WorldWideScience

Sample records for alloy weldability identification

  1. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present thesis is to make advancements in understanding solidification crack formation in aluminum welds, by investigating in particular the aluminum 6060/4043 system. Alloy 6060 is typical of a family of Al-Mg-Si extrusion alloys, which are considered weldable only when using an appropriate filler alloy such as 4043 (Al-5Si). The effect of 4043 filler dilution (i.e. weld metal silicon content) on cracking sensitivity and solidification path of Alloy 6060 welds are investigated. Afterwards, cracking models are developed to propose mechanisms for solidification crack initiation and growth. Cracking Sensitivity. Building upon the concept that silicon improves weldability and that weldability can be defined by a critical strain rate, strain rate-composition combinations required for solidification crack formation in the Al- 6060/4043 system were determined using the newly developed Controlled Tensile Weldability (CTW) test utilizing local strain extensometer measurements. Results, presented in a critical strain rate - dilution map, show a crack - no crack boundary which reveals that higher local strain rates require higher 4043 filler dilution to avoid solidification cracking when arc welding Alloy 6060. Using the established crack - no crack boundary as a line of reference, additional parameters were examined and their influence on cracking characterized. These parameter influences have included studies of weld travel speed, weld pool contaminants (Fe, O, and H), and grain refiner additions (TiAl{sub 3} + Boron). Each parameter has been independently varied and its effect on cracking susceptibility quantified in terms of strain rate - composition combinations. Solidification Path. Solidification path of the Al-6060/4043 system was characterized using thermal analysis and phase identification. Increasing 4043 filler dilution from 0 to 16% in Alloy 6060 arc welds resulted in little effect on thermal arrests and microstructure, no effect on

  2. Development of Weldable Superplastic Forming Aluminum Alloy Sheet Final Report CRADA No. TC-1086-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, T. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Numerous applications could exist for superplastic formable, weldable aluminum alloys in the automotive, aerospace, architectural, and construction industries. In this project, LLNL and Kaiser worked with the Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems to develop and evaluate weldable superplastic alloys.

  3. Weldability and joining techniques for advanced fossil energy system alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Liu, W.; Yang, D.; Zhou, G.; Morrison, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The efforts represent the concerns for the basic understanding of the weldability and fabricability of the advanced high temperature alloys so necessary to affect increases in the efficiency of the next generation Fossil Energy Power Plants. The effort was divided into three tasks with the first effort dealing with the welding and fabrication behavior of 310HCbN (HR3C), the second task details the studies aimed at understanding the weldability of a newly developed 310TaN high temperature stainless (a modification of 310 stainless) and Task 3 addressed the cladding of austenitic tubing with Iron-Aluminide using the GTAW process. Task 1 consisted of microstructural studies on 310HCbN and the development of a Tube Weldability test which has applications to production welding techniques as well as laboratory weldability assessments. In addition, the evaluation of ex-service 310HCbN which showed fireside erosion and cracking at the attachment weld locations was conducted. Task 2 addressed the behavior of the newly developed 310 TaN modification of standard 310 stainless steel and showed that the weldability was excellent and that the sensitization potential was minimal for normal welding and fabrication conditions. The microstructural evolution during elevated temperature testing was characterized and the second phase particles evolved upon aging were identified. Task 3 details the investigation undertaken to clad 310HCbN tubing with Iron Aluminide and developed welding conditions necessary to provide a crack free cladding. The work showed that both a preheat and a post-heat was necessary for crack free deposits and the effect of a third element on the cracking potential was defined together with the effect of the aluminum level for optimum weldability.

  4. Development of weldable, corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Wang, X.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion-resistant, weldable FeAl alloys have been developed with improved high-temperature strength industrial applications. Previous processing difficulties with these alloys led to their evaluation as weld-overlay claddings on conventional structural steels to take advantage of their good properties now. Simplified and better processing methods for monolithic FeAl components are also currently being developed so that components for industrial testing can be made. Other avenues for producing FeAl coatings are currently being explored. Neutron scattering experiments residual stress distributions in the FeAl weld-overlay cladding began in FY 1993 and continued this year.

  5. Weldability of molybdenum and its alloy sheet, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Fukuhisa; Ushio, Masao; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Edo, Yoshiaki

    1979-01-01

    Basic weldability of electron-beam melted pure molybdenum has been examined in electron-beam welding in high vacuum and GTA welding in pure and air mixed argon atmospheres by paying attention to weld defects such as hot cracking and porosity in weld metal and also mechanical properties of welded joint in comparison with conventional TZM alloys. The main conclusions obtained were as follows; (1) The weld metals of electron-beam melted pure molybdenum with electron-beam and GTA weldings in pure and air mixed argon atmosphere up to about 1% were almost porosity free. However, large amount of oxygen content of 200 ppm in powder-metallurgy TZM alloy made very porous weld bead in electron-beam welding in high vacuum. Therefore, oxygen content in base metal should be lowered to the minimum, that is, less than 10 ppm, especially in electron-beam welding in high vacuum. (2) Hot cracking occurred in the weld metal of GTA welding when air content in argon atmosphere exceeded about 0.6% for electron-beam melted pure molybdenum and powder metallurgy TZM alloy. In less than 0.26% air, no hot cracking were observed in this experiment. Moreover, in electron-beam welding, no hot cracking was observed in weld metals for both materials. In order to prevent the formation of hot cracking, the purity of welding atmosphere should be kept as high as possible. (3) Joint efficiency of the welded joint of electron-beam melted pure molybdenum with electron-beam welding was 50 to 60% to base metal at room temperature and 500 0 C and almost 100% at 1000 0 C. Those of GTA welds in pure and 0.13% air mixed argon atmospheres were fairly lower than those in electron-beam welding for each testing temperature. (author)

  6. Comparative estimation of weld-ability of medium-alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Eh.L.; Laz'ko, V.E.

    1977-01-01

    Weldability of various industrial steels has been investigated as affected by mutual presence of carbon and alloying elements in a wide range of concentrations. Mechanical properties and technological strength of medium alloyed steel welded joints have been compared. Technological strength parameters have been found to sharply decrease with increasing carbon content, the decrease depending on the alloying system. Resistance to hot and cold cracking is somewhat decreased by nickel and increased by molibdenum and tungsten. The best mechanical properties are displayed by steels of the Kh2GSNVM type. Industrial evidence on argon arc welding of different constructions made of steels 1.5-20 mm thick is compared to laboratory results. Accordingly, the high strength steels are divided into three groups, i.e. those manifesting good, satisfactory and poor weldability

  7. Weldability and mechanical property characterization of weld clad alloy 800H tubesheet forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; McCoy, H.E.

    1984-09-01

    The weldability of an alloy 800H forging that simulates a steam generator tubesheet is studied. Weldability was of concern because a wide range of microstructures was present in this forging. The top and portions of the bottom were weld clad with ERNiC-3 weld metal to a thickness of 19 mm similar to that anticipated for HTGR steam generators. Examinations of the clad fusion line in various regions revealed no weldability problems except possibly on the bottom portion, which contained large grains and some as-cast structure. A few microfissures were evident in this region, but no excessive hot cracking tendency was observed. The tensile properties in all areas of the clad forging were reasonable and not influenced greatly by the microstructure. The elevated-temperature tests showed strong tendency for fracture in the heat-affected zone of the alloy 800H. Creep failure at 649 0 C consistently occurred in the heat-affected zone of the alloy 800H, but the creep strength exceeded the expected values for alloy 800H

  8. Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel and nickel-base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyabu, Ken; Asano, Kyoichi; Takahashi, Hidenori; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Kawano, Shohei; Nakamura, Tomomi; Hashimoto, Tsuneyuki; Koshiishi, Masato; Kato, Takahiko; Katsura, Ryoei; Nishimura, Seiji

    2000-01-01

    Degradation of of weldability caused by helium, which is generated by nuclear transmutation irradiated material, is an important issue to be addressed in planning of proactive maintenance of light water reactor core internal components. In this work, the weldability of neutron.irradiated stainless steel and nickel-base alloy, which are major constituting materials for components, was practically evaluated. The weldability was first examined by TIG welding in relation to the weld heat input and helium content using various specimens (made of SUS304 and SUS316L) sampled from reactor internal components. The specimens were neutron irradiated in a boiling water reactor to fluences from 4 x 10 24 to 1.4 x 10 26 n/ m 2 (E> l MeV ), and resulting helium generation ranged from 0.1 to 103 appm. The weld defects were characterized by dye penetrant test and cross-sectional metallography. The weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel was shown to be better at lower weld heat input and lower helium content. To evaluate mechanical properties of welded joints, thick plates (20 mm) specimens of SUS304 and Alloy 600 were prepared and irradiated in Japan Material Test Reactor (JMTR). The helium content of the specimens was controlled to range from 0.11 to 1.34 appm selected to determine threshold helium content to weld successfully. The welded joints had multiple passes by TIG welding process at 10 and 20 kJ/cm heat input. The welded joints of thick plate were characterized by dye penetrant test, cross-sectional metallography, tensile test, side bend test and root bend test. It was shown that irradiated stainless steel containing below 0.14 appm of helium could be welded with conventional TIG welding process (heat input below 20 kJ/cm). Nickel-base alloy, which contained as much helium as stainless steel could be welded successfully, could also be welded with conventional TIG welding process, These results served as basis to evaluate the applicability of repair welding to

  9. Development of weldable, corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Wang, X.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A boron-microalloyed FeAl alloy (Fe-36Al-0.2Mo-0.05Zr-0.13C, at.%, with 100-400 appm B) with improved weldability and mechanical properties was developed in FY 1994. A new scale-up and industry technology development phase for this work began in FY 1995, pursuing two parallel paths. One path was developing monolithic FeAl component and application technology, and the other was developing coating/cladding technology for alloy steels, stainless steels and other Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. In FY 1995, it was found that cast FeAl alloys had good strength at 700-750{degrees}C, and some (2.5%) ductility in air at room-temperature. Hot-extruded FeAl with refined grain size was found to have ductility and to also have good impact-toughness at room-temperature. Further, it was discovered that powder-metallurgy (P/M) FeAl, consolidated by direct hot-extrusion at 950-1000{degrees}C to have an ultra fine-grained microstructure, had the highest ductility, strength and impact-toughness ever seen in such intermetallic alloys.

  10. Preliminary Results on FeCrAl Alloys in the As-received and Welded State Designed to Have Enhanced Weldability and Radiation Tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Hu, Xunxiang; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the recent results on developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability. The alloys used for these investigations are modern FeCrAl alloys based on a Fe-13Cr-5Al-2Mo-0.2Si-0.05Y alloy (in wt.%, designated C35M). Development efforts have focused on assessing the influence of chemistry and microstructure on the fabricability and performance of these newly developed alloys. Specific focus was made to assess the weldability, thermal stability, and radiation tolerance.

  11. Preliminary Results on FeCrAl Alloys in the As-received and Welded State Designed to Have Enhanced Weldability and Radiation Tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The present report summarizes and discusses the recent results on developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability. The alloys used for these investigations are modern FeCrAl alloys based on a Fe-13Cr-5Al-2Mo-0.2Si-0.05Y alloy (in wt.%, designated C35M). Development efforts have focused on assessing the influence of chemistry and microstructure on the fabricability and performance of these newly developed alloys. Specific focus was made to assess the weldability, thermal stability, and radiation tolerance.

  12. Weldability of superalloys alloy 718 and ATI {sup registered} 718Plus trademark. A study performed by Varestraint testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsson, Jonny [The Production Technology Centre Univ. West, Trollhaettan (Sweden). GKN Aerospace Sweden; Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Industrial and Material Science; Andersson, Joel [The Production Technology Centre Univ. West, Trollhaettan (Sweden). Dept. of Engineering Science; Brederholm, Anssi; Haenninen, Hannu [Aalto Univ., Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Engineering Design and Production

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the old and well-known alloy 718 is compared with the newly developed ATI {sup registered} 718Plus trademark from the weldability point of view. This is done in order to gain new information that have not been documented and established yet among the high-temperature materials with high strength, oxidation resistance, thermal stability and sufficient weldability, yet. ATI {sup registered} 718Plus trademark shows a lower sensitivity to hot cracking than alloy 718 with approximately 10 mm total crack length (TCL) difference in Varestraint testing. In the solution-annealed condition at 982 C for 4.5 h followed by air cooling, the crack sensitivity is decreased as compared to the mill-annealed condition. Along the crack path and also ahead of the crack tip, γ-Laves eutectic is present in both alloys. The microhardness measurements showed similar hardness level of 250 HV in the weld metal of both alloys and even in the parent material of alloy 718. ATI {sup registered} 718Plus trademark parent metal had hardness of 380 HV and a small increase of less than 50 HV was observed for both studied alloys in the heat affected zone (HAZ). For the same grain size of ATI {sup registered} 718Plus trademark (8.3 μm) and alloy 718 (15.6 μm), the susceptibility to liquation cracking may increase with increasing grain size. With a small grain size, there is a possibility to accommodate more trace elements (B, S, P) due to the larger grain boundary area. The impurity elements were found in relatively small precipitates, typically borides (0.2 μm), phosphides (0.1 to 0.5 μm) and carbo-sulphides. The solidification sequence of alloy 718 and ATI {sup registered} 718Plus trademark is relatively similar, where the liquid starts to solidify as γ-phase followed by γ/MC reaction at about 1260 C and then final γ/Laves eutectic reaction at around 1150 C. Detailed knowledge about weldability of alloy 718 and ATI {sup registered} 718Plus trademark can be used for material

  13. Laser Weldability of High-Strength Al-Zn Alloys and Its Improvement by the Use of an Appropriate Filler Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enz, Josephin; Riekehr, Stefan; Ventzke, Volker; Huber, Norbert; Kashaev, Nikolai

    2016-06-01

    Heat-treatable Al-Zn alloys are promising candidates for use as structural lightweight materials in automotive and aircraft applications. This is mainly due to their high strength-to-density ratio in comparison to conventionally employed Al alloys. Laser beam welding is an efficient method for producing joints with high weld quality and has been established in the industry for many years. However, it is well known that aluminum alloys with a high Zn content or, more precisely, with a high (Zn + Mg + Cu) content are difficult to fusion weld due to the formation of porosity and hot cracks. The present study concerns the laser weldability of these hard-to-weld Al-Zn alloys. In order to improve weldability, it was first necessary to understand the reasons for weldability problems and to identify crucial influencing factors. Based on this knowledge, it was finally possible to develop an appropriate approach. For this purpose, vanadium was selected as additional filler material. Vanadium exhibits favorable thermophysical properties and, thereby, can improve the weldability of Al-Zn alloys. The effectiveness of the approach was verified by its application to several Al-Zn alloys with differing amounts of (Zn + Mg + Cu).

  14. Effect of chemical composition of copper alloys on their hot-brittleness and weldability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    Effect of different alloying elements on the hot crack formation in argon-arc welding of M1 copper has been studied. It is shown that the effective crystallization interval has a determining influence on hot-brittleness of low-alloyed high-thermal- and electric conducting welded copper alloys. The narrow is this interval the lower is linear schrinkage and the alloys inclined to the formation of crystallization cracks in welding to a lesser degree. Alloying elements with low solubility in copper in solid state broadening the crystallization interval affect negatively the alloy hot-brittleness. Such additives as zirconium are useful at 0.02-0.O5% content and at > 0.1% content are intolerable. As to cadmium, tin, magnesium, cerium and antimony additives they don't practically strengthen copper and its alloys at 700-800 deg C and they should not be introduced

  15. Corrosion resistant properties and weldabilities of ASTM Grade 12 titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumori, Yoshikatsu; Itoh, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    Plates, sheets, bars, wires and thinner seam-welded tubings were manufactured from large-scaled ingot of ASTM Grade 12 alloy (Ti-0.8Ni-0.3Mo). The processability of G-12 alloy has proved almost similar to that of conventional commercially pure titanium grades. It has been clarified that the G-12 alloy showed several advantageous features: Chlorides-Crevice corrosion resistance of the alloy was almost equals to G-7 and Pd0/TiO 2 coated titanium, and the maximum allowable stress was able to be designed higher than that of commercially pure titanium. This alloy has been in applications also offers where such environments as seawater, brines and moist chlorine, various oil refinery and chemical industries, and others. (author)

  16. Micro alloyed steel weldability and sensibility testing on the lamellar cracks appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stojadinović

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work are given the testing results of mechanical properties welded joints and microstructure of micro alloyed steel as well as its sensitivity to lamellar cracks appearance. The obtained results show that steel has good resistance to lamellar cracks appearance and with an appropriate wire choice for welding, a good combination of mechanical properties could be obtained at room (ambience temperatures as well as at low temperatures.

  17. Influence of microstructure of high-strength low-alloy steels on their weldability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwiek, J.; Labanowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    Microstructure of steel before welding has influence on the steel's susceptibility to cold cracking because it influences hardenability and maximum hardness of heat affected zone (HAZ). Two high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel grades 18G2AV and 14HNMBCu, in various heat treatment conditions, were subjected to simulated welding thermal cycles. It was revealed that maximum HAZ hardness is influenced by microstructure presented before thermal cycle was applied. The higher HAZ hardness was observed for quenched and tempered condition, comparing to full annealed and overheated conditions. (author)

  18. Weldability of Inconel 718 - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidharan, B.G.; Shankar, V.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1996-01-01

    The report discusses the main issues related to weldability of Inconel 718. How the problem of strain age cracking during post weld treatment is avoided in this alloy has also been discussed. It also elaborates phases present in the alloys of 718 and its solidification metallurgy

  19. Enhancing Friction Stir Weldability of 6061-T6 Al and AZ31B Mg Alloys Assisted by External Non-rotational Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shude; Huang, Ruofei; Meng, Xiangchen; Zhang, Liguo; Huang, Yongxian

    2017-05-01

    In order to increase cooling rate and then reduce the amounts of intermetallic compounds, external non-rotational shoulder tool system derived from traditional tool in friction stir welding was used to join dissimilar Al and Mg alloys. In this study, based on the external non-rotational shoulder, the weldability of Al and Mg alloys was significantly improved. The non-rotational shoulder tool is propitious to make more materials into weld, increase cooling rate and then reduce material adhesion of rotational pin, obtaining sound joint with smaller flashes and smooth surface. Importantly, the thickness of intermetallic compounds layer is reduced compared with traditional tool. Meanwhile, hardness values of dissimilar joint present uneven distribution, resulting from complex intercalated structures in nugget zone (NZ) featured by intermetallic compound layers and fine recrystallized Mg and Al grains. Compared with traditional tool, non-rotational shoulder is beneficial to higher tensile properties of joint. Due to the intermetallic compound layer formed in the interface of Al-Mg, the welding joint easily fractures at the NZ, presenting the typical brittle fracture mode.

  20. Weldability of AA 5052 H32 aluminium alloy by TIG welding and FSW process - A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanavas, S.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    Aluminium 5xxx series alloys are the strongest non-heat treatable aluminium alloy. Its application found in automotive components and body structures due to its good formability, good strength, high corrosion resistance, and weight savings. In the present work, the influence of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding parameters on the quality of weld on AA 5052 H32 aluminium alloy plates were analyzed and the mechanical characterization of the joint so produced was compared with Friction stir (FS) welded joint. The selected input variable parameters are welding current and inert gas flow rate. Other parameters such as welding speed and arc voltage were kept constant throughout the study, based on the response from several trial runs conducted. The quality of the weld is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength. A double side V-butt joints were fabricated by double pass on one side to ensure maximum strength of TIG welded joints. Macro and microstructural examination were conducted for both welding process.

  1. Weldability charts for constructional steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, J C; Ashby, M F

    2012-01-01

    The weldability of materials is still a poorly understood concept; a quantitative assessment remains elusive. The variables associated with welding are reduced here into two groups - processing parameters and material properties - from which two characteristic indices are defined and used as the basis of weldability charts. For the case of constructional steels, a carbon equivalent characterises both heat affected zone hardenability and the maximum hardness developed after solid state phase transformations. The welding process is characterised by its energy input. A mathematical model is used to establish relationships between the indices, which are displayed on charts as contours of microstructure and hardness.

  2. Weldability of Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It gives an outline of metallographic properties of welding zone of stainless steels, generation and mechanisms of welding crack and decreasing of corrosion resistance of welding zone. It consists of seven chapters such as introduction, some kinds of stainless steels and properties, metallographic properties of welding zone, weld crack, toughness of welding zone, corrosion resistance and summary. The solidification modes of stainless steels, each solidification mode on the cross section of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy phase diagram, each solidification mode of weld stainless steels metal by electron beam welding, segregation state of alloy elements at each solidification mode, Schaeffler diagram, Delong diagram, effects of (P + S) mass content in % and Cr/Ni equivalent on solidification cracking of weld stainless steels metal, solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, effects of trace impurity elements on solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, ductile fracture susceptibility of weld austenitic stainless steels metal, effects of H2 and ferrite content on generation of crack of weld 25Cr-5N duplex stainless steels, effects of O and N content on toughness of weld SUS 447J1 metals, effect of ferrite content on aging toughness of weld austenitic stainless steel metal, corrosion morphology of welding zone of stainless steels, generation mechanism of knife line attack phenomenon, and corrosion potential of some kinds of metals in seawater at room temperature are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  3. Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, John C.; Kotecki, Damian J.

    2005-03-01

    Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels, the first book in over twenty years to address welding metallurgy and weldability issues associated with stainless steel, offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of these topics currently available. The authors emphasize fundamental metallurgical principles governing microstructure evolution and property development of stainless steels, including martensistic, ferric, austenitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. They present a logical and well-organized look at the history, evolution, and primary uses of each stainless steel, including detailed descriptions of the associated weldability issues.

  4. Development of a highly weldable and corrosion resistant nickel-chromium filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.A.; Capobianco, T.E.; Etien, R.A.; Mullen, J.V.; Leveillee, S.; Sander, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a long term research effort to develop an improved filler metal for gas-tungsten- arc welding of Alloy 690. The goal of this work was to maintain the corrosion resistance of wrought Alloy 690 while eliminating ductility dip cracking (DDC) or other as welded defects in prototypical welds. Results from weld mockups, weldability testing, microstructural and microchemical characterization, and computational modeling show that ductility dip cracking is a form of precipitation-induced-cracking and can be mitigated via alloying to control the type and extent of carbide formation. Additionally, these tests illustrate that in commercially available filler metals, alloying additions intended to provide DDC resistance (Nb, B, and Zr) are not effective and, in many cases, cause solidification cracking in addition to DDC. Based on these welding results, three candidate alloys of 24 wt.%, 27 wt.%, and 30 wt.% chromium were further evaluated for their mechanical properties, phase stability, and resistance to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Results to date show weldability mechanical properties, and phase stability comparable to EN82, but significantly improved resistance to EAC. These findings are used to define an alloy designated EN52i, that offers a desirable combination of weldability and corrosion resistance. (author)

  5. Development of a highly weldable and corrosion resistant nickel-chromium filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, G.A.; Capobianco, T.E.; Etien, R.A.; Mullen, J.V.; Leveillee, S.; Sander, P.C. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, New York (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports on a long term research effort to develop an improved filler metal for gas-tungsten- arc welding of Alloy 690. The goal of this work was to maintain the corrosion resistance of wrought Alloy 690 while eliminating ductility dip cracking (DDC) or other as welded defects in prototypical welds. Results from weld mockups, weldability testing, microstructural and microchemical characterization, and computational modeling show that ductility dip cracking is a form of precipitation-induced-cracking and can be mitigated via alloying to control the type and extent of carbide formation. Additionally, these tests illustrate that in commercially available filler metals, alloying additions intended to provide DDC resistance (Nb, B, and Zr) are not effective and, in many cases, cause solidification cracking in addition to DDC. Based on these welding results, three candidate alloys of 24 wt.%, 27 wt.%, and 30 wt.% chromium were further evaluated for their mechanical properties, phase stability, and resistance to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Results to date show weldability mechanical properties, and phase stability comparable to EN82, but significantly improved resistance to EAC. These findings are used to define an alloy designated EN52i, that offers a desirable combination of weldability and corrosion resistance. (author)

  6. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T e and N e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T e and N e for aluminum in aluminum alloys as a marker for the correct alloying using an optical fiber probe.

