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Sample records for alloy-c-103

  1. Effects of long-term aging on ductility of the columbium alloys C-103, Cb-1Zr, and Cb-752 and the molybdenum alloy Mo-TZM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine if aging embrittlement occurs in the columbium alloys C-103, CB-1Zr, and Cb-752 or in the molybdenum alloy Mo-TZM. Results showed that aging embrittlement does not occur in C-103, Cb-1Zr, or Mo-TZM during long-term (1000 hr) aging at temperatures in the range 700 to 1025 C. In contrast, aging embrittlement did occur in the Cb-752 alloy after similar aging at 900 C. A critical combination of the solute additions W and Zr in Cb-752 led to Zr segregation at grain boundaries during long-term aging. This segregation subsequently resulted in embrittlement as indicated by an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature from below -1960 C to about -150 C.

  2. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicided niobium alloy (C103) combustion chambers have been used extensively in both NASA and DoD liquid rocket propulsion systems. Niobium alloys offer a good...

  3. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicided niobium alloy (C103) combustion chambers have been used extensively in both NASA and DoD liquid rocket propulsion systems. Niobium alloys offer a good...

  4. Advanced materials for radiation-cooled rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian; Biaglow, James; Schneider, Steven

    1993-01-01

    The most common material system currently used for low thrust, radiation-cooled rockets is a niobium alloy (C-103) with a fused silica coating (R-512A or R-512E) for oxidation protection. However, significant amounts of fuel film cooling are usually required to keep the material below its maximum operating temperature of 1370 C, degrading engine performance. Also the R-512 coating is subject to cracking and eventual spalling after repeated thermal cycling. A new class of high-temperature, oxidation-resistant materials are being developed for radiation-cooled rockets, with the thermal margin to reduce or eliminate fuel film cooling, while still exceeding the life of silicide-coated niobium. Rhenium coated with iridium is the most developed of these high-temperature materials. Efforts are on-going to develop 22 N, 62 N, and 440 N engines composed of these materials for apogee insertion, attitude control, and other functions. There is also a complimentary NASA and industry effort to determine the life limiting mechanisms and characterize the thermomechanical properties of these materials. Other material systems are also being studied which may offer more thermal margin and/or oxidation resistance, such as hafnium carbide/tantalum carbide matrix composites and ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers.

  5. Advanced materials for radiation-cooled rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian; Biaglow, James; Schneider, Steven

    1993-11-01

    The most common material system currently used for low thrust, radiation-cooled rockets is a niobium alloy (C-103) with a fused silica coating (R-512A or R-512E) for oxidation protection. However, significant amounts of fuel film cooling are usually required to keep the material below its maximum operating temperature of 1370 C, degrading engine performance. Also the R-512 coating is subject to cracking and eventual spalling after repeated thermal cycling. A new class of high-temperature, oxidation-resistant materials are being developed for radiation-cooled rockets, with the thermal margin to reduce or eliminate fuel film cooling, while still exceeding the life of silicide-coated niobium. Rhenium coated with iridium is the most developed of these high-temperature materials. Efforts are on-going to develop 22 N, 62 N, and 440 N engines composed of these materials for apogee insertion, attitude control, and other functions. There is also a complimentary NASA and industry effort to determine the life limiting mechanisms and characterize the thermomechanical properties of these materials. Other material systems are also being studied which may offer more thermal margin and/or oxidation resistance, such as hafnium carbide/tantalum carbide matrix composites and ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers.

  6. High-Performance Bipropellant Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaglow, James A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1999-01-01

    TRW, under contract to the NASA Lewis Research Center, has successfully completed over 10 000 sec of testing of a rhenium thrust chamber manufactured via a new-generation powder metallurgy. High performance was achieved for two different propellants, N2O4- N2H4 and N2O4 -MMH. TRW conducted 44 tests with N2O4-N2H4, accumulating 5230 sec of operating time with maximum burn times of 600 sec and a specific impulse Isp of 333 sec. Seventeen tests were conducted with N2O4-MMH for an additional 4789 sec and a maximum Isp of 324 sec, with a maximum firing duration of 700 sec. Together, the 61 tests totalled 10 019 sec of operating time, with the chamber remaining in excellent condition. Of these tests, 11 lasted 600 to 700 sec. The performance of radiation-cooled rocket engines is limited by their operating temperature. For the past two to three decades, the majority of radiation-cooled rockets were composed of a high-temperature niobium alloy (C103) with a disilicide oxide coating (R512) for oxidation resistance. The R512 coating practically limits the operating temperature to 1370 C. For the Earth-storable bipropellants commonly used in satellite and spacecraft propulsion systems, a significant amount of fuel film cooling is needed. The large film-cooling requirement extracts a large penalty in performance from incomplete mixing and combustion. A material system with a higher temperature capability has been matured to the point where engines are being readied for flight, particularly the 100-lb-thrust class engine. This system has powder rhenium (Re) as a substrate material with an iridium (Ir) oxidation-resistant coating. Again, the operating temperature is limited by the coating; however, Ir is capable of long-life operation at 2200 C. For Earth-storable bipropellants, this allows for the virtual elimination of fuel film cooling (some film cooling is used for thermal control of the head end). This has resulted in significant increases in specific impulse performance