to support the implementation of these advanced nuclear technologies and the data that can be obtained in available experimental facilities. The need to develop materials capable of performing in the severe operating environments expected in fusion and fission (Generation IV) reactors represents a significant challenge in materials science. There is a range of potential Gen-IV fission reactor design concepts and each concept has its own unique demands. Improved economic performance is a major goal of the Gen-IV designs. As a result, most designs call for significantly higher operating temperatures than the current generation of LWRs to obtain higher thermal efficiency. In many cases, the desired operating temperatures rule out the use of the structural alloys employed today. The very high operating temperature (up to 1000 C) associated with the NGNP is a prime example of an attractive new system that will require the development of new structural materials. Fusion power plants represent an even greater challenge to structural materials development and application. The operating temperatures, neutron exposure levels and thermo-mechanical stresses are comparable to or greater than those for proposed Gen-IV fission reactors. In addition, the transmutation products created in the structural materials by the high energy neutrons produced in the DT plasma can profoundly influence the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of these materials. Although the workshop addressed issues relevant to both Gen-IV and fusion reactor materials, much of the discussion focused on fusion; the same focus is reflected in this report. Most of the physical models and computational methods presented during the

  14. Effect of materials and temperature on the forward extrusion of magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium alloys are being extensively used in weight-saving applications and as a potential replacement for plastics in electronic and computer applications. However, processing of magnesium has always been a challenge for manufacturing industries owing to their high brittleness despite their good EMI shielding property and high specific strength. Despite these advantages, they are limited by their processability. The present work aims to evaluate lower temperature formability of magnesium alloys. Three different materials were selected for axisymmetric extrusion tests, namely AZ31, AZ61 and the forging alloy, ZK 60. To establish the size and capacity of the press required to perform these forming trials and to know the formability, simulation using finite element analysis was carried on a representative material AZ31 using the properties established based on earlier work. A die set with a die shoe was designed to perform the forward extrusion trials. The area reduction ratio for forward extrusion was fixed at 41% for the die design and simulation. The maximum strain is given as ln(Ao/Af) ∼ 0.88 in the case of forward extrusion. The temperature was varied with a temperature controller built in-house from room temperature (RT) to 300 deg.C. However, the results provided below only include the tests carried out at RT, 100, 150, 175 and 200 deg.C. Although the forming trials were successful above 200 deg.C, there was difficulty in removing the specimens from the die cavity. Secondly, the process of removing the samples in the case of AZ31 and ZK 60 resulted in cracking, so it was difficult to evaluate the samples and the process. However, AZ61 samples did not show any evidence of crack formation during ejection of the formed sample. Simulation results and experimental trials showed that magnesium (AZ31) could be easily formed at elevated temperatures of 300 deg.C. Though there was a good correlation on the yield point prediction between simulation and experimental

  15. Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of the CrMnFeCoNi High-Entropy Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gludovatz, Bernd; George, Easo P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2015-08-01

    Equiatomic multi-component alloys, referred to variously as high-entropy alloys, multi-component alloys, or compositionally complex alloys in the literature, have recently received significant attention in the materials science community. Some of these alloys can display a good combination of mechanical properties. Here, we review recent work on the processing, microstructure and mechanical properties of one of the first and most studied high-entropy alloys, namely the single-phase, face-centered cubic alloy CrMnFeCoNi, with emphasis on its excellent damage tolerance (strength with toughness) in the temperature range from room temperature down to liquid nitrogen temperature.

  16. CERN: Materials science with radioactive isotopes from ISOLDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Among the major physics objectives at CERN's ISOLDE on-line isotope separator is the growth field of nuclear solid state physics, where the goals are both technological and scientific. ISOLDE research entered a new era when the facility began operations last year in its new home at the 1 GeV Booster synchrotron (July 1992, page 5). Nuclear solid state physics accounts for about 30% of ISOLDE beam time, other research highlights being nuclear physics, atomic physics, nuclear astrophysics, and biophysics. The achievements so far and ongoing goals of nuclear solid state research were covered in a recent workshop - 'Materials Science with Radioactive Isotopes' - held at CERN from 5-7 April. This carried on from where the 'Radioactive Implants in Materials Science' meeting in Bad Honnef left off in January 1992. The main aims of the CERN meeting were: - to show the outstanding possibilities offered by ISOLDE for solid state experiments using short-lived isotopes; - to stimulate discussion between physicists using nuclear techniques and those employing other methods; and - to look for collaboration opportunities between present ISOLDE users and other researchers: small teams could be strengthened to provide a very cost-effective way of exploiting ISOLDE beams. Nuclear solid state physics at ISOLDE is mainly focused on the investigation of defects and impurities in semiconductors, but will also be used for metals, surfaces and interfaces, using nuclear techniques such as radiotracer diffusion, emission channeling, and Mössbauer or Perturbed Angular Correlation Spectroscopy (PACS). The hitherto serious limitation of many nuclear methods due to a restricted range of chemically different suitable radioactive probe atoms can be easily overcome by ISOLDE'S lengthy isotope menu. Thus whole new classes of semiconductors become accessible for PACS, yielding information on the annealing of radiation damage after heavy ion implantation and

  17. Forging the Solution to the Energy Challenge: The Role of Materials Science and Materials Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey

    2010-05-01

    The energy challenge is central to the most important strategic problems facing the United States and the world. It is increasingly clear that even large-scale deployments of the best technologies available today cannot meet the rising energy demands of a growing world population. Achieving a secure and sustainable energy future will require full utilization of, and substantial improvements in, a comprehensive portfolio of energy systems and technologies. This goal is complicated by several factors. First, energy strategies are inextricably linked to national security and health issues. Second, in developing and deploying energy technologies, it is vital to consider not only environmental issues, such as global climate change, but also economic considerations, which strongly influence both public and political views on energy policy. Third, a significant and sustained effort in basic and applied research and development (R&D) will be required to deliver the innovations needed to ensure a desirable energy future. Innovations in materials science and engineering are especially needed to overcome the limits of essentially all energy technologies. A wealth of historical evidence demonstrates that such innovations are also the key to economic prosperity. From the development of the earliest cities around flint-trading centers, to the Industrial Revolution, to today’s silicon-based global economy, the advantage goes to those who lead in exploiting materials. I view our challenge by considering the rate of innovation and the transition of discovery to the marketplace as the relationship among R&D investment, a skilled and talented workforce, business innovations, and the activities of competitors. Most disturbing in analyzing this relationship is the need for trained workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). To develop the STEM workforce needed for innovation, we need sustainable, positive change in STEM education at all levels from preschool

  18. Progress on research of materials science and biotechnology by ion beam application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, Isao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Research of materials science and biotechnology by ion beam application in Takasaki Establishment was reviewed. Especially, the recent progresses of research on semiconductors in space, creation of new functional materials and topics in biotechnology were reported. (author)

  19. Information technologies and software packages for education of specialists in materials science [In Russian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Krzhizhanovskaya; S. Ryaboshuk

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents methodological materials, interactive text-books and software packages developed and extensively used for education of specialists in materials science. These virtual laboratories for education and research are equipped with tutorials and software environment for modeling complex

  20. PREFACE: 36th Risø International Symposium on Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fæster, S.; Hansen, N.; Hong, C.; Huang, X.; Jensen, D. Juul; Mishin, O. V.; Sun, J.; Yu, T.; Zhang, Y. B.

    2015-08-01

    The 36th Risø Symposium focuses on the effects of deformation-induced structural variations on annealing mechanisms. Although it is widely recognized that the processes occurring during annealing of deformed metals are determined by the local environment in which they occur, much of the current understanding, analysis and modelling is based on larger scale considerations. Recent detailed investigations of deformation microstructures have led to a paradigm shift in the way these structures are characterized and analyzed. It is now clear that deformation microstructures are hierarchical, with dislocations and deformation-induced boundaries subdividing the original grains. This subdivision means that there are variations in the crystallographic orientations and in the distribution of stored energy on the scale of the subdivision, which typically is on the micrometer, sub-micrometer or nanometer scale. Structural variations in this subdivision may also be present from grain to grain in polycrystalline materials, thereby introducing variations on the grain scale. Finally, processing may also introduce structural variations on even larger scales. There are thus structural variations at many length scales, all of which play an essential role in subsequent annealing processes and in property optimization. Recent advances in incorporating these structural variations into the understanding of annealing mechanisms and of how they affect the mechanical and physical properties of annealed metals and alloys are addressed in these Proceedings. The Proceedings contain 15 key-note and 46 contributed papers. The 36th Risø International Symposium on Materials Science is organized by the Section for Materials Science and Advanced Characterization, Department of Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU). We would like to thank all those at DTU who assisted in the preparations for the Symposium. We appreciate additionally the help from the international advisory committee

  1. The surface alloying effect of silicon in a binary NiTi-base alloy on the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psakhie, S. G.; Lotkov, A. I.; Meisner, L. L.; Meisner, S. N.; Matveeva, V. A.

    2013-02-01

    The corrosion resistance behavior and cytotoxicity of binary NiTi-base alloy specimens subjected to surface modification by silicon ion beams and the proliferative ability of mesenchymal stem cells of rat marrow on an ion-implanted surface of the alloy have been studied. The silicon ion beam processing of specimen surfaces is shown to bring about a nearly two-fold improvement in the corrosion resistance of the material to attack by aqueous solutions of NaCl (artificial body fluid) and human plasma and a drastic decrease in the nickel concentration after immersion of the specimens into the solutions for ˜3400 and ˜6000 h, respectively (for the artificial plasma solution, a nearly 20-fold decrease in the Ni concentration is observed.)

  2. Removing device for organic material in radioactive solid waste including zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention comprises a rotational cleaning vessel which overflows supplied cleaning water while rotating around an inclined axis, a containing vessel for containing radioactive solid wastes including zirconium alloy and equipped with a large number of water permeation holes and a stand for loading the rotational washing vessel. A stand inclining device for inclining the stand is also disposed on the side opposite to the stand so as to support at least one side of the stand reclinable by a fulcrum pin and make the rotational cleaning vessel being at least vertical. Deposited or tangled organic materials such as waste, paper or nylon sheet are separated from the solid wastes, and passed through between moving around waste layers, so that the solid wastes after removing the organic materials can be transferred to a next step without moving them to a transferring vessel thereby enabling to contribute improvement of removing efficiency of organic materials and transferring operation efficiency of solid wastes. (N.H.)

  3. Virtual tensile test machine as an example of Material Science Virtual Laboratory post

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; A. Jagiełło; R. Honysz

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to present virtual strength machine from material science virtual laboratory, which can be used for laboratory staff or students training. Material Science Virtual Laboratory, is an open scientific, simulating and didactic medium helpful in the realization of the didactic and educational tasks from the field of material engineering in Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials of the Silesian University of Technology in Gliwice, Poland.Design/methodology/app...

