WorldWideScience

Sample records for alloy-ehi 183

  1. Fabrication of cold-rolled bands of the alloy-ehi 702 in rolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuchin, V.N.; Gindin, A.Sh.; Shaburov, V.E.; Vladimirov, S.M.; Sokolov, V.A.; Shavkun, V.V.; Perepelitsa, I.V.; Markov, V.V.; Naymov, E.P.; Evstaf'ev, P.P.

    1977-01-01

    The questions are discussed, connected with the manufacture of cold-rolled strip of alloy EI702 in reels from strip blanks. It has been established that in the manufacture of hot-rolled stock from EI702 slabs it is necessary to use powerful rolling equipment because of high resistance to deformation. The reel method for manufacturing EI702 alloy improves the rolled stock and increases percentage of serviceable stock, as well as the output

  2. 33 CFR 183.510 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.510 Fuel tanks. (a) Each fuel tank in a boat must have been tested by its manufacturer under § 183.580 and not leak when...

  3. 33 CFR 183.524 - Fuel pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.524 Fuel pumps. (a) Each...) If tested under § 183.590, each fuel pump, as installed in the boat, must not leak more than five...

  4. 33 CFR 183.590 - Fire test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire test. 183.590 Section 183... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Tests § 183.590 Fire test. (a) A piece of equipment is... A2” hoses and hose clamps are tested in a fire chamber. (2) Fuel filters, strainers, and pumps are...

  5. 46 CFR 183.540 - Elevators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elevators. 183.540 Section 183.540 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Miscellaneous Systems and Requirements § 183.540 Elevators. Each elevator on a vessel must meet the requirements of ANSI A 17.1 ...

  6. 33 CFR 183.507 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General. 183.507 Section 183.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems General § 183.507 General. Each fuel system component on a boat...

  7. 46 CFR 183.390 - Shore power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shore power. 183.390 Section 183.390 Shipping COAST...) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 183.390 Shore power. A vessel with an electrical system operating at more than 50 volts, which is provided with a means to connect to shore power...

  8. 33 CFR 183.542 - Fuel systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel systems. 183.542 Section 183... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.542 Fuel systems. (a) Each fuel system in a boat must have been tested by the boat manufacturer and not leak when subjected to the...

  9. 32 CFR 18.3 - Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organization. 18.3 Section 18.3 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS APPOINTING AUTHORITY FOR MILITARY COMMISSIONS § 18.3 Organization. (a) The Appointing Authority for Military Commissions is...

  10. 33 CFR 183.420 - Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batteries. 183.420 Section 183... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.420 Batteries. (a) Each installed battery must not move more than one inch in any direction when a pulling force of...

  11. 14 CFR 183.17 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports. 183.17 Section 183.17 Aeronautics... REGULATIONS REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ADMINISTRATOR Certification of Representatives § 183.17 Reports. Each representative designated under this part shall make such reports as are prescribed by the Administrator. ...

  12. 33 CFR 183.801 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability. 183.801 Section 183.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Navigation Lights § 183.801 Applicability. This subpart...

  13. Configuration dependent deformation in 183Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, P.; Kumar, A.; Govil, I.M.; Mukherjee, G.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetime measurements in 183 Au nucleus were carried in order to probe the deformation properties of the band built on the i 3/2 and h 9/2 configurations. The nucleus of 183 Au was populated using a reaction 28 Si( 159 Tb,4n) 183 Au at a beam energy of 140 MeV. Lifetime measurements were carried out using Recoil Distance Measurements (RDM) method

  14. 14 CFR 183.43 - Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ADMINISTRATOR Organization Designation Authorization § 183.43 Application... structure, including a description of the proposed ODA Unit as it relates to the applicant's organizational structure; and (d) A proposed procedures manual as described in § 183.53 of this part. ...

  15. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.183 Section 61... Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a..., calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous monitoring system for the measurement of the opacity of each...

  16. 14 CFR 183.55 - Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ADMINISTRATOR Organization Designation Authorization § 183.55 Limitations... structure), no Unit member may perform that function until the Administrator is notified of the change, and...

  17. 183-H Basin sludge treatability test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyani, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the results from the treatability testing of a 1-kg sample of 183-H Basin sludge. Compressive strength measurements, Toxic Characteristic Leach Procedure, and a modified ANSI 16.1 leach test were conducted

  18. 33 CFR 183.415 - Grounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.415 Grounding. If a boat has more than one gasoline engine, grounded cranking motor circuits must be connected to...

  19. 77 FR 28255 - Safety Zone; Upper Mississippi River, Mile 183.0 to 183.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... on the Upper Mississippi River. Discussion of Rule The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety...-AA00 Safety Zone; Upper Mississippi River, Mile 183.0 to 183.5 AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone for all waters of the...

  20. 33 CFR 183.5 - Incorporation by reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Warrendale, PA 15096: SAE J378 Marine Engine Wiring—1984 § 183.430 SAE J557 High Tension Ignition Cable—1968 § 183.440 SAE J1127 Battery Cable—1980 § 183.430 SAE J1128 Low Tension Primary Cable—1975 § 183.430 SAE... 08854: IEEE 45 IEEE Recommended Practice for Electrical Installations on Shipboard—1983. Cable...

  1. 33 CFR 183.584 - Shock test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Tests § 183.584 Shock test. A fuel tank is tested by... the boat, apply 1000 cycles of 25g vertical accelerations at a rate of 80 cycles or less per minute... manufactured for installation with its center of gravity aft of the half length of the boat, apply 1000 cycles...

  2. 33 CFR 183.425 - Conductors: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.425... than 30 inches. (g) This section does not apply to communications systems; electronic navigation... conductors and terminations that are in ignition systems; pigtails of less than seven inches of exposed...

  3. 33 CFR 183.505 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems General § 183.505 Definitions. As used in this subpart... system means the entire assembly of the fuel fill, vent, tank, and distribution components, including... a boat floats in calm water, with each fuel tank filled to its rated capacity, but with no person or...

  4. 33 CFR 183.405 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems General § 183.405 General. Each electrical component on a boat to which this subpart applies must meet the requirements of this subpart unless the component is...

  5. Reference: 183 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 183 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15737939i Booker Jon...noid-derived branch-inhibiting hormone. 3 443-9 15737939 2005 Mar Developmental cell Booker Jonathan|Goddard

  6. 38 CFR 18.3 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discrimination prohibited... THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 General § 18.3 Discrimination prohibited. (a) General. No person in the..., be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program to which...

  7. 46 CFR 183.380 - Overcurrent protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 183.380 Overcurrent protection. (a) Overcurrent protection must be provided for each ungrounded conductor for the purpose of opening the electric..., ground detector light, or potential transformer, must be protected by an overcurrent device. (d...

  8. Prolate yrast cascade in 183Tl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviol, W.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Jenkins, D.; Toth, K. S.; Bingham, C. R.; Riedinger, L. L.; Weintraub, W.; Cizewski, J. A.; Lauritsen, T.

    2000-01-01

    The yrast sequence in 183 Tl has been studied for the first time in recoil-mass selected γ-ray spectroscopic measurements. A rotational-like cascade of seven transitions is established down to the band head with probable spin and parity (13/2 + ). Unlike in the adjacent odd-mass Tl nuclei, prompt γ decay from the yrast band to a lower lying weakly deformed (oblate) structure is not observed. These features are consistent with the predicted drop of the prolate band head in 183 Tl compared to 185 Tl. The implications for the prolate energy minimum in odd-mass Tl nuclei at the neutron i 13/2 midshell (N=103) are discussed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  9. 33 CFR 183.534 - Fuel filters and strainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.534 Fuel filters and strainers. If tested under § 183.590, each fuel filter and strainer, as installed in the boat...

  10. 27 CFR 19.183 - Change of trade name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Change of trade name. 19.183 Section 19.183 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... After Original Qualification § 19.183 Change of trade name. If there is to be a change in, or addition...

  11. 33 CFR 183.440 - Secondary circuits of ignition systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... systems. 183.440 Section 183.440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.440 Secondary circuits of ignition systems. (a) Each conductor in a secondary circuit of an...

  12. 7 CFR 28.183 - Fees and costs; payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees and costs; payment. 28.183 Section 28.183... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Classification for Foreign Growth Cotton § 28.183 Fees and costs; payment. The provisions of §§ 28.115 through 28.126 relating to fees, costs, and method of...

  13. 46 CFR 183.350 - Batteries-general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Batteries-general. 183.350 Section 183.350 Shipping...) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 183.350 Batteries—general. (a) Where provisions are made for charging batteries, there must be natural or induced ventilation sufficient to...

  14. 46 CFR 183.360 - Semiconductor rectifier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Semiconductor rectifier systems. 183.360 Section 183.360... TONS) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 183.360 Semiconductor rectifier systems. (a) Each semiconductor rectifier system must have an adequate heat removal system that prevents...

  15. 29 CFR 18.3 - Service and filing of documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Service and filing of documents. 18.3 Section 18.3 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.3 Service and filing of documents. (a) Generally. Except...

  16. 46 CFR 183.320 - Generators and motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Generators and motors. 183.320 Section 183.320 Shipping...) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 183.320 Generators and motors. (a) Each generator and motor must be: (1) In a location that is accessible, adequately ventilated, and as dry as...

  17. 33 CFR 183.630 - Standards for natural ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for natural ventilation... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Ventilation § 183.630 Standards for natural ventilation. (a) For the purpose of § 183.620, “natural ventilation” means an airflow in a compartment in a...

  18. 33 CFR 183.520 - Fuel tank vent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.520 Fuel tank vent systems. (a) Each fuel tank must have a vent system that prevents pressure in the tank from exceeding 80... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank vent systems. 183.520...

  19. 33 CFR 183.610 - Powered ventilation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Powered ventilation system. 183... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Ventilation § 183.610 Powered ventilation system... must: (1) Be open to the atmosphere, or (2) Be ventilated by an exhaust blower system. (b) Each exhaust...

  20. 49 CFR 173.183 - Nitrocellulose base film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitrocellulose base film. 173.183 Section 173.183... Nitrocellulose base film. Films, nitrocellulose base, must be packaged in packagings conforming to the... tape or paper; authorized only for not over 600 m (1969 feet) of film. [Amdt. 173-224, 55 FR 52643 Dec...

  1. Examining the role of glutamic acid 183 in chloroperoxidase catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, X.; Conesa, A.; Punt, P.J.; Hager, L.P.

    2003-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to investigate the role of glutamic acid 183 in chloroperoxidase catalysis. Based on the x-ray crystallographic structure of chloroperoxidase, Glu-183 is postulated to function on distal side of the heme prosthetic group as an acid-base catalyst in

  2. 33 CFR 183.566 - Fuel pumps: Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel pumps: Placement. 183.566...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.566 Fuel pumps: Placement. Each fuel pump must be on the engine it serves or within 12 inches of the engine, unless it is a...

  3. 37 CFR 1.83 - Content of drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Content of drawing. 1.83... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions The Drawings § 1.83 Content of drawing. (a) The drawing in a nonprovisional application must show every feature of the...

  4. 33 CFR 183.564 - Fuel tank fill system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank fill system. 183.564...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.564 Fuel tank fill system. (a) Each fuel fill opening must be located so that a gasoline overflow of up to five...

  5. 33 CFR 183.518 - Fuel tank openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank openings. 183.518...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.518 Fuel tank openings. Each opening into the fuel tank must be at or above the topmost surface of the tank. ...

  6. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... resistant material; and (2) Not cut or abrade the fuel line. (b) If tested in accordance with the fire test under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or “USCG... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.532 Clips...

  7. 46 CFR 183.330 - Distribution panels and switchboards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 183.330... vessel's wiring, must not have any electrically unshielded or uninsulated surfaces. (j) Switchboards and...

  8. 33 CFR 183.455 - Overcurrent protection: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183... secondary circuits of ignition systems; pigtails of less than seven inches of exposed length; and power...

  9. 46 CFR 183.376 - Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....376 Section 183.376 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER... propulsion, power, lighting, or distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral... generator to ground before the generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power...

  10. 33 CFR 183.514 - Fuel tanks: Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.514 Fuel tanks... accelerations the statement, “Must be installed aft of the boat's half length.” (c) Each letter and each number... water, oil, salt spray, direct sunlight, heat, cold, and wear expected in normal operation of the boat...

  11. 33 CFR 183.554 - Fittings, joints, and connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.554 Fittings, joints, and connections. Each fuel system fitting, joint, and connection must be arranged so that it can be reached for inspection, removal, or maintenance without removal of permanent boat structure. ...

  12. 33 CFR 183.562 - Metallic fuel lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.562 Metallic fuel lines. (a) Each metallic fuel line that is mounted to the boat structure must be connected to the engine by a flexible fuel line. (b) Each metallic fuel line must be attached to the boat's structure...

  13. 33 CFR 183.558 - Hoses and connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.558 Hoses and... boat is in its static floating position, and (C) The fuel system is filled to the capacity marked on...: (A) The hose is severed at the point where maximum drainage of fuel would occur, (B) The boat is in...

  14. 33 CFR 183.550 - Fuel tanks: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.550 Fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank must not be integral with any boat structure or mounted on an engine. (b) Each... the top surface of each metallic fuel tank when the boat is in its static floating position. (e) Each...

  15. 40 CFR 52.183 - Small business assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small business assistance program. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arkansas § 52.183 Small business assistance... a Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance Program...

  16. Physical property characterization of 183-H Basin sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyani, R.K.; Delegard, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the characterization of 183-H Basin sludge physical properties, e.g. bulk density of sludge and absorbent, and determination of free liquids. Calcination of crucible-size samples of sludge was also done and the resulting 'loss-on-ignition' was compared to the theoretical weight loss based on sludge analysis obtained from Weston Labs

  17. 33 CFR 183.552 - Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plastic encased fuel tanks... § 183.552 Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank encased in cellular plastic foam or in fiber reinforced plastic must have the connections, fittings, and labels accessible for...

  18. 7 CFR 3015.183 - Access to contractor records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to contractor records. 3015.183 Section 3015... contractor records. The Attachment 0 requires recipients to include in specified kinds of contracts a provision for access to the contractor's records by the recipient and the Federal government. The following...

  19. 33 CFR 183.620 - Natural ventilation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the aggregate area of those openings exceeds 2 percent of the area between the compartments, except as... vents into that compartment; or (5) Contains a non-metallic fuel tank: (i) With an aggregate... permeability rate. (b) Each supply opening required in § 183.630 must be located on the exterior surface of the...

  20. 7 CFR 18.3 - Development and adoption of equal employment opportunity programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Development and adoption of equal employment opportunity programs. 18.3 Section 18.3 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IN THE STATE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICES § 18.3 Development and adoption of equal employment opportunity programs. (a) Submission....

  1. 27 CFR 1.83 - Acquiring or receiving distilled spirits in bulk for addition to wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... distilled spirits in bulk for addition to wine. 1.83 Section 1.83 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... UNDER THE FEDERAL ALCOHOL ADMINISTRATION ACT, NONINDUSTRIAL USE OF DISTILLED SPIRITS AND WINE, BULK... Bottling § 1.83 Acquiring or receiving distilled spirits in bulk for addition to wine. Persons holding...

  2. 14 CFR 183.63 - Continuing requirements: Products, parts or appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... appliances. 183.63 Section 183.63 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Designation Authorization § 183.63 Continuing requirements: Products, parts or appliances. For any approval or certificate for a product, part or appliance issued under the authority of this subpart, or under the...

  3. Observations of interstellar H2O emission at 183 Gigahertz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, J.W.; Gustincic, J.J.; Kakar, R.K.; Kuiper, T.B.H.; Roscoe, H.K.; Swanson, P.N.; Rodriguez Kuiper, E.N.; Kerr, A.R.; Thaddeus, P.

    1980-01-01

    Line emission at 183 GHz by the 3 13 --2 20 rotational transition of water vapor has been detected from the Orion Nebula with the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory 91 cm telescope. The peak antenna temperature of the line is 15 K, its LSR velocity is 8 km s -1 , and its width is 15 km s -1 . The velocity profile has characteristics similar to those for CO:a narrow (approx.4 km s -1 ) ''spike'' centered at 9.5 km s -1 and a broad ''plateau'' with flaring wings centered at approx.8 km s -1 . Our 7'.5 antenna beam did not resolve the source. The 183 GHz H 2 O plateau emission appears enhanced above that expected for thermal excitation if it originates from the no greater than 1' region characteristic of plateau emission from all other observed molecules. The spike emission is consistent with an optically thick source of the approximated size of the well-known molecular ridge in Orion having the H 2 O in thermal equilibrium at Tapprox. =50 K. If this is the case, then the H 2 O column density giving rise to the spike is N/sub H/2/sub O/> or =3 x 10 17 cm -2 . An excitation calculation implies N/sub H/2/sub O/approx. =10 18 cm -2 for a source the size of the molecular ridge. These results imply that H 2 O is one of the more abundant species in the Orion Molecualr Cloud.H 2 O emission at 183 GHz was not detected in Sgr A, Sgr B2, W3, W43, W49, W51, DR 21, NGC 1333, NGC 7027, GL 2591, or the rho Oph cloud; it may have been detected in M17

  4. 183-H Basin Mixed Waste Analysis and Testing Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis report is to provide data necessary to support treatment and disposal options for the low-level mixed waste from the 183-H solar evaporation ponds. In 1973, four of the 16 flocculation and sedimentation basins were designated for use as solar evaporation basins to provide waste reduction by natural evaporation of liquid chemical wastes from the 300 Area fuel fabrication facilities. The primary purpose of this effort is to gather chemical and bulk property data for the waste in the drums/boxes of sediment removed from the basin at Central Waste Complex

  5. microRNA-183 is Essential for Hair Cell Regeneration after Neomycin Injury in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Woo; Han, Ji Hyuk; Wu, Ling; Choi, Jae Young

    2018-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs composed of 20 to 22 nucleotides that regulate development and differentiation in various organs by silencing specific RNAs and regulating gene expression. In the present study, we show that the microRNA (miR)-183 cluster is upregulated during hair cell regeneration and that its inhibition reduces hair cell regeneration following neomycin-induced ototoxicity in zebrafish. miRNA expression patterns after neomycin exposure were analyzed using microarray chips. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to validate miR-183 cluster expression patterns following neomycin exposure (500 μM for 2 h). After injection of an antisense morpholino (MO) to miR-183 (MO-183) immediately after fertilization, hair cell regeneration after neomycin exposure in neuromast cells was evaluated by fluorescent staining (YO-PRO1). The MO-183 effect also was assessed in transgenic zebrafish larvae expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in inner ear hair cells. Microarray analysis clearly showed that the miR-183 cluster (miR-96, miR-182, and miR-183) was upregulated after neomycin treatment. We also confirmed upregulated expression of the miR-183 cluster during hair cell regeneration after neomycin-induced ototoxicity. miR-183 inhibition using MO-183 reduced hair cell regeneration in both wild-type and GFP transgenic zebrafish larvae. Our work demonstrates that the miR-183 cluster is essential for the regeneration of hair cells following ototoxic injury in zebrafish larvae. Therefore, regulation of the miR-183 cluster can be a novel target for stimulation of hair cell regeneration. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2018

  6. Esophageal dysmotility in scleroderma: a prospective study of 183 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahcene, M; Oumnia, N; Matougui, N; Boudjella, M; Tebaibia, A; Touchene, B

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of esophageal motor disorders in systemic sclerosis. In 183 consecutive cases of scleroderma, as diagnosed by American College of Rheumatology criteria (1980). Patients' mean age was 40.6+/-13.3 years, the gender ratio was 0.13 and the average duration of disease was 6.8+/-7.5 years. A localized, cutaneous form was observed in 148 patients (81%) and a diffuse form in 35 (19%). All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and standard esophageal manometry. Esophageal symptoms and reflux esophagitis were found in 108 (59%) and 68 (37%) of patients, respectively. Esophageal motor disorders were present in 148 patients (81%), and were associated with a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter in 114 (62%). The presence of these motor abnormalities was not related to age, gender, skin extension or duration of disease. Esophageal motor disorders were present in almost all patients with esophageal symptoms or esophagitis, and were also found in 48 (64%) of the asymptomatic patients. Esophageal motor disorders are frequently seen in scleroderma, especially in cases with clinical symptoms, but are not associated with a specific form of the disease.

  7. 77 FR 44582 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 183 Under Alternative Site Framework; Austin, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Order No. 1843] Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 183 Under Alternative Site Framework; Austin, TX Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade... Austin Customs and Border Protection port of entry, and FTZ 183's existing Sites 1 through 24 would be...

  8. 76 FR 73587 - Foreign-Trade Zone 183-Austin, Tx; Site Renumbering Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 183--Austin, Tx; Site... (Board Order 1366). FTZ 183 currently consists of 8 ``sites'' totaling some 2,818 acres in the Austin... Austin Enterprise Zone, located at Bolm Road and Gardner Road, Austin; Site 2 (50 acres)--Balcones...

  9. 25 CFR 183.2 - What terms do I need to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... et seq.). Community development project or purpose means any business, recreational, social, health... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What terms do I need to know? 183.2 Section 183.2 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER USE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE SAN...

  10. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pressure test for fuel tanks. A fuel tank is tested by performing the following procedures in the following... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test for fuel tanks. 183.580 Section 183.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  11. Final decommissioning report for the 183-C Filter Building/Pumproom facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marske, S.G.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the decommissioning and demolition (D ampersand D) of the 183-C Filter Building/Pumproom facility (located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington). The 183-C Facility D ampersand D involved the performance of characterization to support the development of a project plan and final hazard classification

  12. 14 CFR 135.183 - Performance requirements: Land aircraft operated over water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... operated over water. 135.183 Section 135.183 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS... operated over water. No person may operate a land aircraft carrying passengers over water unless— (a) It is...

  13. Final hazard classification for the 183-C D ampersand D project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a final Hazard Classification for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities associated with the 183-C Filter Plant/Pump Room facility. The Hazard Classification was determined based upon DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, ''DOE Limited Standard, Hazard Baseline Documentation,'' issued by the US Department of Energy. The 183-C Filter Plant/Pump Room facility was constructed to support operations of the 105-B and 105-C Reactors at the Hanford Site. Since shutdown of the 105-C Reactor in April 1969, the 183-C facility has been kept in a safe storage condition

  14. HF183/BFDrev and HumM2 qPCR data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Concentration estimates for HF183/BFDrev and HumM2 qPCR genetic markers in raw sewage collected from 54 geographic locations across the United States. This dataset...

  15. Atomic mass determinations for 183W and 199Hg and the mercury problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillari, D.K.; Vaz, J.V.; Barber, R.C.; Sharma, K.S.

    2003-01-01

    Recent modifications to the 'Manitoba II' high resolution mass spectrometer are described. Mass differences among the members of the triplet 199 Hg - 183 W 16 O- 12 C 2 35 Cl 5 have been measured. These self-consistent mass differences give masses for 183 W and 199 Hg, as well as the mass difference across the W to Hg region of the mass table. These masses and the mass difference provide important constraints for the least squares atomic mass evaluation

  16. The 183-WSL Fast Rain Rate Retrieval Algorithm. Part II: Validation Using Ground Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviola, Sante; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The Water vapour Strong Lines at 183 GHz (183-WSL) algorithm is a method for the retrieval of rain rates and precipitation type classification (convectivestratiform), that makes use of the water vapor absorption lines centered at 183.31 GHz of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit module B (AMSU-B) and of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) flying on NOAA-15-18 and NOAA-19Metop-A satellite series, respectively. The characteristics of this algorithm were described in Part I of this paper together with comparisons against analogous precipitation products. The focus of Part II is the analysis of the performance of the 183-WSL technique based on surface radar measurements. The ground truth dataset consists of 2.5 years of rainfall intensity fields from the NIMROD European radar network which covers North-Western Europe. The investigation of the 183-WSL retrieval performance is based on a twofold approach: 1) the dichotomous statistic is used to evaluate the capabilities of the method to identify rain and no-rain clouds; 2) the accuracy statistic is applied to quantify the errors in the estimation of rain rates.The results reveal that the 183-WSL technique shows good skills in the detection of rainno-rain areas and in the quantification of rain rate intensities. The categorical analysis shows annual values of the POD, FAR and HK indices varying in the range 0.80-0.82, 0.330.36 and 0.39-0.46, respectively. The RMSE value is 2.8 millimeters per hour for the whole period despite an overestimation in the retrieved rain rates. Of note is the distribution of the 183-WSL monthly mean rain rate with respect to radar: the seasonal fluctuations of the average rainfalls measured by radar are reproduced by the 183-WSL. However, the retrieval method appears to suffer for the winter seasonal conditions especially when the soil is partially frozen and the surface emissivity drastically changes. This fact is verified observing the discrepancy distribution diagrams where2the 183-WSL

  17. NMR-ON of 182Ta and 183Ta in Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allsop, A.L.; Chaplin, D.H.; Murray, D.W.; Stone, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been observed on radioactive 182 Ta and 183 Ta oriented at low temperature in an Fe host, by detection of the change in spatial anisotropy of γ-rays emitted during nuclear decay. By measuring the resonant frequencies of 183 Ta in four different applied magnetic fields the nuclear magnetic moment and hyperfine field have been deduced. These are: vertical stroke μ( 183 Ta;I = 7/2) = 2.28(3)μsub(N) and Bsub(h)sub(f)(TaFe at 0 K) = -67.2(1.3)T. The sin of the ground state of 182 Ta has been determined as I = 3 by comparing resonance results with those obtained in a thermal equilibrium nuclear orientation study. The ratio of the resonant frequencies observed for 182 Ta and 183 Ta at one applied field value yields a magnetic moment for the former of vertical stroke μ( 182 Ta;I = 3) vertical stroke = 2.91(3)μsub(N). The spin lattice relaxation time for 183 TaFe (0.12 at% Ta) at 18 mK in an applied field of 0.5 T has been found to be 40(10)s. (orig.)

  18. SPECT scintigraphy with HDP and Mab BW 250/183 of loosened hip endoprothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predic, P [Hospital Celje, Celje (Sierra Leone); Gregoric, E [Hospital Izola, Izola (Sierra Leone); Dodig, D [Clinical Hospital Centre, Zagreb (Croatia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Protection

    1994-10-01

    Main problem of the loosened hip endoprothesis is in distinguishing between the aseptic and septic loosening of endoprothesis. The study involved 27 pts with a loosened hip; 15 pts with aseptic and 12 pts with septic loosening. The patients were injected 550-770 MBq Tc-99m-HDP and underwent SPECT scintigraphy of the hips to repeat then the examination with only 370 MBq Tc-99m-Mab Bw 230/183. HDP application evidenced positive accumulation at the endoprothesis in all patients with a loosened hip while Mab Bw 250/183 only in the patients with septic loosening. Conclusion: SPECT scintigraphy of hip endoprothesis with HDP and Mab BW 250/183 allows differential diagnosing between septic and aseptic hip loosening and hereby a correct therapeutical approach. (author).

  19. Unit-specific contingency plan for the 183-H solar evaporation basins. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoric, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    This document is a supplement to the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan. It provides the unit-specific information needed to fully comply with the Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 173-303, ''Dangerous Waste Regulations,'' for contingency plans. General emergency and response information is contained in the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan and is not repeated in this supplement. The 183-H solar evaporation basins are four concrete internal surfaces which contained radiologically- and hazardous-contaminated waste. The 183-H basins are currently empty, inactive and designated as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act interim-status treatment, storage, and disposal unit undergoing closure. There is no dangerous waste management actively occurring. There is very little likelihood of any incidents that would present hazards to public health or the environment occurring at the 183-H basins

  20. Unit-specific contingency plan for the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoric, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a supplement to the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan. It provides the unit-specific information needed to fully comply with the Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 173-303, ''Dangerous Waste Regulations,'' for contingency plans. General emergency and response information is contained in the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan and is not repeated in this supplement. The 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins are four concrete internal surfaces which contained radiologically- and hazardous-contaminated waste. The 183-H basins are currently empty, inactive and designated as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act interim-status treatment, storage, and disposal unit undergoing closure. There is no dangerous waste management actively occurring. There is very little likelihood of any incidents that would present hazards to public health or the environment occurring at the 183-H basins

  1. Unit-Specific Contingency Plan for the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edens, V.G.

    1998-04-01

    This document is a supplement to DOE/RL-93-75, 'Hanford Contingency Plan.' It provides the unit-specific information needed to fully comply with the Washington Administrative Code. General emergency and response information is contained in the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan and is not repeated in this supplement. The 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins were four concrete internal surfaces, which contained radiologically and hazardous contaminated waste. The 183-H Basin area is a final status treatment, storage, and disposal unit undergoing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act modified post- closure care

  2. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-B-2, 183-B Clearwells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The 126-B-2, 183-B Clearwells were built as part of the 183-B Water Treatment Facility and are composed of 2 covered concrete reservoirs. The bulk of the water stored in the clearwells was used as process water to cool the 105-B Reactor and as a source of potable water. Residual conditions were determined to meet the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD through an evaluation of the available process knowledge. The results of the evaluation do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also indicate that residual concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  3. 1995 Phase 1 concrete sampling at the decontaminated 183-H basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, C.D.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a consolidated reference for 1995 concrete sampling data associated with the Hanford Site's 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins (located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington). In 1995, the basins were decontaminated and dismantled. Sampling efforts began after completion of concrete decontamination efforts. Soil and water samples were collected and are described in chronological order in this report

  4. Revised ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This document contains ground-water monitoring plans for a mixed waste storage facility located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This facility has been used since 1973 for storage of mixed wastes, which contain both chemicals and radionuclides. The ground-water monitoring plans presented here represent revision and expansion of an effort in June 1985. At that time, a facility-specific monitoring program was implemented at the 183-H Basins as part of the regulatory compliance effort being conducted on the Hanford Site. This monitoring program was based on the ground-water monitoring requirements for interimstatus facilities, which are those facilities that do not yet have final permits, but are authorized to continue interim operations while engaged in the permitting process. The program initially implemented for the 183-H Basins was designed to be an alternate program, which is required instead of the standard detection program when a facility is known or suspected to have contaminated the ground water in the uppermost aquifer. This effort, named the RCRA Compliance Ground-Water Monitoring Project for the 183-H Basins, was implemented. A supporting project involving ground-water flow modeling for the area surrounding the 183-H Basins was also initiated during 1985. Those efforts and the results obtained are described in subsequent chapters of this document. 26 refs., 55 figs., 14 tabs

  5. 78 FR 68814 - Subzone 183B; Authorization of Production Activity; Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [B-70-2013] Subzone 183B; Authorization of Production Activity; Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC (Semiconductors); Austin, Texas On June 26, 2013, Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC submitted a notification of proposed export production activity to the...

  6. In-Beam Studies of High-Spin States in Mercury -183 and MERCURY-181

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Detang

    The high-spin states of ^{183 }Hg were studied by using the reaction ^{155}Gd(^{32}S, 4n)^{183}Hg at a beam energy of 160 MeV with the tandem-linac accelerator system and the multi-element gamma-ray detection array at Florida State University. Two new bands, consisting of stretched E2 transitions and connected by M1 inter-band transitions, were identified in ^{183}Hg. Several new levels were added to the previously known bands at higher spin. The spins and parities to the levels in ^{183}Hg were determined from the analysis of their DCO ratios and B(M1)/B(E2) ratios. While the two pairs of previously known bands in ^ {183}Hg were proposed to 7/2^ -[514] and 9/2^+ [624], the two new bands are assigned as the 1/2^-[521] ground state configuration based upon the systematics of Nilsson orbitals in this mass region. The 354-keV transition previously was considered to be an E2 transition and assigned as the only transition from a band which is built on an oblate deformed i_{13/2} isomeric state. However, our DCO ratio analysis indicates that the 354-keV gamma-ray is an M1 transition. This changes the decay pattern of the 9/2^+[624 ] prolate structure in ^ {183}Hg, so it is seen to feed only into the i_{13/2} isomer band head. Our knowledge of the mercury nuclei far from stability was then extended through an in-beam study of the reaction ^{144}Sm(^{40 }Ar, 3n)^{181}Hg by using the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) and the ten-Compton-suppressed -germanium-detector system at Argonne National Laboratory. Band structures to high-spin states are established for the first time in ^{181}Hg in the present experiment. The observed level structure of ^{181}Hg is midway between those in ^{185}Hg and in ^{183}Hg. The experimental results are analyzed in the framework of the cranking shell model (CSM). Alternative theoretical explanations are also presented and discussed. Systematics of neighboring mercury isotopes and N = 103 isotones is analyzed.

  7. Field screening sampling and analysis strategy and methodology for the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins: Phase 2, Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipas, A.; Hopkins, A.M.; Wasemiller, M.A.; McCain, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides a sampling/analytical strategy and methodology for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins within the boundaries and requirements identified in the initial Phase II Sampling and Analysis Plan for RCRA Closure of the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins

  8. Overexpression of a heat shock protein (ThHSP18.3) from Tamarix hispida confers stress tolerance to yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Caiqiu; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Yucheng; Liu, Guifeng; Yang, Chuanping

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that plant heat shock proteins (HSPs) play important roles both in response to adverse environmental conditions and in various developmental processes. However, among plant HSPs, the functions of tree plant HSPs are poorly characterized. To improve our understanding of tree HSPs, we cloned and characterized an HSP gene (ThHSP18.3) from Tamarix hispida. Sequence alignment reveals that ThHSP18.3 belongs to the class I small heat shock protein family. A transient expression assay showed that ThHSP18.3 protein was targeted to the cell nucleus. Treatment of Tamarix hispida with cold and heat shock highly induced ThHSP18.3 expression in all studied leaves, roots and stems, whereas, treatment of T. hispida with NaCl, NaHCO(3), and PEG induced ThHSP18.3 expression in leaves and decreased its expression in roots and stems. Further, to study the role of ThHSP18.3 in stress tolerance under different stress conditions, we cloned ThHSP18.3 into the pYES2 vector, transformed and expressed the vector in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast cells transformed with an empty pYES2 vector were employed as a control. Compared to the control, yeast cells expressing ThHSP18.3 showed greater tolerance to salt, drought, heavy metals, and both low and high temperatures, indicating that ThHSP18.3 confers tolerance to these stress conditions. These results suggested that ThHSP18.3 is involved in tolerance to a variety of stress conditions in T. hispida.

  9. El medio interestelar en los alrededores de la region HII Sh2-183

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichowolski, S.; Cappa, C. E.; Blanco, A.; Eppens, L.; Ertini, K.; Leiva, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the HII region Sh2-183, located at (,) = (123.3,+3.0) at a distance of 7.0 1.5 kpc from the Sun. Based on the radio continuum data we estimated the amount of ionized gas, the electronic density, and the number of ionizing photons needed to keep the region ionized, which is important since the star/s responsible of the region was/were not detected yet. On the other hand, based on IRAS data we have analyzed the dust temperature and distribution. The Hi line data allowed the detection of a shell-like structure surrounding the ionized gas and the CO data revealed the presence of 6 molecular clouds probably related to Sh2-183, which harbor several young stellar object candidates.

  10. Dysregulated miR-183 inhibits migration in breast cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lowery, Aoife J

    2010-01-01

    The involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of fundamental cellular functions has placed them at the fore of ongoing investigations into the processes underlying carcinogenesis. MiRNA expression patterns have been shown to be dysregulated in numerous human malignancies, including breast cancer, suggesting their probable involvement as novel classes of oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes. The identification of differentially expressed miRNAs and elucidation of their functional roles may provide insight into the complex and diverse molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. MiR-183 is located on chromosome 7q32 and is part of a miRNA family which are dysregulated in numerous cancers. The aims of this study were to further examine the expression and functional role of miR-183 in breast cancer.

  11. Elevation of Proenkephalin 143-183 in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Moyamoya Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Kinya; Maruwaka, Mikio; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Araki, Yoshio; Okamoto, Sho; Sumitomo, Masaki; Kawamura, Akino; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kenzo; Izumi, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2018-01-01

    In moyamoya disease (MMD), the causes of differences in clinical features between children and adults and of the dramatic temporal changes in moyamoya vessels are poorly understood. We previously discovered elevated levels of m/z 4588 and m/z 4473 peptides in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with MMD. This study examined the amino acid sequences of these peptides and quantified in specimens. The m/z 4588 and m/z 4473 peptides in CSF from patients with MMD were purified and concentrated by high-performance liquid chromatography and ultrafiltration. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis was performed to identify the amino acid sequences of these peptides. We quantified these peptides in samples using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and concentrations in CSF were compared between MMD (n = 40, 19 male; median age, 37 years) and non-MMD intracranial disease (n = 40, 19 male; median age, 39 years) as controls. These peptides were identified as proenkephalin 143-183 (PENK 143-183). The concentration of PENK 143-183 was significantly greater in patients with MMD (median, 8,270 pmol/L) than control patients (median, 3,760 pmol/L; P < 0.001) and decreased in an age-dependent manner in MMD (r = -0.57; P < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve in children (age <18 years) was 0.885 (95% confidence interval 0.741-1). The correlation between proenkephalin concentration and temporal changes in moyamoya vessels was suggested. Proenkephalin 143-183 in CSF may offer a helpful diagnostic biomarker in pediatric MMD. The effect of enkephalin peptides through opioid growth factor receptor or delta opioid receptor might be associated with the pathophysiology of MMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 1996 Phase 2 soil sampling at the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, C.D.

    1996-10-01

    This report consolidates 1996 soil sampling data collected from the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin Site. This report is intended to be a data reference and does not make comparisons or conclusions regarding specific regulatory criteria. Chemical and radiological data were collected to support cleanup activities at the Hanford Site; soil sampling occurred beneath and next to the former basin structures. The 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, which consisted of four adjoining concrete basins, were located in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site, north of the retired 105-H Reactor. Originally, the basins were built as part of the 100-H water treatment structures. The four basins were inactive from the mid-1960's until 1973 when radioactive and dangerous (mixed) waste from the 300 Area Fuel Fabrication Facility was shipped to the basins for storage and treatment. The basins were used for solar evaporation of the waste. The last shipment of waste to the 183-H Basins took place in November 1985. Decontamination of the cement structure took place in 1995. The structure has subsequently been dismantled and disposed. Chapters 2.0 through 4.0 present summary information about sampling (1) beneath the loading ramp and berm piles, (2) in shallow soils beneath the former basin floor, and (3) deep vadose soils. Detailed data are provided in the appendices

  13. 78 FR 40427 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 183-Austin, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Samsung...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ..., Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC (Semiconductors); Austin, Texas Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC (Samsung), operator of Subzone 183B, submitted a... June 26, 2013. Samsung currently has authority to produce semiconductor memory devices for export...