  7. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T(e and N(e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T(e and N(e for the aluminum in aluminum alloys using an optical fiber probe.

  8. Welding and Weldability of Directionally Solidified Single Crystal Nickel-Base Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitek, J M; David, S A; Reed, R W; Burke, M A; Fitzgerald, T J

    1997-09-01

    Nickel-base superalloys are used extensively in high-temperature service applications, and in particular, in components of turbine engines. To improve high-temperature creep properties, these alloys are often used in the directionally-solidified or single-crystal form. The objective of this CRADA project was to investigate the weldability of both experimental and commercial nickel-base superalloys in polycrystalline, directionally-solidified, and single-crystal forms.

  9. Effect of nitrogen and boron on weldability of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaduri, A.K.; Albert, S.K.; Srinivasan, G.; Divya, M.; Das, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    Hot cracking is a major problem in the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly the fully austenitic grades. A group of alloys of enhanced-nitrogen 316LN austenitic stainless steel is being developed for structural components of the Indian Fast Reactor programme. Studying the hot cracking behaviour of this nitrogen-enhanced austenitic stainless steel is an important consideration during welding, as this material solidifies without any residual delta ferrite in the primary austenitic mode. Nitrogen has potent effects on the solidification microstructure, and hence has a strong influence on the hot cracking behaviour. Different heats of this material were investigated, which included fully austenitic stainless steels containing 0.070.22 wt% nitrogen. Also, borated austenitic stainless steels, such as type 304B4, have been widely used in the nuclear applications primarily due to its higher neutron absorption efficiency. Weldability is a major concern for this alloy due to the formation of low melting eutectic phase that is enriched with iron, chromium, molybdenum and boron. Fully austenitic stainless steels are prone to hot cracking during welding in the absence of a small amount of delta ferrite, especially for compositions rich in elements like boron that increases the tendency to form low melting eutectics. Detailed weldability investigations were carried out on a grade 304B4 stainless steel containing 1.3 wt% boron. Among the many approaches that have been used to determine the hot cracking susceptibility of different alloys, Variable-Restraint (Varestraint) weld test and Hot Ductility (Gleeble) tests are commonly used to evaluate the weldability of austenitic alloys. Hence, investigations on these materials consisted of detailed metallurgical characterization and weldability studies that included studying both the fusion zone and liquation cracking susceptibility, using Varestraint tests at 0.254.0%, strain levels and Gleeble (thermo

  10. Physical Metallurgy, Weldability, and in-Service Performance of Nickel-Chromium Filler Metals Used in Nuclear Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, George A.; Etien, Robert A.; Hackett, Micah J.; Tucker, Julie D.; Capobianco, Thomas E.

    Wrought Alloy 690 is well established for corrosion resistant nuclear applications but development continues to improve the weldability of a filler metal that retains the corrosion resistance and phase stability of the base metal. High alloy Ni-Cr filler metals are prone to several types of welding defects and new alloys are emerging for commercial use. This paper uses experimental and computational methods to illustrate key differences among welding consumables. Results show that solidification segregation is critical to understanding the weldability and environmentally-assisted cracking resistance of these alloys. Primary water stress corrosion cracking tests show a marked decrease in crack growth rates near 21 wt. % Cr at the grain boundary. While filler metals with 21-29 wt.% grain boundary Cr show similar PWSCC resistance, the higher alloyed grades are more prone to solidification cracking. Modeling and aging studies indicate that in some filler metals minor phase formation (e.g., Laves and σ) and long range order (LRO) must be assessed to ensure adequate weldability and inservice performance.

  11. Prospects of weldable steels for nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilous, V.

    1985-01-01

    In nuclear power plants with WWER reactors a medium-alloyed CrNiMoV steel is considered for the pressure vessel and a MnNiMoV steel for the primary pipes, the pressurizer and other systems. The chemical composition of both steels is given and briefly discussed are the results of tests carried out within a study of the weldability of the steels. Attention is also devoted to the causes of cracks under austenite-based overlays occurring when medium-alloyed CrNiMoV steels are overlaid with strip electrodes using high thermal input submerged arc welding, and in the process of heat treatment. It appears that austenitic overlays reduce the life span by 5 to 15% as compared with the basic steel. If, however, the overlay is not part of the cross section critical with regard to strength, the reduced life span need not be considered and both types of steel will be suitable for primary circuits of nuclear power plants because they guarantee the required mechanical and physical properties of the welded joints. (Z.M.)

  12. Increasing Weldability of Service-Aged Reformer Tubes by Partial Solution Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafaei, M.; Shamanian, M.; Purmohamad, H.; Amini, M.

    2016-04-01

    A dissimilar joint of 25Cr-35Ni/30Cr-48Ni (HP/HV) heat-resistant steels was evaluated. The investigations indicated that the as-cast HP alloy contained M7C3, M23C6, and NbC carbides and HV alloy with 5 wt.% tungsten, contained M23C6 and M6C carbides embedded in an austenitic matrix. After 8 years of ex-service aging at 1050 °C, the ductility of HP/HV reformer tubes was decreased dramatically, and thus, the repair welding of the aged HP/HV dissimilar joint was at a risk. In order to repair the aged reformer tubes and increase weldability properties, a new partial solution annealing treatment was designed. Mechanical testing results showed that partial solution annealing at 1200 °C for 6 h increased the elongation and toughness of the aged HP and HV alloys drastically. Also, a mechanism for constitutional liquation cracking in the heat-affected zones (HAZ) of the HP/HV dissimilar joint was proposed. In the HAZ of the aged HP/HV welded joint, the cracks around the locally melted carbides were initiated and propagated during carbides solidification at the cooling cycle of welding associated with the decrease in the ductility of the aged HP and HV alloys. In addition, Varestraint weldability test showed that the susceptibility to hot cracking was decreased with partial solution annealing.

  13. Method and apparatus for determining weldability of thin sheet metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Gene M.; Hudson, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    A fixture is provided for testing thin sheet metal specimens to evaluate hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability on a heat-to-heat basis or through varying welding parameters. A test specimen is stressed in a first direction with a load selectively adjustable over a wide range and then a weldment is passed along over the specimen in a direction transverse to the direction of strain to evaluate the hot-cracking characteristics of the sheet metal which are indicative of the weldability of the metal. The fixture provides evaluations of hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability in a highly reproducible manner with minimum human error.

  14. Relationships between microstructure and microfissuring in alloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Microfissures which occur in the weld heat affected zone of alloy 718 can be a limiting factor in the material's weldability. Several studies have attempted to relate microfissuring susceptibility to processing conditions, microstructure, and/or heat-to-heat chemistry differences. The present investigation studies the relationships between microstructure and microfissuring by isolating a particular microstructural feature and measuring microfissuring as a function of that feature. Results to date include the identification of a microstructure-microfissure sequence, microfissuring susceptibility as a function of grain size, and microfissuring susceptibility as a function of solution annealing time.

  15. Assembly for testing weldability of sheet metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Woodhouse, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    A test assembly for determining the weldability of sheet metal includes a base having a flat side surface with an annular groove in the side surface, a counterbore being formed in the outer wall of the groove and the surface portion of the base circumscribed by the inner wall of the groove being substantially coplanar with the bottom of the counterbore, a test disk of sheet metal the periphery of which is positioned in the counterbore and the outer surface of which is coplanar with one side of the base, and a clamp ring overlying the side surface of the base and the edge portion of the test disk and a plurality of clamp screws which extend through the clamp ring for holding the periphery of the test disk against the bottom of the counterbore

  16. Weldability of thermally grain-refined Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti for cryogenic structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.E.

    1980-02-01

    The weldability of a research alloy designed for structural use in liquid helium temperature, cryogenic environments was investigated. Plates of iron-12 weight percent nickel-0.25 weight percent titanium were grain refined by the four-step, grain refining thermal treatment developed for this alloy and welded with Inconel Number 92 weld wire using the Gas Metal Arc (GMA) welding process with argon-15% helium gas shielding. Both a single pass and a double-sided, 2 pass electron beam (EB) weld were also made without filler metal addition. Weldments were radiographed and sectioned and the charpy V-notch specimens removed were tested at liquid nitrogen and helium temperatures

  17. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4 0 K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs

  18. Weldability of newly developed austenitic alloy for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Koseki, T.

    1986-01-01

    The testing reported in this paper involved typical steels of the new grades such as STEEL-A (0.025C-14Ni-25Cr-0.35N), STEEL-B (0.04C-23Mn-13Cr-0.22N) and STEEL-C (0.20C-25Mn-5Cr), and commercial steels of Type 300 series. Weldments were made mainly using the GTAW, SMAW and SAW processes with experimental and commercial filler metals. Strength and toughness of weldments were examined at 77 K (-321 0 F) and 4 K. The strengthening of material through the addition of nitrogen was far greater in the weld metal that in the base metal at cryogenic temperature. In fact, 0.2% proof stress of weld metals bearging 0.20% to 0.40% nitrogen at 77 K exhibited a higher value by 60 to 150 MPa (8,740 to 21,760 psi) than that of the base metal. Impact absorbed energy of weld metals at 77 K decreased rapidly with nitrogen content, 60-90 J at 0.20%N to 20-50J at 0.35% N. Rather high impact absorbed energy was obtained when the weld metal solidified as primary austenitic phase, resulting in fully austenitic microstructure or austenite-eutectic ferrite mixture at ambient temperature. In addition, oxide inclusions, the number of which strongly depends on welding processes, were detrimental to toughness of weld metals at cryogenic temperature

  19. Identification of a cast iron alloy containing nonstrategic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. V.; Anton, D. L.; Lemkey, F. D.; Nowotny, H.; Bailey, R. S.; Favrow, L. H.; Smeggil, J. G.; Snow, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    A program was performed to address the mechanical and environmental needs of Stirling engine heater head and regenerator housing components, while reducing the dependence on strategic materials. An alloy was developed which contained no strategic elemental additions per se. The base is iron with additions of manganese, molybdenum, carbon, silicon, niobium, and ferro-chromium. Such an alloy should be producible on a large scale at very low cost. The resulting alloy, designated as NASAUT 4G-Al, contained 15 Mn, 15 Cr, 2 Mo, 1.5 C, 1.0 Si, 1.0 Nb (in weight percent) with a balance of Fe. This alloy was optimized for chemistry, based upon tensile strength, creep-rupture strength, fracture behavior, and fatigue resistance up to 800 C. Alloys were also tested for environmental compatibility. The microstructure and mechanic properties (including hardness) were assessed in the as-cast condition and following several heat treatments, including one designed to simulate a required braze cycle. The alloy was fabricated and characterized in the form of both equiaxed and columnar-grained castings. The columnar grains were produced by directional solidification, and the properties were characterized in both the longitudinal and transverse orientations. The NASAUT 4G-Al alloy was found to be good in cyclic-oxidation resistance and excellent in both hydrogen and hot-corrosion resistance, especially in comparison to the baseline XF-818 alloy. The mechanical properties of yield strength, stress-rupture life, high-cycle-fatigue resistance, and low-cycle-fatigue resistance were good to excellent in comparison to the current alloy for this application, HS-31 (X-40), with precise results depending in a complex manner on grain orientation and temperature. If required, the ductility could be improved by lowering the carbon content.

  20. Procedure of identification of fullerenes isolated from iron-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakirnichnaya, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    A method of fullerenes isolation from the structure of iron-carbon alloys and their identification using physical methods which provide determination of the different parameters of nanoobjects is developed. Qualitative (mass-spectrometry of positive and negative ions, small angle X-ray scattering) and quantitative (IR-spectrometry, liquid chromatography) evaluation of fullerenes in the samples obtained from iron-carbon alloys and their visual observation using scanning tunnel microscopy are performed. It is found that the method provides isolation and identification of fullerenes present in the structure of steels and irons [ru

  1. Weldability of general purpose heat source new-process iridium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanne, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Weldability tests on General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) iridium capsules showed that a new iridium fabrication process reduced susceptibility to underbead cracking. Seventeen capsules were welded (a total of 255 welds) in four categories and the number of cracks in each weld was measured

  2. Carbon Equivalence and Weldability of Microalloyed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-25

    being considered for Navy applications. Wilson et al [181 in their review of copper-adde. steels have shown that in the CCT diagram for modified versions...almost linearly with austenite grain size (Fig. 4.2) [211. Therefore, the net effect of the addition of micro-alloying elements is to shift the CCT ... diagram to shorter times and thereby decrease the amount of martensite in the HAZ. Recently, computation of austenite grain growth in the HAZ’s of micro

  3. An investigation into the sealing of magnesium alloy cans by argon-arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A.F.

    1964-05-15

    The weldability of several magnesium alloys, which may be suitable as canning materials has been investigated. The most suitable welding conditions necessary for sealing Magnox C cans are recommended.

  4. Weldability, machinability and surfacing of commercial duplex stainless steel AISI2205 for marine applications – A recent review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vinoth Jebaraj

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present review, attempts have been made to analyze the metallurgical, mechanical, and corrosion properties of commercial marine alloy duplex stainless steel AISI 2205 with special reference to its weldability, machinability, and surfacing. In the first part, effects of various fusion and solid-state welding processes on joining DSS 2205 with similar and dissimilar metals are addressed. Microstructural changes during the weld cooling cycle such as austenite reformation, partitioning of alloying elements, HAZ transformations, and the intermetallic precipitations are analyzed and compared with the different welding techniques. In the second part, machinability of DSS 2205 is compared with the commercial ASS grades in order to justify the quality of machining. In the third part, the importance of surface quality in a marine exposure is emphasized and the enhancement of surface properties through peening techniques is highlighted. The research gaps and inferences highlighted in this review will be more useful for the fabrications involved in the marine applications.

  5. Weldability, machinability and surfacing of commercial duplex stainless steel AISI2205 for marine applications - A recent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth Jebaraj, A; Ajaykumar, L; Deepak, C R; Aditya, K V V

    2017-05-01

    In the present review, attempts have been made to analyze the metallurgical, mechanical, and corrosion properties of commercial marine alloy duplex stainless steel AISI 2205 with special reference to its weldability, machinability, and surfacing. In the first part, effects of various fusion and solid-state welding processes on joining DSS 2205 with similar and dissimilar metals are addressed. Microstructural changes during the weld cooling cycle such as austenite reformation, partitioning of alloying elements, HAZ transformations, and the intermetallic precipitations are analyzed and compared with the different welding techniques. In the second part, machinability of DSS 2205 is compared with the commercial ASS grades in order to justify the quality of machining. In the third part, the importance of surface quality in a marine exposure is emphasized and the enhancement of surface properties through peening techniques is highlighted. The research gaps and inferences highlighted in this review will be more useful for the fabrications involved in the marine applications.

  6. Nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    The specified alloys consist of Ni, Cr and Fe as main constituents, and Mo, Nb, Si, Zr, Ti, Al, C and B as minor constituents. They are said to exhibit high weldability and long-time structural stability, as well as low swelling under nuclear radiation conditions, making them especially suitable for use as a duct material and control element cladding for sodium-cooled nuclear reactors. (U.K.)

  7. Microstructural, mechanical and weldability assessments of the dissimilar welds between γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naffakh Moosavy, Homam, E-mail: homam_naffakh@iust.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mapelli, Carlo [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Massa 34, Milan 20156 (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys has been investigated to identify the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and weldability characteristics. γ′-Strengthened nickel-base Alloy 500 and γ″-strengthened nickel-base Alloy 718 were used for dissimilar welding. Gas tungsten arc welding operations were utilized for performing the autogenous dissimilar welding. Alloy 500 and Alloy 718 base metals showed various types of phases, carbides, intermetallics and eutectics in their microstructure. The results for Alloy 500 weld metal showed severe segregation of titanium to the interdendritic regions. The Alloy 718 weld metal compositional analysis confirmed the substantial role of Nb in the formation of low-melting eutectic-type morphologies which can reduce the weldability. The microstructure of dissimilar weld metal with dilution level of 65% wt.% displayed semi-developed dendritic structure. The less segregation and less formation of low-melting eutectic structures caused to less susceptibility of the dissimilar weld metal to the solidification cracking. This result was confirmed by analytic modeling achievements. Dissolution of γ″-Ni{sub 3}Nb precipitations took place in the Alloy 718 heat-affected zone leading to sharp decline of the microhardness in this region. Remelted and resolidified regions were observed in the partially-melted zone of Alloy 500 and Alloy 718. Nevertheless, no solidification and liquation cracking happened in the dissimilar welds. Finally, this was concluded that dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys can successfully be performed. - Highlights: • Dissimilar welding of γ′- and γ″-strengthened nickel-base superalloys is studied. • Microstructural, mechanical and weldability aspects of the welds are assessed. • Microstructure of welds, bases and heat-affected zones is characterized in detail. • The type

  8. Self-weldability of various materials in high temperature sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizobuchi, Syotaro; Kano, Shigeki; Nakayama, Kohichi; Atsumo, Hideo

    1980-01-01

    Self-Weldability of Various Materials in High Temperature Sodium. The self-welding behavior of various materials was evaluated by measuring the tensile breakaway force of the specimen which had been self-welded in high temperature sodium. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of the sodium temperature and the contact stress on the self-welding behavior. The results obtained are as follows: (1) The self-welding behavior in sodium was recognized to initiate by the diffusion of the principal element through the real contact area. (2) Remarkable self-welding behavior was observed for SUS 316 material at 650 0 C, and for 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel at a sodium temperature of 600 0 C. The self-welding force acting on the real contact area corresponds to the tensile strength of each material. (3) Hard chrome plating or hardfacing material showed good self-weld resistance, but the different combinations of SUS 316 with either of these materials were observed to easily cause self-welding. (4) The self-weldability of Cr 3 C 2 /Ni-Cr material varied with the preparing methods, especially, with the distribution of the binder composition contained in this material. (5) A derived equation was proposed to evaluate the self-welding force. It was found that the measured breakaway force was relatively equal to the self-welding force derived from this equation. (author)

  9. Weldability prequalification of steels for deep water service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Michael D. [Acute Technological Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Ibarra, S. Jim [BP America (United States); Fazackerley, W.J. [EWI Microalloying, Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The weldability of steels for deep water applications must be determined long before welding procedures are qualified. The weldments of deep water equipment such as steel Catenary risers (SCRs) are subjected to currents which result in high cyclic stresses. It is imperative that steels selected for such service have high CTOD fracture toughness values after welding to ensure good defect tolerance. Through fracture mechanics analyses, these CTOD values are used to determine the defect acceptance criteria that is used for inspection of such weldments. The base metal and weld metal are more easily obtained, but because the weld joint design changes the position of the HAZs, the CTOD value for the HAZ is usually a combination of the base, weld consumable, and HAZ. The value obtained from such a test is suspect, and may give an optimistic value if the weld metal or base metal have high CTOD values. This paper discusses the various strategies for determining the true weldability long before construction commences, using API RP 2Z (1) Type tests for prequalification of base materials. (author)

  10. Identification of fullerenes in iron-carbon alloys structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUZEEV Iskander Rustemovich

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Steels of various purposes are used in the construction industry, for example, as the reinforcement material in reinforced concrete structures. In the oil and gas industry, steel structures are used for storage and transportation of explosive toxic media. In this case the catastrophic damages might take place, that points at insufficiently deep knowledge about the processes running in structural materials when load is applied. Recent studies show that many properties of steel are set at the nanoscale level during crystallization from the molten metal and thermal treatment. To detect and identify fullerenes С60 and С70, which are independent nanoscale objects in steel structure, by various methods requires studying of how these objects influence on formation of steel properties. Iron atoms can serve as a catalyst and, interacting with large aromatic structures or fragments of the graphite planes, they form voluminous fullerene-type structures. The inverse phenomenon, i.e. influence of the formed nanoscale objects on structuring of the iron atoms, is also possible, as fullerene size is comparable with the size of the stable nucleus of the iron crystalline phase. The article discusses the issue of mechanisms of fullerenes formation in steels and cast irons. The most complicated issue in the study is the fullerenes identification by spectral methods as the quantity of released molecules is small. In order to increase the sensitivity of the fullerenes IR-spectrometry method, potassium bromide has been proposed to use. Dried and reduced sediment obtained as a result of dissolving iron matrix in steels is mixed with potassium bromide, the mixture becomes bright-orange. This fact points to presence of bromic fullerenes and to presence of fullerenes in the studied specimens. It is shown that the offered specimen preparation algorithm significantly increases sensitivity of the method.

  11. Weldability of the superalloys Haynes 188 and Hastelloy X by Nd:YAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graneix Jérémie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The requirements for welded aircraft parts have become increasingly severe, especially in terms of the reproducibility of the geometry and metallurgical grade of the weld bead. Laser welding is a viable method of assembly to meet these new demands, because of automation, to replace the manual TIG welding process. The purpose of this study is to determine the weldability of Hastelloy X and Haynes 188 alloys by the butt welding process with a Nd:YAG laser. To identify the influential parameters of the welding process (laser power, feed rate, focal diameter and flow of gas while streamlining testing, an experimental design was established with the CORICO software using the graphic correlation method. The position of the focal point was fixed at 1/3 of the thickness of the sheet. The gas flow rate and the power of the beam have a major effect on the mechanical properties and geometry of the weld. The strength of the weld is comparable to that of the base metal. However, there is a significant decrease in the elongation at break of approximately 30%. The first observations of the cross section of the weld by scanning electron microscopy coupled with EBSD analysis show a molten zone presenting dendritic large grains compared to the equiaxed grains of the base metals without a heat affected zone.