  4. Perspectives of molibdenum containing materials application for alloying of iron-carbon alloys during manufacturing of critical castings

    OpenAIRE

    A. G. Slutsky; A. S. Kalinichenko; R. E. Trubitsky; V. A. Sheinert

    2015-01-01

    Motor is one of most important part of automobile determine its economical effectiveness of usage. On the other hand, sleeves, pistons and rings are crucible parts as they determine the service life of a motor. These parts are producing in big scale – dozens of millions pieces. Increase of cylinder sleeves physical-mechanical properties results in prolongation of motor service life and improvement of motor’s characteristics. Nowadays low alloyed cast irons with perlite structure are used to m...

  5. Influence of Dental Alloys and an All-Ceramic Material on Cell Viability and Interleukin-1beta Release in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZEN, Jülide; Ural, Ali Uğur; Dalkiz, Mehmet; BEYDEMİR, Bedri

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of various types of dental casting alloys and ceramic upon cell viability and the synthesis of IL-1beta (b) in a three-dimensional cell culture system consisting of human gingival fibroblast, and to determine their effect in gingival inflammation. Au-Pt-In alloy (Pontostar), Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (Remanium-CS), a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), copper (Cu), and an all ceramic (In-Ceram) were used as test materials. The materials were exposed to a ...

  6. Mechanistic Studies Of Combustion And Structure Formation During Combustion Synthesis Of Advanced Materials: Phase Separation Mechanism For Bio-Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, A.; Lau, C.; Mukasyan, A.

    2003-01-01

    Among all implant materials, Co-Cr-Mo alloys demonstrate perhaps the most useful balance of resistance to corrosion, fatigue and wear, along with strength and biocompatibility [1]. Currently, these widely used alloys are produced by conventional furnace technology. Owing to high melting points of the main alloy elements (e.g. Tm.p.(Co) 1768 K), high-temperature furnaces and long process times (several hours) are required. Therefore, attempts to develop more efficient and flexible methods for production of such alloys with superior properties are of great interest. The synthesis of materials using combustion phenomena is an advanced approach in powder metallurgy [2]. The process is characterized by unique conditions involving extremely fast heating rates (up to 10(exp 6 K/s), high temperatures (up to 3500 K), and short reaction times (on the order of seconds). As a result, combustion synthesis (CS) offers several attractive advantages over conventional metallurgical processing and alloy development technologies. The foremost is that solely the heat of chemical reaction (instead of an external source) supplies the energy for the synthesis. Also, simple equipment, rather than energy-intensive high-temperature furnaces, is sufficient. This work was devoted to experiments on CS of Co-based alloys by utilizing thermite (metal oxide-reducing metal) reactions, where phase separation subsequently produces materials with tailored compositions and properties. Owing to high reaction exothermicity, the CS process results in a significant increase of temperature (up to 3000 C), which is higher than melting points of all products. Since the products differ in density, phase separation may be a gravitydriven process: the heavy (metallic phase) settles while the light (slag) phase floats. The goal was to determine if buoyancy is indeed the major mechanism that controls phase segregation.

  7. Metals and ceramics division materials science program. Aunnual progress report for period ending June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1979-10-01

    Progress is reported concerning theoretical studies of metals and alloys, deformation and mechanical properties, physical properties and transport phenomena, radiation effects, and engineering materials. During this period emphasis was shifted from support of nuclear technologies to support of nonnuclear energy systems. (FS)

  8. Metals and ceramics division materials science program. Aunnual progress report for period ending June 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported concerning theoretical studies of metals and alloys, deformation and mechanical properties, physical properties and transport phenomena, radiation effects, and engineering materials. During this period emphasis was shifted from support of nuclear technologies to support of nonnuclear energy systems

  9. Structure and mechanical properties of the three-layer material based on a vanadium alloy and corrosion-resistant steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulin, S. A.; Rozhnov, A. B.; Nechaikina, T. A.; Rogachev, S. O.; Zavodchikov, S. Yu.; Khatkevich, V. M.

    2014-10-01

    The quality of three-layer pipes has been studied; they are manufactured by hot pressing of a three-layer assembly of tubular billets followed by forging and cold rolling. The operating core is made from a V-4Ti-4Cr alloy. The protective claddings are made from corrosion-resistant steels of two grades, 08Kh17T and 20Kh13. The results of investigation into the structure and microhardness of the junction zone of steel and the vanadium alloy, which includes a contact zone and a transition diffusion layer, are reported. The 08Kh17T steel is shown to be a preferred cladding material.

  10. Localized corrosion resistance of high nickel alloys as candidate materials for nuclear waste repository. Effect of alloy and weldment aging at 427 C for up to 40,000 h

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys (e.g. C-22, C-4 and C-276) are considered candidate materials for nuclear waste containers because they offer excellent resistance to localized attack in conditions that can be encountered at the permanent repository site. Electrochemical and standard immersion tests showed that the most resistant of the studied alloys to localized attack was C-22 alloy and the less resistant was C-4 alloy. It was important to determine if long time exposure to low temperatures (below 500 C) would be detrimental in the resistance of these alloys to localized attack (pitting and crevice corrosion). After aging for 40,000 h at 427 C none of these alloys showed precipitation of a second phase (such as carbides or μ phase) that could promote a higher corrosion susceptibility of the alloys. Moreover, immersion and electrochemical tests showed that, after the same long term aging, the susceptibility to corrosion of both the base material and weldments remained unchanged. The effects of alloying elements on the resistance of the alloys to localized attack is discussed

  11. 75 FR 69078 - Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... AGENCY Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) AGENCY... a workshop to evaluate initial draft materials for the Pb Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) is... within each discipline to assist EPA in integrating within and across disciplines. This workshop...

  12. Influence of Magnesium Alloy Degradation on Undifferentiated Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Cecchinato; Nezha Ahmad Agha; Adela Helvia Martinez-Sanchez; Berengere Julie Christine Luthringer; Frank Feyerabend; Ryo Jimbo; Regine Willumeit-Römer; Ann Wennerberg

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnesium alloys are of particular interest in medical science since they provide compatible mechanical properties with those of the cortical bone and, depending on the alloying elements, they have the capability to tailor the degradation rate in physiological conditions, providing alternative bioresorbable materials for bone applications. The present study investigates the in vitro short-term response of human undifferentiated cells on three magnesium alloys and high-purity magnes...

  13. Dispositions Supporting Elementary Interns in the Teaching of Reform-Based Science Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Charles J.; Stewart, Bethany

    2010-11-01

    Dispositions supporting the teaching of science as structured inquiry by four elementary candidates are presented. Candidates were studied during student teaching based on their positive attitudes toward teaching science with reform-based materials in their methods course. Personal learning histories informed their attitudes, values, and beliefs about the teaching and learning of science through structured inquiry. Supportive dispositions included curiosity and questioning, investigating first-hand, learning together, and active learning. These dispositions supported early science teaching despite candidates limited science content knowledge, and may contribute to candidates’ further learning of science.

  14. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M. [comps.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory`s defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location.

  15. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory's defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location

  16. Processing Parameters Optimization for Material Deposition Efficiency in Laser Metal Deposited Titanium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamood, Rasheedat M.; Akinlabi, Esther T.

    2016-03-01

    Ti6Al4V is an important Titanium alloy that is mostly used in many applications such as: aerospace, petrochemical and medicine. The excellent corrosion resistance property, the high strength to weight ratio and the retention of properties at high temperature makes them to be favoured in most applications. The high cost of Titanium and its alloys makes their use to be prohibitive in some applications. Ti6Al4V can be cladded on a less expensive material such as steel, thereby reducing cost and providing excellent properties. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process, an additive manufacturing process is capable of producing complex part directly from the 3-D CAD model of the part and it also has the capability of handling multiple materials. Processing parameters play an important role in LMD process and in order to achieve desired results at a minimum cost, then the processing parameters need to be properly controlled. This paper investigates the role of processing parameters: laser power, scanning speed, powder flow rate and gas flow rate, on the material utilization efficiency in laser metal deposited Ti6Al4V. A two-level full factorial design of experiment was used in this investigation, to be able to understand the processing parameters that are most significant as well as the interactions among these processing parameters. Four process parameters were used, each with upper and lower settings which results in a combination of sixteen experiments. The laser power settings used was 1.8 and 3 kW, the scanning speed was 0.05 and 0.1 m/s, the powder flow rate was 2 and 4 g/min and the gas flow rate was 2 and 4 l/min. The experiments were designed and analyzed using Design Expert 8 software. The software was used to generate the optimized process parameters which were found to be laser power of 3.2 kW, scanning speed of 0.06 m/s, powder flow rate of 2 g/min and gas flow rate of 3 l/min.

  17. Irradiation damage behavior of low alloy steel wrought and weld materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the irradiation damage response of several different types of low alloy steel. The materials included vitange type ASTM A302 Grade B (A302B) plates and welds containing different nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) concentrations, 3.5% Ni steels similar to ASTM A508 Class 4, welds containing about 1% Ni (similar to type 105S), and 3.5% Ni steels with 'superclean' composition (extremely low phosphorus, sulfur, manganese and silicon). To determine irradiation damage behavior, all materials were irradiated at several different irradiation damage levels ranging from 0.0003 dpa to 0.06 dpa at an irradiation damage levels ranging from 0.003 dpa to 0.06 dpa at an irradiation temperature of about 232 degrees C (450 degrees F). Complete Charpy V-notch impact energy transition temperature curves were generated for all materials before and after irradiation to determine the transition temperature at 41J (30 ft-lb) or 47J (35 ft-lb) and the upper shelf energy. The irradiation damage behavior was measured by the shift in the Charpy 41J or 47J transition temperature (ΔTT41J or ΔTT47J) and lowering of the upper shelf Charpy energy at a given irradiation damage level. It was found that chemical composition greatly influenced irradiation damage behavior. The highest irradiation damage (greatest ΔTT) was found in an A302B type weld contaiNing 1.28% Ni and 0.20% CU while the least irradiation damage was found in the 3.5% Ni, 0.05% Cu, superclean wrought materials

  18. Prediction of Material removal rate for Aluminum BIS-24345 Alloy in wire-cut EDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PUJARI SRINIVASA RAO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the parametric optimization method using Taguchi’s robust design is proposed for wire-cut electric discharge machining of Aluminum BIS-24345 alloy. In the recent past this material gained dominance, where high strength and/or hardness is required at elevated temperatures. So, experimentation has been done by using Taguchi’s L18 (21x37 orthogonal array. Each experiment was conducted under different conditions of pulse on time, pulse off time, peak current, flushing pressure of dielectric fluid, wire feed rate, wire tension, spark gap voltage and servo feed setting. The response of material removal rate is considered for improving themachining efficiency. Optimal combinations of parameters were obtained by this method. Mathematical and artificial neural network models has been developed relating the machining performance and process parameters. The study shows that the Taguchi’s method is suitable to solve the stated problem with minimum number of trails as compared with a full factorial design.

