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Sample records for alloyed uranium sicral

  1. Heating uranium alloy billets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data were obtained for the surface heat transfer coefficient of uranium and the alloys of uranium-0.75 wt percent titanium, uranium-6 wt percent niobium, and uranium-7.5 wt percent niobium-2.5 wt percent zirconium. Samples were heated to 8500C in both a molten salt bath and an argon-purged air furnace, then the samples were cooled in air. Surface heat transfer coefficients were calculated from the experimental data for both heating and cooling of the metals. 4 fig, 4 tables

  2. Uranium-Based Cermet Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes certain features of dispersion-hardened uranium-based cermets. As possible hardening materials, consideration was given to UO2, UC, Al2O3, MgO and UBe13. Data were obtained on the behaviour of uranium alloys containing the above-mentioned admixtures during creep tests, short-term strength tests and cyclic thermal treatment. The corrosion resistance o f UBe13-based uranium alloys was also studied. )author)

  3. Process for alloying uranium and niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.; Masters, David R.; Chapman, Lloyd R.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys such as U-6Nb are prepared by forming a stacked sandwich array of uraniun sheets and niobium powder disposed in layers between the sheets, heating the array in a vacuum induction melting furnace to a temperature such as to melt the uranium, holding the resulting mixture at a temperature above the melting point of uranium until the niobium dissolves in the uranium, and casting the uranium-niobium solution. Compositional uniformity in the alloy product is enabled by use of the sandwich structure of uranium sheets and niobium powder.

  4. Hot rolling of thick uranium molybdenum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMint, Amy L.; Gooch, Jack G.

    2015-11-17

    Disclosed herein are processes for hot rolling billets of uranium that have been alloyed with about ten weight percent molybdenum to produce cold-rollable sheets that are about one hundred mils thick. In certain embodiments, the billets have a thickness of about 7/8 inch or greater. Disclosed processes typically involve a rolling schedule that includes a light rolling pass and at least one medium rolling pass. Processes may also include reheating the rolling stock and using one or more heavy rolling passes, and may include an annealing step.

  5. Corrosion of copper alloys by gaseous uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion of electrolytic copper and eight copper alloys in gaseous uranium hexafluoride at a pressure of 15 kPa was investigated. Corrosion-time relationships were established for five temperatures ranging from 50 to 150oC and for exposure times between 5 and 1000 h. Post-corrosion investigations were performed, employing a variety of physical techniques. Electrolytic copper, beryllium copper, and aluminium bronze were found to be the most resistant of the alloys investigated. The uranium containing corrosion products found were the α and β forms of UF5 and U2F9, with the more reactive alloys giving rise to U2F9. Changes in corrosion mechanism correlated with changes in the intermediate uranium fluoride formed. Corrosion activation energies were low, compared to conventional oxidation, ranging from 4 to 64 kJ mol-1. (Author)

  6. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR FORMED PROJECTILE OF DEPLETED URANIUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋顺成; 高平; 才鸿年

    2003-01-01

    The numerical simulation for forming projectile of depleted uranium alloy with the SPH ( Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic ) algorithm was presented. In the computations the artificial pressures of detonation were used, i. e. , the spatial distribution and time distribution were given artificially. To describe the deformed behaviors of the depleted uranium alloy under high pressure and high strain rate, the Johnson-Cook model of materials was introduced. From the numerical simulation the formed projectile velocity,projectile geometry and the minimum of the height of detonation are obtained.

  7. Qualification of Uranium-Molybdenum Alloys for Research Reactor Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys are being produced to refuel international research reactors - replacing current highly-enriched uranium fuel assemblies. Over the past two years, Y-12 Analytical Chemistry has been the primary qualification laboratory for current U-Mo materials development in the U.S. During this time, multiple analytical techniques have been explored to obtain complete and accurate characterization of U-Mo materials. For the chemical characterization of U-Mo materials, three primary techniques have been utilized: (i) thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) for uranium content and isotopic analyses, (ii) a combination of inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) techniques for determination of molybdenum content and trace elemental concentrations and (iii) combustion analyses for trace elemental analyses. Determination of uranium content, uranium isotopic composition and elemental impurities by combustion analyses (H, C, O, N) required only minimal changes to existing analytical methodology for uranium metal analyses. However, spectral interferences (both isobaric and optical) due to high molybdenum content presented significant challenges to the use of ICP instrumentation. While providing a brief description of methods for determination of uranium content and H, C, O and N content, this manuscript concentrates on the challenges faced in applying ICP techniques to qualification of U-Mo fuels. Multiple ICP techniques were explored to determine the effectiveness (e.g., accuracy, precision, speed of analysis, etc.) for determining both molybdenum content and trace elemental impurity concentrations: high-resolution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS), inductively- coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) and inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The merits and limitations of these techniques for qualification of U-Mo alloys are presented, to include the limits of quantitation and uncertainties

  8. Determination of uranium in fissium-uranium alloy and in fissium dross

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolution and analysis techniques for fissium-uranium alloy and fissium dross are described. The fuming technique of dissolution effectively eliminated all interferring elements in the titration determination of U. The results from the semiquantitative analysis of fission dross by spark source mass spectrometry were tabulated

  9. The use of telecommunications satellites by the air, sea, and land military forces and by civil defense - Project SICRAL AM/136/80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni, A.

    1983-03-01

    The projected uses and design concept of SICRAL, an Italian satellite program being developed for classified and emergency communications, are discussed. It is shown that a dedicated satellite, as a complement to terrestrial systems, is ideally suited to serve the needs of the armed forces, in cooperation with NATO, and of the civil defense organizations. SICRAL should provide normal and secure telephone, telegraph and teletype, facsimile, and data-transmission services to a variable mix of fixed and mobile stations, using the SHF, UHF, and EHF bands. Present plans call for two 1400-kg triaxially stabilized multiple-payload-type geostationary satellites, one operational and one in reserve, with a third satellite ready for launch as soon as the reserve satellite becomes operational. SICRAL could be launched by Ariane IV or Shuttle for preoperational testing within five years and full operational status in six or seven years, including time for ground-facility construction.

  10. Effect of titanium content and aging temperature on the properties of uranium-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical properties and microstructures of four uranium-titanium alloys were examined as functions of titanium content and aging temperature. Titanium alloy content was varied from 0.41 to 0.79 weight percent. Aging temperatures from 350 to 4500C (all for six hours) were evaluated for each alloy in addition to tests in the unaged conditions. Titanium and aging temperature were both shown to be strong effects in determining alloy properties. It was determined that the uranium-0.41 weight percent titanium alloy underwent extensive age-hardening even though the alloy did not exhibit a martensitic microstructure characteristic of the alloys richer in titanium

  11. Niobium-uranium alloys with voids of predetermined size and total volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Cluskey, J. K.; Wilhelm, H. A.

    1969-01-01

    Mixture of uranium oxide, niobium oxide, and graphite of various carbon-to-oxygen ratios is heated to a temperature below the melting point of the noibium-uranium alloy. The alloy is produced by this method with voids predetermined as to size and total volume.

  12. Kr ion irradiation study of the depleted-uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Kirk, M. A.; Rest, J.; Allen, T. R.; Wachs, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fuel development for the reduced enrichment research and test reactor (RERTR) program is tasked with the development of new low enrichment uranium nuclear fuels that can be employed to replace existing high enrichment uranium fuels currently used in some research reactors throughout the world. For dispersion type fuels, radiation stability of the fuel-cladding interaction product has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted-uranium alloys are cast for the radiation stability studies of the fuel-cladding interaction product using Kr ion irradiation to investigate radiation damage from fission products. SEM analysis indicates the presence of the phases of interest: U(Al, Si) 3, (U, Mo)(Al, Si) 3, UMo 2Al 20, U 6Mo 4Al 43 and UAl 4. Irradiations of TEM disc samples were conducted with 500 keV Kr ions at 200 °C to ion doses up to 2.5 × 10 19 ions/m 2 (˜10 dpa) with an Kr ion flux of 10 16 ions/m 2/s (˜4.0 × 10 -3 dpa/s). Microstructural evolution of the phases relevant to fuel-cladding interaction products was investigated using transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Aqueous corrosion behavior of uranium-molybdenum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Levi D.

    Nuclear fuel characterization requires understanding of the various conditions to which materials are exposed in-reactor. One of these important conditions is corrosion, particularly that of fuel constituents. Therefore, corrosion behavior is of special interest and an essential part of nuclear materials characterization efforts. In support of the Office of Material Management and Minimization's Reactor Conversion Program, monolithic uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy (U-Mo) is being investigated as a low enriched uranium alternative to highly enriched uranium dispersion fuel currently used in domestic high performance research reactors. The aqueous corrosion behavior of U-Mo is being examined at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of U-Mo fuel fabrication capability activity. No prior study adequately represents this behavior given the current state of alloy composition and thermomechanical processing methods, and research reactor water chemistry. Two main measurement techniques were employed to evaluate U-Mo corrosion behavior. Low-temperature corrosion rate values were determined by means of U-Mo immersion testing and subsequent mass-loss measurements. The electrochemical behavior of each processing condition was also qualitatively examined using the techniques of corrosion potential and anodic potentiodynamic polarization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical metallography (OM) imagery and hardness measurements provided supplemental corrosion analysis in an effort to relate material corrosion behavior to processing. The processing effects investigated as part of this were those of homogenization heat treatment (employed to mitigate the effects of coring in castings) and sub-eutectoid heat treatment, meant to represent additional steps in fabrication (such as hot isostatic pressing) performed at similar temperatures. Immersion mass loss measurements and electrochemical results both showed very little appreciable difference between

  14. Real-time monitoring of plutonium content in uranium-plutonium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shelly Xiaowei; Westphal, Brian Robert; Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2015-09-01

    A method and device for the real-time, in-situ monitoring of Plutonium content in U--Pu Alloys comprising providing a crucible. The crucible has an interior non-reactive to a metallic U--Pu alloy within said interior of said crucible. The U--Pu alloy comprises metallic uranium and plutonium. The U--Pu alloy is heated to a liquid in an inert or reducing atmosphere. The heated U--Pu alloy is then cooled to a solid in an inert or reducing atmosphere. As the U--Pu alloy is cooled, the temperature of the U--Pu alloy is monitored. A solidification temperature signature is determined from the monitored temperature of the U--Pu alloy during the step of cooling. The amount of Uranium and the amount of Plutonium in the U--Pu alloy is then determined from the determined solidification temperature signature.

  15. Effects of processing variables on the hydrogen content and resultant mechanical properties of uranium and uranium-3/4 wt % titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium and its alloys are capable of being processed, fabricated and heat treated by many different methods. The deleterious effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of uranium and its alloys are well established. In this study the effects of certain processing procedures on hydrogen absorption and removal were investigated. Both unalloyed uranium and uranium-3/4 wt % titanium were involved in this work. The tensile test data for both materials clearly show the adverse effects of hydrogen absorption

  16. Study of the pyrophoric characteristics of uranium-iron alloys; Etude du caractere pyrophorique des alliages uranium fer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplessis, X

    2000-02-23

    The objective of the study is to understand the pyrophoric characteristics of uranium-iron alloys. In order to carry out this research we have elected to use uranium-iron alloy powder with granules of 200 {mu}m and 1000 {mu}m diameter with 4%, 10.8% and 14% iron content. The experiments were performed on small samples of few milligrams and on larger quantities of few hundred grams. The main conclusions obtained are the followings: -The reaction start at 453 K (180 deg. C) and the ignition at 543 K (270 deg. C) - The influence of the specific area seems more important than the iron concentration in the alloys - When the alloy ignites, the fire spreads quickly and the alloy rapidly consumes. (author)

  17. Interaction phenomena between ceramic coatings and liquid uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the high chemical reactivity of molten uranium alloys, the use of traditional graphite crucibles for casting fuel slugs for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is problematic. Moreover, rare earth (RE) elements retained in the fuel slugs for an SFR, which are extracted from the spent fuel by pyro-processing, are more reactive than uranium melt. Therefore, in this study, Y2O3 single-layer coatings with thicknesses of approximately 50, 70, and 120 μm and double-layer coatings of TaC/Y2O3 and Y2O3/TaC were plasma-sprayed onto niobium substrates and tested for thermal shock resistance and compatibility against U-10 wt% Zr and U-10 wt% Zr-5 wt% RE melt. The Y2O3 single-layer coating, regardless of coating thickness, and the TaC/Y2O3 double-layer coating showed good contact at the interface between the coating and the niobium substrate, with no deterioration after the thermal cycling test. In the interaction studies, the single- and double-layer coatings showed good compatibility with the U-Zr melt. However, the Y2O3 coatings with thicknesses of approximately 50 and 70 μm showed severe penetration of the U-Zr-RE melt and reacted with the niobium substrate. The single-layer Y2O3 coating with a thickness of 120 μm and the double-layer TaC/Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising performance among the candidate coatings. (author)

  18. Strength and fracture of uranium, plutonium and several their alloys under shock wave loading

    OpenAIRE

    Golubev V.K.

    2012-01-01

    Results on studying the spall fracture of uranium, plutonium and several their alloys under shock wave loading are presented in the paper. The problems of influence of initial temperature in a range of − 196 – 800∘C and loading time on the spall strength and failure character of uranium and two its alloys with molybdenum and both molybdenum and zirconium were studied. The results for plutonium and its alloy with gallium were obtained at a normal temperature and in a temperature range of 40–31...

  19. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in liquid gallium, indium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics of uranium is determined in alloys with Ga, In and their mixtures. • In Ga–In alloys decreasing temperature leads to increasing interaction of U with Ga. • Activity coefficients of uranium decrease with increasing gallium content. - Abstract: Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium, indium and gallium–indium alloys containing 21.8 (eutectic), 40 and 70 wt.% In. Activity was measured at 573–1073 K employing the electromotive force method, and solubility between room temperature (or the alloy melting point) and 1073 K employing direct physical measurements. Activity coefficients were obtained from the difference of experimentally determined temperature dependencies of uranium activity and solubility. Intermetallic compounds formed in the respective alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of uranium in the studied alloys were calculated. Liquidus lines in U–Ga and U–In phase diagrams from the side rich in gallium or indium are proposed

  20. Annex 4 - Task 08/13 final report, Producing the binary uranium alloys with alloying components Al, Mo, Zr, Nb, and B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to reactivity of uranium in contact with the gasses O2, N2, H2, especially under higher temperatures uranium processing is always done in vacuum or inert gas. Melting, alloying and casting is done in high vacuum stoves. This report reviews the type of furnaces and includes detailed description of the electric furnace for producing uranium alloys which is available in the Institute

  1. Microstructural investigation of uranium rich U-Zr-Nb ternary alloy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Kaushik; Kaity, Santu; Mishra, Sudhir; Kumar, Arun

    2014-03-01

    Uranium rich U-Zr-Nb alloy system is a potential candidate among the family of alloys considered as metallic fuel for fast reactors application. As a part of the program U-7% Zr, U-5% Zr-2% Nb, U-3.5% Zr-3.5% Nb, U-2% Zr-5% Nb and U-7% Nb (composition in wt.%) alloys were prepared. The total amount of Nb and Zr was restricted, because higher addition of non-fissile alloying element not only reduces the fissile content it also decreases the breeding ratio due to parasitic absorption. The alloys were characterized by SEM micrograph. The phase analysis was performed with the help of XRD and the phase transformation temperatures were determined by DTA. The variation in crystal structure with subsequent replacement of Zr with Nb as an alloying element has been highlighted. The as quenched U-7% Nb alloy shows complete γ° phase at ambient temperature.

  2. Impact strength of the uranium-6 weight percent niobium alloy between -1980 and +2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to determine if a ductile-to-brittle transition wxisted for the uranium-6 wt % niobium (U-6Nb) alloy. Standard V-notched Charpy bars were made from both solution-quenched and solution-quenched and aged U-6Nb alloy and were tested between -1980 and +2000C. It was found that a sharp ductile-brittle transition does not exist for the alloy. A linear relationship existed between test temperature and impact strength, and the alloy retained a significant amount of impact strength even at very low temperatures. 9 figures

  3. Effects of heat treatments on the thermal diffusivity of Uranium-Molybdenum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarano, D. M.; Mansur, F. A.; Santos, A. M. M.; Ferraz, W. B.; Pedrosa, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    U-Mo alloys are the most investigated nuclear fuel material to be used in research reactors. The addition of molybdenum stabilizes the gamma phase of uranium and increases its melting point. A research program under development at Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) aims the obtaining of uranium-molybdenum alloys to enable the high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) conversions. U-Mo ingots with 10% by weight were induction melted and heat treated at 300 °C for 72 h, 120 h and 240 h. Thermal diffusivity was determined by the laser flash method and thermal quadrupole method, from room temperature to 300 oC and 400oC. It was observed that the thermal diffusivity tends to increase with increasing temperature.

  4. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the γ → β transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the β → α transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form β at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the β and γ regions. The β phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the α form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The β phase obtained by quenching from the β phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the γ region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the β phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The β → α transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct γ → α transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C/s. He has however observed the formation of several martensitic structures. (author)

  5. Fluorimetric determination of uranium in zirconium and zircaloy alloys; Determinacion fluorimetrica de uranio en aleaciones de zirconio y zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta L, E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: eal@nuclear.inin.mx

    1991-05-15

    The objective of this procedure is to determine microquantities of uranium in zirconium and zircaloy alloys. The report also covers the determination of uranium in zirconium alloys and zircaloy in the range from 0.25 to 20 ppm on 1 g of base sample of radioactive material. These limit its can be variable if the size of the used aliquot one is changed for the final determination of uranium. (Author)

  6. Elemental Solubility Tendency for the Phases of Uranium by Classical Models Used to Predict Alloy Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Blackwood; Travis Koenig; Saleem Drera; Brajenda Mishra; Davis Olson; Doug Porter; Robert Mariani

    2012-03-01

    Traditional alloy theory models, specifically Darken-Gurry and Miedema’s analyses, that characterize solutes in solid solvents relative to physical properties of the elements have been used to assist in predicting alloy behavior. These models will be applied relative to the three solid phases of uranium: alpha (orthorhombic), beta (tetragonal), and gamma (bcc). These phases have different solubilities for specific alloy additions as a function of temperature. The Darken-Gurry and Miedema models, with modifications based on concepts of Waber, Gschneider, and Brewer will be used to predict the behavior of four types of solutes: 1) Transition metals that are used for various purposes associated with the containment as alloy additions in the uranium fuel 2) Transuranic elements in the uranium 3) Rare earth fission products (lanthanides) 4) Transition metals and other fission products Using these solute map criteria, elemental behavior will be predicted as highly soluble, marginally soluble, or immiscible (compound formers) and will be used to compare solute effects during uranium phase transformations. The overlapping of these solute maps are convenient first approximation tools for predicting alloy behavior.

  7. Obtention of uranium-molybdenum alloy ingots technique to avoid carbon contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, Tercio A.; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Reis, Sergio C.; Brina, Jose Giovanni M.; Faeda, Kelly Cristina M.; Ferraz, Wilmar B., E-mail: tap@cdtn.b, E-mail: jbp@cdtn.b, E-mail: jgmb@cdtn.b, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The replacement of high enriched uranium (U{sup 235} > 85 wt%) by low enriched uranium (U{sup 235} < 20wt%) nuclear fuels in research and test reactors is being implemented as an initiative of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, conceived in the USA since mid-70s, in order to avoid nuclear weapons proliferation. Such replacement implies in the use of compounds or alloys with higher uranium densities. Among the several uranium alloys investigated since then, U-Mo presents great application potential due to its physical properties and good behavior during irradiation, which makes it an important option as a nuclear fuel material for the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. The development of the plate-type nuclear fuel based on U-Mo alloy is being performed at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) and also at IPEN. The carbon contamination of the alloy is one of the great concerns during the melting process. It was observed that U-Mo alloy is more critical considering carbon contamination when using graphite crucibles. Alternative melting technique was implemented at CDTN in order to avoid carbon contamination from graphite crucible using Yttria stabilized ZrO{sub 2} crucibles. Ingots with low carbon content and good internal quality were obtained. (author)

  8. HPIC separation and quantification of Ca and Fe in uranium metal and alloy compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the separation and quantification of Ca and Fe from uranium metal and uranium based alloy fuels employing ion chromatography (IC). Ca separation from other metal ions of alkali and alkaline groups was carried out on a cation exchange column and the same was detected and quantified by means of conductivity detector. In case of Fe, it was separated from other transition elements using chelation ion chromatography where detection and quantification was carried out photometrically after the addition of PAR as post column reagent. For both the analyses a preliminary column chromatography separation for eliminating the bulk matrix uranium was performed. (author)

  9. Magnetic properties of two new uranium-based alloys: UAuCu4 and UPdCu4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new uranium-based alloys UAuCu4 and UPdCu4 have been prepared and their magnetic properties studied. The NMR of the isotope 63Cu in these alloys suggests that they are well ordered ternary materials. There is a strong correlation between the occupancy of the (4c) sites in the structure and the relative size of the two non-uranium atoms in these alloys. (author)

  10. Chemical analysis of uranium-niobium alloys by wavelength dispersive spectroscopy at the sigma complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papin, Pallas A.

    2012-06-01

    Uranium-niobium alloys play an important role in the nation's nuclear stockpile. It is possible to chemically quantify this alloy at a micron scale by using a technique know as wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. This report documents how this technique was used and how it is possible to reproduce measurements of this type. Discussion regarding the accuracy and precision of the measurements, the development of standards, and the comparison of different ways to model the matrices are all presented.

  11. Chemical compatibility of uranium carbides with Cr-Fe-Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the chemical compatibility of uranium carbides and Cr-Fe-Ni alloys, which has been evaluated by thermodynamic modeling and experimental phase studies. Two reaction temperatures, 973 and 1273 K, were used to simulate normal and overtemperature operation of advanced liquid-metal fast breeder reactor fuel-cladding couples. 27 refs

  12. Study and comparison of analytical methods for dosing molybdenum in uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods to determine molybdenum in uranium-molybdenum alloys are developed by various technic: molecular absorption spectrophotometry, emission spectroscopy, X ray fluorescence, atomic absorption spectrophotometry. After a comparison on samples in which molybdenum content lies between 1 and 10 per cent by weight, one concludes in the interest of some of the exposed methods for routine analysis. (author)

  13. Determination of crystalline texture in aluminium - uranium alloys by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Textures of hot-rolled aluminum-uranium alloys and of aluminum were determined by neutron diffraction. Sheets of alloys containing 8.0, 21.5 and 23.7 wt pct U, as well as pure aluminum, were obtained in a stepped rolling process, 15% reduction each step, 75% total reduction. During the rolling the temperature was 6000C. Alloys with low uranium contents are two phase systems in which an intermetallic compound UAl4, orthorhombic, is dispersed in a pure aluminum matrix. The addition of a few percent of Si in such alloys leads to the formation of UAl3, simple cubic, instead of UAl4. The Al -- 23.7 wt pct U alloy was prepared with 2,2 wt pct of Si. The results indicate that the texture of the matrix is more dependent on the uranium concentration than on the texture of the intermetallic phases. An improvement in the technique applied to texture measurements by using a sample fully bathed in the neutron beam is also presented. The method takes advantage of the low neutron absorption of the studied materials as well as of the neglibible variation in the multiple scattering which occurs in a conveniently shaped sample having a weakly developed texture. (Author)

  14. Obtention of uranium-molybdenum alloy ingots microstructure and phase characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, Tercio A.; Braga, Daniel M.; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Brina, Jose Giovanni M.; Ferraz, Wilmar B., E-mail: tap@cdtn.b, E-mail: bragadm@cdtn.b, E-mail: jbp@cdtn.b, E-mail: jgmb@cdtn.b, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The replacement of high enriched uranium (U-{sup 235} > 85 wt%) by low enriched uranium (U-{sup 235} < 20 wt%) nuclear fuels in research and test reactors is being implemented as an initiative of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, conceived in the USA since mid-70s, in order to avoid nuclear weapons proliferation. Such replacement implies in the use of compounds or alloys with higher uranium densities. Several uranium alloys that fill this requirement has been investigated since then. Among these alloys, U-Mo presents great application potential due to its physical properties and good behavior during irradiation, which makes it an important option as a nuclear fuel material for the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. The development of the plate-type nuclear fuel based on U-Mo alloys is being performed at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) and also at the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research - IPEN. U-{sup 10}Mo ingots were melted in an induction furnace with protective argon atmosphere. The microstructure of the ingots were characterized through optical and scanning electronic microscopy in the as cast and heat treated conditions. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and X-Ray Diffraction were used as characterization techniques for elemental analysis and phases determination. It was confirmed the presence of metastable gamma-phase in the as cast condition, surrounded by hypereutectoid alpha-phase (uranium-rich phase), as well as a pearlite-like constituent, composed by alternated lamellas of U{sub 2}Mo compound and alpha-phase, in the heat treated condition. (author)

  15. Thermodynamics and separation factor of uranium from lanthanum in liquid eutectic gallium-indium alloy/molten salt system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The behavior of lanthanum and uranium on liquid gallium-indium eutectic alloy was carried out. The experiments were done in fused 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic vs. Cl−/Cl2 reference electrode at the temperature range 723–823 K. Thermodynamic properties of La-Ga-In and U-Ga-In alloys and the separation factor U/La were calculated. - Abstract: This work presents the electrochemical study of lanthanum and uranium compounds in fused 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic vs. Cl−/Cl2 reference electrode in the temperature range 723–823 K on liquid gallium-indium eutectic alloy. Thermodynamics and the activity coefficients of lanthanum and uranium were studied. The separation factor of uranium from lanthanum on gallium-indium eutectic alloy was determined

  16. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  17. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  18. A Model for High-Strain-Rate Deformation of Uranium-Niobium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.L.Addessio; Q.H.Zuo; T.A.Mason; L.C.Brinson

    2003-05-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to develop a framework for modeling uranium-niobium alloys under the conditions of high strain rate. Using this framework, a three-dimensional phenomenological model, which includes nonlinear elasticity (equation of state), phase transformation, crystal reorientation, rate-dependent plasticity, and porosity growth is presented. An implicit numerical technique is used to solve the evolution equations for the material state. Comparisons are made between the model and data for low-strain-rate loading and unloading as well as for heating and cooling experiments. Comparisons of the model and data also are made for low- and high-strain-rate uniaxial stress and uniaxial strain experiments. A uranium-6 weight percent niobium alloy is used in the comparisons of model and experiment.

  19. Thermodynamic study of the treatment of uranium zirconium alloys for recovering their constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the reactions of attack of enriched uranium alloys and of zirconium includes two parts: - Effect of gaseous HCl on one and the other substances. Separation of zirconium chloride by sublimation. - Fluoridation action of F2 and ClF3 followed by sublimation of UF6. At the end of each part, shall be found general considerations deduced from the preceding results, for the practical realization of the attacks. (author)

  20. Spectrographic determination of silicon in uranium-carbon-silicon alloys; Le dosage spectrographique du silicium dans les alliages uranium-carbone-silicium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, J.P.; Chazee, J.J.; Tran Van, D.; Desforges, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-04-01

    The use of a spark excitation under a controlled argon atmosphere enables the spectrographic determination of silicon in uranium-carbon-silicon alloys. The method presented here is rapid and its accuracy is most satisfactory. (authors) [French] L'utilisation d'une excitation par etincelle sous biosphere controlee d'argon permet le dosage spectrographique du silicium dans les alliages uranium-carbone-silicium. La methode proposee est rapide et sa precision tres satisfaisante. (auteurs)

  1. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    beginning of the materials processing setup. Also included within this section is a thesis proposal by Jeff Hausaman. Appendix C contains the public papers and presentations introduced at the 2010 American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting. Appendix A - MSNE theses of David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich and proposal by Jeff Hausaman A.1 December 2009 Thesis by David Garnetti entitled 'Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications' A.2 September 2009 Presentation by David Garnetti (same title as document in Appendix B.1) A.3 December 2010 Thesis by Grant Helmreich entitled 'Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications' A.4 October 2010 Presentation by Grant Helmreich (same title as document in Appendix B.3) A.5 Thesis Proposal by Jeffrey Hausaman entitled 'Hot Extrusion of Alpha Phase Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors' Appendix B - External presentations introduced at the 2010 ANS Winter Meeting B.1 J.S. Hausaman, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, 'Powder Metallurgy of Alpha Phase Uranium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors,' Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.2 PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.1 B.3 G.W. Helmreich, W.J. Sames, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, 'Uranium Powder Production Using a Hydride-Dehydride Process,' Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.4. PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.3 B.5 Poster Presentation from C.3 Appendix C - Fuel cycle research and development undergraduate materials and poster presentation C.1 Poster entitled 'Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys' presented at the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Annual Meeting C.2 April 2011 Honors Undergraduate Thesis by William Sames, Research Fellow

  2. Study on hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of uranium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of two U-Mn intermetallic compounds, U{sub 6}Mn and UMn{sub 2}, were investigated. U{sub 6}Mn absorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen desorption pressure of U{sub 6}Mn obtained from this experiment was higher than that of U, which was considered to be the effect of alloying, whereas UMn{sub 2} was not observed to absorb hydrogen up to 50 atm at room temperature. (author)

  3. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    outlining the beginning of the materials processing setup. Also included within this section is a thesis proposal by Jeff Hausaman. Appendix C contains the public papers and presentations introduced at the 2010 American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting. Appendix A—MSNE theses of David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich and proposal by Jeff Hausaman A.1 December 2009 Thesis by David Garnetti entitled “Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.2 September 2009 Presentation by David Garnetti (same title as document in Appendix B.1) A.3 December 2010 Thesis by Grant Helmreich entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.4 October 2010 Presentation by Grant Helmreich (same title as document in Appendix B.3) A.5 Thesis Proposal by Jeffrey Hausaman entitled “Hot Extrusion of Alpha Phase Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors” Appendix B—External presentations introduced at the 2010 ANS Winter Meeting B.1 J.S. Hausaman, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Powder Metallurgy of Alpha Phase Uranium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.2 PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.1 B.3 G.W. Helmreich, W.J. Sames, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Uranium Powder Production Using a Hydride-Dehydride Process,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.4. PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.3 B.5 Poster Presentation from C.3 Appendix C—Fuel cycle research and development undergraduate materials and poster presentation C.1 Poster entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys” presented at the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Annual Meeting C.2 April 2011 Honors Undergraduate Thesis

  4. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    outlining the beginning of the materials processing setup. Also included within this section is a thesis proposal by Jeff Hausaman. Appendix C contains the public papers and presentations introduced at the 2010 American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting. Appendix A—MSNE theses of David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich and proposal by Jeff Hausaman A.1 December 2009 Thesis by David Garnetti entitled “Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.2 September 2009 Presentation by David Garnetti (same title as document in Appendix B.1) A.3 December 2010 Thesis by Grant Helmreich entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.4 October 2010 Presentation by Grant Helmreich (same title as document in Appendix B.3) A.5 Thesis Proposal by Jeffrey Hausaman entitled “Hot Extrusion of Alpha Phase Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors” Appendix B—External presentations introduced at the 2010 ANS Winter Meeting B.1 J.S. Hausaman, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Powder Metallurgy of Alpha Phase Uranium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.2 PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.1 B.3 G.W. Helmreich, W.J. Sames, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Uranium Powder Production Using a Hydride-Dehydride Process,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.4. PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.3 B.5 Poster Presentation from C.3 Appendix C—Fuel cycle research and development undergraduate materials and poster presentation C.1 Poster entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys” presented at the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Annual Meeting C.2 April 2011 Honors Undergraduate Thesis

  5. Incentives for the use of depleted uranium alloys as transport cask containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive material transport casks use either lead or depleted uranium (DU) as gamma-ray shielding material. Stainless steel is conventionally used for structural containment. If a DU alloy had sufficient properties to guarantee resistance to failure during both nominal use and accident conditions to serve the dual-role of shielding and containment, the use of other structure materials (i.e., stainless steel) could be reduced. (It is recognized that lead can play no structural role.) Significant reductions in cask weight and dimensions could then be achieved perhaps allowing an increase in payload. The mechanical response of depleted uranium has previously not been included in calculations intended to show that DU-shielded transport casks will maintain their containment function during all conditions. This paper describesa two-part study of depleted uranium alloys: First, the mechanical behavior of DU alloys was determined in order to extend the limited set of mechanical properties reported in the literature. The mechanical properties measured include the tensile behavior the impact energy. Fracture toughness testing was also performed to determine the sensitivity of DU alloys to brittle fracture. Fracture toughness is the inherent material property which quantifies the fracmm resistance of a material. Tensile strength and ductility are significant in terms of other failure modes, however, as win be discussed. These mechanical properties were then input into finite element calculations of cask response to loading conditions to quantify the potential for claiming structural credit for DU. (The term ''structural credit'' describes whether a material has adequate properties to allow it to assume a positive role in withstanding structural loadings.)

  6. Atomistic modeling of high temperature uranium-zirconium alloy structure and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A. P.; Beeler, B.; Deo, C.; Baskes, M. I.; Okuniewski, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A semi-empirical Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) potential is developed for application to the high temperature body-centered-cubic uranium-zirconium alloy (γ-U-Zr) phase and employed with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the high temperature thermo-physical properties of U-Zr alloys. Uranium-rich U-Zr alloys (e.g. U-10Zr) have been tested and qualified for use as metallic nuclear fuel in U.S. fast reactors such as the Integral Fast Reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactors, and are a common sub-system of ternary metallic alloys like U-Pu-Zr and U-Zr-Nb. The potential was constructed to ensure that basic properties (e.g., elastic constants, bulk modulus, and formation energies) were in agreement with first principles calculations and experimental results. After which, slight adjustments were made to the potential to fit the known thermal properties and thermodynamics of the system. The potentials successfully reproduce the experimental melting point, enthalpy of fusion, volume change upon melting, thermal expansion, and the heat capacity of pure U and Zr. Simulations of the U-Zr system are found to be in good agreement with experimental thermal expansion values, Vegard's law for the lattice constants, and the experimental enthalpy of mixing. This is the first simulation to reproduce the experimental thermodynamics of the high temperature γ-U-Zr metallic alloy system. The MEAM potential is then used to explore thermodynamics properties of the high temperature U-Zr system including the constant volume heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, adiabatic index, and the Grüneisen parameters.

  7. Contribution to studies of an industrial alloy uranium-niobium with 6% by weight niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This uranium alloy with 6% by weight niobium (U-6% Nb) obtained by fusion in an induction furnace with thermal gradient directed solidification in a mould, exhibits a small amount of minor segregation (less than 1% by weight), little major segregation and small diameter isolated aggregations. Microsegregation can be eliminated by a homogenization heat treatment (8 hours at 11000C). The hot forming temperature for this alloy lies between 800 and 9000C. In this temperature range, the deformation resistance is low and the deformation capacity high. Laminated tempered U-6%Nb alloy is of very low hardness (150 Vickers) and has a low elastic limit (180 MPa) at 0.2% suitable for cold forming. Annealing performed at temperatures less than 3000C enhance the strength of this alloy when it is in a laminated tempered state without significantly diminishing its ductility properties. Finally, U-6%Nb alloy in the laminated tempered state and welded by electron bombardment does not exhibit differential rupture and retains satisfactory mechanical properties

  8. Fermi energy 5f spectral weight variation in uranium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denlinger, J.D.; Clack, J.; Allen, J.W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Uranium materials display a wide range of thermal, electrical and magnetic properties, often exotic. For more than a decade there have been efforts to use photoemission spectroscopy to develop a systematic and unified understanding of the 5f electron states giving rise to this behavior. These efforts have been hampered by a paucity of systems where changes in transport properties are accompanied by substantial spectral changes, so as to allow an attempt to correlate the two kinds of properties within some model. The authors have made resonant photoemission measurements to extract the 5f spectral weight in three systems which show varying degrees of promise of permitting such an attempt, Y{sub 1{minus}x}U{sub x}Pd{sub 3}, U(Pd{sub x}Pt{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 3} and U(Pd{sub x}Cu{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 5}. They have also measured U 4f core level spectra. The 4f spectra can be modeled with some success by the impurity Anderson model (IAM), and the 5f spectra are currently being analyzed in that framework. The IAM characterizes the 5f-electrons of a single site by an f binding energy {epsilon}{sub f}, an f Coulomb interaction and a hybridization V to conduction electrons. Latent in the model are the phenomena of 5f mixed valence and the Kondo effect.

  9. Strength and fracture of uranium, plutonium and several their alloys under shock wave loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, V. K.

    2012-08-01

    Results on studying the spall fracture of uranium, plutonium and several their alloys under shock wave loading are presented in the paper. The problems of influence of initial temperature in a range of - 196 - 800∘C and loading time on the spall strength and failure character of uranium and two its alloys with molybdenum and both molybdenum and zirconium were studied. The results for plutonium and its alloy with gallium were obtained at a normal temperature and in a temperature range of 40-315∘C, respectively. The majority of tests were conducted with the samples in the form of disks 4 mm in thickness. They were loaded by the impact of aluminum plates 4 mm thick through a copper screen 12 mm thick serving as the cover or bottom part of a special container. The character of spall failure of materials and the damage degree of samples were observed on the longitudinal metallographic sections of recovered samples. For a concrete test temperature, the impact velocity was sequentially changed and therefore the loading conditions corresponding to the consecutive transition from microdamage nucleation up to complete macroscopic spall fracture were determined. The conditions of shock wave loading were calculated using an elastic-plastic computer program. The comparison of obtained results with the data of other researchers on the spall fracture of examined materials was conducted.

  10. Strength and fracture of uranium, plutonium and several their alloys under shock wave loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubev V.K.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Results on studying the spall fracture of uranium, plutonium and several their alloys under shock wave loading are presented in the paper. The problems of influence of initial temperature in a range of − 196 – 800∘C and loading time on the spall strength and failure character of uranium and two its alloys with molybdenum and both molybdenum and zirconium were studied. The results for plutonium and its alloy with gallium were obtained at a normal temperature and in a temperature range of 40–315∘C, respectively. The majority of tests were conducted with the samples in the form of disks 4 mm in thickness. They were loaded by the impact of aluminum plates 4 mm thick through a copper screen 12 mm thick serving as the cover or bottom part of a special container. The character of spall failure of materials and the damage degree of samples were observed on the longitudinal metallographic sections of recovered samples. For a concrete test temperature, the impact velocity was sequentially changed and therefore the loading conditions corresponding to the consecutive transition from microdamage nucleation up to complete macroscopic spall fracture were determined. The conditions of shock wave loading were calculated using an elastic-plastic computer program. The comparison of obtained results with the data of other researchers on the spall fracture of examined materials was conducted.

  11. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  12. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  13. Specific heat of the uranium-zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of thermophysical properties of materials is essential for designing nuclear power plants. Nuclear fuel designers must demonstrate the safety of the reactor by detailed examination of the outcome of steady state and transient conditions. In special, transient effects may occur in normal operations as well as in accident situations and must be analyzed to assure the fuel element maintains its integrity during the insertion time in the reactor core. So, despite its low value, the specific heat of metallic fuel is an important parameter in the design calculations of the fuel element and the uncertainties associated with this property contribute to reduce the safety margins in the fuel element design. The experimental data of the U-Zr alloys from the open literature was revised and reduced by applying the Relative Variational Model to depict the dependences on the entire composition range, on the temperature range from 0 K up to the melting point and also to derive estimates of the associated uncertainties. Significant reductions of the uncertainties have been obtained in the evaluations of specific heat and enthalpy of phase transition in the U-Zr system. (author)

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  15. Spectrographic analysis of uranium-molybdenum alloys; Analisis espectrografico de aleaciones uranio-molibdeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M.

    1967-07-01

    A spectrographic method of analysis has been developed for uranium-molybdenum alloys containing up to 10 % Mo. The carrier distillation technique, with gallium oxide and graphite as carriers, is used for the semiquantitative determination of Al, Cr, Fe, Ni and Si, involving the conversion of the samples into oxides. As a consequence of the study of the influence of the molybdenum on the line intensities, it is useful to prepare only one set of standards with 0,6 % MoO{sub 3}. Total burning excitation is used for calcium, employing two sets of standards with 0,6 and 7.5 MoO{sub 3}. (Author) 5 refs.