  12. Weldability of Al4C3-Al composites via diffusion welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arik, Halil; Aydin, Mustafa; Kurt, Adem; Turker, Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    In this study, Al-Al 4 C 3 composites, produced by powder metallurgy in situ techniques, were joined by diffusion welding technique at 250 MPa pressure with various welding temperatures and durations. Microstructures and shear strengths of the joined areas were determined. Al powders were mixed with 2% carbon black and milled in a high energy ball mill (mechanical alloying) for up to 20 h. In order to obtain cylindrical blanks with 10 mm in diameter and 15 mm in height, powders were compacted in a single action press at 1000 MPa. Samples were sintered in Ar atmosphere at 650 deg C and metal matrix composite (MMC) containing 8% Al 4 C 3 particles were produced. Products were then joined to each other by using diffusion welding techniques. Scanning electron microscopy examination was carried out on the welded interfaces and shear tests were conducted to the sample interfaces to find out the effect of welding temperatures and duration on the weldability properties. It was found that high welding temperatures resulted in increase of both joined strength and shear properties. However, increase in welding duration did not make any detectable changes. Results indicated that MMC could be joined by diffusion welding technique successfully with the 88% strength of base material

  13. Weldability aspects of a newly developed duplex stainless steel LDX 2101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westin, E.M. [Avesta Research Centre, Avesta (Sweden). Outokumpu Stainless; Brolund, B. [SSAB Tunnplat, Borlaenge (Sweden); Hertzman, S. [Outokumpu Stainless Research Foundation, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-06-15

    Duplex grades have, due to balanced chemical compositions of both filler and base metals, a weldability that allows for successful welding using a majority of the technically relevant techniques of today. In order to fulfil the performance requirements several aspects must be considered. In the heat affected zone (HAZ) the austenite reformation must be reasonably high and in the weld metal the microstructure must be stable so that e.g. high productivity welding and multi-pass welding are possible, without precipitation of detrimental phases in previous passes. This paper addresses the effect of alloying elements and thermal cycles on phase balance in the high temperature HAZ (HTHAZ) of the newly developed lean duplex grade LDX 2101 (EN 1.4162, UNS S32101). Bead-on-plate welds and simulated weld structures have been produced and investigated using metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results are analysed using the thermodynamic database Thermo-Calc and a model for phase transformation based on a paraequilibrium assumption for ferrite-austenite transformation. In the temperature region outside the paraequilibrium domain, growth controlled by diffusion of substitutional elements was considered. The analysis follows a model by Cahn regarding grain boundary nucleated growth and the Hillert-Engberg model on kinetics of spherical and planar growth. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of the Weldability in Spot Welding using Ultrasonic Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Min Sung; Kim, No Hyu

    2005-01-01

    Spot welding is the most widely used in automotive and aerospace industries. The quality of weld depends upon the size of nugget between the overlapped steel plates. Recently, the thickness of the steel plates is much thinner and hence, it introduces the smaller size of nugget. Therefore, it is necessary not only to develop the criterion to evaluate the quality of weld but also to obtain the optimal welding conditions for the better performance. In this paper, the steel plates, 0.5 mm through 1.5 mm thickness, have been spot welded at different welding conditions and the nugget sizes are examined by ultrasonic technique (C-scan type). The relationships between the nugget sizes and the weldability have been investigated. The result of ultrasonic technique shows the good agreement with that of the tensile test

  15. Evaluation of the Weldability in Spot Welding using Ultrasonic Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Min Sung [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, No Hyu [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    Spot welding is the most widely used in automotive and aerospace industries. The quality of weld depends upon the size of nugget between the overlapped steel plates. Recently, the thickness of the steel plates is much thinner and hence, it introduces the smaller size of nugget. Therefore, it is necessary not only to develop the criterion to evaluate the quality of weld but also to obtain the optimal welding conditions for the better performance. In this paper, the steel plates, 0.5 mm through 1.5 mm thickness, have been spot welded at different welding conditions and the nugget sizes are examined by ultrasonic technique (C-scan type). The relationships between the nugget sizes and the weldability have been investigated. The result of ultrasonic technique shows the good agreement with that of the tensile test

  16. Non-destructive identification of unknown minor phases in polycrystalline bulk alloys using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yiming, E-mail: yangyiming1988@outlook.com [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Liang [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Yudan; Du, Guohao [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yang, Sam [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Melbourne, VIC 3168 (Australia); Xiao, Tiqiao, E-mail: tqxiao@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Minor phases make considerable contributions to the mechanical and physical properties of metals and alloys. Unfortunately, it is difficult to identify unknown minor phases in a bulk polycrystalline material using conventional metallographic methods. Here, a non-destructive method based on three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) is developed to solve this problem. Simulation results demonstrate that this method is simultaneously able to identify minor phase grains and reveal their positions, orientations and sizes within bulk alloys. According to systematic simulations, the 3DXRD method is practicable for an extensive sample set, including polycrystalline alloys with hexagonal, orthorhombic and cubic minor phases. Experiments were also conducted to confirm the simulation results. The results for a bulk sample of aluminum alloy AA6061 show that the crystal grains of an unexpected γ-Fe (austenite) phase can be identified, three-dimensionally and nondestructively. Therefore, we conclude that the 3DXRD method is a powerful tool for the identification of unknown minor phases in bulk alloys belonging to a variety of crystal systems. This method also has the potential to be used for in situ observations of the effects of minor phases on the crystallographic behaviors of alloys. - Highlights: •A method based on 3DXRD is developed for identification of unknown minor phase. •Grain position, orientation and size, is simultaneously acquired. •A systematic simulation demonstrated the applicability of the proposed method. •Experimental results on a AA6061 sample confirmed the practicability of the method.

  17. Identification of Technological Parameters of Ni-Alloys When Machining by Monolithic Ceramic Milling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czán, Andrej; Kubala, Ondrej; Danis, Igor; Czánová, Tatiana; Holubják, Jozef; Mikloš, Matej

    2017-12-01

    The ever-increasing production and the usage of hard-to-machine progressive materials are the main cause of continual finding of new ways and methods of machining. One of these ways is the ceramic milling tool, which combines the pros of conventional ceramic cutting materials and pros of conventional coating steel-based insert. These properties allow to improve cutting conditions and so increase the productivity with preserved quality known from conventional tools usage. In this paper, there is made the identification of properties and possibilities of this tool when machining of hard-to-machine materials such as nickel alloys using in airplanes engines. This article is focused on the analysis and evaluation ordinary technological parameters and surface quality, mainly roughness of surface and quality of machined surface and tool wearing.

  18. Finite strain transient creep of D16T alloy: identification and validation employing heterogeneous tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutov, A. V.; Larichkin, A. Yu

    2017-10-01

    A cyclic creep damage model, previously proposed by the authors, is modified for a better description of the transient creep of D16T alloy observed in the finite strain range under rapidly changing stresses. The new model encompasses the concept of kinematic hardening, which allows us to account for the creep-induced anisotropy. The model kinematics is based on the nested multiplicative split of the deformation gradient, proposed by Lion. The damage evolution is accounted for by the classical Kachanov-Rabotnov approach. The material parameters are identified using experimental data on cyclic torsion of thick-walled samples with different holding times between load reversals. For the validation of the proposed material model, an additional experiment is analyzed. Although this additional test is not involved in the identification procedure, the proposed cyclic creep damage model describes it accurately.

  19. Electron-beam welding of 21-6-9 (Cr--Ni--Mn) stainless steel: effect of machine parameters on weldability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, H.

    1975-04-01

    The high-manganese, nitrogen-strengthened 21-6-9 (Cr--Ni--Mn) austenitic stainless steel has a weldability rating similar to that of more common austenitic stainless steels in terms of cracking, porosity, etc. However, weld pool disruption problems may occur with this alloy that can be related to instability within the molten weld pool. Selection of machine parameters is critical to achieving weld pool quiescence as this report confirms from recent tests. Test samples came from heats of air-melted, vacuum-arc remelted, and electroslag remelted material. Low- and high-voltage machine parameters are discussed, and effects of parameter variation on weld pool behavior are given. Data relate weld pool behavior to weld fusion-zone geometry. Various weld parameters are recommended for the 21-6-9 alloy, regardless of its source or chemistry. (auth)

  20. An Analysis of the Weldability of Ductile Cast Iron Using Inconel 625 for the Root Weld and Electrodes Coated in 97.6% Nickel for the Filler Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-Javier Cárcel-Carrasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the weldability of ductile cast iron when the root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG welding process employing an Inconel 625 source rod, and when the filler welds are applied with electrodes coated with 97.6% Ni. The welds were performed on ductile cast iron specimen test plates sized 300 mm × 90 mm × 10 mm with edges tapered at angles of 60°. The plates were subjected to two heat treatments. This article analyzes the influence on weldability of the various types of electrodes and the effect of preheat treatments. Finally, a microstructure analysis is made of the material next to the weld in the metal-weld interface and in the weld itself. The microstructure produced is correlated with the strength of the welds. We treat an alloy with 97.6% Ni, which prevents the formation of carbides. With a heat treatment at 900 °C and 97.6% Ni, there is a dissolution of all carbides, forming nodules in ferritic matrix graphite.

  1. A dual energy gamma-ray transmission technique for gold alloy identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Shingu, Hiroyasu; Iwase, Hirotoshi

    1991-01-01

    An application of the dual energy gamma-ray transmission techniques to gold alloy identification is presented. The measurement by dual energy gamma-ray transmission is independent of thickness and density of a sample. Due to this advantage, golden accessories such as necklaces, earrings and rings can be assayed in spite of their various thicknesses and irregular sectional shapes. Choice of a gamma-ray energy pair suitable for the object is important. The authors chose 511 keV and 1275 keV gamma-rays from 22 Na. With this energy pair, R value (a ratio of mass attenuation coefficients for low and high energy gamma-rays) is predominantly related to the weight fraction of gold of the sample. Using a 370 kBq 22 Na small source and a 50 mm dia.x 50 mm thick NaI(Tl) scintillator for 1200 seconds, a resolution of 2% for the R value was obtained. This corresponds to approximately 5% of the weight fraction of gold. A better resolution can be obtained by increasing the source activity or measurement time. (author)

  2. Linear microstructural features in R5(Si,Ge)4-type alloys: Difficulties in identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumbley, L.S.; Ugurlu, O.; McCallum, R.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Mudryk, Y.; Gschneidner, K.A.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    2008-01-01

    A brief review of the current literature concerning compounds based upon the R 5 (Si x Ge 1-x ) 4 structure reveals that essentially all examined alloys contain 'linear features' similar to those first observed by Szade et al. on the surface of Gd 5 Si 4 , Gd 5 Si 2 Ge 2 and Gd 5 Ge 4 samples. Attempts to characterize these features, using a variety of techniques, have proven to be a difficult task. Rather than becoming clearer and better understood, discrepancies in the reported data have resulted in much confusion. A series of comprehensive experiments involving optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, magnetization, and heat capacity measurements have been performed in an attempt to clarify the situation. These experiments, coupled with a critical examination of published data, allow certain misconceptions and apparent contradictions to be understood and explained. Of major importance is the discovery that the volume fraction of the linear feature present is far lower than what one may estimate on the basis of etched samples. The results of this study support previous data that show the linear features are a second phase of composition R 5 (Si x Ge 1-x ) 3 , and reveal the various difficulties associated with proper identification of this phase due to its small size scale and low volume percentage

  3. Qualification of Alloy 800 for sodium heated steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duke, J.M.; Sessions, C.E.; Ray, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    A reference specification of Alloy 800 for use in LMFBR steam generators is defined considering waterside corrosion, weldability and mechanical properties. Additional mechanical test data are being generated to support ASME Code acceptance. Candidate weld filler metals were assessed for use in subsequent weld process development. Progress on resolving technical concerns related to the role of tertiary creep identified the impact of test conditions and gamma prime strengthening in determining the creep behavior of Alloy 800

  4. Weldability investigation steel P 91 by weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates results of hardness and impact energy of thermal cycle simulated specimens of high-alloy steel P 91 and their dependence on cooling time from 800 to 500 °C. Results were obtained by measuring hardness HV 1 and by experimental testing of Charpy notched specimens. Metallographic analysis of samples was performed on scanning electronic microscope.

  5. Microstructural and mechanical behavior of friction welds in a high creep resistance magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, G.A.; Olea, C.A.W.; dos Santos, J.F.; Kainer, K.U. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Institute for Materials Research, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Friction weldability of Mg based alloys has been worldwide discussed. Within this context the aim of this study was to investigate rotational friction welding of an Aluminum-Rare Earth based high creep resistance Mg alloy AE42HP from the viewpoint of thermo cycle-microstructure-performance relationships to evaluate the potential use of FW in joining modern Mg-alloys. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Identification of modes of fracture in a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy using stereophotogrammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas Zamarripa, A., E-mail: a.salaszamarripa@gmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon. Av. Universidad S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, Apartado Postal 076 Suc. ' F' San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico); Pinna, C.; Brown, M.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield. Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Mata, M.P. Guerrero; Morales, M. Castillo; Beber-Solano, T.P. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon. Av. Universidad S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, Apartado Postal 076 Suc. ' F' San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    The identification and the development of a quantification technique of the modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces of a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy were developed during this research. Fatigue tests at room and high temperature (230 Degree-Sign C) were carried out to be able to compare the microscopic fractographic features developed by this material under these testing conditions. The overall observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surfaces showed a mixture of transgranular and ductile intergranular fracture. The ductile intergranular fracture contribution appears to be more significant at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. A quantitative methodology was developed to identify and to measure the contribution of these microscopic fractographic features. The technique consisted of a combination of stereophotogrammetry and image analysis. Stereo-pairs were randomly taken along the crack paths and were then analyzed using the profile module of MeX software. The analysis involved the 3-D surface reconstruction, the trace of primary profile lines in both vertical and horizontal directions within the stereo-pair area, the measurements of the contribution of the modes of fracture in each profile, and finally, the calculation of the average contribution in each stereo-pair. The technique results confirmed a higher contribution of ductile intergranular fracture at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, there was no indication of a direct relationship between this contribution and the strain amplitudes range applied during the fatigue testing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stereophotogrammetry and image analysis as a measuring tool of modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mixture of ductile intergranular and transgranular fracture was identified at room temperature and 230 Degree-Sign C testing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative methodology to

  7. Identification of modes of fracture in a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy using stereophotogrammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas Zamarripa, A.; Pinna, C.; Brown, M.W.; Mata, M.P. Guerrero; Morales, M. Castillo; Beber-Solano, T.P.

    2011-01-01

    The identification and the development of a quantification technique of the modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces of a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy were developed during this research. Fatigue tests at room and high temperature (230 °C) were carried out to be able to compare the microscopic fractographic features developed by this material under these testing conditions. The overall observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surfaces showed a mixture of transgranular and ductile intergranular fracture. The ductile intergranular fracture contribution appears to be more significant at room temperature than at 230 °C. A quantitative methodology was developed to identify and to measure the contribution of these microscopic fractographic features. The technique consisted of a combination of stereophotogrammetry and image analysis. Stereo-pairs were randomly taken along the crack paths and were then analyzed using the profile module of MeX software. The analysis involved the 3-D surface reconstruction, the trace of primary profile lines in both vertical and horizontal directions within the stereo-pair area, the measurements of the contribution of the modes of fracture in each profile, and finally, the calculation of the average contribution in each stereo-pair. The technique results confirmed a higher contribution of ductile intergranular fracture at room temperature than at 230 °C. Moreover, there was no indication of a direct relationship between this contribution and the strain amplitudes range applied during the fatigue testing. - Highlights: ► Stereophotogrammetry and image analysis as a measuring tool of modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces. ► A mixture of ductile intergranular and transgranular fracture was identified at room temperature and 230 °C testing. ► Development of a quantitative methodology to obtain the percentage of modes of fracture within the fracture surface.

  8. High Yield Strength Cast Steel With Improved Weldability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Transformation ( CCT ) diagram presented in Figure 25. It is clear that these low carbon steels generally will produce martensite and~or bainite over a very wide...microstructure. The CCT diagram developed from the Gleeble evaluations appears to indicate a martensite start (MJ temperature of approximately 800° F...Regardless of the exact identity of the transformation products, the CCT diagram contains the features desired for the experimental alloy system

  9. The combined use of EBSD and EDX analyses for the identification of complex intermetallic phases in multicomponent Al-Si piston alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-L.; Thomson, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Multicomponent Al-Si based casting alloys are used for a variety of engineering applications, including for example, piston alloys. Properties include good castability, high strength, light weight, good wear resistance and low thermal expansion. In order for such alloys to continue operation to increasingly higher temperatures, alloy element modifications are continually being made to further enhance the properties. Improved mechanical and physical properties are strongly dependent upon the morphologies, type and distribution of the second phases, which are in turn a function of alloy composition and cooling rate. The presence of additional elements in the Al-Si alloy system allows many complex intermetallic phases to form, which make characterisation non-trivial. These include, for example, CuAl 2 , Al 3 Ni 2 , Al 7 Cu 4 Ni, Al 9 FeNi and Al 5 Cu 2 Mg 8 Si 6 phases, all of which may have some solubility for additional elements. Identification is often non-trivial due to the fact that some of the phases have either similar crystal structures or only subtle changes in their chemistries. A combination of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) has therefore been used for the identification of the various phases. This paper will present comparisons of phase identification methodologies using EBSD alone, and in combination with chemical information, either directly or through post processing.

  10. Re-weldability tests of irradiated Inconel 625 by TIG welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Shimizu, M.; Kawamura, H.; Matsuda, F.; Kalinin, G.

    1998-01-01

    Inconel 625 is one of the possible materials for the vacuum vessel (VV) and for the in-vessel components of fusion reactors where high strength and high electrical resistance are required. In particular, Inconel 625 is used for the VV of JET and for flexible branch pipe lines in the ITER design. One of the most important issues for their applications is its re-weldability between un-irradiated and irradiated materials. This has a large impact on the design of in-vessel components. In this study, re-weldability of un-irradiated and/or irradiated Inconel 625 that has been welded by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process has been examined, and effect of helium generation amount on mechanical properties of the weld joint has been discussed. (authors)

  11. Gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insung; Yun, Hyeonsang; Kim, Dongcheol; Kang, Munjin; Kim, Young-Min

    2018-01-01

    The gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic (MART) steel was evaluated using both inverter direct current (DC) and DC pulse power type welders, under conditions of different welding currents, welding speeds, and shielding gasses. By investigating the bead appearance, tensile strength, and arc stability, it was determined that DC pulse power is better than inverter DC power for arc welding of 1.3 mm thick 1.5 GPa grade MART steel. Further, from the results of the weldability for various shielding gases, it was determined that mixed shielding gas is more effective for welding 1.5 GPa grade MART steel than is pure inert gas (Ar) or active (CO2) gas. In the case of pure shielding gas, no sound bead was formed under any conditions. However, when the mixed shielding gas was used, sound and fine beads were obtained.

  12. Severe plastic deformation of α+β Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy by cryo-rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Arup; Parida, Pradyumna Kumar; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-01-01

    The α-β (β ∼ 8%) Ti5Ta1.8Nb alloy is under development at IGCAR for reprocessing applications owing to its superior corrosion resistance and weldability. A possible method to strengthen the alloy is to engineer the grain size to finer dimensions through severe plastic deformation (SPD). A detailed analysis of the study of evolution of microstructure and micro-texture in the SPD Ti-Ta-Nb alloy is presented

  13. Weldability of AISI 304 to copper by friction welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Balalan, Zulkuf [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2013-06-01

    Friction welding is a solid-state welding method, which can join different materials smoothly and is excessively used in manufacturing industry. Friction welding method is commonly used in welding applications of especially cylindrical components, pipes and materials with different properties, for which other welding methods remain incapable. AISI 304 stainless steel and a copper alloy of 99.6 % purity were used in this study. This couple was welded in the friction welding machine. After the welding process, samples were analyzed macroscopically and microscopically, and their microhardness was measured. Tensile test was used to determine the bond strength of materials that were joined using the friction welding method. At the end of the study, it was observed that AISI 304 stainless steel and copper could be welded smoothly using the friction welding method and the bond strength is close to the tensile strength of copper. (orig.)

  14. Analysis of laser beam weldability of Inconel 738 superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbewande, A.T.; Buckson, R.A.; Ojo, O.A.

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of pre-weld heat treated laser beam welded IN 738 superalloy to heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking was studied. A pre-weld heat treatment that produced the minimal grain boundary liquation resulted in a higher level of cracking compared to those with more intergranular liquation. This deviation from the general expectation of influence of intergranular liquation extent on HAZ microfissuring is attributable to the reduction in the ability of the base alloy to accommodate welding tensile stress that accompanied a pre-weld heat treatment condition designed to minimize intergranular liquation. Furthermore, in contrast to what has been generally reported in other nickel-based superalloys, a decrease in laser welding speed resulted in increased HAZ cracking in the IN 738, which can be attributed to exacerbated process instability at lower welding speeds.

  15. Literature Review: Weldability of Iridium DOP-26 Alloy for General Purpose Heat Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgardt, Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pierce, Stanley W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-19

    The basic purpose of this paper is to provide a literature review relative to fabrication of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) that is used to provide electrical power for deep space missions of NASA. The particular fabrication operation to be addressed here is arc welding of the GPHS encapsulation. A considerable effort was made to optimize the fabrication of the fuel pellets and of other elements of the encapsulation; that work will not be directly addressed in this paper. This report consists of three basic sections: 1) a brief description of the GPHS will be provided as background information for the reader; 2) mechanical properties and the optimization thereof as relevant to welding will be discussed; 3) a review of the arc welding process development and optimization will be presented. Since the welding equipment must be upgraded for future production, some discussion of the historical establishment of relevant welding variables and possible changes thereto will also be discussed.

  16. Preparation and characterization of sintered Mo-Re alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morito, F.

    1993-01-01

    By the method of powder metallurgy, we have tried to fabricate Mo-Re alloys, which were electron beam weldable. Severe quality control was carried out during the whole fabrication process focused to reducing oxygen contamination. It is inevitable that the starting raw powders of Mo and Re were both high purity with 99.99 mass% up. Moreover, high vacuum sintering was performed before final sintering with high-purity hydrogen gas. As a result, we obtained electron beam weldable Mo-Re alloys, the total oxygen content of which was about 10 mass ppm or less, respectively. Several specimens were melted by electron beam welding (EBW) method. It was found that EBW gives an easy and effective survey to examine the weldability and the quality of the materials. Fracture surfaces examined by AES exhibited very low content of oxygen, carbon and nitrogen or that less than detectability limit. In conclusion, we have succeeded to obtain defect-free welds of sintered Mo-Re alloys. Furthermore it was found that Mo-Re alloys showed excellent potentialities not only in mechanical properties at low temperature but also in the respects of microstructure. (orig.)

  17. Metallurgy and deformation of electron beam welded similar titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasang, T.; Sabol, J. C.; Misiolek, W. Z.; Mitchell, R.; Short, A. B.; Littlefair, G.

    2012-04-01

    Butt welded joins were produced between commercially pure titanium and various titanium alloys using an electron beam welding technique. The materials used represent commercially pure grade, α-β alloy and β alloy. They were CP Ti, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) and Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti5553), respectively. Grains were largest in the FZs of the different weldments, decreasing in size towards the heat affected zones (HAZs) and base metals. Hardness measurements taken across the traverse cross-sections of the weldments were constant from base metal-to-weld-to-base metal for CP Ti/CP Ti and Ti64/Ti64 welds, while the FZ of Ti5553/Ti5553 had a lower hardness compared with the base metal. During tensile testing the CP Ti/CP Ti weldments fractured at the base metal, whereas both the Ti64/Ti64 and Ti5553/Ti5553 broke at the weld zones. Fracture surface analysis suggested microvoid coalescence as the failure mechanism. The compositional analysis showed a relatively uniform distribution of solute elements from base metal-to-weld-to-base metal. CP Ti has always been known for its excellent weldability, Ti64 has good weldability and, preliminary results indicated that Ti5553 alloy is also weldable.