  19. Market Opportunity of Some Aluminium Silicon Alloys Materials through Changing the Casting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfim SOARES

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is considered to be the most common mechanism by which engineering components fail, and it accounts for at least 90% of all service failures attributed to mechanical causes. Mechanical properties (tensile strength, tensile strain, Young modulus, etc as well as fatigue properties (fatigue life are very dependent on casting method. The most direct effects of casting techniques are on the metallurgical microstructure that bounds the mechanical properties. One of the important variables affected by the casting technique is the cooling rate which is well known to strongly restrict the microstructure. In the present research has been done a comparison of fatigue properties of two aluminum silicon alloys obtained by two casting techniques. It was observed that the fatigue life is increasing with 24% for Al12Si and 31% for AL18Si by using centrifugal casting process instead of gravity casting. This increasing in fatigue life means that a component tailored from materials obtained by centrifugal casting will stay longer in service. It was made an estimation of the time required to recover the costs of technology in order to use the centrifuge process that will allow to obtain materials with improved properties. The amortization can be achieved by using two different marketing techniques: through the release of the product at the old price and with much longer life of the component which means "same price - longer life", or increasing price, by highlighting new product performance which means "higher price - higher properties".

  20. Adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to Zirconia, Titanium Alloy and some other Restorative Materials: “An in-vitro Study”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzatollah Jalalian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacterial adhesion on restorative materials may lead to gingival inflammation and secondary caries.Objectives: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the adhesion of streptococcus mutans to zirconia, Feldespatic porcelain, titanium alloy and Indirect composite resin In-vitro. The effect of surface roughness on bacterial adhesion was also studied.Materials and Methods: 10 specimens (5mm diameter, 1mm thickness of each material, Zirconia, Indirect composite resin, Titanium alloy and Feldespatic porcelain were fabricated. Enamel was used as reference. Specimens were covered with artificial saliva and bacterial suspension (109 CFU/mL. Bacterial adhesion was determined using scanning electron microscope and culturing the specimens in blood agar. Data were analyzed with One way ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc test for roughness and Kruskal-wallis test for adhesion values.Results: The highest bacterial adhesion was recorded for composite specimens and the lowest was seen in Ziconia group (p<0.5. The mean value of adhesion for zirconia, feldespatic peocelain, Titanium alloy and indirect composite were 28±6.32, 40.80±8.40, 75±4.47 and 386±13.75, respectively. The differences between zirconia and titanium alloy and also zirconia and indirect composite and porcelain and indirect composite were statistically significant (p<0.5.Conclusion: Zirconia showed the lowest bacterial adhesion in comparison to other tested materials and Enamel. The difference between zirconia and titanium alloy and also zirconia and indirect composite was statistically significant (p<0.5. No correlation was found between surface roughness and bacterial adhesion. Keywords: Bacterial adhesions; Streptococcus mutans; Dental caries

  1. BFS Method for Alloys Optimized and Verified for the Study of Ordered Intermetallic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The aerospace industry has a need for new metallic alloys that are lightweight and have high strength at elevated temperatures. The BFS (Bozzolo, Ferrante, and Smith) method is a new, computationally efficient and physically sound quantum semi-perturbative approach for describing metals and their defects. Based on a simple interpretation of the alloy formation process that identifies strain and chemical contributions to the energy of the alloy, the method provides an atom-by-atom description of an alloy. Its implementation requires little more than algebra and the solution of transcendental equations. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, we have demonstrated that BFS can investigate the properties of a large number of alloys with a minimum computational effort on low-level computers. This screening allows the selection of the best alloy candidates for a particular application and, therefore, promises large cost savings over current approaches.

  2. Effects of molybdenum on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties in Zr–Nb alloys as nuclear fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zr–Nb alloys were modified by doping of Mo as a minor alloying element to seek for the nuclear fuel cladding materials with better characteristics. The effects of Mo on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties in Zr–Nb alloys were systematically investigated and elucidated. Results showed that the martensitic microstructure, a mixture of lath martensites and lens martensites with internal twins, was observed in the alloys quenched from β-phase. Width of the lath martensite reduced with the increasing Mo concentration, and the volume fraction of lens martensite increased with increase in the Mo concentration. After final annealing, a new kind of precipitate, namely β-(Nb, Mo, Zr), was identified in the Mo-containing alloys. It was also found that Mo reduced the growth of the precipitates but increased their number density. Furthermore, Mo addition retarded the recrystallization process strongly and reduced the grain size significantly. In terms of the mechanical properties, Mo addition enhanced the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength at room temperature, however decreased the ductility. The grain size strengthening was presumed as the greatest contributor in this system. (author)

  3. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600%C2%B0C with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  4. On the effects of geometry, defects, and material asymmetry on the mechanical response of shape memory alloy cellular lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamooz Ravari, M. R.; Nasr Esfahani, S.; Taheri Andani, M.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Ghaei, A.; Karaca, H.; Elahinia, M.

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloy (such as NiTi) cellular lattice structures are a new class of advanced materials with many potential applications. The cost of fabrication of these structures however is high. It is therefore necessary to develop modeling methods to predict the functional behavior of these alloys before fabrication. The main aim of the present study is to assess the effects of geometry, microstructural imperfections and material asymmetric response of dense shape memory alloys on the mechanical response of cellular structures. To this end, several cellular and dense NiTi samples are fabricated using a selective laser melting process. Both cellular and dense specimens were tested in compression in order to obtain their stress-strain response. For modeling purposes, a three -dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on microplane theory which is able to describe the material asymmetry was employed. Five finite element models based on unit cell and multi-cell methods were generated to predict the mechanical response of cellular lattices. The results show the considerable effects of the microstructural imperfections on the mechanical response of the cellular lattice structures. The asymmetric material response of the bulk material also affects the mechanical response of the corresponding cellular structure.

  5. Materials science aspects of nanocrystalline PVD hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -B-C coatings was characterized by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Grain growth occurred for the individual phases in TiB-1.2N-0.5 and Ti-1.2C-0.6 coatings during heating up to 1400oC from approximately 4 to 15 nm and 4 to 5 nm, respectively. To interpret the interrelationships between processing, microstructure and mechanical and thermal properties, the well-known fundamentals of materials science are used. (author)

  6. Proceedings of the national symposium on advances in materials science and technology: abstract book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This symposium sheds light on various topics like magnetic materials, oxides, nanomaterials, spintronics, semiconductors, microwave dielectric, multiferroics, and computational materials science and technology. The influence of modern technologies based on innovations and new discoveries in the field of materials science can be seen in all spheres of life, which include nanotechnology based new solar cells, purifiers for clean drinking water and guided drug delivery. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. The assessment of teaching materials science subjects using e-learning method

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; F. Brom

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of this article is to present the advantages and disadvantages of the use of blended learning in teaching Fundamentals of Materials Science and Metal Materials. The purpose of carried research is to analyse the effectiveness of e-learning as means of teaching in blended learning model.Design/methodology/approach: This article includes a description of blended learning; comparison of students’ results in materials science between the traditional method and remot...

  8. Blended learning in teaching materials science subjects at full time studies

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański,; F. Brom

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of this article is to present the advantages and disadvantages of the use of blendedlearning in teaching Fundamentals of Materials Science and Metal Materials. The purpose of carried research is toanalyse the effectiveness of e-learning as means of teaching in blended learning model.Design/methodology/approach: This article includes a description of blended learning; comparison ofstudents’ results in materials science between the traditional method and remote teaching us...

  9. THE DEVELOPMENT OF GUIDED INQUIRY SCIENCE LEARNING MATERIALS TO IMPROVE SCIENCE LITERACY SKILL OF PROSPECTIVE MI TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. S. Putra

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to produce valid, practical and effective guided inquiry model science learning materials to enhance science literacy skill of prospective MI teachers. The tryout of the materials was implementedto students of MI teacher educationof Unipdu Jombang at academic year of 2015/2016 semesters 3 using One Group Pretest Posttest Design. The data collections were done using observation, testing, and questionnaires. Data were analysed using descriptive analysis of quantitative, qualitative and non-parametric statistical tests. The findings of the research were: 1 the learning materials were valid; 2 Practicality of the materials was tested through the implementation of lesson plans, while the learners’ activity wereappropriate to the guided inquirymodel; and 3 The effectiveness of the learning materials in terms of improvement of learning outcomes of students was seen from the n-gain with high category and increasing mastery of science literacy skills of learners also scored n-gain with high category and the response of students to the device and the implementation of learning is very positive. It was concluded that the materials were valid, practical, and effective to enhance science literacy skills of prospective MI teachers.

  10. The use of Spark Plasma Sintering to fabricate a two-phase material from blended aluminium alloy scrap and gas atomized powder

    OpenAIRE

    Paraskevas, Dimos; Vanmeensel, Kim; Vleugels, Jef; Dewulf, Wim; Duflou, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Recently innovative solid state / 'meltless' recycling techniques have been developed and proposed for the consolidation of aluminium alloy scrap, aiming both at energy and material savings by eliminating the melting step. In this context, a powder metallurgy route is examined as a solid state recycling technique for the fabrication of a two-phase material via Spark Plasma Sintering. By mixing aluminium atomized powder and machining chips of the same alloy, a two-phase material was produced, ...

  11. Critical questions in materials science and engineering for successful development of fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is the general conclusion of all national programs that the development of high-performance reduced-activation structural materials is essential for the successful development of fusion power. In this paper, the experience gleaned from previous programs to develop materials for high temperature structural applications is used to identify and discuss some of the most critical issues that must be addressed in the development of candidate materials for fusion structural applications. Critical issues discussed include radiation-induced solute segregation and implications on phase stability in the development of high-performance alloys/ceramics; the effects of very large amounts of helium on mechanical properties and the implications for alloy design/development; development of high temperature design methodology and incorporation of radiation effects into this methodology; the effects of radiation damage on flow localization, and the implications and approach to control the phenomena; and considerations of mass transfer and corrosion in complex fusion systems

  12. Corrosion Behavior and Strength of Dissimilar Bonding Material between Ti and Mg Alloys Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patchara Pripanapong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ti and solution treated Mg alloys such as AZ31B (ST, AZ61 (ST, AZ80 (ST and AZ91 (ST were successfully bonded at 475 °C by spark plasma sintering, which is a promising new method in welding field. The formation of Ti3Al intermetallic compound was found to be an important factor in controlling the bonding strength and galvanic corrosion resistance of dissimilar materials. The maximum bonding strength and bonding efficiency at 193 MPa and 96% were obtained from Ti/AZ91 (ST, in which a thick and uniform nano-level Ti3Al layer was observed. This sample also shows the highest galvanic corrosion resistance with a measured galvanic width and depth of 281 and 19 µm, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the matrix on Mg alloy side was controlled by its Al content. AZ91 (ST exhibited the highest corrosion resistance considered from its corrode surface after corrosion test in Kroll’s etchant. The effect of Al content in Mg alloy on bonding strength and corrosion behavior of Ti/Mg alloy (ST dissimilar materials is discussed in this work.