  16. Low-temperature irradiation behavior of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Hayes, S. L.; Clark, C. R.; Wiencek, T. C.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Strain, R. V.; Kim, K.-H.

    2002-08-01

    Irradiation tests have been conducted to evaluate the performance of a series of high-density uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy, aluminum matrix dispersion fuels. Fuel plates incorporating alloys with molybdenum content in the range of 4-10 wt% were tested. Two irradiation test vehicles were used to irradiate low-enrichment fuels to approximately 40 and 70 at.% 235U burnup in the advanced test reactor at fuel temperatures of approximately 65 °C. The fuel particles used to fabricate dispersion specimens for most of the test were produced by generating filings from a cast rod. In general, fuels with molybdenum contents of 6 wt% or more showed stable in-reactor fission gas behavior, exhibiting a distribution of small, stable gas bubbles. Fuel particle swelling was moderate and decreased with increasing alloy content. Fuel particles with a molybdenum content of 4 wt% performed poorly, exhibiting extensive fuel-matrix interaction and the growth of relatively large fission gas bubbles. Fuel particles with 4 or 6 wt% molybdenum reacted more rapidly with the aluminum matrix than those with higher-alloy content. Fuel particles produced by an atomization process were also included in the test to determine the effect of fuel particle morphology and microstructure on fuel performance for the U-10Mo composition. Both of the U-10Mo fuel particle types exhibited good irradiation performance, but showed visible differences in fission gas bubble nucleation and growth behavior.

  17. Studies on separation and purification of fission 99Mo from neutron activated uranium aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method has been developed for separation and purification of fission 99Mo from neutron activated uranium–aluminum alloy. Alkali dissolution of the irradiated target (100 mg) results in aluminum along with 99Mo and a few fission products passing into solution, while most of the fission products, activation products and uranium remain undissolved. Subsequent purification steps involve precipitation of aluminum as Al(OH)3, iodine as AgI/AgIO3 and molybdenum as Mo-α-benzoin oxime. Ruthenium is separated by volatilization as RuO4 and final purification of 99Mo was carried out using anion exchange method. The radiochemical yield of fission 99Mo was found to be >80% and the purity of the product was in conformity with the international pharmacopoeia standards. - Highlights: • 99Mo separation, purification method developed from neutron activation of 100 g U–Al alloy. • Uranium, fission, activation product decontamination by alkali dissolution of activated target. • Purification by Al(OH)3, AgI/AgIO3, Mo-α-benzoin oxime precipitation and anion exchange. • Very high decontamination factors for alpha activity obtained. • Final 99Mo product (recovery >80%) complied with international pharmacopoeia standards

  18. Spall fracture and strength of uranium, plutonium and their alloys under shock wave loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Numerous results on studying the spall fracture phenomenon of uranium, two its alloys with molybdenum and zirconium, plutonium and its alloy with gallium under shock wave loading are presented in the paper. The majority of tests were conducted with the samples in the form of disks 4mm in thickness. They were loaded by the impact of aluminum plates 4mm thick through a copper screen serving as the cover or bottom part of a special container. The initial temperature of samples was changed in the range of -196 - 800 C degree for uranium and 40 - 315 C degree for plutonium. The character of spall failure of materials and the degree of damage for all tested samples were observed on the longitudinal metallographic sections of recovered samples. For a concrete test temperature, the impact velocity was sequentially changed and therefore the loading conditions corresponding to the consecutive transition from microdamage nucleation up to complete macroscopic spall fracture were determined. Numerical calculations of the conditions of shock wave loading and spall fracture of samples were performed in the elastoplastic approach. Several two- and three-dimensional effects of loading were taken into account. Some results obtained under conditions of intensive impulse irradiation and intensive explosive loading are presented too. The rather complete analysis and comparison of obtained results with the data of other researchers on the spall fracture of examined materials were conducted.

  19. Contribution to the micrographic study of uranium and its alloys; Contribution a l'etude micrographique de l'uranium et de ses alliages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-06-15

    The present report is the result of research carried out by the radio metallurgy section, to perfect micrographic techniques applicable to the study of samples of irradiated uranium. In the first part of this work, two polishing baths are developed, having the qualities with a minimum of disadvantages inherent in their respective compositions: they are, on the one hand perchloric acid-ethanol mixtures, and on the other hand a phospho-chromic-ethanol bath. In the chapter following, the micrographic attack of uranium is studied. The only satisfactory process is oxidation by cathode bombardment forming epitaxic layers. In the third chapter, an attempt is made to characterise the different surface states of the uranium by dissolution potential measurements and electronic diffraction. In the fourth chapter are given some examples of the application of these techniques to the micrographic study of various uranium alloys. In an appendix, it is shown how the chemical oxidation after phospho-chromic-alcohol polishing allows the different inclusions present in the molten uranium to be distinguished. By X-ray diffraction, uranium monocarbide and mononitride inclusions in particular are characterised. (author) [French] Le present rapport est le resultat de recherches effectuees au service de radiometallurgie pour la mise au point de techniques micrographiques applicables a l'etude d'echantillons d'uranium irradie. Dans la premiere partie de ce travail, nous mettons au point deux bains de polissage qui presentent les qualites inherentes a leur composition respective, avec le minimum d'inconvenients: ce sont d'une part des melanges acide perchlorique-ethanol, et d'autre part un bain phospho-chromique-ethanol. Dans le chapitre suivant, nous etudions l'attaque micrographique de l'uranium. Seul le procede d'oxydation par bombardement cathodique formant des couches epitaxiques, est satisfaisant. Dans le troisieme chapitre, nous essayons

  20. Corrosion rates and electrochemical studies of a depleted uranium alloy tungsten fiber metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion rates of a tungsten reinforced depleted uranium alloy metal matrix composite have been measured, by immersion tests, in three environments (laboratory air, distilled water, and 3.5% NaCl) and compared to the rates of the matrix alloy (DU-0.75 Ti) alone. The corrosion rates of both specimens are negligible in laboratory air, increase in distilled water, and are greatest in NaCl for a 30 day period. In all environments the matrix allo is preferentially attacked. In distilled water the corrosion rate of the matrix alloy is 3 times greater than the composite whereas in NaCl the corrosion rate of the composite is 1.3 times greater than the matrix. In electrochemical tests the composite was simulated by coupling separate samples of the fiber and matrix and the short-circuit (galvanic) currents were measured. A comparison of the corrosion rates calculated from the galvanic currents and from immersio tests shows the principal reaction of the composite in NaCl is galvanic coupling of the matrix and fiber

  1. Basic design of a rotating disk centrifugal atomizer for uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most used techniques to produce metallic powders is the centrifugal atomization with a rotating disk. This process is employ to fabricate ductile metallic particles of uranium-molybdenum alloys (typically U- 7 % Mo, by weight) for nuclear fuel elements for research and testing reactors. These alloys exhibit a face-centered cubic structure (γ phase) which is stable above 700 C degrees and can be retained at room temperature. The rotating disk centrifugal atomization allows a rapid solidification of spherical metallic droplets of about 40 to 100 μm, considered adequate to manufacture nuclear fuel elements. Besides the thermo-physical properties of both the alloy and the cooling gas, the main parameters of the process are the radius of the disk (R), the diameter of the atomization chamber (D), the disk rotation speed (ω), the liquid volume flow rate (Q) and the superheating of the liquid (ΔT). In this work, they were applied approximate analytical models to estimate the optimal geometrical and operative parameters to obtain spherical metallic powder of U- 7 % Mo alloy. Three physical phenomena were considerate: the liquid metal flow along the surface of the disk, the fragmentation and spheroidization of the droplets and the cooling and solidification of the droplets. The principal results are the more suitable gas is helium; R ≅ 20 mm; D ≥ 1 m; ≅ 20,000 - 50,000 rpm; Q ≅ 4 - 10 cm3/s; ΔT ≅ 100 - 200 C degrees. By applying the relevant non-dimensional parameters governing the main physical phenomena, the conclusion is that the more appropriate non-radioactive metal to simulate the atomization of U- 7 % Mo is gold

  2. Determination of ultratrace amounts of uranium and thorium in aluminium and aluminium alloys by electrothermal vaporization/ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for determining the 0.01 ng g-1 level of uranium and thorium in aluminium and aluminium alloys by electrothermal vaporization (ETV)/ICP-MS. This method was found to be significantly interfered with any matrices or other elements contained. An ion-exchange technique was therefore applied to separate uranium and thorium from aluminium and other elements. It was known that uranium are adsorbed on an anion-exchange resin and thorium are adsorbed on cation-exchange resin. However, aluminium and copper were eluted with 6 M hydrochloric acid. Dissolve the sample with hydrochloric acid containing copper which was added for analysis of pure aluminium, and oxidize with hydrogen peroxide. Concentration of hydrochloric acid in the solution was adjusted to 6 M, and then passed the solution through the mixed ion-exchange resin column. After the uranium and thorium were eluted with 1 M hydrofluoric acid-0.1 M hydrochloric acid, the solution was evaporated to dryness. It was then dissolved with 1 M hydrochloric acid. Uranium and thorium were analyzed by ETV/ICP-MS using tungsten and molybdenum boats, respectively, since the tungsten boat contained high-level thorium and the molybdenum boat contained uranium. The determination limit of uranium and thorium were 0.003 and 0.005 ng g-1, respectively. (author)

  3. Method for improving the mechanical properties of uranium-1 to 3 wt % zirconium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1983-11-22

    A uranium-1 to 3 wt % zirconium alloy characterized by high strength, high ductility and stable microstructure is fabricated by an improved thermal mechanical process. A homogenous ingot of the alloy which has been reduced in thickness of at least 50% in the two-step forging operation, rolled into a plate with a 75% reduction and then heated in vacuum at a temperature of about 750 to 850/sup 0/C and then quenched in water, is subjected to further thermal-mechanical operation steps to increase the compressive yield strength approximately 30%, stabilize the microstructure, and decrease the variations in mechanical properties throughout the plate is provided. These thermal-mechanical steps are achieved by cold rolling the quenchd plate to reduce the thickness thereof about 8 to 12%, aging the cold rolled plate at a first temperature of about 325 to 375/sup 0/C for five to six hours and then aging the plate at a higher temperature ranging from 480 to 500/sup 0/C for five to six hours prior to cooling the billet to ambient conditions and sizing the billet or plate into articles provides the desired increase in mechanical properties and phase stability throughout the plate.

  4. Report of the panel on the use of depleted uranium alloys for large caliber long rod kinetic energy penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early 1977 the National Materials Advisory Board, an operating unit in the Commission on Sociotechnical Systems of the National Research Council, NAS/NAE, formed a study committee on High Density Materials for Kinetic Energy Penetrators. The Specific objectives of the Committee were defined as follows. Assess the potential of two materials for use in kinetic energy penetrators, including such factors as: (a) properties (as applied to this application: strength, toughness, and dynamic behavior); (b) uniformity, reliability and reproducibility; (c) deterioration in storage; (d) production capability; (e) ecological impact; (f) quality assurance; (g) availability, and (h) cost. The Committee was divided into two Panels; one panel devoted to the study of tungsten alloys and the other devoted to the study of depleted uranium alloys for use in Kinetic energy penetrators. This report represents the findings and recommendation of the Panel on Uranium

  5. Hardening and failure of wedge-shaped specimens of uranium and its alloys with molybdenum and zirconium under explosion loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems of failure of uranium and some of its alloys in short-wave loading have been examined in a number of investigations using the methods of loading the specimens by means of impact of a rapidly flying plate and explosion of the large charge of an explosive substance. The spallation strength of the material was determined by recording the speed of the free surface of the specimens during loading. In this work, investigations were carried out to determine the properties of uranium and of its two alloys with molybdenum and zirconium in loading the specimens by the explosion of a layer of a plastic explosive substance. The application of wedge-shaped specimens made it possible to determine, in a small number of experiments, the data on the nature of attenuation of explosion-induced shock waves, the critical conditions of initiation of spallation failure and the degree of shock wave hardening of the materials

  6. Major constituent quantitative determination in uranium alloys by coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and X ray fluorescence wavelength dispersive spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luis Claudio de; Silva, Adriana Mascarenhas Martins da; Gomide, Ricardo Goncalves; Silva, Ieda de Souza, E-mail: luis.claudio@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: adriana@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: gomide@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: ieda@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CEA/CTMSP), Ipero, SP (Brazil). Centro Experimental Aramar

    2013-07-01

    A wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) spectrometric method for determination of major constituents elements (Zr, Nb, Mo) in Uranium/Zirconium/Niobium and Uranium/Molybdenum alloy samples were developed. The methods use samples taken in the form of chips that were dissolved in hot nitric acid and precipitate particles melted with lithium tetraborate and dissolved in hot nitric acid and finally analyzed as a solution. Studies on the determination by inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectrometry (ICP OES) using matched matrix in calibration curve were developed. The same samples solution were analyzed in both methods. The limits of detection (LOD), linearity of the calibrations curves, recovery study, accuracy and precision of the both techniques were carried out. The results were compared. (author)

  7. Hardening and fracture of wedge-shaped specimens of uranium and its alloys with molybdenum and zirconium under explosive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of studies of explosion effect on properties of uranium and its alloys, namely U-1,4Mo and U-1,4Mo-0,7Zr, are presented. The specimens in the form of a wedge were loaded with explosion of a plastic explosive layer 1,5-3,0 mm thick. The character of attenuation of shock waves caused by explosion was determined. The data on critical conditions of spall fracture initiation and on degree of shock-wave hardening of the materials were obtained

  8. Determination of five kinds of impurity elements such as titanium in uranium titanium alloy by ICP-OES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New description is given of an ICP-OES method in which 5 impurities, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Al in U-Ti alloy can be determined simultaneously. Studying the dissolution of the sample preparation, separation condition of impurity elements; determining analysis of instrument line, detection limit and detection lower limit; eliminating the matrix effect of Ti and TiO2 on the measurement of precipitation; standard addition method verify the method accuracy and precision. The results show: taking Uranium titanium alloys containing 0.1000 g sample, 5 kinds of elements Ti detection lower limits is 0.2-0.7 μg·g-1, recovery were in the range of 98.8%-102.1%, and RSD'S found were less than 8%. The method of measurement proved is accurate and reliable. (authors)

  9. Influence of uranium content on magnetostriction of Fe73.5Cu1Nb3-xUxSi13.5B9 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of annealing treatment on structure, magnetic properties and magnetostriction of the Fe73.5Cu1Nb3-xUxSi13.5B9 nanocrystalline alloys. The results confirmed the nanocrystalline character of these alloys in the temperature range 550-650-bar C. The influence of the uranium content on the structural stability has been observed for annealing treatment at higher temperature, i.e. at about 700-bar C. The coercivity and the magnetostriction strongly depended both on the annealing temperature and on the uranium content

  10. The use of slightly alloyed uranium as fuel: its influence on the dissolution and other stages of treatment; Emploi de l'uranium faiblement allie comme combustible: son incidence sur la dissolution et les autres phases du retraitement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faugeras, P.; Leroy, P.; Lheureux, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    This report deals chiefly with the treatment of binary alloys (UAI, UMo, UZr, UCr, USi) with a low concentration of the additional element ({<=}2 per cent). The investigation was pursued with a view to the continued utilisation, with a minimum of modification, of the existing plants for treatment of non-alloyed irradiated uranium. In the first part, the usual process for the treatment of irradiated uranium by solvent extraction is briefly recalled. The second part is devoted to a study of the selective dissolution of the canning around certain of these alloys. The third part gives the behaviour of these different alloys at various phases of the usual treatment: a) dissolution; b) extractions; c) final treatment of fission products; d) final purification of plutonium. To conclude, possible alloys are classed as a function of their repercussions on the normal treatment. (author) [French] Il s'agit surtout du traitement d'alliages binaires (UAI, UMo, UZr, UCr, USi) a faible teneur en element etranger ({<=}2 pour cent). L'etude a ete conduite en vue d'utiliser un minimum de modifications les usines de traitement d'uranium irradie non allie. Dans une premiere partie, nous rappelons brievement le procede habituel de traitement de l'uranium irradie par extraction au solvant. La deuxieme partie est consacree a l'etude de la dissolution selective de la gaine entourant certains de ces alliages. La troisieme partie donne le comportement de ces differents alliages au cours des phases du traitement habituel: a) dissolution; b) extractions; c) traitement final des produits de fission; d) purification finale du plutonium. Enfin, en conclusion, nous etablirons un classement des alliages possibles en fonction des repercussions sur le traitement normal. (auteur)

  11. Method of increasing the phase stability and the compressive yield strength of uranium-1 to 3 wt. % zirconium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    A uranium-1 to 3 wt. % zirconium alloy characterized by high strength, high ductility and stable microstructure is fabricated by an improved thermal mechanical process. A homogenous ingot of the alloy which has been reduced in thickness of at least 50% in the two-step forging operation, rolled into a plate with a 75% reduction and then heated in vacuum at a temperature of about 750.degree. to 850.degree. C. and then quenched in water is subjected to further thermal-mechanical operation steps to increase the compressive yield strength approximately 30%, stabilize the microstructure, and decrease the variations in mechanical properties throughout the plate is provided. These thermal-mechanical steps are achieved by cold rolling the quenched plate to reduce the thickness thereof about 8 to 12%, aging the cold rolled plate at a first temperature of about 325.degree. to 375.degree. C. for five to six hours and then aging the plate at a higher temperature ranging from 480.degree. to 500.degree. C. for five to six hours prior to cooling the billet to ambient conditions and sizing the billet or plate into articles provides the desired increase in mechanical properties and phase stability throughout the plate.

  12. Study of the transformation of uranium-niobium alloys with low niobium concentrations, tempered from the gamma and beta + gamma 1 regions and then annealed at different temperatures. Comparison with uranium-molybdenum alloys (1963); Etude des transformations des alliages uranium-niobium a faible teneur en niobium trempes depuis les domaines gamma et beta + gamma 1 puis revenus a differentes temperatures. Comparaison avec les alliages uranium-molybdene (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collot, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-09-15

    The author shows that uranium-niobium alloys, like uranium-molybdenum alloys, tempered from the gamma region, give a martensitic phase with a structure deriving from that of alpha uranium by a slight contraction parallel to the axis [001], The critical cooling rate allowing the formation of this martensite is 80 deg. C/s at 750 deg. C. Retention of the beta phase of uranium-niobium alloys is particularly difficult, the critical retention rate being 700 deg. C/s at 668 deg. C for an alloy containing 2.5 at. per cent of Nb. This beta phase is completely converted to the alpha phase at room temperature in about 6 hours. The TTT curves of this beta alloy are effectively reduced to the lower branch of the lower 'C'. The beta phase conversion law is expressed as: 1-x = exp. (kt){sup n} x being the degree of progression of the conversion, t the time, n an exponent no-varying with temperature and having approximately the value 2 for the alloy considered, k an increasing function of temperature. The activation energy of conversion is of the order of 14,600 cal/mole. Niobium is much less active than molybdenum as a stabiliser of beta uranium. (author) [French] Dans ce travail l'auteur montre que les alliages uranium-niobium, comme d'ailleurs les alliages uranium-molybdene, trempes depuis le domaine gamma, donnent une phase martensitique dont la structure derive de celle de l'uranium alpha par une legere contraction parallele de l'axe [001]. La vitesse critique de refroidissement permettant la formation de cette martensite est de 80 deg. C/s a 750 deg. C. La retention de la phase beta des alliages uranium-niobium est particulierement delicate car la vitesse critique de retention est de 700 deg. C/s a 668 deg. C pour l'alliage a 2,5 at. pour cent de Nb. Cette phase beta se transforme completement en phase alpha a la temperature ordinaire en 6 heures environ. Les courbes TTT de cet alliage de structure beta se reduisent pratiquement a la

  13. Nickel based alloys compatibility with fuel salts for molten salt reactor with thorium and uranium support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R and D on molten salt reactors (MSR) in Europe are concentrated now on fast/intermediate spectrum concepts which were recognised as long-term alternative to solid fuelled fast reactors due to their attractive features: strong negative feedback coefficients, easy in-service inspection, and simplified fuel cycle. For high-temperature MSR corrosion of the metallic container alloy in primary circuit is the primary concern. Key problem receiving current attention include surface fissures in Ni-based alloys probably arising from fission product tellurium attack. This paper summarises results of corrosion tests conducted recently to study effect of oxidation state in selected fuel salts on tellurium attack and to develop means of controlling tellurium cracking in the special Ni - based alloys recently developed for large power units: molten salt actinide recycler and transmuter (MOSART) and molten salt fast reactor (MSFR). Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys was tested in the temperature range from 730 deg. C up to 800 deg. C in stressed and unloaded conditions with fuel LiF-BeF2-UF4 and LiF-BeF2-ThF4-UF4 salt mixtures at different [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratios from 0.7 up to 500. Following Russian and French Ni-based alloys (in mass%): HN80M-VI (Mo-12, Cr-7.6, Nb-1.5), HN80MTY (Mo-13, Cr-6.8, Al-1.1, Ti-0.9), HN80MTW (Mo-9.4, Cr-7.0, Ti-1.7, W-5.5) and EM-721 (W-25.2, Cr-5.7, Ti-0.17) were used for the study in the corrosion facility. The HN80MTY alloy has shown the best resistance against Te cracking and after test mechanical properties. (authors)

  14. Uranium and neodymium partitioning in alkali chloride melts using low-melting gallium-based alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melchakov Stanislav Yu.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Partitioning of uranium and neodymium was studied in a ‘molten chloride salt - liquid Ga-X (X = In or Sn alloy’ system. Chloride melts were based on the low-melting ternary LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic. Nd/U separation factors were calculated from the thermodynamic data as well as determined experimentally. Separation of uranium and neodymium was studied using reductive extraction with neodymium acting as a reducing agent. Efficient partitioning of lanthanides (Nd and actinides (U, simulating fission products and fissile materials in irradiated nuclear fuels, was achieved in a single stage process. The experimentally observed Nd/U separation factor valued up to 106, depending on the conditions.

  15. Microstructural evolution of a uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum alloy for nuclear reactor fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A. J.; Clarke, K. D.; McCabe, R. J.; Necker, C. T.; Papin, P. A.; Field, R. D.; Kelly, A. M.; Tucker, T. J.; Forsyth, R. T.; Dickerson, P. O.; Foley, J. C.; Swenson, H.; Aikin, R. M.; Dombrowski, D. E.

    2015-10-01

    Low-enriched uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (LEU-10wt.%Mo) is of interest for the fabrication of monolithic fuels to replace highly-enriched uranium (HEU) dispersion fuels in high performance research and test reactors around the world. In this work, depleted uranium-10 wt.%Mo (DU-10wt.%Mo) is used to simulate the solidification and microstructural evolution of LEU-10wt.%Mo. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and complementary electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) reveal significant microsegregation present in the metastable γ-phase after solidification. Homogenization is performed at 800 and 1000 °C for times ranging from 1 to 32 h to explore the time-temperature combinations that will reduce the extent of microsegregation, as regions of higher and lower Mo content may influence local mechanical properties and provide preferred regions for γ-phase decomposition. We show for the first time that EBSD can be used to qualitatively assess microstructural evolution in DU-10wt.%Mo after homogenization treatments. Complementary EPMA is used to quantitatively confirm this finding. Homogenization at 1000 °C for 2-4 h may the regions that contain 8 wt.% Mo or lower, whereas homogenization at 1000 °C for longer than 8 h effectively saturates Mo chemical homogeneity, but results in substantial grain growth. The appropriate homogenization time will depend upon additional microstructural considerations, such as grain growth and intended subsequent processing. Higher carbon LEU-10wt.%Mo generally contains more inclusions within the grains and at grain boundaries after solidification. The effect of these inclusions on microstructural evolution (e.g. grain growth) during homogenization and as potential γ-phase decomposition nucleation sites is unclear, but likely requires additional study.

  16. Micro segregation and homogenization treatments of uranium-niobium alloys (U-Nb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the following sections micro segregation results in 0-3,6 wt% Nb and U-6,1 wt% Nb alloys casted in no consumable electrode arc furnace are presented. The micro segregation is studied qualitatively by optical microscopy and quantitatively by electron microprobe. The degree of homogenization has been measured after 800 and 850 deg C heat treatments in tubular resistive furnace. The microstructures after heat treatments are quantitatively analysed to check effects on the casting structures, mainly the variations in solute along the dendrite arm spacing. Some solidification phenomena are then discussed on reference to theoretical models of dendritic solidification , including microstructure and micro segregation. The experimental results are compared to theoretical on basis of initial and residual micro segregation after homogenization treatments. The times required for homogenization of the alloys are also discussed in function of the micro segregation from casting structures and the temperatures of the treatments. (author)

  17. APFIM STUDY OF THE INITIAL STAGES OF AGING IN DILUTE URANIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    B. Jenkins; Edmonds, D.

    1987-01-01

    Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy (APFIM) has been used to characterise the microstructural and chemical changes occurring in depleted U - 0.75wt% Ti and depleted U - 2.2 wt% Mo during aging to peak strength. Strengthening in U - 0.75 Ti was found to follow the classical GP zone - equilibrium precipitate route. Precipitation hardening was confirmed in the U - 2.2 Mo alloy.

  18. A zero-current chronopotentiometric investigation of the uranium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronopotentiometric investigations of the UFe, UCu and UNi alloys are reported. The experimental procedure is based on the control of the p02- of the liquid melt and that allows to avoid undesirable chemical side-reactions. The capability of the method to prove the existence of two different metallic phases either of similar compositions or of non-stoichiometric composition is discussed. (author) 5 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  19. Rapid Determination of Uranium in Water Samples by Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry Using a Tin-Bismuth Alloy Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the tin-bismuth alloy electrode (SnBiE) was used for U(VI) concentration determination for the first time. Compared to the conventional solid electrode (glassy carbon electrode and bismuth bulk electrode), the SnBiE possesses a higher hydrogen overpotential, which indicates that the tin-bismuth alloy can considerably extend the application of potentially available electrode detection systems. Combining with electrochemical behavior analysis and spectrometric measurements as well as theoretical calculation methods, the geometric structures of uranium-cupferron (N-nitrosophenylhydroxylamine) complexes have been revealed and a more detailed electrode mechanism has been proposed. The electroanalysis results show that the optimal sensitivity could be obtained by using diphenylguanidine as the auxiliary reagent. The calibration plot for U(VI) quantification was linear from 0.5 nM to 30 nM with a correlation coefficient of 0.999. In the meanwhile, a detection limit of 0.24 nM was obtained in connection with an accumulation time of 30 s, which is comparable with that of mercury analogues. The practical applications of SnBiE have been tentatively performed for the determination of UO22+ in real water samples and the results were well consistent with those by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). A very simple, convenient and cheap approach was established for the determination of UO22+ in natural water samples containing surfactants without the otherwise necessity of sample pretreatment, which drastically reduce the analysis time

  20. Fabrication and characterisation of uranium, molybdenum, chromium, niobium and aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes fabrication of binary uranium alloys by melting and casting. The following alloys with nominal composition were obtained by melting in the vacuum furnace: uranium with niobium contents from 0.5%- 4.0% and uranium with molybdenum contents from 0.4% - 1.2%. Uranium alloys with chromium content from 0.4% - 1.2% and uranium alloy with 0.12% of aluminium were obtained by vacuum induction furnace (electric arc melting)

  1. Determination of boron in uranium-aluminum-silicon alloy by spectrophotometry and estimation of expanded uncertainty in measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanjaneyulu, P.S. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sayi, Y.S. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: yssayi@barc.gov.in; Ramakumar, K.L. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: klram@barc.gov.in

    2008-08-31

    Quantification of boron in diverse materials of relevance in nuclear technology is essential in view of its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the determination of boron in uranium-aluminum-silicon alloy, based on leaching of boron with 6 M HCl and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, its selective separation by solvent extraction with 2-ethyl hexane 1,3-diol and quantification by spectrophotometry using curcumin. The method has been evaluated by standard addition method and validated by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Relative standard deviation and absolute detection limit of the method are 3.0% (at 1{sigma} level) and 12 ng, respectively. All possible sources of uncertainties in the methodology have been individually assessed, following the International Organization for Standardization guidelines. The combined uncertainty is calculated employing uncertainty propagation formulae. The expanded uncertainty in the measurement at 95% confidence level (coverage factor 2) is 8.840%.

  2. Molten uranium eutectic interaction on iron-alloy by MPS method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustari, Asril Pramutadi Andi, E-mail: pramutadi@aoni.waseda.jp; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Development of MPS development on eutectic model. • Binary phase diagram of Fe–U system development by THERMOCALC with NUCL10 dataset. • Eutectic behavior of TREAT experiment analysis by MPS simulation. - Abstract: Development of moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method for predicting the eutectic reaction during severe accident, especially at the lower head, in nuclear power plants is important. In this study, solid–liquid system of eutectic interaction was developed. Mass diffusion theory was used for mass transfer between particles. Binary phase diagram was used for developing criteria of transforming into liquid/eutectic particle. THERMOCALC with NUCL10 dataset was utilized to obtain binary phase diagram. Based on the developed MPS model, the TREAT experiments were analyzed. For penetration rates of molten uranium into steel test section, the two-dimensional MPS simulations predicted agreeable values with the experiments for temperature above 1233 and 1187 °C for Armco iron and SS304, respectively. As for SS430, MPS simulation predicted agreeable result at 1244 °C.

  3. Molten uranium eutectic interaction on iron-alloy by MPS method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Development of MPS development on eutectic model. • Binary phase diagram of Fe–U system development by THERMOCALC with NUCL10 dataset. • Eutectic behavior of TREAT experiment analysis by MPS simulation. - Abstract: Development of moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method for predicting the eutectic reaction during severe accident, especially at the lower head, in nuclear power plants is important. In this study, solid–liquid system of eutectic interaction was developed. Mass diffusion theory was used for mass transfer between particles. Binary phase diagram was used for developing criteria of transforming into liquid/eutectic particle. THERMOCALC with NUCL10 dataset was utilized to obtain binary phase diagram. Based on the developed MPS model, the TREAT experiments were analyzed. For penetration rates of molten uranium into steel test section, the two-dimensional MPS simulations predicted agreeable values with the experiments for temperature above 1233 and 1187 °C for Armco iron and SS304, respectively. As for SS430, MPS simulation predicted agreeable result at 1244 °C

  4. Method and apparatus for producing uranyl peroxide (U0/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium and uranium alloy pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of producing uranyl peroxide (UO/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium-bearing metal pieces comprising: dissolving the uranium-bearing metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing nitric acid and at least 0.5% but no greater than 5.0% fluoboric acid to provide a second aqueous solution which includes uranyl ions (UO/sub 2//sup +2/) and nitric and fluoboric acids; adding hydrogen peroxide to the second aqueous solution to precipitate uranyl peroxide out of the second solution and provide a third aqueous solution containing nitric and fluoboric acids; and separating the uranyl peroxide from the third aqueous solution

  5. Method and apparatus for producing uranyl peroxide (UO/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium and uranium alloy pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a method of producing uranyl peroxide (UF/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium-bearing metal pieces comprising: dissolving the uranium-bearing metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing nitric acid and at least 0.5% but no more than 2.0% fluoboric acid to provide a second aqueous solution which includes uranyl ions (UO/sub 2//sup +2/) and nitric and fluoboric acids; adding hydrogen peroxide to the second aqueous solution to precipitate uranyl peroxide out of the second solution and provide a third aqueous solution containing nitric and fluoboric acid; and separating the uranyl peroxide from the third aqueous solution

  6. Capability assessment for application of clay mixture as barrier material for irradiated zirconium alloy structure elements long-term processing for storage during decommissioning of uranium-graphite nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Zakharova, E. V.; Volkova, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    The radionuclide composition and the activity level of the irradiated zirconium alloy E110, the radionuclide immobilization strength and the retention properties of the mixed clay barrier material with respect to the radionuclides identified in the alloy were investigated to perform the safety assessment of handling structural units of zirconium alloy used for the technological channels in uranium-graphite reactors. The irradiated zirconium alloy waste contained the following activation products: 93mNb and the long-lived 94Nb, 93Zr radionuclides. Radionuclides of 60Co, 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides were also present in the alloy. In the course of the runs no leaching of niobium and zirconium isotopes from the E110 alloy was detected. Leach rates were observed merely for 60Co and 137Cs present in the deposits formed on the internal surface of technological channels. The radionuclides present were effectively adsorbed by the barrier material. To ensure the localization of radionuclides in case of the radionuclide migration from the irradiated zirconium alloy into the barrier material, the sorption properties were determined of the barrier material used for creating the long-term storage point for the graphite stack from uranium-graphite reactors.

  7. A study of phase transformations processes in 0,5 to 4% mo uranium-molybdenum alloys; Etude des processus des transformations dans les alliages uranium-molybdene de teneur 0,5 a 4% en poids de molybdene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-06-15

    Isothermal and continuous cooling transformations process have been established on uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 4 w% Mo. Transformations process of the {beta} and {gamma} solid solutions are described. These processes depend upon molybdenum concentration. Out of the {beta} solid solution phase appears an eutectoid decomposition of {beta} to ({alpha} + {gamma}) or the formation of a martensitic phase {alpha}''. The {gamma} solid solution shows a decomposition of {gamma} to ({alpha} + {gamma}) or ({alpha} + {gamma}'), or a formation of martensitic phases a' or a'{sub b}. The U-Mo equilibrium diagram is discussed, particularly in low concentrations zones. Limits between domains ({alpha} + {gamma}) and ({beta} + {gamma}), ({beta} + {gamma}) and {gamma}, ({beta} + {gamma}) and {beta}, have been determined. (author) [French] Les processus des transformations isothermes, et au cours de refroidissements continus ont ete etablis sur les alliages uranium-molybdene de 0,5 a 4 % en poids de Mo. Ceci a permis de mettre en evidence les processus des transformations de solutions solides {beta} et {gamma}, differents suivant la teneur en molybdene de l'alliage. Dans le premier cas il y a decomposition eutectoide de {beta} en ({alpha} + {gamma}) ou formations d'une phase martensitique {alpha}''. Dans le second cas il y a decomposition de {gamma} soit en ({alpha} + {gamma}) soit en ({alpha} + {gamma}') suivant la temperature, ou bien formation des phases martensitiques {alpha}' ou {alpha}'{sub b}. Le diagramme d'equilibre, uranium-molybdene est sujet a de nombreuses controverses, en particulier dans la zone des faibles concentrations. Les limites entre les domaines ({alpha} + {gamma}) et ({beta} + {gamma}), ({beta} + {gamma}) et {gamma}, ({beta} + {gamma}) et {beta}, ont ete determinees. (auteur)

  8. Development of metal uranium fuel and testing of construction materials (I-VI); Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project includes the following tasks: Study of crystallisation of metal melt and beta-alpha transforms in uranium and uranium alloys; Study of the thermal treatment influence on phase transformations and texture in uranium alloys; Radiation damage of metal uranium; Project related to irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; Development of fuel element for nuclear reactors

  9. Reactivity of ceramic coating materials with uranium and uranium trichlorid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Cho, Choon Ho; Lee, Yoon Sang; Lee, Han Soo; Kim, Jeong Guk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Uranium and uranium alloys are typically induction melted in graphite crucibles under a vacuum. The graphite crucible is used for the manufacturing of uranium ingots in the casting equipment. But, due to the chemical reactivity of uranium and most alloying elements with carbon, a protective ceramic coating is generally applied to the crucibles. In this study, to investigate the most suitable ceramic coating material applied to graphite melting crucibles and ingot moldsused in the melting and casting of uranium in the casting equipment, firstly, the thermodynamic analysis was performed by using HSC software to investigate the reactivity between uranium and several ceramic materials and the experiments on the reaction of ceramic coated crucibles in molten uranium were carried out at 1300 .deg. C

  10. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures; Desenvolvimento de um combustivel de alta densidade a base das ligas uranio-molibdenio com alta compatibilidade em altas temperaturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de

    2008-07-01

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature

  11. Irradiation performance of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuels; Desempenho sob irradiacao de elementos combustiveis do tipo U-Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Cirila Tacconi de

    2005-07-01

    The U-Mo-Al dispersion fuels of Material Test Reactors (MTR) are analyzed in terms of their irradiation performance. The irradiation performance aspects are associated to the neutronic and thermal hydraulics aspects to propose a new core configuration to the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP using U-Mo-Al fuels. Core configurations using U-10Mo-Al fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 8 gU/cm{sup 3} were analyzed with the computational programs Citation and MTRCR-IEA R1. Core configurations for fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 5 gU/cm{sup 3} showed to be adequate to use in IEA-R1 reactor e should present a stable in reactor performance even at high burn-up. (author)

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of the Unconventional Kondo Alloy System Uranium COPPER(5-X) Palladium(x)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Oscar Orlando

    The intermetallic Kondo alloy system UCu _{5-x}Pd_{x } is one of a number of recently-discovered Kondo materials which exhibit deviations from Fermi liquid behavior in their thermodynamic and transport properties down to micro-Kelvin temperatures. Studying local electronic structure by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques (NMR) in this unconventional system, we find anomalous behavior of NMR parameters versus magnetic susceptibility chi in UCu_4Pd and UCu_{3.5}Pd_ {1.5}. Metallic alloys containing magnetic impurities usually display a linear relation between the susceptibility and the Knight shift and its distribution, the magnetic broadening. In UCu_{5 -x}Pd_{x}, as the temperature is lowered, it is found that for both concentrations the magnetic broadening of the ^{63}Cu NMR spectra grows non-linearly with respect to chi, reaching enhancements at the lowest temperatures of ~100% over the values expected from a high-temperature linear relation. Enhancement of the linewidth over the susceptibility might indicate the possibility of U-spin freezing, as observed in some dilute Kondo alloys. The absence of any anomalies in either the specific heat or the magnetic susceptibility of these samples suggests, however, that spin freezing does not account for the observations, and that the enhancement is related to intrinsic behavior of the paramagnetic alloys. Smaller but similar anomalies are found for the isotropic and axial components of the Knight shift {cal K} as functions chi in the two materials. {cal K} presents a linear relation with chi only down to ~30 K. Below this temperature, the absolute value of the Knight-shift components grows more slowly than would be expected from extrapolating their high temperature behavior, suggesting temperature-dependent transferred-hyperfine fields at the Cu sites or a temperature-dependent lineshape asymmetry. We interpret these observations in terms of disorder of the density of conduction-electron states (DOS). A simple model of

  13. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  14. An examination of the initial oxidation of a uranium-base alloy (U-14.1 at.% Nb) by O 2 and D 2O using surface-sensitive techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manner, William L.; Lloyd, Jane A.; Hanrahan, Robert J.; Paffett, Mark T.

    1999-08-01

    The corrosion resistance of uranium is greatly enhanced by alloying with niobium. In this study the initial stages of corrosion of a specific uranium-base alloy (U-14.1 at.% Nb) by O 2 or D 2O have been examined using the surface specific techniques of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal programmed desorption (TPD), static secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SSIMS), and sputtered neutrals mass spectroscopy (SNMS). XPS studies of the U-14.1 at.% Nb surface following oxidation using O 2 at 300 K indicate production of a thin oxide overlayer of stoichiometric UO 2.0 intermixed with Nb 2O 5. The same stoichiometry is exhibited for uranium when the oxide is prepared at 500 K with O 2; although, niobium is much less oxidized exhibiting a mixture of NbO and Nb. Contrary to previous XPS literature, SNMS depth profiling studies reveal that oxidation by O 2 is much greater (as judged by oxide layer thickness) than that exhibited by D 2O. An oxide layer thickness of less than 20 Å was created using D 2O as an oxidant at 300 K with exposures >3500 L (oxide layers created from O 2 are significantly greater at much smaller exposures). Formation of a critical density of Nb 2O 5 is suggested to be responsible for the enhanced corrosion resistance by preventing diffusion of O - (O 2-) or OD -/OH - into the oxide/metal interface region. The domains of stability of hydroxyl formation have also been followed using TPD, SSIMS and XPS. Maximal surface hydroxyl concentrations ( Θrel=0.30) are obtained at a surface temperature of 175 K for these experimental conditions.