  14. Regiospecificity determinants of human heme oxygenase: differential NADPH- and ascorbate-dependent heme cleavage by the R183E mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Lad, Latesh; Poulos, Thomas L; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2005-01-28

    The ability of the human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) R183E mutant to oxidize heme in reactions supported by either NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase or ascorbic acid has been compared. The NADPH-dependent reaction, like that of wild-type hHO-1, yields exclusively biliverdin IXalpha. In contrast, the R183E mutant with ascorbic acid as the reductant produces biliverdin IXalpha (79 +/- 4%), IXdelta (19 +/- 3%), and a trace of IXbeta. In the presence of superoxide dismutase and catalase, the yield of biliverdin IXdelta is decreased to 8 +/- 1% with a corresponding increase in biliverdin IXalpha. Spectroscopic analysis of the NADPH-dependent reaction shows that the R183E ferric biliverdin complex accumulates, because reduction of the iron, which is required for sequential iron and biliverdin release, is impaired. Reversal of the charge at position 183 makes reduction of the iron more difficult. The crystal structure of the R183E mutant, determined in the ferric and ferrous-NO bound forms, shows that the heme primarily adopts the same orientation as in wild-type hHO-1. The structure of the Fe(II).NO complex suggests that an altered active site hydrogen bonding network supports catalysis in the R183E mutant. Furthermore, Arg-183 contributes to the regiospecificity of the wild-type enzyme, but its contribution is not critical. The results indicate that the ascorbate-dependent reaction is subject to a lower degree of regiochemical control than the NADPH-dependent reaction. Ascorbate may be able to reduce the R183E ferric and ferrous dioxygen complexes in active site conformations that cannot be reduced by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase.

  15. Wnt/catenin β1/microRNA 183 predicts recurrence and prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuzhuo; Song, Weiliang

    2018-04-01

    The present study assessed the association between the Wnt/catenin β1 (CTNNB1)/microRNA (miR)183 signaling pathway and the recurrence and prognosis of colorectal cancer. The expression of Wnt, CTNNB1 and miR183 in primary colorectal cancer tissue was increased compared with that in the paracarcinoma tissue. Disease-free survival and overall survival were decreased in patients with colorectal cancer and increased miR183 expression compared with those in patients with colorectal cancer and decreased miR183 expression. The human colorectal cancer cell line HCT-116 was treated with 5 µM inhibitor of Wnt response (IWR-2) for 24 h to inhibit Wnt protein expression. Downregulating Wnt and CTNNB1 expression inhibited the viability of, and induced cell death and caspase 3 protein expression in, HCT-116 cells. The expression of BCL2 associated X protein and miR183 was increased, and cyclin D1 protein expression was suppressed, by the downregulation of Wnt and CTNNB1 expression in HCT-116 cells. Collectively, the results of the present study suggested that the Wnt/CTNNB1/miR183 signaling pathway may represent a promising biomarker for the recurrence and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  16. Decay of a three-quasiparticle isomer in the neutron-rich nucleus 183Ta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu S.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Excited states in neutron-rich tantalum isotopes have been studied with deep-inelastic reactions using 136Xe ions incident on a 186W target. New transitions observed below the τ=1.3 μs isomer in 183Ta have enabled the establishment of its energy and put limits on the spin and parity. On the basis of the reduced hindrances for the depopulating transitions, a 3-quasiparticle configuration of ν1/2−[510]11/2+[615] ⊗ π9/2−[514] is suggested.

  17. Tank Farm WM-182 and WM-183 Heel Slurry Samples PSD Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batcheller, T.A.; Huestis, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of INTEC Tank Farm WM-182 and WM-183 heel slurry samples were performed using a modified Horiba LA-300 PSD analyzer at the RAL facility. There were two types of testing performed: typical PSD analysis, and setting rate testing. Although the heel slurry samples were obtained from two separate vessels, the particle size distribution results were quite similar. The slurry solids were from approximately a minimum particle size of 0.5 mm to a maximum of 230 mm with about 90% of the material between 2-to-133 mm, and the cumulative 50% value at approximately 20 mm. This testing also revealed that high frequency sonication with an ultrasonic element may break-up larger particles in the WM-182 and WM-183 tank from heel slurries. This finding represents useful information regarding ultimate tank heel waste processing. Settling rate testing results were also fairly consistent with material from both vessels in that it appears that most of the mass of solids settle to an agglomerated, yet easily redispersed layer at the bottom. A dispersed and suspended material remained in the ''clear'' layer above the settled layer after about one-half an hour of settling time. This material had a statistical mode of approximately 5 mm and a maximum particle size of 30 mm

  18. Biosynthesis of digalactosyldiacylglycerol in plastids from 16:3 and 18:3 plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heemskerk, J.W.M.; Heinz, E. (Univ. of Hamburg (West Germany)); Storz, T.; Schmidt, R.R. (Univ. of Konstanz (West Germany))

    1990-08-01

    Intact chloroplasts isolated from leaves of eight species of 16:3 and 18:3 plants and chromoplasts isolated from Narcissus pseudonarcissus L. flowers synthesize galactose-labeled mono-, di-, and trigalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG, DGDG, and TGDG) when incubated with UDP-(6-{sup 3}H)galactose. In all plastids, galactolipid synthesis, and especially synthesis of DGDG and TGDG, is reduced by treatment of the organelles with the nonpenetrating protease thermolysin. Envelope membranes isolated from thermolysin-treated chloroplasts of Spinacia oleracea L. (16:3 plant) and Pisum sativum L. (18:3 plant) or membranes isolated from thermolysin-treated chromoplasts are strongly reduced in galactolipid:galactolipid galactosyltransferase activity, but not with regard to UDP-Gal:diacylglycerol galactosyltransferase. For the intact plastids, this indicates that thermolysin treatment specifically blocks DGDG (and TGDG) synthesis, whereas MGDG synthesis is not affected. Neither in chloroplast nor in chromoplast membranes is DGDG synthesis stimulated by UDP-Gal. DGDG synthesis in S. oleracea chloroplasts is not stimulated by nucleoside 5{prime}-diphospho digalactosides. Therefore, galactolipid:galactolipid galactosyltransferase is so far the only detectable enzyme synthesizing DGDG.

  19. Biosynthesis of digalactosyldiacylglycerol in plastids from 16:3 and 18:3 plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heemskerk, J.W.M.; Heinz, E.; Storz, T.; Schmidt, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    Intact chloroplasts isolated from leaves of eight species of 16:3 and 18:3 plants and chromoplasts isolated from Narcissus pseudonarcissus L. flowers synthesize galactose-labeled mono-, di-, and trigalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG, DGDG, and TGDG) when incubated with UDP-[6- 3 H]galactose. In all plastids, galactolipid synthesis, and especially synthesis of DGDG and TGDG, is reduced by treatment of the organelles with the nonpenetrating protease thermolysin. Envelope membranes isolated from thermolysin-treated chloroplasts of Spinacia oleracea L. (16:3 plant) and Pisum sativum L. (18:3 plant) or membranes isolated from thermolysin-treated chromoplasts are strongly reduced in galactolipid:galactolipid galactosyltransferase activity, but not with regard to UDP-Gal:diacylglycerol galactosyltransferase. For the intact plastids, this indicates that thermolysin treatment specifically blocks DGDG (and TGDG) synthesis, whereas MGDG synthesis is not affected. Neither in chloroplast nor in chromoplast membranes is DGDG synthesis stimulated by UDP-Gal. DGDG synthesis in S. oleracea chloroplasts is not stimulated by nucleoside 5'-diphospho digalactosides. Therefore, galactolipid:galactolipid galactosyltransferase is so far the only detectable enzyme synthesizing DGDG

  20. Absolute Transition Probabilities from the 453.1 keV Level in 183W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmskog, S.G.

    1966-10-01

    The half life of the 453.1 keV level in 183 W has been measured by the delayed coincidence method to 18.4 ± 0.5 nsec. This determines twelve absolute M1 and E2 transition probabilities, out of which nine are K-forbidden. All transition probabilities are compared with the single particle estimate. The three K-allowed E2, ΔK = 2 transition rates to the 1/2 - (510) rotational band are furthermore compared with the Nilsson model. An attempt to give a quantitative explanation of the observed transition rates has been made by including the effects from admixtures into the single particle wave functions

  1. Absolute Transition Probabilities from the 453.1 keV Level in {sup 183}W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, S G

    1966-10-15

    The half life of the 453.1 keV level in {sup 183}W has been measured by the delayed coincidence method to 18.4 {+-} 0.5 nsec. This determines twelve absolute M1 and E2 transition probabilities, out of which nine are K-forbidden. All transition probabilities are compared with the single particle estimate. The three K-allowed E2, {delta}K = 2 transition rates to the 1/2{sup -} (510) rotational band are furthermore compared with the Nilsson model. An attempt to give a quantitative explanation of the observed transition rates has been made by including the effects from admixtures into the single particle wave functions.

  2. Searches for R-Parity Violating Decays of Gauginos at 183 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hoch, M.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Searches for pair-produced charginos and neutralinos with R-parity violating decays have been performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 56 pb-1 collected with the OPAL detector at LEP at a centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV. An important consequence of R-parity violation is that the lightest supersymmetric particle becomes unstable. The searches have been performed under the assumptions that the lightest supersymmetric particle promptly decays and that only one R-parity violating coupling is dominant for each of the decay modes considered. Such processes would yield multiple leptons, leptons plus jets, or multiple jets with or without significant missing energy in the final state. No excess of such events above Standard Model backgrounds has been observed. Limits are presented on the production cross-sections of gauginos in R-parity violating scenarios. Limits are also presented in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  3. Epidemiological study of 183 patients with spontaneous rupture of cerebral aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, D.; Tasheva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral vessels aneurysms represent a significant part of the cerebral vessels pathology. There is no extensive study on that in Bulgaria. We present a study of 183 patients with spontaneous rupture of cerebral aneurysm, diagnosed and treated in UMHATEM ‘Pirogov’, Sofia. We used clinical methods - data from subject history, analysis of the accompanying documentation, subject medical chart; imaging-diagnostics methods - CT, DSA and MRI; and statistical methods. A total of 183 patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms were studied. 65% were females and 35% were men.The ration female/male is 1.86, The mean age of all patients is 53.1 ±10.1 years. The highest incidence of ruptured aneurysms is seen in the age group 50 to 59 years. Aneurysms of a. cerebri media and a. communicants anterior are the most frequent (63.4% in total); while the lest are those of a basilaris (4.9%). 88.5% of the aneurysms in the studied group are small, 9.8% are large and 1.6% are giant. Intracranial hematomas are seen in 13.1% of the patients with ruptured aneurysms. Most frequently hematomas are connected with a. cerebri media and a.communicants anterior (87.5% in total). Patients with multiple aneurysms are 11.5% in total, 85.7% of them with an aneurysm of a.cerebri media. The incidence of ruptured cerebral aneurysms is higher amongst female. Frequency in the fifth decade of life is the highest. Most often seen are the aneurysms of a. cerebri media and a. communicants anterior, and the least - those of a. basilaris. Intracranial hematomas most frequently are associated with ruptures of a. cerebri media and a. communicants anterior, in patients with multiple aneurysms the highest is the frequency of aneurysms of a. cerebri media. (authors)

  4. ICE AND DUST IN THE PRESTELLAR DARK CLOUD LYNDS 183: PREPLANETARY MATTER AT THE LOWEST TEMPERATURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittet, D. C. B.; Poteet, C. A.; Bajaj, V. M.; Horne, D.; Chiar, J. E.; Pagani, L.; Shenoy, S. S.; Adamson, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Dust grains are nucleation centers and catalysts for the growth of icy mantles in quiescent interstellar clouds, the products of which may accumulate into preplanetary matter when new stars and solar systems form within the clouds. In this paper, we present the first spectroscopic detections of silicate dust and the molecular ices H 2 O, CO, and CO 2 in the vicinity of the prestellar core L183 (L134N). An infrared photometric survey of the cloud was used to identify reddened background stars, and we present spectra covering solid-state absorption features in the wavelength range 2-20 μm for nine of them. The mean composition of the ices in the best-studied line of sight (toward J15542044–0254073) is H 2 O:CO:CO 2 ≈ 100:40:24. The ices are amorphous in structure, indicating that they have been maintained at low temperature (∼ 2 O) correlates with reddening by dust, exhibiting a threshold effect that corresponds to the transition from unmantled grains in the outer layers of the cloud to ice-mantled grains within, analogous to that observed in other dark clouds. A comparison of results for L183 and the Taurus and IC 5146 dark clouds suggests common behavior, with mantles first appearing in each case at a dust column corresponding to a peak optical depth τ 9.7 = 0.15 ± 0.03 in the silicate feature. Our results support a previous conclusion that the color excess E J–K does not obey a simple linear correlation with the total dust column in lines of sight that intercept dense clouds. The most likely explanation is a systematic change in the optical properties of the dust as the density increases

  5. ICE AND DUST IN THE PRESTELLAR DARK CLOUD LYNDS 183: PREPLANETARY MATTER AT THE LOWEST TEMPERATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittet, D. C. B.; Poteet, C. A.; Bajaj, V. M.; Horne, D. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy and New York Center for Astrobiology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Chiar, J. E. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Pagani, L. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Shenoy, S. S. [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Adamson, A. J. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-09-10

    Dust grains are nucleation centers and catalysts for the growth of icy mantles in quiescent interstellar clouds, the products of which may accumulate into preplanetary matter when new stars and solar systems form within the clouds. In this paper, we present the first spectroscopic detections of silicate dust and the molecular ices H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} in the vicinity of the prestellar core L183 (L134N). An infrared photometric survey of the cloud was used to identify reddened background stars, and we present spectra covering solid-state absorption features in the wavelength range 2-20 {mu}m for nine of them. The mean composition of the ices in the best-studied line of sight (toward J15542044-0254073) is H{sub 2}O:CO:CO{sub 2} Almost-Equal-To 100:40:24. The ices are amorphous in structure, indicating that they have been maintained at low temperature ({approx}< 15 K) since formation. The ice column density N(H{sub 2}O) correlates with reddening by dust, exhibiting a threshold effect that corresponds to the transition from unmantled grains in the outer layers of the cloud to ice-mantled grains within, analogous to that observed in other dark clouds. A comparison of results for L183 and the Taurus and IC 5146 dark clouds suggests common behavior, with mantles first appearing in each case at a dust column corresponding to a peak optical depth {tau}{sub 9.7} = 0.15 {+-} 0.03 in the silicate feature. Our results support a previous conclusion that the color excess E{sub J-K} does not obey a simple linear correlation with the total dust column in lines of sight that intercept dense clouds. The most likely explanation is a systematic change in the optical properties of the dust as the density increases.

  6. Let-7, mir-98 and mir-183 as biomarkers for cancer and schizophrenia [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Rizos

    Full Text Available Recent evidence supports a role of microRNAs in cancer and psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, through their regulatory role on the expression of multiple genes. The rather rare co-morbidity of cancer and schizophrenia is an old hypothesis which needs further research on microRNAs as molecules that might exert their oncosuppressive or oncogenic activity in the context of their role in psychiatric disorders. The expression pattern of a variety of different microRNAs was investigated in patients (N = 6 suffering from schizophrenia termed control, patients with a solid tumor (N = 10 and patients with both schizophrenia and tumor (N = 8. miRNA profiling was performed on whole blood samples using the miRCURY LNA microRNA Array technology (6th & 7th generation. A subset of 3 microRNAs showed a statistically significant differential expression between the control and the study groups. Specifically, significant down-regulation of the let-7p-5p, miR-98-5p and of miR-183-5p in the study groups (tumor alone and tumorand schizophrenia was observed (p<0.05. The results of the present study showed that let-7, miR-98 and miR-183 may play an important oncosuppressive role through their regulatory impact in gene expression irrespective of the presence of schizophrenia, although a larger sample size is required to validate these results. Nevertheless, further studies are warranted in order to highlight a possible role of these and other micro-RNAs in the molecular pathways of schizophrenia.

  7. Molecular characterization of oxysterol binding to the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (GPR183)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Norn, Christoffer; Laurent, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    , the family of G protein-coupled seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7TM receptors) was added to this group. Specifically, the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) was shown to be activated by several oxysterols, most potently by 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC). Nothing is known about...

  8. Comparing Presenting Clinical Features in 48 Children With Microscopic Polyangiitis to 183 Children Who Have Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabral, David A; Canter, Debra L; Muscal, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    with GPA, whose diagnoses had been classified according to both adult- and pediatric-specific criteria. Descriptive statistics were used for comparisons. RESULTS: In total, 231 of 440 patients (64% female) fulfilled the classification criteria for either MPA (n = 48) or GPA (n = 183). The median time...

  9. 77 FR 8806 - Foreign-Trade Zone 183-Austin, TX; Application for Reorganization Under the Alternative Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Docket 8-2012] Foreign-Trade Zone 183--Austin... following sites: Site 1 (33 acres)--Interchange within the Austin Enterprise Zone, located at Bolm Road and Gardner Road, Austin; Site 2 (50 acres)--Balcones Research site located in north central Austin at the...

  10. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder 183 GHz H2O Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, W. A.; Suttie, M. R.; Froidevaux, L.; Harwood, R. S.; Lau, C. L.; Lungu, T. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; hide

    1996-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) microwave limb sounder (MLS) makes measurements of thermal emission at 183.3 GHz which are used to infer the concentration of water vapor over a pressure range of 46-0.2hPa (approximately 20-60 km). We provide a validation of MLS H2O by analyzing the integrity of the measurements, by providing an error characterization, and by comparison with data from other instruments. It is estimated that version 3 MLS H2O retrievals are accurate to within 20-25% in the lower stratosphere and to within 8-13% in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. The precision of a single profile is estimated to be approximately 0.15 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in the midstratosphere and 0.2 ppmv in the lower and upper stratosphere. In the lower mesosphere the estimate of a single profile precision is 0.25-0.45 ppmv. During polar winter conditions, H2O retrievals at 46 hPa can have a substantial contribution from climatology. The vertical resolution of MLS H2O retrievals is approximately 5 km.

  11. 183-W, M2 = 2.4 Yb:YAG Q -switched laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honea, E.C.; Beach, R.J.; Mitchell, S.C.; Avizonis, P.V.

    1999-01-01

    We have fabricated a diode-array end-pumped Yb:YAG rod laser with output powers greater than 200thinspthinspW cw and 195thinspthinspW Q -switched at 5thinspthinspkHz. At an output power of 183thinspthinspW and a repetition rate of 5thinspthinspkHz, the beam quality was measured to be M 2 =2.4 . The laser design incorporates a hollow lens duct to concentrate the diode pump light for delivery to the end of the laser rod while maintaining access to the laser beam. This configuration provides increased flexibility for the resonator design and permits the use of birefringence compensation in the cavity to yield polarized output with increased efficiency. Using the recently described birefringence compensation method of Clarkson et al.thinspthinsp[in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1998), paper CTuI3], we obtained 112thinspthinspW of cw power with a polarized beam of M 2 =3.2 . copyright 1999 Optical Society of America

  12. Search for Higgs Bosons in $e^{+} e^{-}$ Collisions at 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hoch, M.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    The data collected by the OPAL experiment at sqrts=183 GeV were used to search for Higgs bosons which are predicted by the Standard Model and various extensions, such as general models with two Higgs field doublets and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 54pb-1. None of the searches for neutral and charged Higgs bosons have revealed an excess of events beyond the expected background. This negative outcome, in combination with similar results from searches at lower energies, leads to new limits for the Higgs boson masses and other model parameters. In particular, the 95% confidence level lower limit for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson is 88.3 GeV. Charged Higgs bosons can be excluded for masses up to 59.5 GeV. In the MSSM, mh > 70.5 GeV and mA > 72.0 GeV are obtained for tan{beta}>1, no and maximal scalar top mixing and soft SUSY-breaking masses of 1 TeV. The range 0.8 < tanb < 1.9 is excluded for minimal scalar top...

  13. Fe(Co)SiBPCCu nanocrystalline alloys with high Bs above 1.83 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Kong, Fengyu; Xie, Lei; Wang, Anding; Chang, Chuntao; Wang, Xinmin; Liu, Chain-Tsuan

    2017-11-01

    Fe84.75-xCoxSi2B9P3C0.5Cu0.75 (x = 0, 2.5 and 10) nanocrystalline alloys with excellent magnetic properties were successfully developed. The fully amorphous alloy ribbons exhibit wide temperature interval of 145-156 °C between the two crystallization events. It is found that the excessive substitution of Co for Fe greatly deteriorates the magnetic properties due to the non-uniform microstructure with coarse grains. The alloys with x = 0 and 2.5 exhibit high saturation magnetization (above 1.83 T), low core loss and relatively low coercivity (below 5.4 A/m) after annealing. In addition, the Fe84.75Si2B9P3C0.5Cu0.75 nanocrystalline alloy also exhibits good frequency properties and temperature stability. The excellent magnetic properties were explained by the uniform microstructure with small grain size and the wide magnetic domains of the alloy. Low raw material cost, good manufacturability and excellent magnetic properties will make these nanocrystalline alloys prospective candidates for transformer and motor cores.

  14. V1.42In1.83Mo15Se19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Potel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title compound, vanadium indium pentadecamolybdenum nonadecaselenide, V1.42In1.83Mo15Se19, is isotypic with In2.9Mo15Se19 [Grüttner et al. (1979. Acta Cryst. B35, 285–292]. It is characterized by two cluster units Mo6Sei8Sea6 and Mo9Sei11Sea6 (where i represents inner and a apical atoms that are present in a 1:1 ratio. The cluster units are centered at Wyckoff positions 2b and 2c and have point-group symmetry overline{3} and overline{6}, respectively. The clusters are interconnected through additional Mo—Se bonds. In the title compound, the V3+ cations replace the trivalent indium atoms present in In2.9Mo15Se19, and a deficiency is observed on the monovalent indium site. One Mo, one Se and the V atom are situated on mirror planes, and two other Se atoms and the In atom are situated on threefold rotation axes.

  15. Study of the odd mass transition nuclei: 185Hg, 187Hg, 189Hg and 183Ir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerrouki, A.

    1979-01-01

    The radioactive decay of 185 Tl, 186 Tl, 187 Tl has been studied on the isotope separator Isocele II working on line with the Orsay synchrocyclotron from Au( 3 He,xn) reactions: the emitted α lines have been measured and the main γ lines belonging to the 187 Tl→ 187 Hg decay have been identified. The 185 Hg, 187 Hg, 189 Hg high spin states have been studied using the following (HI,xn) reactions obtained on the Strasbourg MP Tandem: 168 Er( 24 Mg,xn) 187 Hg, 188 Hg, 166 Er( 24 Mg,xn) 185 Hg, 186 Hg, 157 Gd( 32 S,xn) 184 Hg, 185 Hg, 158 Gd( 32 S,5n) 185 Hg and 175 Lu( 19 F,5n) 189 Hg. The excitation functions are indicated and a high spin level scheme of 189 Hg is proposed: it is compared to the 'quasiparticle + triaxial rotor' model predictions. A level scheme of 183 Ir is proposed from the data collected at Isolde II (CERN) by Dr. SCHUCK: it is analysed within the framework of the same theoretical model used above [fr

  16. miR-183 inhibits TGF-β1-induced apoptosis by downregulation of PDCD4 expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jipeng; Fu, Hanjiang; Xu, Chengwang; Tie, Yi; Xing, Ruiyun; Zhu, Jie; Qin, Yide; Sun, Zhixian; Zheng, Xiaofei

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, some miRNAs have been reported to be connected closely with the development of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In our previous studies, a set of miRNAs were revealed to be dysregulated in HCC tissues. However, the functions of these miRNAs in HCC remain largely undefined. The expression profiles of miR-183 were compared between HCC tissues and adjacent normal liver tissues using qRT-PCR method. This method was used to screen the potential target genes of miR-183. A luciferase reporter assay was conducted to confirm target association. Finally, the functional effect of miR-183 in hepatoma cells was examined. Among the 25 HCC samples analyzed, microRNA-183 was significantly up-regulated (twofold to 367-fold) in 17 samples compared with the matching nontumoral liver tissues. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) was identified as the target gene of miR-183. Moreover, PDCD4 is a proapoptotic molecule involved in TGF-β1-induced apoptosis in human HCC cells, we found that miR-183 transfectants were resistant to apoptosis induced by TGF-β1. We conclude that miR-183 can inhibit apoptosis in human HCC cells by repressing the PDCD4 expression, and miR-183 may play an important role in HCC development

  17. Simulation of VANAM M3 test using MELCOR 1.8.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Won; Kim, Hee Dong

    1996-07-01

    A standard problem is defined as a comparison between experimental and analytical results in the field of reactor safety research. The detailed comparison of the data permits conclusions for the reliability and precision of computer simulations of postulated accidents and contributions to the development and improvement of reactor safety computer codes. Following a suggestion of the Federal Republic of Germany, the OECD-CSNI agreed to offer the experiment VANAM M3 at the Battelle Model Containment (BMC), an experiment on thermohydraulics and aerosol behavior in a containment, as International Standard Problem No. 37 (ISP 37). The general objectives of the ISP 37 are to analyse the thermohydraulics of a containment atmosphere and the distribution and settlement of aerosol after a high pressure path with depressurization by pressurizer relief valve discharge. Steam condensation at the aerosol particles(condensation in volume) is enhanced by the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol materials, even in case of limited steam supply. The originally small, low-density NaOH particles are converted to solution droplets by steam condensation, the increasing droplet mass significantly enhancing aerosol depletion by gravity settlement. As a result, higher depletion rate have been obtained for the NaOH aerosol than for the SnO 2 aerosol in M2. The MELCOR code, version 1.8.3, has been used for the simulation of this experiment, and the results are compared with the results of other calculations at GRS. The objectives of this report are to contribute to the efficient use of MELCOR code and understanding of the aerosol behavior. 12 tabs., 19 figs., 11 refs. (Author)

  18. Melting of size-selected gallium clusters with 60-183 atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyfer, Katheryne L; Kafader, Jared O; Yalamanchali, Anirudh; Jarrold, Martin F

    2014-07-10

    Heat capacities have been measured as a function of temperature for size-selected gallium cluster cations with between 60 and 183 atoms. Almost all clusters studied show a single peak in the heat capacity that is attributed to a melting transition. The peaks can be fit by a two-state model incorporating only fully solid-like and fully liquid-like species, and hence no partially melted intermediates. The exceptions are Ga90(+), which does not show a peak, and Ga80(+) and Ga81(+), which show two peaks. For the clusters with two peaks, the lower temperature peak is attributed to a structural transition. The melting temperatures for clusters with less than 50 atoms have previously been shown to be hundreds of degrees above the bulk melting point. For clusters with more than 60 atoms the melting temperatures decrease, approaching the bulk value (303 K) at around 95 atoms, and then show several small upward excursions with increasing cluster size. A plot of the latent heat against the entropy change for melting reveals two groups of clusters: the latent heats and entropy changes for clusters with less than 94 atoms are distinct from those for clusters with more than 93 atoms. This observation suggests that a significant change in the nature of the bonding or the structure of the clusters occurs at 93-94 atoms. Even though the melting temperatures are close to the bulk value for the larger clusters studied here, the latent heats and entropies of melting are still far from the bulk values.

  19. Description of Work for Drilling at the 183-DR Site in Support of the In Situ Gaseous Reduction Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Edward C.; Olsen, Khris B.; Schalla, Ronald

    2000-06-26

    In Situ Gaseous Reduction is a technology currently being developed by DOE for the remediation of soil waste sites contaminated with hexavalent chromium. Prior work suggests that a candidate for application of this approach is the 183-DR site at Hanford. However, deep vadose zone drilling is needed to verify the presence of a hexavalent chromium source and to determine the concentration levels and spatial distribution of contamination. This document presents the requirements associated with drilling one to two vadose zone boreholes at the 183-DR site to obtain this information. If hexavalent chromium is determined to be present at levels of at least 10 ppm in the vadose zone in one of the initial boreholes, this hole will be completed for gas injection and six additional gas extraction boreholes will be drilled and completed. This network will be used as a flowcell for performing a gas treatment test at the site.

  20. Measurement on K-electron capture probabilities in the decay of [sup 183]Re and [sup 168]Tm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, N.V.S.V.; Rao, M.V.S.C.; Reddy, S.B.; Satyanarayana, G.; Sastry, D.L. (Andhra Univ., Visakhapatnam (India). Swami Jnanananda Labs. for Nuclear Research); Murty, G.S.K. (UNDNJ, Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Chintalapudi, S.N. (Inter University Consortium for DAE Facilities, Calcutta (India))

    1994-03-01

    The K-electron capture probabilities for the 5/2[sup +] to 3/2[sup -]transition in the electron capture decay of [sup 183]Re to the 208.805 keV level in the daughter [sup 183]W and for the 3[sup (+)] to 3[sup -]and 3[sup (+)] to 4[sup -] transitions in the electron capture decay of [sup 168]Tm to the 1541.4 keV and 1093.0 keV levels, respectively, in the daughter [sup 168]Er were measured for the first time using an x-[gamma] summing method. The experimental P[sub K] values are reported in this paper, together with those due to theory, and discussed. (Author).

  1. Photosystem II repair and plant immunity: Lessons learned from Arabidopsis mutant lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari eJärvi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425. Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light.

  2. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for disposal of structural concrete and soil from the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badden, J.W.; Miller, L.R.

    1996-08-01

    This engineering evaluation/cost analysis is intended to aid the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office in selecting a preferred response action alternative for removing contaminated structural concrete and soils stockpiled next to the 183-H evaporation basin, which was conducted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. This EE/CA evaluates possible alternative response actions and documents the decision making process

  3. A Low-mass Exoplanet Candidate Detected by K2 Transiting the Praesepe M Dwarf JS 183

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Joshua; Gillen, Ed; Parviainen, Hannu; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Cody, Ann Marie; Aigrain, Suzanne; Stauffer, John; Vrba, Frederick J.; David, Trevor; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Stassun, Keivan G.; Conroy, Kyle E.; Pope, Benjamin J. S.; Barrado, David

    2017-04-01

    We report the discovery of a repeating photometric signal from a low-mass member of the Praesepe open cluster that we interpret as a Neptune-sized transiting planet. The star is JS 183 (HSHJ 163, EPIC 211916756), with T eff = 3325 ± 100 K, M * = 0.44 ± 0.04 M ⊙, R * = 0.44 ± 0.03 R ⊙, and {log}{g}* = 4.82+/- 0.06. The planet has an orbital period of 10.134588 days and a radius of R P = 0.32 ± 0.02 R J. Since the star is faint at V = 16.5 and J = 13.3, we are unable to obtain a measured radial velocity orbit, but we can constrain the companion mass to below about 1.7 M J, and thus well below the planetary boundary. JS 183b (since designated as K2-95b) is the second transiting planet found with K2 that resides in a several-hundred-megayear open cluster; both planets orbit mid-M dwarf stars and are approximately Neptune sized. With a well-determined stellar density from the planetary transit, and with an independently known metallicity from its cluster membership, JS 183 provides a particularly valuable test of stellar models at the fully convective boundary. We find that JS 183 is the lowest-density transit host known at the fully convective boundary, and that its very low density is consistent with current models of stars just above the fully convective boundary but in tension with the models just below the fully convective boundary.

  4. Intensities of two-quanta cascades at different excitation energies of compound nuclei 146Nd, 174Yb, 183W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boneva, S.T.; Khitrov, V.A.; Sukhovoj, A.M.; Vojnov, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    Intensities of two-quanta cascades are obtained for 2-3 final low-lying levels of the following nuclei 146 Nd, 174 Yb and 183 W. These measured intensities are compared with the intensities calculated in the frame of various models at primary transition energies ranging from 0.5 MeV to the neutron binding energy. Some excitation energy intervals are revealed, experimentally obtained intensities of cascade are inconsistent with model calculations. 15 refs.; 7 figs

  5. Oxysterol Sensing through the Receptor GPR183 Promotes the Lymphoid-Tissue-Inducing Function of Innate Lymphoid Cells and Colonic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emgård, Johanna; Kammoun, Hana; García-Cassani, Bethania; Chesné, Julie; Parigi, Sara M; Jacob, Jean-Marie; Cheng, Hung-Wei; Evren, Elza; Das, Srustidhar; Czarnewski, Paulo; Sleiers, Natalie; Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Kvedaraite, Egle; Svensson, Mattias; Scandella, Elke; Hepworth, Matthew R; Huber, Samuel; Ludewig, Burkhard; Peduto, Lucie; Villablanca, Eduardo J; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Pereira, João P; Flavell, Richard A; Willinger, Tim

    2018-01-16

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) sense environmental signals and are critical for tissue integrity in the intestine. Yet, which signals are sensed and what receptors control ILC3 function remain poorly understood. Here, we show that ILC3s with a lymphoid-tissue-inducer (LTi) phenotype expressed G-protein-coupled receptor 183 (GPR183) and migrated to its oxysterol ligand 7α,25-hydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC). In mice lacking Gpr183 or 7α,25-OHC, ILC3s failed to localize to cryptopatches (CPs) and isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs). Gpr183 deficiency in ILC3s caused a defect in CP and ILF formation in the colon, but not in the small intestine. Localized oxysterol production by fibroblastic stromal cells provided an essential signal for colonic lymphoid tissue development, and inflammation-induced increased oxysterol production caused colitis through GPR183-mediated cell recruitment. Our findings show that GPR183 promotes lymphoid organ development and indicate that oxysterol-GPR183-dependent positioning within tissues controls ILC3 activity and intestinal homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical value and potential pathways of miR-183-5p in bladder cancer: A study based on miRNA-seq data and bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jia-Min; Huang, Lin-Zhen; Huang, Zhi-Guang; He, Rong-Quan

    2018-04-01

    The clinicopathological value and exploration of the potential molecular mechanism of microRNA-183-5p (miR-183-5p) have been investigated in various cancers; however, to the best of the author's knowledge, no similar research has been reported for bladder cancer. In the present study, it was revealed that the expression level of miR-183-5p was notably increased in bladder cancer tissues compared with adjacent non-cancerous tissues (P=0.001) and was markedly increased in the tissue samples of papillary, pathological T stage (T0-T2) and pathological stage (I-II) compared with tissue samples of their counterparts (P=0.05), according to data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed the robust diagnostic value of miR-183-5p for distinguishing bladder cancer from non-cancerous bladder tissues (area under curve=0.948; 95% confidence interval: 0.919-0.977). Amplification and deep deletion of miR-183-5p were indicated by cBioPortal, accounting for 1% (4/412) of bladder cancer cases. Data from YM500v3 demonstrated that compared with other cancers, bladder cancer exhibited high expression levels of miR-183-5p, and miR-183-5p expression in primary solid tumors was much higher compared with solid normal tissues. A meta-analysis indicated that miR-183-5p was more highly expressed in bladder cancer samples compared with normal counterparts. A total of 88 potential target genes of miR-183-5p were identified, 13 of which were discerned as hub genes by protein-protein interaction. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathway was the most significantly enriched pathway by FunRich (P=0.0001). In summary, miR-183-5p may participate in the tumorigenesis and development of bladder cancer via certain signaling pathways, particularly the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathway. However, the exact molecular mechanism of miR-183-5p in bladder cancer must be validated by in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  7. Overexpression of miR-183/-96/-182 triggers neuronal cell fate in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial (hRPE) cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Maliheh; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Samiei, Shahram; Sharifi, Zohreh; Pirmardan, Ehsan Ranaei

    2017-01-29

    miR-183 cluster, composed of miR-183/-96/-182 genes, is highly expressed in the adult retina, particularly in photoreceptors. It involves in development, maturation and normal function of neuroretina. Ectopic overexpression of miR-183/-96/-182 genes was performed to assess reprogramming of hRPE cells. They were amplified from genomic DNA and cloned independently or in tandem configuration into pAAV.MCS vector. hRPE cells were then transfected with the recombinant constructs. Real-Time PCR was performed to measure the expression levels of miR-183/-96/-182 and that of several retina-specific neuronal genes such as OTX2, NRL, PDC and DCT. The transfected cells also were immunocytochemically examined for retina-specific neuronal markers, including Rhodopsin, red opsin, CRX, Thy1, CD73, recoverin and PKCα, to determine the cellular fate of the transfected hRPE cells. Data showed that upon miR-183/-96/-182 overexpression in hRPE cultures, the expression of neuronal genes including OTX2, NRL, PDC and DCT was also upregulated. Moreover, miR-183 cluster-treated hRPE cells were immunoreactive for neuronal markers such as Rhodopsin, red opsin, CRX and Thy1. Both transcriptional and translational upregulation of neuronal genes in miR-183 cluster-treated hRPE cells suggests that in vitro overexpression of miR-183 cluster could trigger reprogramming of hRPE cells to retinal neuron fate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparation of {sup 183,184}Re samples for modelling a rapid gas phase chemistry of Nielsbohrium (Ns), element 107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, R.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Eichler, B.; Tuerler, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Chemical gas phase reactions of the heavier group 7 elements in the system O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O are presumably best suited for a separation of Nielsbohrium from the lighter transactinides. We expect a higher reaction velocity using the more reactive gas system O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. For the experimental verification of this idea we prepared {sup 183}Re/{sup 184}Re samples for thermochromatography experiments with both gas systems. (author) 8 refs.

  9. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the LEP2 collider near $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Perrodo, P; Pietrzyk, B; Alemany, R; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Becker, U; Boix, G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Leroy, O; Maley, P; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Chalmers, M; Curtis, L; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Ward, J J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Marinelli, N; Martin, E B; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Williams, M; Van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Kröcker, M; Nürnberger, H A; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Trabelsi, A; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Prange, G; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Mamier, G; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Vogt, M; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    2000-01-01

    During 1997 the ALEPH experiment at LEP gathered $57 \\pb$ of data at centre-of-mass energies near $183 ~\\G$. These data are used to look for possible signals from the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the reaction $\\ee\\r\\H\\Z$. No evidence of a signal is found in the data; seven events are selected, in agreement with the expectation of 7.2 events from background processes. This observation results in an improved lower limit on the mass of the Higgs boson: $\\mH > 87.9 \\Gcs$ at 95\\% confidence level.