  13. Marginalization of Socioscientific Material in Science-Technology-Society Science Curricula: Some Implications for Gender Inclusivity and Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gwyneth

    2000-05-01

    Science education reformers have argued that presenting science in the abstract is neither motivating nor inclusive of the majority of students. Science-technology-society (STS) curricula that give science an accessible social context have developed in response, but controversy surrounds the extent to which students should be introduced to socioscientific debate. Using material from a case study of Salters' Advanced Chemistry in the United Kingdom, this article demonstrates how socioscientific material is marginalized through the structures and language of syllabus texts and through classroom practices. This means students are unlikely to engage with socioscientific aspects in their course. Socioscientific content is gendered through association with social concerns and epistemological uncertainty, and because gender is asymmetric, socioscience is devalued with respect to the masculinity of abstract science. Teachers fear that extensive coverage of socioscience devalues the curriculum, alienates traditional science students and jeopardizes their own status as gatekeepers of scientific knowledge. Thus, although STS curricula such as Salters' offer potential for making science more accessible, the article concludes that greater awareness of, and challenges to, gender binaries could result in more effective STS curriculum reform.

  14. Development of an x-ray beam line at the NSLS for studies in materials science using x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research programs reported span virtually the entire range of condensed matter studies involving the fields of solid state physics, chemistry, electrochemistry, materials science and biochemistry. Results are discussed for various groups. Topics reported include work on amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors, particularly photostructural changes, kinetics of structural changes and rapid quenching, bond strengths, force constants and phonons. Also reported are temperature dependent EXAFS studies of bonding in high temperature alloys, amorphous systems, disordered alloys and studies of resolve electronic structure, EXAFS and XANES studies of permanent magnet systems based on Nd2Fe14B, glancing angle EXAFS study of Nb/Al and Nb/Si interfacial systems, x-ray absorption of krypton-implanted solids and high dose implants into silicon, and x-ray absorption and EXAFS studies of superconducting oxide compounds of Cu and related magnetic systems. Work is also reported on XAFS measurements on the icosahedral phase

  15. Materials science virtual laboratory as an example of the computer aid in materials engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the presented article is to describe the material science virtual laboratory, which is an open scientific, investigative, simulating and didactic medium for the realization of the didactic and educational tasks performed by traditional and e-learning methods.Design/methodology/approach: The laboratory is an aggregate of testers and training simulators, placed in the virtual reality and created in various languages and the programming techniques, which represents the properties, functionality and manual principles of real equipment installed and accessible in the real laboratories of scientific universities.Findings: Application of the equipment, that is practically imperishable, cheap in exploitation and easy in the use certainty will encourage students and scientific workers to independent audits and experiments in situations, where the possibilities of their execution in the true investigative laboratory will be limited because of the high material costs, difficult access to real equipment or the possible risk of his damage.Practical implications: The use possibilities of the virtual laboratory are practically unrestricted; it can be a base for any studies, course or training programme. It is assumed, that the project of the laboratory as fully multimedial. The participants of this laboratory can e.g. investigate training experiments from the definite field of material engineering, give questions, pass tests, contact with lecturers and the different users of the laboratory and obviously on participate in his design and content.Originality/value: The project of the virtual laboratory corresponds with the global tendency for expand the investigative and academical centers about the possibilities of training and experiments performance with use of the virtual reality. This enriches the education programme of the new abilities reserved so far exclusively for effecting only on real equipment.

  16. From the perception of science to the design of teaching materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Dumbrăveanu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available To design teaching materials starting from the subject matter in Science field, from the contents of textbooks or by studying the syllabuses are regular practices within schools. The SEDEC project proposes concrete and innovative modalities of conceiving teaching materials starting from teachers perception of science and by talking with them about their ideas and needs regarding teaching Science. A deep discussion of the relationships between science education and European citizenship has been another important ingredient of this new process of didactic design.

  17. Possibility to use high-chromium nickel base alloys in accordance with criteria of operational capability of materials for ITEP first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data on corrosion resistance, strength and plastic properties are presented for alloy KhNM-1 and steel 00Kh16N15M3B. It is shown that alloy KhNM substantially surpasses austenitic stainless steel in processing (weldability) and operational (tendency to corrosion cracking) properties as a candidate material for ITER first wall and blanket

  18. Hartree-fock-slater method for materials science the DV-X alpha method for design and characterization of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Adachi, H; Kawai, J

    2006-01-01

    Molecular-orbital calculations for materials design such as alloys, ceramics, and coordination compounds are now possible for experimentalists. Molecuar-orbital calculations for the interpretation of chemical effect of spectra are also possible for experimentalists. The most suitable molecular-orbital calculation method for these purpose is the DV-Xa method, which is robust in such a way that the calculation converges to a result even if the structure of the molecule or solid is impossible in the pressure and temperature ranges on earth. This book specially addresses the methods to design novel materials and to predict the spectralline shape of unknown materials using the DV-Xa molecular-orbital method, but is also useful for those who want to calculate electronic structures of materials using any kind of method.

  19. Nanotube formation and morphology change of Ti alloys containing Hf for dental materials use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Kang [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, College of Dentistry, 2nd Stage of Brain Korea 21 for College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Han-Cheol, E-mail: hcchoe@chosun.ac.k [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, College of Dentistry, 2nd Stage of Brain Korea 21 for College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Yeong-Mu [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, College of Dentistry, 2nd Stage of Brain Korea 21 for College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Oral Disease Regulation of the Aged, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Brantley, William A. [College of Dentistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, Ti-Hf (10, 20, 30 and 40 wt.%) alloys were prepared by arc melting, and subjected to heat treatment for 24 h at 1000 {sup o}C in an argon atmosphere. Formation of surface nanotubes was achieved by anodizing a Ti-Hf alloy in 1.0 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} electrolytes with small amounts of NaF at room temperature. Microstructures of the alloys and nanotube morphology were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The homogenized Ti-Hf alloys had a needle-like microstructure of {alpha} phase, and nanotubes formed on Ti-xHf alloys had the anatase phase after treatment that promoted crystallization. Uniform nanotubes formed for Hf contents up to 20 wt.%. Irregular nanotubes formed on the Ti-30Hf and Ti-40Hf alloys. The structure of the irregular layers on the Ti-30Hf and Ti-40Hf alloys had nanotubes of two sizes. Increasing the Hf content in Ti led to the formation of nanotubes with more narrow size. The pores in the nanotubes typically had a diameter ranging from 80-120 nm and a length of approximately 1.7 {mu}m. It is concluded that nanotube morphology on Ti-Hf alloys can controlled by varying the amount of Hf.

  20. Dynamic material property of the sinter-forged Cu-Cr alloys with the variation of chrome content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum interrupters are used in various switch-gear components such as circuit breakers, distribution switches, contactors. The electrodes of a vacuum interrupter are manufactured of sinter-forged Cu-Cr material for good electrical and mechanical characteristics. Since the closing velocity is 1∼2m/s and impact deformation of the electrode depends on the strain-rate at the given velocity, the dynamic material property of the sinter-forged Cu-Cr alloy is important to design the vacuum interrupter reliably and to identify the impact characteristics of a vacuum interrupter accurately. This paper is concerned with the dynamic material properties of sinter-forged Cu-Cr alloy for various strain rates. The amount of chrome is varied from 10 wt% to 30 wt% in order to investigate the influence of the chrome content on the dynamic material property. The high speed tensile test machine is utilized in order to identify the dynamic property of the Cu-Cr alloy at the intermediate strain-rate and the split Hopkinson pressure bar is used at the high strain-rate. Experimental results from both the quasi-static and the high strain-rate up to the 5000 /sec are interpolated with respect to the amount of chrome in order to construct the Johnson-Cook and the modified Johnson-Cook model as the constitutive relation that should be applied to numerical simulation of the impact behavior of electrodes

  1. Electrochemical behavior of magnesium alloys as biodegradable materials in Hank's solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoneim, A.A., E-mail: Azzaghoneim@gmail.co [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Fekry, A.M.; Ameer, M.A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2010-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of extruded AZ31E and AZ91E alloys was investigated in Hank's solution at 37 {sup o}C. The behavior of the two alloys was studied with immersion time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization and weight loss tests. It was found that the corrosion resistance of AZ31E alloy is higher than that of AZ91E. Also, the effect of adding different concentrations of a commercial drug called glucosamine sulphate (as inhibitor) to Hank's solution was studied for AZ31E alloy. The corrosion was effectively inhibited by the addition of 0.01 mM glucosamine sulphate that reacts with AZ31E alloy and forms a protective film on its surface. The results were confirmed by surface examination via scanning electron microscope.

  2. The Development Materials from Substances Waste for Some Topics in Science and Technology Textbook for Primary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Aydın

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study is to develop instructional materials from substances waste in which students teachers have problems to learn, taught in Instructional Technology and Materials Course at the third year of primary science teacher education program. The study was carried out with 54 primary science student teachers attending primary science teacher education program in Ahi Evran University Faculty of Education, in the fall term of the 2009-2010 academic year. Material design or development of prospective teachers' views were taken before and after. The findings from the material prepared were supported by the data obtained from the interviews conducted with 16 head student teachers. It was concluded that, based on the findings obtained from the material design the environmental pollution by waste products are designed for visual teaching materials. Can be taken into account the materials designed or developed by nominated teacher, during revised to be name of last books.

  3. SAW surfacing of low-alloyed steel with super-ferrite additional material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Klimpel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of these researches was to investigate influence of heat input in SAW surfacing of low-alloyed steel with super-ferrite filler material on quality of deposits.Design/methodology/approach: the quality of single and multilayer, stringer beads was assessed by metallographic examinations, stresses measurements and hardness tests.Findings: due to the fact that it was used at automated surfacing stand, the analysis of properties of the deposits was performed for single and multilayer, stringer beads.Research limitations/implications: for complete information about tested deposits it is needed to compare deposits properties with other technologies of super-ferrite deposits surfacing.Practical implications: results of this paper is an optimal range of parameters for surfacing of single and multilayer, stringer beads of super-ferrite layers.Originality/value: the researches (macro- and micro-observations, hardness tests, stresses distribution tests were provided for surfacing of single and multilayer, stringer beads, and the results were compared. The influence of heat input on layers properties and theirs structure was defined.

