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Sample records for alloy-ht-9

  1. The co-evolution of microstructure features in self-ion irradiated HT9 at very high damage levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getto, E.; Vancoevering, G.; Was, G. S.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the void swelling and phase evolution of reactor structural materials at very high damage levels is essential to maintaining safety and longevity of components in Gen IV fast reactors. A combination of ion irradiation and modeling was utilized to understand the microstructure evolution of ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 at high dpa. Self-ion irradiation experiments were performed on alloy HT9 to determine the co-evolution of voids, dislocations and precipitates up to 650 dpa at 460 °C. Modeling of microstructure evolution was conducted using the modified Radiation Induced Microstructure Evolution (RIME) model, which utilizes a mean field rate theory approach with grouped cluster dynamics. Irradiations were performed with 5 MeV raster-scanned Fe2+ ions on samples pre-implanted with 10 atom parts per million He. The swelling, dislocation and precipitate evolution at very high dpa was determined using Analytical Electron Microscopy in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) mode. Experimental results were then interpreted using the RIME model. A microstructure consisting only of dislocations and voids is insufficient to account for the swelling evolution observed experimentally at high damage levels in a complicated microstructure such as irradiated alloy HT9. G phase was found to have a minimal effect on either void or dislocation evolution. M2X played two roles; a variable biased sink for defects, and as a vehicle for removal of carbon from solution, thus promoting void growth. When accounting for all microstructure interactions, swelling at high damage levels is a dynamic process that continues to respond to other changes in the microstructure as long as they occur. effect of dislocations on voids, effect of precipitates on dislocations and voids and combined effect of dislocations and precipitates on voids. The overall approach will be to examine a simple system of voids and dislocations and then incorporate the more complex treatments of

  2. Void swelling and microstructure evolution at very high damage level in self-ion irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Jiao, Z.; Hackett, M. J.; Was, G. S.

    2016-11-01

    The void swelling and microstructure evolution of ferritic-martensitic alloys HT9, T91 and T92 were characterized following irradiation with Fe++ ions at 460 °C to damage levels of 75-650 displacements per atom with 10 atom parts per million pre-implanted helium. Steady state swelling rate of 0.033%/ dpa was determined for HT9, the least swelling resistant alloy, and 0.007%/ dpa in T91. In T91, resistance was due to suppression of void nucleation. Swelling resistance was greatest in T92, with a low density (∼1 × 1020 m-3) of small voids that had not grown appreciably, indicating suppression of nucleation and growth. Additional heats of T91 indicated that alloy composition was not the determining factor of swelling resistance. Carbon and chromium-rich M2X precipitates formed at 250 dpa and were correlated with decreased nucleation in T91 and T92, but did not affect void growth in HT9. Dislocation and G-phase microstructure evolution was analyzed up to 650 dpa in HT9.

  3. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  4. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B. [Washington State Univ., WA (United States); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eiholzer, C.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  5. Investigation of Magnetic Signatures and Microstructures for Heat-Treated Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H.; McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan

    2013-05-01

    There is increased interest in improved methods for in-situ nondestructive interrogation of materials for nuclear reactors in order to ensure reactor safety and quantify material degradation (particularly embrittlement) prior to failure. Therefore, a prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated to assess microstructure effects on micromagnetics measurements – Barkhausen noise emission, magnetic hysteresis measurements, and first-order reversal curve analysis – for samples with three different heat-treatments. Microstructural and physical measurements consisted of high-precision density, resonant ultrasound elastic constant determination, Vickers microhardness, grain size, and texture. These were varied in the HT-9 alloy samples and related to various magnetic signatures. In parallel, a meso-scale microstructure model was created for alpha iron and effects of polycrystallinity and demagnetization factor were explored. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission decreased with increasing hardness and decreasing grain size (lath spacing) while coercivity increased. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys.

  6. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eiholzer, C.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.