  18. The properties and weldability of materials for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, B.A.; Kee, C.K.; Wilcox, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Low-activation austenitic stainless steels have been suggested for applications within fusion reactors. The use of these nickel-free steels will help to reduce the radioactive waste management problem after service. one requirement for such steels is the ability to obtain sound welds for fabrication purposes. Thus, two austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn alloys were studied to characterize the welded microstructure and mechanical properties. The two steels investigated were a Russian steel (Fe-11.6Cr19.3Mn-0.181C) and an US steel (Fe-12.lCr-19.4Mn-0.24C). Welding was performed using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Microscopic examinations of the structure of both steels were conducted. The as-received Russian steel was found to be in the annealed state. Only the fusion zone and the base metal were observed in the welded Russian steel. No visible heat affected zone was observed. Examination revealed that the as-received US steel was in the cold rolled condition. After welding, a fusion zone and a heat affected zone along with the base metal region were found

  19. Improvements in the weldability of a superconductor sheath material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, L.T.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of chemistry and heat treatment variation on the 4-K tensile properties of A-286, a candidate sheath material for force-cooled superconductors. Currently, full use of A-286 and similar superalloys is limited by the observed low yield and ultimate tensile strengths in the welded and aged condition. The low strength is shown to be associated with the formation of precipitate-free zones as a result of alloying-element segregation during weld pool solidification. It has been determined that minor modifications of the weld-metal chemistry by the addition of Ti reduce precipitate-free-zone formation, resulting in matching weld-metal and base-plate strengths at 4 K. Furthermore, nucleation of the γ' hardening phase has been found to be a strong function of temperature and composition. Modified heat-treatment schedules have been determined that are amenable to superconductor fabrication and that resulted in increased weld hardening and improved 4-K tensile properties

  20. Phase Identification of Cu-In Alloys with 45 and 41.25 at.% In Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baqué, Laura; Torrado, D.; Aurelio, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the thermal stability of Cu-In alloys with 45.0 and 41.2 at.% In nominal compositions was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, and in-situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction (S-PXRD) over...

  1. Weldability and Strength Recovery of NUCu-140 Advanced Naval Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Jason T.

    lowest TTF for NUCu-140 occurred in the temperature range of 500-550°C (932-1022°F), and was contributed to the achievement of maximum hardness as a result of ageing of Cu-rich precipitates at this temperature. HSLA-100 exhibited a minimum TTF at 650°C (1202°F), and this was attributed to the formation of austenite at this temperature. HSLA-100 and NUCu-140 exhibited a relatively narrow liquation cracking temperature ranges (LCTR) of 32°C (90°F) and 36°C (97°), respectively. The low susceptibility of both alloys was attributed to the formation of delta-ferrite within the same temperature range as incipient melting. Ineffective wetting and liquid film discontinuity in both alloys was established through metallographic and fractographic analysis.

  2. Weldability with Process Parameters During Fiber Laser Welding of a Titanium Plate (II) - The Effect of Control of Heat Input on Weldability -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Do; Kim, Ji Sung [Korea Maritime and Ocean Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Laser welding is a high-density energy welding method. Hence, deep penetration and high welding speed can be realized with lower heat input as compared with conventional welding. The heat input of a CW laser welding is determined by laser power and welding speed. In this study, bead and lap welding of 0.5 mmt pure titanium was performed using a fiber laser. Its weldability with laser power and welding speed was evaluated. Penetration, bead width, joining length, and bead shape were investigated, and the mechanical properties were examined through tensile-shear strength tests. Welds with sound joining length were obtained when the laser power and welding speed were respectively 0.5 kW and 2.5 m/min, and 1.5 kW and 6 m/min, and the weld obtained at low output presented better ductility than that obtained at high output.

  3. Weldability with Process Parameters During Fiber Laser Welding of a Titanium Plate (II) - The Effect of Control of Heat Input on Weldability -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Do; Kim, Ji Sung

    2016-01-01

    Laser welding is a high-density energy welding method. Hence, deep penetration and high welding speed can be realized with lower heat input as compared with conventional welding. The heat input of a CW laser welding is determined by laser power and welding speed. In this study, bead and lap welding of 0.5 mmt pure titanium was performed using a fiber laser. Its weldability with laser power and welding speed was evaluated. Penetration, bead width, joining length, and bead shape were investigated, and the mechanical properties were examined through tensile-shear strength tests. Welds with sound joining length were obtained when the laser power and welding speed were respectively 0.5 kW and 2.5 m/min, and 1.5 kW and 6 m/min, and the weld obtained at low output presented better ductility than that obtained at high output

  4. Comparative study on laser welding and TIG welding of semi-solid high pressure die cast A356 aluminium alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available components. The low porosity levels in SSM high pressure die castings (HPDC) improves the weldability of these components. The aim of the current research was to perform a comparative study of laser and TIG welding of SSM HPDC aluminium alloy A356. SSM...

  5. Identification of phases in zinc alloy powders using electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Martin G. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Kenik, Edward A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 100 Bethel Valley Rd., Bldg. 4515, MS-6064, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)]. E-mail: mjokeefe@umr.edu; Miller, F. Scott [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Johnson, Benedict [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2006-05-25

    Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used for the structural characterization of phases in Zn alloy powders. Commercial Zn alloy powders contained additions of <1000 ppm of Bi, In, Al or Mg. Bismuth and In have extremely low solubility in Zn and form intermetallic Bi-In compounds which segregate to the Zn grain boundaries. The Bi-In phases were <0.3 {mu}m in size, had low melting points, and were not abundant enough for EBSD analysis. Increasing the alloying additions 20-40-fold resulted in Bi-In phases >1 {mu}m that could be used for EBSD analysis for phase characterization. Deformation-free microstructures were obtained by mechanical polishing and ion milling. The Zn matrix was characterized as Zn via EBSD. A BiIn{sub 2} phase was identified in the powder microstructures via EBSD. An In phase with 8-9 wt.% Bi was identified using low voltage energy dispersive spectroscopy and closely matched the composition predicted by the Bi-In phase diagram.

  6. Hot coiled steel strip with elevated niobium content for pipelines and its weldability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brozda, J.; Zeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Examinations and tests have been performed on thermomechanically rolled and hot coiled 14 mm thick steel strips with a low carbon and elevated niobium content, assigned for the production of pipelines. There were examined basic mechanical properties of the steels, brittle fracture resistance of the parent material and simulated HAZ's, susceptibility to cold cracking as well as properties of MMA and GMA welded joints. It was found that the tested steels are characterized by a good weldability, are not prone to cold cracking, have a low brittle fracture transition temperature and the HAZ of welded joints shows a sufficient high brittle fracture resistance. (authors)

  7. Nickel-based gadolinium alloy for neutron adsorption application in ram packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robino, C.; McConnell, P.; Mizia, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will outline the results of a metallurgical development program that is investigating the alloying of gadolinium into a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy matrix. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section and low solubility in the expected U.S. repository environment. The nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy family was chosen for its known corrosion performance, mechanical properties, and weldability. The workflow of this program includes chemical composition definition, primary and secondary melting studies, ingot conversion processes, properties testing, and national consensus codes and standards work. The microstructural investigation of these alloys shows that the gadolinium addition is not soluble in the primary austenite metallurgical phase and is present in the alloy as gadolinium-rich second phase. This is similar to what is observed in a stainless steel alloyed with boron. The mechanical strength values are similar to those expected for commercial Ni-Cr-Mo alloys. The alloys have been corrosion tested in simulated Yucca Mountain aqueous chemistries with acceptable results. The initial results of weldability tests have also been acceptable. Neutronic testing in a moderated critical array has generated favorable results. An American Society for Testing and Materials material specification has been issued for the alloy and a Code Case has been submitted to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers for code qualification. The ultimate goal is acceptance of the alloy for use at the Yucca Mountain repository

  8. Identification of the material properties of Al 2024 alloy by means of inverse analysis and indentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moy, Charles K.S. [School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Bocciarelli, Massimiliano, E-mail: massimiliano.bocciarelli@polimi.it [Department of Structural Engineering, Technical University of Milan (Politecnico di Milano), 20133 Milan (Italy); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Ranzi, Gianluca [School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} Identification of mechanical properties by indentation test and inverse analysis. {yields} Pile-up height is also considered as experimental information. {yields} Inverse problem results to be well posed also in the case of mystical materials. {yields} 2024 Al alloy samples prepared using different age-hardening treatments are studied. - Abstract: This paper outlines an inverse analysis approach aimed at the identification of the mechanical properties of metallic materials based on the experimental results obtained from indentation tests. Previous work has shown the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem based on the load-penetration curve when dealing with mystical materials, which exhibit identical indentation curves even if possessing different yield and strain-hardening properties. For this reason, an additional measurement is used in the present study as input for the inverse analysis which consists of the maximum pile-up height measured after the indentation test. This approach lends itself for practical applications as the load-penetration curve can be easily obtained from commonly available micro-indenters while the pile-up present at the end of the test can be measured by different instruments depending on the size of the indented area, for example by means of an atomic force microscope or a laser profilometer. The inverse analysis procedure consists of a batch deterministic approach, and conventional optimization algorithms are employed for the minimization of the discrepancy norm. The first part of the paper outlines how the inclusion of both the maximum height of the pile-up and the indentation curve in the input data of the inverse analysis leads to a well-defined inverse problem using parameters of mystical materials. The approach is then applied to real experimental data obtained from three sets of 2024 Al alloy samples prepared using different age-hardening treatments. The accuracy of the identification process is validated

  9. Identification of the material properties of Al 2024 alloy by means of inverse analysis and indentation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moy, Charles K.S.; Bocciarelli, Massimiliano; Ringer, Simon P.; Ranzi, Gianluca

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Identification of mechanical properties by indentation test and inverse analysis. → Pile-up height is also considered as experimental information. → Inverse problem results to be well posed also in the case of mystical materials. → 2024 Al alloy samples prepared using different age-hardening treatments are studied. - Abstract: This paper outlines an inverse analysis approach aimed at the identification of the mechanical properties of metallic materials based on the experimental results obtained from indentation tests. Previous work has shown the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem based on the load-penetration curve when dealing with mystical materials, which exhibit identical indentation curves even if possessing different yield and strain-hardening properties. For this reason, an additional measurement is used in the present study as input for the inverse analysis which consists of the maximum pile-up height measured after the indentation test. This approach lends itself for practical applications as the load-penetration curve can be easily obtained from commonly available micro-indenters while the pile-up present at the end of the test can be measured by different instruments depending on the size of the indented area, for example by means of an atomic force microscope or a laser profilometer. The inverse analysis procedure consists of a batch deterministic approach, and conventional optimization algorithms are employed for the minimization of the discrepancy norm. The first part of the paper outlines how the inclusion of both the maximum height of the pile-up and the indentation curve in the input data of the inverse analysis leads to a well-defined inverse problem using parameters of mystical materials. The approach is then applied to real experimental data obtained from three sets of 2024 Al alloy samples prepared using different age-hardening treatments. The accuracy of the identification process is validated against the mechanical

  10. The Analysis of the General Performance and Mechanical Behavior of Unirradiated FeCrAl Alloys Before and After Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-03

    The present report summarizes and discusses the preliminary results for the in-depth characterization of the modern, nuclear-grade FeCrAl alloys currently under development. The alloys were designed for enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability, and the research is currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Last year, seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well-controlled chemistry and microstructures were designed and produced; welding was performed under well-controlled conditions. The structure and general performance of unirradiated alloys were assessed using standardized and advanced microstructural characterization techniques and mechanical testing. The primary objective is to identify the best candidate alloy, or at a minimum to identify the contributing factors that increase the weldability and radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys, therefore enabling future generations of FeCrAl alloys to deliver better performance parameters. This report is structured so as to describe these critical assessments of the weldability; radiation tolerance will be reported on in later reports from this program.

  11. Development of Alloy Coating Process of Steel Pipe for Seawater service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jong Man; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Lee, Sang Hyeog [Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Ltd., Okpo (Korea)

    2001-02-01

    The new alloy coating process was developed to apply steel pipe for seawater service. This process consists of Zn-Al hot-dip coating treatment immediately following after normal galvanizing treatment. The alloy coating process formed double layer after surface treatment, and the surface layer was similar to that of Galfan steel and the intermetallic layer was also similar to that of aluminized steel. The alloy coating layer protect steel pipe galvanically and provide steel pipe with high resistance to general corrosion of seawater. This new alloy coated steel pipe had also good weldability and adhesion strength of paints compared to galvanized steel. 5 refs., 14 figs.

  12. Properties, weldability and corrosion behavior of supermartensitic stainless steels for on- and offshore applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taban, Emel; Kaluc, Erdinc; Ojo, Olatunji Oladimeji [Kocaeli Univ. (Turkey). Welding Research, Education and Training Center

    2016-08-01

    Stimulated material-environment interactions inside and around flowlines of deep or ultra deep wells during oil and gas exploration, and fabrication economy of pipelines have been the major challenges facing the oil and gas industries. Presumably, an extensive focus on high integrity, performance and material economy of flowlines have realistically made supermartensitic stainless steels (SMSS) efficient and effective material choices for fabricating onshore and offshore pipelines. Supermartensitic stainless steels exhibit high strength, good low temperature toughness, sufficient corrosion resistance in sweet and mildly sour environments, and good quality weldability with both conventional welding processes and modern welding methods such as laser beam welding, electron beam welding and hybrid welding approaches. In terms of economy, supermartensitic stainless steels are cheaper and they are major replacements for more expensive duplex stainless steels required for tubing applications in the oil and gas industry. However, weld areas of SMSS pipes are exposed to sulphide stress cracking (SSC), so intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) or stress corrosion cracking can occur. In order to circumvent this risk of cracking, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) for 5 minutes at about 650 C is recommended. This paper provides detailed literature perusal on supermartensitic stainless steels, their weldability and corrosion behaviors. It also highlights a major research area that has not been thoroughly expounded in literature; fatigue loading behaviors of welded SMSS under different corrosive environments have not been thoroughly detailed in literature.

  13. Properties, weldability and corrosion behavior of supermartensitic stainless steels for on- and offshore applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taban, Emel; Kaluc, Erdinc; Ojo, Olatunji Oladimeji

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated material-environment interactions inside and around flowlines of deep or ultra deep wells during oil and gas exploration, and fabrication economy of pipelines have been the major challenges facing the oil and gas industries. Presumably, an extensive focus on high integrity, performance and material economy of flowlines have realistically made supermartensitic stainless steels (SMSS) efficient and effective material choices for fabricating onshore and offshore pipelines. Supermartensitic stainless steels exhibit high strength, good low temperature toughness, sufficient corrosion resistance in sweet and mildly sour environments, and good quality weldability with both conventional welding processes and modern welding methods such as laser beam welding, electron beam welding and hybrid welding approaches. In terms of economy, supermartensitic stainless steels are cheaper and they are major replacements for more expensive duplex stainless steels required for tubing applications in the oil and gas industry. However, weld areas of SMSS pipes are exposed to sulphide stress cracking (SSC), so intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) or stress corrosion cracking can occur. In order to circumvent this risk of cracking, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) for 5 minutes at about 650 C is recommended. This paper provides detailed literature perusal on supermartensitic stainless steels, their weldability and corrosion behaviors. It also highlights a major research area that has not been thoroughly expounded in literature; fatigue loading behaviors of welded SMSS under different corrosive environments have not been thoroughly detailed in literature.

  14. Weldability examination of ASTM A 240 S41500 martensitic stainless steel by thermal cycles simulation testings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Velázquez-del Rosario

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The weldability assets of ASTM A 240 S41500 (ASTM A 240/A 240M martensitic stainless steel are presented through the study of the effects of single and double thermal weld cycles on mechanical properties and microstructure of base metal (BM and the artificial heat affected zone (HAZ created by thermal weld simulations. For single cycles, separate peak temperatures of 1000 ºC/12 s and 1350 ºC/12 s (cooling times: 12 s in both cases were evaluated, whilst two combinations of peak temperatures: (1350 ºC/5 s + 1000 ºC/5 s ºC and (1350 ºC/12 s + 1000 ºC/12 s ºC (cooling times: 5 s and 12 s, were applied for double cycles. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT with short and long holding times were applied and Vickers hardness, impact toughness and metallographic examinations were used in order to assess mechanical and metallographic properties in the as-simulated (no heat treated and postweld heat treated conditions. Best properties of the welded joint for double thermal weld cycles with long holding times were reached, which reveals the good weldability and applicability of the tested material in post weld heat treated conditions.

  15. Helium embrittlement model and program plan for weldability of ITER materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Tosten, M.H.; Rankin, D.T.; Cross, B.J.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents a refined model of how helium embrittles irradiated stainless steel during welding. The model was developed based on experimental observations drawn from experience at the Savannah River Site and from an extensive literature search. The model shows how helium content, stress, and temperature interact to produce embrittlement. The model takes into account defect structure, time, and gradients in stress, temperature and composition. The report also proposes an experimental program based on the refined helium embrittlement model. A parametric study of the effect of initial defect density on the resulting helium bubble distribution and weldability of tritium aged material is proposed to demonstrate the roll that defects play in embrittlement. This study should include samples charged using vastly different aging times to obtain equivalent helium contents. Additionally, studies to establish the minimal sample thickness and size are needed for extrapolation to real structural materials. The results of these studies should provide a technical basis for the use of tritium aged materials to predict the weldability of irradiated structures. Use of tritium charged and aged material would provide a cost effective approach to developing weld repair techniques for ITER components

  16. Corrosion-Resistant Ti- xNb- xZr Alloys for Nitric Acid Applications in Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasagam, Geetha; Anbarasan, V.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-09-01

    This article reports the development, microstructure, and corrosion behavior of two new alloys such as Ti-4Nb-4Zr and Ti-2Nb-2Zr in boiling nitric acid environment. The corrosion test was carried out in the liquid, vapor, and condensate phases of 11.5 M nitric acid, and the potentiodynamic anodic polarization studies were performed at room temperature for both alloys. The samples subjected to three-phase corrosion testing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX). As Ti-2Nb-2Zr alloy exhibited inferior corrosion behavior in comparison to Ti-4Nb-4Zr in all three phases, weldability and heat treatment studies were carried out only on Ti-4Nb-4Zr alloy. The weldability of the new alloy was evaluated using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes, and the welded specimen was thereafter tested for its corrosion behavior in all three phases. The results of the present investigation revealed that the newly developed near alpha Ti-4Nb-4Zr alloy possessed superior corrosion resistance in all three phases and excellent weldability compared to conventional alloys used for nitric acid application in spent nuclear reprocessing plants. Further, the corrosion resistance of the beta heat-treated Ti-4Nb-4Zr alloy was superior when compared to the sample heat treated in the alpha + beta phase.

  17. Cutting Zone Temperature Identification During Machining of Nickel Alloy Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czán, Andrej; Daniš, Igor; Holubják, Jozef; Zaušková, Lucia; Czánová, Tatiana; Mikloš, Matej; Martikáň, Pavol

    2017-12-01

    Quality of machined surface is affected by quality of cutting process. There are many parameters, which influence on the quality of the cutting process. The cutting temperature is one of most important parameters that influence the tool life and the quality of machined surfaces. Its identification and determination is key objective in specialized machining processes such as dry machining of hard-to-machine materials. It is well known that maximum temperature is obtained in the tool rake face at the vicinity of the cutting edge. A moderate level of cutting edge temperature and a low thermal shock reduce the tool wear phenomena, and a low temperature gradient in the machined sublayer reduces the risk of high tensile residual stresses. The thermocouple method was used to measure the temperature directly in the cutting zone. An original thermocouple was specially developed for measuring of temperature in the cutting zone, surface and subsurface layers of machined surface. This paper deals with identification of temperature and temperature gradient during dry peripheral milling of Inconel 718. The measurements were used to identification the temperature gradients and to reconstruct the thermal distribution in cutting zone with various cutting conditions.

  18. Second Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Briggs, Samuel A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-12-30

    The present report summarizes and discusses the current results and on-going activity towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program.

  19. Weldability with Process Parameters During Fiber Laser Welding of a Titanium Plate (I) - Effect of Type and Flow Rate of Shielding Gases on Weldability -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Do; Kim, Ji Sung [Korea Maritime and Ocean Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, welding of pure titanium was carried out by using a continuous wave fiber laser with a maximum output of 6.3 kW. Because brittle regions form easily in titanium as a result of oxidation or nitriding, the weld must be protected from the atmosphere by using an appropriate shielding gas. Experiments were performed by changing the type and the flow rate of shielding gases to obtain the optimal shielding condition, and the weldability was then evaluated. The degree of oxidation and nitriding was distinguished by observing the color of beads, and weld microstructure was observed by using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The mechanical properties of the weld were examined by measuring hardness. When the weld was oxidized or nitrified, the bead color was gray or yellow, and the oxygen or nitrogen content in the bead surface and overall weld tended to be high, as a result of which the hardness of the weld was thrice that of the base metal. A sound silvery white bead was obtained by using Ar as the shielding gas.

  20. Identification of microstructural mechanisms during densification of a TiAl alloy by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbar, Houria; Couret, Alain; Durand, Lise [CNRS, CEMES-UPR 8011, Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, BP 94347, 29 rue J. Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Monchoux, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: monchoux@cemes.fr [CNRS, CEMES-UPR 8011, Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, BP 94347, 29 rue J. Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31055 Toulouse (France)

    2011-10-13

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > Mechanisms of a TiAl alloy powder densified by spark plasma sintering are identified. > Microstructure evolution of the powder is followed during the sintering cycle. > As-atomized supersaturated powder comes back to equilibrium. > Densification occurs by plastification of the particles at high temperature. > No mechanisms related to electric current are observed. - Abstract: This work aims at identifying, by coupled scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) observations, the densification mechanisms occurring when an atomized Ti-47Al-1W-1Re-0.2Si powder is densified by spark plasma sintering (SPS). For this purpose, interruptions of the SPS cycle have been performed to follow the evolution of the microstructure step by step. The powder particles exhibit a classical dendritic microstructure containing a large amount of out-of-equilibrium {alpha} phase. During heating-up, the microstructure undergoes successive transformations. At T = 525-875 deg. C the {alpha} phase transforms into {gamma}. The {gamma} phase formed is supersaturated in W and Re. It de-saturates for T above 875 deg. C by discontinuous precipitation of W and Re-rich B2 phase. Densification takes place for T between 900 deg. C and 1150 deg. C by plastic deformation of the powder particles. TEM observations show that the repartition of the plastic deformation is correlated to the dendritic microstructure, and that dynamic recrystallization mechanisms occur. Microstructural phenomena directly resulting from the high currents involved in the SPS process have not been observed.

  1. Weldability and Impact Energy Properties of High-Hardness Armor Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, Aleksandar; Geric, Katarina; Jovanovic, Milos; Vukic, Lazic

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the weldability of high-hardness armor steel by the gas metal arc welding method has been investigated. The study was aimed at determining the weakness points of manual welding compared to automated welding through microhardness testing, the cooling rate, tensile characteristics and nondestructive analysis. Detailed studies were performed for automated welding on the impact energy and microhardness in the fusion line, as the most sensitive zone of the armor steel weld joint. It was demonstrated that the selection of the preheating and interpass temperature is important in terms of the cooling rate and quantity of diffusible and retained hydrogen in the weld joint. The tensile strength was higher than 800 MPa. The width of the heat-affected zone did not exceed 15.9 mm, measured from the weld centerline, while the impact energy results were 74 and 39 J at 20 and - 40 °C, respectively.

  2. A weldability study of the structural steel of the Angra II reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Pinto, M. dos.

    1980-01-01

    A weldability study of the german steel WSTE-51 based on mechanical, metallographic, hardness as well as special tests such as the CTS, the Tekken, for cold cracking, and the Vinckier test for reheat cracking is presented. The welding process used was the manual metal arc with low hydrogen eletrodes. In order to broaden the scope of this study the properties of weldments fabricated by submerged arc welding with high and low heat input were analized by means of mechanical and metallographic tests. The results showed that the joints had good quality and emphasize the necessity of special care in order to avoid cold cracking as well as the use of a temperbead in order to avoid reheat cracking. The submerged arc welding study concludes that higher impact resistance in the HAZ is obtained with low heat imput. (Author) [pt

  3. Comparative study of TIG and SMAW root welding passes on ductile iron cast weldability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cárcel-Carrasco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the weldability of ductile iron when: (I a root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG process using an Inconel 625 source rod and filler welds are subsequently applied using coated electrodes with 97,6%Ni; and (II welds on ductile iron exclusively made using the manual shielded metal arc welding technique (SMAW. Both types of welds are performed on ductile iron specimen test plates that are subjected to preheat and post-weld annealing treatments. Samples with TIG root-welding pass shown higher hardness but slightly lower ductility and strength. Both types of welding achieved better ductile and strength properties than ones found in literature.