  15. Potentiometric determination of uranium in organic extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potentimetric determination of uranium in organic extracts was studied. A mixture of 30% TBP, (tributylphosphate), in carbon tetrachloride was used, with the NBL (New Brunswick Laboratory) titrimetric procedure. Results include a comparative analysis performed on organic extracts of fissium alloys vs those performed on aqueous samples of the same alloys which had been treated to remove interfering elements. Also comparative analyses were performed on sample solutions from a typical scrap recovery operation common in the uranium processing industry. A limited number of residue type materials, calciner products, and presscakes were subjected to analysis by organic extraction. The uranium extraction was not hindered by 30% TBP/CCl4. To fully demonstrate the capabilities of the extraction technique and its compatibility with the NBL potentiometric uranium determination, a series of uranium standards was subjected to uranium extraction with 30% TBP/CCl4. The uranium was then stripped out of the organic phase with 40 mL of H3PO4, 15 mL of H20, and 1 mL of 1M FeSO4 solution. The uranium was then determined in the aqueous phosphoric phase by the regular NBL potentiometric method, omitting only the addition of another 40 mL of H3PO4. Uranium determinations ranging from approximately 20 to 150 mg of U were successfully made with the same accuracy and precision normally achieved. 8 tables

  16. Method of fabricating a uranium-bearing foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Jackie G.; DeMint, Amy L.

    2012-04-24

    Methods of fabricating a uranium-bearing foil are described. The foil may be substantially pure uranium, or may be a uranium alloy such as a uranium-molybdenum alloy. The method typically includes a series of hot rolling operations on a cast plate material to form a thin sheet. These hot rolling operations are typically performed using a process where each pass reduces the thickness of the plate by a substantially constant percentage. The sheet is typically then annealed and then cooled. The process typically concludes with a series of cold rolling passes where each pass reduces the thickness of the plate by a substantially constant thickness amount to form the foil.

  17. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NOx emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NOx fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NOx emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO2 which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered

  18. Effect of electrical discharge machining on uranium-0.75 titanium and tungsten-3.5 nickel-1.5 iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was found that U--0.75 Ti alloy cracked if the EDM parameters were out of control, and precipitation of carbides adjacent to the EDM surface took place during subsequent solution quenching. Cracks form in the ''recast'' layer when solution-quenched U--0.75 Ti alloy undergoes EDM, and the cracks propagated during subsequent nickel plating. If the recast layer was removed prior to nickel plating, only a slight loss in strength resulted, compared to conventional machining. W--3.5 Ni--1.5 Fe alloy also sustained some surface damage during EDM and also experienced a small loss in strength compared to conventionally machined material. 12 figures, 4 tables

  19. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  20. Production of Mo-99 using low-enriched uranium silicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last several years, uranium silicide fuels have been under development as low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for Mo-99. The use of LEU silicide is aimed at replacing the UAlx alloy in the highly-enriched uranium dissolution process. A process to recover Mo-99 from low-enriched uranium silicide is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The uranium silicide is dissolved in alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments performed to determine the optimum dissolution procedure are discussed, and the results of dissolving a portion of a high-burnup (>40%) U3Si2 miniplate are presented. Future work related to Mo-99 separation and waste disposal are also discussed

  1. Tramp uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many utilities have implemented a no leaker philosophy for fuel performance and actively pursue removing leaking fuel assemblies from their reactor cores whenever a leaking fuel assembly is detected. Therefore, the only source for fission product activity in the RCS when there are no leaking fuel assemblies is tramp uranium. A technique has been developed that strips uranium impurities from ZrCl4. Unless efforts are made to remove natural uranium impurities from reactor materials, the utilities will not be able to reduce the RCS specific 131I activity in PWRs to below the lower limit of ∼1.0 x 10-4 μCi/g

  2. Hydrogen influence on metal behavior. Pt. 5. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking of 0,2 wt % vanadium uranium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) has been investigated by means of an improved sensitivity mechanical test involving multiaxial stresses. Embedded disks clamped at their edge are submitted to an increasing gaseous pressure on one side. Modelling with the finite elements methode has demonstrated that the disk pole is plane stressed and the anchorage plane strained. It is shown that thermally H-charged, α-structured, U-0.2V alloy has an IHE threshold lower than 0,02 ppm. A systematic study of the stressing rate influence shows that this alloy is affected by two main kinds of IHE, one due to hydrides at high rates and, one due to dissolved H at low rates. Finally Stress Corrosion Cracking has been studied in aqueous media as a function of pH and the role of HE is indicated. H can form by a chemical reaction with the metal and enter the metal. In pH zones without cracking, H either is not formed or cannot enter the metal. Similar conclusions are proposed for U 0.2 wt%Cr alloy

  3. Uranium Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main fuel component for commercial nuclear power reactors is Uranium. When compared to fossil fuels, it has a competitive edge due to factors such as economics and environmental conditions and in particular due to its international market availability. Uranium world demand reached to 67 320 tU in 2004, which was covered with additional sources. To project the uranium markets behavior requires to know and to accept some conditions tied to the demand, such as the electrical world consumption, the greenhouse effect; water desalination, production of hydrogen, industrial heat, the innovative development of nuclear reactors, and the average time of 10 years between the beginning of exploration programs and definition of deposits, which it owes mainly to the difficulty of achieving the legal, environmental and local community authorizations, to open new mining centers. Uranium market future projections, made by IAEA experts in 2001, that considered middle and high demand scenarios, concluded that cumulatively to year 2050, with regard to demand it will be required 5.4 and 7.6 million tons of uranium respectively, and with regard to the uranium price, it should present a sustained increase. In the last years the situation of the uranium market has changed dramatically. In August 2006 the price of uranium reached to USD 106/kgU in the spot market, surpassing all the made projections. The increase in price that has stayed in rise in the last five years is reactivating the prospection and exploration efforts anywhere in the world, and competition between prospective areas of potential resources mainly in less explored territories

  4. Fabrication of atomized uranium dispersion targets for fission mo production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Moonsoo; Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Jong Hyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Among radioisotopes for medical diagnosis, Tc-99m is most widely used. Mo-99 produced from nuclear fission of uranium in research reactors is the key radioisotopes for Tc-99m generators. Generally, major producers of Mo-99 still use targets containing highly enriched uranium (HEU). However, the international non-proliferation policy emphasizes the minimization of the use of HEU in medical radioisotopes production nowadays. Therefore, low enriched uranium (LEU) targets have been developed by casting and crushing of UAl{sub 2} compounds. The UAl{sub 2} particle dispersed target has a lower U-235 density when compared to HEU targets. In order to improve the low production efficiency of LEU targets, target designers try to develop high uranium density targets with LEU. KAERI has proposed that high density uranium alloys, instead of UAl{sub 2}, can be used as dispersing particles in an aluminum matrix. While it is very difficult to fabricate uranium alloys powder by grinding or crushing, spherical powder of uranium alloys can be produced easily by centrifugal atomization. Mini-size targets with 3, 6, and 9 g-U/cc were fabricated in this study to investigate the feasibility of high density targets with atomized uranium particles. The microstructural changes after thermal treatments were observed to analyze the interaction behavior of uranium particles and aluminum matrix.

  5. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  6. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  7. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  8. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  9. Dispersion Target Fabrication for Fission Mo Using Atomized Uranium Powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Moonsoo; Ryu, Hojin; Park, Jongman; Kim, Changkyu; Lee, Jonghyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Major producers of Mo-99 still generators which producers of Mo-99 still use targets containing highly enriched uranium (HEU). However, the international non-proliferation policy currently emphasizes the minimization of the use of HEU in medical radioisotope production. Therefore, low enriched uranium (LEU) targets have been developed by casting and crushing of UAl{sub 2} compounds. The UAl{sub 2} particle dispersed target has a lower U-235 density of the conventional UAl{sub 2} dispersion targets is known to be lower than 2.7g-U/cm{sup 2}. To improve the low production efficiency of LEU targets, target designers try to develop high uranium density targets with LEU. KAERI has proposed that high density uranium alloys, instead of UAl{sub 2}, can be used as dispersing particles in an aluminum matrix. While it is very difficult to fabricate uranium alloys powder by grinding or crushing, spherical powders of uranium alloy can be produced easily by centrifugal atomization. Mini-size targets with 3, 6, and 9 g-U/cm{sup 3} were fabricated in this study to investigate the feasibility of high density targets with atomized uranium particles. The microstructural changes after thermal treatments were observed to analyze the interaction behavior of uranium particles and an aluminum matrix. · An mini-size dispersion target with atomized uranium particles up to 9 g-U/cm{sup 3} were fabricated by hot rolling at 500 .deg. C. · Atomized uranium particles react with the aluminum matrix to form UAl{sub x} phases during the fabrication processes. · Most of the uranium particles in the dispersion targets were converted into UAl{sub x} after annealing at 700 .deg. C.

  10. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  11. FORMING TUBES AND RODS OF URANIUM METAL BY EXTRUSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-01-27

    A method and apparatus are presented for the extrusion of uranium metal. Since uranium is very brittle if worked in the beta phase, it is desirable to extrude it in the gamma phase. However, in the gamma temperature range thc uranium will alloy with the metal of the extrusion dic, and is readily oxidized to a great degree. According to this patent, uranium extrusion in thc ganmma phase may be safely carried out by preheating a billet of uranium in an inert atmosphere to a trmperature between 780 C and 1100 C. The heated billet is then placed in an extrusion apparatus having dies which have been maintained at an elevated temperature for a sufficient length of time to produce an oxide film, and placing a copper disc between the uranium billet and the die.

  12. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  13. The microstructure and hydriding characteristics of high temperature aged U-13 at.%Nb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hefei; Shi, Peng; Li, Ruiwen; Jiang, Chunli; Yang, Jiangrong; Hu, Guichao

    2015-09-01

    Niobium as alloying element significantly improves physical and chemical properties of metallic uranium, exhibiting great application potential in uranium alloy materials. The corrosion resistance performance as well as the internal alloy phase structure of uranium-niobium alloy is closely related to aging processes. Microstructure and hydriding characteristics of the 400 °C/9 h + 500 °C/2 h aged uranium-13 at.% niobium alloys (U-13 at.%Nb) were investigated from the point of view of relationship between the microstructure and growth of the hydriding areas. The microstructure, morphology and composition of the alloy phases before and after the hydriding were well characterized by the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Experimental results indicated that the hydrogen preferentially reacted with the Nb-depleted phase α-like-U to form monolithic β-UH3Nbx, and the alloy microstructure played an important role in hydride growth.

  14. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  15. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  16. Study of Fe Zr U B and Fe Zr U Cu B nanocrystalline alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sólyom, A.; Petrovič, P.; Marko, P.; Kováč, J.; Konczos, G.

    2000-06-01

    The influence of uranium and copper additives on the crystallization process and magnetic properties was studied in Fe 87Zr 7B 6 amorphous alloys. The addition of copper resulted in homogeneous nanocrystalline precipitates and improvement of soft magnetic properties. The alloying with uranium led to the formation of inhomogeneous microstructure and increase in coercive force.

  17. Study of Fe-Zr-U-B and Fe-Zr-U-Cu-B nanocrystalline alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of uranium and copper additives on the crystallization process and magnetic properties was studied in Fe87Zr7B6 amorphous alloys. The addition of copper resulted in homogeneous nanocrystalline precipitates and improvement of soft magnetic properties. The alloying with uranium led to the formation of inhomogeneous microstructure and increase in coercive force

  18. Depleted-Uranium Weapons: the Whys and Wherefores

    OpenAIRE

    Gsponer, Andre

    2003-01-01

    The only military application in which depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform present-day tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10%, and it disappears when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform DU alloys, enabling the production of ...

  19. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  20. Issues in uranium availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  1. Uranium industry annual 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and related topics. A glossary and appendices are included to assist the reader in interpreting the substantial array of statistical data in this report and to provide background information about the survey

  2. Depleted Uranium Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers radiological and toxic impact of the depleted uranium on the human health. Radiological influence of depleted uranium is less for 60 % than natural uranium due to the decreasing of short-lived isotopes uranium-234 and uranium-235 after enrichment. The formation of radioactive aerosols and their impact on the human are mentioned. Use of the depleted uranium weapons has also a chemical effect on intake due to possible carcinogenic influence on kidney. Uranium-236 in the substance of the depleted uranium is determined. The fact of beta-radiation formation in the uranium-238 decay is regarded. This effect practically is the same for both depleted and natural uranium. Importance of toxicity of depleted uranium, as the heavier chemical substance, has a considerable contribution to the population health. The paper analyzes risks regarding the use of the depleted uranium weapons. There is international opposition against using weapons with depleted uranium. Resolution on effects of the use of armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium was five times supported by the United Nations (USA, United Kingdom, France and Israel did not support). The decision for banning of depleted uranium weapons was supported by the European Parliament

  3. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

  4. Depleted Uranium Penetrators : Hazards and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Rao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The depleted uranium (DU alloy is a state-of-the-art material for kinetic energy penetrators due to its superior ballistic performance. Several countries use DU penetrators in their main battle tanks. There is no gamma radiation hazard to the crew members from stowage of DO rounds. Open air firing can result in environmental contamination and associated hazards due to airborne particles containing essentially U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ and UO/sub 2/. Inhalation of polluted air only through respirators or nose masks and refraining form ingestion of water or food materials from contaminated environment are safety measures for avoiding exposure to uranium and its toxicity. Infusion of sodium bicarbonate helps in urinary excretion of uranium that may have entered the body.

  5. Morphology Characterization of Uranium Particles From Laser Ablated Uranium Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In the study, metallic uranium and uranium dioxide material were ablated by laser beam in order to simulate the process of forming the uranium particles in pyrochemical process. The morphology characteristic of uranium particles and the surface of

  6. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  7. New data on the structure of uranium monocarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium monocarbide (UC) or ternary alloys are considered to be possible candidates for future nuclear fuels. Although the crystallographic and electronic structure of UC has been addressed in past investigations, discrepancies in the literature data have fostered a new investigation of the UC phase. We report here a reinvestigation of the UC phase by complementary X-ray spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. A combination of X-ray powder diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis at the uranium LIII edge led to the crystallographic determination of the UC phase of the NaCl type. For electronic structure investigation, a combination of uranium X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy at the LIII edge and at the NIV, NV edges with quantum chemical calculations allowed us to define the evolution of the metal charge in comparison with metallic uranium on the one hand and uranium dioxide on the other hand. (authors)

  8. Uranium Provinces in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Three uranium provinces are recognized in China, the Southeast China uranium province, the Northeast China-lnner Mongolia uranium province and the Northwest China (Xinjiang) uranium province. The latter two promise good potential for uranium resources and are major exploration target areas in recent years. There are two major types of uranium deposits: the Phanerozoic hydrothermal type (vein type) and the Meso-Cenozoic sandstone type in different proportions in the three uranium provinces. The most important reason or prerequisite for the formation of these uranium provinces is that Precambrian uranium-enriched old basement or its broken parts (median massifs) exists or once existed in these regions, and underwent strong tectonomagmatic activation during Phanerozoic time. Uranium was mobilized from the old basement and migrated upwards to the upper structural level together with the acidic magma originating from anatexis and the primary fluids, which were then mixed with meteoric water and resulted in the formation of Phanerozoic hydrothermal uranium deposits under extensional tectonic environments. Erosion of uraniferous rocks and pre-existing uranium deposits during the Meso-Cenozoic brought about the removal of uranium into young sedimentary basins. When those basins were uplifted and slightly deformed by later tectonic activity, roll-type uranium deposits were formed as a result of redox in permeable sandstone strata.

  9. Uranium industry annual 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  10. Uranium industry annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  11. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  12. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  13. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  14. Uranium: myths and realities the depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is an element whose name causes worry. The uranium properties are very unknown for people. However the element plays an important roll in the Earth as responsible of numerous natural phenomena, which are vital for life evolution. An example of the low knowledge about uranium has been the Balkan syndrome. A relation between cancers and the use of depleted uranium in ammunition in the Balkan War has been pretended to be established. From the beginning, this hypothesis could have been discarded as it has been confirmed and stated in recent reports of UNEP Commissions who have studied this matter. (Author)

  15. DEPLETED URANIUM TECHNICAL WORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Depleted Uranium Technical Work is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this mater...

  16. Governing uranium in China

    OpenAIRE

    Patton Schell, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power is playing an increasingly prominent role in China's long-term strategic energy calculus. In response, China is responding by producing more uranium domestically, buying more uranium on the international market, and investing heavily in overseas uranium properties. At the same time, China has been updating its nuclear regulations over the last three decades, resulting in a myriad of regulatory agencies with widely varying responsibilities related to implementing uranium regulati...

  17. Uranium industry annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  18. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING UAl$sub 4$ FORMATION IN U-Al ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picklesimer, M.L.; Thurber, W.C.

    1960-08-23

    A method is given for suppressing the formation of UAl/sub 4/ in uranium- - aluminum alloys, thereby rendering these alloys more easily workable. The method comprises incorporating in the base alloy a Group Four element selected from the group consisting of Si, Ti, Ge, Zr, and Sn, the addition preferably being within the range of 0.5to20at.%.

  19. Uranium resources, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific character of uranium as energy resources, the history of development of uranium resources, the production and reserve of uranium in the world, the prospect regarding the demand and supply of uranium, Japanese activity of exploring uranium resources in foreign countries and the state of development of uranium resources in various countries are reported. The formation of uranium deposits, the classification of uranium deposits and the reserve quantity of each type are described. As the geological environment of uranium deposits, there are six types, that is, quartz medium gravel conglomerate deposit, the deposit related to the unconformity in Proterozoic era, the dissemination type magma deposit, pegmatite deposit and contact deposit in igneaus rocks and metamorphic rocks, vein deposit, sandstone type deposit and the other types of deposit. The main features of respective types are explained. The most important uranium resources in Japan are those in the Tertiary formations, and most of the found reserve belongs to this type. The geological features, the state of yield and the scale of the deposits in Ningyotoge, Tono and Kanmon Mesozoic formation are reported. Uranium minerals, the promising districts in the world, and the matters related to the exploration and mining of uranium are described. (Kako, I.)

  20. Uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to uranium and thorium content in fluorite. In order to obtain the comprehensive view on uranium and thorium distribution in fluorite 100 fluorite samples of various geologic deposits and ores of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and some geologic deposits of Russia were studied. The uranium and thorium content in fluorite of geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was defined.

  1. Analytical Methods for Uranium Concentration Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of analytical procedures for the determination of uranium, as performed for NMM in the United States of America, is presented. Methods are outlined for the measurement of the element in a variety of materials, i.e. ores, concentrates, uranium metal, alloys, ceramics, compounds of uranium, scrap processing solutions, residues, and waste stream products. It is not intended as a complete résumé dealing with the subject, but it does offer measurement methods believed to give precise and accurate results of a high order. Because of the monetary value of the materials, and the transfer activities from one installation to another, involving payments or credits, burn-up charges, use charges, etc., it is essential that such methods are used. Methods of analysis to a large extent are dictated by the types of material to be analysed. The use of gravimetric methods are reviewed pertaining to product materials, which are generally defined as uranium metal, or compounds of the metal, such as oxides, halides, or nitrates. A pyro-hydrolysis technique is included under this heading. Non-volatile metallic impurities are determined spectroscopically, and the gravimetric results are corrected accordingly. Volumetric procedures, the ''workhorse'' methods for determining uranium, are thoroughly explored. The technique is applicable to all types of material, providing the uranium available for measurement is present in milligram quantities. Due to the valence states of uranium, reduction-oxidation schemes are particularly attractive. Dissolution problems, separation of interfering elements, reduction steps, and oxidation titrations of reduced uranium are discussed. The application of certain spectrophotometric and fluorometric procedures for analysing low-grade materials are included. Various separation steps incorporated in the procedures before the determination of uranium are reviewed. Along these lines the utilization of differential colorimetry is examined for determining

  2. Annex 5 - Fabrication of U-Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloy U-Al with low content of aluminium is often used for fabrication of fuel elements because it is stable under moderate neutron flux density. Additionally this type of alloys show much better characteristics than pure uranium under reactor operating conditions (temperature, mechanical load, corrosion effect of water). This report contains the analysis of the phase diagram of U-Al alloy with low content of aluminium, applied procedure for alloying and casting with detailed description of equipment. Characteristics of the obtained alloy are described and conclusions about the experiment and procedure are presented

  3. Aqueous corrosion study on U-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In low power or research reactor, U-Zr alloy is a potential candidate for dispersion fuel. Moreover, Zirconium has a low thermal-neutron cross section and uranium alloyed with Zr has excellent corrosion resistance and dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In the present study aqueous corrosion behavior of U-Zr alloy samples was studied in autoclave at 200 deg C temperature. Corrosion rate was determined from weight loss with time. (author)

  4. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed....

  5. Uranium hexafluoride public risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

  6. Uranium enrichment. Principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium enrichment industry is a more than 60 years old history and has developed without practically no cost, efficiency or profit constraints. However, remarkable improvements have been accomplished since the Second World War and have led to the development of various competing processes which reflect the diversity of uranium compositions and of uranium needs. Content: 1 - general considerations: uranium isotopes, problem of uranium enrichment, first realizations (USA, Russia, Europe, Asia, other countries), present day situation, future needs and market evolution; 2 - principles of isotopic separation: processes classification (high or low enrichment), low elementary enrichment processes, equilibrium time, cascade star-up and monitoring, multi-isotopes case, uranium reprocessing; 3 - enrichment and proliferation. (J.S.)

  7. Uses of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depleted uranium is that in which percentage of uranium-235 fission executable is less than 0.2% or 0.3%. It is usually caused by the process of reprocessing the nuclear fuel burning, and also mixed with some other radioactive elements such as uranium 236, 238 and plutonium 239. The good features of the depleted uranium are its high density, low price and easily mined. So, the specifications for depleted uranium make it one of the best materials in case you need to have objects small in size, but quite heavy regarding its size. Uses of deplet ed uranium were relatively increased in domestic industrial uses as well as some uses in nuclear industry in the last few years. So it has increased uses in many areas of military and peaceful means such as: in balancing the giant air crafts, ships and missiles and in the manufacture of some types of concrete with severe hardness. (author)

  8. Uranium Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new Uranium Newsletter is presented as an IAEA annual newsletter. The organization of the IAEA and its involvement with uranium since its founding in 1957 is described. The ''Red Book'' (Uranium Resources, Production and Demand) is mentioned. The Technical Assistance Programme of the IAEA in this field is also briefly mentioned. The contents also include information on the following meetings: The Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium Deposits in Magmatic and Metamorphic Rocks, Advisory Group Meeting on the Use of Airborne Radiometric Data, and the Technical Committee Meeting on Metallogenesis. Recent publications are listed. Current research contracts in uranium exploration are mentioned. IAEA publications on uranium (in press) are listed also. Country reports from the following countries are included: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China (People's Republic of), Denmark, Finland, Germany (Federal Republic of), Malaysia, Philippines, Portugal, South Africa (Republic of), Spain, Syrian Arab Republic, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, and Greece. There is also a report from the Commission of European Communities

  9. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  10. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  11. Simulating distinguish enriched uranium from depleted uranium by activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detecting uranium material is an important work in arms control Active detection is an efficient method for uranium material. The paper focuses on the feasibility that can distinguish the enriched uranium and the depleted uranium by MCNP program. It can distinguish the enriched uranium and the depleted uranium by the curve of relationship between fission rate of uranium material and thickness of moderator.Advantages of 252Cf and 14 MeV neutron sources are discussed in detecting uranium material through calculation. The results show that 252Cf neutron source is better than 14 MeV one. Delayed neutrons are more easily detected than delayed gamma ray at measurement aspect. (authors)

  12. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU), there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000): 215-220

  13. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  14. International trade in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two reports are presented; one has been prepared by the Uranium Institute and is submitted by the United Kingdom delegation, the other by the United States delegation. The report of the Uranium Institute deals with the influence of the government on international trade in uranium. This influence becomes apparent predominantly by export and import restrictions, as well as by price controls. The contribution submitted by the United States is a uranium market trend analysis, with pricing methods and contracting modes as well as the effect of government policies being investigated in the light of recent developments

  15. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehle, A.E.; Stevenson, J.W.

    1957-11-12

    An improved process is described for the magnesium reduction of UF/sub 4/ to produce uranium metal. In the past, there have been undesirable premature reactions between the Mg and the bomb liner or the UF/sub 4/ before the actual ignition of the bomb reaction. Since these premature reactions impair the yield of uranium metal, they have been inhibited by forming a protective film upon the particles of Mg by reacting it with hydrated uranium tetrafluoride, sodium bifluoride, uranyl fluoride, or uranium trioxide. This may be accomplished by adding about 0.5 to 2% of the additive to the bomb charge.

  16. Calorimetry studies on U-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calorimetric study of Uranium-Chromium system is of interest on both basic and applied fronts. With the advent of U-Pu-Zr alloy as the fuel, in combination with ferritic-martensitic steel as the cladding material, the metal fuelled fast reactors constitute the second major step in Indian nuclear power program. In such a context, a fundamental investigation on the high temperature phase stability of U-Cr alloys is of particular relevance in getting further insight in to the complex issue of the metallurgical compatibility of ferritic steels with metallic Uranium-Zirconium fuel. It may be added that following U-Fe, and U-Zr binaries, the U-Cr constitutes one of the important subsystems of the complex U-Zr-Pu-Fe- Cr-Mn-Si-V-Nb-C-N multinary system. In the current study, the results of calorimetry investigations on U, U-2, 3, 7, 15wt. % Cr alloys are presented

  17. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U3O8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U3O8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U3O8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  18. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  19. Depleted Uranium Penetrators : Hazards and Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, S S; T. Balakrishna Bhat

    1997-01-01

    The depleted uranium (DU) alloy is a state-of-the-art material for kinetic energy penetrators due to its superior ballistic performance. Several countries use DU penetrators in their main battle tanks. There is no gamma radiation hazard to the crew members from stowage of DO rounds. Open air firing can result in environmental contamination and associated hazards due to airborne particles containing essentially U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ and UO/sub 2/. Inhalation of polluted air only through resp...

  20. Depleted-Uranium Weapons the Whys and Wherefores

    CERN Document Server

    Gsponer, A

    2003-01-01

    The only military application in which present-day depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10% and disappearing when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform existing DU alloys, enabling the production of tungsten munition which will be better than uranium munition, and whose overall life-cycle cost will be less due to the absence of the problems related to the radioactivity of uranium. The reasons why DU weapons have been introduced and used are analysed from the perspective that their radioactivity must have played an important role in the decision making process. It is found that DU weapons belong to the diffuse category of low-radiological-impact nuclear weapons to which emerging types of low-yield, i.e., fourth...

  1. Depleted uranium in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, depleted uranium ammunition is regarded as nuclear weapons and meets with fierce opposition. The fact that US Marines mistakenly fired bullets containing depleted uranium on an island off Okinawa during training exercises in December 1995 and January 1996, also contributes. The overall situation in this area in Japan is outlined. (P.A.)

  2. Uranium Measurements and Attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It may be necessary to find the means to determine unclassified attributes of uranium in nuclear weapons or their components for future transparency initiatives. We briefly describe the desired characteristics of attribute measurement systems for transparency. The determination of uranium attributes; in particular, by passive gamma-ray detection is a formidable challenge

  3. Uranium: abundance or shortage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steyn, J. [Energy Resources International, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-09-01

    With large uranium stockpiles, particularly in the form of HEU, continuing to be the dominant factor in the world uranium market, buyers should be able to enter into attractive long-term commitments for the future. Nevertheless, producers are now able to see forward with some degree of certainty and are expected to meet their planned levels of production and demand. (author).

  4. EPR of uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the electron paramagnetic resonance data on the uranium ions is given. After a general account of the electronic structure of the uranium free atoms and ions, the influence of the external fields (magnetic field, crystal fields) is discussed. The main information obtained from EPR studies on the uranium ions in crystals are emphasized: identification of the valence and of the ground electronic state, determination of the structure of the centers, crystal field effects, role of the intermediate coupling and of the J-mixing, role of the covalency, determination of the nuclear spin, maqnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment of the odd isotopes of uranium. These data emphasize the fact that the actinide group has its own identity and this is accutely manifested at the beginning of the 5fsup(n) series encompassed by the uranium ions. (authors)

  5. Management of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large stocks of depleted uranium have arisen as a result of enrichment operations, especially in the United States and the Russian Federation. Countries with depleted uranium stocks are interested in assessing strategies for the use and management of depleted uranium. The choice of strategy depends on several factors, including government and business policy, alternative uses available, the economic value of the material, regulatory aspects and disposal options, and international market developments in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of a depleted uranium study conducted by an expert group organised jointly by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It contains information on current inventories of depleted uranium, potential future arisings, long term management alternatives, peaceful use options and country programmes. In addition, it explores ideas for international collaboration and identifies key issues for governments and policy makers to consider. (authors)

  6. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L.; Ackerman, John P.; Williamson, Mark A.

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  7. Uranium triamidoamine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benedict M; Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-01

    Triamidoamine (Tren) complexes of the p- and d-block elements have been well-studied, and they display a diverse array of chemistry of academic, industrial and biological significance. Such in-depth investigations are not as widespread for Tren complexes of uranium, despite the general drive to better understand the chemical behaviour of uranium by virtue of its fundamental position within the nuclear sector. However, the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes is characterised by the ability to stabilise otherwise reactive, multiply bonded main group donor atom ligands, construct uranium-metal bonds, promote small molecule activation, and support single molecule magnetism, all of which exploit the steric, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic features of the Tren ligand system. This Feature Article presents a current account of the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes.

  8. Uranium deposit research, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on uranium deposits in Canada, conducted as a prerequisite for assessment of the Estimated Additional Resources of uranium, revealed that (a) the uranium-gold association in rudites of the Huronian Supergroup preferably occurs in the carbon layers; (b) chloritized ore at the Panel mine, Elliot Lake, Ontario, occurs locally in tectonically disturbed areas in the vicinity of diabase dykes; (c) mineralization in the Black Sturgeon Lake area, Ontario, formed from solutions in structural and lithological traps; (d) the Cigar Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, has two phases of mineralization: monomineralic and polymetallic; (e) mineralization of the JEB (Canoxy Ltd.) deposit is similar to that at McClean Lake; (f) the uranium-carbon assemblage was identified in the Claude deposit, Carswell Structure; and (g) the Otish Mountains area, Quebec, should be considered as a significant uranium-polymetallic metallogenic province

  9. Foreign uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Known foreign uranium resources are concentrated in a few countries. The resources of many countries are largely unassessed, but the known uranium countries appear to have the best potential for future expansion. Availability of supply from known resources will depend on resolution of national policies regarding uranium production, ownership and export, and actions of the mining industry. Foreign uranium demand projections have decreased markedly in the last few years, and currently planned and attainable production should be adequate through the 1980's. Longer term resources and supply outlook are still a major concern to both those planning electric supply systems based on converter reactors and those considering reprocessing and recycle of uranium and plutonium and development of breeder reactors. Work continues to clarify long-term supply in several countries and internationally, but more effort, and time, will be needed to clarify these issues

  10. Results of the work on development of research reactor fuel element based on high density fuel with decreased enrichment in uranium-235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work is developed to the branch program on decrease of fuel enrichment in the Russian research reactors. The analysis of results of foreign works and own studies on creating dispersion fuel compositions on the basis of high density uranium compounds is accomplished. The uranium alloys U3Si, U3Si alloys, U-Zr-Nb, U6Fe and U6Fe alloys are chosen for application in further developments. Characteristics of these alloys are given from the viewpoint of their behaviour under irradiation

  11. DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

  12. Uranium deposits in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Africa is not only known for its spectacular diamond, gold, copper, chromium, platinum and phosphorus deposits but also for its uranium deposits. At least two uranium provinces can be distinguished - the southern, with the equatorial sub-province; and the south Saharan province. Uranium deposits are distributed either in cratons or in mobile belts, the first of sandstone and quartz-pebble conglomerate type, while those located in mobile belts are predominantly of vein and similar (disseminated) type. Uranium deposits occur within Precambrian rocks or in younger platform sediments, but close to the exposed Precambrian basement. The Proterozoic host rocks consist of sediments, metamorphics or granitoids. In contrast to Phanerozoic continental uranium-bearing sediments, those in the Precambrian are in marginal marine facies but they do contain organic material. The geology of Africa is briefly reviewed with the emphasis on those features which might control the distribution of uranium. The evolution of the African Platform is considered as a progressive reduction of its craton area which has been affected by three major Precambrian tectonic events. A short survey on the geology of known uranium deposits is made. However, some deposits and occurrences for which little published material is available are treated in more detail. (author)

  13. Uranium resource assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this investigation is to examine what is generally known about uranium resources, what is subject to conjecture, how well do the explorers themselves understand the occurrence of uranium, and who are the various participants in the exploration process. From this we hope to reach a better understanding of the quality of uranium resource estimates as well as the nature of the exploration process. The underlying questions will remain unanswered. But given an inability to estimate precisely our uranium resources, how much do we really need to know. To answer this latter question, the various Department of Energy needs for uranium resource estimates are examined. This allows consideration of whether or not given the absence of more complete long-term supply data and the associated problems of uranium deliverability for the electric utility industry, we are now threatened with nuclear power plants eventually standing idle due to an unanticipated lack of fuel for their reactors. Obviously this is of some consequence to the government and energy consuming public. The report is organized into four parts. Section I evaluates the uranium resource data base and the various methodologies of resource assessment. Part II describes the manner in which a private company goes about exploring for uranium and the nature of its internal need for resource information. Part III examines the structure of the industry for the purpose of determining the character of the industry with respect to resource development. Part IV arrives at conclusions about the emerging pattern of industrial behavior with respect to uranium supply and the implications this has for coping with national energy issues

  14. Uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report uranium mining and milling are reviewed. The fuel cycle, different types of uranium geological deposits, blending of ores, open cast and underground mining, the mining cost and radiation protection in mines are treated in the first part of this report. In the second part, the milling of uranium ores is treated, including process technology, acid and alkaline leaching, process design for physical and chemical treatment of the ores, and the cost. Each chapter is clarified by added figures, diagrams, tables, and flowsheets. (HK)

  15. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides a process for recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. It consists of treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount equal to at least 0.5 part H2O2 per part of vanadium (V2O5) in solution in excess of the stoichiometric (1.26 parts/part U3O8) amount required to form the uranium peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three phases. (auth)

  16. Refining U-Zr-Nb alloys by remelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, B.M.; Kniess, C.T.; Riella, H.G., E-mail: bmaguiar@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferraz, W.B. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The high density U-Zr-Nb and U-Nb uranium-based alloys can be employed as nuclear fuel in a PWR reactor due to their high density and nuclear properties. These alloys can stabilize the gamma phase, however, according to TTT diagrams, at the working temperature of a PWR reactor, all gamma phase transforms to {alpha}'' phase in a few hours. To avoid this kind of transformation during the nuclear reactor operation, the U-Zr-Nb alloy and U-Nn are used in {alpha}'' phase. The stability of {alpha}'' phase depends on the alloy composition and cooling rate. The alloy homogenization has to be very effective to eliminate precipitates rich in Zr and Nb to avoid changes in the alloying elements contents in the matrix. The homogenization was obtained by remelting the alloy and keeping it in the liquid state for enough time to promote floating of the precipitates (usually carbides, less dense) and leaving the matrix free of precipitates. However, this floating by density difference may result in segregation between the alloying elements (Nb and Zr, at the top) and uranium (at the bottom). The homogenized alloys were characterized in terms of metallographic techniques, optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, EDS and X-ray diffraction. In this paper, it is shown that the contents of Zr and Nb at the bottom and at the top of the matrix are constant. (author)

  17. Uranium in granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research activities of the Canadian Uranium in Granites Study are presented in 18 papers and 3 abstracts. 'Granites' is used as a generic term for granitoids, granitic rocks, and plutonic rocks

  18. Ontario's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report traces the Ontario uranium mining industry from the first discovery of uranium north of Sault Ste. Marie through the uranium boom of the 1950's when Elliot Lake and Bancroft were developed, the cutbacks of the 1960s, the renewed enthusiasm in exploration and development of the 1970s to the current position when continued production for the domestic market is assured. Ontario, with developed mines and operational expertise, will be in a position to compete for export markets as they reopen. The low level of expenditures for uranium exploration and the lack of new discoveries are noted. The report also reviews and places in perspective the development of policies and regulations governing the industry and the jurisdictional relationships of the Federal and Provincial governments

  19. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (smbullet) Uranium fuel production (smbullet) Test reactor and separations experiments (smbullet) Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex (smbullet) .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  20. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  1. Selective separation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the selective separation of uranium from elements accompanying it in a uranium-containing ore is claimed. It comprises preparing a uranium-containing solution; adding hydrochloric acid in an amount sufficient to form complex anions of the type (UO2Clsub(n))sup(2-n) where n is 3 or 4, or sulfuric acid in an amount sufficient to form complex anions of the type UO2(SO4)sub(m)sup(2-2m) where m is 2 or 3; adding a cationic surface active agent which forms a difficultly soluble precipitate with the complex anion; subjecting the solution to a gas flotation step to produce a foam fraction containing the pecipitate and a liquid fraction; separating the two fractions; and recovering uranium from the foam fraction

  2. Uranium determination in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method used for the spectrometric uranium determination with 2-(2-thiolase)-5-diethylaminophenol was modified for its application in the zirconium samples analysis with an uranium content of the 0.1% order. The samples, previously dissolved in nitric acid, were submitted to a separative stage of liquid-liquid extraction, with a trioctylphosphine (TOPO) oxide diluted in cyclohexane. A sodium fluoride aqueous solution was necessary to be aggregated in the spectrometric determination so as to complex the zirconium vestiges, which could be present, originated by the Zr/U high relation of the initial sample. Under the established working conditions, different spectrometric assays, dyes absorption spectra and its uranium complex, complex stability, PH influence determination of the dyes-uranium relation, calculation of the complex's apparent formation constant and its molar absorption, were performed. (Author)

  3. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  4. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  5. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988 Canada's five uranium producers reported output of concentrate containing a record 12,470 metric tons of uranium (tU), or about one third of total Western world production. Shipments exceeded 13,200 tU, valued at $Cdn 1.1 billion. Most of Canada's uranium output is available for export for peaceful purposes, as domestic requirements represent about 15 percent of production. The six uranium marketers signed new sales contracts for over 11,000 tU, mostly destined for the United States. Annual exports peaked in 1987 at 12,790 tU, falling back to 10,430 tU in 1988. Forward domestic and export contract commitments were more than 70,000 tU and 60,000 tU, respectively, as of early 1989. The uranium industry in Canada was restructured and consolidated by merger and acquisition, including the formation of Cameco. Three uranium projects were also advanced. The Athabasca Basin is the primary target for the discovery of high-grade low-cost uranium deposits. Discovery of new reserves in 1987 and 1988 did not fully replace the record output over the two-year period. The estimate of overall resources as of January 1989 was down by 4 percent from January 1987 to a total (measured, indicated and inferred) of 544,000 tU. Exploration expenditures reached $Cdn 37 million in 1987 and $59 million in 1988, due largely to the test mining programs at the Cigar Lake and Midwest projects in Saskatchewan. Spot market prices fell to all-time lows from 1987 to mid-1989, and there is little sign of relief. Canadian uranium production capability could fall below 12,000 tU before the late 1990s; however, should market conditions warrant output could be increased beyond 15,000 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are now or are expected to be in service by the late 1990s. There is significant potential for discovering additional uranium resources. Canada's uranium production is equivalent, in

  6. Production of molybdenum-99 from low enriched uranium targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission molybdenum-99 is being produced in Argentina, at the Ezeiza Atomic Centre, since 1985. The procedure involved the irradiation of HEU targets with an Uranium-Aluminum alloy 'meat' cladded with aluminum. Chemical processing of the targets is based on the method developed by Dr. Sameh Ali at KfK in Germany. Some years ago the Atomic Energy National Commission of Argentina (CNEA) started the development of new LEU targets for its Mo-99 production, in order to replace present HEU miniplates. In a previous paper several tests were described, employing uranium silicide and uranium aluminide as target materials. Based on those tests, the method for Mo-99 production from HEU targets was adapted to LEU aluminide targets. A description of the method, yielding results and quality control data of the final product are shown. At present, this is the method employed in Argentina to obtain high quality fission Mo-99 from LEU targets to be used in nuclear medicine. (author)

  7. Decontamination of uranium-contaminated equipment and parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Uranium enrichment pilot plant was decommissioned in 1985-1986. The decontamination concept and methods and results for the equipment and parts decontaminated are discussed. The kinds of metals involved in the decontamination action were copper, nickel, aluminium alloy, mild steel, and stainless steel. Decontamination results showed the surface contamination levels of most parts decontaminated achieved the required level. The uranium content in aluminium ingots after metal refining was from 33 to 232 ppm. The decontamination liquid wastes were treated with the multiprecipitation method. The contents of uranium, nickel, and fluoride in the supernatant were 0.02-0.1 mg/1, 0.02 mg/1, and 0.13 mg/1, respectively

  8. Ranger uranium environmental enquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The submission is divided into three sections. Section A considers the international implications of the development of uranium resources including economic and resource aspects and environmental and social aspects. Section B outlines the government's position on export controls over uranium and its effect on the introduction of nuclear power in Australia. Section C describes the licensing and regulatory functions that would be needed to monitor the environmental and health aspects of the Ranger project. (R.L.)