  4. Modelling of material behavior in the numerical simulation of heat treatment processes of metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, the numerical simulation becomes more and more used as a help for a better optimization of heat treatment processes (quenching, surface hardening, thermochemical treatments...) as far as microstructures, residual stresses and strains are concerned. One key point of such simulations is the modelling of the material behavior: on one hand the modelling of phase transformation kinetics by taking into account the various thermal histories that can exist in massive pieces as well as the effects of the stress states and chemical composition gradients. On the other hand, the modelling of the thermomechanical behavior by taking into account the consequences of the phase transformations : variations of mechanical properties, volume changes. Moreover, strong coupling between transformation progress and stress can occur (transformation plasticity phenomenon). In this presentation, a review will be given on the present models for steels and for aluminum alloys. These models have been implemented in finite element software and the necessary experimental characterizations and validations have been performed. As an example, the results of the numerical simulation of a quenching process will be described focusing on the couplings between stress and phase transformations. Refs. 3 (author)

  5. Digestive ripening: a synthetic method par excellence for core-shell, alloy, and composite nanostructured materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srilakshmi P Bhaskar; Balaji R Jagirdar

    2012-11-01

    The solvated metal atom dispersion (SMAD) method has been used for the synthesis of colloids of metal nanoparticles. It is a top-down approach involving condensation of metal atoms in low temperature solvent matrices in a SMADreactor maintained at 77 K.Warming of the matrix results in a slurry ofmetal atoms that interact with one another to form particles that grow in size. The organic solvent solvates the particles and acts as a weak capping agent to halt/slow down the growth process to a certain extent. This as-prepared colloid consists of metal nanoparticles that are quite polydisperse. In a process termed as digestive ripening, addition of a capping agent to the as-prepared colloid which is polydisperse renders it highly monodisperse either under ambient or thermal conditions. In this, as yet not well-understood process, smaller particles grow and the larger ones diminish in size until the system attains uniformity in size and a dynamic equilibrium is established. Using the SMAD method in combination with digestive ripening process, highly monodisperse metal, core-shell, alloy, and composite nanoparticles have been synthesized. This article is a review of our contributions together with some literature reports on this methodology to realize various nanostructured materials.

  6. Ultrasonic properties of low solvus high refractory (LSHR) super alloy disk material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements are made for ultrasonic linear and nonlinear properties of the powder metallurgy disk alloy LSHR material designed with a relatively low γ' precipitate solvus temperature and high refractory element content. This allows versatile heat treatment processing which results in high tensile, creep and fatigue properties depending on the grain size controlled through proper selection of solution heat treatment temperatures relative to the γ' precipitate solvus temperature. Sound velocity and attenuation for both longitudinal and shear modes at various frequencies from 5 to 20 MHz help to identify and quantify the size of transition zone nondestructively between the small grain (∼10 μm) and the large grain (∼100 μm) zones. The shear wave velocity measurements taken by aligning the transducer polarization direction parallel and perpendicular to the grain transition direction reveal some results that we do not fully understand at this time and will be the basis of future research. Similarly, measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter show some variations that may originate from uncertain sources.

  7. Influence of Temperature on the Strain Controlled Fatigue Behaviour of Alloy 690 Tube Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain controlled fatigue tests for hot-extruded tube material of Alloy 690 (Sandvik Sanicro 69) have been performed at room temperature (RT) and at elevated temperature (204 deg. C). The influences of temperature on the cyclic deformation behaviour and the fatigue life have been investigated. The influence of temperature on the fatigue life is relatively small in the temperature range investigated. However, the fatigue behaviour at elevated temperature is quite different from that at RT. A second cyclic strain hardening was observed at 204 deg. C. The possible mechanisms have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Besides dislocation mechanism, the interactions between moving dislocations and stacking faults and between interstitial atoms and moving dislocations could also contribute to this secondary cyclic strain hardening. The formation of micro-twins during cyclic loading at 204 deg. C and its influence on the cyclic stress-strain response were also discussed. Temperature affects both fatigue crack initiation and propagation behaviour. Increase in temperature promotes duplex slipping process, which causes the formation of striation. (authors)

  8. Considerations on the performance and fabrication of candidate materials for the Yucca Mountain repository waste packages highly corrosion resistant nickel-base and titanium-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E; Goldberg, A

    1995-11-30

    Among the metallurgical factors that affect the performance of a material in a given environment are alloy composition, alloy segregation, depletion of alloying elements, non-uniform microstructures, precipitation leading to an increase in susceptibility to corrosion as well as decreases in ductility, residual plastic deformation, and residual stresses. Precipitation often occurs preferentially at grain boundaries, causing depletion of critical elements in regions adjacent to these boundaries. Continuous grain-boundary precipitates can lead to drops in ductility and toughness. The presence of non-metallic inclusions, if excessive and/or segregated, can also cause embrittlement. Segregation of alloying elements can result in localized galvanic action. Depletion of alloying elements as well as segregation can result in reductions in the concentrations of critical elements below those necessary to resist localized corrosion. Segregation and alloy depletion can also facilitate precipitation that could lead to embrittlement.

  9. The material co-construction of hard science fiction and physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-12-01

    This article explores the relationship between hard science fiction and physics and a gendered culture of science. Empirical studies indicate that science fiction references might spur some students' interest in physics and help develop this interest throughout school, into a university education and even further later inspire the practice of doing science. There are many kinds of fiction within the science fiction genre. In the presented empirical exploration physics students seem particularly fond of what is called `hard science fiction': a particular type of science fiction dealing with technological developments (Hartwell and Cramer in The hard SF renaissance, Orb/TOR, New York, 2002). Especially hard science fiction as a motivating fantasy may, however, also come with a gender bias. The locally materialized techno-fantasies spurring dreams of the terraforming of planets like Mars and travels in time and space may not be shared by all physics students. Especially female students express a need for other concerns in science. The entanglement of physics with hard science fiction may thus help develop some students' interest in learning school physics and help create an interest for studying physics at university level. But research indicates that especially female students are not captured by the hard techno-fantasies to the same extent as some of their male colleagues. Other visions (e.g. inspired by soft science fiction) are not materialized as a resource in the local educational culture. It calls for an argument of how teaching science is also teaching cultural values, ethics and concerns, which may be gendered. Teaching materials, like the use of hard science fiction in education, may not just be (yet another) gender bias in science education but also carrier of particular visions for scientific endeavours.

  10. Effect of Cr, Ni and Mo on corrosion resistance of highly alloyed materials in sour well environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of Cr, Ni and Mo on the corrosion behaviours of highly alloyed materials was investigated in simulated sour well environments. The increases of all of Cr, Ni and Mo contents increase the resistance to general and pitting corrosion. Increasing Ni content also improves the resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). From the standpoint of those resistances, high Ni content as well as high Cr and Mo contents is essential to maintain the corrosion resistance in sour well environments. Surface film analysis shows there are two types of film structure, that is: Cr oxide single layer, and double layer with outer Ni sulfide and inner Cr oxide. Corrosion resistance is basically determined by the presence of surface Cr oxide film. Increasing Ni and Mo contents is considered to increase the stability of the surface film. In addition, electrochemical measurements were carried out with high alloy materials and pure metals to clarify the behaviours of Cr, Ni and Mo

  11. Development of basket for transport/storage cask using square tube made of aluminium alloy containing neutron absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basket of transport/storage cask must have a structural strength at any temperature expected during storage and transport condition, and must satisfy each function of sub-criticality and heat removal. It is also preferable to increase the number of fuel assemblies in the cask and to reduce the manufacturing cost. The use of aluminium alloy for the basket is preferable because of its high thermal conductivity in order to improve heat removal. Aluminium alloy is lightweight and it is more effective to improve the capacity. The conventional design of aluminium basket had a combination of square tubes, which have structural strength and heat removal function, and the neutron absorption material with high concentration of boron. The developed basket has square tube shape containing neutron absorption materials that has both functions of heat removal and sub-criticality. It is an effective way to improve the storage capacity of fuel assemblies and it is also easy to be assembled

  12. A binary Al/Li alloy as a new material for the realization of high-intensity pulsed photocathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septier, A.; Sabary, F.; Dudek, J. C.; Bergeret, H.; Leblond, B.

    1991-07-01

    We propose a new material for the fabrication of high-current photocathodes: a binary Al/Li alloy acting as a lithium dispenser cathode. This material would have the great advantage to allow regeneration of the Li layer after poisoning or air exposure, by a simple heating process. In a first experiment, we have measured the photoemission energy threshold, WΦ, of a piece of Al/Li alloy and the quantum yield, Y, as a function of the photon energy. After a heating process (340°C for 12 h) we obtained WΦ = 2 eV and Y = 6 × 10 -4 for 4.6 eV photon energy. In a second experiment another sample was illuminated with a 40 ps frequency-tripled YAG laser. After two heating processes, we obtained electron bunches containing 1 nC with an incident laser energy of 100 μJ per pulse.

  13. Analytical techniques for thin films treatise on materials science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, K N

    1988-01-01

    Treatise on Materials Science and Technology, Volume 27: Analytical Techniques for Thin Films covers a set of analytical techniques developed for thin films and interfaces, all based on scattering and excitation phenomena and theories. The book discusses photon beam and X-ray techniques; electron beam techniques; and ion beam techniques. Materials scientists, materials engineers, chemical engineers, and physicists will find the book invaluable.

  14. Development of tomographic reconstruction methods in materials science with focus on advanced scanning methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan

    Techniques for obtaining 3 dimensional information of individual crystals, socalled grains, in polycrystalline materials are important within the field of materials science for understanding and modeling the behavior of materials.In the last decade, a number of nondestructive X-ray diffraction...

  15. Optimizing Material Removal Rate (MRR) in WEDMing Titanium Alloy (Ti6Al4V) Using the Taguchi Method

    OpenAIRE

    Danial Ghodsiyeh; Mohammadreza Askaripour Lahiji; Mahdi Ghanbari; Mostafa Rezazadeh Shirdar; Abolfazl Golshan

    2012-01-01

    Selection of optimal cutting parameters has always been a critical issue to achieve high-quality in the machining process. In this study Design of Experiment (DOE) method for selection of optimal cutting parameters during WEDM of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) is experimentally studied. Moreover, the behaviour of three control parameters such as Pulse ON Time (A), Pulse OFF Time (B) and Peak Current (C) on machining performance, including Material Removal Rate (MRR) and Surface Roughness (SR) is st...

  16. Life Science Research Facility materials management requirements and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine C.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Programs Office at NASA Ames Research Center has defined hypothetical experiments for a 90-day mission on Space Station to allow analysis of the materials necessary to conduct the experiments and to assess the impact on waste processing of recyclable materials and storage requirements of samples to be returned to earth for analysis as well as of nonrecyclable materials. The materials include the specimens themselves, the food, water, and gases necessary to maintain them, the expendables necessary to conduct the experiments, and the metabolic products of the specimens. This study defines the volumes, flow rates, and states of these materials. Process concepts for materials handling will include a cage cleaner, trash compactor, biological stabilizer, and various recycling devices.