  4. Re-weldability tests of irradiated 316L(N) stainless steel using laser welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hirokazu; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kalinin, George; Kohno, Wataru; Morishima, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    SS316L(N)-IG is the candidate material for the in-vessel and ex-vessel components of fusion reactors such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). This paper describes a study on re-weldability of un-irradiated and/or irradiated SS316L(N)-IG and the effect of helium generation on the mechanical properties of the weld joint. The laser welding process is used for re-welding of the water cooling branch pipeline repairs. It is clarified that re-welding of SS316L(N)-IG irradiated up to about 0.2 dpa (3.3 appm He) can be carried out without a serious deterioration of tensile properties due to helium accumulation. Therefore, repair of the ITER blanket cooling pipes can be performed by the laser welding process

  5. Re-weldability tests of irradiated 316L(N) stainless steel using laser welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hirokazu; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kalinin, George; Kohno, Wataru; Morishima, Yasuo

    2002-12-01

    SS316L(N)-IG is the candidate material for the in-vessel and ex-vessel components of fusion reactors such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). This paper describes a study on re-weldability of un-irradiated and/or irradiated SS316L(N)-IG and the effect of helium generation on the mechanical properties of the weld joint. The laser welding process is used for re-welding of the water cooling branch pipeline repairs. It is clarified that re-welding of SS316L(N)-IG irradiated up to about 0.2 dpa (3.3 appm He) can be carried out without a serious deterioration of tensile properties due to helium accumulation. Therefore, repair of the ITER blanket cooling pipes can be performed by the laser welding process.

  6. Evaluation of properties of low activation Mn-Cr steel. 1. Mechanical properties and weldability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shigeru; Fukaya, Kiyoshi; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Sato, Ikuo; Kusuhashi, Mikio; Hatakeyama, Takeshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    1999-10-01

    In JAERI, JT-60SU (Super Upgrade) program is discussed. In the design optimization activity of JT-60SU, it is required for vacuum vessel material to be highly strong, low activated and nonmagnetic. However, there is no suitable material to fulfill all the requirements. Therefore, JAERI started to develop a new material for vacuum vessel together with The Japan Steel Works LTD. (JSW). Chemical composition and production processes were optimized and a new Mn-Cr steel named VC9 with a non-magnetic single {gamma} phase was selected as a candidate material for vacuum vessel of JT-60SU. In this study, characterization of mechanical properties and weldability of VC9 were studied and the results were compared with those of 316L stainless steel. (author)

  7. Analysis and application of GEWI sleeve weld-ability (Material: C45)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weiming; Zhang Hongliu

    2010-01-01

    Welding may use two kinds of welding process of shielded metal arc welding and CO 2 shielded arc welding between inner ring in nuclear island steel lining (material: P265GH) and GEWI sleeve (material:C45).CO 2 shielded arc welding is often used because of higher welding efficiency, in particular, in condition of plan press, but quality can come into being some problems if we lack strict measures, for example welding procedure. Shielded metal arc welding control easier quality, but welding efficiency is lower. Comparing and analyzing Weld-ability of C45(Medium carbon Quenched and Tempered Steel.) between of shielded metal arc welding and CO 2 shielded arc welding, suggest to use shielded metal arc welding in project practice, and control strict welding procedure measure of pre-heating treatment and Post-heating. (authors)

  8. Testing and assessment of low alloy steel for marine application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad, M.; Ahmad, S.; Mahmood, K.; Qureshi, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an account of the work carried out during the assessment of low alloy steel (WH-80) for marine application. The relevant acceptance criteria consulted during the process is DEFST AN 02-874 and a standard reference material. Assessment is based on the experimental results of the tests carried out for the steel. Testing comprised of mechanical (tensile, impact and hardness) tests, corrosion (immersion corrosion and stress corrosion cracking) tests, metallography test and weldability (weld joint strength, controlled thermal severity -CTS and Y -Groove) tests undertaken at various testing laboratories in Pakistan. The results obtained after testing have been compared with acceptance criteria (DEFSTAN 02-874 and standard reference material). Moreover results have been compared with contemporary steels used for marine applications. Results showed a reasonable agreement with results available in literature for other low alloy steels with respect to mechanical strength and weldability. Steel weldments qualified the weld joint strength tests and weldability tests. Toughness has been measured at various temperatures. Results revealed that the toughness of base metal is higher than heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal. In weldability tests, weld metal and HAZ were examined microscopically to investigate integrity of weld. No cracks have been observed in the weld which indicates complete diffusion in to the welding material. WH- 80 steel has exhibited comparatively high corrosion rate, reduction in tensile strength during SCC test and low Charpy energy values at -50 degree C. It is therefore concluded that the WH-80 steel is unsuitable for use in application at subzero (OC) temperatures and in highly corrosive environment. (author)

  9. Linear microstructural features in R{sub 5}(Si,Ge){sub 4}-type alloys: Difficulties in identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbley, L.S. [Iowa State University, 214 Wilhelm, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ames Laboratory, 126 Metals Development, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)], E-mail: chumbley@iastate.edu; Ugurlu, O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail stop G755, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); McCallum, R.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Mudryk, Y. [Ames Laboratory, 126 Metals Development, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Gschneidner, K.A.; Pecharsky, V.K. [Iowa State University, 214 Wilhelm, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ames Laboratory, 126 Metals Development, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    A brief review of the current literature concerning compounds based upon the R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} structure reveals that essentially all examined alloys contain 'linear features' similar to those first observed by Szade et al. on the surface of Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4}, Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} samples. Attempts to characterize these features, using a variety of techniques, have proven to be a difficult task. Rather than becoming clearer and better understood, discrepancies in the reported data have resulted in much confusion. A series of comprehensive experiments involving optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, magnetization, and heat capacity measurements have been performed in an attempt to clarify the situation. These experiments, coupled with a critical examination of published data, allow certain misconceptions and apparent contradictions to be understood and explained. Of major importance is the discovery that the volume fraction of the linear feature present is far lower than what one may estimate on the basis of etched samples. The results of this study support previous data that show the linear features are a second phase of composition R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 3}, and reveal the various difficulties associated with proper identification of this phase due to its small size scale and low volume percentage.

  10. Susceptibility testing for welding of AlMg alloys intended for extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Borowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of research was to determine the weldability, using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG of extruded sections made of hard-deformable 5xxx series aluminum alloys with differing magnesium content, i.e. AlMg3, AlMg4,5, AlMg5, AlMg7. Welded joints were obtained as a result of a welding process consisting of several steps. Only welds characterized by very good appearance and quality were selected for tests. As a result of conducted research, TIG welding parameters were determined for sections with a thickness of 8 mm. It was observed that alloys of differing Mg content are characterized by high weldability and do not exhibit a significant reduction of the yield point. Moreover, joints exhibit uniform hardness distribution in the welded joint and heat-affected zone. Tensile strength is reduced.

  11. The Study on Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot-Stamped Steel by Using Laser Heat Source (Ⅲ) - Comparison on Laser Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot -Stamped Steel-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, So Young; Kim, Jong Do [Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Su [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    This study was conducted to compare the laser weldability of boron steel and hot-stamped steel. In general, boron steel is used in the hot-stamping process. Hot-stamping is a method for simultaneously forming and cooling boron steel in a press die after heating it to the austenitizing temperature. Hot-stamped steel has a strength of 1500 MPa or more. Thus, in this study, the laser weldability of boron steel and that of hot-stamped steel were investigated and compared. A continuous wave disk laser was used to produce butt and lap joints. In the butt welding, the critical cooling speed at which full penetration was obtained in the hot-stamped steel was lower than that of boron steel. In the lap welding, the joint widths were similar regardless of the welding speed when full penetration was obtained.

  12. The Study on Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot-Stamped Steel by Using Laser Heat Source (Ⅲ) - Comparison on Laser Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot -Stamped Steel-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, So Young; Kim, Jong Do; Kim, Jong Su

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the laser weldability of boron steel and hot-stamped steel. In general, boron steel is used in the hot-stamping process. Hot-stamping is a method for simultaneously forming and cooling boron steel in a press die after heating it to the austenitizing temperature. Hot-stamped steel has a strength of 1500 MPa or more. Thus, in this study, the laser weldability of boron steel and that of hot-stamped steel were investigated and compared. A continuous wave disk laser was used to produce butt and lap joints. In the butt welding, the critical cooling speed at which full penetration was obtained in the hot-stamped steel was lower than that of boron steel. In the lap welding, the joint widths were similar regardless of the welding speed when full penetration was obtained

  13. Identification method of fracture mode based on measurement of microscopic plastic deformation in a Mg cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochi, Naoya [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Higuchi, Yu-ki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Narita, Ichihito, E-mail: i-narita@live.jp [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Miyahara, Hirofumi, E-mail: miyahara@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Matsumoto, Toshiharu [Tobata Seisakusho Co., Ltd., 8-21 Shinsone, Kokuraminami-ku, Kitakyushu 800-0211 (Japan); Noguchi, Hiroshi, E-mail: noguchi.hiroshi.936@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-08-26

    Plastic deformation under fracture surface in non-combustible magnesium alloy was investigated using electron backscatter diffraction analysis after tensile tests of specimens having a fatigue pre-crack or shrinkage porosity, so that it revealed that the fracture mode of shrinkage porosity of the magnesium alloy can be treated as a crack.

  14. Influence of the phase morphology on the weldability of PLA/PBAT-blends by using butt-welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, L.; Bonten, C.

    2014-05-01

    The material development in the field of bioplastics is steadily increasing. It is important to examine the processability but the Investigation of further process steps is also very important. In this paper the weldability of bioplastics is discussed. Compounds of Polylactide (PLA) and Polybutyleneadipate-terephthalate (PBAT) are produced by a twin screw extruder with different mixing ratios. Tensile specimens are produced by injection moulding and the tensile tests are carried out. In order to verify the weldability, some tensile specimens are cut in halfes and butt welded. Afterwards a tensile test is performed with the welded samples and the results are compared with the values of the unwelded samples. For understanding the results, the morphology of the welds were examined and correlated. It has been found that blends with a mixing ratio of 50:50 have the lowest welding factor, because of the immiscibility of PLA and PBAT. Weld images show segregated areas that reduce the force transmission.

  15. Aeronautical requirements for Inconel 718 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefterie, C. F.; Guragata, C.; Bran, D.; Ghiban, B.

    2017-06-01

    The project goal is to present the requirements imposed by aviation components made from super alloys based on Nickel. A significant portion of fasteners, locking lugs, blade retainers and inserts are manufactured from Alloy 718. The thesis describes environmental factors (corrosion), conditions of external aggression (salt air, intense heat, heavy industrial pollution, high condensation, high pressure), mechanical characteristics (tensile strength, yield strength and fatigue resistance) and loadings (tensions, compression loads) that must be satisfied simultaneously by Ni-based super alloy, compared to other classes of aviation alloys (as egg. Titanium alloys, Aluminum alloys). For this alloy the requirements are strength durability, damage tolerance, fail safety and so on. The corrosion can be an issue, but the fatigue under high-magnitude cyclic tensile loading it’s what limits the lifetime of the airframe. Also, the excellent malleability and weldability characteristics of the 718 system make the material physical properties tolerant of manufacturing processes. These characteristics additionally continue to provide new opportunities for advanced manufacturing methods.

  16. The welding of alloy 800

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, M.; Norman, P.L.

    1975-01-01

    This paper reviews the technical literature published on the welding of alloy 800. Much of this work has been carried out using the Varestraint and Gleeble tests to investigate the susceptibility of the alloy and of high nickel consumables to hot-cracking. Inspite of much reported work, it is pointed out that many years of experience in the use of alloy 800 shows it to be readily weldable without any major problems occurring due to hot-cracking. The elements investigated include titanium, aluminium, sulphur, phosphorus and carbon, and the effects of these elements are discuused in terms of their effects on the hot-ductility curves obtained by Gleeble testing. Conclusions reached by various researchers state that the individual effects of the above five elements may be masked by other unknown factors. It is concluded that with correct welding procedures alloy 800 can be welded without cracking problems even with high heat input welding processes using either high-nickel filler wires or a matching electrode. Matching composition filler wires have been used with success but none are at present available commercially. (author)

  17. Aluminium alloys welding with high-power Nd:YAG lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Orza, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Aluminium alloys have good mechanical properties (high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance) and good workability. their applications are growing up, specially in the transportation industry. Weldability is however poorer than in other materials; recent advances in high power YAG laser are the key to obtain good appearance welds and higher penetration, at industrial production rates. Results of the combination of high power YAG beams with small fiber diameters and specific filler wires are presented. It is also characterized the air bone particulate material, by-product of the laser process: emission rates, size distribution and chemical composition are given for several aluminium alloys. (Author) 6 refs

  18. Identification of intermetallic phases in a eutectic Al-Si casting alloy using electron backscatter diffraction pattern analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kral, M.V.; McIntyre, H.R.; Smillie, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Intermetallic phases in sand cast eutectic Al-Si alloys were characterized using a combination of SEM, EDS and EBSD pattern analysis. Chinese script α-phase particles were consistent with cubic Al 19 (Fe,Mn) 5 Si 2 . Plate-shaped β-phase particles were consistent with tetragonal Al 3 (Fe,Mn)Si 2

  19. Identification of salt-alloy combinations for thermal energy storage applications in advanced solar dynamic power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Misra, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations based on the available data for flouride salt systems reveal that a number of congruently melting compositions and eutectics exist which have the potential to meet the lightweight, high energy storage requirements imposed for advanced solar dynamic systems operating between about 1000 and 1400 K. Compatibility studies to determine suitable containment alloys to be used with NaF-22CaF2-13MgF2, NaF-32CaF2, and NaF-23MgF2 have been conducted at the eutectic temperature + 25 K for each system. For these three NaF-based eutectics, none of the common, commercially available high temperature alloys appear to offer adequate corrosion resistance for a long lifetime; however mild steel, pure nickel and Nb-1Zr could prove useful. These latter materials suggest the possibility that a strong, corrosion resistant, nonrefractory, elevated temperature alloy based on the Ni-Ni3Nb system could be developed.

  20. Friction stir welding of T joints of dissimilar aluminum alloy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakare, Shrikant B.; Kalyankar, Vivek D.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum alloys are preferred in the mechanical design due to their advantages like high strength, good corrosion resistance, low density and good weldability. In various industrial applications T joints configuration of aluminum alloys are used. In different fields, T joints having skin (horizontal sheet) strengthen by stringers (vertical sheets) were used to increase the strength of structure without increasing the weight. T joints are usually carried out by fusion welding which has limitations in joining of aluminum alloy due to significant distortion and metallurgical defects. Some aluminum alloys are even non weldable by fusion welding. The friction stir welding (FSW) has an excellent replacement of conventional fusion welding for T joints. In this article, FSW of T joints is reviewed by considering aluminum alloy and various joint geometries for defect analysis. The previous experiments carried out on T joints shows the factors such as tool geometry, fixturing device and joint configurations plays significant role in defect free joints. It is essential to investigate the material flow during FSW to know joining mechanism and the formation of joint. In this study the defect occurred in the FSW are studied for various joint configurations and parameters. Also the effect of the parameters and defects occurs on the tensile strength are studied. It is concluded that the T-joints of different joint configurations can be pretended successfully. Comparing to base metal some loss in tensile strength was observed in the weldments as well as overall reduction of the hardness in the thermos mechanically affected zone also observed.

  1. Fatigue testing of weldable high strength steels under simulated service conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantbirojn, Natee

    There have been concerns over the effect of Cathodic Protection (CP) on weldable high strength steels employed in Jack-up production platform. The guidance provided by the Department of Energy HSE on higher strength steels, based on previous work, was to avoid overprotection as this could cause hydrogen embrittlement. However, the tests conducted so far at UCL for the SE702 type high strength steels (yields strength around 690 MPa) have shown that the effect of over protection on high strength steels may not be as severe as previously thought. For this thesis, SE702 high strength steels have been investigated in more detail. Thick (85mm) parent and ground welded plates were tested under constant amplitude in air and seawater with CP. Tests were also conducted on Thick (40mm) T-butt welded plates under variable amplitude loading in air and seawater with two CP levels (-800mV and -1050mV). Different backing materials (ceramic and metallic) for the welding process of the T-butt plates were also investigated. The variable amplitude sequences employed were generated using the Jack-up Offshore Standard load History (JOSH). The fatigue results are presented as crack growth and S/N curves. They were compared to the conventional offshore steel (BS 4360 50D). The results suggested that the fatigue life of the high strength steels was comparable to the BS 4360 50D steels. The effect of increasing the CP was found to be detrimental to the fatigue life but the effect was not large. The effect of CP was less noticeable in T-butt welded plates. However, in general, the effect of overprotection is not as detrimental to the Jack-up steels as previously thought. The load histories generated by JOSH were found to have some unfavourable characteristics. The framework is based on Markov Chain method and pseudo-random number generator for selecting sea-states. A study was carried out on the sequence generated by JOSH. The generated sequences were analysed for their validity for fatigue

  2. Design criteria for rhenium-reduced nickel-based single-crystal alloys. Identification and computer-assisted conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goehler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, design criteria and property models for the creep strength optimization of rhenium-free nickel based single crystal Superalloys are investigated. The study focuses on a typical load condition of 1050 C and 150 MPa, which is representative for flight engine applications. Thereby the key aspect is to link chemical composition, manufacturing processes, microstructure formation and mechanistic understanding of dislocation creep through a computational materials engineering approach. Beside the positive effect of rhenium on solid solution hardening, a second mechanism in which rhenium increases high temperature creep strength is identified. It indirectly stabilizes precipitation hardening by reducing the coarsening kinetics of γ'-rafting. Five 1st and 2nd generation technical Superalloys show a comparable microstructure evolution for up to 2 % plastic elongation, while creep times differ by a factor of five. The application of a microstructure sensitive creep model shows that these coarsening processes can activate γ-cutting and thus lead to an increasing creep rate. Based on these calculations a threshold value of φ γ/γ' > 2,5 at 150 MPa is estimated. This ratio of matrix channel to raft thickness has been proofed for multiple positions by microstructure analysis of interrupted creep tests. The mechanism described previously can be decelerated by the enrichment of the γ-matrix with slow diffusing elements. The same principle also increases the solid solution strength of the γ-matrix. Therefore, the present work delivers an additional mechanistic explanation why creep properties of single phase nickel based alloys can be transferred to two phase technical Superalloys with rafted γ'-structure. Following, the best way to substitute both rhenium fundamental properties, namely a slow diffusion coefficient and a small solubility in g', has been investigated by means of CALPHAD-modeling. Only molybdenum and especially tungsten

  3. Identification of low cycle fatigue parameters of high strength low-alloy (HSLA steel at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bulatović

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Low cycle fatigue test was performed in ambient atmosphere at room temperature. Cycle loading of material, in case of High strength low-alloy steel, entails modifications of its properties and in this paper is therefore shown behavior of fatigue life using low cycle fatigue parameters. More precisely, crack initiation life of tested specimens was computed using theory of Coffin-Manson relation during the fatigue loading. The geometry of the stabilized hysteresis loop of welded joint HSLA steel, marked as Nionikral 70, is also analyzed. This stabilized hysteresis loop is very important for determination of materials properties.

  4. Identification of mechanical properties of weld joints of AlMgSi07.F25 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kopas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the analysis of selected mechanical properties of weld joints of AlMgSi07.F25 aluminium alloy. We will focus on the influence of the test bar neck shape on the tensile strength characteristics and the course of hardness in the weld joint cross-section. For the welding process using TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas technology we considered AlSi5 as the additive material. This paper also includes a short study of numerical modelling of the test bar welding.

  5. Requirements of Inconel 718 alloy for aeronautical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiban, Brandusa; Elefterie, Cornelia Florina; Guragata, Constantin; Bran, Dragos

    2018-02-01

    The main requirements imposed by aviation components made from super alloys based on Nickel are presented in present paper. A significant portion of fasteners, locking lugs, blade retainers and inserts are manufactured from Inconel 718 alloy. The thesis describes environmental factors (corrosion), conditions of external aggression (salt air, intense heat, heavy industrial pollution, high condensation, high pressure), mechanical characteristics (tensile strength, creep, density, yield strength, fracture toughness, fatigue resistance) and loadings (tensions, compression loads) that must be satisfied simultaneously by Ni-based super alloy, compared to other classes of aviation alloys (as egg. Titanium alloys, Aluminum alloys). For this alloy the requirements are strength, durability, damage tolerance, fail safety and so on. The corrosion can be an issue, but the fatigue under high-magnitude cyclic tensile loading it what limits the lifetime of the airframe. The excellent malleability and weldability characteristics of the 718 system make the material physical properties tolerant of manufacturing processes. These characteristics additionally continue to provide new opportunities for advanced manufacturing methods.

  6. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  7. Microstructure-property relationships in Al-Cu-Li-Ag-Mg Weldalite (tm) alloys, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, T. J.; Pickens, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of the ultrahigh strength Al-Cu-Li-Ag-Mg alloy, Weldalite (tm) 049, were studied. Specifically, the microstructural features along with tensile strength, weldability, Young's modulus and fracture toughness were studied for Weldalite (tm) 049 type alloys with Li contents ranging from 1.3 to 1.9 wt. pct. The tensile properties of Weldalite 049 and Weldalite 049 reinforced with TiB2 particles fabricated using the XD (tm) process were also evaluated at cryogenic, room, and elevated temperatures. In addition, an experimental alloy, similar in composition to Weldalite 049 but without the Ag+Mg, was fabricated. The microstructure of this alloy was compared with that of Weldalite 049 in the T6 condition to assess the effect of Ag+Mg on nucleation of strengthening phases in the absence of cold work.

  8. Development of remote welding technology for nuclear fuel end capping (A study on the weldability of Zircaloy-4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kho, Jin Hyun; Sung, Ho Hyun; Hyun, Yong Kyu; Suh, Hee Kang [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea)

    1998-03-01

    The integrity of nuclear fuel end cap welds is essential to the nuclear fuel performance and safety as well as the usability of power plant. The first aim of this project is to obtain experimental data on the nuclear fuel cladding materials of Zircaloy-4 with welding processes such as plasma arc, gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding. the data obtained in this study will be applicable to the nuclear fuel design, fabrication and nuclear fuel quality control. In addition, the welding processes applicable to the Zircaloy-4 welding were compared and contrasted. The weldability of Zircaloy-4 was evaluated from the metallurgical and mechanical standpoints. 88 refs., 57 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  9. characterization and weldability of plasma nitrided P/M martensitic stainless steel X 20 Cr Ni 172

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Karim, R.A.; El-demellawy, M.A; Waheed, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    stainless steels are widely used in nuclear applications, as a construction material. in these applications stainless steels suffer from corrosion degradation due severe environment and operating conditions. improving the engineering properties of such material prolong the service life time.in the present study, powder metallurgy technique namely plasma rotating electrode process (PREP) was used to produce martensitic steel DIN X 20 Cr Ni 172 with 0.5 % N. this step was followed by hot isostatic pressing process (HIP) . the effect of N on the weldability of this steel has been investigated . this included microstructure characterization, hardness evaluation and ferrite content measurements. the results showed that the presence of high nitrogen content in this steel resulted in a pore free structure with improved the hardness across the welding area. A single phase with few precipitates was detected on the grain boundaries in the heat affected zone. the results were supplemented by x-ray diffraction patterns and EDAX analysis

  10. Long-term creep rupture strength of weldment of Fe-Ni based alloy as candidate tube and pipe for advanced USC boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Gang; Sato, Takashi [Babcok-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Research Laboratory; Marumoto, Yoshihide [Babcok-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Div.