  9. Uranium leads political stakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until the announcement by the federal Environment Minister Peter Garrett that the government would permit uranium mining at Beverly Four Mile, South Australia, there had been little news flow from the sector over the past year. Uranium was the first to turn down, even before the United States sub-prime mortgage crisis began to cause shock waves through the global economy, a report by BGF Equities analyst Warwick Grigor shows.

  10. Uranium determination in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our laboratory, a procedure has been assessed to determine uranium content of water in normal situations. The method proposed without sample pre-treatment, is simple and rapid. Uranium mass is measured by fluorimetry. For calculation of detection limit (Ld) and quantification level (Lq) we used blank samples and the results were analyzed for different statistical test. The calculation of total propagated uncertainty and sources contribution on real samples are presented. (author)

  11. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results

  12. Uranium tailings bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliography containing 1,212 references is presented with its focus on the general problem of reducing human exposure to the radionuclides contained in the tailings from the milling of uranium ore. The references are divided into seven broad categories: uranium tailings pile (problems and perspectives), standards and philosophy, etiology of radiation effects, internal dosimetry and metabolism, environmental transport, background sources of tailings radionuclides, and large-area decontamination

  13. Production of sized particles of uranium oxides and uranium oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for converting uranium hexafluoride to uranium dioxide of a relatively large particle size in a fluidized bed reactor by mixing uranium hexafluoride with a mixture of steam and hydrogen to form a mixture of uranium oxide and uranium oxyfluoride seed particles of varying sizes, separating the larger particles from the smaller particles in a cyclone separator, recycling the smaller seed particles through the ejector to increase their size, and introducing the larger seed particles from the cyclone separator into a fluidized bed reactor where the seed particles serve as nuclei on which coarser particles of uranium dioxide are formed. (Patent Office Record)

  14. Fabrication of high-uranium-loaded U3O8-Al developmental fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common plate-type fuel for research and test reactors is U3O8 dispersed in aluminum and clad with an aluminum alloy. There is an impetus to reduce the 235U enrichment from above 90% to below 20% for these fuels to lessen the risk of diversion of the uranium for nonpeaceful uses. Thus, the uranium content of the fuel plates has to be increased to maintain the performance of the reactors. This paper describes work at ORNL to determine the maximal uranium loading for these fuels that can be fabricated with commercially proven materials and techniques and that can be expected to perform satisfactorily in service

  15. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities, characterized by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H2O2 per part vanadium (V2O5) above the stoichio-metric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment being carried out in three sequential phases consisting of: 1) a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction media maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of 5 to 180 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; 2) a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of 5 to 180 minutes and 3) a final phase in which the pH of the reaction media is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities, the excess hydrogen peroxide aforesaid being maintained until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction mixture

  16. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Kvanefjeld uranium project is to evaluate the possibility of a uranium production from the deposit at Narssaq, South Greenland. The project comprises investigations in the fields of geology, mining, process chemistry and technology, economy and environment protection. The predominant uraniferous rock is a nepheline syenite called lujavrite in which the main uranium mineral is steenstrupine. The deposit can be mined in an open pit. Calculations have shown a resource of 56 million tonnes of ore with an average grade of 365 ppm corresponding to 20,400 tonnes of uranium. The uranium is extracted by a sodium carbonate solution at 260degC in an autoclave. A pilot plant has been established including ball mill, continuous pipe autoclave and a belt filter for separation of leach liquor and residue. The uranium is finally precipitated as UO2 by reduction in an autoclave at 260degC. With the existing ore sample, recoveries of more than 80% have been obtained. The carbonate leaching causes a low solubility of most contaminants in the tailings. A draft project has been prepared for an industrial plant in Greenland. The total investments have been calculated at 3 x 109 Dkr. Electrical energy is assumed to be supplied by a hydropower plant at Johan Dahl Land. The mine and mill are expected to employ 500-600 persons. (author)

  17. The development of uranium foil farication technology utilizing twin roll method for Mo-99 irradiation target

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C K; Park, H D

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion in Canada, occupying about 75% of global supply of Mo-99 isotope, has provided the irradiation target of Mo-99 using the rod-type UAl sub x alloys with HEU(High Enrichment Uranium). ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) through co-operation with BATAN in Indonesia, leading RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program substantially for nuclear non-proliferation, has designed and fabricated the annular cylinder of uranium targets, and successfully performed irradiation test, in order to develop the fabrication technology of fission Mo-99 using LEU(Low Enrichment Uranium). As the uranium foils could be fabricated in laboratory scale, not in commercialized scale by hot rolling method due to significant problems in foil quality, productivity and economic efficiency, attention has shifted to the development of new technology. Under these circumstances, the invention of uranium foil fabrication technology utilizing twin-roll casting method in KAERI is found to be able to fabricate LEU or...

  18. Study of uranium plating measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In neutron physics experiments, the measurement for plate-thickness of uranium can directly affect uncertainties of experiment results. To measure the plate-thickness of transform target (enriched uranium plating and depleted uranium plating), the back to back ionization chamber, small solid angle device and Au-Si surface barrier semi-conductor, were used in the experiment study. Also, the uncertainties in the experiment were analyzed. Because the inhomo-geneous of uranium lay of plate can quantitively affect the result, the homogeneity of uranium lay is checked, the experiment result reflects the homogeneity of uranium lay is good. (authors)

  19. Determination of low concentration of uranium in uranium amalgam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the strong interference in the determination of low concentrations of uranium in uranium amalgam by spectrophotometry, a new and rapid method has been developed for the removal of the interference of mercury(II) ion in the range of low uranium concentration by reducing Hg(II) to Hg in the sample dissolved in nitric acid with ascorbic acid. The separated uranium in the solution is determined by spectrophotometry in the concentration range of 0.25 approximately 5 mg/g uranium amalgam. The average error is about 2%. Very low concentrations of uranium (approximately 0.25 mg/g) in the uranium amalgam can be determined directly by fluorometric method. No interference effect has been observed at the mercury to uranium ratio up to 105; the average error is about 10%. (author)

  20. Joining Uranium to Aluminum using Electron Beam Welding and an Explosively Clad Niobium Interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J W; Terrill, P; Brasher, D; Butler, D

    2001-06-12

    A uranium alloy was joined to a high strength aluminum alloy using a commercially pure niobium interlayer. Joining of the Nb interlayer to the aluminum alloy was performed using an explosive welding process, while joining the Nb interlayer to the uranium alloy was performed using an electron beam welding process. Explosive welding was selected to bond the Nb to the aluminum alloy in order to minimize the formation of brittle intermetallic phases. Electron beam welding was selected to join the Nb to the uranium alloy in order to precisely control melting so as to minimize mixing of the two metals. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, microhardness, and tensile testing of the welds were used to characterize the resulting joints. This paper presents the welding techniques and processing parameters that were developed to produce high integrity ductile joints between these materials.

  1. Microstructural evolution and thermophysical property evaluation of Th-U alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium-uranium alloy fuel has not received much research attention mainly because of easy availability of uranium and military incentive offered by U-Pu cycle. Moreover, (i) lack of a consistent systematic effort to develop the alloys and define the limitations of these fuels, (ii) dearth of initiatives to define its microstructures that can result from composition and fabrication variables are prime reasons for this system not having witnessed much developmental research endeavour. Hence, it seems prudent to explore few compositions selected from thorium-uranium phase diagram keeping two primary objectives in view viz. (i) establishing its microstructural features and to study the variations in those, if any, brought about by processing variables etc. and (ii) to assess few thermal properties relevant to fuel applications. This experimental work aims at addressing gap in research on thorium-uranium alloys. Selected compositions of thorium-uranium alloy have been taken for microstructural study and evaluation of thermophysical properties. Based on the microstructural features and thermophysical property evaluation it is seen that high thorium Th-U alloys have appreciable thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient. It can reasonably be concluded that high thorium Th-U alloy can be used for possible nuclear fuel application in reactors provided other factors (e.g. reactor physics, post irradiation examinations etc.) are also seen to be favourable. (author)

  2. Uranium hexafluoride handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF6 from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride

  3. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Uranium markets after the hangover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, H. (Hugh Douglas and Co. Ltd., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1982-07-01

    A report is given on the current depressed state of the world's uranium markets and on the prospects for recovery. The impact on the uranium industry of low prices and reduced demand are outlined.

  5. New data on the structure of uranium monocarbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Fillaux, C.; Moisy, P. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DRCP/SCPS, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Maslennikov, A. [Russian Acad Sci, Inst Phys Chem and Electrochem, Moscow 119991, (Russian Federation); Noel, H. [Univ Rennes 1, CNRS, UMR 6226, Lab Chim Solide et Mat, F-35042 Rennes, (France); Roques, J.; Simoni, E. [Univ Paris 11, IPN Orsay, F-91405 Orsay, (France); Shuh, D. K.; Tyliszczak, T. [Univ Calif Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720, (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Uranium monocarbide (UC) or ternary alloys are considered to be possible candidates for future nuclear fuels. Although the crystallographic and electronic structure of UC has been addressed in past investigations, discrepancies in the literature data have fostered a new investigation of the UC phase. We report here a reinvestigation of the UC phase by complementary X-ray spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. A combination of X-ray powder diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis at the uranium L{sub III} edge led to the crystallographic determination of the UC phase of the NaCl type. For electronic structure investigation, a combination of uranium X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy at the L{sub III} edge and at the N{sub IV}, N{sub V} edges with quantum chemical calculations allowed us to define the evolution of the metal charge in comparison with metallic uranium on the one hand and uranium dioxide on the other hand. (authors)

  6. Uranium resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power-generating capacity will continue to expand, albeit at a slower pace than during the past fifteen years. This expansion must be matched by an adequately increasing supply of uranium. This report compares uranium supply and demand data in free market countries with the nuclear industry's natural uranium requirements up to the year 2000. It also reviews the status of uranium exploration, resources and production in 46 countries

  7. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  8. Radiation damage of metal uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is concerned with the role of dispersion second phase in uranium and burnup rate. The role of dispersion phases in radiation stability of metal uranium was studies by three methods: variation of electric conductivity dependent on the neutron flux and temperature of pure uranium for different states of dispersion second phase; influence of dispersion phase on the radiation creep; transmission electron microscopy of fresh and irradiated uranium

  9. Study of the condensation and flow of a simulated uranium-iron alloy in the liquid-solid domain of the phase diagram; Etude de la condensation et de l'ecoulement d'un alliage de simulation de l'uranium fer dans domaine biphase liquide-solide du diagramme de phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroux, S.; Gueneau, Ch.; Le Ny, J. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. de Protection de l' environnement (DPE), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Camel, D.; Drevet, B.; Granier, J. [CEA/Grenoble, Dept. d' Etudes des Materiaux (DEM), 38 (France)

    1999-07-01

    Silver-copper alloys with a composition entering a liquid-solid domain of the phase diagram are condensed on a titled molybdenum substrate, regulated in temperature. Droplets containing nodular crystals, for the most part in contact with the substrate, condense and coalesce to form a film. The film forms more quickly in the solid-liquid than in the fully liquid areas. It indicates that the crystals constitute pinning points for the droplets. A correlation between the condensate thickness and the local solid fraction at the transition between film and droplets is given. In the film areas, the gravity-dependent effect plays an important role. In case of the silver-rich condensate, the solid-phase is expected to be more easily driven by the liquid flow. (authors)

  10. Uranium extraction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1983 the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA) and the IAEA jointly published a book on Uranium Extraction Technology. A primary objective of this report was to document the significant technological developments that took place during the 1970s. The purpose of this present publication is to update and expand the original book. It includes background information about the principle of the unit operations used in uranium ore processing and summarizes the current state of the art. The publication also seeks to preserve the technology and the operating 'know-how' developed over the past ten years. This publication is one of a series of Technical Reports on uranium ore processing that have been prepared by the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management at the IAEA. A complete list of these reports is included as an addendum. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. The Kintyre uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kintyre Uranium Project is being developed by Canning Resources Pty Ltd, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto (formerly CRA). The work on the project includes the planning and management of a number of background environmental studies. The company has also commissioned studies by external consultants into process technologies, mining strategies and techniques for extracting the uranium ore from the waste rock. In addition, Canning Resources has made a detailed assessment of the worldwide market potential for Australian uranium in the late 1990s and into the 21st century. The most significant factor affecting the future of this project is the current product price. This price is insufficient to justify the necessary investment to bring this project into production

  12. Therapy of uranium contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal risks associated with the use of chelating agent as a treatment for acute uranium contamination were investigated. Rats were given a single intramuscular injection of uranyl nitrate solution. The percentage of renal uptake of uranyl nitrate as a function of the quantity injected was measured. Then the effect of a single DTPA intraperitoneal injection and the effect of a single bicarbonate injection on renal uptake of uranyl nitrate were studied. The preliminary results were as follows: constancy of renal uptake of uranyl nitrate (13 to 20% of the quantity injected); harmlessness of DTPA as a treatment for uranium contamination (DTPA does not increase uranium renal burden); inefficacy of bicarbonates on uranyl renal uptake

  13. Sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World-class sandstone-type uranium deposits are defined as epigenetic concentrations of uranium minerals occurring as uneven impregnations and minor massive replacements primarily in fluvial, lacustrine, and deltaic sandstone formations. The main purpose of this introductory paper is to define, classify, and introduce to the general geologic setting for sandstone-type uranium deposits

  14. Uranium resources, demand and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimations of the demand and production of principal uranium resource categories are presented. The estimations based on data analysis made by a joint 'NEA/IAEA Working Party on Uranium Resources' and the corresponding results are published by the OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) in the 'Uranium Resources, Production and Demand' Known as 'Red Book'. (M.C.K.)

  15. The uranium International trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is the understanding of how the present dynamic of uranium International trade is developed, the variables which fall into, the factors that are affecting and conditioning it, in order to clarify which are going to be the outlook in the future of this important resource in front of the present ecological situation and the energetic panorama of XXI Century. For this purpose, as starting point, the uranium is considered as a strategic material which importance take root in its energetic potential as alternate energy source, and for this reason in Chapter I, the general problem of raw materials, its classification and present situation in the global market is presented. In Chapter II, by means of a historical review, is explain what uranium is, how it was discovered, and how since the end of the past Century and during the last three decades of present, uranium pass of practically unknown element, to the position of a strategic raw material, which by degrees, generate an International market, owing to its utilization as a basic resource in the generation of energy. Chapter III, introduce us in the roll played by uranium, since its warlike applications until its utilization in nuclear reactors for the generation of electricity. Also is explain the reason for this change in the perception at global level. Finally, in Chapter IV we enter upon specifically in the present conditions of the International market of this mineral throughout the trends of supply and demand, the main producers, users, price dynamics, and the correlation among these economical variables and other factors of political, social and ecological nature. All of these with the purpose to found out, if there exist, a meaning of the puzzle that seems to be the uranium International trade

  16. Chemwes Uranium Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemwes Uranium Plant is located in an area which is underlain to a major extent by pinnacled dolomite. It was decided to adopt a replacement fill for support of light structures in preference to alternatives such as the installation of piles or 'bridging' between pinnacles. The 3 m thick soil 'raft' resulting from the fill replacement technique made it possible to support all but a very small number of foundations upon shallow spread footings or raft slabs. This article describes a replacement fill for support of light structures at the Chemwes Uranium Plant

  17. Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and method of making thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariani, Robert Dominick; Porter, Douglas Lloyd

    2016-04-05

    Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and methods of making nuclear fuel mixtures are provided. Pseudo-binary actinide-M fuel mixtures form alloys and exhibit: body-centered cubic solid phases at low temperatures; high solidus temperatures; and/or minimal or no reaction or inter-diffusion with steel and other cladding materials. Methods described herein through metallurgical and thermodynamics advancements guide the selection of amounts of fuel mixture components by use of phase diagrams. Weight percentages for components of a metallic additive to an actinide fuel are selected in a solid phase region of an isothermal phase diagram taken at a temperature below an upper temperature limit for the resulting fuel mixture in reactor use. Fuel mixtures include uranium-molybdenum-tungsten, uranium-molybdenum-tantalum, molybdenum-titanium-zirconium, and uranium-molybdenum-titanium systems.

  18. Uranium sorption by tannin resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of uranium by immobilised Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. and Lysiloma latisiliqua L tannins was investigated. Immobilization condition were analyzed. These resins resulted suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. At pH 5.5 maximum in sorption capacity is registered. The presence of appreciable amount of sodium chloride do not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these that could be found in sea water and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. Tannin resins can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity

  19. Uranium mineralization in fluviatile facies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over half the world's known uranium reserves occur in fluviatile rocks. These deposits include Archean quartz-pebble conglomerates of alluvial fan facies and arkosic braided and meandering fluviatile sandstone facies. Uranium-bearing quartz-pebble conglomerates are described. Approximately 40% of the world's uranium reserves have been found in epigenetic sandstone deposits. Deposits of uranium in braided or meandering fluviatile sandstones can be grouped into peneconcordant and roll-front types. Uranium deposits are widely distributed through central, northern and western Australia but only a very small proportion of the reserves occur in fluviatile sequences

  20. Preliminary investigations on the use of uranium silicide targets for fission Mo-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cols, H.; Cristini, P.; Marques, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentine Republic owns and operates an installation for production of molybdenum-99 from fission products since 1985, and, since 1991, covers the whole national demand of this nuclide, carrying out a program of weekly productions, achieving an average activity of 13 terabecquerel per week. At present they are finishing an enlargement of the production plant that will allow an increase in the volume of production to about one hundred of terabecquerel. Irradiation targets are uranium/aluminium alloy with 90% enriched uranium with aluminium cladding. In view of international trends held at present for replacing high enrichment uranium (HEU) for enrichment values lower than 20 % (LEU), since 1990 the authors are in contact with the RERTR program, beginning with tests to adapt their separation process to new irradiation target conditions. Uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) was chosen as the testing material, because it has an uranium mass per volume unit, so that it allows to reduce enrichment to a value of 20%. CNEA has the technology for manufacturing miniplates of uranium silicide for their purposes. In this way, equivalent amounts of Molybdenum-99 could be obtained with no substantial changes in target parameters and irradiation conditions established for the current process with Al/U alloy. This paper shows results achieved on the use of this new target.

  1. Diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

  2. Hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature survey is presented of uranium hexafluoride hydrolysis methods as the first step in UF6 conversion to UO2. Reviewed are early methods of hydrolysis, the hydrolysis by dry water vapour, the fluidized-bed method, and the liquid phase hydrolysis of UF6 gas. (J.P.)

  3. Uranium recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process of recovering uranium from an aqueous medium containing both it and sulfuric acid which comprises contacting the medium with an anion exchange resin having tertiary amine groups, said resin being the product of (a) the reaction of polyethyleneimine and a dihaloalkane and (b) the subsequent reductive alkylation of the product of (a)

  4. The neurotoxicology of uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinocourt, Céline; Legrand, Marie; Dublineau, Isabelle; Lestaevel, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The brain is a target of environmental toxic pollutants that impair cerebral functions. Uranium is present in the environment as a result of natural deposits and release by human applications. The first part of this review describes the passage of uranium into the brain, and its effects on neurological functions and cognitive abilities. Very few human studies have looked at its cognitive effects. Experimental studies show that after exposure, uranium can reach the brain and lead to neurobehavioral impairments, including increased locomotor activity, perturbation of the sleep-wake cycle, decreased memory, and increased anxiety. The mechanisms underlying these neurobehavioral disturbances are not clearly understood. It is evident that there must be more than one toxic mechanism and that it might include different targets in the brain. In the second part, we therefore review the principal mechanisms that have been investigated in experimental models: imbalance of the anti/pro-oxidant system and neurochemical and neurophysiological pathways. Uranium effects are clearly specific according to brain area, dose, and time. Nonetheless, this review demonstrates the paucity of data about its effects on developmental processes and the need for more attention to the consequences of exposure during development.

  5. Uranium prospection in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The worldwide increase of energy consumption and high fossil fuels costs generates the necessity of alternative energy sources. At present, nuclear energy is substituting the use of hydrocarbons, due to its high performance and contribution to environmental preservation, since it avoids the emission of greenhouse gases. Uranium consumer countries will continue to increase its demand, and even, is expected the incorporation of new reactors in countries with emerging economies. Base in the statement considered above, investment in new mineral deposit is justified. At present, some countries are motivated to start or continue the uranium exploration because of the evolution of the nuclear energy industry. Venezuela started exploration in the mid of 1970s, and stopped at 1980s. Our purpose is to evaluate uranium resources potential in the country, both for own use or export. In order to locate potential areas for exploration, in this initial phase all data from previous period is being compiled, incorporating information from oil exploration (seismic data, wells profiles, etc.). This information is been digitalized to generate a database into a geographical information system. Preliminary results show three areas of interest, where new geological, geochemical and geophysical surveys are propose. At this time, we do not have specific information about ore reserves, but we have anomalous areas that have been established as starting points to continue the uranium exploration in the country. (author)

  6. Uranium: The recalcitrant commodity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium is analysed as a special market commodity and compared with other metals like copper. The supply-demand balance, production costs and the special form of pricing are discussed. The likely evaluation of inventories and the future capacity utilization are also discussed and commented. (author). 2 refs, 8 figs

  7. Uranium and nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seminar focussed on the major issues affecting the future of the entire nuclear fuel cycle. In particular it covered issues bearing on the formation of public policy in relation to the use of uranium as an energy source: economic risk, industrial risks, health effects, site selection, environmental issues, and public acceptance

  8. Swelling of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An understanding of the mechanism of swelling in irradiated uranium has been handicapped by lack of data from experiments in which the parameters are accurately known. The present- concepts of swelling are based largely on data of this nature. In this study, uranium specimens with less than 0,01% impurity were irradiated below 300°C, and the swelling was induced by subsequent heat treatment outside the reactor where careful control of the temperature was possible. The results obtained by this technique were self'consistent but in considerable disagreement with rhe results of the in-pile investigations. The density and porosity of irradiated uranium specimens were determined following pulse annealing in the alpha, beta and gamma phases« Both the light microscope and the electron microscope were used to study porosity. The results may be summarized as follows: (1) Uranium specimens irradiated to 0.30%bum-up and heat-treated 75 h at temperatures less than 550°C in the α-phase swelled less than 1%. (2) Uranium specimens (0.30% bum-up) heat-treated 75 h at temperatures between 550°C and 650°C in the α- phase swelled up to 18%. This swelling was due to bubbles with diameters up to 15/μm. These results were diametrically opposed to recent data. (3) Uranium specimens (0.30% bum-up) heat-treated 75 h at temperatures in the ß-phase decreased their density by 4- 5%. This decrease in density is apparently the result of grain-boundary cracking rather than bubble formation, as there is evidence to suggest that fission gas is retained in the matrix of the γ-phase. These results suggest that a modification of the role of pressure and surface tension is required in the current theories of swelling. (4) A uranium specimen (0.30% bum- up) heat-treated for 15 h in the γ-phase at 820°C swelled 20%. In this case the swelling was primarily due to the formation of bubbles in the vicinity of and on grain boundaries. The explanation of these experimental results requires

  9. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The draft uranium project ''Kvanefjeld'' describes the establishment and operation of an industrial plant for exploiting the uranium deposit at Kvanefjeld. The draft project is part of the overall pre-feasibility project and is based on its results. The draft project includes two alternative locations for the processing plant and the tailings deposit plant. The ore reserve is estimated at 56 million tons with an average content of 365 PPM. The mine will be established as an open pit, with a slope angle of 55deg. Conventional techniques are used in drilling, blasting and handling the ore. Waste rock with no uranium content will be disposed of in two ponds near the mine. The waste rock volume is estimated at 80 million tons. A processing plant for extracting uranium from the ore will be established. The technical layout of the plant is based on the extraction experiments performed at Risoe from 1981-83. Yearly capacity is 4.2 million tons of ore. Electrical energy will be supplied from a hydroelectric station to be built at Johan Dahl Land. Thermal energy (steam/heat) will be supplied from a coal-fired district heating plant to be built in connection with the processing plant. Expected power consumption is estimated at 225 GWh/year. Heat consumption is of the same order. In the third year the plant is expected to operate at full capacity. Operating costs will be Dkr. 121/ton of ore from years 1 through 7. Consumption of chemicals will be reduced from the 7th year, and operating costs will consequently drop to Dkr. 115/ton of ore. Calculations show that industrial extraction of the uranium deposit in Kvanefjeld is economically advantageous. In addition, the economy of the project is expected to improve by extracting byproducts from the ore. (EG)

  10. Uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 105, which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 103 in seawater instead of the reported values of 105. However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 105 in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater

  11. Uranium from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg, D.; Folkendt, M.

    1982-09-21

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 10/sup 5/, which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 10/sup 3/ in seawater instead of the reported values of 10/sup 5/. However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 10/sup 5/ in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater.

  12. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...

  13. Studies on the separation of 99Mo from U-Al alloy target and recovery of 235U using TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indian nuclear medicine community needs continuous and reliable supply of fission 99Mo to promote the beneficial use of 99mTc in the country. To make it available indigenously irradiation of low enriched uranium target is being looked into. Various steps involved in the production are target fabrication, irradiation, dissolution, recovery of 99Mo and its purification, fabrication of generator and management of waste. To understand the separation chemistry of Mo from such source preliminary experiments was carried out. A natural uranium-aluminum alloy fuel target fabricated at NFG, BARC was dissolved and analyzed. The alloy was found to contain ∼ 25% uranium as expected

  14. Alternative Anodes for the Electrolytic Reduction of Uranium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwin, Augustus

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is an essential step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. In order to consume current stockpiles, ceramic uranium dioxide spent nuclear fuel will be subjected to an electrolytic reduction process. The current reduction process employs a platinum anode and a stainless steel alloy 316 cathode in a molten salt bath consisting of LiCl-2wt% Li 2O and occurs at 700°C. A major shortcoming of the existing process is the degradation of the platinum anode under the severely oxidizing conditions encountered during electrolytic reduction. This work investigates alternative anode materials for the electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide. The high temperature and extreme oxidizing conditions encountered in these studies necessitated a unique set of design constraints on the system. Thus, a customized experimental apparatus was designed and constructed. The electrochemical experiments were performed in an electrochemical reactor placed inside a furnace. This entire setup was housed inside a glove box, in order to maintain an inert atmosphere. This study investigates alternative anode materials through accelerated corrosion testing. Surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was characterized using energy dispersive spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Electrochemical behavior of candidate materials was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization characteristics. After narrowing the number of candidate electrode materials, ferrous stainless steel alloy 316, nickel based Inconel 718 and elemental tungsten were chosen for further investigation. Of these materials only tungsten was found to be sufficiently stable at the anodic potential required for electrolysis of uranium dioxide in molten salt. The tungsten anode and stainless steel alloy 316 cathode electrode system was studied at the required reduction potential for UO2 with varying lithium oxide concentrations. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

  15. Recovery of uranium from uranium refining waste water by using immobilized persimmon tannin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some attempts were made to examine the practical conditions for uranium recovery from uranium refining waste water. The adsorbent was highly effective in recovering uranium. The uranium adsorption was affected by pH, temperature, and uranium concentration of the uranium refining waste water. The adsorbent also recovered uranium effectively in column system. It aquires better mechanical properties and can be used repeatedly in the uranium adsorption-desorption cycles. (author)

  16. 31 CFR 540.309 - Natural uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural uranium. 540.309 Section 540... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.309 Natural uranium. The term natural uranium means uranium found...

  17. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  18. Uranium Potential and Regional Metallogeny in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jindai; LI Ziying

    2008-01-01

    This paper is briefly involved in distributions of China's uranium metallogenic types,provinces, regions and belts. Eight target regions have been pointed out to be worthy of prospectingfor uranium resources. The regional uranium metallogeny is discussed and great uranium potentialpointed out from many aspects. Generally speaking, there are favorable conditions for uraniummineralization and good perspective to explore for uranium resources.

  19. The Influence of Casting Conditions on the Microstructure of As-Cast U-10Mo Alloys: Characterization of the Casting Process Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean M.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-12-13

    Sections of eight plate castings of uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) were sent from Y-12 to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for microstructural characterization. This report summarizes the results from this study.

  20. Preparation of Uranium Powder having Reactive Shape using Uranium Hydridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident tolerance of the LWR fuel has become a primary matter of concern. So, it is indispensable to develop the innovative nuclear fuel material concepts and technologies which can overcome degradation of fuel safety and integrity. Uranium nitride fuel has been proposed as a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because nitride fuel has the advantages of both metallic and oxide fuels. That is, the high melting point, high uranium density, and high thermal conductivity are the representative merits of nitride fuel. Nitride fuel is also considered as a fuel material for the accident tolerant fuel of current LWRs to compensate for the decrease in fissile fuel material caused by adopting a thickened cladding such as SiC composites. However, nitride fuel has a critical disadvantage of a serious reaction with water at a typical LWR condition. Bulk uranium nitride is known to be dissolved in water at a temperature above 230 .deg. C. Uranium nitride powder is more unstable and reacts with water at about 150 .deg. C. Therefore, the water-proof nitride fuel must be developed to apply to current LWRs. Several strategies to prevent or reduce the reaction of nitride fuel with water have been suggested. KAERI is developing uranium nitride-oxide composite fuel pellet that is expected to have higher fuel performance and lower water reactivity. In the development of the fabrication technologies of uranium based composite fuel pellet, uranium nitride powder should be prepared, first. We have considered a simple reaction method to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from metal uranium powders. Also, to create reactive uranium powder with nitrogen, it is applied that the uranium powder is pretreated in the hydrogen atmosphere. In this study, to investigate the behavior of the uranium powder hydriding process, thermal analysis tests were performed

  1. Plasma hydrogen reduction of uranium from depleted uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process scheme of plasma hydrogen reduction of waste by 235U uranium hexafluoride, preparation of metal uranium and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is proposed. Results of the experimental investigations into the basic stages of this process scheme: production of the U - F - H-plasma, production and separation of uranium melt and anhydrous of hydrogen fluoride are treated. Level of plasma and high frequency technique for the realization of the plasma hydrogen process of conversion of waste UF6 for metal uranium and anhydrous HF was analyzed

  2. Riddle of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is the waste product of uranium enrichment from the manufacturing of fuel rods for nuclear reactors in nuclear power plants and nuclear power ships. DU may also results from the reprocessing of spent nuclear reactor fuel. Potentially DU has both chemical and radiological toxicity with two important targets organs being the kidney and the lungs. DU is made into a metal and, due to its availability, low price, high specific weight, density and melting point as well as its pyrophoricity; it has a wide range of civilian and military applications. Due to the use of DU over the recent years, there appeared in some press on health hazards that are alleged to be due to DU. In these paper properties, applications, potential environmental and health effects of DU are briefly reviewed

  3. Depleted uranium: Metabolic disruptor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of uranium in the environment can lead to long-term contamination of the food chain and of water intended for human consumption and thus raises many questions about the scientific and societal consequences of this exposure on population health. Although the biological effects of chronic low-level exposure are poorly understood, results of various recent studies show that contamination by depleted uranium (DU) induces subtle but significant biological effects at the molecular level in organs including the brain, liver, kidneys and testicles. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that DU induces effects on several metabolic pathways, including those metabolizing vitamin D, cholesterol, steroid hormones, acetylcholine and xenobiotics. This evidence strongly suggests that DU might well interfere with many metabolic pathways. It might thus contribute, together with other man-made substances in the environment, to increased health risks in some regions. (authors)

  4. Recovery of uranium from lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium in raw lignite is associated with the organic matter and is readily soluble in acid (and carbonate) solutions. However, beneficiation techniques were not successful for concentrating the uranium or removing part of the reagent-consuming materials. Once the lignite was heated, the uranium became much less soluble in both acid and carbonate solutions, and complete removal of carbon was required to convert it back to a soluble form. Proper burning improves acid-leaching efficiency; that is, it reduces the reagent consumption and concentrates the uranium, thereby reducing plant size for comparable uranium throughput, and it eliminates organic fouling of leach liquors. Restrictions are necessary during burning to prevent the uranium from becoming refractory. The most encouraging results were obtained by flash-burning lignite at 1200 to 1300/sup 0/C and utilizing the released SO/sub 2/ to supplement the acid requirement. The major acid consumers were aluminum and iron.

  5. Radiochemistry of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gindler, J.E.

    1962-03-01

    This volume which deals with the radiochemistry of uranium is one of a series of monographs on radiochemistry of the elements. There is included a review of the nuclear and chemical features of particular interest to the radiochemist, a discussion of problems of dissolution of a sample and counting technique, and finally, a collection of radiochemical procedures for the element as found in the literature.

  6. Uranium in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Mongolian electricity is produced from fossil fuels (about 98%, mainly coal). Rapid growth in demand has given rise to power shortages, and the reliance on fossil fuels has led to much air pollution. Mongolia does not have nuclear reactor and thus is not a beneficiary of nuclear technology. In April 2008 Russia and Mongolia signed a high-level agreement to cooperate in identifying and developing Mongolia's uranium resources. Russia is also examining the feasibility of building nuclear power plants in Mongolia In our government need to create the environment for investment in nuclear power, including professional regulatory regime, policies on nuclear waste management and decommissioning, and involvement with international non-proliferation and insurance arrangements. Some 46 million kilowatt-hours of electricity are produced from one tones of natural uranium. The production of this amount of electrical power from fossil fuels would require the burning of over 20 000 tonnes of black coal or 8.5 million cubic meters of gas. Mongolia has a long history of uranium exploration commencing with joint Russian and Mongolian endeavors to 1957. Today the Canada-based Khan Resources owns a 69% share in the Dornod project through its subsidiary Central Asian Uranium Co. Ltd and Russia's Priargunsky Mining and Chemical Enterprise owns a further share. In 2007 Khan published NI 43-101 compliant indicated resource figure of 25 000 tU for the project, including probable reserves of 7 000 tU. A bankable feasibility study is now being undertaken, with capital cost estimate being US$283 million and first production in 2011. Khan has applied for a mining licence from the Mineral Resources and Petroleum Authority of Mongolia (MRPAM). (author)

  7. Uranium in western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium has been in use in Europe since the Middle Ages, and working of uraniferous minerals on an industrial scale for the production of radium began in Portugal and Czechoslovakai in 1904. Mining began soon after World War II for the production of fissile material. Western Europe's uranium resources represent about a tenth of the world's resources, of 486 950 tonnes recoverable at $130 per kg or less. Production in 1978 was 2 513 tonnes of uranium. The principal producing countries were the Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, France, and Portugal. Uraniferous vein deposits occur in the Moldanubian granites, the Iberian Meseta, the Armorican massif, the Massif Central, and the Black Forest. Deposits associated with sedimentary rocks occur in the Cambrian shales of Ranstad, the Permian lutites and silts of Lodeve, and in grits and sandstones elsewhere. Volcanic deposits are present in Alpine areas. The current rate of exploration must be maintained if the energy needs of Europe predicted for the year 2000 are to be met. (L.L.)

  8. Uranium in situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the depressed situation that has affected the uranium industry during the past years, the second Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium In Situ Leaching, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and held in Vienna from 5 to 8 October 1992, has attracted a relatively large number of participants. A notable development since the first meeting was that the majority of the contributions came from the actual operators of in situ leaching uranium production. At the present meeting, presentations on operations in the USA were balanced by those of the eastern European and Asian countries. Contributions from Bulgaria, China, Czechoslovakia, Germany (from the operation in the former German Democratic Republic), the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan represent new information not commonly available. In situ leach mining is defined in one of the paper presented as a ''mining method where the ore mineral is preferentially leached from the host rock in place, or in situ, by the use of leach solutions, and the mineral value is recovered. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. COGEMA's UMF [Uranium Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The French government-owned corporation, COGEMA, is responsible for the nuclear fuel cycle. This paper describes the activities at COGEMA's Pierrelatte facility, especially its Uranium Management Facility. UF6 handling and storage is described for natural, enriched, depleted, and reprocessed uranium. UF6 quality control specifications, sampling, and analysis (halocarbon and volatile fluorides, isotopic analysis, uranium assay, and impurities) are described. In addition, the paper discusses the filling and cleaning of containers and security at UMF

  10. Uranium Critical Point Location Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Significant uncertainty of our present knowledge for uranium critical point parameters is under consideration. Present paper is devoted to comparative analysis of possible resolutions for the problem of uranium critical point location, as well as to discussion of plausible scheme of decisive experiment, which could resolve existing uncertainty. New calculations of gas-liquid coexistence in uranium by modern thermodynamic code are included in the analysis.

  11. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Depleted uranium (DU is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed.

  12. Gamma stability and powder formation of UMo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, F.B.V.; Andrade, D.A.; Angelo, G.; Belchior Junior, A.; Torres, W.M.; Umbehaun, P.E., E-mail: wmtorres@ipen.br, E-mail: umbehaun@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelo, E., E-mail: eangelo@mackenzie.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Grupo de Simulacao Numerica (GSN)

    2015-07-01

    A study of the hydrogen embrittlement as well as a research on the relation between gamma decomposition and powder formation of uranium molybdenum alloys were previously presented. In this study a comparison regarding the hypo-eutectoid and hyper-eutectoid molybdenum additions is presented. Gamma uranium molybdenum alloys have been considered as the fuel phase in plate type fuel elements for material and test reactors (MTR). Regarding their usage as a dispersion phase in aluminum matrix, it is necessary to convert the as cast structure into powder, and one of the techniques considered for this purpose is the hydration-dehydration (HDH). This paper shows that, under specific conditions of heating and cooling, γ-UMo fragmentation may occur with non-reactive or reactive mechanisms. Following the production of the alloys by induction melting, samples of the alloys were thermally treated under a constant flow of hydrogen. It was observed that, even without a massive hydration-dehydration process, the alloys fragmented under specific conditions of thermal treatment, during the thermal shock phase of the experiments. Also, there is a relation between absorption and the rate of gamma decomposition or the gamma phase stability of the alloy and this phenomenon can be related to the eutectoid transformation temperature. This study was carried out to search for a new method for the production of powders and for the evaluation of important physical parameter such as the eutectoid transformation temperature, as an alternative to the existing ones. (author)

  13. Uranium exploration in Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radioactive exploration dates back to 1955 and since then little progress has been made. Few pits and trenches in some places show radioactive anomalies.The Wadera radioactive anomaly occurs within the lower part of Wadera series, Southern Ethiopia. As observed from a trench the anomalous bed has a thickness of 0.9-1.2 m and is made of reddish-grey thin bedded sandstones.The presence of Xenotime in arkosic sandstone points to the sedimentary origin of mineralization. It was noticed that the sandstone in the lower part of Wadera series has at places a radioactivity 2-3 times higher than adjacent gneisses. The presence of a placer of such a type in the Wadera series is probably a clue for the existence of larger deposits in the area. In 2007 geological, geochemical and geophysical surveys were conducted to identify and delineate Uranium mineralization in three localities(Kuro, Kalido and Gueti) of Werri area, southern Ethiopia. Kaolinization, silicification, epidotization and chloritization are the main types of alteration associated with different units in the area. Uranium-bearing grains which are hosted in pegmatite veins and associated with magnetite/or ilmenite were observed in the three localities. Geochemical exploration accompanied by geological mapping and radiometric survey was done by employing heavy mineral concentrate, soil, chip and trench channel sampling. Radiometric readings of total count, U,Th and K were taken using GAD-6.Soil and trench geochemical samples of the localities analyzed by ICP-MS have shown 0.1 to 3.8 ppm and 3.9 to 147 ppm Uranium and 3.5 to 104.7 ppm and 3.9 to 147ppm Thorium respectively. Radiometric reading is higher in pegmatite veins that host Uranium-bearing minerals and some course grained pegmatoidal granite varieties. The areas recognized for Uranium associations need further investigations using state-of-the-art to discover economic deposits for development and utilization of the resource. (author)

  14. METHOD FOR RECOVERING URANIUM FROM OILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, L.H.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for recovering uranium from hydrocarbon oils, wherein the uranium is principally present as UF/sub 4/. According to the invention, substantially complete removal of the uranium from the hydrocarbon oil may be effected by intimately mixing one part of acetone to about 2 to 12 parts of the hydrocarbon oil containing uranium and separating the resulting cake of uranium from the resulting mixture. The uranium in the cake may be readily recovered by burning to the oxide.