  17. Tribology of ceramics and composites materials science perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Bikramjit

    2011-01-01

    This book helps students and practicing scientists alike understand that a comprehensive knowledge about the friction and wear properties of advanced materials is essential to further design and development of new materials. With important introductory chapters on the fundamentals, processing, and applications of tribology, the book then examines in detail the nature and properties of materials, the friction and wear of structural ceramics, bioceramics, biocomposites, and nanoceramics, as well as lightweight composites and the friction and wear of ceramics in a cryogenic environment.

  18. Modular titanium alloy neck adapter failures in hip replacement - failure mode analysis and influence of implant material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloemer Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modular neck adapters for hip arthroplasty stems allow the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intraoperatively. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such a modular device due to high loads or surface contamination inside the modular coupling. Unfortunately we have experienced such a failure of implants and now report our clinical experience with the failures in order to advance orthopaedic material research and joint replacement surgery. The failed neck adapters were implanted between August 2004 and November 2006 a total of about 5000 devices. After this period, the titanium neck adapters were replaced by adapters out of cobalt-chromium. Until the end of 2008 in total 1.4% (n = 68 of the implanted titanium alloy neck adapters failed with an average time of 2.0 years (0.7 to 4.0 years postoperatively. All, but one, patients were male, their average age being 57.4 years (36 to 75 years and the average weight 102.3 kg (75 to 130 kg. The failures of neck adapters were divided into 66% with small CCD of 130° and 60% with head lengths of L or larger. Assuming an average time to failure of 2.8 years, the cumulative failure rate was calculated with 2.4%. Methods A series of adapter failures of titanium alloy modular neck adapters in combination with a titanium alloy modular short hip stem was investigated. For patients having received this particular implant combination risk factors were identified which were associated with the occurence of implant failure. A Kaplan-Meier survival-failure-analysis was conducted. The retrieved implants were analysed using microscopic and chemical methods. Modes of failure were simulated in biomechanical tests. Comparative tests included modular neck adapters made of titanium alloy and cobalt chrome alloy material. Results Retrieval examinations and biomechanical simulation revealed that primary micromotions initiated fretting within the modular tapered neck

  19. BIOMIMICRY BASED ON MATERIAL SCIENCE: THE INSPIRING ART FROM NATURE (REVIEW ARTICLE)

    OpenAIRE

    Okuyucu, Can

    2015-01-01

    Biomimicry is an art which adopts the nature to science. Basically, it is the name of an art which converts the birds to the planes. It finds the qualities which the humanity does not have, the evolution gave to the nature. Moreover, it discovers these qualities and makes available for humanity with scientific methods. Therefore, as far as its relation to material science as concerned, it is the most important inter-disciplinary science field for humanity. Hence, when this scientific value an...

  20. Alloy 33: A new material for the handling of HNO3/HF media in reprocessing of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloy 33, an austenitic 33Cr-32Fe-31Ni-1.6Mo-0.6Cu-0.4N material shows excellent resistance to corrosion when exposed to highly oxidizing media as e.g. HNO3 and HNO3/HF mixtures which are encountered in reprocessing of nuclear fuel. According to the test results available so far, resistance to corrosion in boiling azeotropic (67%) HNO3 is about 6 and 2 times superior to AISI 304 L and 310 L. In higher concentrated nitric acid it can be considered corrosion resistant up to 95% HNO3 at 25 C, up to 90% HNO3 at 50 C and up to somewhat less than 85% HNO3 at 75 C. In 20% HNO3/7% HF at 50 C its resistance to corrosion is superior to AISI 316 Ti and Alloy 28 by factors of about 200 and 2.4. Other media tested with different results include 12% HNO3 with up to 3.5% HF and 0.4% HF with 32 to 67.5% HNO3 at 90 C. Alloy 33 is easily fabricated into all product forms required for chemical plants (e.g. plate, sheet, strip, wire, tube and flanges). Components such as dished ends and tube to tube sheet weldments have been successfully fabricated facilitating the use of Alloy 33 for reprocessing of nuclear fuel

  1. Corrosion and Discharge Behaviors of Mg-Al-Zn and Mg-Al-Zn-In Alloys as Anode Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarun Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Mg-6%Al-3%Zn and Mg-6%Al-3%Zn-(1%, 1.5%, 2%In alloys were prepared by melting and casting. Their microstructures were investigated via metallographic and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS analysis. Moreover, hydrogen evolution and electrochemical tests were carried out in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution aiming at identifying their corrosion mechanisms and discharge behaviors. The results suggested that indium exerts an improvement on both the corrosion rate and the discharge activity of Mg-Al-Zn alloy via the effects of grain refining, β-Mg17Al12 precipitation, dissolving-reprecipitation, and self-peeling. The Mg-6%Al-3%Zn-1.5%In alloy with the highest corrosion rate at free corrosion potential did not perform desirable discharge activity indicating that the barrier effect caused by the β-Mg17Al12 phase would have been enhanced under the conditions of anodic polarization. The Mg-6%Al-3%Zn-1.0%In alloy with a relative low corrosion rate and a high discharge activity is a promising anode material for both cathodic protection and chemical power source applications.

  2. Dispositions Supporting Elementary Interns in the Teaching of Reform-Based Science Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Charles J.; Stewart, Bethany

    2010-01-01

    Dispositions supporting the teaching of science as structured inquiry by four elementary candidates are presented. Candidates were studied during student teaching based on their positive attitudes toward teaching science with reform-based materials in their methods course. Personal learning histories informed their attitudes, values, and beliefs…

  3. The Elaboration of the Academic Technology Roadmap (ATRM) : Three Cases in Academic Material Science Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Okutsu, Shoko; Tatsuse, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The Academic Technology Road Map (ATRM) was originally proposed to support academic Science and Engineering (S&E) laboratories. In this paper, ATRM is elaborated through three cases in academic materials science laboratories. According to those cases, a knowledge collaboration board (KCB) is newly designed based on the “Kadai-Barashi approach”and the original ATRM.

  4. Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd R. Allen

    2011-12-01

    This is a document required by Basic Energy Sciences as part of a mid-term review, in the third year of the five-year award period and is intended to provide a critical assessment of the Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels (strategic vision, scientific plans and progress, and technical accomplishments).

  5. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning the theoretical studies of metals and alloys; x-ray diffraction research; structural ceramics; structure of coal; analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy; deformation and mechanical properties; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; metastable materials; neutron radiation effects; charged particle radiation effects; theory and modeling of radiation effects; facility and advanced technique development; fundamentals of welding and joining; and studies in nondestructive evaluation

  6. Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  7. Development of engineering and materials science in Pronuclear: retrospective and perspectives for the 80's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of a great number of persons that completed engineering and materials science course, up to 1981, is showed. The Pronuclear, an organ that finances the personel education with emphasis in nuclear engineering, is described. (E.G.)

  8. A Study of the effect of gamma radiation on some alloy materials for use as dosimetry systems and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloys are metallic materials consisting of two or more elements combined in such a way that they cannot be readily separated by physical means. More than 90% of metals used are in the form of alloys. Alloys can be divided into two types: ferrous and non- ferrous. In metallurgy, a nonferrous metal is any metal that is not ferrous, including alloys, that does not contain iron in appreciable amounts. Groups of inorganic glassy materials which always contain one or more of the chalcogen elements S, Se or Te, in conjunction with more electropositive elements as As, Sb and Bi, are recognized as chalcogenide glasses but Ferroalloy refers to various alloys of iron with a high proportion of one or more other elements, for example ferrotitanium alloy. Chalcogenide glasses are generally less robust, more weakly bonded materials than oxide glasses. Glasses were prepared from Ge, Se, As and Te elements with purity 99.999%.These glasses are reactive at high temperature with oxygen. Therefore, synthesis was accomplished in evacuated clean silica tubes. The tubes were washed by distilled water, and then dried in a furnace whose temperature was about 100 degree C. The weighted materials were introduced into the cleaned silica tubes and then evacuated to about 10-4 torr and sealed. The sealed tubes were placed inside the furnace and the temperature of the furnace was raised gradually up to 900 degree C within 1 hour and kept constant for 10 hours. Moreover, shaking of the constituent materials inside the tube in the furnace was necessary for realizing the homogeneity of the composition. After synthesis, the tube was quenched into ice water. The glassy ingots could be obtained by drastic quenching. Then materials were removed from the tubes and kept in dry atmosphere. Thin films of the selected compositions were prepared by thermal evaporation technique under vacuum 10-4 torr with constant thickness 100 nm. Ferrotitanium alloy is prepared by the reduction of rutile and ilmenite ores

  9. Powder diffraction in materials science using the KENS cold-neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since superconductivity fever spread around the world, neutron powder diffraction has become very popular and been widely used by crystallographers, physicists, chemists, mineralogists, and materials scientists. The purpose of present paper is to show, firstly, important characteristics of time-of-flight TOF powder diffraction using cold-neutron source in the study of materials science, and, secondly, recent studies on the structure and function of batteries at the Neutron Science Laboratory (KENS) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK)

  10. RIMS International Conference : Mathematical Challenges in a New Phase of Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    Kotani, Motoko

    2016-01-01

    This volume comprises eight papers delivered at the RIMS International Conference "Mathematical Challenges in a New Phase of Materials Science", Kyoto, August 4–8, 2014. The contributions address subjects in defect dynamics, negatively curved carbon crystal, topological analysis of di-block copolymers, persistence modules, and fracture dynamics. These papers highlight the strong interaction between mathematics and materials science and also reflect the activity of WPI-AIMR at Tohoku University, in which collaborations between mathematicians and experimentalists are actively ongoing.

  11. Research planning for new materials development based on basic · interdisciplinary science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is aimed to apply the super-interface theory to the basic · interdisciplinary science to find novel material and establish the basic technology for future economy. For this purpose, definition of the super-interface theory and new material, classification of three characteristics and four application fields for the super-interface theory, and planning the technology development roadmap were conducted. Through this work, the national competitiveness in the field of the new material development can be maximized by suggesting the development direction of multi-functional material based on the basic · interdisciplinary science

  12. Time Resolved X Ray Scattering and Spectroscopy In Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of materials relevant for energy applications covers a large array of experimental techniques, time domains and types of materials. In this paper, we will discuss some of the issues that we have encountered and describe some experiments and which combinations of techniques were used. The paper mainly presents results based on synchrotron radiation X ray techniques but also shows how important it is to complement their results with those obtained through non X ray techniques in order to obtain a comprehensive picture of the time evolution of the materials under study. (author)

  13. The intrinsic disorder related alloy scattering in ZrNiSn half-Heusler thermoelectric materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hanhui Xie; Heng Wang; Chenguang Fu; Yintu Liu; G. Jeffrey Snyder; Xinbing Zhao; Tiejun Zhu

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic structural disorder dramatically affects the thermal and electronic transport in semiconductors. Although normally considered an ordered compound, the half-Heusler ZrNiSn displays many transport characteristics of a disordered alloy. Similar to the (Zr,Hf)NiSn based solid solutions, the unsubstituted ZrNiSn compound also exhibits charge transport dominated by alloy scattering, as demonstrated in this work. The unexpected charge transport, even in ZrNiSn which is normally conside...