    2010-07-01

    A lot of works have been going to develop 700C USC power plant in Europe and Japan. High strength Ni based alloys such as Alloy 617, Alloy 740 and Alloy 263 were the candidates for boiler tube and pipe in Europe, and Fe-Ni based alloy HR6W (45Ni-24Fe-23Cr-7W-Ti) is also a candidate for tube and pipe in Japan. One of the Key issues to achieve 700 C boilers is the welding process of these alloys. Authors investigated the weldability and the long-term creep rupture strength of HR6W tube. The weldments were investigated metallurgically to find proper welding procedure and creep rupture tests are ongoing exceed 38,000 hours. The long-term creep rupture strengths of the HST weld joints are similar to those of parent metals and integrity of the weldments was confirmed based on with other mechanical testing results. (orig.)

  11. The modification of some properties of Al-2%Mg alloy by Ti &Li alloying elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talib Abdulameer Jasim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium-Magnisium alloys are light, high strength with resistance to corrosion and good weldability. When the content of magnesium  exceeds 3% there is a tendency to stress corrosion . This work is an attempt is to prepare low density alloy with up to approximately 2.54 g / cm3 by adding different contents of Ti, and lithium to aluminum-2%Magnisium alloy. The lithium is added in two aspects, lithium chloride and pure metal. The casting performed using conventional casting method. Moreover, solution heat treatment (SHT at 520 ºC for 4 hrs, quenching in cold water, and aging at 50ºC for 4 days were done to get better mechanical properties of all samples. Microstructure was inspected by light optical microscope before and after SHT. Alloy3 which contains 1.5%Ti was tested by SEM and EDS spectrometer to exhibit the shape and micro chemical analysis of Al3Ti phase. Hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and modulus of elasticity were tested for all alloys. The results indicated that Al3Ti phase precipitates in alloys contain 0.5%T, 1%Ti, And 1.5%Ti.  The phases Al3Li as well as Al3Ti were precipitated in alloy4 which contains 2%Ti, and 2.24%Li. Mechanical properties test results also showed that the alloy4 has achieved good results, the modulus of elasticity chanced from 310.65GPa before SHT to 521.672GPa, after SHT and aging, the ultimate tensile strength was changed from 365MPa before SHT to 469MPa, after SHT and aging,  and hardness was increased from 128 to 220HV.

  12. Identification of Intermetallic Compounds and Its Formation Mechanism in Boron Steel Hot-Dipped in Al-7 wt.% Mn Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Yun Kwak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In laser welding and hot stamping Al-Si-coated boron steel, there is a problem that the strength of the joint is lowered due to ferrite formation in the fusion zone. The purpose of this study is to develop an Al-7 wt.% Mn hot-dip coating in which Mn, an austenite stabilizing element, replaces the ferrite stabilizing element Si. The nucleation and formation mechanism of the reaction layer was studied in detail by varying the dipping time between 0 and 120 s at 773 °C. The microstructure and phase constitution of the reaction layer were investigated by various observational methods. Phase formation is discussed using a phase diagram calculated by Thermo-CalcTM. Under a 30 s hot-dipping process, no reaction occurred due to the formation of a Fe3O4 layer on the steel surface. The Fe3O4 layer decomposed by a reduction reaction with Al-Mn molten alloy, constituent elements of steel dissolved into a liquid, and the reaction-layer nucleus was formed toward the liquid phase. A coated layer consists of a solidified layer of Al and Al6Mn and a reactive layer formed beneath it. The reaction layer is formed mainly by inter-diffusion of Al and Fe in the solid state, which is arranged on the steel in the order of Al11Mn4 → FeAl3 (θ → Fe2Al5 (η phases, and the Fe3AlC (κ in several nm bands formed at the interface between the η-phase and steel.

  13. Property evaluation of Ni base alloy for superconducting generators and its application to seal welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobuhisa Suzuki; Toshiaki Murakami; Kenichi Suzuki; Satoru Asai; Minorou Tanaka; Yoshio Kobayashi

    1992-01-01

    Property requirements demanded on structural materials for rotors of superconducting generators are quite strict while there are many themes in the technical development of such materials. Components used in the cryogenic temperature are of course required to be nonmagnetic material. Additional requirements demanded on cryogenic structural materials for high response excitation superconducting generators can be summarized as follows: (1) 0.2% yield strength > 800 MPa (RT) (2) Charpy absorbed energy > 25 J (4K) (3) Electrical resistivity > 90 μΩ·cm (4K). As a candidate material which satisfy the above property requirements, we can cite precipitation-hardened Ni base alloys, for example, Inconel 718. However, production of Inconel718 is limited to about 2 tons due to problems related to segregation etc., and therefore fabrication of large-sized ingots for manufacturing generator components may be difficult. Also, there may be problems regarding weldability, especially from the viewpoint of microcracking in the heat affected zone, among strength-supporting parts or the parts requiring functional capability such as seal welded joints. Under such background circumstances, we conducted studies on chemical composition by considering producibility of large-sized ingots and weldability of the alloy as well as property evaluations of materials incorporating such requirements. Further, included in this paper are the application of the alloy to seal welded joints and its unified fatigue strength evaluation method

  14. Weldability and microstructural analysis of nuclear-grade austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    This study evaluated the hot-ductility response, and hot-cracking susceptibility (fusion-zone solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking) of modified nuclear-grade and standard austenitic stainless steels. Extensive microstructural characterization using state-of-the-art analytical electron microscopy (TEM and STEM) as well as SEM (EDAX) and OLM was performed to correlate the material behavior with metallurgical characteristics. In addition, studies of the effect of Si, N, and rare earth elements on hot-cracking susceptibility, significance of the ductility dip phenomena and backfilled solidification cracks were also performed. Furthermore, based on the metallurgical evaluation, the possible mechanisms involved in solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking of the modified alloys are proposed. Finally, the optimized chemical specifications and requirements for nuclear-grade stainless steels are also suggested

  15. A parametric study of surface roughness and bonding mechanisms of aluminum alloys with epoxies: a molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Termaath, Stephanie

    The marine environment is highly aggressive towards most materials. However, aluminium-magnesium alloys (Al-Mg, specifically, 5xxx series) have exceptionally long service life in such aggressive marine environments. For instance, an Al-Mg alloy, AA5083, is extensively used in naval structures because of its good mechanical strength, formability, seawater corrosion resistance and weldability. However, bonding mechanisms of these alloys with epoxies in a rough surface environment are not fully understood yet. It requires a rigorous investigation at molecular or atomic levels. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation to study an adherend surface preparation and surface bonding mechanisms of Al-Mg alloy (AA5083) with different epoxies by developing several computer models. Various distributions of surface roughness are introduced in the models and performed molecular dynamics simulations. Formation of a beta phase (Al3Mg2) , microstructures, bonding energies at the interface, bonding strengths and durability are investigated. Office of Naval Research.

  16. Effect of boron on the properties of ordered Ni-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawancy, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    Ordered alloys and intermetallic compounds have long been known to possess a number of technologically useful properties, however, their structural applications is limited by relatively poor ductility. Efforts to improve the mechanical strength of these materials have led to the recognition that small additions of B improve the ductility of intermetallic compounds, based upon the L1 2 , superlattice such as Ni 3 Al and Ni 3 Si. Also it has been demonstrated that small additions of B improve the ductility of binary ordered Ni-Ni 4 Mo alloys. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that critical additions of B to selected Ni-Mo alloys could significantly improve their ductility and corrosion properties in the ordered state while maintaining a similar level of other properties, particularly, weldability. The effect of B on the ordered microstructure was emphasized

  17. The creep properties of a low alloy ferritic steel containing an intermetallic precipitate dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, A.D.; Murphy, M.C.; Edmonds, D.V.

    1976-01-01

    A good combination of creep rupture ductility and strength together with excellent long term thermal stability, has been obtained from a dispersion of intermetallic Laves phase precipitate in a non-transforming ferritic low alloy steel. The steel is without many of the problems currently associated with the heat affected zone microstructures of low alloy transformable ferritic steels, and can be used as a weld metal. Following suitable development to optimize the composition and heat treatment, such alloys may provide a useful range of weldable creep resistant steels for steam turbine and other high temperature applications. They would offer the unique possibility of easily achievable microstructural uniformity, giving good long term strength and ductility across the entire welded joint

  18. Effect of reversible hydrogen alloying and plastic deformation on microstructure development in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzinova, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen leads to degradation in fracture-related mechanical properties of titanium alloys and is usually considered as a very dangerous element. Numerous studies of hydrogen interaction with titanium alloys showed that hydrogen may be considered not only as an impurity but also as temporary alloying element. This statement is based on the following. Hydrogen stabilizes high-temperature β-phase, leads to decrease in temperature of β→α transformation and extends (α + β )-phase field. The BCC β-phase exhibits lower strength and higher ductility in comparison with HCP α -phase. As a result, hydrogen improves hot workability of hard-to-deform titanium alloys. Hydrogen changes chemical composition of the phases, kinetics of phase transformations, and at low temperatures additional phase transformation (β→α + TiH 2 ) takes place, which is accompanied with noticeable change in volumes of phases. As a result, fine lamellar microstructure may be formed in hydrogenated titanium alloys after heat treatment. It was shown that controlled hydrogen alloying improves weldability and machinability of titanium alloys. After processing hydrogenated titanium preforms are subjected to vacuum annealing, and the hydrogen content decreases up to safe level. Hydrogen removal is accompanied with hydrides dissolution and β→α transformation that makes possible to control structure formation at this final step of treatment. Thus, reversible hydrogen alloying of titanium alloys allows to obtain novel microstructure with enhanced properties. The aim of the work was to study the effect of hydrogen on structure formation, namely: i) influence of hydrogen content on transformation of lamellar microstructure to globular one during deformation in (α+β)-phase field; ii) effect of dissolved hydrogen on dynamic recrystallization in single α- and β- phase regions; iii) influence of vacuum annealing temperature on microstructure development. The work was focused on the optimization of

  19. Properties of super alloys for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izaki, Takashi; Nakai, Yasuo; Shimizu, Shigeki; Murakami, Takashi

    1975-01-01

    The existing data on the properties at high temperature in helium gas of iron base super alloys. Incoloy-800, -802 and -807, nickel base super alloys, Hastelloy-X, Inconel-600, -617 and -625, and a casting alloy HK-40 were collectively evaluated from the viewpoint of the selection of material for HTGRs. These properties include corrosion resistance, strength and toughness, weldability, tube making, formability, radioactivation, etc. Creep strength was specially studied, taking into consideration the data on the creep characteristics in the actual helium gas atmosphere. The necessity of further long run creep data is suggested. Hastelloy-X has completely stable corrosion resistance at high temperature in helium gas. Incoloy 800 and 807 and Inconel 617 are not preferable in view of corrosion resistance. The creep strength of Inconel 617 extraporated to 1,000 deg C for 100,000 hours in air was the greatest rupture strength of 0.6 kg/mm 2 in all above alloys. However, its strength in helium gas began to fall during a relatively short time, so that its creep strength must be re-evaluated in the use for long time. The radioactivation and separation of oxide film in primary construction materials came into question, Inconel 617 and Incoloy 807 showed high induced radioactivity intensity. Generally speaking, in case of nickel base alloys such as Hastelloy-X, oxide film is difficult to break away. (Iwakiri, K.)

  20. Development of advanced low alloy steel for nuclear RPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. C.; Shin, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, B. J. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    Low carbon low alloy steels are used in nuclear power plants as pressure vessel, steam generator, etc. Nuclear pressure vessel material requires good combination of strength/ toughness, good weldability and high resistance to neutron irradiation and corrosion fatigue. For SA508III steels, most widely used in the production of nuclear power plant, attaining toughness is more difficult than strength. When taking into account the loss of toughness due to neutron irradiation, attaining as low transition temperature as possible prior to operation is a critical task in the production of nuclear pressure vessels. In the present study, we investigated detrimental microstructural features of SA508III steels to toughness, then alloy design directions to achieve improved mechanical properties were devised. The next step of alloy design was determined based on phase equilibrium thermodynamics and obtained results. Low carbon low alloy steels having low transition temperatures with enough strength and hardenability were developed. Microstructure and mechanical properties of HAZ of SA508III steels and alloy designed steels were investigated. 22 refs., 147 figs., 38 tabs. (Author)

  1. Identification of ultra-fine Ti-rich precipitates in V-Cr-Ti alloys irradiated below 300 deg. C by using positron CDB technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Matsui, Hideki; Ohkubo, Hideaki; Tang, Zheng; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Hasegawa, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Irradiation-induced Ti-rich precipitates in V-Ti and V-4Cr-4Ti alloys are studied by TEM and positron annihilation methods (positron lifetime, and coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB)). The characteristics of small defect clusters formed in V alloys containing Ti at irradiation temperatures below 300 deg. C have not been identified by TEM techniques. Strong interaction between vacancy and Ti solute atoms for irradiated V alloys containing Ti at irradiation temperatures from 220 to 350 deg. C are observed by positron lifetime measurement. The vacancy-multi Ti solute complexes in V-alloys containing Ti are definitely identified by using CDB measurement. It is suggested that ultra-fine Ti-rich precipitates or Ti segregation at periphery of dislocation loops are formed in V alloys containing Ti at irradiation temperatures below 300 deg. C

  2. Study on Welding Mechanism Based on Modification of Polypropylene for Improving the Laser Transmission Weldability to PA66

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huixia; Jiang, Hairong; Guo, Dehui; Chen, Guochun; Yan, Zhang; Li, Pin; Zhu, Hejun; Chen, Jun; Wang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Polypropylene and PA66 are widely used in our daily life, but they cannot be welded by laser transmission welding (LTW) because of polar differences and poor compatibility. In this paper, grafting modification technology is used to improve the welding performance between polypropylene and PA66. Firstly, the strong reactive and polar maleic-anhydride (MAH) is grafted to polypropylene and infrared spectrometer is used to prove that MAH has been grafted to polypropylene. At the same time, the mechanical and thermal properties of the graft modified polypropylene (TGMPP) are tested. The results prove that the grafting modification has little influence on them. Also, the optical properties of TGMPP are measured. Then, the high welding strength between TGMPP and PA66 is found and the mechanism of the weldability is researched, which shows that there are two reasons for the high welding strength. By observing the micro morphology of the welding zone, one reason found is that the modification of polypropylene can improve the compatibility between polypropylene and PA66 and make them easy to diffuse mutually, which causes many locking structures formed in the welding region. The other reason is that there are chemical reactions between TGMPP and PA66 proved by the X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. PMID:28793484

  3. Weldability and weld performance of a special grade Hastelloy-X modified for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, S.; Mutoh, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of weld defects in the electron beam (EB) welding and the tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding for Hastelloy-XR, a modified version of Hastelloy-X, are clarified through the bead-on-plate test and the Trans-Varestraint test. Based on the results, weldabilities on EB and TIG weldings for Hastelloy-XR are discussed and found to be almost the same as Hastelloy-X. The creep rupture behaviors of the welded joints are evaluated by employing data on creep properties of the base and the weld metals. According to the evaluation, the creep rupture strength of the EB-welded joint may be superior to that of the TIG-welded joint. The corrosion test in helium containing certain impurities is conducted for the weld metals. There is no significant difference of such corrosion characteristics as weight gain, internal oxidation, depleted zone, and so on between the base and the weld metals. Those are superior to Hastelloy-X

  4. Investigation on Nd:YAG laser weldability of zircaloy-4 end cap closure for nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Lee, Chul Yung; Yang, Myung Seung

    2001-01-01

    Various welding processes are now available for end cap closure of nuclear fuel element such as TIG(Tungsten Inert Gas) welding, magnetic resistance welding and laser welding. Even though the resistance and TIG welding processes are widely used for manufacturing commercial fuel elements, they can not be recommended for the remote seal welding of a fuel element at a hot cell facility due to the complexity of electrode alignment, difficulty in the replacement of parts in the remote manner and a large heat input for a thin sheath. Therefore, the Nd:YAG laser system using optical fiber transmission was selected for Zircaloy-4 end cap welding inside hot cell. The laser welding apparatus was developed using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 500 watt average power with optical fiber transmission. The weldability of laser welding was satisfactory with respect to the microstructures and mechanical properties comparing with TIG and resistance welding. The optimum operation processes of laser welding and the optical fiber transmission system for hot cell operation in a remote manner have been developed. The effects of irradiation on the properties of the laser apparatus were also being studied

  5. XHM-1 alloy as a promising structural material for water-cooled fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solonin, M.I.; Alekseev, A.B.; Kazennov, Yu.I.; Khramtsov, V.F.; Kondrat'ev, V.P.; Krasina, T.A.; Rechitsky, V.N.; Stepankov, V.N.; Votinov, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    Experience gained in utilizing austenitic stainless steel components in water-cooled power reactors indicates that the main cause of their failure is the steel's propensity for corrosion cracking. In search of a material immune to this type of corrosion, different types of austenitic steels and chromium-nickel alloys were investigated and tested at VNIINM. This paper presents the results of studying physical and mechanical properties, irradiation and corrosion resistance in a water coolant at <350 C of the alloy XHM-1 as compared with austenitic stainless steels 00Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, 00Cr20Ni25Nb and alloy 00Cr20Ni40Mo5Nb. Analysis of the results shows that, as distinct from the stainless steels studied, the XHM-1 alloy is completely immune to corrosion cracking (CC). Not a single induced damage was encountered within 50 to 350 C in water containing different amounts of chlorides and oxygen under tensile stresses up to the yield strength of the material. One more distinctive feature of the alloy compared to steels is that no change in the strength or total elongation is encountered in the alloy specimens irradiated to 32 dpa at 350 C. The XHM-1 alloy has adequate fabricability and high weldability characteristics. As far as its properties are concerned, the XHM-1 alloy is very promising as a material for water-cooled fusion reactor components. (orig.)

  6. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  7. Corrosion resistance of aluminum-magnesium alloys in glacial acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitseva, L.V.; Romaniv, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Vessels for the storage and conveyance of glacial acetic acid are produced from ADO and AD1 aluminum, which are distinguished by corrosion resistance, weldability and workability in the hot and cold conditions but have low tensile strength. Aluminum-magnesium alloys are stronger materials close in corrosion resistance to technical purity aluminum. An investigation was made of the basic alloying components on the corrosion resistance of these alloys in glacial acetic acid. Both the base metal and the weld joints were tested. With an increase in temperature the corrosion rate of all of the tested materials increases by tens of times. The metals with higher magnesium content show more pitting damage. The relationship of the corrosion resistance of the alloys to magnesium content is confirmed by the similar intensity of failure of the joint metal of all of the investigated alloys and by electrochemical investigations. The data shows that AMg3 alloy is close to technically pure ADO aluminum. However, the susceptibility of even this material to local corrosion eliminates the possibility of the use of aluminum-magnesium alloys as reliable constructional materials in glacial acetic acid

  8. Russian aluminum-lithium alloys for advanced reusable spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charette, Ray O.; Leonard, Bruce G.; Bozich, William F.; Deamer, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Cryotanks that are cost-affordable, robust, fuel-compatible, and lighter weight than current aluminum design are needed to support next-generation launch system performance and operability goals. The Boeing (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-MDA) and NASA's Delta Clipper-Experimental Program (DC-XA) flight demonstrator test bed vehicle provided the opportunity for technology transfer of Russia's extensive experience base with weight-efficient, highly weldable aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys for cryogenic tank usage. As part of NASA's overall reusable launch vehicle (RLV) program to help provide technology and operations data for use in advanced RLVs, MDA contracted with the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS/IMASH) for design, test, and delivery of 1460 Al-Li alloy liquid oxygen (LO 2 ) cryotanks: one for development, one for ground tests, and one for DC-XA flight tests. This paper describes the development of Al-Li 1460 alloy for reusable LO 2 tanks, including alloy composition tailoring, mechanical properties database, forming, welding, chemical milling, dissimilar metal joining, corrosion protection, completed tanks proof, and qualification testing. Mechanical properties of the parent and welded materials exceeded expectations, particularly the fracture toughness, which promise excellent reuse potential. The LO 2 cryotank was successfully demonstrated in DC-XA flight tests

  9. The metal alloys from the XIX century and weathering action in the Mercado do Ver-o-Peso building, northern Brazil: Identification with the usage of laboratory analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palácios, Flávia Olegário; Angélica, Rômulo Simões; Sanjad, Thais Alessandra Bastos Caminha

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of metallic buildings started in Europe after the Industrial Revolution in the 18th century. Metallic constructions became very popular, and started being imported by several countries, due to the facility of constructing or assembling. Belém, a northern Brazilian city, holds a great number of buildings entirely made of iron, including the Ver-o-Peso, a fish market which structures were imported from England by the end of the 19th century. This building represents a unique type of architecture and it's an important part of the city's heritage. However, research so far did not focus on its construction materials. Ver-o-Peso building's metal alloys haven't been thoroughly studied concerning physical, chemical and mineralogical characterizations. This paper aims to identify the types of metal alloys used in the building, and also corrosion products' result from weathering actions. The methods used to characterize the materials were scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Through this research it was possible to identify four types of iron alloys used in the different parts of the building, characterize the paint coats, and determine types of corrosion. The characterization of the materials in the building allows enrolling basis for restoration processes, documenting the types of metal alloy used in architectural heritage from the 19th century, as well as understanding the advances of corrosion. - Highlights: • Ver-o-peso is a heritage building from the 19th century with unidentified alloys. • Alloy and weathering product characterization was done using SEM/EDS and XRD. • Four metal alloy types were described, indicating different types of foundries. • Weathering products showed distinct mineral phases and physical characteristics. • Original paint coats were found among corrosion products

  10. The metal alloys from the XIX century and weathering action in the Mercado do Ver-o-Peso building, northern Brazil: Identification with the usage of laboratory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palácios, Flávia Olegário, E-mail: flavia.op@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Pará, LCM (Laboratório de Caracterização Mineral), Programa de Pós-Graduação em Geologia e Geoquímica (PPGG) (Brazil); Angélica, Rômulo Simões [Universidade Federal do Pará, LCM (Laboratório de Caracterização Mineral), Programa de Pós-Graduação em Geologia e Geoquímica (PPGG) (Brazil); Sanjad, Thais Alessandra Bastos Caminha [Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), LACORE (Laboratório de Restauração, Conservação e Reabilitação), Programa de Pós-Graduação em Arquitetura e Urbanismo - PPGAU (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    The fabrication of metallic buildings started in Europe after the Industrial Revolution in the 18th century. Metallic constructions became very popular, and started being imported by several countries, due to the facility of constructing or assembling. Belém, a northern Brazilian city, holds a great number of buildings entirely made of iron, including the Ver-o-Peso, a fish market which structures were imported from England by the end of the 19th century. This building represents a unique type of architecture and it's an important part of the city's heritage. However, research so far did not focus on its construction materials. Ver-o-Peso building's metal alloys haven't been thoroughly studied concerning physical, chemical and mineralogical characterizations. This paper aims to identify the types of metal alloys used in the building, and also corrosion products' result from weathering actions. The methods used to characterize the materials were scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Through this research it was possible to identify four types of iron alloys used in the different parts of the building, characterize the paint coats, and determine types of corrosion. The characterization of the materials in the building allows enrolling basis for restoration processes, documenting the types of metal alloy used in architectural heritage from the 19th century, as well as understanding the advances of corrosion. - Highlights: • Ver-o-peso is a heritage building from the 19th century with unidentified alloys. • Alloy and weathering product characterization was done using SEM/EDS and XRD. • Four metal alloy types were described, indicating different types of foundries. • Weathering products showed distinct mineral phases and physical characteristics. • Original paint coats were found among corrosion products.