  15. Topical and working papers on uranium resources and availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic topics relative to world-wide resources and availability of uranium resources; potential for recovery of uranium from mill tailings in Canada; uranium from seawater; depleted uranium as an energy source; world uranium requirements in perspective

  16. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435( R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t ( t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275( R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t ( t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  17. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435(R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t (t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275(R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t (t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  18. Uranium Stewardship - The unifying foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Uranium Stewardship is a WNA programme of action seeking to define, and achieve worldwide industry adherence to, principles and practices designed to ensure that uranium and its by-products are managed in ways that are safe, environmentally responsible, and economically and socially acceptable. Through this programme WNA will engage all industry sectors involved with the uranium life cycle, as well as relevant stakeholders, with the objective of first encouraging best practice, then sustaining an ongoing industry effort to continually improve it. In pursuing this objective WNA has identified key Principles of Uranium Stewardship and will aim to obtain, from all relevant enterprises, formal commitment to a Code of Practice that translates these principles into worldwide industry performance. The WNA sets forth these Principles of Uranium Stewardship as the basis for a Code of Practice, to which relevant enterprises are invited to commit and adhere: 1. Support the safe and peaceful use of nuclear technology. 2. Act responsibly in all areas we manage and control. 3. Operate ethically with sound corporate governance. 4. Uphold and respect fundamental human rights. 5. Contribute to the social and economic development of regions where we operate. 6. Provide for responsible sourcing, use and disposition of uranium and its by-products. 7. Support best practice and responsible behaviour throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. 8. Improve continually in all areas of our performance. 9. Communicate regularly on progress. 10. Review and update. The Australian Uranium Association's Uranium Stewardship Principles reflect and are consistent with the global principles being developed under the auspices of the World Nuclear Association. The Association's Principles are additional to the broader Australian minerals industry's commitment to sustainable development as outlined in the Minerals Council of Australia's Enduring Value; and to the Australian Uranium Association

  19. Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site

  20. Uranium project DINAMIGE-BRGM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Uranium review was carried out in the frame work of Uranium prospecting programme between (DINAMIGE-BRGM) from February to June 1982. It was included radimetric cutting in sedimentaries and crystallines ground (gondwanic basin of the NE).The task was developed (1.300.000 scale) in Cunapiru, Carrillada, Vichadero, Minas de Corrales, Paso Mazangano and Yaguari zones.

  1. Fossile fuel and uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world's resources of coal, lignite, oil, natural gas, shale oil and uranium are reviewed. These quantities depend on the prices which make new resources exploitable. Uranium resources are given exclusively for the USSR, Eastern Europe and China. Their value in terms of energy depends heavily on the reactor type used. All figures given are estimated to be conservative

  2. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  3. Recrystallization of pressed technical uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this task was to study changes originating from heat treatment of uranium by metallographic methods and by measuring the hardness. Correlation of previously determined textures with the present study would improve the knowledge on the recrystallization process of pressed uranium

  4. Reactivity change measurements on plutonium-uranium fuel elements in hector experimental techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques used in making reactivity change measurements on HECTOR are described and discussed. Pile period measurements were used in the majority of oases, though the pile oscillator technique was used occasionally. These two methods are compared. Flux determinations were made in the vicinity of the fuel element samples using manganese foils, and the techniques used are described and an error assessment made. Results of both reactivity change and flux measurements on 1.2 in. diameter uranium and plutonium-uranium alloy fuel elements are presented, these measurements being carried out in a variety of graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 450 deg. C. (author)

  5. Uranium nucleophilic carbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The only stable f-metal carbene complexes (excluding NHC) metals f present R2C2- groups having one or two phosphorus atoms in the central carbon in alpha position. The objective of this work was to develop the chemistry of carbenes for uranium (metal 5f) with the di-anion C{Ph2P(=S)}22- (SCS2-) to extend the organometallic chemistry of this element in its various oxidation states (+3-+6), and to reveal the influence of the 5f orbitals on the nature and reactivity of the double bond C=U. We first isolated the reactants M(SCHS) (M = Li and K) and demonstrated the role of the cation M+ on the evolution of the di-anion M2SCS (M = Li, K, Tl) which is transformed into LiSCHS in THF or into product of intramolecular cyclization K2[C(PhPS)2(C6H4)]. We have developed the necessary conditions mono-, bis- and tris-carbene directly from the di-anion SCS2- and UCl4, as the precursor used in uranium chemistry. The protonolysis reactions of amides compounds (U-NEt2) by the neutral ligand SCH2S were also studied. The compounds [Li(THF)]2[U(SCS)Cl3] and [U(SCS)Cl2(THF)2] were then used to prepare a variety of cyclopentadienyl and mono-cyclo-octa-tetra-enyliques uranium(IV) carbene compounds of the DFT analysis of compounds [M(SCS)Cl2(py)2] and [M(Cp)2(SCS)] (M = U, Zr) reveals the strong polarization of the M=C double bond, provides information on the nature of the σ and π interactions in this binding, and shows the important role of f orbitals. The influence of ancillary ligands on the M=C bond is revealed by examining the effects of replacing Cl- ligands and pyridine by C5H5- groups. Mulliken and NBO analyzes show that U=C bond, unlike the Zr=C bond, is not affected by the change in environment of the metal center. While the oxidation tests of carbene complexes of U(IV) were disappointing, the first carbene complex of uranium (VI), [UO2(SCS)(THF)2], was isolated with the uranyl ion UO22+. The reactions of compounds UO2X2 (X = I, OTf) with anions SCS2- and SCHS- provide the

  6. Advanced uranium enrichment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three advanced Uranium enrichment processes are dealt with in the report: AVLIS (Atomic Vapour LASER Isotope Separation), MLIS (Molecular LASER Isotope Separation) and PSP (Plasma Separation Process). The description of the physical and technical features of the processes constitutes a major part of the report. If further presents comparisons with existing industrially used enrichment technologies, gives information on actual development programmes and budgets and ends with a chapter on perspectives and conclusions. An extensive bibliography of the relevant open literature is added to the different subjects discussed. The report was drawn up by the nuclear research Centre (CEA) Saclay on behalf of the Commission of the European Communities

  7. Uranium in soils and water; Uran in Boden und Wasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dienemann, Claudia; Utermann, Jens

    2012-07-15

    The report of the Umweltbundesamt (Federal Environmental Agency) on uranium in soils and water covers the following chapters: (1) Introduction. (2) Deposits and properties: Use of uranium; toxic effects on human beings, uranium in ground water and drinking water, uranium in surface waters, uranium in soils, uranium in the air. (3) Legal regulations. (4) Uranium deposits, uranium mining, polluted area recultivation. (5) Diffuse uranium entry in soils and water: uranium insertion due to fertilizers, uranium insertion due to atmospheric precipitation, uranium insertion from the air. (6) Diffuse uranium release from soils and transfer in to the food chain. (7) Conclusions and recommendations.

  8. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N{sup 15} gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work.

  9. Uranium distribution in Brazilian granitic rocks. Identification of uranium provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research characterized and described uranium enriched granitoids in Brazil. They occur in a variety of tectonic environments and are represented by a variety granite types of distinct ages. It may be deduced that in general they have been generated by partial melting process of continental crust. However, some of them, those with tonality composition, indicate a contribution from mantle derived materials, thus suggesting primary uranium enrichment from the upper mantle. Through this study, the identification and characterization of uranium enriched granite or uranium provinces in Brazil can be made. This may also help identify areas with potential for uranium mineralization although it has been note that uranium mineralization in Brazil are not related to the uranium enrichment process. In general the U-anomalous granitoids are composed of granites with alkaline composition and granite ''sensu strictu'' which comprise mainly of syenites, quartz-syenites and biotite-hornblende granites, with ages between 1,800 - 1,300 M.a. The U-anomalous belongings to this period present high Sr initial ratios values, above 0.706, and high Rb contents. Most of the U-enriched granitoids occur within ancient cratonic areas, or within Early to Mid-Proterozoic mobile belts, but after their cratonization. Generally, these granitoids are related to the border zones of the mobile belts or deep crustal discontinuity. Refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present publication describes the development work of a process to recover uranium from seawater and the proposition of a commercial demonstration plant. The essential components of this process are verified in the laboratory scale as well as in some field tests. A detailed engineering design for a model plant in a semi-technical scale to allow field tests in the marine environment is also presented. These field tests are expected to produce more realistic data on the technical and economical feasibility of the proposed technology. Production cost estimates based on state-of-the-art technology lie around 250 Dollar/1b U3O8. However, the effect of a corresponding uranium price increase on electricity costs are comparable to cost increases in coal operated power plants caused by the desulfurisation of coal. Further reductions of the production costs in the range below 150 Dollar/1b U3O8 seem possible through special research efforts in the area of sorber development and concept design. (orig.)

  11. Uranium in river water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, M.R. (Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom)); Edmond, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1993-10-01

    The concentration of dissolved uranium has been determined in over 250 river waters from the Orinoco, Amazon, and Ganges basins. Uranium concentrations are largely determined by dissolution of limestones, although weathering of black shales represents an important additional source in some basins. In shield terrains the level of dissolved U is transport limited. Data from the Amazon indicate that floodplains do not represent a significant source of U in river waters. In addition, the authors have determined dissolved U levels in forty rivers from around the world and coupled these data with previous measurements to obtain an estimate for the global flux of dissolved U to the oceans. The average concentration of U in river waters is 1.3 nmol/kg, but this value is biased by very high levels observed in the Ganges-Brahmaputra and Yellow rivers. When these river systems are excluded from the budget, the global average falls to 0.78 nmol/kg. The global riverine U flux lies in the range of 3-6 [times] 10[sup 7] mol/yr. The major uncertainty that restricts the accuracy of this estimate (and that of all other dissolved riverine fluxes) is the difficulty in obtaining representative samples from rivers which show large seasonal and annual variations in runoff and dissolved load.

  12. Uranium: inexhaustible energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There exist two social worries in reference with the use of energy, to know, the first is the availability of energy resources for the near future, in terms that the main energy sources at the present, petroleum has a foreseeable limit, and the other, the possible negative effects that the use of fossil fuels, coal among them could have on the environment, the ecology and the life conditions for the human being in general. This two worries take us to consider the availability of uranium, as an alternate energy source for the future of the mankind, considering its lesser ecological impact, since it can be controlled. in this study, the results of several investigations concerning to the abundance, energetic content, extraction costs and the appropiate use of the uranium existing in the earth crust determining the period of time that this fuel can be used as energy source to satisfy the demand of a growing population of human beings on the eart, are re-examined. It is concluded that the utilization of this fuel in the so caled breeder reactors, could satisfy the energy demand for the whole humanity for a long period of time comparable to the life of the sunas a yellow star. (Author)

  13. Conversion of Molybdenum-99 production process to low enriched uranium: Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses of HEU and LEU target plates for irradiation in Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Ahmad; Iqbal, Masood; Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain; Mahmood, Tayyab; Muhammad, Atta

    2012-09-01

    Technetium-99m, the daughter product of Molybdenum-99 is the most widely needed radionuclide for diagnostic studies in Pakistan. Molybdenum-99 Production Facility has been established at PINSTECH. Highly enriched uranium (93% 235U) U/Al alloy targets have been irradiated in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) for the generation of fission Mo-99, while basic dissolution technique is used for separation of Mo-99 from target matrix activity. In line with the international objective of minimizing and eventually eliminating the use of HEU in civil commerce, national and international efforts have been underway to shift the production of medical isotopes from HEU to LEU (LEU; uranium is needed. LEU aluminum uranium dispersion target has been developed, which may replace existing HEU aluminum/uranium alloy targets for production of 99Mo using basic dissolution technique. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations were performed for safe irradiation of targets in the core of PARR-1.

  14. Sedimentary rocks Uranium in Cerro Largo Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of the uranium minerals exploration has been carried out several studies by UTE technicians in Cerro Largo Province from 1968 to 1969. In uranium concentration has been found pyrite, phosphate, iron oxides and manganese in uranium. Furthermore in La Divisa Ore were studied concentration Uranium enrichment has been studied in La Divisa ore

  15. OXYGEN ISOTOPE FRACTION ATION IN URANIUM OXIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑永飞

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic oxygen isotope factors for uranium oxides have been calculated by means of the modified increment method.The sequence of 18O-enrichment in the uranium oxides with respect to the common rock-forming minerals is predicted as follows:spineluranium blacks≤coffiniteuranium oxides and water and between the uranium oxides and the other minerals have been obtained for 0-1200℃.The theoretical results are applicable to the isotopic geothermometry of uranium ores when pairing with other gangue minerals in hydrothermal uranium deposits.

  16. Uranium accumulation by Pseudomonas sp. EPS-5028

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas sp. EPS-5028 was examined for the ability to accumulate uranium from solutions. The uptake of uranium by this microorganism is very rapid and is affected by pH but not by temperature, metabolic inhibitors, culture time and the presence of various cations and anions. The amount of uranium absorbed by the cells increased as the uranium concentration of the solution increased up to 55 mg uranium/g cell dry weight. Electron microscopy indicated that uranium accumulated intracellularly as needle-like fibrils. Uranium could be removed chemically from the cells, which could then be reused a a biosorbent. (orig.)

  17. Development of high uranium-density fuels for use in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium silicide U3Si2 possesses uranium density 11.3 gU/cm3 with a congruent melting point of 1665degC, and is now successfully in use as a research reactor fuel. Another uranium silicide U3Si and U6Me-type uranium alloys (Me=Fe,Mn,Ni) have been chosen as new fuel materials because of the higher uranium densities 14.9 and 17.0 gU/cm3, respectively. Experiments were carried out to fabricate miniature aluminum-dispersion plate-type and aluminum-clad disk-type fuels by using the conventional picture-frame method and a hot-pressing technique, respectively. These included the above-mentioned new fuel materials as well as U3Si2. Totally 14 miniplates with uranium densities from 4.0 to 6.3 gU/cm3 of fuel meat were prepared together with 28 disk-type fuel containing structurally-modified U3Si, and subjected to the neutron irradiation in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). Some results of postirradiation examinations are presented. (author)

  18. The Uranium Institute: the first ten years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As noted in its Memorandum of Association, the Uranium Institute was founded: to promote the use of uranium for peaceful purposes; to conduct research into uranium requirements, uranium resources and uranium production; to consult for these purposes with governments and other bodies; and to provide a forum for the exchange of information on these matters. A brief account of Institute organisation and activities during the period 1975-1985 is given. (author)

  19. Governing uranium in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Berkemeier, Molly; Bowen, Wyn Q.; Hobbs, Christopher; Moran, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This country report is the first study of uranium governance in the United Kingdom. It explores the UK's approach to regulating natural uranium and provides a historical overview of uranium procurement and usage. The report documents British and Euratom nuclear legislation, regulation and implementation, including export/import and transportation regulations. This case study is part of the large 'Governing Uranium' project on uranium governance, led by DIIS, the Danish Institute for Internati...

  20. Biosorption isotherm for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the biological sorption of uranium on mycelia of Penicillium C-1 is provided. From an isotherm test, a rough estimate of the biomass, required for removal of uranium to a certain level can be attained. The process presents a new approach towards water pollution control and resource recovery. The biosorption method may find its greatest application in solutions of low uranium concentration (100 ppM to 300 ppM) such as in waste mine water or very lean leach solutions

  1. Uranium project GEO 2 attachment: cronostratigraphy aplied to Uranium research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the article, different sources of information about Uranium stratigraphy from Uruguay have been reviewed. Some results have been presented in Upper Cambrian period and Precambrian era, specially Devonian, Carboniferous and Silurian period

  2. Uranium plutonium oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium plutonium oxide is the principal fuel material for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR's) throughout the world. Development of this material has been a reasonably straightforward evolution from the UO2 used routinely in the light water reactor (LWR's); but, because of the lower neutron capture cross sections and much lower coolant pressures in the sodium cooled LMFBR's, the fuel is operated to much higher discharge exposures than that of a LWR. A typical LMFBR fuel assembly is shown. Depending on the required power output and the configuration of the reactor, some 70 to 400 such fuel assemblies are clustered to form the core. There is a wide variation in cross section and length of the assemblies where the increasing size reflects a chronological increase in plant size and power output as well as considerations of decreasing the net fuel cycle cost. Design and performance characteristics are described

  3. Uranium hexafluoride bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of reports written about the transportation, handling, safety, and processing of uranium hexafluoride. An on-line literature search was executed using the DOE Energy files and the Nuclear Science Abstracts file to identify pertinent reports. The DOE Energy files contain unclassified information that is processed at the Office of Scientific and Technical Information of the US Department of Energy. The reports selected from these files were published between 1974 and 1983. Nuclear Science Abstracts contains unclassified international nuclear science and technology literature published from 1948 to 1976. In addition, scientific and technical reports published by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration, as well as those published by other agencies, universities, and industrial and research organizations, are included in the Nuclear Science Abstracts file. An alphabetical listing of the acronyms used to denote the corporate sponsors follows the bibliography.

  4. The uranium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In identifying uranium provinces, and, more importantly, mineralized zones within these provinces, it is of paramount importance to attempt to trace the geochemical behaviour of an element through all stages of Earth's evolution. Aspects that need to be addressed in this regard include solar abundance levels and fractionation processes during accretion, changing patterns of crustal evolution, effects of an evolving atmosphere, and the weathering cycle. Abundance patterns and partition coefficients of some of the siderophile elements in mantle rocks lend support to a multistage accretionary process. Lack of a terrestrial record in the first 500 Ma necessitates that lunar models be invoked, which suggests that early fractionation of a mafic/ultramafic magma resulted in an anorthositic crust. Fractionation of the mantle and transfer of materials to the upper levels must be central to any model invoked for development of the crust. Given high heat flow conditions in the early Archaean it would seem inescapable that the process of sea floor spreading and plate tectonics was an ongoing process. If the plate tectonic model is taken back to 3500 Ma, and assuming current speading rates, then about half of the mantle has passed through the irreversible differentiation cycle. Arguments in support of recycled material must be balanced against mantle metasomatism effects. With the associated advent of partial melting of the mantle material a partitioning of minor and trace elements into the melt fraction would take place. The early primitive mafic and ultramafic komatiites exemplify this feature by concentrating U and Th by a factor of 5 compared to chondritic abundances. It is of tantamount importance to understand the generation of the magmas in order to predict which are the 'fertile' bodies in terms of radioelement concentrations. In that the granitoid magmas image their source compositions, the association of high radioelements will primarily be source-dependent. Uranium

  5. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes and types of dispersion that produce anomalies in stream water, stream sediment, and ground water, and the factors that must be considered in planning and interpreting geochemical surveys are reviewed. Examples of surveys near known deposits show the types of results to be expected. Background values depend mainly on the content of U in rocks of the drainage area. In igneous rocks, U tends to increase with potassium from ultramafic rocks (0.01 ppM) to granitic rocks (1 to 5 ppM). Some alkalic rocks have unusually high contents of U (15 to 100 ppM). Uranium-rich provinces marked by igneous rocks unusually rich in U are recognized in several areas and appear to have a deep crustal or mantle origin. In western U.S., many tertiary tuffaceous rocks have a high U content. Sandstones, limestones, and many shales approximate the crustal abundance at 0.5 to 4 ppM, but black shales, phosphates, and some organic materials are notably enriched in U. Uranium is very soluble in most oxidizing waters at the earth's surface, but is precipitated by reducing agents (organic matter, H2S) and adsorbed by organic material and some Fe oxides. In most surface and ground waters, U correlates approximately with the total dissolved solids, conductivity, and bicarbonate concentration of the water, and with the U content of rocks it comes into contact with. Most surveys of stream water near known districts show distinct anomalies extending a few km to tens of km downstream. A complication with water is the large variability with time, up to x 50, as a result of changes in the ratio of ground water to direct runoff, and changes in rate of oxidation and leaching. Collection and analysis of water samples also pose some difficulties

  6. Determination of uranium traces in fuel cans of nuclear reactors; Determinacion de trazas de uranio en vainas de combustible de reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta L, C.E.; Benavides M, A.M.; Sanchez P, L.A.; Nava S, G.F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this work is to quantify the uranium content that as impurity can be found in zircon and zircaloy alloys which are used in the construction of fuel cans. The determination of this serves as a quality control measure due to that the increment of uranium content in alloy, diminishing the corrosion resistance. The fluorimetric method was used to do this determination. It is a very sensitive, reliable, rapid method also high reproducibility and repeatability as well as low detection limits (0.25 mg/kg). (Author)

  7. Metal alloy identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  8. Project SAPPHIRE uranium-beryllium dose rate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a six-week period in the fall of 1994 a team of 31 US government and Y-12 personnel packaged and removed several thousand kilograms of material containing highly enriched uranium from the (former Soviet Union) Republic of Kazakhstan for interim storage at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This classified mission, known as PROJECT SAPPHIRE, had been initiated at the request of the Kazakhstan government in order to rid itself of possible security problems. Planning for the mission included assurance of the health and safety of the team members, as well as compliance with all local, IAEA, and US government regulations regarding the handling, packaging, transportation, and storage of radioactive and fissile material. The mission classification restrictions were relaxed following the return of the team and material to the United States. The material to be removed, in the form of small billets and rods of uranium metal and uranium-beryllium alloy and oxide powder, was sealed by team members on site into two-liter steel cans. Two or three cans each were loaded into more than 400 IAEA certified fissile material shipping container, and each container was packed into a large steel drum for transport by US Air Force cargo planes to the United States

  9. In situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is described for the in-situ leaching of uranium-containing ores employing an acidic leach liquor containing peroxymonosulphuric acid. Preferably, additionally, sulphuric acid is present in the leach liquor. (author)

  10. Continuing investigations for technology assessment of /sup 99/Mo production from LEU (low enriched Uranium) targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandergrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Currently much of the world's supply of /sup 99m/Tc for medical purposes is produced from /sup 99/Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). The need for /sup 99m/Tc is continuing to grow, especially in developing countries, where needs and national priorities call for internal production of /sup 99/Mo. This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched Uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product /sup 99/Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal are reported. These improvements continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or hastaloy. A cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets is reported. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in other current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent /sup 99/Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to (1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and (2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that both concerns can be handled and that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved.

  11. Interview regarding Uzbekistan Uranium Reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In his first extensive interview, Nicolay I. Kuchersky, President of Kyzylkumredmetzoloto and General Director of the Novoi Mining and Metallurgy Combine, discusses the business of mining uranium in Uzbekistan. This is a companion article following one that took an in-depth look at this newly independent country's activities in uranium mining. The president of the responsible organization discusses plans, wages, and interactions with the western world

  12. Uranium glass in museum collections

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Filipa

    2008-01-01

    The presence of uranium glass objects in museum and private collections has raised radiation protection concerns resulting from possible exposure to ionizing radiation emitted by this type of object. Fourteen glass objects with different uranium contents were studied. Dose rates (β + γ radiation) were measured with a beta/gamma probe at several distances from the glass objects. In general the determined dose rates did not raise any concern as long as some precautions were taken. Rado...

  13. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological) and their exposure levels that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumonconiosis and emphysema

  14. The Espinharas uranium occurrence, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclam has been exploring for uranium in Brazil since 1976. During this period one uranium ore body has been found in the vicinity of Espinharas, a village in Paraiba State, northeast Brazil. According to present knowledge, the mineralized ore body is caused by metasomatic action. The history of discovery and the exploration work until the end of 1979 is given, showing the conceptual change with increasing knowledge of the mineralized zone. (author)

  15. Overview of Canada's uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper places Canada's uranium industry in its international context. Most uranium, except that produced in the United States, is traded internationally. A brief history of the industry worldwide is given to show how the principal producing areas have fared to date. The industry is young, highly cyclical, and still far from achieving stability. Uranium is a single end-use commodity, entirely dependent on the generation of electricity in nuclear stations, and is without price elasticity: lowering the price does not increase demand. The typical nuclear fuel processing chain has not encouraged or led to much vertical integration. Uranium is subject to more governmental control than any other commodity. The principal market is located in the industrial countries of western Europe, the United States, Canada, and the far east. The uranium supply-demand situation is reviewed, including the current and near-term oversupply and the longer term outlook to 1995. The major negative impact of reactor cancellations and deferments in the United States is discussed. Because of the difficulty in getting reactors on line, it has become easier to forecast the demand for uranium over the next 10 years. It is more difficult to predict how that demand will be met from the more than ample competing sources. Canada's potential for supplying a significant portion of this demand is considered in relation to producers and potential new producers in other countries

  16. Uranium - resources development and availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia possesses a major portion of the world's low cost uranium and it is confidently expected that further exploration will delineate yet more reserves. The level of such exploration and the rate of development of new production will remain critically dependent on world market developments. For the foreseeable future all development will be dedicated to supplying the export market. Australian government policies for uranium take account of both domestic and international concerns. With Australia, the policies act to protect the interests of the Aboriginal people affected by uranium production. In response to national interests and concerns, foreign investment in uranium production ventures is regulated in a manner which requires Australian control but allows a measure of foreign equity. Environmental concerns are recognized and projects may only be approved after comprehensive environmental protection procedures have been complied with. Without these policies public acceptability, which provides the foundations for long-term stability of the industry, would be prejudiced. On the world scene, Australia's safeguards policy serves to support international nuclear safeguards and, in particular, to honour its obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Export policy requires that reasonable sales contract conditions apply and that fair negotiated market prices are obtained for Australia's uranium. Australia's recent re-emergence as a major producer and exporter of uranium is convincing testimony to the success of these policies. (author)

  17. Uranium exploration planning and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has long had an interest in providing manuals and guidebooks to assist workers in the most effective use of uranium exploration methods and techniques. These have been widely used by the mineral industry around the world. Little has been done, however, to guide and assist senior levels of management of national Atomic Energy Commissions or Geological Surveys in planning for and managing their uranium exploration had development programmes. The nature of uranium, and its potential military use makes it a commodity requiring special consideration. On the other hand, the fact that it is a mineral fuel commodity that is explored for and mined like other mineral commodities presents management with problems of mineral economics unlike those normally faced by government scientific organizations. In order to address these questions, the IAEA convened a Advisory Group meeting in December 1988, to discuss the requirements for uranium exploration planning and practice, from the point of view of national policy and strategy. The six advisors, three observers and four Agency staff members brought to the discussions a wealth of experience in government and in the minerals industry dealing with uranium. The present document, comprising 8 papers as well as transcribed discussions on each, should be of interest and value to senior government planners charged with the task of regulating and controlling their country's uranium development. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Uranium retrieval support, storage, and marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy is implementing a stewardship approach to management of uranium assets. This life-cycle approach to managing uranium addresses current needs in the context of a long-term strategy. In June 1998, the United States Department of Energy established the Uranium Management Group. The mission of the UMG is to safely collect and store commercially viable uranium from various DOE facilities at a central location. The Oak Ridge Operations Office, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was given the task to establish a facility for the storage of these uranium materials. Materials collected are non-waste uranium and packaged to allow transport and long-term storage. Coordination of uranium management under the Uranium Management Group offers significant opportunities for sayings through improved planning and efficiency and creates an environmentally sound approach for the storage and reuse of excess uranium. (author)

  19. Magneto-optical study of uranium additions to amorphous TbxFe1 - x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, J. F., Jr.; van Dover, R. B.; Hong, M.; Gyorgy, E. M.; Albiston, S. D.

    1987-02-01

    Recent reports of huge magneto-optical Kerr rotations in certain crystalline metallic uranium compounds prompted a study of the magnetic and magneto-optical effects of uranium additions to a rare-earth transition metal amorphous alloy. Using variable composition samples, the polar Kerr effect at a small spot (e.g., 0.5 mm diam) was measured as field, temperature, and composition were varied. Points on the Curie line and the edges of the compensation region were determined from these observations. The compositions studied included (TbxFe1-x)1-yUy with 0.125≤x≤0.550 and y=0.0, 0.04, 0.07, 0.16. The addition of uranium to TbxFe1-x depresses the TC of Tb-rich material much more strongly than that of Tb-poor material. The compensation region does not shift at all with increasing y. It appears that uranium does not contribute to the magnetization of these amorphous alloys, nor does it significantly affect the magneto-optical effects.

  20. Uranium separations using extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the analysis of environmental samples for uranium and thorium pollutants and at natural levels for the dating of geological samples there was felt a need to develop better uranium and thorium, separation procedures to replace the established anion exchange method used at AEA Technology plc. This was the first aim of the PhD research. Separation of uranium from thorium prior to measurement of the isotopes by alpha spectrometry was necessary due to the similar alpha energies of 234U and 230Th. TRU and UTEVA extraction chromatography resins (EIChroM Industries) were investigated as potential replacements to the anion exchange separation method. The resins are claimed by EIChroM to offer the advantage of providing an actinide specific separation while reducing the separation time from 2 to 0.5 days; the volume of acidic waste produced by a factor of 3, therefore, the cost of analysis was reduced. A uranium and thorium separation procedure using the UTEVA extraction chromatography resin was developed. The uranium and thorium were sorbed by the UTEVA resin from 2M nitric acid. The thorium was then eluted from the resin with 5M hydrochloric acid and the uranium with 0.02M hydrochloric acid. The separation procedure was then evaluated using uraninite ore, coral, granite and lake sediment reference materials. The uranium and thorium concentrations and the 234U/238U and 230Th/234U activity ratio values determined for the reference material were in good agreement with certified values. The presence of plutonium was found to interfere with the measurement of uranium and thorium by alpha spectrometry. This was due to the similar alpha energies of uranium, thorium and plutonium. The co-elution of plutonium with uranium and thorium from the UTEVA resin was prevented by the inclusion of a reduction step using iron (II) sulphamate. The resulting plutonium (III) was not retained by the UTEVA column. The chemical recoveries for the procedure were similar to those for anion

  1. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Benesova, Dagmar [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Environment Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dvorakova, Marcela [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vanek, Tomas, E-mail: vanek@ueb.cas.cz [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC{sub 50} value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC{sub 50} = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: > The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. > Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. > Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. > The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  2. Chapter 6. Uranium extraction possibilities from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition. 6.1. Some uranium extraction methods from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to various uranium extraction methods from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition. Various uranium extraction methods from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition were described.

  3. Alloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition and properties are listed of alloyed steel for use in the manufacture of steam generators, collectors, spacers, emergency tanks, and other components of nuclear power plants. The steel consists of 0.08 to 0.11% w.w. C, 0.6 to 1.4% w.w. Mn, 0.35 to 0.6% w.w. Mo, 0.02 to 0.07% w.w. Al, 0.17 to 0.37% w.w. Si, 1.7 to 2.7% w.w. Ni, 0.03 to 0.07% w.w. V, 0.005 to 0.012% w.w. N, and the rest is Fe. The said steel showed a sufficiently low transition temperature between brittle and tough structures, a greater depth of hardenability, and better weldability than similar steels. (B.S.)

  4. Sequential extraction of uranium metal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of uranium contaminated dirt collected from the dirt floor of an abandoned metal rolling mill were analyzed for uranium using a sequential extraction protocol involving a series of five increasingly aggressive solvents. The quantity of uranium extracted from the contaminated dirt by each reagent can aid in predicting the fate and transport of the uranium contamination in the environment. Uranium was separated from each fraction using anion exchange, electrodeposition and analyzed by alpha spectroscopy analysis. Results demonstrate that approximately 77 % of the uranium was extracted using NH4Ac in 25 % acetic acid. (author)

  5. Survey of United States uranium marketing activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from a survey of US uranium marketing and procurement in 1978 are presented. Information for the present survey was received from 61 utilities with nuclear reactor projects, 35 present or potential uranium producers, and 5 reactor manufacturers. The survey requested data on domestic uranium purchase commitments, uranium imports and exports, unfilled requirements, U3O8 available for sale by producers, inventories of domestic- and foreign-origin uranium, inventory policies, and prices under existing contracts between domestic primary producers and domestic buyers. Information on actual and planned capital expenditures for uranium production facilities, also gathered in the survey, will be presented in a separate report

  6. Uranium accumulation by aquatic macrophyte, Pistia stratiotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium accumulation by aquatic macrophyte, Pistia stratiotes from aqueous solution was investigated in laboratory condition. The objective was to evaluate the uranium accumulation potential and adopt the plant in uranium containing medium to improve its uptake capacity. The plant was found to tolerate and grow in the pH range of 3-7. Accumulation of uranium improved with increasing pH and the plant could remove 70% uranium from the medium (20 mg/L) within 24 hours of incubation at pH 5-6. Uptake of uranium on either side of this pH range decreased

  7. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested

  8. The Microstructure of Rolled Plates from Cast Billets of U-10Mo Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyberg, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report covers the examination of 13 samples of rolled plates from three separate castings of uranium, alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) which were sent from the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y12) to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  9. Long-term management and use of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The products resulting from the process of enrichment of natural uranium, or reprocessed uranium, are enriched uranium products as the light fraction and depleted uranium (uranium tails) as the heavy fraction. If the source material is natural uranium, the mass ratios of uranium products and uranium tails can be derived relatively easily from the required enrichment level of the uranium product (product assay (% of U-235)) and the selected depletion level of the uranium tails (tails assay (% of U-235)). The paper discusses among other aspects the dependence of the tails mass on the required enrichment level of the relevant uranium product, for various tails assays. (orig./CB)

  10. Development and Validation of Capabilities to Measure Thermal Properties of Layered Monolithic U-Mo Alloy Plate-Type Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Pool, Karl N.; Smith, Frances N.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2014-07-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the thermal-conductivity behavior of the fuel system as a function of temperature and expected irradiation conditions. The purpose of this paper is to verify functionality of equipment installed in hot cells for eventual measurements on irradiated uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel specimens, refine procedures to operate the equipment, and validate models to extract the desired thermal properties. The results presented here demonstrate the adequacy of the equipment, procedures, and models that have been developed for this purpose based on measurements conducted on surrogate depleted uranium-molybdenum (DU-Mo) alloy samples containing a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061). The results are in excellent agreement with thermal property data reported in the literature for similar U-Mo alloys as a function of temperature.

  11. Uranium in South Africa: 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    South Africa's participation in the nuclear industry was limited to the production of uranium and research, with minor commercial activities. The commissioning of the Koeberg Nuclear power station in 1984 placed South Africa firmly on the path of commercial nuclear power generation. A unique locally developed uranium enrichment process wil enable South Africa to be self-sufficient in its nuclear-fuel needs. Uranium has always been of secondary importance to gold as a target commodity in the exploration of the quartz-pebble conglomerates. In the Witwatersrand Basin it is estimated that in excess of R300 million was spend on exploration during 1987. This was spend primarily in the search for gold but as many of the gold reefs are uraniferous, new uranium resources are being discovered concurrently with those of gold. Uranium mineralization is present in rocks which encompass almost the whole of the geological history of South Africa. Significant mineralization is restricted to five fairly well-defined time periods. Each period is characterized by a distinct type or combination of types of mineralization. Resource estimates are divided into separate categories that reflect different levels of confidence in the quantities reported. The resource categories are further separated into levels of exploitability based on the estimated cost of their exploitation. A major part (87%) of South Africa's uranium resources is present as a by-product of gold in the quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand Basin. The uranium resources in the RAR and EAR-I categories were 536 500 t u. Production during 1987 was 3963 t u. Although a production peaking at over 1100 t U/a is theoretically attainable, it is considered, from market projections, that a production ceiling of 10 000 t U/a would be more realistic

  12. Uranium in South Africa: 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    South Africa's participation in the nuclear industry was limited to the production of uranium and research, with minor commercial activities. The commissioning of the Koeberg Nuclear power station in 1984 placed South Africa firmly on the path of commercial nuclear power generation. A unique, locally developed uranium enrichment process will enable South Africa to be self-sufficient in its nuclear-fuel needs. Uranium has always been of secondary importance to gold as a target commodity in the exploration of the quartz-pebble conglomerates. In the Witwatersrand Basin it is estimated that in excess of R100 million was spent on exploration during 1985. This was spent primarily in the search for gold but as many of the gold reefs are uraniferous, new uranium resources are being discovered concurrently with those of gold. Uranium mineralization is present in rocks which encompass almost the whole of the geological history of South Africa. Significant mineralization is restricted to five fairly well-defined time periods. Each period is characterized by a distinct type or combination of types of mineralization. Resource estimates are divided into separate categories that reflect different levels of confidence in the quantities reported. The resource categories are further separated into levels of exploitability based on the estimated cost of their exploitation. A major part (87%) of South Africa's uranium resources is present as a by-product of gold in the quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand Basin. The uranium resources in the reasonably assured resources (RAR) and estimated additional resources - category I (EAR-I) catogories were 483 300 t U. Production during 1985 was 4880 t U. Although a production peaking at over 1200 t U/a is theoretically attainable, it is considered, from market projections, that a production ceilling of 10 000 t U/a would be more realistic

  13. Uranium speciation in Fernald soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details progress made from January 1 to May 31, 1992 in this analytical support task to determine the speciation of uranium in contaminated soil samples from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site under the auspices of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration funded through the US DOE's Office of Technology Development. The authors' efforts have focused on characterization of soil samples collected by S.Y. Lee (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) from five locales at the Fernald site. These were chosen to sample a broad range of uranium source terms. On the basis of x-ray absorption spectroscopy data, they have determined that the majority of uranium (> 80--90%) exists in the hexavalent oxidation state for all samples examined. This is a beneficial finding from the perspective of remediation, because U(VI) species are more soluble in general than uranium species in other oxidation states. Optical luminescence data from many of the samples show the characteristic structured yellow-green emission from the uranyl (UO22+) moiety. The luminescence data also suggest that much of the uranium in these soils is present as well-crystallized UO22+ species. Some clear spectroscopic distinctions have been noted for several samples that illustrate significant differences in the speciation (1) from site to site, (2) within different horizons at the same site, and (3) within different size fractions of the soils in the same horizon at the same site. This marked heterogeneity in uranyl speciation suggests that several soil washing strategies may be necessary to reduce the total uranium concentrations within these soils to regulatory limits

  14. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  15. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a description and an investment estimate for the infrastructure connected with establishing uranium mining activities at Narssaq. The infrastructure comprises dwellings for employess, etc., personnel and cargo transport, incl. harbours, primary storage facilities and supply routes. The report does not cover the production plant, ore and tailings transport systems, energy supply, nor workshop and administration buildings. The report assumes that the Greenland mining enterprise will employ approx. 280 persons in mining and administration, and approx. 300 persons in processing plants, etc. An increased population will also provide increased demand for shops, institutions and facilities for leisure activities. It is expected that areas will be reserved for local shops, and one or two day-care institutions for children will be built. The increase in cargo transport to and from production plants and in connection with population growth will necessitate the construction of new harbours and/or extension of the existing harbour in Narssaq. The annual volumes of coal and chemical products in bulk for the processing plant will amount to approx. 160,000 t. Approx. 8,000 tons a year will be needed to satisfy the requirements of both mining and the increased population. The present volume passing through the harbour in Narssaq is approx. 7,000 t. (EG)

  16. Liquefaction of uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical methods for assessing the liquefaction potential of soils are reviewed with a view to their application to uranium tailings. The method can be divided into two categories: total stress analysis, where changes in pore pressure are not considered in the soil model, and effective stress analysis, where changes in pore pressure are included in the soil model. Effective stress analysis is more realistic, but few computer programs exist for such analysis in two or three dimensions. A simple linearized, two-dimensional, finite element effective stress analysis which incorporates volumetric compaction due to shear motion is described and implemented. The new program is applied to the assessment of liquefaction potential of tailings in the Quirke Mine tailings area near Elliot Lake, Ontario. The results are compared with those of a total stress analysis. Both analyses indicate liquefaction would occur if a magnitude 6.0 earthquake were to occur near the area. However, the extent of liquefaction predicted by the effective stress analysis is much less than that predicted by the total stress analysis. The results of both methods are sensitive to assumed material properties and to the method used to determine the cyclic shear strength of the tailings. Further analysis, incorporating more in situ and/or laboratory data, is recommended before conclusions can be made concerning the dynamic stability of these tailings

  17. The uranium in Kvanefjeld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is a final thesis at the study of biology at the University of Copenhagen. It examines on a theoretical basis a number of possible environmental effects from a uranium mining and milling project under consideration at the Kvanefjeld site near Narssaq in South Greenland. An introductory description and discussion of the advantages and limitations of ecological baseline studies and dose committment assessments as a tool for planning and decision making is given. The leaching and atmospheric dispersion of particles, heavy metals, radionuclides and other elements from future waste rock and ore piles as well as from mill tailings at the Kvanefjeld site are analysed and discussed. Also, the mobility, transport and accumulation of potentially toxic elements in local terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and food chains are examined. The resulting human burden are discussed with special attention given to the impact on the local population from eating lamb and seafood. A special quantitative analysis of the dispersion and biological uptake of fluoride, which is found in high concentrations in the ore, is given, focusing on the possible human intake of fluoride-polluted arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) caught in Narrssaq River. The report at the end gives consideration to the long term problems of controlling mill tailings, discussing among other things the long term human exposure to radon and thoron daughters. (author)

  18. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overall investments connected with project start constitute approx. Dkr. 3.500 million for the uranium mine, approx. Dkr. 1,100 milion for the hydroelectric station, and approx. Dkr. 400 million for the social infrastructure, adding up to approx. Dkr. 5 billion. This corresponds to Greenlands's gross domestic product over two years or total exports over three years. The effect on employment in the construction phase is assumed to be 650 jobs on average, of which 25%, or approx. 150 jobs, can be filled by Greenland labour. The value of the project on Greenland's economy has been calculated according to its contribution to both the GDP and GNP. The GDP denotes the added value created in a community through production of goods and services in all trades, including public services. The GNP denotes that part of the DGP accruing to the citizens of a country, in this case Greenlanders. Large capital expenditures will be applied towards payment of interest and depreciation. These amounts consitute approx. 70 % of project earnings, measured as its contribution to GDP. The contribution to GNP amounts to approx. Dkr. 170 million per year i the construction phase. However, lack of official data for Greenland's economy makes it difficult to relate these results to other business activities or to assess their size exactly in relation to Greenland's economy. The underlying trend of the calculations is clear nevertheless. The project will have a significant, favourable effect on national accounts and will provide a large number of job openings for Greenland workers. (EG)

  19. Distribution of uranium, thorium, and isotopic composition of uranium in soil samples of south Serbia: Evidence of depleted uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo Sarata Kumar; Fujimoto Kenzo; Čeliković Igor; Ujić Predrag; Žunić Zora S.