  10. Z boson pair production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 and 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A study of Z boson pair production in e+e- annihilation at center-of-mass energies near 183 GeV and 189 GeV is reported. Final states containing only leptons, (l+l-l+l- and l+l-nu nubar), quark and lepton pairs, (q qbar l+l-, q qbar nu nubar) and the all-hadronic final state (q qbar q qbar) are considered. In all states with at least one Z boson decaying hadronically, q qbar and b bbar final states are considered separately using lifetime and event-shape tags, thereby improving the cross-section measurement. At sqrt(s) = 189 GeV the Z-pair cross section was measured to be 0.80 (+0.14-0.13, stat.) (+0.06-0.05, syst.) pb, consistent with the Standard Model prediction. At sqrt(s) = 183 GeV the 95.L. upper limit is 0.55 pb. Limits on anomalous ZZgamma and ZZZ couplings are derived.

  11. Evaluated 182,183,184,186W Neutron Cross Sections and Covariances in the Resolved Resonance Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigni, Marco T; Leal, Luiz C

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently completed the resonance parameter evaluation of four tungsten isotopes, i.e., 182,183,184,186 W, in the neutron energy range of thermal up to several keV. This nuclear data work was performed with support from the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) in an effort to provide improved tungsten cross section and covariance data for criticality safety analyses. The evaluation methodology uses the Reich-Moore approximation of the R-matrix formalism of the code SAMMY to fit high-resolution measurements performed in 2010 and 2012 at the Geel linear accelerator facility (GELINA), as well as other experimental data sets on natural tungsten available in the EXFOR library. In the analyzed energy range, this work nearly doubles the resolved resonance region (RRR) present in the latest US nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.1. In view of the interest in tungsten for distinct types of nuclear applications and the relatively homogeneous distribution of the isotopic tungsten - namely, 182 W(26.5%), 183 W(14.31%), 184 W(30.64%), and 186 W(28.43%) - the completion of these four evaluations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of the ENDF library. This paper presents an overview of the evaluated resonance parameters and related covariances for total and capture cross sections on the four tungsten isotopes.

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta inhibits microRNA-183-96-182 cluster via the β-Catenin/TCF/LEF-1 pathway in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Dong; Hu, Ping; Zeng, Zongyue; Li, Ming; Tucker, Lynne; Monahan, Renee; Resnick, Murray B; Liu, Manran; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2014-03-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) is a critical protein kinase that phosphorylates numerous proteins in cells and thereby impacts multiple pathways including the β-Catenin/TCF/LEF-1 pathway. MicroRNAs (miRs) are a class of noncoding small RNAs of ∼22 nucleotides in length. Both GSK3β and miR play myriad roles in cell functions including stem cell development, apoptosis, embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here we show that GSK3β inhibits the expression of miR-96, miR-182 and miR-183 through the β-Catenin/TCF/LEF-1 pathway. Knockout of GSK3β in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells increases expression of miR-96, miR-182 and miR-183, coinciding with increases in the protein level and nuclear translocation of β-Catenin. In addition, overexpression of β-Catenin enhances the expression of miR-96, miR-182 and miR-183 in human gastric cancer AGS cells. GSK3β protein levels are decreased in human gastric cancer tissue compared with surrounding normal gastric tissue, coinciding with increases of β-Catenin protein, miR-96, miR-182, miR-183 and primary miR-183-96-182 cluster (pri-miR-183). Furthermore, suppression of miR-183-96-182 cluster with miRCURY LNA miR inhibitors decreases the proliferation and migration of AGS cells. Knockdown of GSK3β with siRNA increases the proliferation of AGS cells. Mechanistically, we show that β-Catenin/TCF/LEF-1 binds to the promoter of miR-183-96-182 cluster gene and thereby activates the transcription of the cluster. In summary, our findings identify a novel role for GSK3β in the regulation of miR-183-96-182 biogenesis through β-Catenin/TCF/LEF-1 pathway in gastric cancer cells.

  13. Clinical application study of bone marrow immunoscintigraphy using 99mTc-labelled anti-granulocyte monoclonal antibody BW250/183

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zengli; Wu Jinchang; Shi Yizhen; Tang Jun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study: (1) The labelling method of 99m Tc-BW250/183 and its organ distribution pattern after injection. (2) The clinical value of bone marrow immunoscintigraphy of evaluation of patients with aplastic anemia. (3) The clinical value of bone marrow immunoscintigraphy of determination of bone metastasis. Methods: (1) Whole body imaging was performed to one volunteer after injection of 555 MBq 99m Tc-BW250/183, meanwhile, 2 ml blood samples was taken from a cubital vein. The percentage of radioactivity of different organs and the kinetic data of in-vivo 99m Tc-BW250/183 was then calculated. In all the blood samples the peripheral leukocytes were counted by a standard procedure. (2) Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy were performed to 8 patients with aplastic anemia 4 h after injection of 99m Tc-BW250/183, 6 of them also underwent bone marrow imaging with 99m Tc-SC. (3) Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy and conventional bone scan were performed to 14 patients with suspected bone metastases to detect bone metastases. The results was compared with X-ray, X-CT or MRI. Results: 99m Tc-BW250/183 is a safe and ideal bone marrow imaging agent. Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy plays an important role in evaluating patients with aplastic anemia and determining bone metastases

  14. Anti-microbial Functions of Group 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues Are Regulated by G-Protein-Coupled Receptor 183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Coco; Moriyama, Saya; Li, Zhi; Zhou, Lei; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Klose, Christoph S N; Moeller, Jesper B; Putzel, Gregory G; Withers, David R; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Artis, David

    2018-06-26

    The intestinal tract is constantly exposed to various stimuli. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) reside in lymphoid organs and in the intestinal tract and are required for immunity to enteric bacterial infection. However, the mechanisms that regulate the ILC3s in vivo remain incompletely defined. Here, we show that GPR183, a chemotactic receptor expressed on murine and human ILC3s, regulates ILC3 migration toward its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC) in vitro, and GPR183 deficiency in vivo leads to a disorganized distribution of ILC3s in mesenteric lymph nodes and decreased ILC3 accumulation in the intestine. GPR183 functions intrinsically in ILC3s, and GPR183-deficient mice are more susceptible to enteric bacterial infection. Together, these results reveal a role for the GPR183-7α,25-OHC pathway in regulating the accumulation, distribution, and anti-microbial and tissue-protective functions of ILC3s and define a critical role for this pathway in promoting innate immunity to enteric bacterial infection. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost effectiveness of a government supported policy strategy to decrease sodium intake: global analysis across 183 nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Michael; Fahimi, Saman; Singh, Gitanjali M; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Micha, Renata; Powles, John

    2017-01-01

    Objective To quantify the cost effectiveness of a government policy combining targeted industry agreements and public education to reduce sodium intake in 183 countries worldwide. Design Global modeling study. Setting 183 countries. Population Full adult population in each country. Intervention A “soft regulation” national policy that combines targeted industry agreements, government monitoring, and public education to reduce population sodium intake, modeled on the recent successful UK program. To account for heterogeneity in efficacy across countries, a range of scenarios were evaluated, including 10%, 30%, 0.5 g/day, and 1.5 g/day sodium reductions achieved over 10 years. We characterized global sodium intakes, blood pressure levels, effects of sodium on blood pressure and of blood pressure on cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular disease rates in 2010, each by age and sex, in 183 countries. Country specific costs of a sodium reduction policy were estimated using the World Health Organization Noncommunicable Disease Costing Tool. Country specific impacts on mortality and disability adjusted life years (DALYs) were modeled using comparative risk assessment. We only evaluated program costs, without incorporating potential healthcare savings from prevented events, to provide conservative estimates of cost effectiveness Main outcome measure Cost effectiveness ratio, evaluated as purchasing power parity adjusted international dollars (equivalent to the country specific purchasing power of US$) per DALY saved over 10 years. Results Worldwide, a 10% reduction in sodium consumption over 10 years within each country was projected to avert approximately 5.8 million DALYs/year related to cardiovascular diseases, at a population weighted mean cost of I$1.13 per capita over the 10 year intervention. The population weighted mean cost effectiveness ratio was approximately I$204/DALY. Across nine world regions, estimated cost effectiveness of sodium reduction

  16. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-F-2, 183-F Clearwells, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-05-04

    The 126-F-2 site is the clearwell facility formerly used as part of the reactor cooling water treatment at the 183-F facility. During demolition operations in the 1970s, potentially contaminated debris was disposed in the eastern clearwell structure. The site has been remediated by removing all debris in the clearwell structure to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of radiological surveys and visual inspection of the remediated clearwell structure show neither residual contamination nor the potential for contaminant migration beyond the clearwell boundaries. The results of verification sampling at the remediation waste staging area demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  17. A direct comparison of MELCOR 1.8.3 and MAAP4 results for several PWR ampersand BWR accident sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, M.T.; Ashbaugh, S.G.; Cole, R.K.; Bergeron, K.D.; Nagashima, K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of calculations of severe accident progression for several postulated accident sequences for representative Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) nuclear power plants performed with the MELCOR 1.8.3 and the MAAP4 computer codes. The PWR system examined in this study is a 1100 MWe system similar in design to a Westinghouse 3-loop plant with a large dry containment; the BWR is a 1100 MWe system similar in design to General Electric BWR/4 with a Mark I containment. A total of nine accident sequences were studied with both codes. Results of these calculations are compared to identify major differences in the timing of key events in the calculated accident progression or other important aspects of severe accident behavior, and to identify specific sources of the observed differences

  18. Multi-photon production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    The process e+e- to gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 56.2 pb-1 taken at a centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV. The measured cross-section agrees well with the expectation from QED. A fit to the angular distribution is used to obtain improved limits at 95% CL on the QED cut-off parameters: Lambda+ > 233 GeV and Lambda- > 265 GeV as well as a mass limit for an excited electron, M(e*) > 227 GeV assuming equal e*egamma and eegamma couplings. No evidence for resonance production is found in the invariant mass spectrum of photon pairs. Limits are obtained for the cross-section times branching ratio for a resonance decaying into two photons.

  19. Search for pair-produced leptoquarks in $e^{+}e^{-}$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s} \\simeq$ 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A search for pair-produced leptoquarks has been performed using a sample of e+e- collision events collected by the OPAL detector at LEP at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of about 183 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 55.9 pb-1. The leptoquarks were assumed to be produced via couplings to the photon and the Z0 and then to decay within a single fermion generation. No evidence for contributions from leptoquark pair production processes was observed. Lower limits on scalar and vector leptoquark masses are obtained. The existing limits are improved in the region of large decay branching ratio to quark-neutrino.

  20. Measurement of the W Mass and Width in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Hoch, M; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1999-01-01

    Using a data sample of 57 pb-1 recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV with the Opal detector at LEP, 282 W+W- -> qqqq and 300 W+W- -> qqlnu candidate events are used to obtain a measurement of the mass of the W boson, W_W = 80.39 +- 0.13(stat.) +- 0.05(syst.) GeV assuming the Standard Model relation between M_W and Gam_W. A second fit provides a direct measure of the width of the W boson and gives Gam_W = 1.96 +- 0.34(stat.) +- 0.20(syst.) GeV. These results are combined with previous OPAL results to obtain M_W = 80.38 +- 0.12(stat.) +- 0.05(syst.) GeV and Gam_W = 1.84 +- 0.32(stat.) +- 0.20(syst.) GeV.

  1. Study of Fermion Pair Production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at 130-183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Riu, I.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Loomis, C.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raeven, B.; Raine, C.; Smith, D.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Ward, J.J.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Nowell, J.; Sciaba, A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Williams, M.I.; van Gemmeren, P.; Giehl, I.; Holldorfer, F.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Lefrancois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Viviede Regie, J.B.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2000-01-01

    The cross sections and forward-backward asymmetries of hadronic and leptonic events produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130-183 GeV are presented. Results for ee, mumu, tautau, qq, bb and cc production show no significant deviation from the Standard Model predictions. This enable constraints to be set upon physics beyond the Standard Model such as four-fermion contact interactions, leptoquarks, Z' bosons and R-parity violating squarks and sneutrinos. Limits on the energy scale Lambda of eeff contact interactions are typically in the range from 2-10 TeV. Limits on R-parity violating sneutrinos reach masses of a few hundred GeV for large values of their Yukawa couplings.

  2. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-F-2, 183-F Clearwells, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The 126-F-2 site is the clearwell facility formerly used as part of the reactor cooling water treatment at the 183-F facility. During demolition operations in the 1970s, potentially contaminated debris was disposed in the eastern clearwell structure. The site has been remediated by removing all debris in the clearwell structure to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of radiological surveys and visual inspection of the remediated clearwell structure show neither residual contamination nor the potential for contaminant migration beyond the clearwell boundaries. The results of verification sampling at the remediation waste staging area demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  3. Verification of the HDR-test V44 using the computer program RALOC-MOD1/83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, H.; Pham, T. v.; Weber, G.; Pham, B.T.

    1985-01-01

    RALOC-MOD1/83 was extended by a drainage and sump level modul and several component models to serve as a containment systems code for various LWR types. One such application is to simulate the blowdown in a full pressure containment which is important for the short and long term hydrogen distribution. The post test calculation of the containment standard problem experiment HDR-V44 shows a good agreement, to the test data. The code may be used for short and long term predictions, but it was learned that double containments need the representation of the gap between the inner and outer shell into several zones to achieve a good long-term temperature prediction. The present work completes the development, verification and documentation of RALOC-MOD1. (orig.) [de

  4. Search for Charged Excited Leptons in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Cohen, I.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2002-01-01

    A search for charged excited leptons decaying into a lepton and photon has been performed using approximately 680 pb-1 of e+e- collision data collected by the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. No evidence for their existence was found. Upper limits on the product of the cross-section and the branching fraction are inferred. Using results from the search for singly produced excited leptons, upper limits on the ratio of the excited lepton coupling constant to the compositeness scale are calculated. From pair production searches, 95% confidence level lower limits on the masses of excited electrons, muons and taus are determined to be 103.2 GeV.

  5. $Z\\gamma*$ production in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Kokkinias, P; Leinonen, L; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Krumshtein, Z; Lesiak, T; Kerzel, U; Liebig, W; King, B T; Lamsa, J; Liko, D; Kjaer, N J; Leder, G; Kluit, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Leitner, R; Kuznetsov, O; Kucharczyk, M; Ledroit, F; Lopes, J H; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lipniacka, A; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou12, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Paganoni, M; Nassiakou, M; Paiano, S; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Ouraou, A; Parkes, C; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Oyanguren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Palacios, J P; Onofre, A; Palka, H; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pape, L; Papadopoulou, T D; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of Zgamma* production are presented using data collected by the DELPHI detector at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 183 to 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 667 pb^{-1}. The measurements cover a wide range of the possible final state four-fermion configurations: hadronic and leptonic (e+ e- q qbar, mu+ mu- q qbar, q qbar nu nubar), fully leptonic (l+ l- l'+ l'-) and fully hadronic final states (q qbar q qbar, with a low mass q qbar pair). Measurements of the Zgamma* cross-section for the various final states have been compared with the Standard Model expectations and found to be consistent within the errors. In addition, a total cross-section measurement of the l+ l- l'+ l'- cross-section is reported, and found to be in agreement with the prediction of the Standard Model.

  6. Conclusive evidence for hexasomic inheritance in chrysanthemum based on analysis of a 183 k SNP array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geest, Geert; Voorrips, Roeland E; Esselink, Danny; Post, Aike; Visser, Richard Gf; Arens, Paul

    2017-08-07

    Cultivated chrysanthemum is an outcrossing hexaploid (2n = 6× = 54) with a disputed mode of inheritance. In this paper, we present a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) selection pipeline that was used to design an Affymetrix Axiom array with 183 k SNPs from RNA sequencing data (1). With this array, we genotyped four bi-parental populations (with sizes of 405, 53, 76 and 37 offspring plants respectively), and a cultivar panel of 63 genotypes. Further, we present a method for dosage scoring in hexaploids from signal intensities of the array based on mixture models (2) and validation of selection steps in the SNP selection pipeline (3). The resulting genotypic data is used to draw conclusions on the mode of inheritance in chrysanthemum (4), and to make an inference on allelic expression bias (5). With use of the mixture model approach, we successfully called the dosage of 73,936 out of 183,130 SNPs (40.4%) that segregated in any of the bi-parental populations. To investigate the mode of inheritance, we analysed markers that segregated in the large bi-parental population (n = 405). Analysis of segregation of duplex x nulliplex SNPs resulted in evidence for genome-wide hexasomic inheritance. This evidence was substantiated by the absence of strong linkage between markers in repulsion, which indicated absence of full disomic inheritance. We present the success rate of SNP discovery out of RNA sequencing data as affected by different selection steps, among which SNP coverage over genotypes and use of different types of sequence read mapping software. Genomic dosage highly correlated with relative allele coverage from the RNA sequencing data, indicating that most alleles are expressed according to their genomic dosage. The large population, genotyped with a very large number of markers, is a unique framework for extensive genetic analyses in hexaploid chrysanthemum. As starting point, we show conclusive evidence for genome-wide hexasomic inheritance.

  7. RESULTS OF GROUNDWATER MONITORING FOR THE 183-H SOLAR EVAPORATION BASINS AND 300 AREA PROCESS TRENCHES JANUARY - JUNE 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    This is one of a series of reports on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) monitoring at the 183-H solar evaporation basins and the 300 Area process trenches. It fulfills the requirement of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-645(11)(g), 'Release from Regulated Units', to report twice each year on the effectiveness of the corrective action program. This report covers the period from January through June 2008. The current objective of corrective action monitoring the 183-H basins is simply to track trends. Although there is short-term variability in contaminant concentrations, trends over the past 10 years are downward. The current Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste (Permit No. WA 7890008967)) and monitoring plan remain adequate for the objective of tracking trends. The objective of groundwater monitoring at the 300 Area process trenches is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the corrective action program by examining the trend of the constituents of interest to confirm that they are attenuating naturally. The overall concentration of uranium in network wells remained above the 30 (micro)g/L drinking water standard in the three downgradient wells screened at the water table. Fluctuations of uranium concentration are caused by changes in river stage. The concentration of cis-1,2-dichloroethene remained above the 70 (micro)g/L drinking water standard in one well (399-1-16B). Concentrations are relatively steady at this well and are not affected by river stage. Trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene concentrations were below detection limits in all wells during the reporting period

  8. The clinical application study of bone marrow immunoscintigraphy using 99Tcm-BW250/183 in evaluating patients with aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zengli; Wu Jinchang; Tang Jun; Wang Wei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of bone marrow immunoscintigraphy for evaluation of patients with aplastic anemia. Methods: Twelve patients with aplastic anemia underwent bone marrow immunoscintigraphy using 99 Tc m labelled anti-granulocyte monoclonal antibody BW250/183, 10 of them also underwent bone marrow imaging using 99 Tc m -sulfur colloid (SC) 2 - 3 days later. The semiquantitative indexes of bone marrow immunoscintigraphy of the patients were compared with those of control patients. Results: Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy was superior to 99 Tc m -SC bone marrow imaging. In patients with aplastic anemia, the accumulation of 99 Tc m -BW250/183 in bone marrow and spleen was lower and in liver and kidney was higher than those of control patients. Nine patients were found with multiple focal accumulation in bone marrow. Conclusion: Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy with 99 Tc m -BW250/183 plays an important role in evaluating patients with aplastic anemia

  9. Heteroepitaxial growth of strained multilayer superconducting thin films of Nd1.83Ce0.17CuOx/YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.; Gross, R.; Olsson, E.; Segmueller, A.; Koren, G.; Tsuei, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Heteroepitaxial growth of strained multilayer thin films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ /Nd 1.83 Ce 0.17 CuO x by pulsed-laser deposition is reported. The coherency strain results in biaxial compression of the tetragonal Nd 1.83 Ce 0.17 CuO x layers, whereas the biaxial tension in the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ layers removes the orthorhombic distortion and makes the unit cell isotropic in the basal plane (a=b). Depending on their oxygen content, either the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ or the Nd 1.83 Ce 0.17 CuO x layers are superconducting in these multilayers. The strain-induced structural modification has a significant influence on the superconducting transition temperature of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ layers

  10. Theoretical study on rotational bands and shape coexistence of 183,185,187Tl in the particle-triaxial-rotor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guojie; Cao Hui; Liu Yuxin; Song Huichao

    2006-01-01

    By taking the particle-triaxial-rotor model with variable moment of inertia, we systematically investigate the energy spectra, deformations, and single-particle configurations of the nuclei 183,185,187 Tl. The calculated energy spectra agree quite well with experimental data. The obtained results indicate that the rotation-aligned bands observed in 183,185,187 Tl originate from one of the [530](1/2) - ,[532](3/2) - ,[660](1/2) + proton configurations coupled to a prolate deformed core. Furthermore, the negative parity bands built upon the (9/2) - isomeric states in 183,185,187 Tl are formed by a proton with the [505](9/2) - configuration coupled to a core with triaxial oblate deformation, and the positive parity band on the (13/2) + isomeric state in 187 Tl is generated by a proton with configuration [606](13/2) + coupled to a triaxial oblate core

  11. Cost effectiveness of a government supported policy strategy to decrease sodium intake: global analysis across 183 nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Michael; Fahimi, Saman; Singh, Gitanjali M; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Micha, Renata; Powles, John; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-01-10

     To quantify the cost effectiveness of a government policy combining targeted industry agreements and public education to reduce sodium intake in 183 countries worldwide.  Global modeling study.  183 countries.  Full adult population in each country.  A "soft regulation" national policy that combines targeted industry agreements, government monitoring, and public education to reduce population sodium intake, modeled on the recent successful UK program. To account for heterogeneity in efficacy across countries, a range of scenarios were evaluated, including 10%, 30%, 0.5 g/day, and 1.5 g/day sodium reductions achieved over 10 years. We characterized global sodium intakes, blood pressure levels, effects of sodium on blood pressure and of blood pressure on cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular disease rates in 2010, each by age and sex, in 183 countries. Country specific costs of a sodium reduction policy were estimated using the World Health Organization Noncommunicable Disease Costing Tool. Country specific impacts on mortality and disability adjusted life years (DALYs) were modeled using comparative risk assessment. We only evaluated program costs, without incorporating potential healthcare savings from prevented events, to provide conservative estimates of cost effectiveness MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:  Cost effectiveness ratio, evaluated as purchasing power parity adjusted international dollars (equivalent to the country specific purchasing power of US$) per DALY saved over 10 years.  Worldwide, a 10% reduction in sodium consumption over 10 years within each country was projected to avert approximately 5.8 million DALYs/year related to cardiovascular diseases, at a population weighted mean cost of I$1.13 per capita over the 10 year intervention. The population weighted mean cost effectiveness ratio was approximately I$204/DALY. Across nine world regions, estimated cost effectiveness of sodium reduction was best in South Asia (I$116/DALY); across the world

  12. Investigation of adsorption and inhibitive effect of acid red GRE (183 dye on the corrosion of carbon steel in hydrochloric acid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abd El-raouf

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption and corrosion inhibitive effect of acid red GRE (183 dye on carbon steel alloy in 1 M HCl solutions was studied using various techniques. Results of weight loss, Tafel polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques show that this compound has fairly good inhibiting properties for steel corrosion in acidic bath; with efficiency around 96% at a concentration of 50 ppm. The inhibition is of a mixed anodic–cathodic nature. Factors affecting the corrosion process have been calculated and discussed. Acid red GRE (183 dye was shown to be an inhibitor in the acidic corrosion. Inhibition efficiency increased with acid red GRE (183 dye concentration but decreased with rise in temperature, corrosion inhibition is attributed to the adsorption of acid red GRE (183 dye on the carbon steel surface via a physical adsorption mechanism. Langmuir isotherm is found to provide an accurate description of the adsorption behavior of the investigated azo compound. The nature of the protective film was investigated using SEM and EDX techniques.

  13. Transcriptome-wide comparison of the impact of Atoh1 and miR-183 family on pluripotent stem cells and multipotent otic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ebeid

    Full Text Available Over 5% of the global population suffers from disabling hearing loss caused by multiple factors including aging, noise exposure, genetic predisposition, or use of ototoxic drugs. Sensorineural hearing loss is often caused by the loss of sensory hair cells (HCs of the inner ear. A barrier to hearing restoration after HC loss is the limited ability of mammalian auditory HCs to spontaneously regenerate. Understanding the molecular mechanisms orchestrating HC development is expected to facilitate cell replacement therapies. Multiple events are known to be essential for proper HC development including the expression of Atoh1 transcription factor and the miR-183 family. We have developed a series of vectors expressing the miR-183 family and/or Atoh1 that was used to transfect two different developmental cell models: pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs and immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP cells representing an advanced developmental stage. Transcriptome profiling of transfected cells show that the impact of Atoh1 is contextually dependent with more HC-specific effects on iMOP cells. miR-183 family expression in combination with Atoh1 not only appears to fine tune gene expression in favor of HC fate, but is also required for the expression of some HC-specific genes. Overall, the work provides novel insight into the combined role of Atoh1 and the miR-183 family during HC development that may ultimately inform strategies to promote HC regeneration or maintenance.

  14. Transcriptome-wide comparison of the impact of Atoh1 and miR-183 family on pluripotent stem cells and multipotent otic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeid, Michael; Sripal, Prashanth; Pecka, Jason; Beisel, Kirk W; Kwan, Kelvin; Soukup, Garrett A

    2017-01-01

    Over 5% of the global population suffers from disabling hearing loss caused by multiple factors including aging, noise exposure, genetic predisposition, or use of ototoxic drugs. Sensorineural hearing loss is often caused by the loss of sensory hair cells (HCs) of the inner ear. A barrier to hearing restoration after HC loss is the limited ability of mammalian auditory HCs to spontaneously regenerate. Understanding the molecular mechanisms orchestrating HC development is expected to facilitate cell replacement therapies. Multiple events are known to be essential for proper HC development including the expression of Atoh1 transcription factor and the miR-183 family. We have developed a series of vectors expressing the miR-183 family and/or Atoh1 that was used to transfect two different developmental cell models: pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cells representing an advanced developmental stage. Transcriptome profiling of transfected cells show that the impact of Atoh1 is contextually dependent with more HC-specific effects on iMOP cells. miR-183 family expression in combination with Atoh1 not only appears to fine tune gene expression in favor of HC fate, but is also required for the expression of some HC-specific genes. Overall, the work provides novel insight into the combined role of Atoh1 and the miR-183 family during HC development that may ultimately inform strategies to promote HC regeneration or maintenance.

  15. Search for chargino pair production in scenarios with gravitino LSP and stau NLSP at $\\sqrt{s} \\sim$ 183 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Bracko, M; Branchini, P; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huber, M; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neufeld, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Niezurawski, P; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pavel, T; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seibert, N; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stanitzki, M; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tortosa, P; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Dam, P; Van den Boeck, W; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    Promptly decaying lightest charginos were searched for in the context of scenarios with gravitino LSP. It was assumed that the stau is the next to lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP). Data collected with the DELPHI detector at a centre-of-mass energy near 183~{~mbox{${mathrm{GeV}}$}}\

  16. Effect of a Mycoplasma hominis-like Mycoplasma on the infection of HEp-2 cells by the TW-183 strain of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, E A; Wadowsky, R M

    2000-02-01

    We isolated a Mycoplasma hominis-like mycoplasma from a stock culture of Chlamydia pneumoniae TW-183 obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and eradicated the contaminant by treating the stock suspension with a nonionic detergent, Igepal CA-630. The M. hominis-like mycoplasma neither inhibits nor enhances the infectivity of C. pneumoniae for HEp-2 cells.

  17. Effect of a Mycoplasma hominis-Like Mycoplasma on the Infection of HEp-2 Cells by the TW-183 Strain of Chlamydia pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Castilla, Elias A.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    We isolated a Mycoplasma hominis-like mycoplasma from a stock culture of Chlamydia pneumoniae TW-183 obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and eradicated the contaminant by treating the stock suspension with a nonionic detergent, Igepal CA-630. The M. hominis-like mycoplasma neither inhibits nor enhances the infectivity of C. pneumoniae for HEp-2 cells.

  18. MELCOR computer code manuals: Primer and user's guides, Version 1.8.3 September 1994. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, R.M.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L.; Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Sanders, R.L.

    1995-03-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. MELCOR is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a second-generation plant risk assessment tool and the successor to the Source Term Code Package. A broad spectrum of severe accident phenomena in both boiling and pressurized water reactors is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework. These include: thermal-hydraulic response in the reactor coolant system, reactor cavity, containment, and confinement buildings; core heatup, degradation, and relocation; core-concrete attack; hydrogen production, transport, and combustion; fission product release and transport; and the impact of engineered safety features on thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide behavior. Current uses of MELCOR include estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. This publication of the MELCOR computer code manuals corresponds to MELCOR 1.8.3, released to users in August, 1994. Volume 1 contains a primer that describes MELCOR's phenomenological scope, organization (by package), and documentation. The remainder of Volume 1 contains the MELCOR Users' Guides, which provide the input instructions and guidelines for each package. Volume 2 contains the MELCOR Reference Manuals, which describe the phenomenological models that have been implemented in each package

  19. The Variant p.(Arg183Trp) in SPTLC2 Causes Late-Onset Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyanarayanan, Saranya; Auranen, Mari; Toppila, Jussi; Paetau, Anders; Shcherbii, Maria; Palin, Eino; Wei, Yu; Lohioja, Tarja; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Schön, Ulrike; Abicht, Angela; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Tyynismaa, Henna; Walter, Maggie C; Hornemann, Thorsten; Ylikallio, Emil

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 1 (HSAN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder that can be caused by variants in SPTLC1 or SPTLC2, encoding subunits of serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase. Disease variants alter the enzyme's substrate specificity and lead to accumulation of neurotoxic 1-deoxysphingolipids. We describe two families with autosomal dominant HSAN1C caused by a new variant in SPTLC2, c.547C>T, p.(Arg183Trp). The variant changed a conserved amino acid and was not found in public variant databases. All patients had a relatively mild progressive distal sensory impairment, with onset after age 50. Small fibers were affected early, leading to abnormalities on quantitative sensory testing. Sural biopsy revealed a severe chronic axonal neuropathy with subtotal loss of myelinated axons, relatively preserved number of non-myelinated fibers and no signs for regeneration. Skin biopsy with PGP9.5 labeling showed lack of intraepidermal nerve endings early in the disease. Motor manifestations developed later in the disease course, but there was no evidence of autonomic involvement. Patients had elevated serum 1-deoxysphingolipids, and the variant protein produced elevated amounts of 1-deoxysphingolipids in vitro, which proved the pathogenicity of the variant. Our results expand the genetic spectrum of HSAN1C and provide further detail about the clinical characteristics. Sequencing of SPTLC2 should be considered in all patients presenting with mild late-onset sensory-predominant small or large fiber neuropathy.

  20. Bose-Einstein Correlations in $e^{+} e^{-} \\to W^{+}W^{-}$ at 172 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Hoch, M; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1999-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations between like-charge pions are studied in hadronic final states produced by e+e- annihilations at center-of-mass energies of 172 and 183 GeV. Three event samples are studied, each dominated by one of the processes W+W- to qqlnu, W+W- to qqqq, or (Z/g)* to qq. After demonstrating the existence of Bose-Einstein correlations in W decays, an attempt is made to determine Bose-Einstein correlations for pions originating from the same W boson and from different W bosons, as well as for pions from (Z/g)* to qq events. The following results are obtained for the individual chaoticity parameters lambda assuming a common source radius R: lambda_same = 0.63 +- 0.19 +- 0.14, lambda_diff = 0.22 +- 0.53 +- 0.14, lambda_Z = 0.47 +- 0.11 +- 0.08, R = 0.92 +- 0.09 +- 0.09. In each case, the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. At the current level of statistical precision it is not established whether Bose-Einstein correlations, between pions from different W bosons exist or not.

  1. $W^{+}W^{-}$ production and triple gauge boson couplings at LEP energies up to 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; De Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hoch, M.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Vachon, B.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    A study of W-pair production in e+e- annihilations at Lep2 is presented, based on 877 W+W- candidates corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 57 pb-1 at sqrt(s) = 183 GeV. Assuming that the angular distributions of the W-pair production and decay, as well as their branching fractions, are described by the Standard Model, the W-pair production cross-section is measured to be 15.43 +- 0.61 (stat.) +- 0.26 (syst.) pb. Assuming lepton universality and combining with our results from lower centre-of-mass energies, the W branching fraction to hadrons is determined to be 67.9 +- 1.2 (stat.) +- 0.5 (syst.)%. The number of W-pair candidates and the angular distributions for each final state (qqlnu,qqqq,lnulnu) are used to determine the triple gauge boson couplings. After combining these values with our results from lower centre-of-mass energies we obtain D(kappa_g)=0.11+0.52-0.37, D(g^z_1)=0.01+0.13-0.12 and lambda=-0.10+0.13-0.12, where the errors include both statistical and systematic uncertainties and each co...

  2. 183 ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    invasive when the balance of the normal bacterial flora is disrupted .... Heidelberg, Germany) for preliminary identification and ... Ethical approval for this work was granted by the ..... our results provide a more practical and real life situation.

  3. List of Participants 183

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narasimhan S L, BARC, Mumbai,. India. Nisha C K, IICT, Hyderabad, India. Pal O R, UICT, Mumbai, India. Pande S S, BARC, Mumbai, India. Paranjpe A S, BARC, Mumbai, India. Paranjpe S K, IAEA, Vienna, Austria. Parmar Rohini N, Saurashtra Univer- sity, Rajkot, India. Patil S R, MS University of Baroda,. Vadodara, India.

  4. Radiological dose assessment for the decontaminated concrete removed from 183-H solar evaporation basins at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1997-01-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates over a 1,000-year time horizon were calculated for exposure to the decontaminated concrete removed from the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The RESRAD computer code, Version 5.62, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy's manual for developing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Currently, the concrete is not being used. Four potential exposure scenarios were developed for the land area where the decontaminated concrete will be stored. In Scenario A industrial use of the land is assumed; in Scenario B recreational use of the land is assumed; in Scenario C residential use of the land is assumed; and in Scenario D (a plausible but unlikely land-use scenario), the presence of a subsistence farmer in the immediate vicinity of the land is assumed. For Scenarios A and B, water used for drinking is assumed to be surface water from the Columbia River; for Scenarios C and D, groundwater drawn from a well located at the downgradient edge of the storage area is the only source of water for drinking, irrigation, and raising livestock. Conservative parameters values were used to estimate the radiation doses. The results of the evaluation indicate that the US Department of Energy's dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for any of the scenarios analyzed. The potential maximum dose rates for Scenarios A, B, C, and D are 0.75, 0.022, 29, 29 mrem/yr, respectively. An uncertainty analysis was performed to determine which parameters have the greatest impact on the estimated doses. The doses in Scenarios C and D were found to be very sensitive to the magnitude of the irrigation rate

  5. Measurement of lifetimes of high spin states in the N = 106 nuclei {sup 183}Ir and {sup 182}Os

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Blumenthal, D.; Carpenter, M.P. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Lifetimes of high spin states in the isotones {sup 183}Ir and {sup 182}Os were measured using the Notre Dame plunger device in conjunction with the Argonne Notre Dame {gamma}-ray facility. The aim of these measurements was to determine the deformation-driving properties of the h{sub 9/2} proton intruder orbital by comparing the values of the intrinsic quadrupole moments in the ground state bands in the odd-mass Ir nucleus and the even-even Os core. Levels in these nuclei were populated by the {sup 150}Nd ({sup 37}Cl,4n) and {sup 150}Nd ({sup 36}S,4n) reactions using a {sup 37}Cl beam of 169 MeV and 164-Mev {sup 36}S beam. The {sup 150}Nd target was 0.9-g/cm{sup 2} thick and was prepared by evaporating enriched {sup 150}Nd onto a stretched 1.5-mg/cm{sup 2} gold foil. The target was covered with a layer of a 60-{mu}g/cm{sup 2} Au to prevent its oxidation. Gamma-ray spectra were accumulated for approximately 4 hours for each target-stopper distance. Data were collected for 20 target-stopper distances ranging from 16 {mu}m to 10.4 mm. Preliminary analysis indicates that it will be possible to extract the lifetimes of the levels in the yrast bands up to and including part of the backbending region with sufficient accuracy. Detailed analysis of the data is in progress.

  6. [The significance of a 4,183 Da peptide of dermcidin protein in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Feng; Lifeng, Liu; Haijing, Song; Xianhua, Liu; Hu, Xia

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the predictive value of 4,183 Da peptide of dermcidin protein in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. A prospective controlled study was conducted. Serum samples were drawn from 161 patients with acute coronary'syndrome [ACS, including 46 patients with unstable angina (UA), 23 with acute non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, and 92 with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction], 111 subjects for routine physical examination, including 45 patients with hypertension history, 42 with coronary heart disease, 22 with diabetes, and 54 patients with non-ACS (including pulmonary embolism, aortic dissection, aneurysm, arrhythmia, myocarditis, coronary myocardial bridge, pleurisy, pneumothorax pneumomediastinum, rib fracture, reflux esophagitis, peptic ulcer, and pancreatitis) to serve as controls. 4 183 Da peptide of dermcidin protein was assessed with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) technology, and myeloperoxidase [MPO, determined by point-of-care testing (POCT) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively], high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), heart type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP), myoglobin (MYO), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), and MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase (CK-MB) were quantitated with biochemical analysis. The power of the biomarkers above for early diagnosis and differential diagnosis for ischemic heart disease were judged by comparison of their sensitivity and specificity. (1) It was showed by one-way ANOVA that 4,183 Da peptide was higher in ACS group than that in control group (relative abundance: 22.05 ± 16.97 vs. 15.52 ± 14.09, P = 0.001), but no difference was found between ACS group and non-ACS group (relative abundance: 22.05 ± 16.97 vs. 19.99 ± 17.63, P = 0.416). (2) The specificity and sensitivity of the 4 183 Da polypeptide and MPO for predicting ACS and UA were compared with the receiver operating

  7. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-50:5 Process Sewers (183-DR Sedimentation Basin Drains). Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-025

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The 100-D-50:5 subsite encompasses the southern process sewers formerly servicing the 183-DR coagulation and sedimentation basins and proximate surface runoff collection drains. The results of confirmatory sampling of pipeline sediments and underlying soils at the 100-D-50:5 subsite demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  8. MELCOR 1.8.3 application to NUPEC M-7-1 test (ISP-35) and two hydrogen severe accident scenarios in a typical PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Garcia, M.A.; Martin-Fuertes, F.; Martin-Valdepenas, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Combustion of the hydrogen released to the containment during a severe accident is one of the issues to establish the real threats to the third barrier integrity in nuclear power facilities. Computational efforts on management procedures, such as the containment spray operation, are being addressed at the CTN-UPM to cope with the problem. On top of this, studies about in-containment hydrogen distribution and combustion are currently carried out with the codes MELCOR 1.8.3 and ESTER 1.0-RALOC 2.2. In this study, MELCOR 1.8.3 has been validated against the NUPEC M-7-1 Test, which already showed in 1993 that a good agreement was reached out when the previous MELCOR 1.8.2 calculations were performed regarding to the helium distribution throughout the facility. Nevertheless, some discrepancies were detected when analysing wall and atmosphere temperatures. Generally, well-mixed atmosphere scenarios, in which the role played by the containment water spraying is of the major importance, appear when such a mechanism promotes the onset of convection driven flow patterns that rapidly homogenize the gas properties. The purpose of the new MELCOR 1.8.3 assessment is to take advantage of the newest implemented models to obtain a more realistic thermalhydraulics simulation. A variation case was also performed to highlight the influence of water spray operation. In a second part of the study, insights coming from the previous work were used to apply MELCOR 1.8.3 models to a SBO severe accident scenario management in a commercial 2700 MWt 3-loop W PWR containment

  9. Growth and transport properties of multilayer superconducting films of Nd1.83Co0.17CuOx/YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.; Gross, R.; Olsson, E.; Segmuller, A.; Koren, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on strained multilayer thin films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ /Nd 1.83 Ce 0.17 CuO x that have been prepared by laser ablation deposition. For individual layers below a critical layer thickness of about 250 Angstrom, coherency strain compresses the Nd 1.83 Ce 0.17 CuO x lattice and expands the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ lattice. The orthorhombic distortion in the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ layers is also removed. Depending on their oxygen content, either the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ , or the Nd 1.83 Ce 0.17 CuO x layers are superconducting in these multilayers. The strain-induced structural modification has a significant influence on the superconducting transition temperature and critical current density of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ layers. Zero field critical current densities as high as 1.1 x 10 7 A/cm 2 at 77K have been measured for the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ layers

  10. Food sources of alpha-linolenic acid (PFA 18:3), listed in descending order by percentages of their contribution to intake, based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food sources of alpha-linolenic acid (PFA 18:3), listed in descending order by percentages of their contribution to intake, based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

  11. Evaluation of the 183-D Water Filtration Facility for Bat Roosts and Development of a Mitigation Strategy, 100-D Area, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C. T.; Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.