  11. Weld metal grain refinement of aluminium alloy 5083 through controlled additions of Ti and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schempp, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing BAM, Berlin (Germany). Div. ' ' Safety of Joined Components' ' ; Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK, Berlin (Germany). Dept. ' ' Joining and Coating Technology' ' ; Schwenk, Christopher; Cross, Carl Edward [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The refinement of the weld metal grain structure may lead to a significant change in its mechanical properties and in the weldability of the base metal. One possibility to achieve weld metal grain refinement is the inoculation of the weld pool. In this study, it is shown how additions of titanium and boron influence the weld metal grain structure of GTA welds of the aluminium alloy 5083 (Al Mg4.5Mn0.7). For this purpose, inserts consisting of base metal and additions of the master alloy Al Ti5B1 have been cast, deposited in the base metal and fused in a GTA welding process. The increase of the Ti and B content led to a significant decrease of the weld metal mean grain size and to a change in grain shape. The results provide a basis for a more precise definition of the chemical composition of commercial filler wires and rods for aluminium arc welding. (orig.)

  12. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a spring-activated valve intended to measure and...

  13. Contribution to the identification of the processes kinetically limiting of the zirconium alloys oxidation; characterization of the oxide films formed at high temperature by solids electrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermoyal, J.J.

    2000-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of zirconium alloys used for cladding tubes has been extensively studied under several oxidation conditions (temperature, steam, dry air, oxygen...) in order to clarify the mechanism(s) of oxide growth and breakdown. Oxidation rate is generally assumed to be controlled by oxygen diffusion inwards the oxide layer. Nevertheless, several experimental facts, such as acceleration or inhibition of corrosion rate in coupling conditions, suggest that electrochemical processes are involved as a rate determining step. This work is an attempt to shed light about the rate-limiting-mechanism of two zirconium alloys oxidation: Zircaloy-4 (Zy-4) and Zr-Nb(1%)O(0,13%). Impedance spectroscopy characterizations of oxide films formed in high temperature water and studied in gaseous atmosphere clearly show the difference of electrical properties between the two alloys. The in situ electrochemical and thermogravimetric investigations in gaseous medium, and the polarization effects on oxidation and hydridation of Zr alloys in PWRs conditions indicate that oxygen diffusion can be considered as the limiting kinetic step for Zy-4 oxidation. On the contrary, the acceleration of oxide growth on Zr-Nb(1%)O(0,13%) under anodic polarization in PWRs conditions (360 deg C) suggests that either the electronic conductivity in the oxide or an interfacial process at least partially control the oxidation rate. Catalytic effects observed in gaseous medium when noble metals increase the oxygen reduction rate would tend to corroborate the oxidation control of this alloy by an interfacial mechanism. An electrochemical description and a heterogeneous kinetics approach based on a diffusion-interfacial process as rate determining step are then proposed. (author)

  14. 3D printing of high-strength aluminium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John H; Yahata, Brennan D; Hundley, Jacob M; Mayer, Justin A; Schaedler, Tobias A; Pollock, Tresa M

    2017-09-20

    Metal-based additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3D) printing, is a potentially disruptive technology across multiple industries, including the aerospace, biomedical and automotive industries. Building up metal components layer by layer increases design freedom and manufacturing flexibility, thereby enabling complex geometries, increased product customization and shorter time to market, while eliminating traditional economy-of-scale constraints. However, currently only a few alloys, the most relevant being AlSi10Mg, TiAl6V4, CoCr and Inconel 718, can be reliably printed; the vast majority of the more than 5,500 alloys in use today cannot be additively manufactured because the melting and solidification dynamics during the printing process lead to intolerable microstructures with large columnar grains and periodic cracks. Here we demonstrate that these issues can be resolved by introducing nanoparticles of nucleants that control solidification during additive manufacturing. We selected the nucleants on the basis of crystallographic information and assembled them onto 7075 and 6061 series aluminium alloy powders. After functionalization with the nucleants, we found that these high-strength aluminium alloys, which were previously incompatible with additive manufacturing, could be processed successfully using selective laser melting. Crack-free, equiaxed (that is, with grains roughly equal in length, width and height), fine-grained microstructures were achieved, resulting in material strengths comparable to that of wrought material. Our approach to metal-based additive manufacturing is applicable to a wide range of alloys and can be implemented using a range of additive machines. It thus provides a foundation for broad industrial applicability, including where electron-beam melting or directed-energy-deposition techniques are used instead of selective laser melting, and will enable additive manufacturing of other alloy systems, such as non-weldable nickel

  15. 3D printing of high-strength aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John H.; Yahata, Brennan D.; Hundley, Jacob M.; Mayer, Justin A.; Schaedler, Tobias A.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2017-09-01

    Metal-based additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3D) printing, is a potentially disruptive technology across multiple industries, including the aerospace, biomedical and automotive industries. Building up metal components layer by layer increases design freedom and manufacturing flexibility, thereby enabling complex geometries, increased product customization and shorter time to market, while eliminating traditional economy-of-scale constraints. However, currently only a few alloys, the most relevant being AlSi10Mg, TiAl6V4, CoCr and Inconel 718, can be reliably printed; the vast majority of the more than 5,500 alloys in use today cannot be additively manufactured because the melting and solidification dynamics during the printing process lead to intolerable microstructures with large columnar grains and periodic cracks. Here we demonstrate that these issues can be resolved by introducing nanoparticles of nucleants that control solidification during additive manufacturing. We selected the nucleants on the basis of crystallographic information and assembled them onto 7075 and 6061 series aluminium alloy powders. After functionalization with the nucleants, we found that these high-strength aluminium alloys, which were previously incompatible with additive manufacturing, could be processed successfully using selective laser melting. Crack-free, equiaxed (that is, with grains roughly equal in length, width and height), fine-grained microstructures were achieved, resulting in material strengths comparable to that of wrought material. Our approach to metal-based additive manufacturing is applicable to a wide range of alloys and can be implemented using a range of additive machines. It thus provides a foundation for broad industrial applicability, including where electron-beam melting or directed-energy-deposition techniques are used instead of selective laser melting, and will enable additive manufacturing of other alloy systems, such as non-weldable nickel

  16. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    transverse direction were evaluated. Metallographic examinations determined that most of the fusion zone is martensitic with small regions of bainite and ferrite. High microhardness values of the order of 550--600 Hv were noted in most joints, which are attributed to high alloy content of the fusion zone as well as high rates of cooling typical of laser welds. During tensile, fatigue and formability tests, no fractures in the fusion or heat affected zones were observed. Geometric variability evaluations indicated that coatings such as aluminum (in the case of USIBOR) and galvanized zinc (TRIP780) can affect the variability of the weld zone and the surface roughness on the top of the weld. Excessive variability in the form of weld concavity in the weld zones can lead to fractures in the weld region, even though higher hardness can, to some extent, compensate for these surface irregularities. The 2-factor design of experiments further confirmed that coatings adversely affect the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Although thickness differentials alone do not make a significant impact on surface roughness, together with coatings, they can have an adverse effect on roughness. Tensile tests in the direction of rolling as well as in the transverse direction indicate that TRIP780 seems weaker in the direction of rolling when compared to transverse direction while mild steel is stronger in the direction of rolling. Weldability analyses revealed that the typical melting efficiency is on the order of 50--70% for full penetration welding. Formability tests showed that TR/MS joints fractured in a direction parallel to the weld line when tested with the loads perpendicular to the weld line. Tests have also confirmed that weld speed and power have no impact on the outcome of formability results. Overall, this work conclusively proves that high power Yb:YAG lasers can effectively join high strength materials such as DP980, TRIP780, USIBOR, as well as mild steel, for use in tailor

  17. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  18. Influence of the Aluminium Alloy Type on Defects Formation in Friction Stir Lap Welding of Thin Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract The weldability in Friction Stir Lap Welding (FSLW of heat and non-heat treatable aluminium alloys, the AA6082-T6 and the AA5754-H22 aluminium alloys, respectively, are compared. For both alloys, welds were produced in very thin sheets, using the same welding parameters and procedures, and strong differences in welds morphology were found. The strength of the welds was evaluated by performing tensile-shear tests under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. As-welded and heat-treated samples of the AA6082- T6 were tested. It was found that the heat-treatable alloy is more sensitive to defects formation, in lap welding, than the non-heat-treatable alloy. The presence of defects has a strong influence on the monotonic and fatigue behaviour of the welds. In spite of this, for very high-applied stresses, the heat-treatable alloy welds perform better in fatigue than the non-heat-treatable alloy welds.

  19. Influences of pulsed current tungsten inert gas welding parameters on the tensile properties of AA 6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthil Kumar, T.; Balasubramanian, V.; Sanavullah, M.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Medium strength aluminium alloy (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. In any structural application of this alloy consideration its weldability is of utmost importance as welding is largely used for joining of structural components. The preferred welding process of aluminium alloy is frequently tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding due to its comparatively easier applicability and better economy. In the case of single pass TIG welding of thinner section of this alloy, the pulsed current has been found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. The use of pulsed current parameters has been found to improve the mechanical properties of the welds compared to those of continuous current welds of this alloy due to grain refinement occurring in the fusion zone. Many considerations come into the picture and one need to carefully balance various pulse current parameters to arrive at an optimum combination. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of pulsed current TIG welding parameters on tensile properties of AA 6061 aluminium alloy weldments

  20. Identification of Optimum Magnetic Behavior of NanoCrystalline CmFeAl Type Heusler Alloy Powders Using Response Surface Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Y.; Srivastava, S.; Boriwal, L.

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical alloying is a novelistic solid state process that has received considerable attention due to many advantages over other conventional processes. In the present work, Co2FeAl healer alloy powder, prepared successfully from premix basic powders of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe) and Aluminum (Al) in stoichiometric of 60Co-26Fe-14Al (weight %) by novelistic mechano-chemical route. Magnetic properties of mechanically alloyed powders were characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). 2 factor 5 level design matrix was applied to experiment process. Experimental results were used for response surface methodology. Interaction between the input process parameters and the response has been established with the help of regression analysis. Further analysis of variance technique was applied to check the adequacy of developed model and significance of process parameters. Test case study was performed with those parameters, which was not selected for main experimentation but range was same. Response surface methodology, the process parameters must be optimized to obtain improved magnetic properties. Further optimum process parameters were identified using numerical and graphical optimization techniques.

  1. Friction stir welded AM50 and AZ31 Mg alloys: Microstructural evolution and improved corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeman, Yael [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Ben Hamu, Guy [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sami Shamoon College of Engineering, Ashdod 77245 (Israel); Meshi, Louisa, E-mail: Louisa@bgu.ac.il [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2017-04-15

    One of the major drawbacks of Mg alloys is poor weldability, caused by porosity formation during conventional fusion welding processes. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is promising technique in this context since it is a solid state technique. Contradicting results were published in the literature regarding the FSWed Mg alloys joint's properties. Current research was performed in order to investigate the microstructure and corrosion properties of FSWed Mg alloys, studying representatives of two commercial families: wrought AZ31-H24 and die cast AM50. It was found that in both alloys recrystallization occurred during the FSW. In AM50 the mechanism of the recrystallization was continuous, manifested by dislocation rearrangement into sub grain boundaries. In AZ31 discontinuous recrystallization had occurred through grain boundaries migration - twins rotated with respect to the matrix, turning into low angle grain boundaries. Corrosion resistance has improved during the FSW in both alloys to different extents. In the AM50 alloy, the nugget exhibited significantly higher surface potential than the base metal mainly due to the higher Al concentration in the matrix of the nugget, resulting from the dissolution of Al-enrichment and β-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase. In the AZ31 alloy, no change in Al concentration had occurred, and the surface potential measured in the nugget was only slightly higher than in the base metal. These results underline the appropriateness of the FSW for Mg alloys since during the conventional welding deterioration of the corrosion resistance occurs. - Highlights: • Following FSW, AZ31-H24 experienced discontinuous recrystallization. • In AZ31 grain boundaries migration occurred, thus twins rotated. • In die cast AM50 continuous recrystallization occurred during the FSW. • In AM50 - dislocations rearranged into sub grain boundaries. • Corrosion resistance has improved during the FSW in both alloys to different extent.

  2. Friction stir welded AM50 and AZ31 Mg alloys: Microstructural evolution and improved corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeman, Yael; Ben Hamu, Guy; Meshi, Louisa

    2017-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks of Mg alloys is poor weldability, caused by porosity formation during conventional fusion welding processes. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is promising technique in this context since it is a solid state technique. Contradicting results were published in the literature regarding the FSWed Mg alloys joint's properties. Current research was performed in order to investigate the microstructure and corrosion properties of FSWed Mg alloys, studying representatives of two commercial families: wrought AZ31-H24 and die cast AM50. It was found that in both alloys recrystallization occurred during the FSW. In AM50 the mechanism of the recrystallization was continuous, manifested by dislocation rearrangement into sub grain boundaries. In AZ31 discontinuous recrystallization had occurred through grain boundaries migration - twins rotated with respect to the matrix, turning into low angle grain boundaries. Corrosion resistance has improved during the FSW in both alloys to different extents. In the AM50 alloy, the nugget exhibited significantly higher surface potential than the base metal mainly due to the higher Al concentration in the matrix of the nugget, resulting from the dissolution of Al-enrichment and β-Mg 17 Al 12 phase. In the AZ31 alloy, no change in Al concentration had occurred, and the surface potential measured in the nugget was only slightly higher than in the base metal. These results underline the appropriateness of the FSW for Mg alloys since during the conventional welding deterioration of the corrosion resistance occurs. - Highlights: • Following FSW, AZ31-H24 experienced discontinuous recrystallization. • In AZ31 grain boundaries migration occurred, thus twins rotated. • In die cast AM50 continuous recrystallization occurred during the FSW. • In AM50 - dislocations rearranged into sub grain boundaries. • Corrosion resistance has improved during the FSW in both alloys to different extent.

  3. Progress with alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant chromium-based austenitic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.; Eichenhofer, K.W.; Renner, M.

    1996-01-01

    Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new chromium-based corrosion resistant austenitic material with nominally (wt. %) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni, 1.6 Mo, 0.6 Cu, 0.4 N has been introduced to the market in 1995. This paper provides new data on this alloy with respect to mechanical properties, formability, weldability, sensitization characteristics and corrosion behavior. Mechanical properties of weldments including ductility have been established, and match well with those of wrought plate material, without any degradation of ISO V-notch impact toughness in the heat affected zone. When aged up to 8 hours between 600 C and 1,000 C the alloy is not sensitized when tested in boiling azeotropic nitric acid (Huey test). Under field test conditions alloy 33 shows excellent resistance to corrosion in flowing 96--98.5% H 2 SO 4 at 135 C--140 C and flowing 99.1% H 2 SO 4 at 150 C. Alloy 33 has also been tested with some success in 96% H 2 SO 4 with nitrosyl additions at 240 C. In nitric acid alloy 33 is corrosion resistant up to 85% HNO 3 and 75 C or even more. Alloy 33 is also corrosion resistant in 1 mol. HCl at 40 C and in NaOH/NaOCl-solutions. In artificial seawater the pitting potential remains unchanged up to 75 C and is still well above the seawater's redox potential at 95 C. Alloy 33 can be easily manufactured into all product forms required. The new data provided support the multipurpose character of alloy 33 to cope successfully with many requirements of the Chemical Process Industry, the Oil and Gas Industry and the Refinery Industry

  4. Nonswelling alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  5. Nonswelling alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-01-01

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses

  6. Fabrication of welded pipes of the KhN45Yu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyapunov, A.I.; Krichevskij, E.M.; L'vov, V.N.; Kozlov, N.N.; Kireeva, T.S.

    1977-01-01

    A highly heat-resistant KhN45Yu (EP 747) alloy has been developed; the alloy is designed to withstand prolonged service in the temperature range of 1000-1300 deg C, or short-term service at 1300-1400 deg C. The satisfactory ductility and good weldability of the alloy have made it possible to obtain sheets and pipes (32 x 2.0 mm) by argon arc welding. The ductility of pipes from EP 747 alloy exceeds that of pipes from KhN78T (EI 435) alloy by 5.10%, the strength being approximately equal. In regard to strength the welded joint differs little from the base metal. The ductility characteristics up to 900 deg C are also equal, since failure occurs in the base metal. At higher temperatures the welded joint fails in the metal of the weld, and its ductility drops sharply. The grain size of the base metal corresponds to No. 3-4. The welded joint has a cast structure with a grain size larger than No. 1, but its ductility characteristics are satisfactory. This structure ensures an increased long-term strength of the material at 1000-1200 deg C

  7. Modification of anomalous deposition of Zn-Ni alloy by using tin additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Zeyang; O`Keefe, T.J. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

    1997-11-25

    One of the common examples of anomalous deposition in electrolytic processing is the Zn-Ni alloy coating system. These alloys, in the range 10-15% Ni, are also of commercial interest in electrogalvanizing for protecting steel from corrosion while retaining good formability, weldability and paintability. The primary objective of this research was to obtain a better fundamental understanding of anomalous deposition and to identify ways to modify its influence. Specifically, the effects of tin additions on the composition, structure and surface morphology of Zn-Ni alloy deposits from electrolyte containing 80 g l{sup -1} Zn and 10 g l{sup -1} Ni were studied. Previous work had shown that low concentrations (parts per million) of cations such as antimony and arsenic were very effective in countering the anomalous deposition and increasing the relative nickel content of the deposits. Unfortunately, the morphology and current efficiency were adversely affected by use of these additives. It was found that the addition of tin also appreciably increased the nickel content of the alloy deposit, as well as giving smooth, dense deposits with a current efficiency of about 90%. The surface morphology of the deposits was correlated with the amount of tin added. The limited electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests conducted showed that the low concentrations of tin did lower the charge transfer resistance of the reaction. Overall, the results were promising but considerably more research is needed to elucidate the basic factors that influence zinc alloy electrocrystallization mechanisms. (orig.) 27 refs.

  8. Effect of two-step aging on the mechanical properties of AA2219 DC cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgallad, E.M., E-mail: eelgalla@uqac.ca; Zhang, Z.; Chen, X.-G.

    2015-02-11

    With its combination of high specific strength, good machinability and excellent weldability, AA2219 direct chill (DC) cast alloy has become a new category of materials for manufacturing large molds for the plastics and automotive industries. The effect of two-step aging on the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of AA2219 DC cast alloy was investigated. The precipitate microstructure was characterized under different heat treatment conditions using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The poor mechanical properties of the air-quenched alloy were attributed to the presence of quench-induced coarse θ′ and θ precipitates, which had very limited contribution to the precipitation hardening during the aging treatment. The two-step aging treatment of the air-quenched AA2219 alloy involved the precipitation of GP zones in the first step followed by their transformation into fine θ″ strengthening precipitates in the second step, which considerably improved the mechanical properties. After undergoing 120 °C/36 h+190 °C/8 h two-step aging, the hardness, YS and UTS of the air-quenched alloy were increased by 27%, 46% and 15%, respectively, compared with 190 °C/8 h one-step aging.

  9. Effects of heat treatment condition on the mechanical properties and weldability of 10Cr-1Mo-VNbN cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, Dae Young; Bang, Kook Soo; Lee, Kyong Woon; Chi, Byung Ha

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical properties and weldability such as HAZ hardness, cold cracking susceptibility and hot ductility of two differently heat treated 10Cr-1Mo-VNbN cast steels were measured and compared. Because of high hardenability of the cast steel, as-annealed cast steel showed martensitic microstructure and thus had higher hardness than annealed-normalized-tempered cast steel which had tempered martensite. Because the welding electrode used resulted in a high hardness weld metal, both cast steels showed same weld metal cold cracking susceptibility even though the as-annealed cast steel had higher HAZ hardness than the annealed-normalized-tempered cast steel. Both cast steels had excellent hot ductility in high temperature range, indicating no risk of grain boundary liquation cracking in the HAZ. However, the as-annealed cast steel showed an inferior ductility in the intermediate temperature range of 1000∼1150 .deg. C because of larger unrecrystallized grain size

  10. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  11. Processing of Advanced Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, P. D. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Hawk, Jeffrey A. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Cowen, Christopher J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760 C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  12. Synthesis Of NiCrAlC alloys by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.K.; Pereira, J.I.; Vurobi Junior, S.; Cintho, O.M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is the synthesis of nickel alloys (NiCrAlC), which has been proposed like a economic alternative to the Stellite family Co alloys using mechanical alloying, followed by sintering heat treatment of milled material. The NiCrAlC alloys consist of a chromium carbides dispersion in a Ni 3 Al intermetallic matrix, that is easily synthesized by mechanical alloying. The use of mechanical alloying enables higher carbides sizes and distribution control in the matrix during sintering. We are also investigated the compaction of the processed materials by compressibility curves. The milling products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and the end product was featured by conventional metallography and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), that enabled the identification of desired phases, beyond microhardness test, which has been shown comparable to alloys manufactured by fusion after heat treating. (author)

  13. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...... thermoelastic coefficients and age hardenable low expansion alloys....

  14. Influence of Laser Welding Speed on the Morphology and Phases Occurring in Spray-Compacted Hypereutectic Al-Si-Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gietzelt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Normally, the weldability of aluminum alloys is ruled by the temperature range of solidification of an alloy according to its composition by the formation of hot cracks due to thermal shrinkage. However, for materials at nonequilibrium conditions, advantage can be taken by multiple phase formation, leading to an annihilation of temperature stress at the microscopic scale, preventing hot cracks even for alloys with extreme melting range. In this paper, several spray-compacted hypereutectic aluminum alloys were laser welded. Besides different silicon contents, additional alloying elements like copper, iron and nickel were present in some alloys, affecting the microstructure. The microstructure was investigated at the delivery state of spray-compacted material as well as for a wide range of welding speeds ranging from 0.5 to 10 m/min, respectively. The impact of speed on phase composition and morphology was studied at different disequilibrium solidification conditions. At high welding velocity, a close-meshed network of eutectic Al-Si-composition was observed, whereas the matrix is filled with nearly pure aluminum, helping to diminish the thermal stress during accelerated solidification. Primary solidified silicon was found, however, containing considerable amounts of aluminum, which was not expected from phase diagrams obtained at the thermodynamic equilibrium.

  15. Aluminum alloy production for the reinforcement of the CMS conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Sequeira-Lopes-Tavares, S; Campi, D; Curé, B; Horváth, I L; Riboni, P; Sgobba, Stefano; Smith, R P

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. To reinforce the high-purity (99.998%) Al-stabilized conductor of the magnet against the magnetic loadings experienced during operation at 4.2 K, two continuous sections of Al-alloy (AA) reinforcement are Electron Beam (EB) welded to it. The reinforcements have a section of 24*18 mm and are produced in continuous 2.55 km lengths. The alloy EN AW-6082 has been selected for the reinforcement due to its excellent extrudability, high strength in the precipitation hardened states, high toughness and strength at cryogenic temperature and good EB weldability. Each of the continuous lengths of the reinforcement is extruded billet on billet and press quenched on-line from the extrusion temperature in an industrial extrusion plant. In order to insure the ready EB welda...