    2004-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and thermal ionization mass spectrom - etry were used to measure concentration of uranium and thorium as well as isotopic composition of uranium respectively in soil samples collected around south Serbia. An analytical method was established for a routine sample preparation procedure for uranium and thorium. Uranium was chemically separated and purified from soil samples by anion exchange resin and UTEVA extraction chromatography and its isotopic c...

  20. Mechanical alloying in immiscible alloy systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, mechanical alloying (MA) of immiscible alloy systems characterized by positive heat of mixing has been extensively investigated. The present article reviews the latest progress in MA of immiscible alloy systems including the mechanisms of non-equilibrium phase transformation and metastable phase formation of the MA-driven supersaturated solid solutions, amorphous phases and nanophase composites as well as their mechanical and physical properties related to those metastable phases.

  1. Determination of trace amounts of nitrogen in uranium based samples by ion chromatography (IC) without Kjeldahl distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Poonam; Rastogi, Ramakant K; Ramakumar, Karanam L

    2007-07-23

    A simple, sensitive and fast ion chromatographic (IC) method with suppressed conductivity detection is described for the determination of traces of nitrogen in uranium based fuel materials. Initially a method was developed to determine nitrogen as NH4(+) using cation exchange column after matrix separation by Kjeldahl distillation. The method was then improved by eliminating this distillation. Matrix separation after sample dissolution was done by hydrolyzing and filtering off the polyvalent cations. This had helped in reducing both the sample size and analysis time. Optimization of dissolution conditions for various kinds of uranium based samples was done to keep acid content minimum; a prerequisite chromatographic condition. The calibration plot for nitrogen was linear in the concentration range of 0.02-1 mg L(-1) with regression coefficient of 0.9999. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) obtained in this method (100 microL injected) was 3% and 2% in 9 replicates at nitrogen level of 28 and 55 ng g(-1), respectively. Detection limit based on S/N=3 (100 microL injected) as well as three times of variation in blank value was 4 ng g(-1). The developed method was authenticated by comparison with certified uranium-alloy standard as well as with independent indophenol photometry method. The developed method was applied to uranium-alloy, uranium-metal, sintered UO2 pellets and sintered UO2 microspheres samples.

  2. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: saliba@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl{sub x} dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of {sup 235}U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  3. Uranium mining sites - Thematic sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first sheet proposes comments, data and key numbers about uranium extraction in France: general overview of uranium mining sites, status of waste rock and tailings after exploitation, site rehabilitation. The second sheet addresses the sources of exposure to ionizing radiations due to ancient uranium mining sites: discussion on the identification of these sources associated with these sites, properly due to mining activities or to tailings, or due to the transfer of radioactive substances towards water and to the contamination of sediments, description of the practice and assessment of radiological control of mining sites. A third sheet addresses the radiological exposure of public to waste rocks, and the dose assessment according to exposure scenarios: main exposure ways to be considered, studied exposure scenarios (passage on backfilled path and grounds, stay in buildings built on waste rocks, keeping mineralogical samples at home). The fourth sheet addresses research programmes of the IRSN on uranium and radon: epidemiological studies (performed on mine workers; on French and on European cohorts, French and European studies on the risk of lung cancer associated with radon in housing), study of the biological effects of chronic exposures. The last sheet addresses studies and expertises performed by the IRSN on ancient uranium mining sites in France: studies commissioned by public authorities, radioactivity control studies performed by the IRSN about mining sites, participation of the IRSN to actions to promote openness to civil society

  4. The End of Cheap Uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Dittmar, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a world...

  5. Uranium exploration and mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium minerals were discovered in Australia in the years 1850 to 1900 already, but most of them were not recognised as such. It was not until 1894 that the first significant uranium find was made in Carcoar, west of Sydney. At that time, the uranium output of the world, which only amounted to a few hundred cwts, was for the most part obtained from mining areas close to the border between Saxony and Bohemia. In South Australia, uranium ore was mined experimentally for the production of radium at Radium Hill from 1906 onwards and at Mt. Painter from 1910 onwards. It was not until World War II, however, that uranium gained importance as a valuable raw material that could also be used for military purposes. The second phase of uranium mining in Australia commenced in 1944. Within ten years Australia's presumed uranium potential was confirmed by extensive exploration. The development of uranium mining in Australia is described in the present paper. (orig.)

  6. Uranium resources, production and demand 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is the Japanese edition of 'Uranium Resources, Production and Demand, 1993' published by OECD/NEA-IAEA in 1994. It contains data on uranium exploration activities, resources and production for about 50 countries. (K.I.)

  7. Past and future of uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in world politics over the last few years have directly affected supplies and price levels in the front-end nuclear industry. Limited by the advance of CIS and East European uranium and nuclear fuel services into the west, the trend towards a declining uranium industry continued until 1994. The expected introduction of military uranium from Russian and American warheads into the civil nuclear fuel cycle creates additional unknowns in the nuclear fuel market. However, the long lasting recession in the uranium industry may already be coming to an end: The uranium inventories still in existence and uranium from the conversion of nuclear warheads will not last long enough to close the existing gap between uranium demand and supply. Additional uranium production will be required as a result. (orig.)

  8. The economics of uranium 1991. 3. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The new Roskill report on the economics of uranium, 1991, gives essential facts and figures on five main topics; background, supply and demand; prices and uranium and nuclear activities by country and company. (author).

  9. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  10. Uranium Determination by Delayed Neutron Counting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Uranium is a very important resource in nuclear industry, especially in the exploiture of nuclear energy. Determination of uranium using delayed neutron counting (DNC) is simple, non-destructive, and

  11. Uranium 2007 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2008-01-01

    Based on official information received from 40 countries, Uranium 2007 provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1st January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. It finds that with rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of underinvestment.

  12. Concentrations of Uranium Isotopes in Uranium Millers' and Miners' Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    1985-01-01

    The alpha-emitting isotopes of uranium and thorium were determined in the lungs of 14 former uranium miners and in soft tissues and bones of three miners and two millers. These radionuclides were also determined in soft tissues and bones of seven normal controls. The average concentrations in pCi/kg wet weight in 17 former miners' lungs are as follows: U-238, 75; U-234, 80; Th-230, 79. Concentrations of each nuclide ranged from 2 to 325 pCi/kg. The average ratio of U-238/U-234 ws 0.92, r...

  13. 40 CFR 421.320 - Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary uranium subcategory. 421.320 Section 421.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Uranium Subcategory § 421.320 Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium... uranium (including depleted uranium) by secondary uranium facilities....

  14. The reactivity of U-25%at. Si and U-5.7%at. Al alloys with Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment of hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of U-25%at. Si and U-5.7%at. Al alloys was tried to develop of materials for temporary storage of hydrogen and isotopes purpose. The experiment data are show that U-5.7%at. Al alloy are similarly of pure uranium properties with the absorb hydrogen capacity about 2.9 atom/M, and decomposition pressure are less decreases while the absorb hydrogen capacity of U-25%at. Si only about 0.037 atom/M, although in the alloys content with uranium phase. From both of alloys, the U-5.7%at. Al more reactive and possible to promote as temporary storage of hydrogen than U-5.7%at. Si

  15. Study of the Utah uranium-milling industry. Volume II. Utah energy resources: uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a general overview of the uranium mining and milling industry and its history and present status with particular reference to Utah. This volume serves two purposes: (1) it serves as a companion volume to Volume I, which is a policy analysis; and (2) it serves as one of a set of energy resource assessment studies previously performed by the authors. The following topics are covered: development of the uranium industry on the Colorado Plateau with emphasis on Utah; geology of uranium; uranium reserves; uranium exploration in Utah; uranium ore production and mining operation in Utah; uranium milling operations in Utah; utilization of uranium; uranium mill tailings; and future outlook. Appendices on pricing of uranium and incentives for production since World War II are also presented

  16. Statistical data of the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented on US uranium reserves, potential resources, exploration, mining, drilling, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1980. The compendium reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Office. Statistics are based primarily on information provided by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. Data on commercial U3O8 sales and purchases are included. Data on non-US uranium production and resources are presented in the appendix

  17. Uranium 2003 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2004-01-01

    Uranium 2003: Resources, Production and Demand paints a detailed statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and for the first time, a report for Turkmenistan. Also included are international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020.

  18. Mechanical and thermal behaviour of U-Mo and U-Nb-Zr Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Denise Adorno; Guisard Restivo, Thomaz Augusto; Padilha, Angelo Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear fuels composed of uranium alloys in monolithic and dispersed forms are being considered for research and compact power reactors due to their density properties (greater than 15 g-U/cm3) and fast heat transfer. U-Nb-Zr and U-Mo alloys are the most promising systems for plate fuel elements owing to their broad γ-phase stability field, which shows higher ductility and isotropic behaviour, allowing extensive fabrication capability. In the present work, γ-phase stabilized U-7.5Nb-2.5Zr and U-10Mo alloys were characterized by mechanical and thermal analyses for comparison of their behaviour under deformation and heat-treatment. The results demonstrate that the alloys have substantially different properties regarding deformation, kinetics phase transformation and recovery/recrystallization. The main results show that U-Nb-Zr is superior regarding fabrication capabilities although the γ-phase is less stable than U-Mo alloys.

  19. Mechanical and thermal behaviour of U–Mo and U–Nb–Zr Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Denise Adorno [LABMAT, Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo, Rod. Sorocaba-Iperó km 12.5, 18560-000 Iperó, SP (Brazil); Guisard Restivo, Thomaz Augusto, E-mail: guisard@dglnet.com.br [UNISO, Universidade de Sorocaba, Rod. Raposo Tavares km 92.5, 18023-000 Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Escola Politécnica USP, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 05508-030 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Padilha, Angelo Fernando [Escola Politécnica USP, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 05508-030 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Nuclear fuels composed of uranium alloys in monolithic and dispersed forms are being considered for research and compact power reactors due to their density properties (greater than 15 g-U/cm{sup 3}) and fast heat transfer. U–Nb–Zr and U–Mo alloys are the most promising systems for plate fuel elements owing to their broad γ-phase stability field, which shows higher ductility and isotropic behaviour, allowing extensive fabrication capability. In the present work, γ-phase stabilized U–7.5Nb–2.5Zr and U–10Mo alloys were characterized by mechanical and thermal analyses for comparison of their behaviour under deformation and heat-treatment. The results demonstrate that the alloys have substantially different properties regarding deformation, kinetics phase transformation and recovery/recrystallization. The main results show that U–Nb–Zr is superior regarding fabrication capabilities although the γ-phase is less stable than U–Mo alloys.

  20. Effect of niobium element on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of depleted uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanping; Wu, Quanwen; Zhu, Shengfa; Pu, Zhen; Zhang, Yanzhi; Wang, Qinguo; Lang, Dingmu; Zhang, Yuping

    2016-09-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has many military and civilian uses. However, its high chemical reactivity limits its application. The effect of Nb content on corrosion behavior of DU is evaluated by scanning Kelvin probe and electrochemical corrosion measurements. The Volta potential value of DU and U-2.5 wt% Nb is about the same level, the Volta potential value of U-5.7 wt% Nb has a rise of 370mVSHE in comparison with DU. The polarization current of U-5.7 wt% Nb alloy is about an order of magnitude of that of DU. The Nb2O5 is the protective layer for the U-Nb alloys. The negative potential of Nb-depleted α phase is the main reason of the poor corrosion resistance of DU and U-2.5 wt% Nb alloy.

  1. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  2. Rehabilitation of uranium tailings impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under Australian environmental controls relating to the management of uranium tailings, it is no longer acceptable practice to search for a rehabilitation strategy at the end of production when the generation of tailings has ceased. The uranium projects currently in production and those being proposed are tightly regulated by the authorities. The waste management plans must consider site specific factors and must include selection of appropriate disposal sites and design for long term containment. The final encapsulation in engineered facilities must take into account the probable routes to the environment of the tailings. Rehabilitation shoud be undertaken by the mining and milling operators to standards approved by appropriate authorities. Appropriate administrative arrangements are required, by way of technical committees and financial bonds to ensure that agreed standards of rehabilitation may be achieved. Past and present experience with the rehabilitation of uranium tailings impoundments in Australia is discussed

  3. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been carried out for the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid produced in Algeria. First of all, the Algerian phosphoric acid produced in Algeria by SONATRACH has been characterised. This study helped us to synthesize a phosphoric acid that enabled us to pass from laboratory tests to pilot scale tests. We have then examined extraction and stripping parameters: diluent, DZEPHA/TOPO ratio and oxidising agent. The laboratory experiments enabled us to set the optimum condition for the choice of diluent, extractant concentration, ratio of the synergic mixture, oxidant concentration, redox potential. The equilibrium isotherms lead to the determination of the number of theoretical stages for the uranium extraction and stripping of uranium, then the extraction from phosphoric acid has been verified on a pilot scale (using a mixer-settler)

  4. Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

    1999-08-05

    Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

  5. First-principles calculations of the stability and incorporation of helium, xenon and krypton in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Helium, xenon, and krypton point defects are investigated in metallic uranium. ► Formation energies of defects are calculated for the prediction of fission gas behavior. ► Defect energies follow a size effect, with helium energies being the smallest. ► The most likely position for Xe and Kr atoms in uranium is the substitutional site. ► Helium atoms are likely to be found in a wide variety of defect positions. - Abstract: While metallic fuels have a long history of reactor use, their fundamental physical and thermodynamic properties are not well understood. Many metallic nuclear fuels are body-centered cubic alloys of uranium that swell under fission conditions, creating fission product gases such as helium, xenon and krypton. In this paper, helium, xenon, and krypton point defects are investigated in the α and γ phases of metallic uranium using first principles calculations. A density functional theory (DFT) framework is utilized with projector augmented-wave (PAW) pseudopotentials. Formation and incorporation energies of He, Xe, and Kr are calculated at various defect positions for the prediction of fission gas behavior in uranium. In most cases, defect energies follow a size effect, with helium incorporation and formation energies being the smallest. The most likely position for the larger Xe and Kr atoms in uranium is the substitutional site. Helium atoms are likely to be found in a wide variety of defect positions due to the comparable formation energies of all defect configurations analyzed. This is the first detailed study of the stability and incorporation of fission gases in uranium.

  6. Removal and Recovery of Uranium using Microorganisms Isolated from North American Uranium Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Takehiko Tsuruta

    2007-01-01

    Some attempts were made to remove and recover uranium that may be present in nuclear fuel effluents and mine tailings using microorganisms isolated from North American uranium deposits. To establish which microorganisms accumulate the most uranium, hundreds strains of microorganisms were screened. Of these strains of microorganisms tested, extremely high uranium accumulating ability was found in some bacteria isolated from North American uranium deposits. These bacterial strains, such as Arth...

  7. The chemical state of complex uranium oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Kvashnina, K. O.; Butorin, S. M.; Martin, P.; P. Glatzel

    2013-01-01

    We report here the first direct observation of U(V) in uranium binary oxides and analyze the gradual conversion of the U oxidation state in the mixed uranium systems. Our finding clarifies previous contradicting results and provides important input for the geological disposal of spent fuel, recycling applications and chemistry of uranium species.

  8. 77 FR 14837 - Bioassay at Uranium Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... COMMISSION Bioassay at Uranium Mills AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-8051, ``Bioassay at Uranium Mills.'' This guide describes a bioassay program acceptable to the NRC staff for uranium mills and applicable portions...

  9. Biotechnology for uranium extraction and environmental control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India is looking forward to augmenting mining and extraction of uranium mineral for its nuclear energy needs. Being a radio-active mineral, mining and processing of uranium ore deposits need be carried out in an environmentally acceptable fashion. In this respect, a biotechnological approach holds great promise since it is environment-friendly, cost-effective and energy-efficient. There are several types of microorganisms which inhabit uranium ore bodies and biogenesis plays an important role in the mineralisation and transport of uranium-bearing minerals under the earth's crust. Uranium occurrences in India are only meagre and it becomes essential to tap effectively all the available resources. Uraninite and pitchblende occurring along with sulfide mineralisation such as pyrite are ideal candidates for bioleaching. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans present ubiquitously in the ore deposits can be isolated, cultured and utilised to bring about efficient acidic dissolution of uranium. Many such commercial attempts to extract uranium from even lean ores using acidophilic autotrophic bacteria have been made in different parts of the world. Anaerobes such a Geobacter and Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) can be effectively used in uranium mining for environmental control. Radioactive uranium mined wastes and tailing dumps can be cleaned and protected using microorganisms. In this lecture use of biotechnology in uranium extraction and bioremediation is illustrated with practical examples. Applicability of environment-friendly biotechnology for mining and extraction of uranium from Indian deposits is outlined. Commercial potentials for bioremediation in uranium-containing wastes are emphasised. (author)

  10. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U, and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles. Such weapons were used by the military in the Persian Gulf, the Balkans and elsewhere. The testing of depleted uranium weapons and their use in combat has resulted in environmental contamination and human exposure. Although the chemical and the toxicological behaviors of depleted uranium are essentially the same as those of natural uranium, the respective chemical forms and isotopic compositions in which they usually occur are different. The chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium can injure biological systems. Normal functioning of the kidney, liver, lung, and heart can be adversely affected by depleted uranium intoxication. The focus of this review is on the chemical and toxicological properties of depleted and natural uranium and some of the possible consequences from long term, low dose exposure to depleted uranium in the environment.

  11. Australian uranium and the election

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international and national complexities of the situation in Australia over the question of mining of the country's large and rich uranium deposits are explored with especial reference to the pending general election. The present position is ironical since access to low cost uranium would give a welcome boost to the nuclear industry which is enthusiastically supported by the Australian prime minister and his colleagues yet the Australian government is unable to promote mining as rapidly as it would like because of the international commitments it has made to provide a justification for its policy. (U.K.)

  12. Uranium, resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thirteenth edition of the report looks at recent developments and their impact on the short term (i.e. to the year 2005) and presents a longer term (to 2030) analysis of supply possibilities in the context of a range of requirement scenarios. It presents results of a 1989 review of uranium supply and demand in the World Outside Centrally Planned Economies Areas. It contains updated information on uranium exploration activities, resources and production for over 40 countries including a few CPEs, covering the period 1987 and 1988

  13. Australia's uranium policy: an examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mining and export of Australian Uranium poses problems for the safety of the world that any responsible government is bound to consider. The following note lists the major problems, attempts to assess their importance, and to suggest what lines may be relevant to Australia for their solution. These problems were examined because of the concern about the appropriateness of attempting to fulfill projected world energy needs by any means; and their fulfillment, by using nuclear fuels carries special problems of biological, social and political hazards. Any development of Australia's uranium resources should be considered in this light. (author)

  14. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the United States may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100

  15. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100

  16. Disposition Options for Uranium-233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program (MD), in support of the U.S. arms-control and nonproliferation policies, has initiated a program to disposition surplus weapons-usable fissile material by making it inaccessible and unattractive for use in nuclear weapons. Weapons-usable fissile materials include plutonium, high-enriched uranium (HEU), and uranium-233 (sup 233)U. In support of this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory led DOE's contractor efforts to identify and characterize options for the long-term storage and disposal of excess (sup 233)U. Five storage and 17 disposal options were identified and are described herein

  17. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  18. Can reprocessed uranium become the most natural substitute to uranium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper performs a value-in-use assessment of reprocessed uranium (RepU) by applying the ‘Customer Value Management’ methodology. This represents a progressive and practical approach which formalizes in a stepwise manner the customer’s requirements and preferences, and what values are relevant to him in the supplier’s offering. (author)

  19. Improvement of uranium extraction during uranium concentrate purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurelian, F.; Georgescu, D.P.; Serban, N.; Panturu, E. [R and D Institute for Rare and Radioactive Metals, Bucharest (Romania)

    2000-07-01

    The majority of solvent extraction operations in the mining industry have the problem of forming a stable emulsion and the eventual formation of crud. The major causes of crud formation in the solvent extraction circuits are suspended solids, colloidal silica and organic constituents, such as humic acids. During the refining of Uranium concentrates sodium or ammonium diuranate are treated with a solvent extraction process. The formation of an emulsion or crud affects the purification process and generates losses of valuable uranium during solid liquid separation. The technology proposed, in a first stage, use dissolution of uranium concentrates under temperature and agitation, in a nitric acid media. This operation partially removes organic impurities. After the dissolution, the solution is kept with the aim to remove silica by settling. Part of the organic impurities are removed by filtration together with silica and other entrained impurities (suspended solids). The liquid phase is carbonated until inorganic impurities are precipitated. From the clear solutions the sodium diuranate is precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution. The uranium purification is controlled by the aqueous phase acidity level. The mechanism of crud formation and prevention are also explained in this paper. (author)

  20. NUSIMEP-7: uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truyens, J; Stefaniak, E A; Aregbe, Y

    2013-11-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) has extensive experience in the development of isotopic reference materials and the organization of interlaboratory comparisons (ILC) for nuclear measurements in compliance with the respective international guidelines (ISO Guide 34:2009 and ISO/IEC 17043:2010). The IRMM Nuclear Signatures Interlaboratory Measurement Evaluation Program (NUSIMEP) is an external quality control program with the objective of providing materials for measurements of trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental matrices. Measurements of the isotopic ratios of the elements uranium and plutonium in small amounts, typical of those found in environmental samples, are required for nuclear safeguards and security, for the control of environmental contamination and for the detection of nuclear proliferation. The measurement results of participants in NUSIMEP are evaluated according to international guidelines in comparison to independent external certified reference values with demonstrated metrological traceability and uncertainty. NUSIMEP-7 focused on measurements of uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles aiming to support European Safeguards Directorate General for Energy (DG ENER), the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) network of analytical laboratories for environmental sampling (NWAL) and laboratories in the field of particle analysis. Each participant was provided two certified test samples: one with single and one with double isotopic enrichment. These NUSIMEP test samples were prepared by controlled hydrolysis of certified uranium hexafluoride in a specially designed aerosol deposition chamber at IRMM. Laboratories participating in NUSIMEP-7 received the test samples of uranium particles on two graphite disks with undisclosed isotopic ratio values n((234)U)/n((238)U), n((235)U)/n((238)U) and n((236)U)/n((238)U). The uranium isotope ratios had to be measured using their routine analytical

  1. The Uranium Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Uranium Institute has run a World Wide Web site since July 1995 and has seen user sessions reach around 5600 per week. The site comprises some 700 pages of news and information and has attracted a good deal of favourable comment. The site is intended as an information resource to augment the service provided by the UI Information Service and is aimed at both industry and non-industry web users. The actual user community includes UI members and others from the industry, mining and financial analysts, lots of students and school children, journalists and a large number of unknown individuals. Hopefully the workshop can be used to examine user reactions to industry sites and get some idea of the extent to which we are talking to ourselves over the net rather than talking to our 'publics'. Although the Ul was quite early on the web scene by nuclear standards, development of the UI site has proceeded fairly slowly and the accent has always been on good quality information. With 170,000 visitors per year site use indicates that there is a demand for nuclear information while responses indicate that there is a substantial body of quiet nuclear support which welcomes the opportunity to communicate with the industry. Does the web help to pull the industry and its supporters together? The WWW has often been portrayed as a vehicle which allows good news and information to be communicated direct to the 'public' but attempts to realise this opportunity have not always met with success. The UI has had a generally positive experience with its web site but this is not universally the case. I would like to explore the background to this both in my presentation and in the subsequent discussion. My general theme is to ask the question 'What do users want from a nuclear related web site and are we providing it?'. Conversely it is pertinent to ask the question, 'does what the users seem to want coincide with what we wish to supply?'. I will seek to address these

  2. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Sidney A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U) down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U), and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles....

  3. The migration of uranium through sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three column experiments are described in which the migration of uranium through Clashach Sandstone was studied. A priori predictions of uranium migration in the experiments were made using an equilibrium chemical transport model. The experimental results showed that, even under oxidising conditions, the migration of uranium is strongly retarded owing to the affinity of uranium for mineral surfaces. For the relatively simple chemical system investigated, the chemical transport model was successful in predicting the migration of uranium and its distribution along the column. (author)

  4. URANIUM 1991 resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium supply aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle have undergone considerable change during the last few years. Nuclear power generating capacity can continue to expand only if there is confidence in the final supply of uranium. This report presents governmental compilations of uranium resource and production data, as established in 1991. It also presents short-term projections of the nuclear industry future natural uranium requirements and reviews the status of uranium exploration, resources and production throughout the world. 10 refs., 14 figs., 15 tabs., 6 appendices

  5. Development of a tungsten heavy alloy, W-Ni-Mn, used as kinetic energy penetrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research was to develop a tungsten heavy alloy having a microstructure and properties good enough to penetrate hard rolled steels as deep as possible. In addition this alloy should not have environmental problems as depleted uranium materials, For this purpose a wide spread literature survey was performed and on the base of information obtained in this survey, three compositions of tungsten heavy alloy were chosen for investigation in this research. The alloys namely 90 W-7 Ni-3 Fe, 90 W-9 Ni-Mn and 90 W-8 Ni-2 Mn were selected and after producing these alloys through powder metallurgy technique, their thermal conductivity, compression flow properties and microstructure, were studied. The results of these investigations indicated that W-Ni-Mn alloys had better flow properties and lower thermal conductivities relative to W-Ni-Fe alloy. In addition Mn helped to obtain a finer microstructure in tungsten heavy alloy. Worth mentioning that a finer microstructure as well as lower thermal conductivity in this type of alloys increased the penetration depth due to formation of adiabatic shear bands during impact

  6. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  7. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  8. Standard test method for analysis of isotopic composition of uranium in nuclear-grade fuel material by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method is applicable to the determination of the isotopic composition of uranium (U) in nuclear-grade fuel material. The following isotopic weight percentages are determined using a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (Q-ICP-MS): 233U, 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U. The analysis can be performed on various material matrices after acid dissolution and sample dilution into water or dilute nitric (HNO3) acid. These materials include: fuel product, uranium oxide, uranium oxide alloys, uranyl nitrate (UNH) crystals, and solutions. The sample preparation discussed in this test method focuses on fuel product material but may be used for uranium oxide or a uranium oxide alloy. Other preparation techniques may be used and some references are given. Purification of the uranium by anion-exchange extraction is not required for this test method, as it is required by other test methods such as radiochemistry and thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS). This test method is also described i...

  9. A Mine-Based Uranium Market Clearing Model

    OpenAIRE

    Aris Auzans; Erich A. Schneider; Robert Flanagan; Tkaczyk, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Economic analysis and market simulation tools are used to evaluate uranium (U) supply shocks, sale or purchase of uranium stockpiles, or market effects of new uranium mines or enrichment technologies. This work expands on an existing U market model that couples the market for primary U from uranium mines with those of secondary uranium, e.g., depleted uranium (DU) upgrading or highly enriched uranium (HEU) down blending, and enrichment services. This model accounts for the interdependence bet...

  10. Domestic utility attitudes toward foreign uranium supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    The current embargo on the enrichment of foreign-origin uranium for use in domestic utilization facilities is scheduled to be removed in 1984. The pending removal of this embargo, complicated by a depressed worldwide market for uranium, has prompted consideration of a new or extended embargo within the US Government. As part of its on-going data collection activities, Nuclear Resources International (NRI) has surveyed 50 domestic utility/utility holding companies (representing 60 lead operator-utilities) on their foreign uranium purchase strategies and intentions. The most recent survey was conducted in early May 1981. A number of qualitative observations were made during the course of the survey. The major observations are: domestic utility views toward foreign uranium purchase are dynamic; all but three utilities had some considered foreign purchase strategy; some utilities have problems with buying foreign uranium from particular countries; an inducement is often required by some utilities to buy foreign uranium; opinions varied among utilities concerning the viability of the domestic uranium industry; and many utilities could have foreign uranium fed through their domestic uranium contracts (indirect purchases). The above observations are expanded in the final section of the report. However, it should be noted that two of the observations are particularly important and should be seriously considered in formulation of foreign uranium import restrictions. These important observations are the dynamic nature of the subject matter and the potentially large and imbalanced effect the indirect purchases could have on utility foreign uranium procurement.

  11. Uranium 2011 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, questions are being raised about the future of the uranium market, including as regards the number of reactors expected to be built in the coming years, the amount of uranium required to meet forward demand, the adequacy of identified uranium resources to meet that demand and the ability of the sector to meet reactor requirements in a challenging investment climate. This 24th edition of the “Red Book”, a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 42 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It offers a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It also provides substantive new information on established uranium production centres around the world and in countri...

  12. Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2014-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

  13. Uranium 2005 Resources, Production and Demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris. Nuclear Energy Agency

    2006-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. This 21st edition presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1st January 2005 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2025 are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major c...

  14. Resonance ionisation spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry has made tremendous strides in its potential and the diversity of applications. A particularly important application of interest is sensitive and selective detection/trace analysis of various long-lived radio-active isotopes. Investigations on three-color photoionization studies of uranium are reported here

  15. Jabiluka gold-uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jabiluka gold-uranium deposit, 230km east of Darwin in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, was discovered by Pancontinental Mining Limited in 1971. Jabiluka, with reserves in excess of 200,000 tonnes of contained U3O8 in two deposits 500 metres apart, is the world's largest high grade uranium deposit and also contains nearly 12 tonnes of gold. It is proposed that only the larger deposit, Jabiluka II will be mined - by underground extraction methods, and that 275,000 tonnes of ore per year will be mined and processed to produce 1,500 tonnes of U3O8 and up to 30,000 oz of gold. The revenue from the uranium sales is estimated to be of the order of A$100 million per year at A$30/lb. By the end of 1982 all necessary mining and environmental approvals had been obtained and significant marketing progress made. With the Australian Labor Party winning Commonwealth Government in the 1983 election, Pancontinental's permission to seek sales contracts was withdrawn and development of the Jabiluka deposit ceased. Jabiluka remains undeveloped - awaiting a change in Australian Government policy on uranium. figs., maps

  16. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  17. Environmental Development Plan: uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Development Plan identifies and examines the environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic concerns and corresponding requirements associated with the DOE research, development, demonstration, and operation of the Uranium Enrichment program, including the gaseous diffusion process, the centrifuge process, centrifuge rotor fabrication, and related research and development activities

  18. Thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide of composition UO2.015 was measured from 300 to 1400 K. The phonon component of the conductivity is found to be quantitatively accounted for by the theoretical expression of Slack derived by modifying the Leibfried-Schlomann equation. (orig.)

  19. Foreign uranium supply. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an assessment of the extent to which foreign uranium may be available to United States utilities in the short term (through 1980), the intermediate term (1981--1985), and the long term (1986--95). All free world foreign uranium producers and prospects are included, with particular emphasis on Australia, Canada, southern Africa, France, and French-speaking Africa. The assessment includes reserves, resources, exploration and prospects; firm and potential production capacity and prospects; national policies and relevant political and economic conditions; foreign uranium demand; etc. Conclusions are: Foreign supply capability is greater than foreign demand in the near term. The current availability of uncommitted future Australian production presents an unusual opportunity for establishing commercial relations with very substantial producers. Foreign uranium contracts represent an increase in diversity of supply and access to resources but have less assurance of supply than do domestic contracts. However, uncertainties can frequently be accommodated within an overall procurement program, thereby retaining the diversity and price advantages of foreign procurement. The practice of market pricing of contracts reduces the incentives for foreign contracting

  20. Mining inventory of Uruguay : Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of Uruguay Uranium prospecting in this document has been summarized the following items: lithostratigraphy, background, economics aspects, radiation measuring, geochemistry, geophysics in Yerba Sola, Magnolia, Paso Amarillo, La Mercedes, Puntas de Abrojal, Las Chircas, La Divisa, Chuy, Apretado and Frayle Muerto

  1. Uranium: Prices, rise, then fall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium prices hit eight-year highs in both market tiers, $16.60/lb U3O8 for non-former Soviet Union (FSU) origin and $15.50 for FSU origin during mid 1996. However, they declined to $14.70 and $13.90, respectively, by the end of the year. Increased uranium prices continue to encourage new production and restarts of production facilities presently on standby. Australia scrapped its open-quotes three-mineclose quotes policy following the ouster of the Labor party in a March election. The move opens the way for increasing competition with Canada's low-cost producers. Other events in the industry during 1996 that have current or potential impacts on the market include: approval of legislation outlining the ground rules for privatization of the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) and the subsequent sales of converted Russian highly enriched uranium (HEU) from its nuclear weapons program, announcement of sales plans for converted US HEU and other surplus material through either the Department of Energy or USEC, and continuation of quotas for uranium from the FSU in the United States and Europe. In Canada, permitting activities continued on the Cigar Lake and McArthur River projects; and construction commenced on the McClean Lake mill

  2. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  3. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  4. Synthesis of uranium fluorides from uranium dioxide with ammonium bifluoride and ammonolysis of uranium fluorides to uranium nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeamans, Charles Burnett

    This work presents the chemical conversion of uranium oxides to uranium fluorides, and their subsequent conversion to uranium nitrides. Uranium dioxide reacts with ammonium bifluoride at 20°C to form compound in the ammonium-uranium fluoride chemical system. This reaction occurs between solid uranium dioxide at the surface of the particles and ammonium fluoride vapor. A shrinking-sphere model demonstrated surface reaction kinetics, not mass transport by diffusion through the product layer, limit the reaction rate when the starting material consists of 100 mum uranium dioxide particles. Powder x-ray diffraction showed the reaction to be complete within 8 hours, with (NH4) 4UF8 the reaction product. High-resolution electron microcopy revealed the product is largely amorphous on a micrometer-scale, but contains well-formed crystal domains on the order of 10x10 nm. X-ray diffraction showed the reaction progresses though beta-NH4UF5, delta-(NH 4)2UF6, and gamma-(NH4)2UF6 intermediate phases before finally forming (NH4)4UF 8. Modeling the system as a series of first-order reaction suggested a fourth intermediate, possibly UF4, is likely to occur. The reaction of (NH4)4UF8 with ammonia gas at 800°C forms alpha-U2N3/UN2 solid solution products with a composition of UN1.83. The x-ray powder diffraction pattern of this product is the fcc pattern commonly referenced as that of UN2 and the lattice parameter was 0.53050 nm. Surface area increased by a factor of ten during ammonolysis, consistent with the action of a hydriding agent. The alpha-U2N 3/UN2 solid solution system formed contained 1 wt% UO 2 as an impurity. Upon subsequent heating to 1150°C for 4.5 hours under argon, the nitride sample formed UN with a UO2 impurity of 9 wt%. Based on the HRTEM images, oxidation in the UN product appears to be limited to within 20 nm of particle surfaces and grain boundaries.