  14. Mapping Chemical Selection Pathways for Designing Multicomponent Alloys: an informatics framework for materials design

    OpenAIRE

    Srikant Srinivasan; Broderick, Scott R.; Ruifeng Zhang; Amrita Mishra; Sinnott, Susan B.; Surendra K. Saxena; LeBeau, James M.; Krishna Rajan

    2015-01-01

    A data driven methodology is developed for tracking the collective influence of the multiple attributes of alloying elements on both thermodynamic and mechanical properties of metal alloys. Cobalt-based superalloys are used as a template to demonstrate the approach. By mapping the high dimensional nature of the systematics of elemental data embedded in the periodic table into the form of a network graph, one can guide targeted first principles calculations that identify the influence of speci...

  15. Neutron irradiation test of copper alloy/stainless steel joint materials

    OpenAIRE

    山田 弘一; 河村 弘

    2006-01-01

    As a study about the joint technology of copper alloy and stainless steel for utilization as cooling piping in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Al2O3-dispersed strengthened copper or CuCrZr was joined to stainless steel by three kinds of joint methods (casting joint, brazing joint and friction welding method) for the evaluation of the neutron irradiation effect on joints. A neutron irradiation test was performed to three types of joints and each copper alloy. The avera...

  16. Water-soluble metal working fluids additives derived from the esters of acid anhydrides with higher alcohols for aluminum alloy materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Syutaro; Tomoda, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Shoji

    2007-01-01

    Water-soluble metal working fluids are used for processing of aluminum alloy materials. This short article describes properties of new additives in water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials. Many half esters or diesters were prepared from the reactions of higher alcohols with acid anhydrides. Interestingly, diesters of PTMG (tetrahydrofuran oligomer, MW = 650 and 1000) and polybutylene oxide (MW = 650) with maleic anhydride and succinic anhydride showed both of an excellent anti-corrosion property for aluminum alloy and a good hard water tolerance. The industrial soluble type processing oils including these additives also showed anti-corrosion property and hard water tolerance. PMID:17898514

  17. IMP Science Gateway: from the Portal to the Hub of Virtual Experimental Labs in Materials Science

    OpenAIRE

    Gordienko, Yuri; Bekenev, Lev; Baskova, Olexandra; Gatsenko, Olexander; Zasimchuk, Elena; Stirenko, Sergii

    2014-01-01

    "Science gateway" (SG) ideology means a user-friendly intuitive interface between scientists (or scientific communities) and different software components + various distributed computing infrastructures (DCIs) (like grids, clouds, clusters), where researchers can focus on their scientific goals and less on peculiarities of software/DCI. "IMP Science Gateway Portal" (http://scigate.imp.kiev.ua) for complex workflow management and integration of distributed computing resources (like clusters, s...

  18. Improvement of Zr-base alloy for nuclear reactor core materials application by Mo addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of Mo in Zr-based alloys was studied in terms of the microstructure, texture and corrosion resistance. The base compositions of the experimental alloys were Zr-1Nb and Zr-1Nb-1Sn-0.1Fe to which Mo was added in varying amount up to 0.5%. Buttons of 300 g in weight have been produced by plasma arc remelting (PAR) and processed in sequence by hot forging, hot rolling, beta annealing, cold rolling and recrystallization annealing. It was confirmed that Mo addition resulted in grain refinement: beta grains as well as recrystallized alpha grains. This, in turn reduced the formation frequency and the size of twins and relaxed of the surface normal preferred orientation, fn. In the corrosion test in water containing 220 ppm LiOH (360 deg C, 17.9 MPa), the alloys with up to 0.2% Mo showed a good corrosion resistance whereas that with 0.5% Mo showed a degraded resistance. Apparently, the corrosion resistance was related to the density and morphology of the second phase particles. Alloys containing fine and uniformly distributed β-Nb particles showed good corrosion resistance whereas those containing excessive number or undesirable distribution of particles particularly in uncrystallized region showed degraded corrosion resistance. Overall, the present study suggests that alloying of up to 0.2% Mo should be favorably considered for improving the mechanical properties without impairing the corrosion resistance of Zr-based alloys for nuclear core applications. (author)

  19. Possible applications of synchrotron radiation for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past 20 years, synchrotron radiation has become an important aid for solid-state physicists, chemists and biologists. On the other hand, the use of synchrotron radiation for experimental studies of a large series of specimens is still in the preliminary stage, however, is necessary for the analyzation of materials. In this paper, present and future possible applications of synchrotron radiation for the characterization of advanced materials are discussed. Beside the further optimization of techniques for the analysis of the atomic structure (e.g. diffraction, absorption spectroscopy), essential progress has to be expected in the field of nondestructive, threedimensional characterization of the microstructure of metallic and ceramic materials, especially during the synthesis of materials. (orig.)

  20. The influence of material of mould and modification on the structure of AlSi11 alloy

    OpenAIRE

    M. Łągiewka; Z. Konopka

    2012-01-01

    The presented work discusses the influence of material of foundry mould on the effect of modification of AlSi11 alloy. For this purpose castings were produced in moulds made of four various materials. Castings of the first type were cast in a metal die, the second ones in the conventional mould of bentonite-bound sand, those of the third type in the sand mould with oil binder, the last ones in a shell mould where phenol-formaldehyde resin was applied as a binder. All the castings were made of...

  1. Oxygen Transport Membranes: A Material Science and Process Engineering Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, W.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes several fundamental aspects on the membrane-integrated oxy-fuel combustion process and can be divided in two parts: 1) The development and characterization of membrane materials; 2) The design, simulation and evaluation of a coal-fired power plant, coupled with a membrane module. A simple and easy method to measure the oxygen nonstoichiometry of a perovskite material is described in chapter 2. A Computing Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model is developed in chapter 3 to describe th...

  2. Energy-selective neutron imaging for materials science

    OpenAIRE

    Peetermans, Steven Luc X

    2015-01-01

    Common neutron imaging techniques study the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating a sample of interest. The recorded radiograph shows a contrast depending on traversed material and its thickness. Tomography allows separating both and obtaining 3D spatial information about the material distribution, solving problems in numerous fields ranging from virtually separating fossils from surrounding rock to water management in fuel cells. It is nowadays routinely performed at PSI¿s neutron imagin...

  3. The review of the modeling methods and numerical analysis software for nanotechnology in material science

    OpenAIRE

    SMIRNOV Vladimir Alexeevich; KOROLEV Evgenij Valerjevich; EVSTIGNEEV Alexandr Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high demand for building materials with universal set of roperties which extend their application area the research efforts are focusing on nanotechnology in material science. The rational combination of theoretical studies, mathematical modeling and simulation can favour reduced resource and time consumption when nanomodified materials are being developed. The development of composite material is based on the principles of system analysis which provides for the necessity of criter...

  4. Influences of Alloying Element and Annealing on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Steam Generator Tubing Materials of Nuclear Power Plant (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influences of alloying elements and annealing heat treatments on Alloy 690 and Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing materials of nuclear power plants were studied. OM, SEM, TEM, and XRD analyses were used to study the microstructural changes of the alloys. Mechanical properties were investigated by means of tension tests and Rockwell hardness tests, and corrosion resistance was evaluated using the anodic polarization tests and the 65% boiling nitric acid immersion tests. Increasing the carbon content of Alloy 690, the hardness and tensile strength were increased, but the elongation and grain size were decreased. However, increasing the annealing temperature, the tensile strength and hardness were decreased, but the elongation and grain size were increased. Increasing the carbon content of Alloy 690, the results of the anodic polarization tests and the nitric acid immersion tests showed that the annealing temperature to reveal a minimum corrosion rate was increased. This behavior seemed to be due to the combination of the solid solution of carbon in the matrix and grain growth with annealing. In this work, the corrosion properties of Alloy 690 were better than that of Alloy 600, and the range of the optimum annealing temperature of Alloy 690 was from 1100 .deg. C to 1150 .deg. C

  5. Template-free electrodeposition of AlFe alloy nanowires from a room-temperature ionic liquid as an anode material for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Yuqi; Guo, Qingjun; Wang, Heng; Li, Bing

    2016-08-15

    AlFe alloy nanowires were directly electrodeposited on copper substrates from trimethylamine hydrochloride (TMHC)-AlCl3 ionic liquids with small amounts of FeCl3 at room temperature without templates. Coin cells composed of AlFe alloy nanowire electrodes and lithium foils were assembled to characterize the alloy electrochemical properties by galvanostatic charge/discharge tests. Effects of FeCl3 concentration, potential and temperature on the alloy morphology, composition and cyclic performance were examined. Addition of Fe into the alloy changed the nanowires from a 'hill-like' bulk morphology to a free-standing morphology, and increased the coverage area of the alloy on Cu substrates. As an inactive element, Fe could also buffer the alloys' large volume changes during Li intercalation and deintercalation. AlFe alloy nanowires composed of a small amount of Fe with an average diameter of 140 nm exhibited an outstanding cyclic performance and delivered a specific capacity of about 570 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles. This advanced template-free method for the direct preparation of high performance nanostructure AlFe alloy anode materials is quite simple and inexpensive, which presents a promising prospect for practical application in Li-ion batteries. PMID:27200436

  6. Deuterium absorption and material phase characteristics of SAES St 198 Zr-Fe Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports deuterium absorption and material phase characteristics of SAES St 198 Zr-Fe Alloy (76.5% Zr). Scanning electron microscope images of polished surfaces, electron probe microanalysis, and x-ray powder diffractometry indicated the presence of a primary Zr2Fe phase with secondary phases of ZrFe2, Zr5FeSn, α-Zr, and Zr6Fe3O. A statistically designed experiment to determine the effects of temperature, time, and vacuum quality on activation of St 198 revealed that, when activated at low temperature (350C), deuterium absorption rate was slower when the vacuum quality was poor (2.5 Pa vs. 3 x 10-4 Pa). However, at higher activation temperature (500C), deuterium absorption rate was fast and was independent of vacuum quality. Deuterium pressure-composition-temperature (P-C-T) data are reported for St 198 in the temperature range 200 to 500C. The P-C-T data over the full range of deuterium loading and at temperatures of 350C and below is described an expression. At higher temperatures, one or more secondary reactions in the solid phase occur that slowly consume D2 from the gas phase. X-ray diffraction and other data suggest these reactions to be: 2 Zr2FeDx → xZrD2 + x/3 ZrFe2 + (2 - 2/3x) Zr2Fe and Zr2FeDx + (2 - 1/2x) D2 → 2 ZrD2 + Fe, where 0 2Fe formed in the first reaction accounts for the observed consumption of deuterium from the gas phase by this reaction