    2011-03-07

    The 183-D Water Filtration Facility is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington. It was used to provide filtered water for cooling the 105-D Reactor and supplying fire-protection and drinking water for all facilities in the 100-D Area. The facility has been inactive since the 1980s and is now scheduled for demolition. Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine if any part of the facility was being used as roosting habitat by bats.

  12. Experimental research on the contrast production of the chemical elements with the atomic numbers 1-83 in a computer-totalbody-tomogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschner, H.; Burmester, U.; Stringaris, K.

    1979-01-01

    The contrast production for the chemical elements with the atomic numbers Z=1-83 were determined by computer-tomography. With the formula relation of the Δ-number and the atomic number can one compute the contrast production of any chosen chemical compound. Iodine-free and inorganic iodine-containing contrast media are examined for their contrast production and compared with presently used organic iodine-containing contrast media. The contrast enhancement of organic contrast media in tissue are discussed. (orig.) [de

  13. Altered spinal microRNA-146a and the microRNA-183 cluster contribute to osteoarthritic pain in knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Kc, Ranjan; Gibson, Gary; Chen, Di; Corbett, Grant T; Pahan, Kalipada; Fayyaz, Sana; Kim, Jae-Sung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Suh, Joon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether altered expression of microRNAs in central nervous system components is pathologically linked to chronic knee joint pain in osteoarthritis. A surgical animal model for knee joint OA was generated by medial meniscus transection in rats followed by behavioral pain tests. Relationships between pathological changes in knee joint and development of chronic joint pain were examined by histology and imaging analyses. Alterations in microRNAs associated with OA-evoked pain sensation were determined in bilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal dorsal horn by microRNA array followed by individual microRNA analyses. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of selected microRNAs (miR-146a and miR-183 cluster) were conducted to identify target pain mediators regulated by these selective microRNAs in glial cells. The ipsilateral hind leg displayed significantly increased hyperalgesia after 4 weeks of surgery, and sensitivity was sustained for the remainder of the 8-week experimental period (F = 341, p pain was correlated with pathological changes in the knee joints as assessed by histological and imaging analyses. MicroRNA analyses showed that miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster were markedly reduced in the sensory neurons in DRG (L4/L5) and spinal cord from animals experiencing knee joint OA pain. The downregulation of miR-146a and/or the miR-183 cluster in the central compartments (DRG and spinal cord) are closely associated with the upregulation of inflammatory pain mediators. The corroboration between decreases in these signature microRNAs and their specific target pain mediators were further confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function analyses in glia, the major cellular component of the central nervous system (CNS). MicroRNA therapy using miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster could be powerful therapeutic intervention for OA in alleviating joint pain and concomitantly regenerating peripheral knee joint cartilage. © 2013

  14. A search for heavy stable and long-lived squarks and sleptons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at energies from 130 to 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Belous, K.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertini, D.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bianchi, F.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenke, T.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burgsmuller, T.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camacho Rozas, A.J.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, P.; Chaussard, L.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Collins, P.; Colomer, M.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Cowell, J.H.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Damgaard, G.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Deghorain, A.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Brabandere, S.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Erzen, B.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Harris, Elisabeth Falk; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Fenyuk, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Fischer, P.A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, J.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gorski, M.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Green, C.; Grimm, H.J.; Gris, P.; Grzelak, K.; Gunther, M.; Guy, J.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Harris, F.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Holthuizen, D.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huet, K.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Koratzinos, M.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kreuter, C.; Kriznic, E.; Krstic, J.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kucewicz, W.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Langefeld, P.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Lorstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazik, J.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Neumeister, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Normand, A.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passon, O.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rakoczy, D.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schneider, H.; Schwemling, P.; Schwickerath, U.; Schyns, M.A.E.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Sheridan, A.; Siebel, M.; Silvestre, R.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Skaali, T.B.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Spiriti, E.; Sponholz, P.; Squarcia, S.; Stampfer, D.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stapnes, S.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Tilquin, A.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkachev, L.G.; Todorova, S.; Toet, D.Z.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Troncon, C.; Tsirou, A.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tzamarias, S.; Uberschar, B.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Vander Velde, C.; Van Apeldoorn, G.W.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Vollmer, C.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zaitsev, A.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    1998-01-01

    A search for stable and long-lived heavy charged particles used the data taken by the DELPHI experiment at energies from 130 to 183 GeV. The Cherenkov light detected in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector and the ionization loss measured in the Time Projection Chamber identify heavy particles from masses of 2 to nearly 89 GeV/c$^2$. Upper limits are given on the production cross-section and masses of sleptons, free squarks with a charge of $q = \\pm 2/3e$ and hadronizing squarks.

  15. Search for invisibly decaying Higgs bosons in e+e- -> Zoho production at sqrt(s) = 183 - 209 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    The OPAL collaboration

    2007-01-01

    A search is performed for Higgs bosons decaying into invisible final states, produced in association with a Zo boson in e+e- collisions at energies between 183 and 209 GeV. The search is based on data samples collected by the OPAL detector at LEP corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 660 pb-1. The analysis aims to select events containing the hadronic decay products of the Zo boson and large missing momentum, as expected from Higgs boson decay into a pair of stable weakly interac...

  16. Measurement of Isolated Prompt Photon Production in Photon-Photon Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{ee}}$=183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    For the first time at LEP the production of prompt photons is studied in the collisions of quasi-real photons using the OPAL data taken at e+e- centre-of-mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. The total inclusive production cross-section for isolated prompt photons in the kinematic range of photon transverse momentum larger than 3.0 GeV and absolute photon pseudorapidity less than 1 is determined to be 0.32 +- 0.04 (stat) +- 0.04 (sys) pb. Differential cross-sections are compared to the predictions of a next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculation.

  17. A human fecal contamination score for ranking recreational sites using the HF183/BacR287 quantitative real-time PCR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiping; Sivaganesan, Mano; Kelty, Catherine A; Wang, Dan; Boehm, Alexandria B; Griffith, John F; Weisberg, Stephen B; Shanks, Orin C

    2018-01-01

    Human fecal pollution of recreational waters remains a public health concern worldwide. As a result, there is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality research and management. However, there are currently no standardized approaches for field implementation and interpretation of qPCR data. In this study, a standardized HF183/BacR287 qPCR method was combined with a water sampling strategy and a novel Bayesian weighted average approach to establish a human fecal contamination score (HFS) that can be used to prioritize sampling sites for remediation based on measured human waste levels. The HFS was then used to investigate 975 study design scenarios utilizing different combinations of sites with varying sampling intensities (daily to once per week) and number of qPCR replicates per sample (2-14 replicates). Findings demonstrate that site prioritization with HFS is feasible and that both sampling intensity and number of qPCR replicates influence reliability of HFS estimates. The novel data analysis strategy presented here provides a prescribed approach for the implementation and interpretation of human-associated HF183/BacR287 qPCR data with the goal of site prioritization based on human fecal pollution levels. In addition, information is provided for future users to customize study designs for optimal HFS performance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Search for Anomalous Production of Acoplanar Di-lepton Events in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=183 and 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A selection of di-lepton events with significant missing transverse momentum has been performed using a total data sample of 237.4 pb-1 at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of 183 GeV and 189 GeV. The observed numbers of events - 78 at 183 GeV and 301 at 189 GeV - are consistent with the numbers expected from Standard Model processes, which arise predominantly from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is also an experimental signature for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Discrimination techniques are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is apparent and model independent limits are presented on the production cross-section times branching ratio squared for sleptons and for leptonically decaying charginos and charged Higgs. Assuming a 100 % branching ratio for the decay of a slepton to a lepton and the lightest neutralino, we exclude at 95...

  19. Search for Acoplanar Lepton Pair Events in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161, 172 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A selection of di-lepton events with significant missing transverse momentum has been performed using a total data sample of 77.0 pb-1 at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV, 172 GeV and 183 GeV. The observed numbers of events: four at 161 GeV, nine at 172 GeV, and 78 at 183 GeV, are consistent with the numbers expected from Standard Model processes, which arise predominantly from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is an experimental signature also for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is apparent and model independent limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio squared for various new physics processes are presented. Assuming a 100% branching ratio for the decay of a right-handed charged slepton to a charged lepton and the lightest neutr...

  20. Search for Anomalous Photonic Events with Missing Energy in $e^{+} e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130, 136 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Photonic events with large missing energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130, 136 and 183 GeV collected in 1997 using the OPAL detector at LEP. Results are presented for event topologies with a single photon and missing transverse energy or with an acoplanar photon pair. Cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of each selection. These results are compared with the expectations from the Standard Model process e+e- to nunubar + photon(s). No evidence is observed for new physics contributions to these final states. Using the data at Ecm = 183 GeV, upper limits on sigma(e+e- to X.Y)*BR(X to Y gamma) and sigma(e+e- to X.X)*BR(X to Y gamma)**2 are derived for the case of stable and invisible Y. These limits apply to single and pair production of excited neutrinos (X = nu*, Y = nu), to neutralino production (X = Chi_2^0, Y = Chi_1^0) and to supersymmetric models in which X = chi_1^0 and Y is a light gravitino.

  1. Tests of the Standard Model and constraints on new physics from measurements of fermion-pair production at 183 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Cross-sections for hadronic, b-bbar and lepton pair final states in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s) = 183 GeV, measured with the OPAL detector at LEP, are presented and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. Forward-backward asymmetries for the leptonic final states have also been measured. Cross-sections and asymmetries are also presented for data recorded in 1997 at sqrt(s) = 130 and 136 GeV. The results are used to measure the energy dependence of the electromagnetic coupling constant alpha_em, and to place limits on new physics as described by four-fermion contact interactions or by the exchange of a new heavy particle such as a leptoquark, or of a squark or sneutrino in supersymmetric theories with R-parity violation.

  2. Analysis for the coolability of the reactor cavity in a Korean 1000 MWe PWR using MELCOR 1.8.3 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Ju Yeul; Chung, Chang Hyun; Park, Soo Yong

    1996-01-01

    The analysis for the coolability of the reactor cavity in typical Korean 1000 MWe Nuclear Unit under severe accidents is performed using MELCOR 1.8.3 code. The key parameters molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) such as melt temperature, concrete ablation history and gas generation are investigated. Total twenty cases are selected according to ejected debris fraction and coolant mass. The ablation rate of concrete decreases as mass of the melt decreases and coolant mass increases. Heat loss from molten pool to coolant is comparable to total decay heat, so concrete ablation is delayed until water is absent and crust begins to remove. Also, overpressurization due to non-condensible gases generated during corium and concrete interacts can cause to additional risk of containment failure. It is concluded that flooded reactor cavity condition is very important to minimize the cavity ablation and pressure load by non-condensible gases on containment

  3. Critical current density of strained multilayer thin films of Nd1.83Ce0.17CuOx/YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.; Gupta, A.; Olsson, E.; Segmueller, A.; Koren, G.

    1990-01-01

    The superconducting transport properties of strained multilayer thin films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ / Nd 1.83 Ce 0.17 CuO x , grown heteroepitaxially by laser ablation deposition, are reported. For individual layer thicknesses below a critical layer thickness of about 250 A, coherency strain removes the orthorhombic distortion in the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ layers and makes them twin-free. Zero-field critical current densities as high as 1.1x10 7 A/cm 2 at 77 K have been measured for the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ layers. Flux pinning energies at zero temperature and zero magnetic field in the range of 80--140 meV have been found

  4. A tentative detection of the 183-GHz water vapor line in the martian atmosphere: Constraints upon the H2O abundance and vertical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, TH.; Lellouch, E.; Cernicharo, J.; Paubert, G.; Gulkis, S.

    1995-01-01

    The 183-GHz water vapor line was tentatively detected on Mars in January 1991, with the IRAM 30-m millimeter antenna, under extremely dry atmospheric conditions. The measurement refers to the whole disk. The spectral line, although marginally detected, can be fit with a constant H2O mixing ratio of 1.0 x 10(exp -5), which corresponds to a water abundance of 1 pr-microns; in any case, an upper limit of 3 pr-microns is inferred. This value is comparable to the very small abundances measured by Clancy (1992) 5 weeks before our observation and seems to imply both seasonal and long-term variations in the martian water cycle.

  5. Search for Anomalous Production of Di-lepton Events with Missing Transverse Momentum in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Caron, B; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kormos, L L; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Leins, A; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; MacPherson, A; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, R J; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01

    In total 1317 di-lepton events with significant missing transverse momentum were identified in a total data sample of 680 pb-1 collected at e+e- centre-of-mass energies ranging from 183 GeV to 209 GeV. The number of di-lepton events, the dependence on centre-of-mass energy, and the event properties are consistent with expectations from Standard Model processes, predominantly W+W- production with both W bosons decaying leptonically. This topology is also an experimental signature for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. No evidence for new phenomena is apparent. Upper limits are presented on the production cross-section multiplied by the relevant branching ratio squared for sleptons, leptonically decaying charginos and charged Higgs bosons. Mass limits are also given.

  6. Effect of a probiotic beverage consumption (Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707 in rats with chemically induced colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Sbaglia Celiberto

    Full Text Available Some probiotic strains have the potential to assist in relieving the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. The impact of daily ingestion of a soy-based product fermented by Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Lactobacillus helveticus 416 with the addition of Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707 on chemically induced colitis has been investigated thereof within a period of 30 days.Colitis was induced by dextran sulfate sodium. The animals were randomly assigned into five groups: Group C: negative control; Group CL: positive control; Group CLF: DSS with the fermented product; Group CLP: DSS with the non-fermented product (placebo; Group CLS: DSS with sulfasalazine. The following parameters were monitored: disease activity index, fecal microbial analyses, gastrointestinal survival of probiotic microorganisms and short-chain fatty acids concentration in the feces. At the end of the protocol the animals' colons were removed so as to conduct a macroscopical and histopathological analysis, cytokines and nitrite quantification.Animals belonging to the CLF group showed fewer symptoms of colitis during the induction period and a lower degree of inflammation and ulceration in their colon compared to the CL, CLS and CLP groups (p<0.05. The colon of the animals in groups CL and CLS presented severe crypt damage, which was absent in CLF and CLP groups. A significant increase in the population of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. at the end of the protocol was verified only in the CLF animals (p<0.05. This group also showed an increase in short-chain fatty acids (propionate and acetate. Furthermore, the intestinal survival of E. faecium CRL 183 and B. longum ATCC 15707 in the CLF group has been confirmed by biochemical and molecular analyzes.The obtained results suggest that a regular intake of the probiotic product, and placebo to a lesser extent, can reduce the severity of DSS-induced colitis on rats.

  7. The co-existence of the IL-18+183 A/G and MMP-9 -1562 C/T polymorphisms is associated with clinical events in coronary artery disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine B Opstad

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-18 has been associated with severity of atherosclerosis and discussed to predict cardiovascular (CV events. We have previously shown that the IL-18+183 G-allele significantly reduces IL-18 levels. This study was aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of the IL-18+183 A/G polymorphism (rs5744292, single and in coexistence with the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 -1562 C/T (rs3918242 polymorphism, in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD. Serum levels of IL-18, MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 were additionally assessed.1001 patients with angiographically verified CAD were genotyped and the biomarkers were measured accordingly. After two years follow-up, 10.6% experienced new clinical events; acute myocardial infarction (AMI, stroke, unstable angina pectoris and death.The IL-18+183 G-allele associated with 35% risk reduction in composite endpoints after adjusting for potential covariates (p = 0.044. The IL-18+183 AA/MMP-9 -1562 CT/TT combined genotypes associated with a significant increase in risk of composite endpoints (OR = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.13-3.11, p = 0.015, adjusted. Patients with clinical events presented with significantly higher IL-18 levels as compared to patients without (p = 0.011, adjusted. The upper tertile of IL-18 levels associated with an increase in risk of AMI as compared to lower tertiles (OR = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.20-4.64, p = 0.013, adjusted.The IL-18+183 A/G polymorphism, single and in combination with MMP-9 genotypes, may influence the risk of clinical events in stable CAD patients.

  8. Messung der Myonpaarproduktion im Prozess e+ e- --> mu+ mu- (gamma) bei Schwerpunktsenergien von 89 GeV bis 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Siedenburg, Thorsten

    2000-01-01

    Presented are the total cross-sections and forward-backward-asymmetries of the reaction at center of mass energies between 89 GeV and 183 GeV at the LEP-accelerator measured with the L3-Detector from 1995 to 1997. These data include measurements from LEP I on the Z-resonance and from LEP II above the W-pairproduction-threshhold. The myonselection acceptance was increased from polar angles above up to Compared to previous measurements, uncertainties are reduced regarding the assumption of lepton-universality and the determination of the Z-mass and width: Fitting the myonpair-data using a parametrisation in effective coupling constants and yields = (91.196Þ0.013) GeV and = (2.497Þ0.021) GeV. Additionally the Z-mass is determined using the S-matrix-parametrisation without restrictions on the -Z interference term. Adding LEP II data to the LEP I results halves the error on the Z-mass. The results presented in this thesis are obtained by using the FB myonchambersystem - installed before 1995 LEP running - to its...

  9. Is Office-Based Surgery Safe? Comparing Outcomes of 183,914 Aesthetic Surgical Procedures Across Different Types of Accredited Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun; Parikh, Rikesh; Nguyen, Lyly; Afshari, Ashkan; Shack, R Bruce; Grotting, James C; Higdon, K Kye

    2017-02-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in office-based surgery. However, due to wide variations in regulatory standards, the safety of office-based aesthetic surgery has been questioned. This study compares complication rates of cosmetic surgery performed at office-based surgical suites (OBSS) to ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and hospitals. A prospective cohort of patients undergoing cosmetic surgery between 2008 and 2013 were identified from the CosmetAssure database (Birmingham, AL). Patients were grouped by type of accredited facility where the surgery was performed: OBSS, ASC, or hospital. The primary outcome was the incidence of major complication(s) requiring emergency room visit, hospital admission, or reoperation within 30 days postoperatively. Potential risk factors including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), smoking, diabetes, type of procedure, and combined procedures were reviewed. Of the 129,007 patients (183,914 procedures) in the dataset, the majority underwent the procedure at ASCs (57.4%), followed by hospitals (26.7%) and OBSS (15.9%). Patients operated in OBSS were less likely to undergo combined procedures (30.3%) compared to ASCs (31.8%) and hospitals (35.3%, P procedures. Plastic surgeons should continue to triage their patients carefully based on other significant comorbidities that were not measured in this present study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 3. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Reliability and Validity Measurement of Sagittal Lumbosacral Quiet Standing Posture with a Smartphone Application in a Mixed Population of 183 College Students and Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Koumantakis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate recording of spinal posture with simple and accessible measurement devices in clinical practice may lead to spinal loading optimization in occupations related to prolonged sitting and standing postures. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish the level of reliability of sagittal lumbosacral posture in quiet standing and the validity of the method in differentiating between male and female subjects, establishing in parallel a normative database. 183 participants (83 males and 100 females, with no current low back or pelvic pain, were assessed using the “iHandy Level” smartphone application. Intrarater reliability (3 same-day sequential measurements was high for both the lumbar curve (ICC2,1: 0.96, SEM: 2.13°, and MDC95%: 5.9° and the sacral slope (ICC2,1: 0.97, SEM: 1.61°, and MDC95%: 4.46° sagittal alignment. Data analysis for each gender separately confirmed equally high reliability for both male and female participants. Correlation between lumbar curve and sacral slope was high (Pearson’s r=0.86, p<0.001. Between-gender comparisons confirmed the validity of the method to differentiate between male and female lumbar curve and sacral slope angles, with females generally demonstrating greater lumbosacral values (p<0.001. The “iHandy Level” application is a reliable and valid tool in the measurement of lumbosacral quiet standing spinal posture in the sagittal plane.

  11. Search for Pair-Produced Neutralinos in Events with Photons and Missing Energy from $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\Sqrt{s}=130-183$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerruti, C; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Collins, P; Colomer, M; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Damgaard, G; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Gris, P; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Masik, J; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rakoczy, D; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Silvestre, R; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    The events with two photons and missing (transverse) energy collected by the DELPHI detector at centre-of-mass energies between 130~GeV and 183~GeV have been studied to search for processes of the type $\\mbox{e}^+\\mbox{e}^- \\to \\mbox{Y} \\mbox{Y}$ with the subsequent decay $\\mbox{Y} \\to \\mbox{X} \\gamma$, where X is an undetectable neutral particle. Reactions of this kind are expected in supersymmetric models, where the Y particle can be either the lightest neutralino, decaying to a photon and a gravitino, or the next-to-lightest neutralino, decaying to a photon and the lightest neutralino. To study the case of long-lived Y particles, a search for single-photon events with the reconstructed photon axis pointing far from the beam interaction region has also been performed. No evidence for a deviation from Standard Model expectations has been observed in the data and upper limits have been derived on the signal cross-section as a function of the the X and Y masses and of the Y mean decay path.

  12. Search for stable and long-lived massive charged particles in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; List, B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    A search for stable and long-lived massive particles of electric charge |Q/e| = 1 or 2/3, pair-produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 130 to 183 GeV, is reported by the OPAL collaboration at LEP. No evidence for production of these particles was observed in a mass range between 45 and 89.5 GeV. Model-independent upper limits on the production cross-section between 0.05 and 0.19 pb have been derived for scalar and spin-1/2 particles with charge +/-1. Within the framework of the minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM), this implies a lower limit of 82.5 (83.5) GeV on the mass of long-lived right- (left-)handed scalar muons and scalar taus. Long-lived charged leptons and charginos are excluded for masses below 89.5 GeV. For particles with charge +/-2/3 the upper limits on the production cross-section vary between 0.05 and 0.2 pb. All limits, on masses and on cross-sections, are valid at the 95% confidence level for particles with lifetimes longer than 10^{-6} s.

  13. Search for invisibly decaying Higgs bosons in $e^{+}e^{-} \\rightarrow Z^{0}h^{0}$ production at $\\sqrt{s} = 183 - 209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, R.M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2010-01-01

    A search is performed for Higgs bosons decaying into invisible final states, produced in association with a Zo boson in e+e- collisions at energies between 183 and 209 GeV. The search is based on data samples collected by the OPAL detector at LEP corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 660 pb-1. The analysis aims to select events containing the hadronic decay products of the Zo boson and large missing momentum, as expected from Higgs boson decay into a pair of stable weakly interacting neutral particles, such as the lightest neutralino in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. The same analysis is applied to a search for nearly invisible Higgs boson cascade decays into stable weakly interacting neutral particles. No excess over the expected background from Standard Model processes is observed. Limits on the production of invisibly decaying Higgs bosons produced in association with a Zo boson are derived. Assuming a branching ratio BR(ho->invisible)=1, a lower limit of 108.2 GeV is placed on the...

  14. Propuesta de actividades físico-recreativas para el adulto mayor, de la Circunscripción 183 del Consejo Popular Hermanos Cruz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lidia Díaz Somonte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Las actividades físico-recreativas y deportivas son de suma importancia en la tercera edad, con el proceso de envejecimiento el adulto mayor sufre cambios a nivel físico, psíquico y social, ya que a la vez estas actividades tienen un papel fundamental que es el mantenimiento, mejoramiento de su salud y el bienestar del adulto mayor o sea mejorar su estilo de vida. Se realiza una propuesta de actividades físico recreativas para la tercera edad Que tiene como objetivo principal proponer un grupo de actividades físico-recreativas y deportivas en función de lograr un mejor estilo de vida del adulto mayor perteneciente al Consultorio Médico No. 40 de la Circunscripción No 183 del Consejo Popular Hermanos Cruz del Municipio Pinar del Río, motivado esto por el diagnóstico realizado que nos demostró la existencia de dificultades para la ocupación del tiempo libre de los ancianos de la comunidad ya mencionada.

  15. RPC Calculations for K-forbidden Transitions in {sup 183}W, Evidence for Large Inertial Parameter Connected with High-lying Rotational Bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, S G [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden); Wahlborn, S [Div. of Theore tical Physics, Royal Inst. of Technology Stockholm (Sweden)

    1967-09-15

    Recent measurements have shown that the transitions deexciting the 453 keV 7/2{sup -} level in {sup 183}W to the K = 1/2{sup -} and 3/2{sup -} bands are strongly retarded. The data for B(M1) and B(E2) are analyzed in terms of the RPC model (rotation + particle motion + coupling). With the {delta}K = 1 (Coriolis) coupling, the K-forbidden M1-transitions proceed via admixtures of high-lying 5/2{sup -} bands. A reasonable and unambiguous fit to the data is obtained by varying the strength of the coupling. Allowing for various uncertainties and corrections, one finds that the inertial parameter (the inverse of the coupling constant, i. e. 2J(2{pi}){sup 2}/({Dirac_h}){sup 2} may have values between roughly 1 and 3 times the rigid rotator value of 2J(2{pi}){sup 2}/({Dirac_h}){sup 2}, thus being unexpectedly large. Calculations with the {delta}K=2 coupling were also performed and turn out not to give better agreement with experiment.

  16. CloudSat-Constrained Cloud Ice Water Path and Cloud Top Height Retrievals from MHS 157 and 183.3 GHz Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, J.; Wu, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Ice water path (IWP) and cloud top height (ht) are two of the key variables in determining cloud radiative and thermodynamical properties in climate models. Large uncertainty remains among IWP measurements from satellite sensors, in large part due to the assumptions made for cloud microphysics in these retrievals. In this study, we develop a fast algorithm to retrieve IWP from the 157, 183.3+/-3 and 190.3 GHz radiances of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) such that the MHS cloud ice retrieval is consistent with CloudSat IWP measurements. This retrieval is obtained by constraining the empirical forward models between collocated and coincident measurements of CloudSat IWP and MHS cloud-induced radiance depression (Tcir) at these channels. The empirical forward model is represented by a lookup table (LUT) of Tcir-IWP relationships as a function of ht and the frequency channel.With ht simultaneously retrieved, the IWP is found to be more accurate. The useful range of the MHS IWP retrieval is between 0.5 and 10 kg/sq m, and agrees well with CloudSat in terms of the normalized probability density function (PDF). Compared to the empirical model, current operational radiative transfer models (RTMs) still have significant uncertainties in characterizing the observed Tcir-IWP relationships. Therefore, the empirical LUT method developed here remains an effective approach to retrieving ice cloud properties from the MHS-like microwave channels.

  17. Scaling violations of quark and gluon jet fragmentation functions in $e^{+}e{-}$ annihilations at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91.2 and 183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    Flavour inclusive, udsc and b fragmentation functions in unbiased jets, and flavour inclusive, udsc, b and gluon fragmentation functions in biased jets are measured in e+e- annihilations from data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 91.2, and 183-209 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The unbiased jets are defined by hemispheres of inclusive hadronic events, while the biased jet measurements are based on three-jet events selected with jet algorithms. Several methods are employed to extract the fragmentation functions over a wide range of scales. Possible biases are studied in the results are obtained. The fragmentation functions are compared to results from lower energy e+e- experiments and with earlier LEP measurements and are found to be consistent. Scaling violations are observed and are found to be stronger for the fragmentation functions of gluon jets than for those of quarks. The measured fragmentation functions are compared to three recent theoretical next-to-leading order calculations and to the p...

  18. Armazenamento refrigerado sob atmosfera modificada de pedúnculos de cajueiro-anão-precoce dos clones CCP-76, end-157, end-183 e end-189 Storage of cashew apples from dwarf clones CCP-76, end-157, end-183 and end-189 under refrigeration and modified atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auricélia de Souza Morais

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Pedúnculos de clones de cajueiro-anão-precoce, dos clones CCP-76, END-157, END-183 e END-189, foram armazenados durante 25 dias, sob refrigeração associada a atmosfera modificada, com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito das condições atualmente utilizadas (5ºC e 85-90% de UR para conservação, transporte e comercialização de cajus in natura. Os pedúnculos foram avaliados a cada 5 dias quanto às seguintes características: perda de peso, firmeza, cor (antocianinas, sólidos e açúcares solúveis, acidez, pH, vitamina C e compostos fenólicos. O uso da refrigeração (5ºC e 85% U.R, associada a atmosfera modificada, proporcionou uma vida útil pós-colheita de 10 dias para o clone END 189, de até 15 dias para o clone END 157 e de até 25 dias para os clones CCP 76 e END 183. A temperatura de 5ºC não se mostrou adequada para armazenamento de pedúnculos de coloração mais intensa (END 157 e END 189 que a testemunha (CCP 76, provocando perda de cor (antocianinas a partir do 10º dia de armazenamento. A atmosfera modificada reduziu significativamente a perda de peso, favorecendo a aparência do produto para comercialização, independentemente do clone estudado.Apples or false fruits from early dwarf cashew clones CCP-76, END-157, END-183 and END-189 were stored for 25 days under refrigeration associated to modified atmosphere with the aim of evaluating the effect of the conditions presently adopted (5ºC and 85-90% RH for conservation, storage and commercialization of fresh cashew apples. The cashew apples were evaluated every 5 days for the following characteristics: weight loss, pulp firmness, color (anthocyannins, acidity, pH, soluble solids, vitamin C and phenolic contents. With the use of refrigeration and modified atmosphere it was possible to attain postharvest storage life of 10 days for clone END 189, 15 days for clone END 157 and up to 25 days for clones CCP 76 and END 183. It was found that 5ºC was not an adequate

  19. Geological interpretation of volcanism and segmentation of the Mariana back-arc spreading center between 12.7°N and 18.3°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa O.; Chadwick, William W.; Hannington, Mark D.; Merle, Susan G.; Resing, Joseph A.; Baker, Edward T.; Butterfield, David A.; Walker, Sharon L.; Augustin, Nico

    2017-06-01

    The relationships between tectonic processes, magmatism, and hydrothermal venting along ˜600 km of the slow-spreading Mariana back-arc between 12.7°N and 18.3°N reveal a number of similarities and differences compared to slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges. Analysis of the volcanic geomorphology and structure highlights the complexity of the back-arc spreading center. Here, ridge segmentation is controlled by large-scale basement structures that appear to predate back-arc rifting. These structures also control the orientation of the chains of cross-arc volcanoes that characterize this region. Segment-scale faulting is oriented perpendicular to the spreading direction, allowing precise spreading directions to be determined. Four morphologically distinct segment types are identified: dominantly magmatic segments (Type I); magmatic segments currently undergoing tectonic extension (Type II); dominantly tectonic segments (Type III); and tectonic segments currently undergoing magmatic extension (Type IV). Variations in axial morphology (including eruption styles, neovolcanic eruption volumes, and faulting) reflect magma supply, which is locally enhanced by cross-arc volcanism associated with N-S compression along the 16.5°N and 17.0°N segments. In contrast, cross-arc seismicity is associated with N-S extension and increased faulting along the 14.5°N segment, with structures that are interpreted to be oceanic core complexes—the first with high-resolution bathymetry described in an active back-arc basin. Hydrothermal venting associated with recent magmatism has been discovered along all segment types.

  20. Significance of fragmented QRS complexes for identifying culprit lesions in patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a single-center, retrospective analysis of 183 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Rong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragmented QRS (fQRS complexes are novel electrocardiographic signals, which reflect myocardial conduction delays in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. The importance of fQRS complexes in identifying culprit vessels was evaluated in this retrospective study. Methods A 12-lead surface electrocardiogram was obtained in 183 patients who had non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI and subsequently underwent coronary angiography (CAG. On the basis of the frequency of fQRS complexes, indices such as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio were evaluated to determine the ability of fQRS complexes to identify the culprit vessels. Results Among the patients studied, elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years and those with diabetes had a significantly higher frequency of fQRS complexes (p = 0.005, p = 0.003, respectively. The fQRS complexes recorded in the 4 precordial leads had the highest specificity (81.8% for indentifying the culprit vessel (left anterior descending artery. However, the specificity of fQRS complexes to identify lesions in the left circumflex and right coronary arteries was lower for the inferior and lateral leads than for the limb leads (65.5% versus 71.7%; however, the limb leads had higher sensitivity (92.3% versus 89.4%. And the total sensitivity and specificity of fQRS (77.1% and 71.5% were higher than those values for ischemic T-waves. Conclusions The frequency of fQRS complexes was higher in elderly and diabetic patients with NSTEMI. The frequency of fQRS complexes recorded in each of the ECG leads can be used to identify culprit vessels in patients with NSTEMI.

  1. Determination of the human cytochrome P450 monooxygenase catalyzing the enantioselective oxidation of 2,2',3,5',6-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 95) and 2,2',3,4,4',5',6-heptachlorobiphenyl (PCB 183).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Haruna; Kakimoto, Kensaku; Konishi, Yoshimasa; Kajimura, Keiji; Nakano, Takeshi

    2017-10-17

    2,2',3,5',6-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 95) and 2,2',3,4,4',5',6-heptachlorobiphenyl (PCB 183) possess axial chirality and form the aS and aR enantiomers. The enantiomers of these congeners have been reported to accumulate in the human body enantioselectively via unknown mechanisms. In this study, we determined the cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenase responsible for the enantioselective oxidization of PCB 95 and PCB 183, using a recombinant human CYP monooxygenase. We evaluated 13 CYP monooxygenases, namely CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, CYP2E1, CYP2J2, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F2, and aromatase (CYP19), and revealed that CYP2A6 preferably oxidizes aS-PCB 95 enantioselectively; however, it did not oxidize PCB 183. The enantiomer composition was elevated from 0.5 (racemate) to 0.54. In addition, following incubation with CYP2A6, the enantiomer fraction (EF) of PCB 95 demonstrated a time-dependent increase.

  2. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Araceli Rivera Casado

    Full Text Available The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil spill-impacted sites containing from 16 to 340 g/Kg total hydrocarbons (THC was assessed to investigate if this is a C18:3 species and if the hydrocarbon removal during the phytoremediation process has a relationship with the fatty acid profile of this plant. The fatty acid profile was specific to each vegetative organ and was strongly affected by the hydrocarbons level in the impacted sites. Leaf extracts of plants from uncontaminated soil produced palmitic acid (C16, octadecanoic acid (C18:0, unsaturated oleic acids (C18:1-C18:3, and unsaturated eichosanoic (C20:2-C20:3 acids with a noticeable absence of the unsaturated hexadecatrienoic acid (C16:3; this finding demonstrates, for the first time, that C. laxus is a C18:3 plant. In plants from the phytoremediation systems, the total fatty acid contents in the leaf and the corm were negatively affected by the hydrocarbons presence; however, the effect was positive in root. Interestingly, under contaminated conditions, unusual fatty acids such as odd numbered carbons (C15, C17, C21, and C23 and uncommon unsaturated chains (C20:3n6 and C20:4 were produced together with a remarkable quantity of C22:2 and C24:0 chains in the corm and the leaf. These results demonstrate that weathered hydrocarbons may drastically affect the lipidic composition of C. laxus at the fatty acid level, suggesting that this species adjusts the cover lipid composition in its vegetative organs, mainly in roots, in response to the weathered hydrocarbon presence and uptake during the phytoremediation process.