  5. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    In wetlands, which are a major feature at the groundwater-surface water interface, plants deliver oxygen to the subsurface to keep root tissue aerobic. Some of this oxygen leaches into the rhizosphere where it will oxidize iron that typically precipitates on or near roots. Furthermore, plans provide carbon via root exudates and turnover, which in the presence of the iron oxides drives the activity of heterotrophic iron reducers in wetland soils. Oxidized iron is an important electron acceptor for many microbially-driven transformations, which can affect the fate and transport of several pollutants. It has been shown that heterotrophic iron reducing organisms, such as Geobacter sp., can reduce water soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). The goal of this study was to determine if and how iron cycling in the wetland rhizosphere affects uranium dynamics. For this purpose, we operated a series of small-scale wetland mesocosms in a greenhouse to simulate the discharge of uranium-contaminated groundwater to surface waters. The mesocosms were operated with two different Fe(II) loading rates, two plant types, and unplanted controls. The mesocosms contained zones of root exclusion to differentiate between the direct presence and absence of roots in the planted mesocosms. The mesocosms were operated for several month to get fully established, after which a U(VI) solution was fed for 80 days. The mesocosms were then sacrificed and analyzed for solid-associated chemical species, microbiological characterization, micro-X-ray florescence (µ-XRF) mapping of Fe and U on the root surface, and U speciation via X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Results showed that bacterial numbers including Geobacter sp., Fe(III), as well as total uranium, were highest on roots, followed by sediments near roots, and lowest in zones without much root influence. Results from the µ-XRF mapping on root surfaces indicated a strong spatial correlation between Fe and U. This correlation was

  6. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  7. Radiological hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present document is to review and assess the occupational hazards to uranium miners in Canada. Amendments to regulations set the maximum permissible dose to uranium miners at 50 mSv per year. Uranium miners are exposed to radon and thoron progeny, external gamma radiation and long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides in dust. The best estimate for the lifetime risk of inhaled radon progeny is about 3 x 10-4 lung cancers per WLM for the average miner, with a range of uncertainty from about 1 -6 x 10-4 per WLM. This central value is nearly twice as high as that recommended by the ICRP in 1981. The probability of serious biological consequences following exposure to external gamma rays is currently under review but is expected to be in the range of 3 - 6 x 10-2 Sv-1. Dosimetric calculations indicate that the stochastic risks per WLM of thoron progeny are about one-third of those for radon progeny. The annual limits on intake of inhaled ore dusts recommended by the ICRP are probably too low by at least a factor of two for the type of ore and dust normally encountered in underground uranium mines in Ontario; this is due in part to the fact that the average diameter of these dusts is five times greater than the value used by the ICRP. Radiological exposures of uranium miners in Canada were reviewed. The biological impact of these exposures were compared with those of conventional accidents on the basis of the years of normal life expectancy that are lost or seriously impaired due to occupational hazards. The objectives in considering all occupational risks are to reduce the total risk from all causes and to use funds spent for health protection as effectively as possible

  8. The Sustainability of Uranium Resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy is an essential element for human species; in developing countries it derives the country's economic growth, while in developed countries improves the quality of lives of people. As the world more economically developing in the future, more energy demand is expected, but this accompanies two inherent limitations: 1) the fossil fuels are limited resources and not able to supply worlds energy demands indefinitely and 2) the use of fossil fuels generates a large amount of greenhouse gas emissions harmful to the environment. 'Nuclear energy' seems to be an answer to solve these problems; increasing interests have recently shown over 'nuclear energy' as an alternative energy source to fossil fuels. Although it is a more technology-intensive energy source compared to others, however, it still needs a raw material uranium to produce electricity. Uranium is also a limited resource. For this reason, for a government to craft its long term energy policy, it needs to know how much uranium is preserved and how long it will support the country's nuclear power generation. Although many analysts so far speculate that the existing known uranium resource would be sufficient to support the nuclear power plants of the world at least until mid-century, most of those analyses assume a small rise in nuclear electricity generation in the short-term, and then a gradual decline in the long-term. Recently rising expectations and a possible renaissance for nuclear power, however, call for new analyses on this issue. This paper projects the future contribution of nuclear power to the world energy mix reflecting such a change of the atmosphere. Based on that projection, this paper analyzes how long uranium will be available for nuclear power generation

  9. Reactive transport modeling at uranium in situ recovery sites: uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Tutu, Hlanganani; Brown, Adrian; Figueroa, Linda; Wolkersdorfer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical changes that can occur down gradient from uranium in situ recovery (ISR) sites are important for various stakeholders to understand when evaluating potential effects on surrounding groundwater quality. If down gradient solid-phase material consists of sandstone with iron hydroxide coatings (no pyrite or organic carbon), sorption of uranium on iron hydroxides can control uranium mobility. Using one-dimensional reactive transport models with PHREEQC, two different geochemical databases, and various geochemical parameters, the uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides are evaluated, because these oxidized zones create a greater risk for future uranium transport than fully reduced zones where uranium generally precipitates.

  10. Thermophysical properties determination of uranium-molybdenum fuel by the flash laser method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of nuclear facilities using high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets has been worldwide encouraged considering the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. A research program under development at CDTN aims the obtaining of uranium and molybdenum alloys to enable the HEU to LEU conversions. Samples of alloys produced with 3,5,7 and 10 weight percent of molybdenum were prepared and their thermophysical properties were determined at room temperature. The thermal diffusivity was measured by the laser flash method. This conceptually simple method presents advantages in comparison to the various methods used in the past. The thermal conductivity was determined by mathematical model developed by the laboratory. The obtained results show good agreement with the literature data with thermal conductivity values ranging from 7.15 up to 19.51 W ·m-1 ·K-1, the thermal diffusivity from 3.83 x 10-6 up to 6.37 x 10-6 m2·s-1 and the specific heat from 114 up to 184 J·kg-1·K-1. The GUM (Guide to the Expression Uncertainty in Measurement) uncertainty framework and the adaptive Monte Carlos Method (MCM) were used to obtain the associated standard uncertainty with an estimate of the output quantities. (author)

  11. Moving to world's best uranium address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most exploration dollars spent in South Australia are focused on exploiting uranium. This is for good reason as South Australia is the world's best address for uranium. Pressure to cut CO2 emissions and the ballistic growth of the Chinese and Indian economies has heightened expectations that the worldwide use of uranium for power generation will mushroom beyond its current 17% market share. The recent Australia-China deal only seems to confirm this; hence uranium's growing popularity among miners and explorers. Such is the attractiveness of uranium-related floats, when Toro Energy sought $18m in March it was swamped with more than three times share application volume. In the north west, Southern Gold and Hindmarsh Resources are expectantly drilling for commercial uranium deposits all around the acreage that hosts the Challenger gold mine in the Gawler Craton. The first exploration drilling for uranium in quaternary-age river channels will take place in South Australia's far north in May. Red Metal says while older and deeper tertiary river channels in the area that host the Beverley uranium mine were explored for uranium, the younger near-surface channel has not had a single hole drilled for uranium. This is despite the area being one of the 'hottest radiogenic terrains in South Australia'. The company will target calcrete-style uranium mineralisation similar to the Yerrlirrie deposit in Western Australia (52,000t U308). Tasman Resources will start drilling to test seven uranium targets within 30km of Olympic Dam, the world's largest known uranium deposit, later this year. Tasman also holds tenements adjoining the Warrior uranium deposit near Tarcoola that contains known radiometric anomalies within the 40km-long Wynbring paleochannels. They are the fourth largest uranium explorer in South Australia. Alliance Resources and its JV partner Quasar Resources are exploring the Beverley 4 Mile uranium prospect at Arkaroola. Quasar is an affiliate of Heathgate Resources

  12. Mixing of Al into uranium silicides reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEM observations have shown that irradiation induced interaction of the aluminum cladding with uranium silicide reactor fuels strongly affects both fission gas and fuel swelling behaviors during fuel burn-up. The authors have used ion beam mixing, by 1.5 MeV Kr, to study this phenomena. RBS and the 27Al(p, γ) 28Si resonance nuclear reaction were used to measure radiation induced mixing of Al into U3Si and U3Si2 after irradiation at 300 C. Initially U mixes into the Al layer and Al mixes into the U3Si. At a low dose, the Al layer is converted into UAl4 type compound while near the interface the phase U(Al.93Si.07)3 grows. Under irradiation, Al diffuses out of the UAl4 surface layer, and the lower density ternary, which is stable under irradiation, is the final product. Al mixing into U3Si2 is slower than in U3Si, but after high dose irradiation the Al concentration extends much farther into the bulk. In both systems Al mixing and diffusion is controlled by phase formation and growth. The Al mixing rates into the two alloys are similar to that of Al into pure uranium where similar aluminide phases are formed

  13. Depleted uranium: Metabolic disruptor?; Uranium appauvri: perturbateur metabolique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souidi, Maamar; Dublineau, Isabelle; Lestaevel, Philippe [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN, Direction de la radioprotection de l' homme, Laboratoire de radiotoxicologie experimentale, Service de radiobiologie et d' epidemiologie, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    The presence of uranium in the environment can lead to long-term contamination of the food chain and of water intended for human consumption and thus raises many questions about the scientific and societal consequences of this exposure on population health. Although the biological effects of chronic low-level exposure are poorly understood, results of various recent studies show that contamination by depleted uranium (DU) induces subtle but significant biological effects at the molecular level in organs including the brain, liver, kidneys and testicles. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that DU induces effects on several metabolic pathways, including those metabolizing vitamin D, cholesterol, steroid hormones, acetylcholine and xenobiotics. This evidence strongly suggests that DU might well interfere with many metabolic pathways. It might thus contribute, together with other man-made substances in the environment, to increased health risks in some regions. (authors)

  14. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  15. NUSIMEP-7: Uranium isotope amount ratios in uranium particles

    OpenAIRE

    TRUYENS Jan; STEFANIAK Elzbieta; MIALLE SÉBASTIEN; Aregbe, Yetunde

    2011-01-01

    The Additional Protocol (AP) authorizes safeguards authorities to verify the absence of undeclared nuclear activities in all parts of a state’s nuclear fuel cycle as well as any other location where nuclear material is or may be present. As part of the Additional Protocol, environmental sampling has become an important tool for the detection of non-declared nuclear activities. In environmental sampling micrometer-sized uranium particles with an isotopic composition characteristic for the proc...

  16. Reports on investigations of uranium anomalies. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodknight, C.S.; Burger, J.A. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    During the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program, conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC), radiometric and geochemical surveys and geologic investigations detected anomalies indicative of possible uranium enrichment. Data from the Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey (ARMS) and the Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), both of which were conducted on a national scale, yielded numerous anomalies that may signal areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Results from geologic evaluations of individual 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangles for the NURE program also yielded anomalies, which could not be adequately checked during scheduled field work. Included in this volume are individual reports of field investigations for the following six areas which were shown on the basis of ARMS, HSSR, and (or) geologic data to be anomalous: (1) Hylas zone and northern Richmond basin, Virginia; (2) Sischu Creek area, Alaska; (3) Goodman-Dunbar area, Wisconsin; (4) McCaslin syncline, Wisconsin; (5) Mt. Withington Cauldron, Socorro County, New Mexico; (6) Lake Tecopa, Inyo County, California. Field checks were conducted in each case to verify an indicated anomalous condition and to determine the nature of materials causing the anomaly. The ultimate objective of work is to determine whether favorable conditions exist for the occurrence of uranium deposits in areas that either had not been previously evaluated or were evaluated before data from recent surveys were available. Most field checks were of short duration (2 to 5 days). The work was done by various investigators using different procedures, which accounts for variations in format in their reports. All papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  17. Fabrication of high-uranium-loaded U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-Al developmental fuel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, G.L.; Martin, M.M.

    1980-12-01

    A common plate-type fuel for research and test reactors is U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ dispersed in aluminum and clad with an aluminum alloy. There is an impetus to reduce the /sup 235/U enrichment from above 90% to below 20% for these fuels to lessen the risk of diversion of the uranium for nonpeaceful uses. Thus, the uranium content of the fuel plates has to be increased to maintain the performance of the reactors. This paper describes work at ORNL to determine the maximal uranium loading for these fuels that can be fabricated with commercially proven materials and techniques and that can be expected to perform satisfactorily in service.

  18. Studies on supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium from liquid and solid matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is being widely used in pharmaceutical and food industry. Because of its simplicity, ease of operation and more importantly the reduction in the analytical waste generation, this technique is being viewed as a potential application technique in nuclear industry also. CO2 is employed as supercritical fluid (SCF) as it is easily recyclable, non-toxic, chemically inert, radiochemically stable and inexpensive. Radioanalytical chemistry section (Radiochemistry and Isotope group) has recently procured a supercritical fluid extraction/chromatography system. The present report describes the work carried out on the system. Detailed study on uranium and thorium extraction from highly acidic medium and tissue paper matrix has been carried out. Direct dissolution and extraction of uranium compounds employing SCF has been carried out. CO2 was employed as supercritical fluid along with very small amount of Tri n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and Tri n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) as co-solvents. The effect of various operating parameters like CO2 flow rate, co-solvent percentage, temperature and pressure on extraction was investigated and parameters for maximum extraction were optimized. For comparison, the modes of extraction viz. static and dynamic and modes of complexation viz. in-situ and online were studied. Uranium extraction of ∼98% has been achieved from nitric acid medium employing TBP as co-solvent in 30 minutes extraction time, whereas with TOPO ∼99% uranium extraction could be achieved. Uranium from tissue paper matrix could be extracted upto the extent of 98% with TOPO as co-solvent whereas with TBP extraction of (66.83± 9.80)% was achievable. Direct dissolution of UO2, U3O8, U metal, U-Al alloy solids into SCF CO2 was carried out employing TBP-HNO3 complex and SFE of uranium was performed using TBP as co-solvent. UO2 and U3O8 solids could be dissolved within 20 minutes and extraction of ∼98% was achieved. For U metal and U

  19. Phase transformation studies in U–Nb–Zr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Denise Adorno [Laboratório de Materiais Nucleares, Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo, 18560-000 Iperó, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Escola Politécnica – USP, 05508-030 São Paulo (Brazil); Restivo, Thomaz Augusto Guisard, E-mail: guisard@dglnet.com.br [Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Escola Politécnica – USP, 05508-030 São Paulo (Brazil); Universidade de Sorocaba UNISO, Rod. Raposo Tavares km 92.5, 18023-000 Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Padilha, Angelo Fernando [Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Escola Politécnica – USP, 05508-030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We employ drop calorimetry under up-quenching mode to detect alloy transformation kinetics for the first time. • Two processing windows for rolling U–Zr–Nb alloy into γ-phase are found at 200 and 400 °C. • Volume changes are measured for the main transformations. • We infer fast transformations from the alloy heating enthalpy curve. - Abstract: Phase transformation diagrams provide fundamental informations for designing thermomechanical processes being a must regarding uranium alloys nuclear fuels. The work shows the evaluation of a kinetic transformation diagram for U–7.5Nb–2.5Zr (wt.%) based on both calorimetry experiments and dilatometry allied to X-ray diffraction analysis. Calorimetry measurements in scanning and drop modes can detect enthalpies of heating and transformation onset points from ambient up to select isotherms while the dilatometer is used to scan for sample volume changes related to phase transformations. The resulted kinetic diagram shows the gamma phase is stable for this alloy, guiding the rolling deformation process to temperature ranges where this phase remains for longer periods. Comparing to the literature results, the low temperature transformation (300–400 °C) is shifted to longer times accordingly to the disclosed TTT kinetic diagram. Therefore, two forming process windows can be proposed at 200 °C and 400 °C neighborhood where gamma-phase remains for enough time to accomplish total reduction.

  20. Phase transformation studies in U–Nb–Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We employ drop calorimetry under up-quenching mode to detect alloy transformation kinetics for the first time. • Two processing windows for rolling U–Zr–Nb alloy into γ-phase are found at 200 and 400 °C. • Volume changes are measured for the main transformations. • We infer fast transformations from the alloy heating enthalpy curve. - Abstract: Phase transformation diagrams provide fundamental informations for designing thermomechanical processes being a must regarding uranium alloys nuclear fuels. The work shows the evaluation of a kinetic transformation diagram for U–7.5Nb–2.5Zr (wt.%) based on both calorimetry experiments and dilatometry allied to X-ray diffraction analysis. Calorimetry measurements in scanning and drop modes can detect enthalpies of heating and transformation onset points from ambient up to select isotherms while the dilatometer is used to scan for sample volume changes related to phase transformations. The resulted kinetic diagram shows the gamma phase is stable for this alloy, guiding the rolling deformation process to temperature ranges where this phase remains for longer periods. Comparing to the literature results, the low temperature transformation (300–400 °C) is shifted to longer times accordingly to the disclosed TTT kinetic diagram. Therefore, two forming process windows can be proposed at 200 °C and 400 °C neighborhood where gamma-phase remains for enough time to accomplish total reduction

  1. Thorium and uranium carbide cluster cations in the gas phase: similarities and differences between thorium and uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cláudia C L; Maurice, Rémi; Lucena, Ana F; Hu, Shuxian; Gonçalves, António P; Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K; Andrews, Lester; Gagliardi, Laura

    2013-10-01

    Laser ionization of AnC4 alloys (An = Th, U) yielded gas-phase molecular thorium and uranium carbide cluster cations of composition An(m)C(n)(+), with m = 1, n = 2-14, and m = 2, n = 3-18, as detected by Fourier transform ion-cyclotron-resonance mass spectrometry. In the case of thorium, Th(m)C(n)(+) cluster ions with m = 3-13 and n = 5-30 were also produced, with an intriguing high intensity of Th13C(n)(+) cations. The AnC13(+) ions also exhibited an unexpectedly high abundance, in contrast to the gradual decrease in the intensity of other AnC(n)(+) ions with increasing values of n. High abundances of AnC2(+) and AnC4(+) ions are consistent with enhanced stability due to strong metal-C2 bonds. Among the most abundant bimetallic ions was Th2C3(+) for thorium; in contrast, U2C4(+) was the most intense bimetallic for uranium, with essentially no U2C3(+) appearing. Density functional theory computations were performed to illuminate this distinction between thorium and uranium. The computational results revealed structural and energetic disparities for the An2C3(+) and An2C4(+) cluster ions, which elucidate the observed differing abundances of the bimetallic carbide ions. Particularly noteworthy is that the Th atoms are essentially equivalent in Th2C3(+), whereas there is a large asymmetry between the U atoms in U2C3(+).

  2. Relationship between reducing medium in Zaohouhao uranium deposits and uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, sandstone-type uranium deposits Rich by in the U6+ groundwater in sandstone migration to the edge of the interlayer oxidation zone in reductive effect or adsorption, the modes of action and become, to precipitate enrichment of uranium content and adsorption uranium form existence, the uranium mineralization of Zaohuohao uranium deposits and the reducing medium of lower member of Zhiluo Formation in Saul closely. Its uranium ore-forming process can be divided into basically ore-hosted strata, the ancient sedimentary pre enrichment stage of the interlayer oxidation effect metallogenic phase, the mineral phases later reductive effect, reducing medium in uranium mineralization in the three stages plays an important role in the deposit features, rock geochemistry environment and ore-controlling factors have strong particularity, fellow by the formation of the reductive effect as uranium deposits celadon sandstone rock geochemistry exploration marks. (author)

  3. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ''waste,'' but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity

  4. World uranium markets: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current state of the world's uranium market and its effect on US nuclear-fueled utilities is discussed. Major uranium-related issues that will confront US utility nuclear fuel managers in the coming years are presented, emphasizing the perspectives of supply, demand, world market adjustment, and US market restrictions on imports. It is stated that the US market is essential by non-US producers to help equilibrate an otherwise excessive supply which would cause chaos in the market. To avoid another ten-year boom/bust cycle, the US is urged to reexamine its position on long-term contracts - which permit greater price stability in contrast to the spot market and its price fluctuations. 13 figures, 6 tables

  5. The uranium market and its characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled as shown. Numerical data are indicated in parenthesis. General characteristics of the uranium market, (enrichment plant variables, fuel requirements of a 1000 MWe power plant); demand pattern (enrichment cost relationships), supply pattern; uranium price analysis, production cost (relationship between future uranium requirements and discovery rates necessary), market break-even cost (break-even uranium cost as a function of fossil fuel prices), market value (theoretical and actual supply - demand balance in uranium market, relationship between U3O8 price and world production); geographic and economic distribution of producers and consumers (world resources of uranium, relationship between U308 world production capacity and annual requirements in 1990). (U.K.)

  6. Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2010-01-01

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

  7. Status and development of uranium prospection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiometric prospection, gamma measuring equipment is widely used. Simple instruments, so-called scintillometers, can only measure total radiation while spectrometers permit separate measurements of uranium, thorium, or calcium via daughter products of their decay chains. Depending on the target investigated, airborne, carborne, or footborne methods are employed. In radon prospection the gaseous decay product radon is measured as a sign of hidden uranium enrichment in ground air or water from springs. Due to its high solubility, uranium is well suited for geochemical prospection where uranium concentrations in bodies of water, river sediments, soil and rock types are determined. There is a trend in uranium prospection towards the discovery of hidden orifications. Novel techniques, e.g. airborne geochemistry, isotope chemistry, tracer element measurement, etc. are being tested with a view to their suitability for uranium prospection. (orig./HP) 891 HP/orig.- 892 MKO

  8. Uranium and radioactivity in Swedish peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Less than 10% of the peatlands in Sweden siutable for peat production have a increased content of uranium (more than 200 ppm) ash. The highest uranium content is normally found on the edges and at the bottom of the bogs, i.e. parts which normally are laft out during peat cutting. In some isolated cases high radioactivity can be found in the upper decimeters of the bogs. Thorium content in peat ashes is always low (less than 150 ppm ashsubstance). Increased contents occurs only when the peat is in contact with ground water. Simple and approved methods for the determination of thorium and uranium levels in fuel peat land exists already. There is no equilibrium on decay between radium 226 and uranium 238 in peatlands and accordingly no simple relationship exists between uranium and radiation on peatlands. Analysis at the prospecting stage ought not only be made on uranium and thorium, but also on other radionuclides. (BoK)

  9. High dose uranium ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implantation of uranium ions into silicon to a maximum dose of 6 x 1016 atoms/cm2, with a maximum concentration of 6 x 1021 atoms/cm3, has been carried out. This concentration corresponds to 12 at. % of uranium in the silicon host material. The implanted uranium content was measured by Rutherford backscattering and confirmed by a measurement of the alpha-particle activity of the buried uranium layer. The range and straggling of the uranium, and sputtering of the silicon target by uranium, were measured and are compared with theoretical estimates. The implantation was performed at an ion mean energy of 157 keV using a new kind of high current metal ion source

  10. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanism is a major contributor to the formation of important uranium deposits both close to centers of eruption and more distal as a result of deposition of ash with leachable uranium. Hydrothermal fluids that are driven by magmatic heat proximal to some volcanic centers directly form some deposits. These fluids leach uranium from U-bearing silicic volcanic rocks and concentrate it at sites of deposition within veins, stockworks, breccias, volcaniclastic rocks, and lacustrine caldera sediments. The volcanogenic uranium deposit model presented here summarizes attributes of those deposits and follows the focus of the International Atomic Energy Agency caldera-hosted uranium deposit model. Although inferred by some to have a volcanic component to their origin, iron oxide-copper-gold deposits with economically recoverable uranium contents are not considered in this model.

  11. Uranium 1995 resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents results of the 1995 review of uranium supply and demand in the world. The report provide a statistical profile of the world uranium industry as of 1 January 1995. It contains data on uranium exploration activities, resources and production for 54 countries, updating the 1993 edition of the Red Book. Significant new information is provided for a number of countries including: Bulgaria, Canada, Cuba, Gabon, Hungary, India, Kazakhstan, Namibia, South Africa and Ukraine. This edition contains reports for 23 of the 25 uranium producing countries, which account for about 92 per cent of world uranium production in 1994. Pakistan and the Russian Federation did not respond to the Red Book Questionnaire. This report also provides projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor related uranium requirements through 2010. (author). 10 refs., 55 figs., 223 tabs., 8 appends

  12. Maximum permissible concentrations of uranium in air

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    The retention of uranium by bone and kidney has been re-evaluated taking account of recently published data for a man who had been occupationally exposed to natural uranium aerosols and for adults who had ingested uranium at the normal dietary levels. For life-time occupational exposure to uranium aerosols the new retention functions yield a greater retention in bone and a smaller retention in kidney than the earlier ones, which were based on acute intakes of uranium by terminal patients. Hence bone replaces kidney as the critical organ. The (MPC) sub a for uranium 238 on radiological considerations using the current (1959) ICRP lung model for the new retention functions is slightly smaller than for earlier functions but the (MPC) sub a determined by chemical toxicity remains the most restrictive.

  13. Uranium Metal Analysis via Selective Dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2008-09-10

    Uranium metal, which is present in sludge held in the Hanford Site K West Basin, can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during sludge handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage operations by its oxidation/corrosion in water. A thorough knowledge of the uranium metal concentration in sludge therefore is essential to successful sludge management and waste process design. The goal of this work was to establish a rapid routine analytical method to determine uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of up to 1000-fold higher total uranium concentrations (i.e., up to 30 wt% and more uranium) for samples to be taken during the upcoming sludge characterization campaign and in future analyses for sludge handling and processing. This report describes the experiments and results obtained in developing the selective dissolution technique to determine uranium metal concentration in K Basin sludge.

  14. Superplasticity in titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    J. Sieniawski; Motyka, M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper reports characteristic of superplasticity phenomenon in titanium alloys and possibility of its applications.Design/methodology/approach: The main objective of the paper is to show features of superplastic forming of titanium alloys and current research trends aiming at widespread application of this technology.Findings: In the paper characteristic of selected superplastic titanium alloys was presented. The effect of microstructural parameters on superplasticity was consider...

  15. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  16. Economics of Australian uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper argues that the uranium industry in Australia is inefficient in economic terms. The author also states that it is inefficient in that various social resources are tied up in producing a material which has an intrinsically negative value, in being the raw material for nuclear weapons, and having unacceptable social costs in safety, environmental and cultural problems throughout the process of production and usage

  17. Manufacture of uranium dioxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium dioxide powder is prepared by the AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) method. Supplementing the known process steps, the AUC, after separation from the mother liquor, is washed with an ammonium hydrogen carbonate or an NH4OH solution and is subsequently post-treated with a liquid which reduces the surface tension of the residual water in an AUC. Such a liquid is, for instance, alcohol

  18. Advances in uranium enrichment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in gas centrifuges and development of the atomic vapour laser isotope separation process promise substantial reductions in the cost of enriched uranium. The resulting reduction in LWR fuel costs could seriously erode the economic advantage of CANDU, and in combination with LWR design improvements, shortened construction times and increased operational reliability could allow the LWR to overtake CANDU. CANDU's traditional advantages of neutron economy and high reliability may no longer be sufficient - this is the challenge. The responses include: combining neutron economy and dollar economy by optimizing CANDU for slightly enriched uranium fuel; developing cost-reducing improvements in design, manufacture and construction; and reducing the cost of heavy water. Technology is a renewable resource which must be continually applied to a product for it to remain competitive in the decades to come. Such innovation is a prerequisite to Canada increasing her share of the international market for nuclear power stations. The higher burn-up achievable with enriched fuel in CANDU can reduce the fuel cycle costs by 20 to 40 percent for a likely range of costs for yellowcake and separative work. Alternatively, some of the benefits of a higher fissile content can take the form of a cheaper reactor core containing fewer fuel channels and less heavy water, and needing only a single fuelling machine. An opportunity that is linked to this need to introduce an enriched uranium fuel cycle into CANDU is to build an enrichment business in Canada. This could offer greater value added to our uranium exports, security of supply for enriched CANDUs, technological growth in Canada and new employment opportunities. AECL has a study in progress to define this opportunity

  19. Uranium deposits in volcanic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-eight papers were presented at the meeting and two additional papers were provided. Three panels were organized to consider the specific aspects of the genesis of uranium deposits in volcanic rocks, recognition criteria for the characterization of such deposits, and approaches to exploration. The papers presented and the findings of the panels are included in the Proceedings. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these papers

  20. Multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (TOFMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) studies of UF6 are reported using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental (λ=1064 nm) and its harmonics (λ=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF+x fragment ions, even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. In general, the doubly charged uranium ion (U2+) intensity is much greater than that of the singly charged uranium ion (U+). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the Un+ (n=1--4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The MPI-PES studies reveal only very slow electrons (≤0.5 eV) for all wavelengths investigated. The dominance of the U2+ ion, the absence or very small intensities of UF+x (x=1--3) fragments, the unstructured wavelength dependence, and the preponderance of slow electrons all indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms following the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule. The data also argue against stepwise photodissociation of UF+x (x=5,6) ions. Neither of the traditional MPI mechanisms (''neutral ladder'' or the ''ionic ladder'') are believed to adequately describe the ionization phenomena observed. We propose that the multiphoton excitation of UF6 under these experimental conditions results in a highly excited molecule, superexcited UF6**

  1. Luminescence of powdered uranium glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks, A. G.; Mcgarrity, J. M.; Silverman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement of cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence efficiencies in powdered borosilicate glasses having different particle size and different uranium content. Excitation with 100 to 350 keV electrons and with 253.7 nm light was found to produce identical absolute radiant exitance spectra in powdered samples. The most efficient glass was one containing 29.4 wt% B2O3, 58.8 wt% SiO2, 9.8 wt% Na2O and 2.0 wt% UO2.

  2. Cellular localization of uranium in the renal proximal tubules during acute renal uranium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma-Takeda, Shino; Kitahara, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kyoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Suya, Noriyoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Terada, Yasuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2015-12-01

    Renal toxicity is a hallmark of uranium exposure, with uranium accumulating specifically in the S3 segment of the proximal tubules causing tubular damage. As the distribution, concentration and dynamics of accumulated uranium at the cellular level is not well understood, here, we report on high-resolution quantitative in situ measurements by high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis in renal sections from a rat model of uranium-induced acute renal toxicity. One day after subcutaneous administration of uranium acetate to male Wistar rats at a dose of 0.5 mg uranium kg(-1) body weight, uranium concentration in the S3 segment of the proximal tubules was 64.9 ± 18.2 µg g(-1) , sevenfold higher than the mean renal uranium concentration (9.7 ± 2.4 µg g(-1) ). Uranium distributed into the epithelium of the S3 segment of the proximal tubules and highly concentrated uranium (50-fold above mean renal concentration) in micro-regions was found near the nuclei. These uranium levels were maintained up to 8 days post-administration, despite more rapid reductions in mean renal concentration. Two weeks after uranium administration, damaged areas were filled with regenerating tubules and morphological signs of tissue recovery, but areas of high uranium concentration (100-fold above mean renal concentration) were still found in the epithelium of regenerating tubules. These data indicate that site-specific accumulation of uranium in micro-regions of the S3 segment of the proximal tubules and retention of uranium in concentrated areas during recovery are characteristics of uranium behavior in the kidney.

  3. Thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Uranium Dioxide and Related Phases. Alloying additions, including plutonium, were not considered. For the work of the panel it was recommended that stoichiometric uranium dioxide be defined as including the range from UO2.000 to UO2.010. This range of stoichiometry was chosen because: (a) it is within these O/U values that most UO2 fuels are being fabricated; (b) the determination of O/U values may vary from one site to another and may not always be accurate to the third decimal place; (c) it can be questioned if any thermal conductivity data have been obtained for exactly stoichiometric uranium dioxide; and (d) values of thermal conductivity above room temperature do not vary significantly in this O/U range. No attempt was made to produce a complete, balanced review of all available data. In those areas where the data were found to be in good agreement and had already been reviewed fully in the published literature, the essential facts are given, together with recommended best values. Where the data are controversial, or new data are available, a more comprehensive review is given. Where appropriate, recommendations have been made for future areas of study

  4. Review of uranium bioassay techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, α-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: α-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided

  5. Technology and the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuing economic and regulatory pressures on the uranium industry can be countered only through advances in technology. Low prices, the 'ALARA' principle, and concerns about 'sustainability' require the industry to continually improve upon its already impressive record of performance. Technological improvement in the uranium industry is necessary in order to: 1) Maintain our resource base through the discovery of ever deeper deposits; 2) Improve the efficiency with which we may exploit - a) very high-grade deposits by remote underground mining methods - b) very low-grade deposits with environmentally-benign, in situ, leaching methods - and c) moderate-grade, near-surface deposits by open-pit mining methods; 3) Meet increasingly stringent and, in many cases, arbitrary and unrealistic environmental and safety requirements; and 4) Cope with increasing competition from an expanding number of sources of secondary supply. Manifestations of the uranium industry's ability to improve its performance through technology can be seen in many ways including: a continuing reduction in production costs; large gains in productivity; and a truly superior record of employee safety. Maintenance of these trends requires both innovation and the open sharing of information. (author)

  6. Technology and the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuing economic and regulatory pressures on the uranium industry can be countered only through advances in technology. Low prices, the 'ALARA' principle, and concerns about 'sustainability' require the industry to continually improve upon its already impressive record of performance. Technological improvement in the uranium industry is necessary in order to: (a) Maintain our resource base through the discovery of ever deeper deposits; (b) Improve the efficiency with which we may exploit (i) very high-grade deposits by remote underground mining methods (ii) very low-grade deposits with environmentally-benign, in situ leaching methods - and (iii) moderate-grade, near-surface deposits by open-pit mining methods (c) Meet increasingly stringent and, in many cases, arbitrary and unrealistic environmental and safety requirements; and (d) Cope with increasing competition from an expanding number of sources of secondary supply. Manifestations of the uranium industry's ability to improve its performance through technology can be seen in many ways including: a continuing reduction in production costs; large gains in productivity; and a truly superior record of employee safety. Maintenance of these trends requires both innovation and the open sharing of information. (author)

  7. Uranium production economics in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review of the economics of production of uranium in Australia provides a detailed description of eleven important uranium deposits including capital and production costs estimates and supply curves. For each mine a detailed assessment has been made of its potential production capacity to the year 2000. Socio-economic factors that play an all-too-important role in the Australian uranium industry are extensively reviewed to provide an insight into the factors affecting Australia's ability to supply. The study is based on a detailed computer-based economic engineering model where all major costs such as labor, consumables and capital recovery charges are analyzed for each mine, and levellised break-even prices determined. It is argued that at the present low market prices, the three on-going operations are profitable, and at least three other deposits could be brought to viable production, given the necessary Government approval. Several other deposits appear to be marginal at the set Australian export floor price of US$26 per pound. Annual production could be raised from about 6,000 tonnes of U3O8 to 16,000 tonnes by the turn of century, with the development of three additional deposits. It is concluded that, if Australian producers were allowed to compete freely on the international market, annual production would pass the 10,000 tonne/annum mark between 1995 and 2000. 35 figs., 38 tabs., 81 refs

  8. Uranium-mill appraisal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of special team appraisals at NRC-licensed uranium mills in the period May to November 1981 are reported. Since the Three Mile Island accident, NRC management has instituted a program of special team appraisals of radiation protection programs at certain NRC-licensed facilities. These appraisals were designed to identify weaknesses and strengths in NRC-licensed programs, including those areas not covered by explicit regulatory requirements. The regulatory requirements related to occupational radiation protection and environmental monitoring at uranium mills have been extensively upgraded in the past few years. In addition, there was some NRC staff concern with respect to the effectiveness of NRC licensing and inspection programs. In response to this concern and to changes in mill requirements, the NRC staff recommended that team appraisals be conducted at mills to determine the adequacy of mill programs, the effectiveness of the new requirements, and mill management implementation of programs and requirements. This report describes the appraisal scope and methodology as well as summary findings and conclusions. Significant weaknesses identified during the mill appraisals are discussed as well as recommendations for improvements in uranium mill programs and mill licensing and inspection

  9. Uranium enrichment: technology, economics, capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale enrichment of uranium has now been carried out for 40 years. While the gaseous diffusion process was the original choice of several countries and continues today to provide the major component of the world production of separative work, the last two decades have witnessed the development of a number of alternative processes for enrichment. These processes, which are being studied and deployed around the world, offer a wide range of technical and economic characteristics which will be useful in assuring adequate capacity to meet projected reactor fuel market needs through the rest of this century at competitive prices. With present uncertainties in future enriched uranium needs, it is apparent that flexibility in the deployment and operation of any enrichment process will be one of the prime considerations for the future. More economical production of separative work not only can have a beneficial impact on reactor fuel costs, but also tends to conserve natural uranium resources. This paper reviews the world scene in the enrichment component of the fuel cycle, including existing or planned commercial-scale facilities and announced R and D efforts on various processes

  10. World uranium supply and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nuclear energy is under increasing scrutiny and uncertainty. None the less, there will be an increasing need for expansion of uranium supply to fuel committed reactors. Longer-term demand projections are very uncertain. Improved knowledge of the extent of world resources and their availability and economics is needed to support planning for reactor development, especially for breeder reactors, and for fuel-cycle development, especially enrichment, and reprocessing and recycle of uranium and plutonium. Efforts to date to estimate world uranium resources have been very useful but have largely reflected the state of available knowledge for the lower cost resources in regions that have received considerable exploration efforts. The IUREP evaluation of world resources provides an initial speculative estimate of world resources, including areas not previously appraised. Projections of long-range supply from the estimated resources suggest that the high-growth nuclear cases using once-through cycle may not be supportable for very long. However, additional effort is needed to appraise and report more completely and consistently on world resources, the production levels attainable from these resources, and the economic and price characteristics of such production. (author)

  11. Studies on uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the exploitation of domestic uranium ore deposit, comprehensive studies on uranium ore processing of the Geum-San pit ore are carried out. Physical and chemical characteristics of the Geum-San ore are similar to those of Goe-San ore and the physical beneficiation could not be applicable. Optimum operating conditions such as uranium leaching, solid-liquid separation, solvent extraction and precipitation of yellow cake are found out and the results are confirmed by the continous operation of the micro-plant with the capacity of 50Kg, ore/day. In order to improve the process of ore milling pilot plant installed recently, the feasibility of raffinate-recycle and the precipitation methods of yellow cake are intensively examined. It was suggested that the raffinate-recycle in the leaching of filtering stage could be reduced the environmental contamination and the peroxide precipitation technique was applicable to improve the purity of yellow cake. The mechanism and conditions the third phase formation are thoroughly studied and confirmed by chemical analysis of the third phase actually formed during the operation of pilot plant. The major constituents of the third phase are polyanions such as PMosub(12)Osub(40)sup(3-) or SiMosub(12)Osub(40)sup(4-). And the formation of these polyanions could be reduced by the control of redox potential and the addition of modifier. (Author)

  12. Internal friction in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium dioxide inelastic properties were studied measuring internal friction at low frequencies (of the order of 1 Hz). The work was developed in the 160 to 400 deg C temperature range. The effect of stoichiometry variation was studied oxidizing the sample with consequent change of the defect structure originally present in the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The presence of a wide and irregular peak due to oxidation was observed at low temperatures. Activation energy calculations indicated the occurrence of various relaxation processes and assuming the existence of a peak between - 80 and - 70 deg C , the absolute value obtained for the activation energy (0,54 eV) is consistent with the observed values determined at medium and high frequencies for the stress induced reorientation of defects. The microstructure effect on the inelastic properties was studied for stoichiometric uranium dioxide, by varying grain size and porosity. These parameters have influence on the high temperature measurements of internal friction. The internal friction variation for temperatures higher than 340 deg C is thought to be due to grain boundary relaxation phenomena. (author)

  13. Corrosion resistant amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publication data on corrosion resistance of amorphous alloys and the methods of amorphization of surface layers of massive materials (laser treatment, iron implantation, detonation-gas spraying, cathode and ion sputtering, electrodeposition) was made. A study was made on corrosion properties of Fe66Cr11B10Si4 alloy in cast state and after laser irradiation, rendering the surface amorphous as well as the samples of Arenco iron and steel 20 with ion-plasma coatings of Fe-Cr-Ni-Ti alloy. It was established that amorphous coatings posses much higher corrosion resistance as compared to crystalline alloys on the same base

  14. Progress in molecular uranium-nitride chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    King, David M.; Liddle, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    The coordination, organometallic, and materials chemistry of uranium nitride has long been an important facet of actinide chemistry. Following matrix isolation experiments and computational characterisation, molecular, solution-based uranium chemistry has developed significantly in the last decade or so culminating most recently in the isolation of the first examples of long-sought terminal uranium nitride linkages. Herein, the field is reviewed with an emphasis on well-defined molecular spec...

  15. Innovations and trends in uranium ore treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last uranium boom in the nineteen seventies and eighties, some key innovations were introduced into the operations established during that period. Some of these were subsequently carried over into hydrometallurgical copper, gold and nickel-cobalt projects, and others have been added. Many of these are likely to be reflected in the new uranium projects sporned by the current era of increasing uranium demand and high prices

  16. Design of Uranium Solution Critical Experimental Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI; Da-yong; GUO; Zhi-jia; YAO; Cheng-zhi; SHI; Chen-lei

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2012, Department of reactor engineering design completes the design and mechanical analysis of Uranium solution critical experimental device. According to user’s requirements and nuclear safety regulations, design and analysis mainly involves two sets of core structure, uranium solution loop, water loop and experimental bench, etc. The core which includes a core vessel, reactor core support, safety rods, control rods, and so on, is used for containing uranium solution and fuel element and fulfilling the

  17. Rate phenomena in uranium extraction by amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C. F.; McDowell, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetics studies and other rate measurements are reviewed in the amine extraction of uranium and of some other related and associated metal ions. Equilibration is relatively fast in the uranium sulfate systems most important to uranium hydrometallurgy. Significantly slow equilibration has been encountered in some other systems. Most of the recorded rate information, both qualitative and quantitative, has come from exploratory and process-development work, while some kinetics studies have been directed specifically toward elucidation of extraction mechanisms. 71 references.