  7. Evaluation on materials performance of Hastelloy Alloy XR for HTTR uses-6. Tensile and creep properties of heat exchanger tube base materials and its welded-joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tensile and creep properties of heat exchanger tube base materials and its welded-joints were investigated as a series of evaluation tests on Hastelloy Alloy XR heat exchanger tube and filler metal for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) components. As for tensile properties after thermal aging of base materials and welded joints, ductility was remarkably reduced at room temperature while it was raised at 950degC. On creep properties, the difference between base materials and welded joints in creep rupture strength was relatively small. Creep rupture elongation tended to decrease with increasing rupture time, and rupture elongation of welded joint had a tendency to be lower than that of base material. On the other hand, a comparison of plate with tube on high temperature tensile ductility after thermal aging was found to be higher in tube than in plate while its difference was slight at room temperature. As for creep properties, base materials and welded joints of tube had a tendency to be slightly shorter in rupture time at lower stress and long terms than those of plate. However, it is concluded that this is not problematic in practical uses from the fact that the rupture time in tube is comparable or greater than that of Hastelloy Alloy XR master curve and that it is much longer than that of design creep rupture strength =SR=. (author)

  8. A low alloy sintered-heat treated steel with good fatigue properties as a suitable material for resisting cyclic stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, attempt has been made to find a low alloy steel with adequate mechanical properties, especially fatigue limit. Two P/M steels (Fe-Ni-Cu-Mo) with 0.6%C, one containing 1.75% and the other 4% nickel were selected. Samples were sintered in H/sub 2//N/sub 2/ atmosphere for 30 minutes at 1120 C. First group (1.75 % Ni) had a density of 7.13 gr/cm/sup 3/ and fatigue limit of 214 MPa (at 2 x 10 /sup 6/ cycles. After heat treatment, austenitizing at 860 degree C and tempering at 180 degree C for one hour, the fatigue limit of the two materials increased to 239 and 350 MPa respectively. Fractured surfaces of fatigue specimens were examined by SEM and found out two distinct areas. One of these areas consist of dimples at the necks between grains indicating plastic deformation during final fracture, and the other intergranular path of fatigue crack growth showing less plastic deformation. In addition, at some locations transgranular brittle fracture indicated by cleavage was observed. Since the strength of necks between increases with increasing nickel content of the alloy, the fatigue crack in nickel rich alloy follows a stronger path. Fatigue limits of both steels have improved by heat treatment due to this fact. Considering adequate fatigue strength and other mechanical properties of the 1.75% Ni alloy in sintered-heat treated condition, makes this alloy a good candidate for parts requiring resistance to cyclic stresses such as rocker arm. (author)

  9. How design can contribute to materials research - Explorative prototyping as a method for collaboration between design and materials science

    OpenAIRE

    Itälä, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines how design, particularly industrial design practice, can contribute to the research and development of materials and their applications in collaboration with materials science. The topic is approached through the notion of constructive design research, which refers to the utilization of concrete design outputs as a means for research. The scientific community is struggling with increasing demands for the generation of impact through research, this being the case also...

  10. Science of materials. Progress report, January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research program is designed to provide information concerning basic properties of materials that are important for the development of energy systems. The emphasis is on the synthesis and characterization of new materials with novel properties for future applications. The research program includes studies of the microchemistry and microstructure; the deformation, corrosion and fracture of metals, ceramics and alloy materials are of particular concern, as is the hydrogen embrittlement of metals; also under investigation are the mechanism of heat transfer across interfaces, catalytic properties of surfaces, and erosion of surfaces by fluid suspended particles. The new materials and materials configurations now being fabricated for research on energy applications include a variety of metastable ceramic, metallic, semi-conducting and molecular assemblies

  11. Preparation of hard magnetic materials based on nitrogenated rare-earth iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nd Fe11Ti, Nd Fe10.5 Mo1.5 and Nd Fe10.75 Mo1.25 alloys were synthesized by reduction-diffusion calciothermic process (RDC) from neodymium chloride (NdCl3), iron, titanium, molybdenum and reduction agent (metallic calcium). The effect of process variables, like temperature, time, excess amount of NdCl3, heating rate, and composition variation of the Nd Fe12-xMox (1 ≥ x ≥ 2). Mother alloys in which 1:12 phase is major were nitrogenated by gas-solid reaction with N2 and by chemical reaction with sodium zide (Na N3). In addition, the influence of reducing particle size of the powdered mother alloys in the nitrogenation step with Na N3 were studied. As prepared and interstitially modified Nd Fe11 Ti, Nd Fe10.5 Mo1.5 and Nd Fe10.75 Mo1.25 alloys with nitrogen , were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, thermomagnetic, SEM and EDS. Nitrogenation by gas-solid reaction with N2 is found to be not promising, since resulted Curie temperatures (Tc) were lower than literature values. However, nitrogenation by chemical reaction with Na N3 was efficient with higher or same Tc than previous reported results. The average increases on Tc and volumetric expansion were 200 deg C and 4%, respectively. Milling of the mother alloys before nitrogenation at 330 deg C is preferred because reaction kinetics is enhanced. Nevertheless, at 450 deg C, a competition between the interstitially modified compound formation (alloy + N) and alloy dissociation has occurred, resulting in a Fe-α phase increase. (author)

  12. Ultrafast laser inscribed integrated photonics: material science to device development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Detailed studies of intense light – material interactions has led to new insights into fs laser induced refractive index change in a range of glass types. This body of knowledge enables the development of advanced processing methodologies, resulting in novel planar and 3D guided wave devices. We will review the chemistry and morphology associated with fs laser induced refractive index change in multi-component glasses such as ZBLAN, phosphates and silicates, and discuss how these material changes inform our research programs developing a range of active and passive lightwave systems.

  13. Materials Reliability Program Resistance to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 690, 52, and 152 in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H. [Framatome ANP, Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Fyfitch, S. [Framatome ANP, Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Scott, P. [Framatome ANP, SAS, Paris (France); Foucault, M. [Framatome ANP, SAS, Le Creusot (France); Kilian, R. [Framatome ANP, GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Winters, M. [Framatome ANP, GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. Repairs and replacements have generally utilized wrought Alloy 690 material and its compatible weld metals (Alloy 152 and Alloy 52), which have been shown to be very highly resistant to PWSCC in laboratory experiments and have been free from cracking in operating reactors over periods already up to nearly 15 years. It is nevertheless prudent for the PWR industry to attempt to quantify the longevity of these materials with respect to aging degradation by corrosion in order to provide a sound technical basis for the development of future inspection requirements for repaired or replaced component items. This document first reviews numerous laboratory tests, conducted over the last two decades, that were performed with wrought Alloy 690 and Alloy 52 or Alloy 152 weld materials under various test conditions pertinent to corrosion resistance in PWR environments. The main focus of the present review is on PWSCC, but secondary-side conditions are also briefly considered.

  14. Materials Reliability Program Resistance to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 690, 52, and 152 in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. Repairs and replacements have generally utilized wrought Alloy 690 material and its compatible weld metals (Alloy 152 and Alloy 52), which have been shown to be very highly resistant to PWSCC in laboratory experiments and have been free from cracking in operating reactors over periods already up to nearly 15 years. It is nevertheless prudent for the PWR industry to attempt to quantify the longevity of these materials with respect to aging degradation by corrosion in order to provide a sound technical basis for the development of future inspection requirements for repaired or replaced component items. This document first reviews numerous laboratory tests, conducted over the last two decades, that were performed with wrought Alloy 690 and Alloy 52 or Alloy 152 weld materials under various test conditions pertinent to corrosion resistance in PWR environments. The main focus of the present review is on PWSCC, but secondary-side conditions are also briefly considered

  15. Department F3. Condensed matter research and materials sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals with work done during 1988 in the field of muon spectroscopy, neutron scattering, spallation neutron source SINQ, cryogenic detectors, accelerator mass spectrometry, geochemistry, trace elements, aerosol chemistry, heavy elements, cement products, defect physics, irradiation damages in fusion reactor materials, and superconductivity. 111 figs., 19 tabs., 321 refs

  16. Chemistry and Materials Science. Progress report, first half, FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research are growth, structure, and reactivity of surfaces and thin films; uranium research; physics and processing of metals; energetic materials; etc. The laboratory-directed R and D include director`s initiatives and individual projects, and transactinium institute studies.

  17. [Science and Technology and Recycling: Instructional Materials on Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum Association, New York, NY.

    Educational materials on the manufacture and use of aluminum are assembled in this multi-media unit for use by junior high and secondary school students. Student booklets and brochures include: "The Story of Aluminum,""Uses of Aluminum,""Independent Study Guide for School Research Projects,""Questions and Answers About Litter, Solid Waste, and…

  18. NANOTECHNOLOGY IN CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL SCIENCE: REALITY AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhdanok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents information on the beginning, state and prospects of nanotechnology application in the construction industry inBelarus. These technologies are based on the national carbon nano-materials, obtained at theInstituteofHeatand Mass Transfer of NAS of Belarus. 

  19. NANOTECHNOLOGY IN CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL SCIENCE: REALITY AND PROSPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    S. Zhdanok; Khroustalev, B.; E. Batyanowski; S. Leonovich

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents information on the beginning, state and prospects of nanotechnology application in the construction industry inBelarus. These technologies are based on the national carbon nano-materials, obtained at theInstituteofHeatand Mass Transfer of NAS of Belarus. 

  20. The Life Cycle Application of Intelligent Software Modeling for the First Materials Science Research Rack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Amanda; Parris, Frank; Nerren, Philip

    2000-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been funding development of intelligent software models to benefit payload ground operations for nearly a decade. Experience gained from simulator development and real-time monitoring and control is being applied to engineering design, testing, and operation of the First Material Science Research Rack (MSRR-1). MSRR-1 is the first rack in a suite of three racks comprising the Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) which will operate on the International Space Station (ISS). The MSRF will accommodate advanced microgravity investigations in areas such as the fields of solidification of metals and alloys, thermo-physical properties of polymers, crystal growth studies of semiconductor materials, and research in ceramics and glasses. The MSRR-1 is a joint venture between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) to study the behavior of different materials during high temperature processing in a low gravity environment. The planned MSRR-1 mission duration is five (5) years on-orbit and the total design life is ten (IO) years. The MSRR-1 launch is scheduled on the third Utilization Flight (UF-3) to ISS, currently in February of 2003). The objective of MSRR-1 is to provide an early capability on the ISS to conduct material science, materials technology, and space product research investigations in microgravity. It will provide a modular, multi-user facility for microgravity research in materials crystal growth and solidification. An intelligent software model of MSRR-1 is under development and will serve multiple purposes to support the engineering analysis, testing, training, and operational phases of the MSRR-1 life cycle development. The G2 real-time expert system software environment developed by Gensym Corporation was selected as the intelligent system shell for this development work based on past experience gained and the effectiveness of the programming environment. Our approach of multi- uses of the simulation model and