  3. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Rodríguez Vázquez, Refugio; Esparza García, Fernando José; Pérez Vargas, Josefina; Ariza Castolo, Armando; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Gómez Guzmán, Octavio

    2015-01-01

    The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil spill-impacted sites containing from 16 to 340 g/Kg total hydrocarbons (THC) was assessed to investigate if this is a C18:3 species and if the hydrocarbon removal during the phytoremediation process has a relationship with the fatty acid profile of this plant. The fatty acid profile was specific to each vegetative organ and was strongly affected by the hydrocarbons level in the impacted sites. Leaf extracts of plants from uncontaminated soil produced palmitic acid (C16), octadecanoic acid (C18:0), unsaturated oleic acids (C18:1-C18:3), and unsaturated eichosanoic (C20:2-C20:3) acids with a noticeable absence of the unsaturated hexadecatrienoic acid (C16:3); this finding demonstrates, for the first time, that C. laxus is a C18:3 plant. In plants from the phytoremediation systems, the total fatty acid contents in the leaf and the corm were negatively affected by the hydrocarbons presence; however, the effect was positive in root. Interestingly, under contaminated conditions, unusual fatty acids such as odd numbered carbons (C15, C17, C21, and C23) and uncommon unsaturated chains (C20:3n6 and C20:4) were produced together with a remarkable quantity of C22:2 and C24:0 chains in the corm and the leaf. These results demonstrate that weathered hydrocarbons may drastically affect the lipidic composition of C. laxus at the fatty acid level, suggesting that this species adjusts the cover lipid composition in its vegetative organs, mainly in roots, in response to the weathered hydrocarbon presence and uptake during the phytoremediation process. PMID:26473488

  4. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Casado, Noemí Araceli; Montes Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Rodríguez Vázquez, Refugio; Esparza García, Fernando José; Pérez Vargas, Josefina; Ariza Castolo, Armando; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Gómez Guzmán, Octavio; Calva Calva, Graciano

    2015-01-01

    The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil spill-impacted sites containing from 16 to 340 g/Kg total hydrocarbons (THC) was assessed to investigate if this is a C18:3 species and if the hydrocarbon removal during the phytoremediation process has a relationship with the fatty acid profile of this plant. The fatty acid profile was specific to each vegetative organ and was strongly affected by the hydrocarbons level in the impacted sites. Leaf extracts of plants from uncontaminated soil produced palmitic acid (C16), octadecanoic acid (C18:0), unsaturated oleic acids (C18:1-C18:3), and unsaturated eichosanoic (C20:2-C20:3) acids with a noticeable absence of the unsaturated hexadecatrienoic acid (C16:3); this finding demonstrates, for the first time, that C. laxus is a C18:3 plant. In plants from the phytoremediation systems, the total fatty acid contents in the leaf and the corm were negatively affected by the hydrocarbons presence; however, the effect was positive in root. Interestingly, under contaminated conditions, unusual fatty acids such as odd numbered carbons (C15, C17, C21, and C23) and uncommon unsaturated chains (C20:3n6 and C20:4) were produced together with a remarkable quantity of C22:2 and C24:0 chains in the corm and the leaf. These results demonstrate that weathered hydrocarbons may drastically affect the lipidic composition of C. laxus at the fatty acid level, suggesting that this species adjusts the cover lipid composition in its vegetative organs, mainly in roots, in response to the weathered hydrocarbon presence and uptake during the phytoremediation process.

  5. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:10, 1607-F3 Sanitary Sewer Pipelines (182-F, 183-F, and 151-F Sanitary Sewer Lines), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-028

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-12-03

    The 100-F-26:10 waste site includes sanitary sewer lines that serviced the former 182-F, 183-F, and 151-F Buildings. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  6. Measurement of the Cross-Section for the Process $\\gamma-\\gamma$ to Proton-Antiproton at $\\sqrt{s_{ee}}$ = 183 - 189 GeV with the OPAL Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Barillari, T

    2004-01-01

    The exclusive production of proton-antiproton pairs in the collisions of two quasi-real photons has been studied using data taken at sqrt(s_ee) = 183 GeV and 189 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. Results are presented for proton-antiproton invariant masses, W, in the range 2.15 < W < 3.95 GeV. The cross-section measurements are compared with previous data and with recent analytic calculations based on the quark-diquark model.

  7. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:10, 1607-F3 Sanitary Sewer Pipelines (182-F, 183-F, and 151-F Sanitary Sewer Lines). Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-028

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The 100-F-26:10 waste site includes sanitary sewer lines that serviced the former 182-F, 183-F, and 151-F Buildings. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  8. Measurement of the Cross-Section for the Process $\\gamma\\gamma \\to p \\overline{p}$ at $\\sqrt{s}_{ee}$=183-189 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    The exclusive production of proton-antiproton pairs in the collisions of two quasi-real photons had been studied using data taken at sqrt(s)_ee=183 GeV and 189 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. Results are presented for Ppbar invariant masses, W, in the range 2.15 W< <3.95 GeV. The cross-section measurements are compared with previous data and with recent analytic calculations based on the quark-diquark model.

  9. Food sources of total omega 3 fatty acids (18:3 + 20:5 + 22:6), listed in descending order by percentages of their contribution to intake, based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food sources of total omega 3 fatty acids (18:3 + 20:5 + 22:6), listed in descending order by percentages of their contribution to intake, based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

  10. Inclusive production of $D^{*\\pm}$ mesons in photon-photon collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{ee}$= 183 and 189 GeV and a first measurement of $F^{\\gamma}_{2,c}$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The inclusive production of D*+- mesons in photon-photon collisions has been measured using the OPAL detector at LEP at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of 183 and 189GeV. The D* mesons are reconstructed in their decay to D0pi+ with the D0 observed in the two decay modes Kpi+ and Kpi+pi-pi+. After background subtraction, 100.4+-12.6(stat) D*+- mesons have been selected in events without observed scattered beam electron ("anti-tagged") and 29.8+-5.9 (stat) D*+- mesons in events where one beam electron is scattered into the detector ("single-tagged"). Direct and single-resolved events are studied separately. Differential cross-sections as functions of the D* transverse momentum p_t and pseudorapidity \\eta are presented in the kinematic region 2

  11. Production of D* mesons in photon-photon collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{ee}$ = 183 GeV and 189 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Patt, J

    2000-01-01

    The inclusive production of D*/sup +or-/ mesons in photon-photon collisions has been measured using the OPAL detector at LEP at e/sup +/e/sup -/ centre-of-mass energies square root (s/sub ee/) of 183 and 189 GeV. The D*/sup +/ mesons are reconstructed in their decay to D /sup 0/ pi /sup +/ with the D/sup 0/ observed in the two decay modes K/sup -/ pi /sup +/ and K/sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup +/. After background subtraction, 121+or-14 (stat.) D*/sup +or-/ events have been selected. Jets are reconstructed using a cone jet finding algorithm to separate direct and single-resolved events. Differential cross-sections d sigma /dp/sub T//sup D/* and d sigma /d eta /sup D /* as functions of the D*/sup +or-/ transverse momentum p/sub T//sup D/* and pseudorapidity eta /sup D/* are presented in the kinematic region 2

  12. Publications | Page 183 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    We share the results of our funded research, and offer free training materials to ... poor, combined with less education and limited access to healthcare services. ... It provides one of the few opportunities for rural women to receive technical and.

  13. 50 CFR 18.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to, any raw, dressed, or dyed fur or skin: Scientific name Common name Date listed Ursus maritimus Polar bear Dec. 21, 1972. Enhydra lutris Sea otter Do. Odobenus rosmarus Walrus Do. Dugong dugon Dugong...

  14. AFJU OFC 18(3).indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imac-3

    Patients and methods: The archival materials of 180 urinary bladder specimens were collected from Depart ... and petrochemical industries are associating with increased risk of ... turia, irritative symptoms, constipation, fecal incontinence, back.

  15. 21 CFR 133.183 - Romano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or added thereto. Harmless artificial blue or green coloring in a quantity which neutralizes any... harmless preparation of enzymes of animal or plant origin capable of aiding in the curing or development of... origin may be declared as “enzymes”. [42 FR 14366, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 48 FR 49014, Oct. 24...

  16. 186 183 Potassium Bromate Content of Bread

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-02

    Dec 2, 2008 ... milk or juice) fats, sugar, salt, eggs, leavening ... soluble in water and almost insoluble in alcohol. It has a vapour ... quality of bread as the main vitamins available in bread are ... metropolis are still being exposed to this toxic ...

  17. 33 CFR 183.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... not limited to mechanical, hydraulic, or electrical control systems. Sailboat means a boat designed or... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS... outer sides of the boat excluding handles, and other similar fittings, attachments, and extensions. Boat...

  18. AFJU OFC 18(3).indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imac-3

    to 88 years, with a male to female ratio of 4 to 1. ... visual internal urethrotomy (n = 86), endoscopic cystolitholapaxy (n = 10), and rigid retrograde endoscopic ... Surgical trainees can benefit by learning the technique of caudal ... less performed in our environment because of high cost of procur- ... Urethral stricture. 87 (19.8).

  19. 29 CFR 1910.183 - Helicopters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... objects. The employer shall take all necessary precautions to protect employees from flying objects in the... safety. The size and weight of loads, and the manner in which loads are connected to the helicopter shall...

  20. 47 CFR 95.183 - Prohibited communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... amuse or entertain; (7) Obscene, profane or indecent words, language or meaning; (8) Advertisements or... campaign (messages about the campaign business may be communicated); (10) International distress signals, such as the word “Mayday” (except when on a ship, aircraft or other vehicle in immediate danger to ask...

  1. 50 CFR 218.183 - Mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... within the command structure in order to facilitate implementation of mitigation measures if marine... attention to the things on the outer edges of their field of vision. (viii) Marine observers shall be...

  2. AFJU OFC 18(3).indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imac-3

    www.ees.elsevier.com/afju www.sciencedirect.com. Pattern of presentation and management of patients with undescended testis at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical. Center, Tanzania. G. Afrika Gasana , K.A. Mteta. Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, P.O. Box 2240, Moshi, Tanzania. Received 19 February 2012; ...

  3. 28 CFR 18.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... agency which has received a research, statistics, discretionary, technical assistance, special emphasis...) Categorical grant applicant means a public or private agency which has applied for a research, statistics... Justice Act means the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, 42 U.S.C. 5601, et seq., as...

  4. AFJU OFC 18(3).indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imac-3

    On average follow-up of 13.5 months all patients were pain free and renal dynamic scan showed non-obstructed clearance. Conclusions: Robotic retrocaval ureter repair .... ureter with an S-shaped, fish hook, or shepherd's crook appearance as type I and a less angulated “sickle-shaped” ureteral deformity as type II [7].

  5. AFJU OFC 18(3).indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imac-3

    a Department of Radiology, Aga Khan Medical University, Karachi, Pakistan b Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA c Department of Surgery, Aga .... In defense of IVU, Saeed et al. [12] noted that the addition of ...

  6. Publications | Page 183 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    We share the results of our funded research, and offer free training materials to guide ... Fishers (Paraty, RJ) and fish manipulation time : a variable associated to the ... Among the challenges they face are the high prices demanded by water ...

  7. AFJU OFC 18(3).indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imac-3

    Abstract. Objectives: To compare the results of anastomotic versus augmentation urethroplasty (buccal mucosa graft. (BMG) onlay), as well as dorsal versus ventral BMG techniques. Methods: A retrospective audit of 69 patients who underwent urethroplasty at Eersteriver Hospital in Cape. Town, South Africa between ...

  8. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  9. AFJU OFC 18(3).indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imac-3

    Loss of pubic and axillary hair, reduced shaving. Less specific .... hemoglobin, lipid profile, liver function tests, vitamin D3 and serum calcium. Dosage ... [14] Isidori AM, Giannetta E, Gianfrilli D, Greco EA, Bonifacio V, Aversa. A, et al. Effects of ...

  10. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... midsagittal plane of the neck-headform assembly is vertical and perpendicular to the plane of motion of the... history of the pendulum falls inside the corridor determined by the upper and lower boundaries specified... maximum rotation in the lateral direction of the reference plane of the headform (175-9000) as shown in...

  11. Search Results | Page 183 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... in 1953, Bolivia has gone through a long and conflictive process related to land redistribution. ... Decentralized Urban Solid Waste Management in Indonesia. Urban areas of Indonesia generate about 55 000 tonnes of solid waste per day, ...

  12. Alpha-eleostearic acid (9Z11E13E-18:3) is quickly converted to conjugated linoleic acid (9Z11E-18:2) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Tsuyoshi; Tokuyama, Yoshiko; Igarashi, Miki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Komai, Michio; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2004-10-01

    We previously showed that alpha-eleostearic acid (alpha-ESA; 9Z11E13E-18:3) is converted to conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; 9,11-18:2) in the liver and plasma of rats that were given diets including 1% alpha-ESA for 4 wk. In this study, we investigated this phenomenon in detail. First, the chemical structure of CLA produced by alpha-ESA administration was determined. After alpha-ESA was orally administered to rats, CLA in rat liver was isolated by HPLC. The positional and geometric isomerism was determined using GC-EI/MS and (13)C-NMR, respectively, and the CLA generated in rats after alpha-ESA feeding was confirmed to be 9Z11E-CLA. Next, the concentrations of alpha-ESA and CLA were determined 0, 3, 6, and 24 h after oral administration of alpha-ESA to rats. Moreover, we also investigated whether enteric bacteria are involved in the conversion of alpha-ESA to CLA using germ-free rats. alpha-ESA was orally administered to germ-free and normal rats and alpha-ESA and CLA were detected in the organs of both groups. In addition, to confirm that this reaction was enzyme-mediated, alpha-ESA was reacted with tissue homogenates (liver, kidney, and small intestine mucous) and coenzymes (NADH, NAD(+), NADPH, and NADP(+)), and the enzyme activities were estimated from the amount of CLA produced. CLA was detected when alpha-ESA was reacted with liver, kidney, and small intestine mucous homogenates and a coenzyme (NADPH). These results indicated that alpha-ESA is converted to 9Z11E-CLA in rats by a Delta13-saturation reaction carried out by an NADPH-dependent enzyme.

  13. Avaliação do simbiótico fermentado com Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 e Lactobacillus helveticus ssp jugurti 416, à base de extratos aquosos de soja e de yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) no controle do desenvolvimento do Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Roselino, Mariana Nougalli [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    O presente trabalho avaliou os efeitos do simbiótico fermentado com Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 e Lactobacillus helveticus ssp jugurti 416, à base de extratos de soja e de yacon produzidos em ratos com Diabetes mellitus, cuja indução foi feita quimicamente pela administração intraperitoneal de estreptozotocina (50mg/kg de peso corporal). Os animais foram divididos em quatro grupos experimentais (n=10): I - animais não diabéticos que receberam somente ração (controle negativo); II - animais d...

  14. Combining results of two GC separations partly achieves determination of all cis and trans 16:1, 18:1, 18:2 and 18:3 except CLA isomers of milk fat as demonstrated using Ag-ion SPE fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, John K G; Hernandez, Marta; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Kraft, Jana; Dugan, Michael E R

    2008-03-01

    Milk fat is a complex mixture of geometric and positional isomers of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated, including short-, long- and branch-chain fatty acids (FAs). There has been partial success to resolve this mixture of FAs using different GC temperature programs, or a combination of GC isothermal and temperature programs. To overcome the problem associated with overlapping isomers prior silver-ion separation was recommended. However, this procedure is time consuming and not practical for routine analysis. In addition, previous methods focused mainly on the trans and cis isomers of 18:1. The present method takes advantage of differences in the relative elution times between different types of FAs. The method involved analyzing each milk fat using the same highly polar 100-m capillary column and GC instrument, and conducting two separations using temperature programs that plateau at 175 and 150 degrees C. The relative shift among the geometric and positional isomers at these two temperature settings was enough to permit identification of most of the trans and cis 16:1, 18:1 and 20:1, the c/t-18:2 and the c/c/t-18:3 isomers found in milk fat. The identity of these FAs was confirmed by prior separation of the total fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) of milk fat using Ag(+)-SPE columns, and comparing the fractions to the total milk fat. The Ag(+)-SPE technique was modified to obtain pure saturated, trans- and cis-monounsaturated and diunsaturated FAMEs. By combining the results from these two separate GC analyses, knowing the elution order, it was possible to determine most of the geometric and positional isomers of 16:1, 18:1, 20:1, 18:2 and 18:3 without a prior silver-ion separation. Only few minor FAs could not be resolved, notable the conjugated linoleic acid isomers that still required the complimentary Ag(+)-HPLC separation. The two GC temperature programs have been successfully used to routinely analyze most FA isomers in total milk and beef fats in about 200

  15. 46 CFR 183.324 - Dual voltage generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS... neutral of a dual voltage system must be solidly connected at the switchboard's neutral bus; and (2) The neutral bus shall be connected to ground. (b) The neutral of a dual voltage system must be accessible for...

  16. All projects related to | Page 183 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Advancing Equity in Universal Health Coverage and in the Social ... with digital technology-leverage cyberspace to organize and change their worlds. ... interconnected challenges to constitutional and human rights guarantees are emerging.

  17. 33 CFR 183.570 - Fuel filters and strainers: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements... the engine or boat structure independent from its fuel line connections, unless the fuel filter or...

  18. Publications - GMC 183 | Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical

    Science.gov (United States)

    materials: AK State C #1, Bush Federal #1, Echooka Unit #1, Fin Creek Unit #1, E. De K. Leffingwell #1, Nora materials: AK State C #1, Bush Federal #1, Echooka Unit #1, Fin Creek Unit #1, E. De K. Leffingwell #1, Nora

  19. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 183-N Backwash Discharge Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. Liquid effluents on the Hanford Site have been classified as Phase I, Phase II, and Miscellaneous Streams. The Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 establishes milestones for State Waste Discharge Permit application submittals for all Phase I and Phase II streams, as well as the following 11 Miscellaneous Streams as identified in Table 4 of the Consent Order No. DE91NM-177.

  20. Far East Asia | Page 183 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tim Unwin, titulaire de la chaire UNESCO en TIC pour le développement et professeur de géographie, Royal Holloway, Université de Londres ... For observers elsewhere in the world, the most striking feature of distance education (DE) in Asia is the mega-universities and mega-schools that have added many millions to the ...

  1. 76 FR 183 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (10-172)] NASA Advisory Council... the NASA Advisory Council. The meeting will be held for the purpose of soliciting from the aeronautics... 20546, (202) 358-0566, or [email protected]nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting will be open...

  2. MELCOR 1.8.3 assessment: CSE containment spray experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-12-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code, being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRS. As part, of an ongoing assessment program, the MELCOR computer code has been used to analyze a series of containment spray tests performed in the Containment Systems Experiment (CSE) vessel to evaluate the performance of aqueous sprays as a means of decontaminating containment atmospheres. Basecase MELCOR results are compared with test data, and a number of sensitivity studies on input modelling parameters and options in both the spray package and the associated aerosol washout and atmosphere decontamination by sprays modelled in the radionuclide package have been done. Time-step and machine-dependency calculations were done to identify whether any numeric effects exist in these CSE assessment analyses. A significant time-step dependency due to an error in the spray package coding was identified and eliminated. A number of other code deficiencies and inconveniences also are noted

  3. 33 CFR 183.512 - Fuel tanks: Prohibited materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tanks: Prohibited materials... tanks: Prohibited materials. (a) A fuel tank must not be constructed from terneplate. (b) Unless it has an inorganic sacrificial galvanic coating on the inside and outside of the tank, a fuel tank must not...

  4. 183 Legal/Judicial Enforcement Approaches towards Prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... The issue of children living with HIV is a serious problem in Nigeria. This .... The pregnant woman must not be exposed to work or environment which ..... cultural, legal and other barrier to HIV and AIDS . socio-cultural barriers.

  5. Publications | Page 183 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le CRDI collabore avec les chercheurs et les établissements des pays en développement au renforcement des capacités locales par le truchement du financement, de la mise en commun des connaissances et de la formation. Avec nos livres, nos articles, nos publications de recherche et nos études, nous visons à ...

  6. 33 CFR 183.41 - Persons capacity: Outboard boats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... tank weight from table 4 of subpart H of this part; or (2) For boats with a maximum persons capacity less than 550 pounds, the maximum persons capacity determined in the following manner: (i) Float the... control weight, battery weight, and full portable fuel tank weight, if any, shown in table 4 of subpart H...

  7. 46 CFR 183.340 - Cable and wiring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a manner as to avoid chafing and other damage. The use of plastic tie wraps must be limited to... requirements. (a) If individual wires, rather than cable, are used in systems greater than 50 volts, the wire... current carrying capacity for the circuit in which they are used; (2) Be installed in a manner to avoid or...

  8. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of distillates... distillates containing aldehydes. Distillates containing aldehydes may be received on wine premises for use in the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were...

  9. 27 CFR 9.183 - Yamhill-Carlton District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the 200-foot elevation line's intersection with Spring Hill Road, section 58, T2S, R3W (Laurelwood Quadrangle); then (2) Proceed south 1.1 miles on Spring Hill Road, which becomes North Valley Road at... elevation line's intersection with Stag Hollow Road, north of Hendricks Road and 190-foot elevation point...

  10. Publications | Page 183 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Globalization, Labor Markets and Inequality in India. L'Inde s'est lancée dans un train de réformes au milieu des années ... Récupérer l'espoir. En octobre 2007, André Casault, professeur d'architecture à l'Université Laval, a invité deux collègues et une douzaine d'étudiants des cycles supérieurs à le rejoindre dans une.

  11. 19 CFR 122.183 - Denial of access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-year period, or any longer period that the port director deems appropriate for the offense in question... suspension of access under § 122.182(g) or § 122.187; (2) Evidence of a pending or past investigation... punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of more than one year; (xxvi) Violence at an airport serving...

  12. 26 CFR 1.183-2 - Activity not engaged in for profit defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... determination whether an activity is engaged in for profit is to be made by reference to objective standards... the activity in a businesslike manner and maintains complete and accurate books and records may... accepted business, economic, and scientific practices, or consultation with those who are expert therein...

  13. 18 CFR 367.1830 - Account 183, Preliminary survey and investigation charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... service company can furnish complete information as to the nature and the purpose of the survey, plans, or... HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005, FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR CENTRALIZED SERVICE COMPANIES SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005...

  14. 77 FR 183 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Preventing Abuse of Interagency Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... ensure a level playing field in the acquisition planning process, the FAR should be amended to require a... the ability of the Government to leverage its purchasing power, e.g., will it have a negative effect... Act also provides authority for placement of orders between major organizational units within an...

  15. Wang et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2015) 12(3):183 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Cooney ... There were more than 400,000 deaths caused by breast cancer per year in past few years .... the rates were 24.9±2.9% (P<0.01), 32.8±4.2% (P<0.01) and 44.9±7.7% (P<0.01) at 24 hours' time point. .... triple negative breast cancer.

  16. 33 CFR 183.430 - Conductors in circuits of less than 50 volts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems Manufacturer... Standard 1128. (b) This section does not apply to communication systems; electronic navigation equipment...

  17. 33 CFR 183.435 - Conductors in circuits of 50 volts or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Electrical Systems Manufacturer... more. (c) This section does not apply to communication systems; electronic navigation equipment; resistance conductors that control circuit amperage; conductors in secondary circuits of ignition systems...

  18. 5 CFR 1201.183 - Procedures for processing petitions for enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... disagreement with the recommendation. The evidence and brief must be filed with the Clerk of the Board within... to be made to a certain Federal employee. This order may apply to any Federal employee, other than a...

  19. Consider the Soil First. Narrative Guide for Color Slide Set and Film Strip C-183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The importance of soil, its use and suitability for agriculture and building construction, and the need for and value of soil surveys are emphasized in this pamphlet. It serves as the script for a set of color slides and filmstrip produced by the Soil Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Each of the 73 frames is illustrated with…

  20. Crystallographic and magnetic structure of the novel compound ErGe 1.83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksyn, O.; Schobinger-Papamantellos, P.; Ritter, C.; de Groot, C. H.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1997-02-01

    The crystal structure and the magnetic ordering of the novel orthorhombic compound ErGe 2-x has been studied by neutron powder diffraction and magnetic measurements. The crystal structure belongs to the DyGe 1.85-type (space group Cmc2 1)·ErGe 2-x ( x = 0.17 (2)) orders antiferromagnetically below TN = 6 K and displays a metamagnetic behaviour. The magnetic cell has the same size as the chemical unit cell ( q = 0 ). The magnetic space group is Cmc2 1 (Sh 36173). At T = 1.5 K the magnetic moments of the two erbium sites have the same ordered magnetic moment values of 7.63 (6) μB/Er and are antiferromagnetically coupled leading to an uniaxial structure along the a direction.

  1. 183 Analyse des précipitations annuelles à la station de Yaoundé ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJAMI

    objectif de cette étude est de constituer une banque de données pluviométriques ... et de l'Organisation Mondiale de la Météorologie Mondiale (OMM) de 1895 à 2006, ..... hydrographiques en zone soudano-sahélienne, Thèse de Doctorat, ...

  2. and its Isotopic mm/Submillimeter Lines from Dark Cloud Lynds 183 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-02-19

    . 75014 Paris, France. ∗ ... The model results accord with the observed data and shows a temperature difference of ∼7K ... and in general a single Gaussian fit, gave good fits for almost all the observations. The various offset ...

  3. 25 CFR 183.1 - What is the purpose of this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE DEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND AND SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE LEASE FUND Introduction... Tribe Water Settlement Act (the Act), Public Law 102-575, 106 Stat. 4748, that requires regulations to administer the Trust Fund, and the Lease Fund established by the Act. ...

  4. Sexospécificités | Page 183 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canadian and African scientists are developing new vaccines to combat animal diseases and curb economic losses in sub-Saharan Africa. Some of the vaccines could be used to control similar diseases in Canada. Read more about New animal vaccines could keep more African farmers in business. Langue English.

  5. : tous les projets | Page 183 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    De son indépendance acquise en 1960 jusqu'en 1999, la Côte d'Ivoire était l'un des ... Bien que le monde arabe ait connu un progrès économique considérable, ... ASPECTS, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK.

  6. SU-E-T-183: Clinical Quality Assurance Workflow for Dynamic Tumor Tracking Radiation Dose Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamalui-Hunter, M; Su, Z; Li, Z

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: One of the most important aspects of implementation of new treatment modalities is an ‘end-to-end’ verification of the treatment process. Radiation treatment based on dynamic tracking of a tumor is highly patient-specific, therefore, special attention should be paid to quality assurance of the treatment delivery. Our goal was to design the clinical workflow that ensures accurate delivery of the planned dose using the Dynamic Target Tracking option of VeroTM (BrainLab,MHI) linac. Methods: A patient simulation is designed to include a pre-treatment session to verify whether the system can reliably track the motion of the implanted marker and build the 4D model of the target motion. The external surrogate and target motion patterns are recorded in the ExactracTM log files. In this work, a spectrum of custom marker and external surrogate motion trajectories closely resembling the patient specific motion patterns was used. 1mm thick/11mm long VisicoilTM marker was placed 15 and 20mm from the center of the spherical tissue equivalent target (centroid to centroid distance) in the 4D motion phantom (CIRSTM). 3D conformal (3 mm block margin) SBRT plans were delivered to 2 moving targets in the phantom: 1) 20mm diameter target that allows ion chamber dose measurement and 2) 25mm target that allows using film to measure CAX dose (GafchromicTM EBT3 used). The measured dose was compared to the iPlanTM TPS results using MonteCarlo algorithm (1% variance, Dose-to-water). Results: On average, film shows 98.9% pass using gamma criterion for 2% and 2mm DTA, 94.3% match for 2% and 1 mm DTA, 98% pass for 1% and 2 mm DTA however only 88% points passing for 1% and 1 mm DTA. Ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculation within 1.5%. Conclusion: The clinical QA workflow was designed for SBRT delivery using real-time tumor tracking on VeroTM linac

  7. SU-F-J-183: Interior Region-Of-Interest Tomography by Using Inverse Geometry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K; Kim, D; Kang, S; Kim, T; Shin, D; Cho, M; Noh, Y; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The inverse geometry computed tomography (IGCT) composed of multiple source and small size detector has several merits such as reduction of scatter effect and large volumetric imaging within one rotation without cone-beam artifact, compared to conventional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). By using this multi-source characteristics, we intend to present a selective and multiple interior region-of-interest (ROI) imaging method by using a designed source on-off sequence of IGCT. Methods: All of the IGCT sources are operated one by one sequentially, and each projection in the shape of narrow cone-beam covers its own partial volume of full field of view (FOV) determined from system geometry. Thus, through controlling multi source operation, limited irradiation within ROI is possible and selective radon space data for ROI imaging can be acquired without additional X-ray filtration. With this feature, we designed a source on-off sequence for multi ROI-IGCT imaging, and projections of ROI-IGCT were generated by using the on-off sequence. Multi ROI-IGCT images were reconstructed by using filtered back-projection algorithm. All these imaging process of our study has been performed by utilizing digital phantom and patient CT data. ROI-IGCT images of the phantom were compared to CBCT image and the phantom data for the image quality evaluation. Results: Image quality of ROI-IGCT was comparable to that of CBCT. However, the distal axial-plane from the FOV center, large cone-angle region, ROI-IGCT showed uniform image quality without significant cone-beam artifact contrary to CBCT. Conclusion: ROI-IGCT showed comparable image quality and has the capability to provide multi ROI image within a rotation. Projection of ROI-IGCT is performed by selective irradiation, hence unnecessary imaging dose to non-interest region can be reduced. In this regard, it seems to be useful for diagnostic or image guidance purpose in radiotherapy such as low dose target localization and patient alignment. This research was supported by the Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning of Korea (NRF-2014R1A2A1A10050270) and by the Radiation Technology R&D program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (No. 2013M2A2A7038291)

  8. Nam et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2018) 15 (1): 183 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-29

    Dec 29, 2017 ... ... BC) are used as traditional medicines for the treatment of skin diseases. .... contributes to rapid wound healing in oral epithelia. ... Chinese medicine use for children with allergic rhinitis: a nationwide population-based study.

  9. 78 FR 60248 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 183-Austin, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... shroud assemblies; mechanism bases; storage; busbars; button dim links; electromagnetic interference fans...; connector brackets; frames; holders; insulators; link torsion; manifold exhausts; stiffeners; subassemblies; thermal pads; insert mold torsion bars; torsion springs; vapor chambers; power supplies; housing magnets...

  10. Interim status of closure/post-closure plan for 183-H solar evaporation basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This report describes a plan for decommissioning several solar evaporation basins on the Hanford reservation. The document describes procedures for sampling during decommissioning and a plan for certification of the resulting completed landfill. Additional plans deal with the training, security of the site, and post-closure monitoring

  11. 34 CFR 222.183 - How does an LEA apply for a grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... roof and a boiler in one school and to replace windows in a second school. It should submit two... that need to be corrected—a failing roof, aging windows that impair the efficiency of the heating...

  12. FCJ-183 iHootenanny: A Folk Archeology of Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Adam Svec

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper excavates two models of communication that can be found littered across the intertwining histories of folk revivalism and digital culture in the United States. First I examine the Hootenanny, initially a form of rent party made popular in New York City in the 1940s by the group the Almanac Singers, which constituted a complex site of convergence of a range interests, styles, media, and performance genres. Second, I explore how the utopian vision of a community joined in song has been taken up recently by ‘social music’ iPhone apps made by the developer Smule. I will ultimately consider how the mediation idealised by the Almanacs has trickled down to a narcissistic will-to-be-‘in touch’ in mainstream digital culture, making the Hootenanny a virtual path untaken in the history of mobile communication.

  13. Tank 241-S-106, cores 183, 184 and 187 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-S-106 push mode core segments collected between February 12, 1997 and March 21, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Safety DQO), the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO). The analytical results are included in Table 1. Six of the twenty-four subsamples submitted for the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis exceeded the notification limit of 480 Joules/g stated in the DQO. Appropriate notifications were made. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyses were performed on all samples that produced exotherms during the DSC analysis. All results were less than the notification limit of three weight percent TOC. No cyanide analysis was performed, per agreement with the Tank Safety Program. None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. Statistical evaluation of results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. No core composites were created because there was insufficient solid material from any of the three core sampling events to generate a composite that would be representative of the tank contents

  14. SU-F-J-183: Interior Region-Of-Interest Tomography by Using Inverse Geometry System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K; Kim, D; Kang, S; Kim, T; Shin, D; Cho, M; Noh, Y; Suh, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The inverse geometry computed tomography (IGCT) composed of multiple source and small size detector has several merits such as reduction of scatter effect and large volumetric imaging within one rotation without cone-beam artifact, compared to conventional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). By using this multi-source characteristics, we intend to present a selective and multiple interior region-of-interest (ROI) imaging method by using a designed source on-off sequence of IGCT. Methods: All of the IGCT sources are operated one by one sequentially, and each projection in the shape of narrow cone-beam covers its own partial volume of full field of view (FOV) determined from system geometry. Thus, through controlling multi source operation, limited irradiation within ROI is possible and selective radon space data for ROI imaging can be acquired without additional X-ray filtration. With this feature, we designed a source on-off sequence for multi ROI-IGCT imaging, and projections of ROI-IGCT were generated by using the on-off sequence. Multi ROI-IGCT images were reconstructed by using filtered back-projection algorithm. All these imaging process of our study has been performed by utilizing digital phantom and patient CT data. ROI-IGCT images of the phantom were compared to CBCT image and the phantom data for the image quality evaluation. Results: Image quality of ROI-IGCT was comparable to that of CBCT. However, the distal axial-plane from the FOV center, large cone-angle region, ROI-IGCT showed uniform image quality without significant cone-beam artifact contrary to CBCT. Conclusion: ROI-IGCT showed comparable image quality and has the capability to provide multi ROI image within a rotation. Projection of ROI-IGCT is performed by selective irradiation, hence unnecessary imaging dose to non-interest region can be reduced. In this regard, it seems to be useful for diagnostic or image guidance purpose in radiotherapy such as low dose target localization and patient alignment. This research was supported by the Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning of Korea (NRF-2014R1A2A1A10050270) and by the Radiation Technology R&D program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (No. 2013M2A2A7038291)

  15. Occurrence of cancer in a cohort of 183 persons with constitutional chromosome 7 abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, H; Olsen, J H; Hansen, J

    1998-01-01

    with constitutional abnormalities involving chromosome 7, including 16 patients with Williams syndrome. By linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry, we found five persons with cancer, including one thyroid carcinoma, three carcinomas of the digestive tract, and one malignant melanoma. There were no cases of leukemia...

  16. Measurement of W-pair production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Riu, I.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Loomis, C.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raeven, B.; Raine, C.; Smith, D.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Ward, J.J.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Nowell, J.; Sciaba, A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Williams, M.; van Gemmeren, P.; Giehl, I.; Holldorfer, F.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Lefrancois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Chambers, J.T.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; Von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.L.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.H.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.E.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Mamier, G.; McNamara, P.A.; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Vogt, M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-01-01

    The production of W+W- pairs is analysed in a data sample collected by ALEPH at a mean centre-of-mass energy of 182.7 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 57 pb-1. Cross sections are given for different topologies of W decays into leptons or hadrons. Under Standard Model assumptions for the W-pair production and decay, the W-pair cross section is measured to be 15.57+-0.62(stat.)+-0.29(syst.) pb. Using also the W-pair data samples collected by ALEPH at lower centre-of-mass energies, the decay branching ratio of the W boson into hadrons is measured to be B(W->hadrons)= 68.93+-1.21(stat.)+-0.51(syst.)%, allowing a determination of the CKM matrix element |Vcs|= 1.043 +- 0.058(stat.) +- 0.026(syst.). The agreement of the cross sections with the Standard Model prediction allows a limit to be set on the W decay rate to undetectable final states.

  17. The physical properties of Santowax 'R' for heat transfer calculations (AERE R/M 183 revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowring, R.W.; Garton, D.A.; Kinneir, J.H.

    1961-03-01

    Values of the following physical properties of Santowax 'R' are presented in graphical and/or tabular form in both English and Metric units: Vapour Pressure, Specific heat, Enthalpy, Density, Dynamic viscosity, Kinematic viscosity, Thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, Surface tension, Latent heat of vaporisation, Critical properties, Gas solubilities. The data were obtained by new experimental measurements, by calculation or from the published literature. Wherever possible an estimate of the probable error is given. Conversion factors and Tables are also presented to facilitate the conversion of any of the properties to convenient units required for calculations. (author)

  18. 33 CFR 183.516 - Cellular plastic used to encase fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cellular plastic used to encase....516 Cellular plastic used to encase fuel tanks. (a) Cellular plastic used to encase metallic fuel...-polyurethane cellular plastic used to encase metallic fuel tanks must have a compressive strength of at least...

  19. 12 CFR 303.183 - Investment by insured state nonmember banks in foreign organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... seeking to make direct or indirect investments in a foreign organization will be acknowledged in writing... form of a letter from an eligible depository institution making direct or indirect investments in a... to make a foreign investment other than under § 347.117(b) of this chapter shall submit an...

  20. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements target diagnostics subsystem SSDR 1.8.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.

    1996-01-01

    This SSDR establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for the Target Experimental System's Diagnostic, WBS 1.8. 3. This includes the individual diagnostic components, the Target Diagnostic Data Acquisition System (Target DAS), the diagnostic vacuum system, the timing/fiducial system, and the EMI protection system

  1. A human fecal contamination index for ranking impaired recreational watersusing the HF183 quantitative real-time PCR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human fecal pollution of surface water remains a public health concern worldwide. As a result, there is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for recreational water quality risk managem...

  2. 34 CFR 403.183 - Under what circumstances may the Secretary waive the maintenance of effort requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Financial Conditions Must Be Met by a State? § 403... following: (1) A natural disaster. (2) An unforeseen and precipitous decline in financial resources. (c) The...

  3. SU-E-T-183: Feasibility of Extreme Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme Using 4π Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D; Rwigema, J; Yu, V; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Selch, M; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: GBM recurrence primarily occurs inside or near the high-dose radiation field of original tumor site requiring greater than 100 Gy to significantly improve local control. We utilize 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy to test the feasibility of planning target volume (PTV) margin expansions or extreme dose escalations without incurring additional radiation toxicities. Methods: 11 GBM patients treated with VMAT to a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were replanned with 4π. Original VMAT plans were created with 2 to 4 coplanar or non-coplanar arcs using 3 mm hi-res MLC. The 4π optimization, using 5 mm MLC, selected and inverse optimized 30 beams from a candidate pool of 1162 beams evenly distributed through 4π steradians. 4π plans were first compared to clinical plans using the same prescription dose. Two more studies were then performed to respectively escalate the GTV and PTV doses to 100 Gy, followed by a fourth plan expanding the PTV by 5 mm and maintaining the prescription dose. Results: The standard 4π plan significantly reduced (p<0.01) max and mean doses to critical structures by a range of 47.0–98.4% and 61.0–99.2%, respectively. The high dose PTV/high dose GTV/expanded PTV studies showed a reduction (p<0.05) or unchanged* (p>0.05) maximum dose of 72.1%/86.7%/77.1% (chiasm), 7.2%*/27.7%*/30.7% (brainstem), 39.8%*/84.2%/51.9%* (spinal cord), 69.0%/87.0%/66.9% (L eye), 76.2%/88.1%/84.1% (R eye), 95.0%/98.6%/97.5% (L lens), 93.9%/98.8%/97.6% (R lens), 74.3%/88.5%/72.4% (L optical nerve), 80.4%/91.3%/75.7% (R optical nerve), 64.8%/84.2%/44.9%* (L cochlea), and 85.2%/93.0%/78.0% (R cochlea), respectively. V30 and V36 for both brain and (brain - PTV) were reduced for all cases except the high dose PTV plan. PTV dose coverage increased for all 4π plans. Conclusion: Extreme dose escalation or further margin expansion is achievable using 4π, maintaining or reducing OAR doses. This study indicates that clinical trials employing 4π delivery using prescription doses up to 100 Gy are feasible. Funding support partially contributed by Varian

  4. The 1984 Literacy Campaign in the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. A Case Study. Notes, Comments...No. 183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Mohammed Saeed; Fisher, Nigel

    In 1984, the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen undertook a nationwide literacy campaign, which mobilized the entire nation in an effort to reach an estimated 194,000 illiterate people, 77 percent of them women. The campaign plan demanded the full and active participation of formal school teachers and students at secondary level and above as…

  5. Search for Higgs bosons and new particles decaying into two photons at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Evans, H G; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    A search for the resonant production of high mass photon pairs associated with a leptonic or hadronic system has been performed using a data sample of 57.7 pb-1 collected at an average center-of-mass energy of 182.6 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for contributions from non-Standard Model physics processes was observed. The observed candidates are used to place limits on BR (H to gamma gamma) assuming a Standard Model production rate for Higgs boson masses up to 92 GeV, and on the production cross section for a scalar resonance decaying into di-photons up to a mass of 170 GeV. Upper limits on the product of cross section and branching ratios, sigma(e+e- to XY) * BR(X to gamma gamma) * BR(Y to f fbar) as low as 70fb are obtained over the M(X) range 10 - 170 GeV for the case where 10 90 GeV, independent of the nature of Y provided it decays to a fermion pair and has negligible width. Higgs scalars which couple only to gauge bosons at Standard Model strength are ruled out up to a mass of 90.0 GeV...

  6. Colour reconnection studies in $e^{+}e^{-} \\to W^{+}W^{-}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$=183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hoch, M.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    The predicted effects of final state interactions such as colour reconnection are investigated by measuring properties of hadronic decays of W bosons, recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s)=182.7 GeV in the OPAL detector at LEP. Dependence on the modelling of hadronic W decays is avoided by comparing W+W- -> qqqq events with the non-leptonic component of W+W- -> qqlnu events. The scaled momentum distribution, its mean value, x_p, and that of the charged particle multiplicity, n_ch, are measured and found to be consistent in the two channels. The measured differences are: Diff(x_p) = +0.7 +- 0.8 +- 0.6 and Diff(n_ch) = (-0.09 +- 0.09 +-0.05)*10**-2. In addition, measurements of rapidity and thrust are performed for W+W- -> qqqq events. The data are described well by standard QCD models and disfavour one model of colour reconnection within the ARIADNE program. The current implementation of the ELLIS-GEIGER model of colour reconnection is excluded. At the current level of statistical precision no evidenc...

  7. Defense AT&L Magazine A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 34, Number 2, DAU 183

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    demonstrated by Soldier of the Year Spc. Wilfredo Mendez , far left, and Staff Sgt. Andrew J. Bullock, Noncommissioned Officer of the Year. To the far right...Bolton Jr., ASA (ALT) in March 2005. Carol Lowman, co-leader of the Army Contracting Study Future Force/Mission team, briefs members of the senior

  8. Defense AT&L Magazine A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 34, Number 2, DAU 183

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turk, Wayne; Wynn, Michael W; Schaeffer, Mark D; Walsh, John; Kratz, Louise A; Ward, Dan; Brown, David; McVay, Tammi

    2005-01-01

    .... As the flagship publication of the Defense Acquisition University, Defense AT AND L also disseminates information on training and education, continuous learning, and e-Learning to those acquisition...

  9. Forest pest conditions in the maritimes in 1992. Information report No. M-X-183E. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magasi, L.P.; Cormier, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Review of the status of forest insects and diseases in the Maritimes Region in 1992, along with forecast conditions for 1993 when appropriate. Describes pests and problems of conifers, hardwoods, and high value areas such as nurseries, seed orchards, plantations, and Christmas tree areas and summarizes control operations against spruce budworm and Sirococcus shoot blight. A chapter on forest health monitoring brings together the various aspects of work dealing with changes in forest conditions. Forest insect monitoring systems, such as pheromones and light traps, are briefly described. A list of reports and publications relating to forest pest conditions is included.

  10. Insufficient intake of alpha-linolenic fatty acid (18:3n-3 during pregnancy and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Garcia VASCONCELOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze alpha-linolenic fatty acid intake in two cohorts of pregnant women, and to identify factors associated with alpha-linolenic acid intake. Methods: This is a cohort study involving pregnant women with low obstetric risk (N=353 in public health system from a municipality of São Paulo state, Brazil. In each trimester, two 24-hour food recalls were collected. Descriptive analyses of dietary lipid profiles were performed, followed by a multiple comparison test. According to the trimester of pregnancy, differences were assessed using the mean difference test. To evaluate the adequacy of linoleic fatty acid and alpha-linolenic acid intake, the adequate intake test was used. The association between alpha-linolenic acid intake adequacy and maternal characteristics was investigated using a binary logistic regression model. Results: Total lipids intake and the percentage contribution to dietary energy met recommended levels. One-third of the diets demonstrated a lower than daily recommended intake of alpha-linolenic acid. Overweight pregnant women were twice as likely to have inadequate alpha-linolenic acid intake. Pregnant women from a more disadvantaged socioeconomic situation had greater risks of inadequate intake. Conclusion: Over-intake of lipids is not problematic, but quality is an issue, with one third of the pregnant women and their fetuses exposed to adverse effects due to low intake of omega-3 fatty acids, indicating important nutritional vulnerability in this population.

  11. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.17377, Lat: 23.64515 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.83m; Data Range: 20080915-20100910.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.42181, Lat: 28.21826 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.83m; Data Range: 20080926-20090321.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Acoustic Doppler Profilers (ADP) provide a time series of water current...

  13. 30 CFR 250.183 - When may MMS or the Secretary extend or cancel a lease at the development and production stage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When may MMS or the Secretary extend or cancel... When may MMS or the Secretary extend or cancel a lease at the development and production stage? (a) MMS..., the Secretary will cancel the lease: (1) When the 5-year period in paragraph (a)(1) of this section...

  14. Multibeam collection for TN183: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2005-09-02 to 2005-10-04, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Uranium and thorium occurrences in New Mexico: distribution, geology, production, and resources, with selected bibliography. Open-file report OF-183

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLemore, V.T.

    1983-09-01

    Over 1300 uranium and thorium occurrences are found in over 100 formational units in all but two counties, in all 1- by 2-degree topographic quadrangles, and in all four geographic provinces in New Mexico. Uranium production in New Mexico has surpassed yearly production from all other states since 1956. Over 200 mines in 18 counties in New Mexico have produced 163,010 tons (147,880 metric tons) of U 3 O 8 from 1948 to 1982, 40% of the total uranium production in the United States. More than 99% of this production has come from sedimentary rocks in the San Juan Basin area in northwestern New Mexico; 96% has come from the Morrison Formation alone. All of the uranium reserves and the majority of the potential uranium resources in New Mexico are in the Grants uranium district. About 112,500 tons (102,058 metric tons) of $30 per pound of U 3 O 8 reserves are in the San Juan Basin, about 55% of the total $30 reserves in the United States. Thorium reserves and resources in New Mexico have not been adequately evaluated and are unknown. Over 1300 uranium and thorium occurrences are described in this report, about 400 of these have been examined in the field by the author. The occurrence descriptions include information on location, commodities, production, development, geology, and classification. Over 1000 citations are included in the bibliography and referenced in the occurrence descriptions. Production statistics for uranium mines that operated from 1948 to 1970 are also included. Mines that operated after 1970 are classified into production categories. 43 figures, 9 tables

  16. Effect of player substitutions on the intensity of second-half soccer match play. DOI:10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n2p183

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Barbosa Coelho

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Most soccer matches are conducted by coaches who usually make all player substitutions allowed. Therefore, it is extremely important to study these substitutions and their effects on the intensity of effort required from players. To date, no published studies have reported on this topic using heart rate (HR as an intensity parameter. The objective of this study was to compare effort intensity (EI of soccer players in the following situations: 1 first half (FH-EI; 2 second half (SH-EI; 3 second half with substitutions(SHS-EI. Forty-five male soccer players (18.5±1.2 years old, 74.25±5.79 kg, 182.6±8.55 cm, 9.56±2.47% body fat, 56.3±4.3 mLO2/kg/min were evaluated during 29 official games. EI was considered as the mean HR, expressed as the percentage of each player’s maximal HR (%HRmax and as the time spent in each intensity zone (Z according to %HRmax (Z1<70%; Z2 70-85%; Z3 85-90%; Z4 90-95%; Z5 95-100%. FH-EI (86.3±3.3%HRmax was higher than SH-EI (80.6±4.4%HRmax and SHS-EI (83.6±2.8%HRmax. SHS-EI was higher than SH-EI (p<0.05. Time spent in high-intensity zones was lower in SH-EI than in FH-EI, buthigher in SHS-EI when compared to SH-EI (p<0.05. It was concluded that the decrease in EI in the second half of soccer matches was attenuated by substitutions made at halftime, as evidenced by a longer time spent in high-intensity zones when compared to SH-EI.

  17. A Human Fecal Contamination Score for Ranking Recreational Sites using the HF183/BacR287 Quantitative Real-Time PCR Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human fecal pollution of recreational waters remains a public health concern worldwide. As a result, there is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality research and manag...

  18. SU-F-T-183: Design of a Beam Shaping Assembly of a Compact DD-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, M; Liu, Y; Nie, L [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To design a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to shape the 2.45-MeV neutrons produced by a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator and to optimize the beam output for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors Methods: MCNP is used for this simulation study. The simulation model consists of a neutron surface source that resembles an actual DD source and is surrounded by a BSA. The neutron source emits 2.45-MeV neutrons isotropically. The BSA is composed of a moderator, reflector, collimator and filter. Various types of materials and geometries are tested for each component to optimize the neutron output. Neutron characteristics are measured with an 2×2×2-cm{sup 3} air-equivalent cylinder at the beam exit. The ideal BSA is determined by evaluating the in-air parameters, which include epithermal neutron per source neutron, fast neutron dose per epithermal neutron, and photon dose per epithermal neutron. The parameter values are compared to those recommended by the IAEA. Results: The ideal materials for reflector and thermal neutron filter were lead and cadmium, respectively. The thickness for reflector was 43 cm and for filter was 0.5 mm. At present, the best-performing moderator has 25 cm of AlF{sub 3} and 5 cm of MgF{sub 2}. This layout creates a neutron spectrum that has a peak at approximately 10 keV and produces 1.35E-4 epithermal neutrons per source neutron per cm{sup 2}. Additional neutron characteristics, fast neutrons per epithermal neutron and photon per epithermal neutron, are still under investigation. Conclusion: Working is ongoing to optimize the final layout of the BSA. The neutron spectrum at the beam exit window of the final configuration will have the maximum number of epithermal neutrons and limited photon and fast neutron contaminations within the recommended values by IAEA. Future studies will also include phantom experiments to validate the simulation results.

  19. Search for R-Parity Violating Decays of Supersymmetric Particles in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at Centre-of-Mass Energies near 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Przysiezniak, H; Alemany, R; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Riu, I; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Becker, U; Boix, G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Greening, T C; Halley, A W; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Leroy, O; Loomis, C; Maley, P; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Spagnolo, P; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Chalmers, M; Curtis, L; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Räven, B; Raine, C; Smith, D; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Ward, J J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Marinelli, N; Martin, E B; Nash, J; Nowell, J; Sciabà, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thomson, E; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Kröcker, M; Müller, A S; Nürnberger, H A; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Azzurri, P; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Lefrançois, J; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Zerwas, D; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Coles, J; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Hutchcroft, D E; Jones, L T; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Trabelsi, A; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, Claus; Hess, J; Misiejuk, A; Prange, G; Sieler, U; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    2000-01-01

    Searches for pair-production of supersymmetric particles under the assumption that R-parity is violated via a single dominant $LL{\\bar E}$, $LQ{\\bar D}$ or ${\\bar U} {\\bar D} {\\bar D}$ coupling are performed using the data collected by the \\ALEPH\\ collaboration at centre-of-mass energies of 181--184~$\\gev$. The observed candidate events in the data are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations. Upper limits on the production cross-sections and lower limits on the masses of charginos, sleptons, squarks and sneutrinos are de rived.

  20. Measurement of the $e^{+}e^{-} \\to ZZ$ Production Cross Section at Centre-of-Mass Energies of 183 and 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Riu, I.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Boix, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Davies, G.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raeven, B.; Raine, C.; Smith, D.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Ward, J.J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Sciaba, A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Muller, A.S.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Gilardoni, Simone S.; Ragusa, F.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Lefrancois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Loomis, C.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.E.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-01-01

    The e+e- -> ZZ cross section at sqrt(s)=182.7 and 188.6 GeV has been measured using the ALEPH detector. The analysis covers all of the visible ZZ final states and yields cross section measurements of sigma_ZZ(182.7 GeV) = 0.11 +- (0.16,0.11) (stat.) +- 0.04 (syst.) pb and sigma_ZZ(188.6 GeV) = 0.67 +- 0.13 (stat.) +- 0.04 (syst.) pb consistent with the Standard Model expectations.

  1. Poderemos viver juntos? http://dx.doi.org/10.15601/1983-7631/rt.v3n5p183-188

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Schultz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O sociólogo Alain Touraine abre uma instigante pergunta ao tratar da constituição do sujeito na sociedade contemporânea: Poderemos viver juntos? O título do livro é uma pergunta retórica à qual só pode ser dada uma resposta condicionada: poderemos sim, desde que... Ou então: não há outra saída – temos que viver juntos.  Tomado nesses termos, a pergunta de Touraine denuncia uma crise geral do sujeito na sociedade contemporânea, para além da crise ambiental, moral, trabalhista, econômica, etc, ou que qualquer uma de “nossas crises prediletas”, como diz Ignacy Sachs. Sua perspectiva mais bem se enquadra numa crise geral civilizacional, transcendendo condições socioculturais específicas. A pergunta Poderemos viver juntos? é global, e a resposta só pode ser geral

  2. Poderemos viver juntos?
    http://dx.doi.org/10.15601/1983-7631/rt.v3n5p183-188

    OpenAIRE

    Adilson Schultz

    2011-01-01

    O sociólogo Alain Touraine abre uma instigante pergunta ao tratar da constituição do sujeito na sociedade contemporânea: Poderemos viver juntos? O título do livro é uma pergunta retórica à qual só pode ser dada uma resposta condicionada: poderemos sim, desde que... Ou então: não há outra saída – temos que viver juntos.  Tomado nesses termos, a pergunta de Touraine denuncia uma crise geral do s...

  3. How Kindergarten Entry Assessments Are Used in Public Schools and How They Correlate with Spring Assessments. Stated Briefly. REL 2017-183

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Katherine A.; Cook, Kyle DeMeo; Greller, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This "Stated Briefly" report is a companion piece that summarizes the results of another report of the same name. Child development research on the importance of early experiences for later life outcomes has underscored the need for effective early childhood education. With the aim of providing high-quality education, many kindergarten…

  4. Search for supersymmetry with R-parity violating LL.OVHBAR.E couplings at űs=183 GeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Calvi, M.; Holt, P. J.; Mašík, Jiří; Němeček, Stanislav; Řídký, Jan; Vrba, Václav; Zumerle, G.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2000), s. 591-608 ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/99/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.408, year: 2000

  5. Dakwah STAIN Purwokerto KOMUNIKA ISSN: 1978-1261 Vol.3 No.2 Juli-Desember 2009 pp.167-183 GENDER DALAM KONSTRUKSI MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariyanto Hariyanto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gender issues, the image of the relation of men and women in the media product, located at the position concurrence. While the media products that represent a certain meaning and reality to be submitted by his creator (media workers. Not infrequently, sense of product made through the media has put the position of media products as part of social reality itself.On the other hand, the position of the meaning of media products into the medium for the legitimacy of a change in governance norms and values in society. In other words, the image of the relation of men and women in the media products that contain sexual harassment can be carried still values the old conservative and applicable to the community that Indonesia is very patriarchy

  6. Can Latin American Oil Companies Free Themselves from the Legacy of Nationalization? (Can Latin American Oil and Gas Companies Break Free of Their Nationalized Past?) - CERI Studies No. 183

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Latin America's national oil companies, created at various times during the twentieth century, have each evolved in a different way. The two main companies - Petroleos de Mexico (Pemex) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) - provide excellent illustrations of the rich diversity of organizational and industrial development. Many factors - such as the importance of earth quakes - explain the diversity. Nevertheless, the role of governments during the period of nationalizations is key. It was then that the relationships between the owners of natural resources, public operators, regulators, the finance ministries, and international operators were defined. This process shaped the companies' institutional structures (path dependency) and set the parameters for future entrepreneurial dynamism. The path by which each of these enterprises developed continues to affect their culture as evidenced by the recent reforms which attempted to restructure Pemex and PDVSA. (author)

  7. Molecular Nickel Phosphide Carbonyl Nanoclusters: Synthesis, Structure, and Electrochemistry of [Ni11P(CO)18]3- and [H6-nNi31P4(CO)39]n- (n = 4 and 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacci, Chiara; Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Funaioli, Tiziana; Zacchini, Stefano; Zanotti, Valerio

    2018-02-05

    The reaction of [NEt 4 ] 2 [Ni 6 (CO) 12 ] in thf with 0.5 equiv of PCl 3 affords the monophosphide [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 3- that in turn further reacts with PCl 3 resulting in the tetra-phosphide carbonyl cluster [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- . Alternatively, the latter can be obtained from the reaction of [NEt 4 ] 2 [Ni 6 (CO) 12 ] in thf with 0.8-0.9 equiv of PCl 3 . The [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- penta-anion is reversibly protonated by strong acids leading to the [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- tetra-anion, whereas deprotonation affords the [Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 6- hexa-anion. The latter is reduced with Na/naphthalene yielding the [Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 7- hepta-anion. In order to shed light on the polyhydride nature and redox behavior of these clusters, electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies were carried out on [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 3- , [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- , and [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- . The reversible formation of the stable [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 4- tetra-anion is demonstrated through the spectroelectrochemical investigation of [Ni 11 P(CO) 18 ] 3- . The redox changes of [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- show features of chemical reversibility and the vibrational spectra in the ν CO region of the nine redox states of the cluster [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] n- (n = 3-11) are reported. The spectroelectrochemical investigation of [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- revealed the presence of three chemically reversible reduction processes, and the IR spectra of [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] n- (n = 4-7) have been recorded. The different spectroelectrochemical behavior of [HNi 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 5- and [H 2 Ni 31 P 4 (CO) 39 ] 4- support their formulations as polyhydrides. Unfortunately, all the attempts to directly confirm their poly hydrido nature by 1 H NMR spectroscopy failed, as previously found for related large metal carbonyl clusters. Thus, the presence and number of hydride ligands have been based on the observed protonation/deprotonation reactions and the spectroelectrochemical experiments. The molecular structures of the new clusters have been determined by single-crystal X-ray analysis. These represent the first examples of structurally characterized molecular nickel carbonyl nanoclusters containing interstitial phosphide atoms.

  8. Os vários tons de uma guerra imaginada: duas visões femininas sobre a guerra colonial de Moçambique DOI - 10.5752/P.2358-3428.2014v18n35p183

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Borille de Abreu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo tem como objetivo comparar e contrastar a maneira imaginada como a protagonista moçambicana Minosse, do romance Ventos do Apocalipse, de Paulina Chiziane, e a portuguesa Eva Lopo, de A costa dos murmúrios, de Lídia Jorge, descrevem a nação moçambicana antes e depois da guerra colonial, e como elas narram o trauma vivenciado na guerra. A hipótese é que a guerra é imaginada por essas mulheres porque o trauma de guerra precisa ser simbolizado para ser processado. Sendo assim, é possível afirmar que escrever sobre o trauma de guerra parece trazer algum tipo de conforto para a mulher afetada pela violência.Palavras-chave: Literaturas de língua portuguesa. Escrita feminina. Escrita feminina de Guerra. Teoria do trauma. Life writing.

  9. Maximum mass ratio of am CVn-type binary systems and maximum white dwarf mass in ultra-compact x-ray binaries (addendum - Serb. Astron. J. No. 183 (2011, 63

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbutina B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recalculated the maximum white dwarf mass in ultra-compact X-ray binaries obtained in an earlier paper (Arbutina 2011, by taking the effects of super-Eddington accretion rate on the stability of mass transfer into account. It is found that, although the value formally remains the same (under the assumed approximations, for white dwarf masses M2 >~0.1MCh mass ratios are extremely low, implying that the result for Mmax is likely to have little if any practical relevance.

  10. Quantum paraelectric behavior of pyrochlore Pb.sub.1.83./sub.Mg.sub.0.29./sub.Nb.sub.1.71./sub.O.sub.6.39./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamba, Stanislav; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Denisov, Sergey; Veljko, Sergiy; Bovtun, Viktor; Savinov, Maxim; Petzelt, Jan; Kalnberga, M.; Sternberg, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 76, - (2007), 054125/1-054125/6 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/06/0403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : quantum paraelectrics * soft mode * infrared spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2007

  11. Forms of n-3 (ALA, C18:3n-3 or DHA, C22:6n-3) Fatty Acids Affect Carcass Yield, Blood Lipids, Muscle n-3 Fatty Acids and Liver Gene Expression in Lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnampalam, Eric N; Lewandowski, Paul A; Fahri, Fahri T; Burnett, Viv F; Dunshea, Frank R; Plozza, Tim; Jacobs, Joe L

    2015-11-01

    The effects of supplementing diets with n-3 alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on plasma metabolites, carcass yield, muscle n-3 fatty acids and liver messenger RNA (mRNA) in lambs were investigated. Lambs (n = 120) were stratified to 12 groups based on body weight (35 ± 3.1 kg), and within groups randomly allocated to four dietary treatments: basal diet (BAS), BAS with 10.7 % flaxseed supplement (Flax), BAS with 1.8 % algae supplement (DHA), BAS with Flax and DHA (FlaxDHA). Lambs were fed for 56 days. Blood samples were collected on day 0 and day 56, and plasma analysed for insulin and lipids. Lambs were slaughtered, and carcass traits measured. At 30 min and 24 h, liver and muscle samples, respectively, were collected for determination of mRNA (FADS1, FADS2, CPT1A, ACOX1) and fatty acid composition. Lambs fed Flax had higher plasma triacylglycerol, body weight, body fat and carcass yield compared with the BAS group (P DHA supplementation increased carcass yield and muscle DHA while lowering plasma insulin compared with the BAS diet (P DHA treatment increased (P DHA concentration. Liver mRNA FADS2 was higher and CPT1A lower in the DHA group (P DHA diet. In summary, supplementation with ALA or DHA modulated plasma metabolites, muscle DHA, body fat and liver gene expression differently.

  12. Oxidative stability of structured lipids containing C18:0, C18:1, C18:2, C18:3 or CLA in sn 2-position - as bulk lipids and in milk drinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Xu, Xuebing

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we compared the oxidative stability of a specific structured lipid (SL) containing conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in the sn2-position with SL containing other C18 fatty acids of different degree of unsaturation (stearic, oleic, linoleic or linolenic acid). SL was produced...... by enzymatic interesterification with caprylic acid. Oxidative stability was compared in the five lipids themselves and in milk drinks containing 5% of the different SL. During storage, samples were taken for chemical and physical analyses. Moreover, sensory assessments were performed on milk drinks....... The oxidative stability of our SL was very different when comparing (a) bulk lipids and milk drink and (b) the five different batches of each product. SL based on oleic acid was the most unstable as bulk lipid, while SL based on linoleic acid was the most unstable in milk drink. SL based on CLA was the second...

  13. Thermal and optical properties of Tm{sup 3+}: Li{sub 6}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal: A potential candidate for 1.83 {mu}m lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Xinghua [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Materials Chemistry and Physics, Yangqiao West Road 155, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li Jianfu; Zhu Zhaojie; You Zhenyu; Wang Yan [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Materials Chemistry and Physics, Yangqiao West Road 155, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Tu Chaoyang [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Materials Chemistry and Physics, Yangqiao West Road 155, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)], E-mail: tcy@fjirsm.ac.cn

    2008-10-15

    Single crystal of Tm{sup 3+}: Li{sub 6}Gd (BO{sub 3}){sub 3} was grown by the Czochralski method. The heat capacity was measured from 308 to 673 K. The absorption spectra of the crystal in three mutually perpendicular arbitrary directions were measured at room temperature. Based on the Judd-Ofelt theory and the spectra measured in three mutually perpendicular directions, the intensity parameters {omega}{sub t} (t=2, 4, 6), the line strengths, the oscillator strengths, the radiative rates, radiative lifetimes and fluorescent branching ratios were calculated. We calculated the emission cross-section by the reciprocity method and also obtained the gain cross-section.

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_004547 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 124 VIVPRDRSAQLNATVKKVACGAAETIPVISVTNLARTMRLLQERNIWIVGTAGEADHTLY 183 ... VIVPRDRSAQLNATVKKVACGAAETIPV...ISVTNLARTMRLLQERNIWIVGTAGEADHTLY Sbjct: 121 VIVPRDRSAQLNATVKKVACGAAETIPVISVTNLARTMRLLQERNIWIVGTAGEADHTLY 180 ...

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006156 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LDKYLVQKIAAGESIDRPCSILRELLDNSIDSGATKIEVFLEEGGIHKILIIDNGIG 60 ... Query: 124 EVENGIEKCFKKQPAINGTIVNVTKIFHNFPARKR...FLKQEPIETKMCLKVLEEKIITHPE 183 ... EVENGIEKCFKKQPAINGTIVNVTKIFHNFPARKRFLKQEPIETKMCLKVLEEKIITHPE Sbjct: 121 EVENGIE

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_003869 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AYDGEEAVKMAKEQNPDLIILDVMLPKMDGFT 60 ... Query: 124 GSEQNHIIRIKNLKIDILKYKVEKNNKEIELTS...REFELLRFLVLNKGLVFSREALLEKVW 183 ... GSEQNHIIRIKNLKIDILKYKVEKNNKEIELTSREFELLRFLVLNKGLVFSREALLEKVW Sbjct: 121 GSEQNHIIRIKNLKIDILKYKVEKNNKEIELTSREFELLRFLVLNKGLVFSREALLEKVW 180 ...

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_005072 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EIAMNIAEQAIKDSWPKSLLLNLNIPPCERNKIKELS 183 ... LENVPSMAISVASFKWKNFEFAGEIAMNIAEQAIKDSWPKSLLLNLNIPPCER...NKIKELS Sbjct: 121 LENVPSMAISVASFKWKNFEFAGEIAMNIAEQAIKDSWPKSLLLNLNIPPCERNKIKELS 180

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_003234 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Length = 183 ... Query: 8 ... EVDLIDLCERNPELANSMVLGVSEHPYLSKKVLRKIPCALFTDNACNSKNIN...RIVTVNGT 67 ... EVDLIDLCERNPELANSMVLGVSEHPYLSKKVLRKIPCALFTDNACNSKNINRIVTVNGT Sbjct: 1 ... EVDLIDLCERNPE

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002940 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available : 124 LFEGSQYLLAWADELQELKTICECGKKAHFVIRLNENGETVTTGEQIQIGGNDKYISVCR 183 ... LFEGSQYLLAWADELQELKTICECGK...KAHFVIRLNENGETVTTGEQIQIGGNDKYISVCR Sbjct: 121 LFEGSQYLLAWADELQELKTICECGKKAHFVIRLNENGETVTTGEQIQIGGNDKYISVCR 180 ...

  20. ORF Alignment: ch_oct10_gene_aa_db [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available uery: 124 IDSGIPMEFFPLAISIAESSHFYGERDISHLMLDPTQSEFEQCISCSTIVINTTEKNIFS 183 ... IDSGIPMEFFPLAISIAESSHFYGERD...ISHLMLDPTQSEFEQCISCSTIVINTTEKNIFS Sbjct: 121 IDSGIPMEFFPLAISIAESSHFYGERDISHLMLDPTQSEFEQCISCSTIVINTTEKNIFS 180 ...

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ry: 128 VNXXXXXXXXXXXXKALLSAEQAELVAHGIASLIDGIWLRGTLNPQGIEADKARII 183 ... V...N ... KALLSAEQAELVAHGIASLIDGIWLRGTLNPQGIEADKARII Sbjct: 121 VNERRLLSHLRRELKALLSAEQAELVAHGIASLIDGIWLRGTLNPQGIEADKARII 176

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003552 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 124 KKENEDMKAVMEQIKEDLLLNRDVLKEGMEDGTIRNDIDPFEMAFIMNLMCNSIICLDPN 183 ... KKENEDMKAVMEQIKEDLLLNRDVLKEGMEDGTIRNDIDPFEM...AFIMNLMCNSIICLDPN Sbjct: 121 KKENEDMKAVMEQIKEDLLLNRDVLKEGMEDGTIRNDIDPFEMAFIMNLMCNSIICLDPN 180 ...

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_006396 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AHDGDDNRRNFRRELDADLVEYDVTERELPDTFAFDGCLVTGSRASVYWDEPW 60 ... Query: 124 VDESFTVFTTHSDRVAEVPPGATTFAENDYGIHGFRKEN...VFSVQFHPEYDPETAKTVTKG 183 ... VDESFTVFTTHSDRVAEVPPGATTFAENDYGIHGFRKENVFSVQFHPEYDPETAKTVTKG Sbjct: 121 VDESFTVFTTHSDRVAEVPPGATTFAENDYGIHGFRKENVFSVQFHPEYDPETAKTVTKG 180 ...

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_003279 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... KRQIISVVLIGNPGVGKSNLLSRFTRNEFNLKSKPTIGVEFATKIISVEGKAVKVQIWDT 60 ... Query: 139 LSHAVPTDEAKIYAERNHISFIETSALDNT...NVEAAFTNIVTEIYK 183 ... LSHAVPTDEAKIYAERNHISFIETSALDNTNVEAAFTNIVTEIYK Sbjct: 121 LSHAVPTDEAKIYAERNHISFIETSALDNTNVEAAFTNIVTEIYK 165

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_005861 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RLRPSALVKTHFKQFLIDVGPDFRLQALRHRIHALDGVILTHAHQDHTAGIDD 60 ... Query: 124 TSINYMTYEQGGMAVNGFRFGDLAYLSDIRTFPQTIFTQ...LQDLKILVISALKYTASQLHF 183 ... TSINYMTYEQGGMAVNGFRFGDLAYLSDIRTFPQTIFTQLQDLKILVISALKYTASQLHF Sbjct: 121 TSINYMTYEQGGMAVNGFRFGDLAYLSDIRTFPQTIFTQLQDLKILVISALKYTASQLHF 180 ...

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_006576 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EVGRDTAAVLLQHLQDFIAPHRWTDLDFLAVAYG 60 ... Query: 124 GALYGCQDGIPVALEAEQVYEPVAWTERLASWGQEDCRADA...AIATTVTDLLAIAERQWQR 183 ... GALYGCQDGIPVALEAEQVYEPVAWTERLASWGQEDCRADAAIATTVTDLLAIAERQWQR Sbjct: 121 GALYGCQDGIPVALEAEQVYEPVAWTERLASWGQEDCRADAAIATTVTDLLAIAERQWQR 180 ...

  7. Master’s Students in History Could Benefit from a Greater Library Sensitivity and Commitment to Interdisciplinarity, and from More Efficient Document Delivery. A Review of: Sherriff, G. (2010. Information use in history research: A citation analysis of master’s level theses. Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 10 (2 165-183. doi: 10.1353/pla.0.0092.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Laval Hunsucker

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study sought to determine the characteristics of research materials used by history students in preparing their master’s theses. Of which information resources formats did such students make use, and in what proportions? What was the age distribution of resources used? What was the dispersal over journal titles and over subject classification, i.e., the degree of interdisciplinarity? To what extent did the master’s students make use of non-English-language materials? To what extent did their institution’s library hold the resources in question?The investigator was especially interested in finding quantitative support for what he terms two “hypotheses.” The first of these is that historical research depends to a high degree on monographs, journal articles being far less important to it than they are to research in, especially, the natural sciences and technology. The second is that the age distribution of resources important to historical research is much flatter and longer than that of resources upon which researchers in the natural sciences and technology rely.Design – Citation analysis, supplemented with comprehensive catalogue searches.Setting – Southern Connecticut State University (SCSU, a mid-sized public university located in New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A.Subjects – MA and MS theses (N=47 successfully submitted to the Department of History over the period from academic year 1998/1999 through academic year 2007/2008, inclusive.Methods – The investigator initially identified the theses through a search of the online catalogue (“Consuls” of the Connecticut State University system, and retrieved all of them in either electronic or hard-copy form. He then subjected all citations (N=3,498 listed in the references sections of these theses to an examination in order to identify for each cited resource the format, the age, the language, and, in the case of scholarly journal articles, the journal of publication. He carried out bibliographic searches in order to rectify any citations which he had noted to be faulty or incomplete. The study took no account of possible additional citations in footnotes or endnotes or in the text, and did not measure citation intensity (whether, for instance, a thesis referred only once, or perhaps many times, to a given resource. Duplicates “were ignored.” He furthermore performed systematic searches in Consuls and in the Library of Congress (LC online catalogue in order to establish, insofar as possible, into which assigned LC Classification class each resource fell, and whether it belonged to the holdings of the SCSU library. “Holdings,” as used here, includes physical resources owned, as well as those resources to which the library has licensed access. Not marked as either “held” or “not held” were: resources available online without restriction or charge, items not identified in either Consuls or the LC catalogue, and all government documents. Ages of cited resources were calculated based on the edition or version date actually given in a student’s citation, without any consideration of a possible earlier date of the original version of the publication or document concerned. Main Results – Format, age distribution, and journal frequency. The local citation analysis found that 53.2% of all cited resources were monographs, 7.8% were scholarly articles, 5.3% were contributed chapters in books, and 0.6% were dissertations or theses. Non-scholarly periodicals accounted for 15.7%, government documents for 6.7%, and freely available web documents for 4.1%. The remainder, approximately 6.5%, comprised archival papers, judicial documents, directories, interviews, posters, audiovisual materials, and 13 other formats. Cited resources, measured back from the date of acceptance of the citing thesis, ranged from 0 to 479 years old; the mode was 3 years, but the median was “25” (p. 170 or “26” (p. 177 years. Just over 70% (i.e., 2,500 cited resources were more than ten years old. Almost one thousand of the cited resources were fifty or more years old. The 274 scholarly journal articles included in the references sections were spread over 153 distinct journal titles, of which 105 titles made only one appearance, and 136 titles three or fewer appearances. The mean was 1.8 appearances.Subject dispersal and language. Of the 2,084 cited resources for which LC classification was locatable, 51.5% had a classification other than history, i.e., other than class C, D, E, or F. Nearly two thirds (66.0% of the cited scholarly journal articles had appeared in journals with a focus other than history. (Note: table 4 is incorrect, precisely reversing the actual ratio. Of all cited items, 98.5% were in the English language. Half (27 of the non-English-language resources cited were in Korean, all cited in the same thesis. Books (i.e., monographs plus compilations from which contributed chapters were cited accounted for 87.0% of foreign-language citations. More than four fifths of the examined theses (83.0% cited not a single non-English-language resource. Local holdings. Of all 3,498 cited items, 3,022 could be coded as either “held” or “not held” by the SCSU library. Of the items so coded (not, as indicated on p. 180, of all cited items, scarcely two fifths (41.0% belonged to the library’s holdings. The holdings percentage was highest (72.6% for the 274 scholarly journal articles cited, followed by the 186 contributed chapters (50.0%, the 550 non-scholarly periodical items (49.5%, and the 1,861 monographs (46.8%. For other cited formats, the percentage was much lower, and in some cases, e.g., for the 55 archival and the 44 judicial documents, it was 0.0%. Of the 54 foreign-language resources cited, the institution’s library held only two. Conclusion – The investigator concludes that his study’s findings do indeed lend quantitative support to his two “hypotheses.” This outcome will surprise few, if any, librarians; it is in accord with what Koenig (1978 long ago saw as a matter of “intuition” and “all conventional wisdom,” something that many subsequent studies have confirmed. Sherriff accordingly recommends, firstly, that collections which strive to support historical research should, in matters of acquisition policy and budget allocation, take serious account of that field’s relatively strong dependence on monographs. Secondly, the data on age distribution carry obvious implications for librarians’ decision-making on matters such as de-accessioning and weeding, relegation to remote storage, and retrospective acquisitions. This finding should also be considered, for instance, in connection with preservation policy and the maintaining of special collections. He even suggests that librarians “need to teach students the value of reviewing literature historically and showing them how to do so effectively” (p. 177.Sherriff considers a number of further (tentative conclusions to be warranted or suggested by the results of this study. First of all, that historical research is now characteristically an interdisciplinary matter, in the sense that it requires extensive access to information resources, including journals, which libraries have traditionally not classified as belonging to the discipline of history itself. For a library supporting such research, this phenomenon “has implications for matters including collection budgets, reference work, bibliographic instruction, and the location of collections and departmental libraries” (p. 168. It also means “that librarians working with history students and history collections need to be aware of the relevant resources in other disciplines. This can improve reference work, research assistance, and bibliographic instruction; it may also help the coordination of acquisitions across departmental lines” (p. 179. Secondly, one may conclude that “there is no ‘core’ collection of journals for history” (p. 178 which will be able to satisfy a large proportion of master’s students’ research needs. Thirdly, the fact that a library such as SCSU’s holds significantly less than half of what master’s students require for preparing their theses “may exercise a narrowing effect on students’ awareness of the existing literature on their topics” (p. 180, “increases the importance of departmental faculty, reference librarians, and subject specialist librarians drawing students’ attention to resources beyond the library’s catalogues and collections” (p. 180, and requires that the library give serious attention to effective document delivery arrangements. Finally, this study’s finding that only a small percentage of master’s students in history made use of non-English-language materials, but then in certain cases used them rather extensively (27 Korean items cited in one thesis, ten Italian in another, nine Spanish in yet another, suggests that acquisition, or at least proactive acquisition, of such materials needn’t be a priority, as long as, once again, the students concerned have easy access to efficient and affordable document delivery services. Sherriff does concede, however, that his finding could indicate “that students are unaware of relevant resources in other languages or are aware of them but lack the language skills necessary to use them” (p. 179.

  8. Implicações do novo modelo de administração pública na gestão das pessoas na prefeitura municipal de Uberlândia, MG http://dx.doi.org/10.15601/1983-7631/rt.v8n15p163-183

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Miquelanti Júnior

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar e analisar implicações na gestão de pessoas na Prefeitura Municipal de Uberlândia (PMU, no que refere a Integração e Acolhimento, Treinamento e Desenvolvimento, Avaliação de Desempenho, Motivação e Gestão de Carreira. A coleta dos dados foi por meio de questionário respondido por 102 funcionários de sete secretarias. Para as análises foi utilizado a Escala de Likert. Os resultados indicaram que há a utilização de técnicas de gestão de pessoas no âmbito da administração pública para aumentar a produtividade de seus servidores. Contudo, existem problemas na gestão de pessoas, principalmente, no tocante ao Treinamento e Desenvolvimento. Palavras-chave: prefeitura de Uberlândia; gestão de pessoas; administração pública.  

  9. Excitation functions and yields for cyclotron production of radiorhenium via deuteron irradiation. {sup nat}W(d,xn){sup 181,182,(A+B),183,184(m+g),186g}Re nuclear reactions and tests on the production of {sup 186g}Re using enriched {sup 186}W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manenti, Simone; Persico, Elisa; Bonardi, Mauro L.; Gini, Luigi; Groppi, Flavia [LASA, Univ. degli Studi di Milano, Segrate (Italy); INFN Milano (Italy); Abbas, Kamel; Holzwarth, Uwe; Simonelli, Federica [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, IHCP, JRC-Ispra, Ispra (Italy)

    2014-10-01

    Excitation functions, thin- and thick-target yields for the {sup 181-186g}Re and {sup 187}W radionuclides were measured by the activation stacked-foil technique on natural tungsten foils for deuteron energies up to 18.0 MeV. These cross sections were validated by comparing the experimental results for thick-target yields with those calculated by integration of the thin-target yields. It was found that the maximum {sup 186g}Re content by irradiation of natural tungsten is about 55%, a higher value compared with the one found for proton beam, but not sufficient to use natural tungsten for medical purposes yet. Thus, in order to have a higher specific activity A{sub S} of {sup 186g}Re, the use of enriched {sup 186}W target is necessary. Therefore the irradiation of a thick target of enriched {sup 186}W by accelerated deuterons was studied and the results for the production of {sup 186g}Re were compared with those obtained from the irradiation of the same target by accelerated protons. It was found that the deuteron irradiation is preferable for three reasons: larger yield, less contamination by tantalum radioisotopes and smaller required amount of the target, which simplify the separation of the {sup 186g}Re from the target itself.

  10. Safety assessment of poloxamers 101, 105, 108, 122, 123, 124, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 188, 212, 215, 217, 231, 234, 235, 237, 238, 282, 284, 288, 331, 333, 334, 335, 338, 401, 402, 403, and 407, poloxamer 105 benzoate, and poloxamer 182 dibenzoate as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Joy, Subhashni D; McLain, Valerie C

    2008-01-01

    Poloxamers are polyoxyethlyene, polyoxypropylene block polymers. The impurities of commercial grade Poloxamer 188, as an example, include low-molecular-weight substances (aldehydes and both formic and acetic acids), as well as 1,4-dioxane and residual ethylene oxide and propylene oxide. Most Poloxamers function in cosmetics as surfactants, emulsifying agents, cleansing agents, and/or solubilizing agents, and are used in 141 cosmetic products at concentrations from 0.005% to 20%. Poloxamers injected intravenously in animals are rapidly excreted in the urine, with some accumulation in lung, liver, brain, and kidney tissue. In humans, the plasma concentration of Poloxamer 188 (given intravenously) reached a maximum at 1 h, then reached a steady state. Poloxamers generally were ineffective in wound healing, but were effective in reducing postsurgical adhesions in several test systems. Poloxamers can cause hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia in animals, but overall, they are relatively nontoxic to animals, with LD(50) values reported from 5 to 34.6 g/kg. Short-term intravenous doses up to 4 g/kg of Poloxamer 108 produced no change in body weights, but did result in diffuse hepatocellular vacuolization, renal tubular dilation in kidneys, and dose-dependent vacuolization of epithelial cells in the proximal convoluted tubules. A short-term inhalation toxicity study of Poloxamer 101 at 97 mg/m(3) identified slight alveolitis after 2 weeks of exposure, which subsided in the 2-week postexposure observation period. A short-term dermal toxicity study of Poloxamer 184 in rabbits at doses up to 1000 mg/kg produced slight erythema and slight intradermal inflammatory response on histological examination, but no dose-dependent body weight, hematology, blood chemistry, or organ weight changes. A 6-month feeding study in rats and dogs of Poloxamer 188 at exposures up to 5% in the diet produced no adverse effects. Likewise, Poloxamer 331 (tested up to 0.5 g/kg day(-1)), Poloxamer 235 (tested up to 1.0 g/kg day(-1)), and Poloxamer 338 (at 0.2 or 1.0 g/kg day(-1)) produced no adverse effects in dogs. Poloxamer 338 (at 5.0 g/kg day(-1)) produced slight transient diarrhea in dogs. Poloxamer 188 at levels up to 7.5% in diet given to rats in a 2-year feeding study produced diarrhea at 5% and 7.5% levels, a small decrease in growth at the 7.5% level, but no change in survival. Doses up to 0.5 mg/kg day(-1) for 2 years using rats produced yellow discoloration of the serum, high serum alkaline phosphatase activity, and elevated serum glutamicpyruvic transaminase and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase activities. Poloxamers are minimal ocular irritants, but are not dermal irritants or sensitizers in animals. Data on reproductive and developmental toxicity of Poloxamers were not found. An Ames test did not identify any mutagenic activity of Poloxamer 407, with or without metabolic activation. Several studies have suggested anticarcinogenic effects of Poloxamers. Poloxamers appear to increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs of multidrug-resistant cancer cells. In clinical testing, Poloxamer 188 increased the hydration of feces when used in combination with a bulk laxative treatment. Compared to controls, one study of angioplasty patients receiving Poloxamer 188 found a reduced myocardial infarct size and a reduced incidence of reinfarction, with no evidence of toxicity, but two other studies found no effect. Poloxamer 188 given to patients suffering from sickle cell disease had decreased pain and decreased hospitilization, compared to controls. Clinical tests of dermal irritation and sensitization were uniformly negative. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel stressed that the cosmetic industry should continue to use the necessary purification procedures to keep the levels below established limits for ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, and 1,4-dioxane. The Panel did note the absence of reproductive and developmental toxicity data, but, based on molecular weight and solubility, there should be little skin penetration and any penetration of the skin should be slow. Also, the available data demonstrate that Poloxamers that are introduced into the body via routes other than dermal exposure have a rapid clearance from the body, suggesting that there would be no risk of reproductive and/or developmental toxicity. Overall, the available data do not suggest any concern about carcinogenesis. Although there are gaps in knowledge about product use, the overall information available on the types of products in which these ingredients are used, and at what concentration, indicates a pattern of use. Based on these safety test data and the information that the manufacturing process can be controlled to limit unwanted impurities, the Panel concluded that these Poloxamers are safe as used.

  11. The Eruptions of hekla in 1947–1948 1. The Eruptions of hekla in Historical Times : S. Thorarinsson. Vísindafélag Islendinga, Reykjavík, 1967, 183 pp., 27 illus., 11 tables, U.S. $5.80

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.G.

    Whilst it can be said that the other volumes on the 1947-1948 eruption form a standard of description for a major volcanic eruption, the present volume sets a high standard for the historic description of a volcano’s former eruptions.

  12. 76 FR 2413 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Lawrence County, SD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... Dakota, to Keith Sauls for the appraised fair market value of $183. DATES: Comments regarding the... proposes to sell this land to Keith Sauls for the appraised fair market value of $183. The public land is...

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_006177 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PGFALTGAIARQGGGRNLAELVPLGGRPGPTVHGSLE Sbjct: 1 ... IRVVLAGATGKVGQVLARALVQEPGFALTGAIARQGGGRNLAELVPLGGRPGPTVHGSLE 60 ... Query: 124 GAFIA...NYAVGIMLLMRFAEEAHRFFPDVEIIEMHHKTKLDAPSGTALRTKARLERGRGDL 183 ... GAFIANYAVGIMLLM...RFAEEAHRFFPDVEIIEMHHKTKLDAPSGTALRTKARLERGRGDL Sbjct: 121 GAFIANYAVGIMLLMRFAEEAHRF

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_002570 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VIPEALDGQNLIVHSQTGTGKTLAYLLPMLTK 60 ... Query: 124 VAVGTPGRILELMEMKKLKVPHVKMIVVDEADRMMEETSAWNAFENVAKRIGNEAQYLFV... 183 ... VAVGTPGRILELMEMKKLKVPHVKMIVVDEADRMMEETSAWNAFENVAKRIGNEAQYLFV Sbjc...t: 121 VAVGTPGRILELMEMKKLKVPHVKMIVVDEADRMMEETSAWNAFENVAKRIGNEAQYLFV 180 ... Query: 244 GIVFVNRLEHVAETTAKLQFKGIK

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006177 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRDPGKARGRVPDGVEVRAGDVTDGATLGPAL 60 ... Query: 124 QTKPWFRAKLMAEKAIRESGIPYTIFRPSWVYGPEDRSLNKFATFARLLPFVPVIGSGRT... 183 ... QTKPWFRAKLMAEKAIRESGIPYTIFRPSWVYGPEDRSLNKFATFARLLPFVPVIGSGRT Sbjc...t: 121 QTKPWFRAKLMAEKAIRESGIPYTIFRPSWVYGPEDRSLNKFATFARLLPFVPVIGSGRT 180 ... Query: 244 WLMKAAAWPLQFLPTPPLSPGAVD

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_004663 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Length = 183 ... Query: 11 ... NLEELKSHYHSIITLLGEDAGREGLLKTPERVAKAMLSLTKGYHMDPHEVLRS...AKFQEEY 70 ... NLEELKSHYHSIITLLGEDAGREGLLKTPERVAKAMLSLTKGYHMDPHEVLRSAKFQEEY Sbjct: 1 ... NLEELKSHYHSIIT...LLGEDAGREGLLKTPERVAKAMLSLTKGYHMDPHEVLRSAKFQEEY 60 ... Query: 131 LQIKDCIQETLNPLGVMVVVEAKHMCMQMRGVEKQNSITTTSDFTG

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_006395 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available C 43049] ... Length = 139 ... Query: 45 ... RQLVTTILSQNVADENTRRASEALFTAYSDFAAIESADHDELADTIRVAGLPDQKXXXXX 10...4 ... RQLVTTILSQNVADENTRRASEALFTAYSDFAAIESADHDELADTIRVAGLPDQK ... Sbjct: ...1 ... RQLVTTILSQNVADENTRRASEALFTAYSDFAAIESADHDELADTIRVAGLPDQKAARIQ 60 ... Query: 165 VERVSKRFGLVTESATNKR 183 ... VERVSKRFGLVTESATNKR Sbjct: 121 VERVSKRFGLVTESATNKR 139

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_002663 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TKFVKALHDRNFDVFLDLKFH Sbjct: 1 ... KIIVALDYEKEEEALCLVDQIDPSLCRLKVGKEMFTTLGTKFVKALHDRNFDVFLDLKFH 60 ... Query: 124 LDLLQIGINASPME...QVIRLANLTQRAGLDGVVCSPQEVEILRANCGKDFKLITPGIRPIG 183 ... LDLLQIGINASPME...QVIRLANLTQRAGLDGVVCSPQEVEILRANCGKDFKLITPGIRPIG Sbjct: 121 LDLLQIGINASPMEQVIRLANLTQRAGLDGVVCSPQEVEILRANCGKDFKLITPGIRPIG 180 ...

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TIMTDPAM 60 ... Query: 124 ... DTIDKAEDRSRFDKAMKDIGLECPRSGIAHSMEEANAVLEKLGFPCIIRPSFTMGGTGGG 183 ... DTIDKA...EDRSRFDKAMKDIGLECPRSGIAHSMEEANAVLEKLGFPCIIRPSFTMGGTGGG Sbjct: 121 ... DTIDKAEDRSRFDK...AMKDIGLECPRSGIAHSMEEANAVLEKLGFPCIIRPSFTMGGTGGG 180 ... Query: 244 ... GVHTGDSITVAPAQTLTDKEYQIMRNASLAVLREIGVETGGSNV

  20. ORF Alignment: Ca19AnnotatedDec2004aaSeq [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9.2041 [Candida ... albicans SC5314] ... Length = 135 ... Query: 183 GSLVKVRKEEPLITFGRLAEFCINILNDVI...NHKFPNQGVLSGPFLEEVDTEVYTDYLDYV 242 ... GSLVKVRKEEPLITFGRLAEFCINILNDVINHK...FPNQGVLSGPFLEEVDTEVYTDYLDYV Sbjct: 1 ... GSLVKVRKEEPLITFGRLAEFCINILNDVINHKFPNQGVLSGPFLEEVDTEVYTDYLDYV 60 ... Quer

  1. D., St. John, EP, Chankseliani, M. & Uribe, L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Student Affairs in Africa | Volume 5(2) 2017, 183–185 | 2307-6267 | DOI: 10.24085/jsaa.v5i2.2708 183 ... Africa, Brazil and Australia. ... Even with such a broad support base, it was still very difficult for the student movement to.

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 183 of 183 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 1 (2004), Socio-economic constraints affecting youths involvement in national economic development, Abstract. Josephine U Nwagwu. Vol 12, No 2 (2007), Stabilizing Potential Of Cement-Fly Ash Mixture On Expansive Clay Soil, Abstract. OO Amu, AB Fajobi, SO Afekhuai. Vol 11 ...

  3. Integrated management of sustainable development and environmental protection along the Indian coasts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawkar, K.

    stream_size 7 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Proc_South_Asia_Workshop_Estuar_Model_CZM_!999_183.pdf.txt stream_source_info Proc_South_Asia_Workshop_Estuar_Model_CZM_!999_183.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content...

  4. Heavy mineral suite in the shelf sediments off Madras coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Rajamanickam, G.V.

    found at 131 m and 183 m indicates their derivation from the present shore line and the provenance. The abundance of unstable minerals like hornblende and augite at depths of 50 and 131 m (sta. nos. 3 and 7) with corresponding lower values at 73 and 183...

  5. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burdikova, Z.; Svindrych, Z.; Pala, J.; Hickey, C. D.; Wilkinson, M. G.; Pánek, Jiří; Auty, M. A. E.; Periasamy, A.; Sheehan, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, March (2015), 183_1-183_10 ISSN 1664-302X Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : cheese matrix * C-SNARF-4 * Oregon Green Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.165, year: 2015

  6. Rapid modification of the insect elicitor N-linolenoyl-glutamate via a lipoxygenase-mediated mechanism on Nicotiana attenuata leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanDoorn Arjen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some plants distinguish mechanical wounding from herbivore attack by recognizing specific constituents of larval oral secretions (OS which are introduced into plant wounds during feeding. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs are major constituents of Manduca sexta OS and strong elicitors of herbivore-induced defense responses in Nicotiana attenuata plants. Results The metabolism of one of the major FACs in M. sexta OS, N-linolenoyl-glutamic acid (18:3-Glu, was analyzed on N. attenuata wounded leaf surfaces. Between 50 to 70% of the 18:3-Glu in the OS or of synthetic 18:3-Glu were metabolized within 30 seconds of application to leaf wounds. This heat-labile process did not result in free α-linolenic acid (18:3 and glutamate but in the biogenesis of metabolites both more and less polar than 18:3-Glu. Identification of the major modified forms of this FAC showed that they corresponded to 13-hydroxy-18:3-Glu, 13-hydroperoxy-18:3-Glu and 13-oxo-13:2-Glu. The formation of these metabolites occurred on the wounded leaf surface and it was dependent on lipoxygenase (LOX activity; plants silenced in the expression of NaLOX2 and NaLOX3 genes showed more than 50% reduced rates of 18:3-Glu conversion and accumulated smaller amounts of the oxygenated derivatives compared to wild-type plants. Similar to 18:3-Glu, 13-oxo-13:2-Glu activated the enhanced accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA in N. attenuata leaves whereas 13-hydroxy-18:3-Glu did not. Moreover, compared to 18:3-Glu elicitation, 13-oxo-13:2-Glu induced the differential emission of two monoterpene volatiles (β-pinene and an unidentified monoterpene in irlox2 plants. Conclusions The metabolism of one of the major elicitors of herbivore-specific responses in N. attenuata plants, 18:3-Glu, results in the formation of oxidized forms of this FAC by a LOX-dependent mechanism. One of these derivatives, 13-oxo-13:2-Glu, is an active elicitor of JA biosynthesis and differential

  7. 75 FR 68377 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... associated funerary objects are 8 obsidian tools, 183 obsidian flakes, 30 chert flakes, 4 basalt flakes, 1... individuals were identified. The 54 associated funerary objects are 20 obsidian tools, 1 chert tool, 3...

  8. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between travel motives and key success factors of visitors at a jazz festival · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. K Williams, M Saayman, 183-202 ...

  9. Specific Statistics of Czech Legislation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2015), s. 162-183 ISSN 1805-8396 Institutional support: RVO:68378122 Keywords : legislation * quantitative description of legislation * structure and development of the legislation in the CR Subject RIV: AG - Legal Sciences

  10. Directionally solidified Eu doped CaF.sub.2./sub./Li.sub.3./sub.AlF.sub.6./sub. eutectic scintillator for neutron detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamada, K.; Hishinuma, K.; Kurosawa, S.; Shoji, Y.; Pejchal, Jan; Ohashi, Y.; Yokota, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, Dec (2015), 71-75 ISSN 0925-3467 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * eutectic * micro-pulling down Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  11. Cytochemical and ultrastructural aspects of aquatic carnivorous plant turions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plachno, B.J.; Adamec, Lubomír; Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, M.; Świątek, P.; Kamińska, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 251, č. 6 (2014), s. 1449-1454 ISSN 0033-183X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : aquatic carnivorous plants * winter buds * storage functions Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.651, year: 2014

  12. Floating large-volume mesocosms as a simple, low-cost experimental design suitable for the variety of lakes and reservoirs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šorf, M.; Brandl, Z.; Znachor, Petr; Vašek, Mojmír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 1 (2013), s. 41-48 ISSN 1863-9135 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mesocosms * enclosures * methods * lakes * reservoirs Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2013

  13. Internetová jazyková příručka – příspěvek k elektronizaci jazykového poradenství

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravdová, Markéta

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 4 (2012), s. 179-183 ISSN 0009-0786 Institutional support: RVO:68378092 Keywords : grammar * orthography * lanugage correctness * language cultivation * sociolinguistics * language consulting centre * Internet Language Reference Book Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics

  14. sinkronisasie van estrus by die sa vleismerino: die invloed op ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SYNCHRONISATION OF OESTRUS lN THE S.A. MUTTON MERINO: THE ... During the breeding season 183 South African Mutton Merino ewes were used to .... The use of progesterone and serum gonadotrophin - (DMS) in the control of ...

  15. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Community Dynamics During Bioaugmentation Studies in a Soil Column and at a Field Test Site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Jun

    2004-01-01

    ...). A butane-utilizing microorganism, strain 183BP, with the ability to cometabolically transform 1,1,1-TCA, 1,1-DCA, and 1,1-DCE was isolated from environmental samples taken from a CAH contaminated site...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 1139

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... implementation to the system. 18 Tr. 183-186. At its annual meeting held in Newton, Massachusetts, on September... generally accepted accounting principles and, most importantly, to facilitate cost finding and financial...

  17. Jsme nutně tělesní?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hříbek, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 7 (2011), s. 183-202 ISSN 0015-1831 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : phenomenology * Kripke * dualism * material constitution Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  18. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis not found in rainforest frogs along an altitudinal gradient of Papua New Guinea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dahl, C.; Kiatik, I.; Baisen, I.; Bronikowski, E.; Fleischer, R. C.; Rotzel, N. C.; Lock, J.; Novotný, Vojtěch; Narayan, E.; Hero, J.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2012), s. 183-186 ISSN 0268-0130 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : altitude * amphibians * Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.081, year: 2012

  19. Late Devonian and Triassic basalts from the southern continental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    continental margin of the East European Platform, tracers of a single heterogeneous ... Areas of Precambrian consolidation within the Late Paleozoic orogen; 3. Areas of ...... and hydrocarbon accumulations; J. Petroleum Geology. 16 183–196.

  20. Recent advances in combination of capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry: Methodology and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Klepárník, K. (Karel)

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the latest development of microseparation electromigration methods in capillaries and microfluidic devices with mass spectrometry detection and identification. A wide selection of 183 relevant articles covers the literature published from June 2012 till May 2014.

  1. Molecular phylogeny, population genetics, and evolution of heterocystous cyanobacteria using nifH gene sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Singh, P.; Singh, S. S.; Elster, Josef; Mishra, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 250, č. 3 (2013), s. 751-764 ISSN 0033-183X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : evolution * heterocystous cyanobacteria * nifH gene Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.171, year: 2013

  2. Michael Angelo Unterberger und seine Nachfolger im Dienst des böhmischen und mährischen Adels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valeš, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 67, 1/2 (2013), s. 174-183 ISSN 0029-9626 Institutional support: RVO:68378033 Keywords : Unterberger * Plandry * Breitenau * Vienna * aristocracy * Zebo * Gedon Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  3. Ethiopian Journal of Health Development - Vol 25, No 3 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptives among female college students in Arba Minch Town, Southern Ethiopia · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. A Worku, 176-183 ...

  4. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... 15), frequent contact with extension agents (2.183) and access to training (2.083) had high propensity to .... Methodology. Sampling Technique .... Perception. Biosecurity Principles. Weighted score. Weighted. Mean. Remark.

  5. The SIFT and FALP techniques; applications to ionic and electronic reactions studies and their evolution to the SIFT-MS and FA-MS analytical methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 377, SI (2015), s. 467-478 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : flow tubes * mass spectrometry * FALP techniques Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  6. Dynamics of ion–molecule reactions from beam experiments: A historical survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk; Futrell, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 377, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 84-92 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ion–molecule reactions * Dynamics * Beam scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  7. Ein vermisster Großvater, ein Tango und ein Museum. Erinnern und Vergessen des Zweiten Weltkriegs und der Shoah in der ukrainischen Gegenwartsliteratur (Larysa Denysenko, Jurij Vynnyčuk, Oksana Zabužko)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvil, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2015), s. 164-183 ISSN 0044-3506 Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : contemporary ukrainian literature * 2nd world war * shoah * memory * trauma Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  8. TMFunction data: 1707 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available G346C ... yes drug transport; inter-domain communication TM6 Multidrug transporter, P...183) Helix ... inter-domain communication; drug transport; substrate translocation; ATPase activity

  9. TMFunction data: 1627 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available S344C ... yes drug transport; inter-domain communication TM6 Multidrug transporter, P...183) Helix ... inter-domain communication; drug transport; substrate translocation; ATPase activity

  10. TMFunction data: 1699 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available S344C ... yes drug transport; inter-domain communication TM6 Multidrug transporter, P...183) Helix ... inter-domain communication; drug transport; substrate translocation; ATPase activity

  11. TMFunction data: 1693 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Q347C ... yes drug transport; inter-domain communication TM6 Multidrug transporter, P...183) Helix ... inter-domain communication; drug transport; substrate translocation; ATPase activity

  12. TMFunction data: 1696 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A354C ... yes drug transport; inter-domain communication TM6 Multidrug transporter, P...183) Helix ... inter-domain communication; drug transport; substrate translocation; ATPase activity

  13. Luminescence and scintillation properties of rare-earth-doped LuF.sub.3./sub. scintillation crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pejchal, Jan; Fukuda, K.; Kurosawa, S.; Yokota, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, Mar SI (2015), s. 58-62 ISSN 0925-3467 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lutetium fluoride * scintillator * scintillator * VUV luminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  14. Chromatographic and biological aspects of organomercurials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbein, L

    1970-01-01

    A thorough review on the biological and chromatographic aspects of methylmercury, phenylmercurials, and miscellaneous organomercurials is presented. Areas covered include ecology, epidemiology, paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, metabolism and toxicity, and environmental degradation. 183 references.

  15. NJP VOLUME 41 NO 3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-01-29

    Jan 29, 2014 ... need and the patient interaction with the health care sys- tem; and lastly to ... fails to deliver its potential benefits, with a chasm be- tween the health .... facilities for both indoor and outdoor games activities,. 183. Parameters.

  16. An investigation of gene action on different traits of tobacco under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-13

    Nicotiana tabacum). Information Bulletin Coresta Congress japan. 183. SHoaei DM, Honarnejad R (2003). Gene effects and Combining ability of quantitative and qualitative characteristics of Burley Tobacco. Information Bulletin ...

  17. 78 FR 15010 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request: Information Requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Abstract: EPA is required under Section 183(e) of the Clean Air Act to regulate Volatile Organic Compound... marine engines, locomotives, non-road recreational vehicles, and many non-road compression-ignition and...

  18. Improving critical thinking : Effects of dispositions and instructions oneconomics students' reasoning skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijltjes, Anita; van Gog, Tamara; Leppink, Jimmie; Paas, Fred

    2014-01-01

    This experiment investigated the impact of critical thinking dispositions and instructions on economics students' performance on reasoning skills. Participants (. N=. 183) were exposed to one of four conditions: critical thinking instruction, critical thinking instruction with self-explanation

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 183 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 61 (2017), New interventions and sustainable solutions: .... Vol 35 (2011), Resurgence of tribal levies: Double taxation for the rural poor, Abstract PDF.

  20. 78 FR 26740 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery Off the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... rule and the results of the SEDAR 17 update, the Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC...] 0 2. In Sec. 622.183, paragraph (b)(4) is removed and reserved. 0 3. In Sec. 622.190, introductory...

  1. Growth performance, blood profiles and carcass traits of Barbary partridge (Alectoris barbara) fed two different insect larvae meals (Tenebrio molitor and Hermetia illucens)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Loponte, R.; Nizza, S.; Bovera, F.; De Riu, N.; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Lombardi, P.; Vassalotti, G.; Mastellone, V.; Nizza, A.; Moniello, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 3 (2017), s. 183-188 ISSN 0034-5288 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Barbary partridge * Hermetia illucens * Tenebrio molitor Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 1.298, year: 2016

  2. Indirect photometric detection of boron cluster anions electrophoretically separated in methanol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítová, Lada; Fojt, Lukáš; Vespalec, Radim

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1338, APR 2014 (2014), s. 174-183 ISSN 0021-9673 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Boron cluster * Capillary electrophoresis * Indirect photometry Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.169, year: 2014

  3. Exchange bias in reduced dimensions: cobalt nanocluster arrays underthe influence of nanometer thin MnPt capping layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sessi, V.; Hertenberger, S.; Zhang, J.; Schmitz, D.; Gsell, S.; Schreck, M.; Morel, R.; Brenac, A.; Honolka, Jan; Kern, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 12 (2014), "123903-1"-"123903-10" ISSN 0021-8979 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnetism * cobalt * nanoclusters * quenching * superparamagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2014

  4. GNSS-R concept extended by a fine orbit tuning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klokočník, Jaroslav; Bezděk, Aleš; Kostelecký, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (2012), s. 957-965 ISSN 0273-1177 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : bistatic altimetry * PARIS concept * orbit resonances Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.183, year: 2012

  5. Apoptosis and necrosis during the circadian cycle in the centipede midgut

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rost-Roszkowska, M.M.; Chajec, Ł.; Vilímová, J.; Tajovský, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 4 (2016), s. 1051-1061 ISSN 0033-183X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cell death * centipede * digestive cells * midgut epithelium * ultrastructure Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  6. Luminescence study on Eu or Tb doped lanthanum-gadolinium pyrosilicate crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurosawa, S.; Shishido, T.; Sugawara, T.; Nomura, A.; Yubuta, K.; Pejchal, Jan; Murakami, R.; Yokota, Y.; Shoji, Y.; Ohashi, Y.; Kamada, K.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, Mar (2015), s. 80-83 ISSN 0925-3467 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * gadolinium pyrosilicate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  7. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-05-08

    Meckl. I, Frommer WB, Opekarova M and Tanner W. 2008 Plasma membrane microdomains regulate turnover of transport proteins in yeast. J. Cell Biol. 183 1075-1088. Grossmann G, Opekarova M, Malinsky J, Weig-Meckl I and.

  8. Anabaenopsis morphospecies (Cyanobacteria, Nostocales) from Los Patos shallow lake (Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina).

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aguilera, A.; Komárek, Jiří; Echenique, R. O.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. 3 (2016), s. 173-183 ISSN 1179-3155 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biodiversity * cyanobacterial blooms * Argentine Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  9. The fats of life: essential fatty acids in health and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lawrence, Glen D

    2010-01-01

    ...: Health Consequences and Dietary Influences Dietary Choices for Comprehensive Health 183 201 Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D Appendix E Glossary References Index Fundamentals of Chemical B...

  10. DMSP SSMT/2 - Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SSM/T-2 sensor is a five channel, total power microwave radiometer with three channels situated symmetrically about the 183.31 GHz water vapor resonance line and...

  11. Arthropod fauna recorded in flowers of apomictic Taraxacum section Ruderalia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honěk, A.; Martínková, Z.; Skuhrovec, J.; Barták, M.; Bezděk, J.; Bogusch, P.; Hadrava, J.; Hájek, J.; Janšta, P.; Jelínek, J.; Kirschner, Jan; Kubáň, V.; Pekár, S.; Průdek, P.; Štys, P.; Šumpich, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2016), s. 173-183 E-ISSN 1802-8829 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : plant-herbivore interactions * arthropods * Taraxacum Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2016

  12. Processing Methodology and Dialectological Aspects of the Dictionary of Moravian and Silesian Anoikonyms (Minor Place Names)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čižmárová, Libuše

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2010), s. 183-195 ISSN 1855-6302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90610518 Keywords : onomastics, dialectology * electronic dictionary * anoikonyms * digitization * Moravia * Silesia * minor place names Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics

  13. July 1998 Sissano, Papua New Guinea Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — At least 2,183 people killed, thousands injured, about 9,500 homeless and about 500 missing as a result of a tsunami generated in the Sissano area. Maximum wave...

  14. Quantitative impedance analysis of solid ionic conductors: Effects of electrode polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patil, D.; Shimakawa, K.; Zima, Vítězslav; Wágner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 14 (2014), "143707-1"-"143707-6" ISSN 0021-8979 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : impedance * conductivity * ion conductors Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2014

  15. Understanding Maternal Deaths from the Family's Perspective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    African Journal of Reproductive Health September 2014; 18(3): 128. SHORT REPORT .... Traditional verbal autopsies rely on data from medical ... autopsy survey data from this study. Methods .... description there does appear to be a large.

  16. On reliability of 3D reconstructions of thermal plasma jet radiation by inverse Radon transform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekerešová, Zuzana; Hlína, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2011), s. 171-183 ISSN 0001-7043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : thermal plasma jet * tomography * image reconstruction Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  17. 5. ADEKUNLE.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2008-02-25

    Feb 25, 2008 ... Adisa & Adekunle: Role Duality among School-age Children données provenant ..... tic (2.183) suggests the absence of serial correlation. That school ..... communities through non formal education; the Ghanaian perspective',.

  18. National Security Education Program: Background and Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuenzi, Jeffrey J; Riddle, Wayne C

    2005-01-01

    ... (NSEA, Title VIII of P.L. 102-183), provides aid for international education and foreign language studies by American undergraduate and graduate students, plus grants to institutions of higher education...

  19. TT2014 meeting report on the 12th Transgenic Technology meeting in Edinburgh: new era of transgenic technologies with programmable nucleases in the foreground

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beck, Inken; Sedláček, Radislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2015), s. 179-183 ISSN 0962-8819 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Transgenic * Nuclease * Gene Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.054, year: 2015

  20. Physiological tolerance and stoichiometric potential of cyanobacteria for hydrocarbon fuel production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamarainen, J.; Knoop, H.; Stanford, N.; Guerrero, F.; Akhtar, M. K.; Aro, E. M.; Steuer, Ralf; Jones, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 1 (2012), s. 67-74 ISSN 0168-1656 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Cyanobacteria * Hydrocarbon * Fuel * Toxicity * Stoichiometric potential Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.183, year: 2012

  1. Patterns, causes and consequences of genome size variation in Restionaceae of the Cape flora

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Linder, H. P.; Suda, Jan; Weiss-Schneeweiss, H.; Trávníček, Pavel; Bouchenak-Khelladi, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 4 (2017), s. 515-531 ISSN 0024-4074 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : chromosome numbers * dispersal * ecology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.277, year: 2016

  2. Catfish Farmers Perception of Training Effectiveness of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... terms of the communication methods used by the trainers ( x =1.83), clarity in ... In order to enhance the entrepreneurial skills of farmers involved in catfish ... Keywords: catfish production, entrepreneurial skills, training on catfish, West Africa

  3. 78 FR 57633 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ...: International Transport Services, Inc. Address: 19987 Commerce Parkway, Cleveland, OH 44130. Date Reissued...: July 4, 2013. License No.: 024023N. Name: OES Logistics, Inc. Address: 10900 E. 183rd Street, 130...

  4. Forward Air Controllers in the Vietnam War: Exemplars of Audacity, Innovation, and Irreverence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    70 We’d sit on the mountains under the clouds ; you could see the troops scuttling across the valley because with the weather they knew the airplanes...bombs would fall through the clouds and the world would come to an end. The enemy called it silent death.183 The NVA could not comprehend how...183 Kelly, 181. 184 Nalty, Neufeld, and Watson, 66. 71 Laos in 1969, replied, “Absolutely not. They ( HQ USAF) had the rules and

  5. Structural determinants of NH3 and NH4+ transport by mouse Rhbg, a renal Rh glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Le, Trang; Rabon, Edd; Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2016-12-01

    Renal Rhbg is localized to the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells and is involved in NH 3 /NH 4 + transport. The structure of Rhbg is not yet resolved; however, a high-resolution crystal structure of AmtB, a bacterial homolog of Rh, has been determined. We aligned the sequence of Rhbg to that of AmtB and identified important sites of Rhbg that may affect transport. Our analysis positioned three conserved amino acids, histidine 183 (H183), histidine 342 (H342), and tryptophan 230 (W230), within the hydrophobic pore where they presumably serve to control NH 3 transport. A fourth residue, phenylalanine 128 (F128) was positioned at the upper vestibule, presumably contributing to recruitment of NH 4 + We generated three mutations each of H183, H342, W230, and F128 and expressed them in frog oocytes. Immunolabeling showed that W230 and F128 mutants were localized to the cell membrane, whereas H183 and H342 staining was diffuse and mostly intracellular. To determine function, we compared measurements of NH 3 /NH 4 + and methyl amine (MA)/methyl ammonium (MA + )-induced currents, intracellular pH, and surface pH (pHs) among oocytes expressing the mutants, Rhbg, or injected with H 2 O. In H183 and W230 mutants, NH 4 + -induced current and intracellular acidification were inhibited compared with that of Rhbg, and MA-induced intracellular alkalinization was completely absent. Expression of H183A or W230A mutants inhibited NH 3 /NH 4 + - and MA/MA + -induced decrease in pHs to the level observed in H 2 O-injected oocytes. Mutations of F128 did not significantly affect transport of NH 3 or NH 4 + These data demonstrated that mutating H183 or W230 caused loss of function but not F128. H183 and H342 may affect membrane expression of the transporter.

  6. The Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Encoding Gene, BcKMO, Is Involved in the Growth, Development, and Pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A pathogenic mutant, BCG183, was obtained by screening the T-DNA insertion library of Botrytis cinerea. A novel pathogenicity-related gene BcKMO, which encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO, was isolated and identified via thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, bioinformatics analyses, and KMO activity measurement. The mutant BCG183 grew slowly, did not produce conidia and sclerotia, had slender hyphae, and presented enhanced pathogenicity. The phenotype and pathogenicity of the BcKMO-complementing mutant (BCG183/BcKMO were similar to those of the wild-type (WT strain. The activities of polymethylgalacturonase, polygalacturonase, and toxins were significantly higher, whereas acid production was significantly decreased in the mutant BCG183, when compared with those in the WT and BCG183/BcKMO. Moreover, the sensitivity of mutant BCG183 to NaCl and KCl was remarkably increased, whereas that to fluconazole, Congo Red, menadione, H2O2, and SQ22536 and U0126 [cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways inhibitors, respectively] were significantly decreased compared with the other strains. Furthermore, the key genes involved in the cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways, Pka1, Pka2, PkaR, Bcg2, Bcg3, bmp1, and bmp3, were significantly upregulated or downregulated in the mutant BCG183. BcKMO expression levels were also upregulated or downregulated in the RNAi mutants of the key genes involved in the cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways. These findings indicated that BcKMO positively regulates growth and development, but negatively regulates pathogenicity of B. cinerea. Furthermore, BcKMO was found to be involved in controlling cell wall degrading enzymes activity, toxins activity, acid production, and cell wall integrity, and participate in cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways of B. cinerea.

  7. The Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Encoding Gene, BcKMO, Is Involved in the Growth, Development, and Pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kang; Yuan, Xuemei; Zang, Jinping; Wang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Li, Peifen; Cao, Hongzhe; Han, Jianmin; Xing, Jihong; Dong, Jingao

    2018-01-01

    A pathogenic mutant, BCG183, was obtained by screening the T-DNA insertion library of Botrytis cinerea . A novel pathogenicity-related gene BcKMO , which encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), was isolated and identified via thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, bioinformatics analyses, and KMO activity measurement. The mutant BCG183 grew slowly, did not produce conidia and sclerotia, had slender hyphae, and presented enhanced pathogenicity. The phenotype and pathogenicity of the BcKMO -complementing mutant (BCG183/ BcKMO ) were similar to those of the wild-type (WT) strain. The activities of polymethylgalacturonase, polygalacturonase, and toxins were significantly higher, whereas acid production was significantly decreased in the mutant BCG183, when compared with those in the WT and BCG183/ BcKMO . Moreover, the sensitivity of mutant BCG183 to NaCl and KCl was remarkably increased, whereas that to fluconazole, Congo Red, menadione, H 2 O 2 , and SQ22536 and U0126 [cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways inhibitors, respectively] were significantly decreased compared with the other strains. Furthermore, the key genes involved in the cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways, Pka1 , Pka2 , PkaR , Bcg2 , Bcg3 , bmp1 , and bmp3, were significantly upregulated or downregulated in the mutant BCG183. BcKMO expression levels were also upregulated or downregulated in the RNAi mutants of the key genes involved in the cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways. These findings indicated that BcKMO positively regulates growth and development, but negatively regulates pathogenicity of B. cinerea . Furthermore, BcKMO was found to be involved in controlling cell wall degrading enzymes activity, toxins activity, acid production, and cell wall integrity, and participate in cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways of B. cinerea .

  8. Bacterial meningitis in diabetes patients: a population-based prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, Kiril E. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased infection rates. We studied clinical features and outcome of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in diabetes patients. Patients were selected from a nationwide, prospective cohort on community-acquired bacterial meningitis performed from March 2006 to October 2014. Data on patient history, symptoms and signs on admission, treatment, and outcome were prospectively collected. A total of 183 of 1447 episodes (13%) occurred in diabetes patients. The incidence of bacterial meningitis in diabetes patients was 3.15 per 100,000 patients per year and the risk of acquiring bacterial meningitis was 2.2-fold higher for diabetes patients. S. pneumoniae was the causative organism in 139 of 183 episodes (76%) and L. monocytogenes in 11 of 183 episodes (6%). Outcome was unfavourable in 82 of 183 episodes (45%) and in 43 of 183 episodes (23%) the patient died. Diabetes was associated with death with an odds ratio of 1.63 (95% CI 1.12–2.37, P = 0.011), which remained after adjusting for known predictors of death in a multivariable analysis (OR 1.98 [95% CI 1.13–3.48], P = 0.017). In conclusion, diabetes is associated with a 2-fold higher risk of acquiring bacterial meningitis. Diabetes is a strong independent risk factor for death in community-acquired adult bacterial meningitis. PMID:27845429

  9. Alteration of the Regiospecificity of Human Heme Oxygenase-1 by Unseating of the Heme but not Disruption of the Distal Hydrogen Bonding Network†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Evans, John P.; Ogura, Hiroshi; La Mar, Gerd N.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Heme oxygenase regiospecifically oxidizes heme at the α-meso position to give biliverdin IXα, CO, and iron. The heme orientation within the active site, which is thought to determine the oxidation regiospecificity, is shown here for the human enzyme (hHO1) to be largely determined by interactions between the heme carboxylic acid groups and residues Arg183 and Lys18 but not Tyr134. Mutation of either Arg183 or Lys18 individually does not significantly alter the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent reaction regiochemistry, but partially shifts the oxidation to the β/δ-meso positions in the reaction supported by ascorbic acid. Mutation of Glu29 to a lysine, which places a positive charge where it can interact with a heme carboxyl if the heme rotates by ~90°, causes a slight loss of regiospecificity, but combined with the R183E and K18E mutations results primarily in β/δ-meso oxidation of the heme under all conditions. NMR analysis of heme binding to the triple K18E/E29K/R183E mutant confirms rotation of the heme in the active site. Kinetic studies demonstrate that mutations of Arg183 greatly impair the rate of the P450 reductase-dependent reaction, in accord with the earlier finding that Arg183 is involved in binding of the reductase to hHO1, but have little effect on the ascorbate reaction. Mutations of Asp140 and Tyr58 that disrupt the active site hydrogen bonding network, impair catalytic rates but do not influence the oxidation regiochemistry. The results indicate both that the oxidation regiochemistry is largely controlled by ionic interactions of the heme propionic acid groups with the protein and that shifts in regiospecificity involve rotation of the heme about an axis perpendicular to the heme plane. PMID:16388581

  10. Measurement of the cross-section for the process $\\gamma^* \\gamma^* \\to$ hadrons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Gong, Z F; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Sakar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the two-photon interaction e+e- --> e+e- hadrons at sqrt(s) = 91 GeV and sqrt(s) = 183 GeV are presented. The double-tag events, collected with the L3 detector, correspond to integrated luminosities of 140 pb-1 at 91 GeV and 52 pb-1 at 183 GeV. The cross-section of gamma*gamma* collisions has been measured at = 3.5 GeV^2 and = 14 GeV^2. The data agree well with predictions based on perturbative QCD, while the Quark Parton Model alone is insufficient to describe the data.

  11. Interband transitions in 106Pd, 152Sm, 152Gd and 182W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartashov, V.M.; Oborovskij, A.I.; Troitskaya, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    Internal transitions in 106 Pd, 152 Sm, 152 Gd, 182 W nuclei, observed during decay of 152,152m Eu, 182,183 Ta, 106m Ag, are studied. The experimental characteristics of E0-transitions and E0-components of E0+M1+E2 type transitions in the studied nuclei, relative intensities of internal conversion electron lines during 182 Ta decay, multipolar composition and forbidden factor for 182 W and 183 W low-energy transitions, characteristics of transitions are presented

  12. Genes encoded within 8q24 on the amplicon of a large extrachromosomal element are selectively repressed during the terminal differentiation of HL-60 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Tetsuo; Ike, Fumio; Murata, Takehide; Obata, Yuichi; Utiyama, Hiroyasu; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2008-01-01

    Human acute myeloblastic leukemia HL-60 cells become resistant to differentiation during long­term cultivation. After 150 passages, double minute chromosomes (dmins) found in early­-passaged cells are replaced by large extrachromosomal elements (LEEs). In a DNA library derived from a purified fraction of LEEs, 12.6% (23/183) of clones were assigned to 8q24 and 9.2% (17/183) were assigned to 14q11 in the human genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed a small aberrant chromos...

  13. Nuclear medicine. Abstracts; Nuklearmedizin 2000. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-07-01

    This issue of the journal contains the abstracts of the 183 conference papers as well as 266 posters presented at the conference. Subject fields covered are: Neurology, psychology, oncology, pediatrics, radiopharmacy, endocrinology, EDP, measuring equipment and methods, radiological protection, cardiology, and therapy. (orig./CB) [German] Die vorliegende Zeitschrift enthaelt die Kurzfassungen der 183 auf der Tagung gehaltenen Vortraege sowie der 226 praesentierten Poster, die sich mit den folgenden Themen befassten: Neurologie, Psychiatrie, Onkologie, Paediatrie, Radiopharmazie, Endokrinologie, EDV, Messtechnik, Strahlenschutz, Kardiologie sowie Therapie. (MG)

  14. Dogs are a reservoir of ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium lineages associated with human infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro; Top, Janetta; Hendrickx, Antoni P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ampicillin resistance is a marker for hospital-associated Enterococcus faecium. Feces from 208 dogs were selectively screened for the occurrence of ampicillin-resistant E. faecium (AREF). AREF was detected in 42 (23%) of 183 dogs screened in a cross-sectional study in the United Kingdom and in 19...

  15. Nuclear medicine. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    This issue of the journal contains the abstracts of the 183 conference papers as well as 266 posters presented at the conference. Subject fields covered are: Neurology, psychology, oncology, pediatrics, radiopharmacy, endocrinology, EDP, measuring equipment and methods, radiological protection, cardiology, and therapy. (orig./CB) [de

  16. Structural Completeness in Fuzzy Logics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Metcalfe, G.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2009), s. 153-183 ISSN 0029-4527 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : structral logics * fuzzy logics * structural completeness * admissible rules * primitive variety * residuated lattices Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  17. Kazakhstan’s Geoeconomic Quest for Power in a Multipolar World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    passing between Malaysia , Singapore, and western Indonesia. The former 183 Yergin, The Quest, 71. 184...following the SWF models of Malaysia and Singapore. The massive development fund is effectively a government holding company, with $66.7 billion in...nuclear power is also a politically unpredictable energy source, with public concerns over its safety record heavily affecting its use. After the

  18. Role of bacterial biofertilizers in agriculture and forestry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    García-Fraile, Paula; Menendéz, E.; Rivas, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2015), s. 183-205 ISSN 2306-5354 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : plant growth-promoting Rhizobacteria * sustainable agriculture * biofertilizer s Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 183 ... Vol 15, No 2 (2010), Effect of Filler Loading on the Molecular ... Students\\' Achievement In Biology: A Case Study Of Bureti District, ... Achievement and Perception of Classroom Learning Environment ... Vol 16, No 1 (2011), Exposure of Senior School Students to Practical Work in Agriculture in Ikwerre ...

  20. Special Consideration in Post-Secondary Institutions: Trends at a Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Joelle; Kamenetsky, Stuart B.; Pongracic, Syb

    2015-01-01

    This study examined trends in the practice of granting special consideration for missed tests and late papers in colleges and universities. We analyzed a database of 4,183 special consideration requests at a large Canadian university between 1998 and 2008. Results show a growing rate of requests per enrolment between 2001 and 2007. Although…

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of an epitaxial BaTiO.sub.3./sub./SrTiO.sub.3./sub. superlattice grown on a (110) SmScO.sub.3./sub. substrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Železný, Vladimír; Soukiassian, A.; Schlom, D. G.; Xi, X.X.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 18 (2014), "184102-1"-"184102-7" ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1011 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : perovskites * superlattices Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2014

  2. Combating Biological Terrorism from Imported Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    tubers 3,151.10 beverages, spirits and vinegar 2,333.90 edible fruit and nuts; peel of citrus fruit or melons 2,288.70 sugars and sugar confectionery...2006 spinach 1 183 E. coli 2005 fermented salmon 0 4 C. botulinum 2004 unknown 0 5 Listeria 2002 turkey 7 46 Listeria 2002 whale 0 8 C. botulinum

  3. Internet Use among Middle School Students in School and at Home: What Can We Learn from a U.S.-China Comparison?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jing; Zhou, Jingye; Wang, Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Based on data collected from middle school students in a U.S. school (N = 159) and a Chinese school (N = 183), this study compared Internet use in school and at home between American students and Chinese students, explored what affected students' use of the Internet, and examined how students' Internet use related to their learning. Results reveal…

  4. Effects of chronic irradiation on spermatogenesis: recovery phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, P.A.; Shifrine, M.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Recovery of sperm production was not seen in four beagles rendered azoospermic or severely oligospermic by exposure to 183 R of gamma radiation given at a dose rate of 1 R/day. Two other dogs from the same group showed a partial recovery, but with very low sperm counts and many abnormal spermatozoa. 1 figure

  5. 77 FR 53214 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Service Coordinators in Multifamily Housing Program, Fiscal Year...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ...,104 Center, Inc. Center. AZ Casa Sierra Vista, Casa Sierra Vista.... 600-A E 25th St...... Yuma 30 190........... 246 176,271 Senior Citizens Avenue. Housing, LTD. NM New Mexico-American La Resolana 1025 Chelwood... Corporation. OH CRS, Ltd (Stern Hendy Clifton Place........ 900 Rue De La Paix... Cincinnati 183 375,387...

  6. Harnessing big data for estimating the energy consumption and driving range of electric vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fetene, Gebeyehu Manie; Kaplan, Sigal; Mabit, Stefan Lindhard

    2017-01-01

    type; (iv) weather conditions. The results of the analysis measure the mean ECR of BEVs at 0.183 kW h/km, underline a 34% increase in ECR and a 25% decrease in driving range in the winter with respect to the summer, and suggest the electricity tariff for BEVs to be cost efficient with respect...

  7. 40 CFR 61.186 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.186 Reporting requirements... at least 30 days prior notice of each reference opacity level determination required in § 61.183(a...

  8. Validation of the Euroscore on Cardiac Surgery Patients in Nairobi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    multiruka1

    curve analysis. Results: Of 109 patients, significant differences (Kenyan vs. AE derivation) were found in the prevalence of pulmonary y hypertension (58.7% vs. 2%) and isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery. (4.6% vs. 65%). Only double valve replacement was a risk factor for operative mortality; odds ratio 5.98 (1.83.

  9. K basin sandfilter backwash line characterization project, analytical results for campaign 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Sample 183KWBMF was taken from the K West Sandfilter Backwash Pit on August 28, 1998 and received by 222-S Laboratory on August 28, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with ''Letter of Instruction for K Basins Sandfilter Backwash Line Samples'' (LOI) in support of the K Basin Sandfilter Backwash Line Characterization Project

  10. [Correlations between PBDEs and thyroid hormone concentrations in adults from production source area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Yuan; Jin, Jun; Yang, Cong-Qiao; Wang, Ying; Ding, Wen-Wei; Yang, Xian-Feng; Liu, An-Ming

    2011-11-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) concentrations in 36 resident serum samples from PBDEs production source area were analyzed by gas chromatography/negative chemical ionization/mass spectrometry(GC-NCI-MS) method, and the concentrations of thyroid hormones were determined as well. The sigma5PBDEs (BDE-28, -47, -153, -183, -209) concentrations(lipid weight) in serum ranged from 130.3 to 4 478.4 ng x g(-1), with an average value of 529.9 ng x g(-1). BDE-209 was a dominant PBDE congener, on average accounting for 69.8% of the total PBDEs concentrations. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was calculated between PBDEs and thyroid hormone, it showed that there were high significant negative correlation between BDE-28, -47, -153, -183 and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and significant negative correlation was also found between BDE-183 and free thyroxine (fT4). Additionally, there were significant positive correlation between BDE-28, -47 and triiodothyronine (T3), as well as between BDE-28, -153, -183 and free triiodothyronine(fT3). In summary, the concentrations of PBDEs in serum in this study were at a high level, and BDE-209 was the predominant congener. The exposure to the PBDEs may affect thyroid hormone levels, and the further research should focus on the relationship between PBDEs and thyroid hormone concentrations.

  11. Dispersion properties and low infrared optical losses in epitaxial AlN on sapphire substrate in the visible and infrared range

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soltani, A.; Stolz, A.; Charrier, J.; Mattalah, M.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Barkad, H.A.; Mortet, Vincent; Rousseau, M.; Bourzgui, N.; BenMoussa, A.; De Jaeger, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 16 (2014), "163515-1"-"163515-6" ISSN 0021-8979 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : III-V semiconductors * AlN films * surface scattering * refractive index * optical properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2014

  12. Automated Cyber Red Teaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    affect one’s cyber system by searching for viable attack plans1, and examining its effect on the system. It is a labour - intensive exercise as it...Both Satisfaction and Optimization Problems,” AI Magazine, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 85-87, 2001. [183] S. Milton, Machine Learning methods for

  13. Elevated Ratio of Maternal Plasma ApoCIII to ApoCII in Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    disease. Given the similarities in pathology, etiology , and clinical presentation between cardiovascular disease and preeclampsia , we hypothesized that...directed fetal/placental signals? In: Lyall F, Belfort M, eds. Preeclampsia : Etiology and Clinical Practice. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press...2007:183-194. 3. Hubel C. Dyslipidemia and preeclampsia . In: Lyall F, Belfort M, eds. Preeclampsia : Etiology and Clinical Practice. Cambridge, UK

  14. Specifications of the High-Flux Solar Furnace | Concentrating Solar Power |

    Science.gov (United States)

    : 183 cm (72 in) Z (vertical) travel: 152±46 cm (60 ±18 in) Nominal focal point: 152 cm (60 in) off table Attenuator Shutter Data acquisition Miscellaneous features Utilities Target/Image Focal point nominally located 152.4 cm (60 in) above floor When using XYZ table top: focal point must be 35 cm (14 in

  15. Factors of the uneven regional development of wind energy projects (a case of the Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frantál, Bohumil; Kunc, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 3 (2010), s. 183-199 ISSN 0016-7193 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB700860801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : wind energy * diffusion of innovation * social acceptance * uneven development Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 183 ... Issue, Title. Vol 62 (2017), #SchoolsOnFire: Criminal justice responses to protests that impede the right to basic education, Abstract PDF. Ann Skelton, Martin Nsibirwa. Vol 45 (2013), 'Pale Face'/'Pointy Face: SA Criminology in Denial, Abstract PDF. S Henkeman. Vol 59 (2017), Aluta continua: Police ...

  17. Collection of Short Papers on the Beaver Creek Watershed Study in West Tennessee, 1989-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Emersent acuatic plants ves no no yes We were unsusccessful at locating a nonchannelized reference site with a similar hydrologic regime (flowing water...402-408. Cummin, K.W., 1973. Trophic Relations of Aquatic Insects . Ann. Review of Entomology 18:183-206. Elder, J.F. and D.J. Cairns, 1982

  18. Stachler et al. 2017 Figure 2 data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Estimated mean log10 concentration of genetic markers for CQQ_056, CPQ_064, HF183/BacR287, and HumM2 genetic markers in nine sewage and two surface water samples....

  19. History of cable-stayed bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The principle of supporting a bridge deck by inclined tension members leading to towers on either side of the span has been known for centuries. However, the real development of cable-stayed bridges did not begin before the 1950s. Since then the free span has been increased from 183 m in the Strö...

  20. Morphometric Studies Of The Cerebellum And Forebrain Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphometric studies were undertaken using the brains of six African giant rats. The mean of weights and lengths (tip of the olfactory bulb to the caudal border of the cerebellum) were observed tobe 4.88 0.183g and 4.40 0.193g, respectively. Similarly, the mean weight and length of the cerebellum and the forebrain ...

  1. Language Outcomes at 12 Years for Children Exposed Prenatally to Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Barbara A.; Minnes, Sonia; Short, Elizabeth J.; Min, Meeyoung O.; Wu, Miaoping; Lang, Adelaide; Weishampel, Paul; Singer, Lynn T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to examine the long-term effects of prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) on the language development of 12-year-old children using a prospective design, controlling for confounding prenatal drug exposure and environmental factors. Method: Children who were exposed to cocaine in utero (PCE; "n" = 183)…

  2. Embedding relations connected with strong approximation of Fourier ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ing only odd functions and a set of functions defined via the strong means of Fourier series of odd continuous functions. We establish an improvement of a recent theorem of Le and Zhou [Math. Inequal. Appl. 11(4) (2008) 749–756] which is a generalization of Tikhonov's results [Anal. Math. 31 (2005) 183–194]. We also ...

  3. 76 FR 5154 - Availability of Draft Report, Biofuels and the Environment: First Triennial Report to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... Draft Report, Biofuels and the Environment: First Triennial Report to Congress AGENCY: Environmental... titled, Biofuels and the Environment: The First Triennial Report to Congress (EPA/600/R- 10/183A). The... production of biofuels (fuels derived from organic materials) from 9 billion gallons per year in 2008 to 36...

  4. Biofuels and the Environment: The First Triennial Report to Congress (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Biofuels and the Environment: The First Triennial Report to Congress (External Review Draft) (EPA/600/R-10/183A) report, prepared by the National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) within EPA’s Office of Research and Development, is the first report published ...

  5. Biofuels and the Environment: the First Triennial Report to Congress (2011 Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report,Biofuels and the Environment: The First Triennial Report to Congress (EPA/600/R-10/183F), prepared by the National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) within EPA’s Office of Research and Development, as the first EPA rep...

  6. Extracellular Matrix Biomarker, Fibulin-1 and Its Association with Soluble uPAR in a Bi-ethnic South African Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Plooy, C. S.; Kruger, R.; Huisman, H. W.

    2015-01-01

    in atherosclerosis. We explored the independent relationship of fibulin-1 with these inflammatory markers in a bi-ethnic South African population. Methods This study included 290 Africans (men: n = 130 and women: n = 160) and 343 sex-and age-matched Caucasians (men: n = 160 and women: n = 183). Serum fibulin-1, su...

  7. Polymorphism, linkage mapping, and association analysis with carcass traits of four porcine candidate genes selected from gene-expression profiles of Czech Large White and Wild Boar muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chalupová, P.; Dvořáková, Věra; Knoll, A.; Stratil, Antonín; Bartenschlager, H.; Stupka, R.; Čítek, J.; Šprysl, M.; Palánová, Anna; Horák, Pavel; Geldermann, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 3 (2014), s. 116-127 ISSN 1212-1819 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/09/0844 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : pig * single nucleotide polymorphism * DNA markers Subject RIV: GI - Animal Husbandry ; Breeding Impact factor: 1.183, year: 2014

  8. Artificial sowing of endangered dry grassland species into disused basalt quarries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, J.; Prach, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 3 (2010), s. 179-183 ISSN 0367-2530 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600050702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : dry grasslands * seedling survival * quarries Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.657, year: 2010

  9. Effects of a novel recombinant somatostatin DNA vaccination on rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-06-19

    Jun 19, 2012 ... OD=0.614±0.183). Immunized groups had higher pregnancy rate, litter size, ... of most hormones (example, growth hormone, insulin, glucagon ..... M4GFP without antibiotic resistance gene and its subcellular localization in ...

  10. Visual attention: the interplay between ad characteristics and context factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.; Smit, E.; van Meurs, A.

    2011-01-01

    Using eye-tracking data, we tested what elements of the ad are able to catch the eye and whether the context of the ad can draw visual attention away. Characteristics of 183 magazine ads and their direct context were systematically coded and linked to eye-tracking data. Results showed that indeed ad

  11. Calcium alpha-ketoglutarate administration to malnourished hemodialysis patients improves plasma arginine concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, E; Hampl, H; Steudle, V; Nündel, M

    1996-01-01

    Calcium alpha-ketoglutarate administration to 24 malnourished hemodialysis patients for 1 year leads to a significant increase in plasma concentrations of L-arginine from 53.6 +/- 18.3 (compared to a healthy control group: 87.5 +/- 27.3) to 71.1 +/- 15.9 mumol/l (p calcium alpha-ketoglutarate administration.

  12. Local perceptions of climate change impacts and migration patterns in Malé, Maldives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stojanov, R.; Duží, Barbora; Kelman, I.; Němec, D.; Procházka, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 4 (2017), s. 370-385 ISSN 0016-7398 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Maldives * climate change impacts * migration * risk management * quantitative survey Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Cultural and economic geography Impact factor: 3.132, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/geoj.12177/abstract

  13. Street Kids: Children in Danger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, James W.; Carlson, Helena M.

    Federal Bureau of Investigation statistics show a 183% increase in female juvenile prostitution and a 245% increase in male juvenile prostitution between the years 1969 and 1978. Most of these juveniles were runaways who shared a common childhood background of physical and sexual abuse. In 1981, a city task force was created to examine the problem…

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 regulates proliferation of cardiac myocytes in normal and hypoplastic left ventricles in the developing chick

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dealmeida, A.; Sedmera, David

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2009), s. 159-169 ISSN 1047-9511 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/08/0615 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Chick embryo * Hypoplastic left heart syndrome * Adenovirus Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.183, year: 2009

  15. Destination Motivation, Cultural Orientation, and Adaptation: International Students' Destination-Loyalty Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaludin, Nor Lelawati; Sam, David Lackland; Sandal, Gro Mjeldheim

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to understand factors predicting destination-loyalty intention in international education. A sample of 378 long-term (n = 195) and short-term (n = 183) international students participated in the study carried out in 2014 through an on-line survey at the University of Bergen, Norway. Using a series of hierarchical regression…

  16. The Relationship Between Iron and Nitrogen Fixation in Trichodesmium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Genes essential to iron transport in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. J Bacteriol 183: 2779-2784. Keren, N., Aurora , R., and...where surface salinity measurements indicate that we were sampling in the Amazon River plume. At E21, the surface salinity measured by the CTD was 32.5

  17. 77 FR 50682 - KC Scoby Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14423-000] KC Scoby Hydro... concrete gravity dam with a 183-foot-long spillway; (2) an existing impoundment having a surface area of 22 acres and a storage capacity of 52 acre-feet at an elevation of 1,080 feet mean sea level (msl); (3) a...

  18. Students' Perceptions regarding Their Impending Transition out of College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazedjian, Ani; Kielaszek, Becki J.; Toews, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Although researchers have argued students experience feelings of stress, fear, and uncertainty as they transition from college to work life, there is limited empirical research supporting this argument. Our study filled this gap by exploring 183 fourth-year students' perceptions regarding their impending transition out of the college environment.…

  19. A Search for Gene Fusions/Translocations in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    2008). The transcriptional landscape of the yeast genome defined by RNA sequencing. Science 320, 1344–1349. Palanisamy, N., Ateeq, B., Kalyana-Sundaram...census of human cancer genes. Nat Rev Cancer 4, 177–183. [2] Santarius T, Shipley J, Brewer D, Stratton MR, and Cooper CS (2010). A census of amplified

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 183 ... Vanessa Barolsky, Chandré Gould. Vol 59 (2017), Editorial: More data mean better tools for South Africa, Abstract PDF. Andrew Faull ... Vol 39 (2012), Feeling the Hawks: Why an anti-corruption agency should not be in the SAPS, Abstract PDF. I Kinnes, G Newham. Vol 44 (2013), Fighting for Respect: ...

  1. A photometric redshift of z = 6.39 +/- 0.12 for GRB 050904

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haislip, J.B.; Nysewander, M.C.; Reichart, D. E.; Levan, A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Cenko, S.B.; Fox, D.B.; Price, P.A.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Evans, C.R.; Figueredo, E.; MacLeod, C.L.; Kirschbrown, J.R.; Jelínek, M.; Guziy, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Cypriano, E.S.; LaCluyze, A.; Graham, J.; Priddey, R.; Chapman, R.; Rhoads, J.; Fruchter, A.S.; Lamb, D.Q.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Bayliss, M.B.; Schmidt, B.P.; Soderberg, A.M.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Harrison, F.A.; Moon, D.S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kasliwal, M.M.; Hudec, René; Vítek,, S.; Kubánek, Petr; Crain, J.A.; Foster, A.C.; Clemens, J.C.; Bartelme, J.W.; Canterna, R.; Hartmann, D.H.; Henden, A. A.; Klose, S.; Park, H.-S.; Williams, G.G.; Rol, E.; O'Brien, P.; Bersier, D.; Prada, F.; Pizzaro, S.; Maturana, D.; Ugarte, P.; Alvarez, A.; Fernandez, A.J.M.; Jarvis, M.J.; Moles, M.; Alfaro, E.; Ivarsen, K.M.; Kumar, N.D.; Mack, C.E.; Zdarowicz, C.M.; Gehrels, N.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 440, č. 7081 (2006), s. 181-183 ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : gamma-ray astrophysics * gamma-ray bursts * optical transients Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 26.681, year: 2006

  2. Software developed by research vs. Freedom of information in EU (open access and open data)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolman, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2014), s. 183-198 ISSN 1802-5951 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : cooperation of public research institutions and private partners * freedom of information in the EU * open access * open data * research and development * software Subject RIV: AG - Legal Sciences

  3. Why has nature invented three stop codons of DNA and only one start codon?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal; Křížek, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 304, Jul 7 (2012), s. 183-187 ISSN 0022-5193 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100190803 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : DNA * RNA * stop codon * synchronization shift * drosophila genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.351, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022519312001580

  4. Developing Concepts of Ordinary and Extraordinary Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jonathan D.; Evans, E. Margaret; Brink, Kimberly A.; Wellman, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    We examine how understandings of ordinary and extraordinary communication develop. Three- to 10-year-old children and adults (N = 183) were given scenarios in which a protagonist wanted help from a human (their parent) or from God. Scenarios varied in whether protagonists expressed their desires aloud (by asking) or silently (by hoping), whether…

  5. Core of Romanticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Milosavljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Review of the book: Isaija Berlin, 2012. Koreni romantizma, Melonova predavanja u Nacionalnoj umetničkoj galeriji, 1965. Vašington, DS (urednik britanskog izdanja: Henri Hardi; preveo sa engleskog: Branimir Gligorić; stihove prevela: Nataša Tučev. Službeni glasnik: Beograd, 183 str.

  6. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart I of... - General Testing Conditions and Additional Guidelines for Personal Fall Protection Systems (Non...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., to its hanging location (6 feet (1.83 m) below the anchorage). The test weight should fall without... belts, the complete belt should withstand a drop test consisting of a 250 pound (113.4 kg) weight.... One belt terminal should be attached to a rigid anchor and the other terminal should hang free. The...

  7. Changes in U.S.-International Arms Trade Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Countertrade : Offsets in the International Arms Market," Orbis, 29: 183-213 (Spring 1985). 48. Office of Management and Budget. Impact of Offsets in...Metin. " Countertrade and Turkey," Middle East Executive Reports, 12: 8,19-21 (March 1989). 65. "Spanish Government Will Purchase 84 McDonnell Douglas F

  8. The effects of feeding triacylglcerols on milk fat composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    concentrations of C18:1 - C18:3 acids compared to the low-fat diet, chow, or the coconut oil-supplemented diets. Compared with the low-fat control diet, all the other dietary regimes suppressed overall fatty acid synthesis in both the lactating mammary gland and liver, with the highest suppression being produced by the olive ...

  9. Shape Oscillations of an Oil Drop Rising in Water : Effect of Surface Contamination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abi Chebel, N.; Vejražka, Jiří; Masbernat, O.; Risso, F.

    Roč. 702, JUL 10 ( 2012 ), s. 533-542 ISSN 0022-1120 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/11/0806 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble dynamics * drops * drops and bubbles Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2012

  10. Association between Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in childhood and schizophrenia later in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Søren; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Frydenberg, M

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To estimate the risk of schizophrenia in adulthood among children and adolescents with ADHD compared to the background population. SUBJECTS/MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and eight youths with ADHD (183 boys; 25 girls) were followed prospectively. Diagnoses of schizophrenia were obta...

  11. First-order reflection/transmission coefficients for unconverted plane P waves in weakly anisotropic media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farra, V.; Pšenčík, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 3 (2010), s. 1443-1454 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/0332 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : body waves * seismic anisotropy * wave propagation Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.411, year: 2010

  12. Live birth rate and number of blastomeres on day 2 transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzarello, Antonino; Hoest, Thomas; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2016-01-01

    -lapse assessment, ACDs and/or recalculated fragmentation >25 % was recognized in 106/578 (18.3 %) of transferred embryos. None of them resulted in a live birth. After exclusion of these embryos, the number of blastomeres on the day of transfer did not have any impact on life birth rate. Conclusion Conventional...

  13. Benediktinské opatství sv. Petra a Pavla ve Vilémově. Příspěvek k historii a stavební podobě "zapomenutého" kláštera pod Železnými horami

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovář, M.; Musílek, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 3 (2009), s. 157-183 ISSN 1803-1382 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M300090903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : Bohemia * Middle Ages * Vilémov * monastery of Vilémov * Benedictine * Benedictine abbey Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  14. Chromatography in authenticity and traceability tests of vegetable oils and dairy products: a review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cserháti, T.; Forgács, E.; Deyl, Zdeněk; Mikšík, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 3 (2005), s. 183-190 ISSN 0269-3879 Grant - others:CZ-HU(CZ) Cooperation programme Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : chromatography * dairy products * vegetable oils Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.218, year: 2005

  15. Cavitation Inception Scale Effects. 1. Nuclei Distributions in Natural Waters. 2. Cavitation Inception in a Turbulent Shear Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    cavitation is pressure-controlled. The term hydrodynamic cavitation is some- times used to stress the dominant role of dynamic pressure in the cavitation...Diffraction Pattern of Opaque and Transparent Objects with Coherent Back- ground," Optica Acta, 11, 183-193. Peterson, F.B. (1972), " Hydrodynamic Cavitation and

  16. Awareness and pattern of needlestick injuries among health workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness and pattern of needlestick injuries among health workers at University Teaching Hospital Ilorin, Nigeria. SA Medubi, TM Akande, GK Osagbemi. Abstract. No Abstract. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology Vol. 7(3) 2006: 183-188. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  17. Nurses' Attitudes toward Gay and Hemophiliac Patients with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Judith A.; Damrosch, Shirley

    A sample of nurses (N=183) enrolled in a School of Nursing's master degree program was randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes about a patient who differed only in terms of diagnosis and lifestyle. Possible diagnoses were Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS acquired by a hemophiliac through blood therapy, and leukemia; possible…

  18. Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics - Vol 12, No 2 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics - Vol 12, No 2 (2011) ... Serum interferon-alpha level in first degree relatives of systemic lupus erythematosus patients: Correlation with autoantibodies titers · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ... LB Salah, CB Salem, F B'Chir, K Bouraoui, F Broly, S Saguem, 183-186.

  19. „Jiskry v temnu?“ Evangeličtí venkovští písmáci jako nositelé české vzdělanosti v pobělohorském období

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bolom-Kotari, Sixtus

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2017), s. 170-183 ISSN 1338-7219 Institutional support: RVO:67985963 Keywords : writers (písmáci) * Protestant society * Counter-Reformation * literacy * Czech lands Subject RIV: AB - History OBOR OECD: History (history of science and technology to be 6.3, history of specific sciences to be under the respective headings)

  20. How Do Groups Work? Age Differences in Performance and the Social Outcomes of Peer Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Do children derive different benefits from group collaboration at different ages? In the present study, 183 children from two age groups (8.8 and 13.4 years) took part in a class quiz as members of a group, or individually. In some groups, cohesiveness was made salient by awarding prizes to the top performing groups. In other groups, prizes were…

  1. Teaching and Learning Theology and Religion at the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togarasei, Lovemore

    2015-01-01

    This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in "Teaching Theology and Religion" 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of…

  2. Religion, Education, and Religious Education in Irish Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Áine; Bocking, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in "Teaching Theology and Religion" 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of…

  3. Teaching Religion in Brazil, in Public Schools and Confessional Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Eduardo R.; Soares, Afonso L.

    2015-01-01

    This essay is part of a collection of short essays solicited from authors around the globe who teach religion courses at the college level (not for professional religious training). They are published together with an introduction in "Teaching Theology and Religion" 18:3 (July 2015). The authors were asked to provide a brief overview of…

  4. The role of crisis in family crisis intervention: do crisis experience and crisis change matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al, C.M.W.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; van der Laan, P.H.; Asscher, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation studies of crisis intervention have focused on prevention of out-of-home placement of children or family functioning, but largely neglected the aspect of crisis. The present study examined crisis in 183 families receiving Family Crisis Intervention (FCI), addressing crisis characteristics

  5. 75 FR 3395 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; U.S. Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... and at least 200 yards (183 m) from marine mammals other than whales, and avoid approaching animals...) behavior of marine animals sighted; (7) direction of travel; (8) environmental information associated with... of marine animals. These transect data will provide an opportunity to collect data of marine mammals...

  6. Long-term Periodicity Analysis of Polarization Variation for Radio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kochanev, P. Yu., Gabuzda, D. C. 1998, In: Radio Emission From Galactic and Extragalactic. Compact Sources (eds) Zensus, J. A., Taylor, G. B., Wrobel, J. M., San Francisco: ASP, p. 273. Lomb, N. R. 1976, ApS&S, 39, 447. Mead, A. R. G., Ballard, K. R., Brand, P. W. J. L. et al. 1990, Astron. Astrophys. Suppl. Ser.,. 83, 183.

  7. Biophysical processes leading to the ingress of temperate fish larvae into estuarine nursery areas: a review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teodósio, M. A.; Paris, C. B.; Wolanski, E.; Morais, Pedro Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 183, A (2016), s. 187-202 ISSN 0272-7714 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-05872S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : fish larvae * sense acuity * orientation * swimming strategies * recruitment model Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2016

  8. Nikkaji Dictionary: プルバラノールA [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term プルバラノールA 名詞 一般 * * * * プルバラノールA ... Nikkaji J1.686.183I 200906013797470415 C CA06 UNKNOWN_2 プルバラノール A

  9. Nikkaji Dictionary: プルバラノールA [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term プルバラノールA 名詞 一般 * * * * プルバラノールA ... Nikkaji J1.686.183I 200906013797470415 C CA06 UNKNOWN_2 プルバラノール A

  10. The Effect of Visual Task Difficulty on the Fixation-Related Lambda Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 23 Di Stasi LL, Antolí A, Cañas JJ . Main sequence: An index for detecting mental workload...North-Holland (Netherlands): Elsevier; 1988. p. 139–183. Hickey C, Di Lollo V, McDonald JJ . Electrophysiological indices of target and distractor

  11. Determination of the average lifetime of bottom hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, P; Schmitz, D; Siebke, H; Wallraff, W [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik 1A und 1. Physikalisches Inst.; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M

    1984-12-27

    We have determined the average lifetime of hadrons containing b quarks produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation to be tausub(B)=1.83 x 10/sup -12/ s. Our method uses charged decay products from both non-leptonic and semileptonic decay modes.

  12. Determination of the average lifetime of bottom hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, P; Schmitz, D; Siebke, H; Wallraff, W; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M

    1984-12-27

    We have determined the average lifetime of hadrons containing b quarks produced in e e annihilation to be tausub(B)=1.83x10 S s. Our method uses charged decay products from both non-leptonic and semileptonic decay modes. (orig./HSI).

  13. A model for strain hardening, recovery, recrystallization and grain growth with applications to forming processes of nickel base alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riedel, H.; Svoboda, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 665, MAY (2016), s. 175-183 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-24252S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Recrystallization * Recovery * Chaboche model Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamic s Impact factor: 3.094, year: 2016

  14. Assessing the impacts of international volunteer tourism in host communities: A new approach to organizing and prioritizing indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Anthony Lupoli; Wayde C. Morse; Conner Bailey; John Schelhas

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the use of indicators to evaluate the impacts of volunteer tourism in host communities, based on an online questionnaire sent to 183 volunteer tourism organizations. Little research exists demonstrating how volunteer tourism programs impact host communities or how impacts can be assessed, but the literature suggests the use of indicators to do so....

  15. Drawing on indigenous knowledge: Students\\' learning in and from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing on indigenous knowledge: Students\\' learning in and from a rural community. E Bitzer, H Menkveld. Abstract. No Abstract Available South African Journal of Higher Education Vol.18(3) 2004: 226-240. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  16. From Addiction to Infection: Managing Drug Abuse in the Context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Pretoria, South Africa. *For Correspondence: E-mail: taiwo.akindipe@gmail.com; Phone: +234 803 388 1391 ... 18[3]: 47-54). Keywords: Drug users, Drug addiction, Substance use, HIV infection, Africa. Résumé ... potentially weak social support systems, ..... electronic media need to highlight the relationship between drug ...

  17. A Novel Approach in Facilitating Aviation Emergency Procedure Learning and Recall through an Intuitive Pictorial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    learning process. California Management Review, 18(3), 21- 31. Kolb , D.A. 1981. Experiential learning theory and the learning style... Experiential Learning Model (adapted from Kolb , 1976). Kolb (1976) questions whether anyone can become highly skilled in all of the four abilities. He...To complement his theory , Kolb (1976) developed a learning style preference instrument, the Learning Style Inventory (LSI), from

  18. Influence of Accountability on the Administration of Student Loans in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    Lack of accountability and transparency in governance was among the challenges that influenced Jamaica's corruption rating of 3.3, resulting in an 87th ranking out of 183 countries in 2011. Although the monitoring of internal control business structures supported accountability, evidence of their presence was limited in government offices. The…

  19. Stuttering, Temperament, and Anxiety: Data from a Community Cohort Ages 2-4 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefalianos, Elaina; Onslow, Mark; Ukoumunne, Obioha; Block, Susan; Reilly, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether and when temperament differences, including precursors of anxiety, emerge before onset and during stuttering development. Method: The authors prospectively studied temperament characteristics of a community cohort of children who stutter (N = 183) and children in the control group (N =…

  20. Gut microbiota: puppeteer of the host juvenile growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schwarzer, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2018), s. 179-183 ISSN 1363-1950 Grant - others:Nadační fond na podporu vědy(CZ) NEURON 26/2017 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : IGF-1 * juvenile growth * microbiota Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 4.023, year: 2016