  18. Radiative characteristics of depleted uranium bomb and it is protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the developing process of depleted uranium bombs described in the first part, the radiative characteristics and mechanism of depleted uranium bombs are analyzed emphatically. The deeper discussion on protection of depleted uranium bombs is proceeded

  19. Powder fabrication of U-Mo alloys for nuclear dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last 30 years high uranium density dispersion fuels have been developed in order to accomplish the low enrichment goals of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Gamma U-Mo alloys, particularly with 7 to 10 wt% Mo, as a fuel phase dispersed in aluminum matrix, have shown good results concerning its performance under irradiation tests. That's why this fissile phase is considered to be used in the nuclear fuel of the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), currently being designed. Powder production from these ductile alloys has been attained by atomization, mechanical (machining, grinding, cryogenic milling) and chemical (hydriding-de hydriding) methods. This work is a part of the efforts presently under way at IPEN to investigate the feasibility of these methods. Results on alloy fabrication by induction melting and gamma-stabilization of U-10Mo alloys are presented. Some results on powder production and characterization are also discussed. (author)

  20. Statistical data of the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry is a compendium of information relating to US uranium reserves and potential resources and to exploration, mining, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1981. The statistics are based primarily on data provided voluntarily by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. The compendium has been published annually since 1968 and reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Area Office (GJAO) of the US Department of Energy. The production, reserves, and drilling information is reported in a manner which avoids disclosure of proprietary information

  1. Ailing uranium millworkers seek recognition, aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium millworkers who helped produce uranium for the U.S. nuclear defense program in the 1950's and 1960's are suing the federal government and uranium companies for compensation for illnesses that they believe are job-related. Symptoms of these illnesses include frequent blackouts, chronic bronchitis, asthma, constant fatigue, and susceptibility to colds. Research is being conducted to determine whether the millworkers' symptoms are due to excessive radiation exposure. Studies to date indicated that during the 1950's and early 1960's, radiation protection procedures at uranium milling facilities were extremely deficient

  2. Uranium - the element: its occurrence and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium metal and its compounds have been of great interest to physicists and chemists due to its use for both civil and military applications, e.g. production of electricity, use in the medical field and for making nuclear weapons. This review paper describes the occurrence, chemistry and metallurgy of the element 'uranium', its conversion to stable compounds such as yellow cake, uranium tetrafluoride and uranium hexafluoride and the enrichment technologies and uses for both civil and military purposes. The paper is meant for ready reference for students and teachers in connection with the recent spate of interest shown in nuclear power generation in Pakistan and abroad. (author)

  3. Uranium and drinking water; Uran und Trinkwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konietzka, Rainer [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet II 3.6 - Toxikologie des Trink- und Badebeckenwassers; Dieter, Hermann H.

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is provoking public anxiety based on the radioactivity of several isotopes and the connection to nuclear technology. Drinking water contains at the most geogenic uranium in low concentrations that might be interesting in the frame of chemical of toxicology, but not due to radiological impact. The contribution gives an overview on the uranium content in drinking water and health effects for the human population based on animal tests. These experiments indicate a daily tolerable intake of 0.2 microgram per kg body mass. The actual limiting value for uranium in drinking water is 0.3 microgram per kg body mass water (drinking water regulation from 2001).

  4. Toxicological issues after depleted uranium weapons attacked

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the uranium enrichment for producing nuclear reactor or nuclear weapon. DU is used in the military as an armor-piercing projectile due to its hardness, strength, and density. A lot of DU weapons were fired in the Gulf War, and bring about critical environmental and internal contamination. Therefore, DU becomes suddenly a hot issue. Some toxicological problems after DU weapons attacked have been reviewed, which include features of internal DU contamination. Hazard of wound contamination and inhalation with insoluble uranium, and other urgent toxicological issues. The healthy effects of implanted with depleted uranium pellets were illustrated in particular

  5. Uranium industry annual 1990, September 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and uranium marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry including utilities with nuclear-powered electric generating plants. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1990), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis within the US Department of Energy. 19 figs., 47 tabs

  6. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Booth, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shuh, D. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van der Laan, G. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sokaras, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Weng, T. -C. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Yu, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bagus, P. S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nordlund, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  7. In Vivo Nanodetoxication for Acute Uranium Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guzmán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accidental exposure to uranium is a matter of concern, as U(VI is nephrotoxic in both human and animal models, and its toxicity is associated to chemical toxicity instead of radioactivity. We synthesized different PAMAM G4 and G5 derivatives in order to prove their interaction with uranium and their effect on the viability of red blood cells in vitro. Furthermore, we prove the effectiveness of the selected dendrimers in an animal model of acute uranium intoxication. The dendrimer PAMAM G4-Lys-Fmoc-Cbz demonstrated the ability to chelate the uranyl ion in vivo, improving the biochemical and histopathologic features caused by acute intoxication with uranium.

  8. Influence of acidified acidity to uranium bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the acidified acidity and the acid consumption and uranium leaching rate in the process of uranium bioleaching is investigated. Results indicate that higher uranium leaching rate is obtained when the relatively high acidity was applied at beginning. For different minerals, although the original acidity should be different, lower original acidity was not better for shortening leaching period and improving uranium leaching rate. It confirms 30-40 g/L sulfuric acid as the original acidity was more suitable and more than 30 g/ L should be applied if the mineral particle sizes were larger. (authors)

  9. Canada's uranium industry - the next decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is a unique commodity. It is both a metal and a fuel. It has both commercial and military uses. It yields 'clean energy' but presents environmental concerns. All of these factors have an impact on the commerce of uranium. Being a metal, uranium is extracted from ore like many other metallic minerals. As a fuel, it is subject to the vagaries of energy commodity market forces. The history of uranium in the first nuclear weapons has led to national governments carefully controlling production and sale of uranium. The spectre of radioactive contamination of the environment adds further to the public concern over the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes from uranium processing and use. There have been a number of excellent reviews on the commercial aspects of the uranium industry. In this discussion, these aspects will be briefly summarized to provide a general picture of the strengths of the Canadian uranium industry and the pressures to which it is being subjected currently. The principal thrust of this paper will be to outline Canada's resource strength and to identify some factors which will affect Canada's ability to continue holding a sizeable share of the world uranium market

  10. Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

  11. Australian uranium exports: nuclear issues and the policy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed as follows: general introduction; formulation of uranium policy (the public debate; the Ranger Enquiry into all environmental aspects of a proposal by the AAEC and Ranger Uranium Mines to develop certain uranium deposits in the Northern Territory of Australia; the Government's decision); issues (non-proliferation and uranium safeguards policy; uranium enrichment in Australia; government involvement in uranium development; U development and environmental protection; U development and the Australian aborigines); conclusions. (U.K.)

  12. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, C; Milodowski, A E; Baker, A C

    2014-02-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm(-2) y(-1) and 2.5-48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area.

  13. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, C; Milodowski, A E; Baker, A C

    2014-02-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm(-2) y(-1) and 2.5-48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area. PMID:24315120

  14. The manufacture of U-7Mo-xZr alloys with using smelting technical and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment of U-7Mo-xZr alloys manufacture done in order to develop new materials for research reactor fuel with a high uranium density. The U-7Mo-xZr alloy made by smelting technique in electric arc furnace with a current of 150 A and argon gas as mediated. Melting performed with 5 time repetitions and U-7Mo-xZr alloy produced are testing / analysis include: analysis of uranium content, specific gravity, microstructure, hardness, thermal properties and phase composition. Visual observation of the U-7Mo-xZr alloys remelting produced no visible cracks, pores or oxide layer on the surface and from it's microstructure looks quite homogeneous Increased of Zr content in the U-7Mo -xZr alloy cause hardness increased while the density decreases. Hardness testing data of U-7Mo, U-7Mo-1Zr, U-7Mo-2Zr and U-7Mo-3Zr alloys consecutive 240.4: 294.6: 314.6, and 333.2 VHN, while the density of 17.8628; 17.3517; 17.0335, and 16.8721 g/cm3 . The data result with the DTA showed that the reaction occurs with enthalpy indothermic 3.2461 cal/g starts at a temperature of 1180.76°C and a peak at a temperature of 1205.15°C, whereas the X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the ingot remelting in γ phase. From the test results of U-7Mo-xZr alloy showed that the alloy is suitable to be nominated as a research reactor fuel in future. (author)

  15. Evaluating the effectiveness of dilution of the recovered uranium with depleted uranium and low-enriched uranium to obtain fuel for VVER reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. Yu; Sulaberidze, G. A.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of the recovered uranium enrichment in a cascade of gas centrifuges with three feed flows (depleted uranium, low-enriched uranium, recovered uranium) with simultaneous dilution of U-232,234,236 isotopes was shown. A series of numerical experiments were performed for different content of U-235 in low-enriched uranium. It has been demonstrated that the selected combination of diluents can simultaneously reduce the cost of separative work and the consumption of natural uranium, not only with respect to the previously used multi-flow cascade schemes, but also in comparison to the standard cascade for uranium enrichment.

  16. Training manual for uranium mill workers on health protection from uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides information for uranium mill workers to help them understand the radiation safety aspects of working with uranium as it is processed from ore to yellowcake at the mills. The report is designed to supplement the radiation safety training provided by uranium mills to their workers. It is written in an easily readable style so that new employees with no previous experience working with uranium or radiation can obtain a basic understanding of the nature of radiation and the particular safety requirements of working with uranium. The report should be helpful to mill operators by providing training material to support their radiation safety training programs

  17. Uranium-236 as an indicator of fuel-cycle uranium in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental monitoring on and around the Hanford Site includes regular sampling of onsite monitoring wells and offsite farm wells. Uranium has been identified in the ground water onsite and also in water from farm wells located on the east side of the Columbia River, across from the Hanford Site. Information on the hydrology of the area indicates that the source of the offsite uranium is not the Hanford Site. This study evaluated the isotopic composition of the uranium in water from the various wells to differentiate the onsite uranium contamination from natural uranium offsite. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Department of Energy depleted uranium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With its strategic supply of depleted uranium, the Department of Energy is studying reuse of the material in nuclear radiation shields, military hardware, and commercial applications. the study is expected to warrant a more detailed uranium recycle plan which would include consideration of a demonstration program and a program implementation decision. Such a program, if implemented, would become the largest nuclear material recycle program in the history of the Department of Energy. The bulk of the current inventory of depleted uranium is stored in 14-ton cylinders in the form of solid uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The radioactive 235U content has been reduced to a concentration of 0.2% to 0.4%. Present estimates indicate there are about 55,000 UF6-filled cylinders in inventory and planned operations will provide another 2,500 cylinders of depleted uranium each year. The United States government, under the auspices of the Department of Energy, considers the depleted uranium a highly-refined strategic resource of significant value. A possible utilization of a large portion of the depleted uranium inventory is as radiation shielding for spent reactor fuels and high-level radioactive waste. To this end, the Department of Energy study to-date has included a preliminary technical review to ascertain DOE chemical forms useful for commercial products. The presentation summarized the information including preliminary cost estimates. The status of commercial uranium processing is discussed. With a shrinking market, the number of chemical conversion and fabrication plants is reduced; however, the commercial capability does exist for chemical conversion of the UF6 to the metal form and for the fabrication of uranium radiation shields and other uranium products. Department of Energy facilities no longer possess a capability for depleted uranium chemical conversion

  19. Uranium Resources and Supply - Demand to 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Robert [Le Seine St. Germain, 12, boulevard des Iles, Issy-les-Moulineaux, 92130 (France)

    2009-06-15

    Recent fluctuations in the market price for uranium have resulted in more activity in this sector over the past few years than in the preceding 20 years. Amidst this background, uranium demand is increasing. Construction of nuclear reactors is proceeding in some countries, ambitious expansion plans have been announced in others and the development of nuclear power programs to meet electricity demand and minimize greenhouse emissions in a cost effective manner is under consideration in many others. This paper reviews projections of nuclear growth and uranium demand and assesses the challenges faced by the uranium mining sector in meeting rising demand. Since the mid-1960's, an international expert committee (the 'Uranium Group') formed by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency has published biennially comprehensive updates on global uranium resources, production and demand (the 'Red Book'). The most recent in this series, based on 2007 data and published in June 2008, includes a supply/demand projection to 2030. However, much has changed since the data were collected for this projection and an assessment of these changes and their impact on uranium production is included in this presentation. It is concluded that world identified uranium resources (5.45 million tU recoverable at costs up to US$130/kg U, or US$50/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) are adequate to meet projected future high case nuclear power requirements. However, recent financial market turmoil and lower uranium prices, the opaque nature of the uranium market itself, increased regulatory requirements, a scarcity of the required specialized labour and the fluctuating costs of raw materials makes the process of turning uranium resources in the ground into yellowcake in the can increasingly more challenging, particularly for new entrants. Considerable investment and expertise will be required to bring about the substantial increase in mine production

  20. Copper-tantalum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  1. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  2. Thermofluency in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is presented about the theoretical and experimental results obtained at present in thermofluency under radiation in zirconium alloys. The phenomenon of thermofluency is presented in a general form, underlining the thermofluency at high temperature because this phenomenon is similar to the thermofluency under radiation, which ocurrs in zirconium alloys into the operating reactor. (author)

  3. Plating on some difficult-to-plate metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrodeposition of coatings on metals such as beryllium, beryllium-copper, Kovar, lead, magnesium, thorium, titanium, tungsten, uranium, zirconium, and their alloys can be problematic. This is due in most cases to a natural oxide surface film that readily reforms after being removed. The procedures we recommend for plating on these metals rely on replacing the oxide film with a displacement coating, or etching to allow mechanical keying between the substrate and plated deposit. The effectiveness of the procedures is demonstrated by interface bond strengths found in ring-shear and conical-head tensile tests

  4. Distribution of uranium, thorium, and isotopic composition of uranium in soil samples of south Serbia: Evidence of depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Sarata Kumar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and thermal ionization mass spectrom - etry were used to measure concentration of uranium and thorium as well as isotopic composition of uranium respectively in soil samples collected around south Serbia. An analytical method was established for a routine sample preparation procedure for uranium and thorium. Uranium was chemically separated and purified from soil samples by anion exchange resin and UTEVA extraction chromatography and its isotopic composition was measured using a thermal ionization mass spectrometry. There was a little deviation of U/Th ratio from the average values in some soil samples. Presence of 236U as well as depleted uranium was observed in 235U/238U ratio measurement in the same soil sample.

  5. Distribution of uranium, thorium, and isotopic composition of uranium in soil samples of south Serbia: evidence of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and thermal ionization mass spectrometry were used to measure concentration of uranium and thorium as well as isotopic composition of uranium respectively in soil samples collected around south Serbia. An analytical method was established for a routine sample preparation procedure for uranium and thorium. Uranium was chemically separated and purified from soil samples by an ion exchange resin and UTEVA extraction chromatography and its isotopic composition was measured using a thermal ionization mass spectrometry. There was a little deviation of U/Th ratio from the average values in some soil samples. Presence of 236U as well as depleted uranium was observed in 235U/238U ratio measurement in the same soil sample. (author)

  6. Corrosion of friction rock stabilizers in selected uranium and copper mine waters. Report of Investigations/1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bureau of Mines evaluated corrosion resistance of Split Set friction rock stabilizer mine roof bolts to aid in better prediction of useful service life. Electrochemical corrosion testing was conducted utilizing an automated corrosion measurement system. Natural and/or synthetic mine waters from four uranium and two copper mines were the test media for the two types of high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steels from which Split Set stabilizers are manufactured, and for galvanized steel. Tests were conducted with waters of minimum and maximum dissolved oxygen content at in-mine water temperatures. Retrieved Split Set stabilizers were also evaluated for property changes

  7. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of selected lanthanide and actinide intermetallic Laves-phase alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Brooks, M. S. S.;

    1989-01-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of some yttrium and uranium Laves-phase pseudobinary alloys with 3d elements have been calculated. The calculations were done by simulating the electronic structure of the alloy by that of an ordered compound with the same stoichiometry. In general...... a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical magnetic moment was found, indicating that the spurious long-range order of the calculations is of minor importance. A comparison between the present supercell cluster approach and the virtual-crystal approximation for the electronic structure...

  8. Phase Relations in the Uranium-Uranium Dioxide System at High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from the literature plus extensive new work reported from this laboratory permit the delineation of a substantial portion of the temperature-composition phase diagram for the uranium-uranium dioxide system. Of particular interest to the many current investigations of the thermodynamic and transport properties of urania as a function of its stoichiometry is the compositional existence range of hypostoichiometric uranium dioxide. The essential features of the phase diagram presented are: (1) A wide liquid miscibility gas exists at temperatures above 2470 ± 25°C; which is the monotectic temperature in the system. (2) At the monotectic temperature, the compositions in O/U atom ratio units of the three condensed phases in mutual equilibrium are: liquid uranium, 0.05 ± 0.01; monotectic liquid, 1.30 ± 0.10; and solid hypostoichiometric uranium dioxide solid, 1.60 ± 0.02. (3) The hypostoichiometric phase boundary in the range 1600 to 2470°C can be expressed by the equation: LogXU = 1.404 - 5769/T, in which XU is the mole fraction of uranium dissolved in a stoichiometric uranium dioxide, and T is in degrees Kelvin. From this equation, the heat of solution of uranium in uranium dioxide is 26.5 kcal/mole. (4) No evidence was observed for the existence of stable phases intermediate to the liquid uranium and solid hypostoichiometric uranium compositions. (author)

  9. Technique for recovering uranium from sludge-like uranium-bearing wastes using hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sludge-like uranium-bearing wastes generated from uranium refining and conversion R and D facilities are stored at the Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. So far, approximately 1500 t of uranium wastes with radioactivity levels exceeding 10,000 Bq/g have been generated. We have proposed an environmentally benign aqueous process for recovering uranium from wastes using hydrochloric acid (HCl). This makes it possible to dispose of the wastes easily, and to reclaim uranium as a resource. In this process, first, the uranium content in the calcium fluoride (CaF2) sludge along with the entire sludge is dissolved almost completely in aqueous solutions containing HCl and aluminum chloride. The uranium species are then recovered as peroxide from the CaF2 sludge solution. Their characteristics are similar to those specified for uranium ore concentrate. After recovering the uranium content, the uranium concentration in the solution is reduced to below 0.01 mg/L using an iminodiacetic chelating resin. Also, the uranium concentration of the precipitate generated by the neutralization of the barren solution falls below 1 Bq/g. (author)

  10. Nondestructive analysis of the natural uranium mass through the measurement of delayed neutrons using the technique of pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents results of non destructive mass analysis of natural uranium by the pulsed source technique. Fissioning is produced by irradiating the test sample with pulses of 14 MeV neutrons and the uranium mass is calculated on a relative scale from the measured emission of delayed neutrons. Individual measurements were normalised against the integral counts of a scintillation detector measuring the 14 MeV neutron intensity. Delayed neutrons were measured using a specially constructed slab detector operated in anti synchronism with the fast pulsed source. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced via the T(d,n) 4He reaction using a 400 kV Van de Graaff accelerated operated at 200 kV in the pulsed source mode. Three types of sample were analysed, namely: discs of metallic uranium, pellets of sintered uranium oxide and plates of uranium aluminium alloy sandwiched between aluminium. These plates simulated those of Material Testing Reactor fuel elements. Results of measurements were reproducible to within an overall error in the range 1.6 to 3.9%; the specific error depending on the shape, size and mass of the sample. (author)

  11. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  12. Alloys in energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new and advanced energy systems often requires the tailoring of new alloys or alloy combinations to meet the novel and often stringent requirements of those systems. Longer life at higher temperatures and stresses in aggressive environments is the most common goal. Alloy theory helps in achieving this goal by suggesting uses of multiphase systems and intermediate phases, where solid solutions were traditionally used. However, the use of materials under non-equilibrium conditions is now quite common - as with rapidly solidified metals - and the application of alloy theory must be modified accordingly. Under certain conditions, as in a reactor core, the rate of approach to equilibrium will be modified; sometimes a quasi-equilibrium is established. Thus an alloy may exhibit enhanced general diffusion at the same time as precipitate particles are being dispersed and solute atoms are being carried to vacancy sinks. We are approaching an understanding of these processes and can begin to model these complex systems

  13. Speciation and Precipitation of Uranium Complexes in Hydrothermal Solutions Related to Granite—type Uranium Deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈培荣; 章邦桐; 等

    1992-01-01

    Uranium-bearing hydrothermal solutions during the stage of ore deposition are weakly alkaline and of the Ca2+ -Na+/HCO3- -F- type.UO2(CO3)22- and UO2F4-, are dominant in the hydrothermal solutions with respect to their activity.Wall-rock hydrothermal alterations ,temperature and pressure drop and the reducing capability of rock assemblage (Δeh) led to a decrease in Eh of the hydrothermal solutions and an increase in Eh at which uranium began precipitating.Therefore,the mechanism of uranium precipitation is essentially the reduction of uranium complexes.The granite-type uranium deposits are the most important type of uranium resources in China.Discussions will be made in this paper concerning the hydrothermal speciation and precipitation mech-anisms of uranium complexes in the light of fluid inclusion and geological data from some major de-posits of this type in South China.

  14. The nature of contaminant uranium phases at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald Site in Ohio have been examined using transmission electron microscopy. The uranium-bearing phases were identified as calcium uranyl phosphate (meta-autunite), uranium oxide (uraninite), uranium metaphosphate [U(PO3)4], uranium calcium oxide, uranium silicate (boltwoodite), and uranium silicide. Uranium have been deposited on the soil through chemical spills and from the operation of an incinerator plant at the site. The uranium metaphosphate phase was found predominantly at an incinerator site at Fernald. Carbonate leaching in an oxygen environment has removed some of the U(IV) phases, however [U(PO3)4] has not been removed by any of the chemical remediation technologies. The identified phases have been included in geochemical modeling of the uranium, these studies show that meta-autunite is the solubility controlling phase for uranium in Fernald soils

  15. Uranium 2011: Resources, Production and Demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, questions are being raised about the future of the uranium market, including as regards the number of reactors expected to be built in the coming years, the amount of uranium required to meet forward demand, the adequacy of identified uranium resources to meet that demand and the ability of the sector to meet reactor requirements in a challenging investment climate. This 24. edition of the 'Red Book', a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 42 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It offers a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It also provides substantive new information on established uranium production centres around the world and in countries developing production centres for the first time. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related requirements through 2035, incorporating policy changes following the Fukushima accident, are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues

  16. Study of uranium-electric plating measured

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plate-thickness of transform target (enriched Uranium-electric plating and depleted Uranium-electric plating) have been measured using Back to Back Ionization Chamber, Small solid angle device and Au-si surface barrier Semi-conductor. Also, the uncertainties in the experiment was analysed. (authors)

  17. Making of uranium plating for detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid track spark auto counter was always used to measure fission rate in neutron character experiment, the key part-transform target is plating (depleted Uranium and enriched Uranium). The plating was made with electric plating. The facture technics and methods is introduced, also the experiment result was analysed and discussed. (authors)

  18. Processing of Sierra Albarrana uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium recovery by hydrometallurgy from brannerite, found in Hornachuelos (Cordoba) is described. It has been studied the acid and alkaline leaching and salt roasting, proving as more satisfactory the acid leaching. Besides the uranium solubilization by acid leaching, is described the further process to obtain pure uranyl nitrate. (Author)

  19. The structure of epitaxial layers of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R C C; Cowley, R A; Ling, N; Goetze, W [Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford Physics, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Lander, G H [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Stirling, W G [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043, Grenoble, Cedex 09 (France)], E-mail: r.cowley@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2008-04-02

    Epitaxial layers of uranium have been grown on a variety of buffer/seed layers on sapphire substrates by UHV magnetron sputtering and their structure determined using x-ray diffraction. The buffer layers were epitaxial layers of niobium, tungsten and niobium covered by a seed layer of hcp gadolinium, on which uranium layers were grown to a thickness of 600 A. The x-ray diffraction results establish that the {alpha}-orthorhombic phase of uranium grows epitaxially in the (110) orientation on the niobium (110) buffer, while on the tungsten (110) buffer the growth planes of the {alpha}-uranium were (002) and for the growth on the gadolinium buffer the {alpha}-uranium was predominantly (021) oriented. These results show that epitaxial uranium films in selected orientations can be grown by using an appropriate buffer. To our knowledge this is the first report of epitaxial {alpha}-uranium films, and it is significant because of the difficulty of growing single crystals of {alpha}-uranium due to the occurrence of high temperature structural transformations.

  20. Uptake and clearance of uranium by misgurnus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author studied the bioconcentration and clearance of uranium in misgurnus and determined bioconcentration factors (BCF) as well as uptake and depuration rate constants. The test was performed under semi-static conditions. The depuration of uranium was best described by a two-compartment first order kinetic model

  1. Uranium Management - Preservation of a National Asset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J. D.; Stroud, J. C.

    2002-02-27

    The Uranium Management Group (UMG) was established at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Operations in 1999 as a mechanism to expedite the de-inventory of surplus uranium from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site. This successful initial venture has broadened into providing uranium material de-inventory and consolidation support to the Hanford site as well as retrieving uranium materials that the Department had previously provided to universities under the loan/lease program. As of December 31, 2001, {approx} 4,300 metric tons of uranium (MTU) have been consolidated into a more cost effective interim storage location at the Portsmouth site near Piketon, OH. The UMG continues to uphold its corporate support mission by promoting the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative (NMSI) and the twenty-five (25) action items of the Integrated Nuclear Materials Management Plan (1). Before additional consolidation efforts may commence to remove excess inventory from Environmental Management closure sites and universities, a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) must be completed. Two (2) noteworthy efforts currently being pursued involve the investigation of re-use opportunities for surplus uranium materials and the recovery of usable uranium from the shutdown Portsmouth cascade. In summary, the UMG is available as a DOE complex-wide technical resource to promote the responsible management of surplus uranium.

  2. Perspectives for the uranium enrichment in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through an analysis of the electrical energy future in Brazil, the needs for enriched uranium are discussed, and therefore the importance of developing local capability for self-production. A description of the production processes that are well established is given first, then the analysis itself is performed and finally a visualization of the International Market for enriched uranium is shown. (author)

  3. Geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the headings: hydrogeochemistry (uranium solubility; sampling; uranium analysis); hydrogeochemistry and prospecting; detailed hydrogeochemistry (water and stream sediment sampling); detailed geochemistry in regions of heavily leached soils; use of radium in detailed geochemical exploration. (U.K.)

  4. Microbial uptake of uranium, cesium, and radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of diverse microbial species to concentrate uranium, cesium, and radium was examined. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium to 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight. Only a fraction of the cells in a given population had visible uranium deposits in electron micrographs. While metabolism was not required for uranium uptake, mechanistic differences in the metal uptake process were indicated. Uranium accumulated slowly (hours) on the surface of S. cerevisiae and was subject to environmental factors (i.e., temperature, pH, interfering cations and anions). In contrast, P. aeruginosa and the mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense, apparently random, intracellular deposits. This very rapid accumulation has prevented us from determining whether the uptake rate during the transient between the initial and equilibrium distribution of uranium is affected by environmental conditions. However, the final equilibrium distributions are not affected by those conditions which affect uptake by S. cerevisiae. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several microbial species tested. The potential utility of microorganisms for the removal and concentration of these metals from nuclear processing wastes and several bioreactor designs for contacting microorganisms with contaminated waste streams will be discussed

  5. Documentation of the Uranium Market Model (UMM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Market Model is used to make projections of activity in the US uranium mining and milling industry. The primary data sources were EIA, the Nuclear Assurance Corporation, and, to a lesser extent, Nuexco and Nuclear Resources International. The Uranium Market Model is a microeconomic simulation model in which uranium supplied by the mining and milling industry is provided to meet the demand for uranium by electric utilities with nuclear power plants. Uranium is measured on a U3O8 (uranium oxide) equivalent basis. The model considers every major production center and utility on a worldwide basis (with Centrally Planned Economies considered in a limited way), and makes annual projections for each major uranium production and consumption region in the world. Typically, nine regions are used: the United States, Canada, Australia, South Africa, Other Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Far East, and Other. Production centers and utilities are identified as being in one of these regions. In general, the model can accommodate any user-provided set of regional definitions and data

  6. Yellow cake to ceramic uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This overview article first reviews the processes for converting uranium ore concentrates to ceramic uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Refinery of Eldorado Resources Limited. In addition, some of the problems, solutions, thoughts and research direction with respect to the production and properties of ceramic UO2 are described

  7. Concept Feasibility Report for Electroplating Zirconium onto Uranium Foil - Year 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, Greg W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meinhardt, Kerry D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pederson, Larry R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Fuel Fabrication Capability within the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversion Program is funded through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) NA-26 (Office of Material Management and Minimization). An investigation was commissioned to determine the feasibility of using electroplating techniques to apply a coating of zirconium onto depleted uranium/molybdenum alloy (U-10Mo). Electroplating would provide an alternative method to the existing process of hot roll-bonding zirconium foil onto the U-10Mo fuel foil during the fabrication of fuel elements for high-performance research reactors. The objective of this research was to develop a reproducible and scalable plating process that will produce a uniform, 25 μm thick zirconium metal coating on U-10Mo foil. In previous work, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established a molten salt electroplating apparatus and protocol to plate zirconium metal onto molybdenum foil (Coffey 2015). During this second year of the research, PNNL furthered this work by moving to the U-10Mo alloy system (90 percent uranium:10 percent molybdenum). The original plating apparatus was disassembled and re-assembled in a laboratory capable of handling low-level radioactive materials. Initially, the work followed the previous year’s approach, and the salt bath composition was targeted at the eutectic composition (LiF:NaF:ZrF4 = 26:37:37 mol%). Early results indicated that the formation of uranium fluoride compounds would be problematic. Other salt bath compositions were investigated in order to eliminate the uranium fluoride production (LiF:NaF = 61:39 mol% and LiF:NaF:KF = 46.5:11.5:42 mol% ). Zirconium metal was used as the crucible for the molten salt. Three plating methods were used—isopotential, galvano static, and pulsed plating. The molten salt method for zirconium metal application provided high-quality plating on molybdenum in PNNL’s previous work. A key advantage of this approach is that

  8. Uranium production cycle: Argentine situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In Argentina, nuclear power plants at Atucha and Embalse are in operation with very high plant load factors. Atucha II is under construction with the expected start-up in 2012. The long term nuclear power plan of Argentina envisages additional seven units in the next 25 years. It is estimated that the cumulative uranium requirements for these nuclear power plants will be about 30000 tU. However the estimated uranium reserves of Argentina at present in different categories is only approximately 15000 tU. Sierra Pintada mine, south west of the Mendoza province, was in production from 1975 to 1995 and was kept in stand-by from 1995. Quartz, feldspar, calcite, and kaolinite are the most abundant minerals in the ore. The rock is formed by moderately well-sorted grains of quartz, feldspar, and rock fragments, all cemented by calcite with minor clay replacement. The mine is an open pit and at 0.025%U cut off about 6500 tU reserves were estimated. Average grade is 0.076% U. The barren - ore rock ratio is 10:1 and barren benches are 10m and ore benches 2.5 m in height. So far 13400000 m3 of barren rock, 376000 t low grade ore and 2500000t plant feed ore has been mined out. The Sierra Pintada mine is expected to restart operations by 2010. The major problems in restarting this mine are the mining laws, community issues and apprehensions of the local tourism and wine industries. The paper will discuss the mining law in Argentina vis-a-vis the uranium situation and exploration programme for the the next years. (author)

  9. Multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, D. P.; Harkins, D. A.; Compton, R. N.; Ding, D.

    1994-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (TOFMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) studies of UF6 are reported using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental (λ=1064 nm) and its harmonics (λ=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF+x fragment ions, even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. In general, the doubly charged uranium ion (U2+) intensity is much greater than that of the singly charged uranium ion (U+). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the Un+ (n=1-4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The MPI-PES studies reveal only very slow electrons (≤0.5 eV) for all wavelengths investigated. The dominance of the U2+ ion, the absence or very small intensities of UF+x (x=1-3) fragments, the unstructured wavelength dependence, and the preponderance of slow electrons all indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms following the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule. The data also argue against stepwise photodissociation of UF+x (x=5,6) ions. Neither of the traditional MPI mechanisms (``neutral ladder'' or the ``ionic ladder'') are believed to adequately describe the ionization phenomena observed. We propose that the multiphoton excitation of UF6 under these experimental conditions results in a highly excited molecule, superexcited UF6**. The excitation of highly excited UF6** is proposed to be facilitated by the well known ``giant resonance,'' whose energy level lies in the range of 12-14 eV above that of ground state UF6. The highly excited molecule then primarily dissociates, via multiple channels, into Un+, UF+x, fluorine atoms, and ``slow'' electrons, although dissociation

  10. Uranium enrichment. 1980 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains data and related information on the production of enriched uranium at the gaseous diffusion plants and an update on the construction and project control center for the gas centrifuge plant. Power usage at the gaseous diffusion plants is illustrated. The report contains several glossy color pictures of the plants and processes described. In addition to gaseous diffusion and the centrifuge process, three advanced isotope separation process are now being developed. The business operation of the enrichment plants is described; charts on revenue, balance sheets, and income statements are included

  11. Borehole logging for uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present text has been prepared taking into account the requirements of both developing countries, which might be at an incipient stage of uranium exploration, and industrialized countries, where more advanced exploration and resource evaluation techniques are commonly in use. While it was felt necessary to include some discussion of exploration concepts and fundamental physical principles underlying various logging methods, it was not the intention of the consultants to provide a thorough, detailed explanation of the various techniques, or even to give a comprehensive listing thereof. However, a list of references has been included, and it is strongly recommended that the serious student of mineral logging consult this list for further guidance

  12. New french uranium mineral species; Nouvelles especes uraniferes francaises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1952-07-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; {beta} uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the {alpha} uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [French] Dans ce travail, les auteurs etudient les nouveaux mineraux uraniferes francais: parsonsite et renardite, phosphates hydrates de plomb et d'uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrate d'uranium et de plomb uranopilite: sulfate d'uranium hydrate; bayleyite: carbonate d'uranium et de magnesium hydrate; {beta} uranolite: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate. Pour tous ces mineraux, les auteurs donnent les caracteres cristallographiques, optiques, et les analyses chimiques quantitatives. Par contre, les especes suivantes, tres rares dans les gites francais, n'ont pas permis d'effectuer d'analyses quantitatives. Ce sont: l'ianthinite: oxyde uraneux hydrate; l'{alpha} uranotile: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate; le bassetite: phosphate d'uranium et de fer hydrate; la hosphuranylite: phosphate duranium hydrate; la becquerelite: oxyde d'uranium hydrate; la curite: oxyde d'uranium

  13. Self-irradiation study of plutonium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plutonium is unstable and produces α or β decays depending on the isotope. These decays generate americium, uranium, helium and different kinds of structural defects. The effects of self-irradiation damage are observed at macroscopic scale, the mechanism occurs from atomic scale. In order to improve our understanding of the self-irradiation effects in PuGa alloys, a technique sensitive to the vacancies and vacancies clusters has been developed: the Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS). The swelling has been characterized by XRD at a microscopic scale and by dilatometry at a macroscopic scale. Swelling starts just after melting and reaches a saturation between 6 and 36 months depending on the degree of gallium homogeneity in the alloy. Swelling at saturation increases with the gallium content, but the absolute change in the cell parameters is constant during time. PAS showed that vacancies clusters develop immediately. Their concentration increase with time. A part of these clusters is stabilized by helium atoms and leads to the creation of bubbles, which contribution to swelling is negligible. The vacancies and vacancies clusters which are not stabilized by helium contribute to the swelling increase by mechanisms known for other materials. These mechanisms are based on a 'dislocation bias'. The presence of these dislocations can furthermore explain the low mean life time value of positrons at the saturation point. (author)

  14. Dissolution experiments of unirradiated uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to measure the dissolution rate of uranium from unirradiated uranium dioxide pellets in deionized water and natural groundwater. Moreover, the solubility limit of uranium in natural groundwater was measured. Two different temperatures, 25 and 60 deg C were used. The low oxygen content of deep groundwater was simulated. The dissolution rate of uranium varied from 10-7 to 10-8 g cm-2 d-1. The rate in reionized water was one order of magnitude lower than in groundwater. No great difference was observed between the natural groundwaters with different composition. Temperature seems to have effect on the dissolution rate. The solubility limit of uranium in natural groundwater in reducing conditions, at 25 deg C, varied from 20 to 600 μg/l and in oxidizing conditions, at 60 deg C, from 4 to 17 mg/l

  15. National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Tonopah quadrangle, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tonopah Quadrangle, Nevada, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Investigations included reconnaissance and detailed surface geologic and radiometric studies, geochemical sampling and evaluation, analysis and ground-truth followup of aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data, and subsurface data evaluation. The results of these investigations indicate environments favorable for hydroallogenic uranium deposits in Miocene lacustrine sediments of the Big Smoky Valley west of Tonopah. The northern portion of the Toquima granitic pluton is favorable for authigenic uranium deposits. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits include Quaternary sediments; intermediate and mafic volcanic and metavolcanic rocks; Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Precambrian sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks; those plutonic rocks not included within favorable areas; and those felsic volcanic rocks not within the Northumberland and Mount Jefferson calderas

  16. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of metallurgy, specifically processes for recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores, problems of imbalance of ion exchange agents, contamination of recycled phosphoric acid with process organics and oxidizing agents, and loss and contamination of uranium product, are solved by removing organics from the raffinate after ion exchange conversion of uranium to uranous form and recovery thereof by ion exchange, and returning organics to the circuit to balance mono and disubstituted ester ion exchange agents; then oxidatively stripping uranium from the agent using hydrogen peroxide; then after ion exchange recovery of uranyl and scrubbing, stripping with sodium carbonate and acidifying the strip solution and using some of it for the scrubbing; regenerating the sodium loaded agent and recycling it to the uranous recovery step. Economic recovery of uranium as a by-product of phosphate fertilizer production is effected. (author)

  17. Restructuring of uranium industry in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A project is described which aims at evaluation of uranium industry and assessment of the technical options for lowering production costs for uranium ore and, implicitly, for nuclear fuel. The main objective is defining the optimal technical and organisational solutions leading to a functional restructuring of this activity, as well as, to implementing modern techniques, technologies and procedures, and, at the same time to lowering the economical and environmental costs. This project is performed in co-operation with IAEA in the frame of TC-ROM/3/003, 'Restructuring the Uranium Mining Industry' project. The following results of carrying out this project are expected: refurbishment of processes and technological procedures, re-dimensioning uranium industry in accordance with the dimensions of nuclear power programme, reducing the environmental impact and lowering the uranium cost

  18. Energetics and dynamics of atomic uranium levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New methods for discovering and identifying new electronic levels of atomic uranium and measuring parameters, such as radiative lifetimes and absorption cross-sections, are described. The uranium atoms are produced within an especially designed induction-heated oven. The uranium vapor is irradiated by nitrogen laser pumped, pulsed dye lasers. The various measurements are accomplished by detection of laser induced fluorescence from selectively excited levels. 138 atomic-uranium odd levels in the region 32260-34900 cm-1 and 16 even levels in the region 49500-49900 cm-1 are reported. Unique J values are presented for 64 levels and partial assignment (two possibilities) for 42 levels. Radiative lifetimes are presented for 134 levels. Absorption cross sections were measured for 12 transitions. Isotope shifts of 17 levels are given. Cross-sections for internal excitation transfer in uranium which are induced by collisions with argon atoms, are presented for 11 levels. (author)

  19. Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most circumstances, measurement of uranium excreted in urine at known times after exposure is potentially the most sensitive method for determining the amount of depleted uranium (DU) incorporated. The problems associated with this approach are that natural uranium is always present in urine because of the ingestion of natural uranium in food and drink, and that the uncertainties in the intakes as assessed from excretion measurements can be quite large, because many assumptions concerning the exposure characteristics (time pattern of exposure, route of intake, chemical form, solubility, biokinetics within the body) must be made. Applying currently available methods and instruments for the measurement of uranium in urine samples, DU incorporations of levels relevant with respect to potential health hazards can be detected reliably, even a long time after exposure. (author)

  20. Advances in uranium refining and conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important steps in the nuclear fuel cycle is the uranium refining and conversion which goes from the yellow cake to three different products: uranium dioxide, natural metallic uranium and uranium hexafluoride. The total volume of this industry, at the present time, is nearly of 40,000 t U per year and at the end of the present century it would have reached the 60,000 t U per year. The refining and conversion of reprocessed uranium that can be extracted by treating irradiated fuel become equally important for recycling recovered fuel. In response to the growing interest in these topics, the IAEA convened a Technical Committee Meeting with the attendance of 37 experts from 21 countries. This technical document contains the 20 papers presented during the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers