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Sample records for alloy-hk-40

  1. Effects of surface condition on the corrosion of candidate structural materials in a simulated HTGR-GT environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment was used to study the effects of surface finish conditions on the subsequent elevated-temperature corrosion behavior of key candidate structural materials. The environment contained helium with 500 μatm H2/50 μatm CO/50 μatm CH4/2O at 9000C with total test exposure durations of 3000 hours. Specimens with lapped, grit-blasted, pickled, and preoxidized surface conditions were studied. Materials tested included two cast superalloys, IN 100 and IN 713LC; one centrifugally cast high-temperature alloy, HK 40 one oxice-dispersion-strengthened alloy, Inconel MA 754; and three wrought high-temperature alloys, Hastelloy Alloy X, Inconel Alloy 617, and Alloy 800H

  2. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium compatibility studies: results of 10,000-hour exposure of selected alloys in simulated reactor helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechtenberg, T.A.; Stevenson, R.D.; Johnson, W.R.

    1980-05-01

    Work on the HTGR Helium Compatibility Task accomplished during the period March 31, 1977 through September 30, 1979, is documented in this report. Emphasis is on the results and analyses of creep data to 10,000 h and the detailed metallurgical evaluations performed on candidate alloy specimens tested for up to 10,000 h. Long-term creep and unstressed aging data in controlled-impurity helium and in air at 800, 900, and 1000/sup 0/C are reported for alloys included in the program in FY-76, including the wrought solid-solution-strengthened alloys, Hastelloy X, Hastelloy S, RA 333, and HD 556, and the centrifugally cast austenitic alloys, HK 40, Supertherm, Manaurite 36X, Manaurite 36XS, and Manaurite 900.

  3. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium compatibility studies: results of 10,000-hour exposure of selected alloys in simulated reactor helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on the HTGR Helium Compatibility Task accomplished during the period March 31, 1977 through September 30, 1979, is documented in this report. Emphasis is on the results and analyses of creep data to 10,000 h and the detailed metallurgical evaluations performed on candidate alloy specimens tested for up to 10,000 h. Long-term creep and unstressed aging data in controlled-impurity helium and in air at 800, 900, and 10000C are reported for alloys included in the program in FY-76, including the wrought solid-solution-strengthened alloys, Hastelloy X, Hastelloy S, RA 333, and HD 556, and the centrifugally cast austenitic alloys, HK 40, Supertherm, Manaurite 36X, Manaurite 36XS, and Manaurite 900

  4. Gas turbine and advanced HTGR materials screening test program: 10,000-hour results and semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenwasser, S.N.; Johnson, W.R.

    1977-07-01

    Work on the Gas-Turbine and Advanced High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Materials Screening Test Program is documented. Emphasis is on the results and analyses of creep data to 11,000 hr and the detailed metallurgical evaluations performed on candidate alloy specimens tested for up to 10,000 hr. Long-term creep and unstressed aging data in controlled-impurity helium and in air at 650, 800, and 900/sup 0/C are reported for the original alloys in the program, including the vacuum-cast Ni-base superalloys, IN 100, Rene 100, IN 713, MM 004, M 21, and IN 738; the wrought solid-solution-strengthened Ni--Cr alloys, Hastelloy X and Inconel 617; the centrifugally-cast austenitic Fe--Ni--Cr alloy, IN 519; the oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni--Cr alloys, MA 753 and MA 754; and the wrought Mo-base alloy, MoTZM. Results at 650/sup 0/C and 10,000 hr for the precipitation-strengthened alloys Inconel 718, Inconel 706, and A 286 are also included. Similar, but much shorter term data at 800, 900, and 1000/sup 0/C for the recently added wrought alloys Hastelloy X (second heat), Hastelloy S, RA 333, and HD 556, and the additional centrifugally-cast alloys HK 40, Supertherm, Manaurite 36X, Manaurige 36XS, and Manaurite 900, are also reported.

  5. Effects of methane concentration on the controlled-impurity helium corrosion behavior of selected HTGR structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion behavior of candidate structural alloys in a series of three simulated advanced gas-cooled reactor environments at 9000C (16520F), with methane concentration varied, is discussed. The alloys investigated include three wrought alloys, Hastelloy X, Inconel 617, and Incoloy 800H; two cast superalloys, Rene 100 and IN 713; one centrifugally cast alloy, HK 40; and an oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy, MA 754. Corrosion behavior was found to be strongly dependent upon both the alloy chemistry and the environment. Oxidation, carburization, and/or mixed behavior was observed depending upon the specific conditions. An equilibrium thermodynamics approach has been used to predict alloy behavior and explain observations relevant to the understanding of gas/metal interactions in reactor helium, which inherently contains small amounts of reactive impurity species. Carburization was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon of concern, and detailed analyses were performed to determine the susceptibility and control of carburization reactions. The presence of alumina scales, containing small amounts of titanium, was found to be particularly effective in inhibiting carburization. Small variations in methane concentration have been shown to have a dramatic effect upon the oxidation potential and subsequent corrosion behavior of the alloy systems

  6. Hydrogen permeation through iron, nickel, and heat resisting alloys at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen permeabilities of several metals and alloys were measured over the temperature range of 200 - 10000C and some factors affecting the hydrogen permeability were discussed. Materials studied were iron, nickel, 80Ni-20Cr alloy, 50Fe-30Ni-20Cr alloy, HK 40, Incoloy 800, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 600. The hydrogen permeability of nickel was proportional to the square root of the pressure and inversely proportional to the membrane thickness. The activation energy and pre-exponential factor for the hydrogen permeation through these metals and alloys were derived from the temperature coefficient. The hydrogen permeability of nickel was larger than that of iron (γ), and the permeabilities of the heat resisting alloys were between those of nickel and iron (γ). There was a close correlation between the hydrogen permeability and nickel content in the alloys, that is, the permeability increased with the increase of the nickel content in the alloys. The formation of the oxide film on the alloy surface in wet hydrogen resulted in a remarkable reduction of the hydrogen permeability at elevated temperatures. (auth.)

  7. Effects of a range of machined and ground surface finishes on the simulated reactor helium corrosion of several candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the corrosion behavior of several candidate reactor structural alloys in a simulated advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) environment over a range of lathe-machined and centerless-ground surface finishes. The helium environment contained 50 Pa H2/5 Pa CO/5 Pa CH4/2O (500 μatm H2/50 μatm CO/50 μatm CH4/2O) at 9000C for a total exposure of 3000 h. The test alloys included two vacuum-cast superalloys (IN 100 and IN 713LC); a centrifugally cast austenitic alloy (HK 40); three wrought high-temperature alloys (Alloy 800H, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 617); and a nickel-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy (Inconel MA 754). Surface finish variations did not affect the simulated advanced-HTGR corrosion behavior of these materials. Under these conditions, the availability of reactant gaseous impurities controls the kinetics of the observed gas-metal interactions. Variations in the near-surface activities and mobilities of reactive solute elements, such as chromium, which might be expected to be affected by changes in surface finish, do not seem to greatly influence corrosion in this simulated advanced HTGR environment. 18 figures, 4 tables

  8. Gas turbine and advanced HTGR materials screening test program: 10,000-hour results and semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on the Gas-Turbine and Advanced High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Materials Screening Test Program is documented. Emphasis is on the results and analyses of creep data to 11,000 hr and the detailed metallurgical evaluations performed on candidate alloy specimens tested for up to 10,000 hr. Long-term creep and unstressed aging data in controlled-impurity helium and in air at 650, 800, and 9000C are reported for the original alloys in the program, including the vacuum-cast Ni-base superalloys, IN 100, Rene 100, IN 713, MM 004, M 21, and IN 738; the wrought solid-solution-strengthened Ni--Cr alloys, Hastelloy X and Inconel 617; the centrifugally-cast austenitic Fe--Ni--Cr alloy, IN 519; the oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni--Cr alloys, MA 753 and MA 754; and the wrought Mo-base alloy, MoTZM. Results at 6500C and 10,000 hr for the precipitation-strengthened alloys Inconel 718, Inconel 706, and A 286 are also included. Similar, but much shorter term data at 800, 900, and 10000C for the recently added wrought alloys Hastelloy X (second heat), Hastelloy S, RA 333, and HD 556, and the additional centrifugally-cast alloys HK 40, Supertherm, Manaurite 36X, Manaurige 36XS, and Manaurite 900, are also reported

  9. Gas-Turbine and Advanced-HTGR Materials Screening Test Program. Semiannual progress report for the period March 31, 1977--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the reporting period controlled impurity helium and air creep-corrosion tests on the original (Group I) 17 alloys in the program reached a maximum 14,000 hr duration, and similar tests on 9 additional (Group II) alloys reached a maximum of 5000 hr. The parallel unstressed controlled impurity helium and air fracture behavior tests on the same alloys reached a maximum of 10,000 hr. The initial tests in the parametric helium impurity corrosion study, which are investigating the effect of methane variation, were initiated and exceeded 1000 hr duration. The results of detailed metallurgical analyses and post-exposure tensile testing on the Group II alloys after 3000 hr stressed and unstressed exposure in controlled impurity helium at 800 to 10000C are reported. Data for the wrought austenitic alloys Hastelloy X (new heat), Hastelloy S, RA 333, and HD 556 and the cast austenitic alloys HK 40, Supertherm, Manaurite 36X, Manaurite 36XS, and Manaurite 900 are reported. All alloys carburized significantly at 900 and 10000C, with minor increases of carbon content exhibited at 8000C. The alloys were grouped with respect to the morphology of their oxide/carbide corrosion scales and the composition of these scales as identified by SEM microprobe analyses. Generally, carburization depths at 10000C were greater in the wrought alloys than in the cast alloys. Room-temperature tensile properties of the wrought alloys were more severely affected by impure helium exposure than were the tensile properties of the helium-exposed cast alloys. Decreases in ductility of the exposed wrought alloys, presumably caused by carburization, were greater than would be expected from thermal aging alone