  16. Alloy SCR-3 resistant to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowaka, Masamichi; Fujikawa, Hisao; Kobayashi, Taiki

    1977-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel is used widely because the corrosion resistance, workability and weldability are excellent, but the main fault is the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in the environment containing chlorides. Inconel 600, most resistant to stress corrosion cracking, is not necessarily safe under some severe condition. In the heat-affected zone of SUS 304 tubes for BWRs, the cases of stress corrosion cracking have occurred. The conventional testing method of stress corrosion cracking using boiling magnesium chloride solution has been problematical because it is widely different from actual environment. The effects of alloying elements on stress corrosion cracking are remarkably different according to the environment. These effects were investigated systematically in high temperature, high pressure water, and as the result, Alloy SCR-3 with excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance was found. The physical constants and the mechanical properties of the SCR-3 are shown. The states of stress corrosion cracking in high temperature, high pressure water containing chlorides and pure water, polythionic acid, sodium phosphate solution and caustic soda of the SCR-3, SUS 304, Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 are compared and reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. Corrosion resistant zirconium alloys prepared by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojeik, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Pure zirconium and zirconium 2.5% niobium were prepared by powder metallurgy. The powders were prepared directly from sponge and consolidated by cold isostatic pressing and sintering. Hot isostatic pressing was also used to obtain full density after sintering. For pure zirconium the effects of particle size, compaction pressure, sintering temperature and purity were investigated. Fully densified zirconium and Zr-2.5%Nb exhibited tensile properties comparable to cast material at room temperature and 300 0 F (149 0 C). Pressed and sintered material having density of 94-99% had slightly lower tensile properties. Corrosion tests were performed in boiling 65% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 70% HNO/sub 3/, 20% HCl and 20% HCl + 500 ppm FeCl/sub 3/ (a known pitting solution). For fully dense material the observed corrosion behavior was nearly equivalent to cast material. A slightly higher rate of attack was observed for samples which were only 94-99% dense. Welding tests were also performed on zirconium and Zr-2.5%Nb alloy. Unlike P/M titanium alloys, these materials had good weldability due to the lower content of volatile impurities in the powder. A slight amount of weld porosity was observed but joint efficiencies were always not 100%, even for 94-99% density samples. Several practical applications of the P/M processed material will be briefly described

  18. Expanding the Availability of Lightweight Aluminum Alloy Armor Plate Procured from Detailed Military Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Kevin; Squillacioti, Richard; Cheeseman, Bryan; Placzankis, Brian; Gallardy, Denver

    For many years, the range of aluminum alloys for armor plate applications obtainable in accordance with detailed military specifications was very limited. However, the development of improved aluminum alloys for aerospace and other applications has provided an opportunity to modernize the Army portfolio for ground vehicle armor applications. While the benefits of offering additional alloy choices to vehicle designers is obvious, the process of creating detailed military specifications for armor plate applications is not trivial. A significant amount of material and testing is required to develop the details required by an armor plate specification. Due to the vast number of material programs that require standardization and with a limited amount of manpower and funds as a result of Standardization Reform in 1995, one typically requires a need statement from a vehicle program office to justify and sponsor the work. This presentation will focus on recent aluminum alloy armor plate specifications that have added capability to vehicle designers' selection of armor materials that offer possible benefits such as lower cost, higher strength, better ballistic and corrosion resistance, improved weldability, etc.

  19. Effect of mechanical treatment on intergranular corrosion of 6064 alloy bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sláma, P.; Nacházel, J.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminium Al-Mg-Si-type alloys (6xxx-series) exhibit good mechanical properties, formability, weldability and good corrosion resistance in various environments. They often find use in automotive industry and other applications. Some alloys, however, particularly those with higher copper levels, show increased susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Intergranular corrosion (IGC) is typically related to the formation of microgalvanic cells between cathodic, more noble phases and depleted (precipitate-free) zones along grain boundaries. It is encountered mainly in AlMgSi alloys containing Cu, where it is thought to be related to the formation Q-phase precipitates (Al4Mg8Si7Cu2) along grain boundaries. The present paper describes the effects of mechanical working (extrusion, drawing and straightening) and artificial aging on intergranular corrosion in rods of the 6064 alloy. The resistance to intergranular corrosion was mapped using corrosion tests according to EN ISO 11846, method B. Corrosion tests showed dependence of corrosion type on mechanical processing of the material. Intergranular, pitting and transgranular corrosion was observed. Artificial ageing influenced mainly the depth of the corrosion.

  20. Studying the Super-cooled Solid Solution Breakdown of V-1341 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Puchkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Deformable alloys of the Al-Mg-Si system are widely used in aviation industry, rocket engineering, shipbuilding, as well as on railway and highway transport. These alloys are characterized by high stamping ability, weld-ability, and machinability with a comparatively high strength and corrosion resistance in a heat-strengthened state. A promising alloy of the Al-Mg-Si system with increased structural strength and manufacturability is on par with foreign analogues in properties is the V-1341 alloy [1, 2].The properties of heat-treatable aluminum alloys strongly depend on the cooling rate of the product during quenching [3-12], which determines the structure and level of residual stresses. Decrease in structural strength, tendency to pitting and inter-crystalline corrosion with slow cooling from the quenching temperature is caused by formation of coarse unequiaxed precipitate, precipitates-free zones, and also by decreasing proportion of inclusions of the strengthening phase [3-12].Thus, the relevant task is to study the effect of isothermal quenching modes on the structure of deformable V-1341 aluminum alloy thermally hardened.The paper studies the impact of isothermal time in quenching on the composition and morphology of breakdown products of the V-1341 alloy solid solution. It is shown that at isothermal time under the solid solution breakdown, at first on the dispersoid surface and then in the solid solution are formed and grow large needle-like crystals of the β'-phase which are structural concentrators of stresses. An increasing isothermal time leads to decreasing solid solution super-saturation by doping elements and vacancies. This leads to a decrease in the fraction of the coherent finely dispersed hardening β '' phase, and also to an increase in the width of the precipitates-free zone.

  1. Analysis of PTA hardfacing with CoCrWC and CoCrMoSi alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Scheid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available CoCrWC alloys are widely used to protect components that operate under wear and high temperature environments. Enhanced performance has been achieved with the CoCrMoSi alloys but processing this alloy system is still a challenge due to the presence of the brittle Laves phase, particularly when welding is involved. This work evaluated Plasma Transferred Arc coatings processed with the Co-based alloy CoMoCrSi - Tribaloy T400, reinforced with Laves phase, comparing its weldability to the CoCrWC - Stellite 6, reinforced with carbides. Coatings were also analyzed regarding the response to temperature exposure at 600°C for 7 days and subsequent effect on microstructure and sliding abrasive wear. Coatings characterization was carried out by light and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers hardness. CoCrWC coatings exhibited a Cobalt solid solution dendritic microstructure and a thin interdendritic region with eutectic carbides, while CoCrMoSi deposits exhibit a large lamellar eutectic region of Laves phase and Cobalt solid solution and a small fraction of primary Laves phase. Although phase stability was observed by X-ray diffraction, coarsening of the microstructure occurred for both alloys. CoCrMoSi showed thicker lamellar Laves phase and CoCrWC coarser eutectic carbides. Coatings stability assessed by wear tests revealed that although the wear rate of the as-deposited CoCrMoSi alloy was lower than that of CoCrWC alloy its increase after temperature exposure was more significant, 22% against 15%. Results were discussed regarding the protection of industrial components in particular, bearings in 55AlZn hot dip galvanizing components.

  2. Experimental research on the ultimate strength of hard aluminium alloy 2017 subjected to short-time radioactive heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dafang, Wu; Yuewu, Wang; Bing, Pan; Meng, Mu; Lin, Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ultimate strength at transient heating is critical to security design of missiles. ► We measure the ultimate strength of alloy 2017 subjected to transient heating. ► Experimental results at transient heating are lacking in strength design handbook. ► Ultimate strength of alloy 2017 experimented is much higher than handbook value. ► The results provide a new method for optimal design of high-speed flight vehicles. -- Abstract: Alloy 2017 (Al–Cu–Mg) is a hard aluminium alloy strengthened by heat treatment. Because of its higher strength, finer weldability and ductility, hard aluminium alloy 2017 has been widely used in the field of aeronautics and astronautics. However, the ultimate strength and other characteristic mechanical parameters of aluminium alloy 2017 in a transient heating environment are still unclear, as these key mechanical parameters are lacking in the existing strength design handbook. The experimental characterisation of these critical parameters of aluminium alloy 2017 is undoubtedly meaningful for reliably estimating life span of and improving safety in designing high-speed flight vehicles. In this paper, the high-temperature ultimate strength, loading time and other mechanical properties of hard aluminium alloy 2017 under different transient heating temperatures and loading conditions are investigated by combining a transient aerodynamic heating simulation system and a material testing machine. The experimental results reveal that the ultimate strength and loading capability of aluminium alloy 2017 subjected to transient thermal heating are much higher than those tested in a long-time stable high-temperature environment. The research of this work not only provides a substantial basis for the loading capability improvement and optimal design of aerospace materials and structures subject to transient heating but also presents a new research direction with a practical application value.

  3. Superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to superconductors having high critical currents. The superconductor described comprises an alloy consisting of a matrix of a Type II superconductor which is a homogeneous mixture of 50 to 95 at.% Pb and 5 to 40 at.%Bi and/or 10 to 50 at.%In. Dispersed in the matrix is a material to provide pinning centres comprising from 0.01% to 20% by volume of the alloy; this material is a stable discontinuous phase of discrete crystalline particles of Cu, Mn, Te, Se, Ni, Ca, Cr, Ce, Ge or La, either in the form of the element or a compound with a component of the matrix. These particles should have an average diameter of not more than 2μ. A method for making this alloy is described. (U.K.)

  4. Radiation enhanced diffusion in FCC alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuele, W.

    1982-01-01

    In many alloys vacancies and interstitials can be identified in a straight forward way by measurements of radiation enhanced diffusion. In some alloys, however, quenching experiments are also necessary for the identification of these defects. Results for two characteristic alloys in which the transformation rate during high energy particle irradiation is determined by an interstitialcy and by a vacancy diffusion mechanism only, are discussed. It is also shown that a decrease of the migration energy of defects due to an interaction of the high energy particles with the lattice atoms must be taken into account in the interpretation of the results. (author)

  5. Silicon Alloying On Aluminium Based Alloy Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanto

    2002-01-01

    Silicon alloying on surface of aluminium based alloy was carried out using electron beam. This is performed in order to enhance tribological properties of the alloy. Silicon is considered most important alloying element in aluminium alloy, particularly for tribological components. Prior to silicon alloying. aluminium substrate were painted with binder and silicon powder and dried in a furnace. Silicon alloying were carried out in a vacuum chamber. The Silicon alloyed materials were assessed using some techniques. The results show that silicon alloying formed a composite metal-non metal system in which silicon particles are dispersed in the alloyed layer. Silicon content in the alloyed layer is about 40% while in other place is only 10.5 %. The hardness of layer changes significantly. The wear properties of the alloying alloys increase. Silicon surface alloying also reduced the coefficient of friction for sliding against a hardened steel counter face, which could otherwise be higher because of the strong adhesion of aluminium to steel. The hardness of the silicon surface alloyed material dropped when it underwent a heating cycle similar to the ion coating process. Hence, silicon alloying is not a suitable choice for use as an intermediate layer for duplex treatment

  6. Weldability Characteristics of Sintered Hot-Forged AISI 4135 Steel Produced through P/M Route by Using Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joby; Muthukumaran, S.; Pandey, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Present investigation is an attempt to study the weldability characteristics of sintered hot-forged plates of AISI 4135 steel produced through powder metallurgy (P/M) route using matching filler materials of ER80S B2. Compacts of homogeneously blended elemental powders corresponding to the above steel were prepared on a universal testing machine (UTM) by taking pre-weighed powder blend with a suitable die, punch and bottom insert assembly. Indigenously developed ceramic coating was applied on the entire surface of the compacts in order to protect them from oxidation during sintering. Sintered preforms were hot forged to flat, approximately rectangular plates, welded by pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) processes with aforementioned filler materials. Microstructural, tensile and hardness evaluations revealed that PCGTAW process with low heat input could produce weldments of good quality with almost nil defects. It was established that PCGTAW joints possess improved tensile properties compared to the base metal and it was mainly attributed to lower heat input, resulting in finer fusion zone grains and higher fusion zone hardness. Thus, the present investigation opens a new and demanding field in research.

  7. First Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the first year efforts towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Significant efforts have been made within the first year of this project including the fabrication of seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well controlled chemistry and microstructure, the microstructural characterization of these alloys using standardized and advanced techniques, mechanical properties testing and evaluation of base alloys, the completion of welding trials and production of weldments for subsequent testing, the design of novel tensile specimen geometry to increase the number of samples that can be irradiated in a single capsule and also shorten the time of their assessment after irradiation, the development of testing procedures for controlled hydrogen ingress studies, and a detailed mechanical and microstructural assessment of weldments prior to irradiation or hydrogen charging. These efforts and research results have shown promise for the FeCrAl alloy class as a new nuclear grade alloy class.

  8. High-power laser and arc welding of thorium-doped iridium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Liu, C.T.

    1980-05-01

    The arc and laser weldabilities of two Ir-0.3% W alloys containing 60 and 200 wt ppM Th have been investigated. The Ir-.03% W alloy containing 200 wt ppM Th is severely prone to hot cracking during gas tungsten-arc welding. Weld metal cracking results from the combined effects of heat-affected zone liquation cracking and solidification cracking. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the fractured surface revealed patches of low-melting eutectic. The cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and thorium content. The alloy has been welded with a continuous-wave high-power CO 2 laser system with beam power ranging from 5 to 10 kW and welding speeds of 8 to 25 mm/s. Successful laser welds without hot cracking have been obtained in this particular alloy. This is attributable to the highly concentrated heat source available in the laser beam and the refinement in fusion zone microstructure obtained during laser welding. Efforts to refine the fusion zone structure during gas tungsten-arc welding of Ir-0.3 % W alloy containing 60 wt ppM Th were partially successful. Here transverse arc oscillation during gas tungsten-arc welding refines the fusion zone structure to a certain extent. However, microstructural analysis of this alloy's laser welds indicates further refinement in the fusion zone microstructure than in that from the gas tungsten-arc process using arc oscillations. The fusion zone structure of the laser weld is a strong function of welding speed

  9. Electron-beam welding of thorium-doped iridium alloy sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Liu, C.T.; Hudson, J.D.

    1979-04-01

    Modified iridium alloys containing 100 ppM Th were found to be very susceptible to hot-cracking during gas tungsten-arc and electron-beam welding. However, the electron-beam welding process showed greater promise of success in welding these alloys, in particular Ir--0.3% W doped with 200 ppM Th and 50 ppM Al. The weldability of this particular alloy was extremely sensitive to the welding parameters, such as beam focus condition and welding speed, and the resulting fusion zone structure. At low speed successful electron-beam welds were made over a narrow range of beam focus conditions. However, at high speeds successful welds can be made over an extended range of focus conditions. The fusion zone grain structure is a strong function of welding speed and focus condition, as well. In the welds that showed hot-cracking, a region of positive segregation of thorium was identified at the fusion boundary. This highly thorium-segregated region seems to act as a potential source for the nucleation of a liquation crack, which later grows as a centerline crack

  10. Friction Stir Welding of three dissimilar aluminium alloy used in aeronautics industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boşneag, A.; Constantin, M. A.; Niţu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an innovative solid-state joining process. This process was, in first time, develop to join the similar aluminum plates but now the technology can be used to weld a large area of materials similar or dissimilar. Taking these into account FSW process, for dissimilar materials are increasingly required, more than traditional arc welding, in industrial environment. More than that FSW is used in aeronautics industry because of very good result and very good weldability between aluminum alloy used at building of airplanes, where the body of airplane are 20% aluminum alloy and this percent can be increaser in future. In this paper is presented an experimental study which includes welding three dissimilar aluminum alloy, with different properties, used in aeronautics industry, this materials are: AA 2024, AA6061 and AA7075. After welding with different parameters, the welding join and welding process will be analyzed considering process temperature, process vertical force, and roughnessof welding seams, visual aspect and microhardness.

  11. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe–Cr–Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G., E-mail: fieldkg@ornl.gov; Gussev, Maxim N., E-mail: gussevmn@ornl.gov; Yamamoto, Yukinori, E-mail: yamamotoy@ornl.gov; Snead, Lance L., E-mail: sneadll@ornl.gov

    2014-11-15

    Ferritic-structured Fe–Cr–Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe–(13–17.5)Cr–(3–4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  12. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe-Cr-Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  13. The use of niobium bearing ferro-alloys in the manufacture of structural steels in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakishev, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the use of niobium as a microalloying element in constructional steels of various types. Niobium causes substantial refinement of grain size and inhibits the process of static recrystallization. It is, therefore, widely used in high strength low-alloy steels subjected to controlled-rolling or thermo-mechanical treatment. The largest strength increases are observed with a niobium content of up to 0.05 percent at which point the impact toughness diminishes slightly. Increased amounts of niobium favorably affect both the impact toughness and the transition temperature. The effectiveness of niobium usage in existing types of construction steels, including HSLA steels intended for the manufacture of weldable large-diameter linepipe for use in Arctic environments is described

  14. Influence of friction stir welding process and tool parameters on strength properties of AA7075-T6 aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajakumar, S.; Muralidharan, C.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    The aircraft aluminium alloys generally present low weldability by traditional fusion welding process. The development of the friction stir welding has provided an alternative improved way of satisfactorily producing aluminium joints, in a faster and reliable manner. In this present work, the influence of process and tool parameters on tensile strength properties of AA7075-T 6 joints produced by friction stir welding was analysed. Square butt joints were fabricated by varying process parameters and tool parameters. Strength properties of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the microstructure, microhardness of weld nugget. From this investigation it is found that the joint fabricated at a tool rotational speed of 1400 rpm, welding speed of 60 mm/min, axial force of 8 kN, using the tool with 15 mm shoulder diameter, 5 mm pin diameter, 45 HRc tool hardness yielded higher strength properties compared to other joints.

  15. Laser Welding of Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joao Pedro de Sousa

    , the first weldability study of superelastic CuAlMn alloy was performed. Superelasticity was preserved after welding. Post-weld laser processing improved the damping capability of the welded joint when compared to both as-welded and base materials, aiming for seismic construction. None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None None

  16. Properties of low content uranium-molybdenum alloys which may be used as nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J.; Decours, J.

    1964-01-01

    Metallurgical properties are given in this report of uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 3 per cent of molybdenum. Since some of these alloys are used in EDF power reactors are given: briefly the operating conditions imposed on nuclear fuels: maximum temperature, temperature gradient and external pressure. In the first part are considered the structural properties of the alloys correlation with the phase transformation kinetics; a description is given of the effects of certain physico-metallurgical factors on the morphology and the crystalline structure of the materials: - solidification conditions and the heredity of the γ structure, - cooling rate at the transformation points, - whether or not the intermediate γ → β transformation is suppressed In the second part we show how a knowledge of the phase transformation processes has made it possible to define the optimum preparation conditions for these materials in the form of fuel tubes intended for the EDF reactors: casting conditions, controlled cooling treatments, weldability. In the third part we study the thermal, stability during the long duration high temperature treatments and the cycles in the two zones of the diagram α + γ; β + γ the effects of the morphology (in particular the two types of α pseudo-grains observed) and of the cooling rate during the transformation point transitions are described. In the fourth part are discussed the mechanical properties: resistance to a tractive force, resistance to creep, resilience. These properties can also be affected by the γ structure heredity and by the cooling rate to which the alloy has been subjected. In conclusion we discuss the reasons which led to the choice of some of these alloys for the first EDF reactors in particular the advantages of their high creep resistance between 450 and 600 deg C for use in the form of tubes subjected to an external pressure. (authors) [fr

  17. Translating VDM to Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausdahl, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    specifications. However, to take advantage of the automated analysis of Alloy, the model-oriented VDM specifications must be translated into a constraint-based Alloy specifications. We describe how a sub- set of VDM can be translated into Alloy and how assertions can be expressed in VDM and checked by the Alloy...

  18. Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    High temperature oxidation resistant iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are candidate alloys for nuclear applications due to their exceptional performance during off-normal conditions such as a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) compared to currently deployed zirconium-based claddings [1]. A series of studies have been completed to determine the weldability of the FeCrAl alloy class and investigate the weldment performance in the as-received (non-irradiated) state [2,3]. These initial studies have shown the general effects of composition and microstructure on the weldability of FeCrAl alloys. Given this, limited details on the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys and their weldments exist. Here, the highest priority candidate FeCrAl alloys and their weldments have been investigated after irradiation to enable a better understanding of FeCrAl alloy weldment performance within a high-intensity neutron field. The alloys examined include C35M (Fe-13%Cr-5% Al) and variants with aluminum (+2%) or titanium carbide (+1%) additions. Two different sub-sized tensile geometries, SS-J type and SS-2E (or SS-mini), were neutron irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor to 1.8-1.9 displacements per atom (dpa) in the temperature range of 195°C to 559°C. Post irradiation examination of the candidate alloys was completed and included uniaxial tensile tests coupled with digital image correlation (DIC), scanning electron microscopy-electron back scattered diffraction analysis (SEM-EBSD), and SEM-based fractography. In addition to weldment testing, non-welded parent material was examined as a direct comparison between welded and non-welded specimen performance. Both welded and non-welded specimens showed a high degree of radiation-induced hardening near irradiation temperatures of 200°C, moderate radiation-induced hardening near temperatures of 360°C, and almost no radiation-induced hardening at elevated temperatures near 550°C. Additionally, low-temperature irradiations showed

  19. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Tie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4 and aging (T6 heat treatment.The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH2 and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7, revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269, and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials.

  20. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  1. Examination of the effect of Sc on 2000 and 7000 series aluminium alloy castings: for improvements in fusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A.F.; Hyde, K.; Costello, F.; Thompson, S.; Birley, S.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that small additions of scandium (Sc) can improve the weldability and mechanical properties of some aluminium aerospace alloys that are normally considered to be 'unweldable'. In order to determine the mechanisms by which these improvements occur, and more rapidly arrive at optimum Sc addition levels, small wedge-shaped castings have been used to simulate the cooling rates found in MIG/TIG welds. Using this technique, a range of Sc addition levels have been made to two typical Al-aerospace alloys, 2024 and 7475. It has been found that when the Sc level exceeds a critical concentration, small Al 3 Sc primary particles form in the melt and act as very efficient grain nucleants, resulting in simulated fusion zone grain sizes as fine as 15 μm. This exceptional level of grain refinement produced an unusual grain structure that exhibited no dendritic, or cellular, substructure and a large increase in strength and ductility of the castings. Sc also produced changes in the alloy's freezing paths, which cannot yet be fully explained, but led to the appearance of the W phase in the 2024 alloy and, in both alloys, an overall reduction in the amount of eutectic formed during solidification. When coupled with the high level of grain refinement, this behaviour could be used to explain the increased strength and ductility of the castings. In 2000 and 7000 series aluminium alloys, it is therefore, anticipated that optimised Sc bearing filler wires will significantly improve the mechanical properties of the weld metal, as well as reducing the tendency for solidification cracking

  2. Evaluation of the Precipitation Behavior in SA508 Gr. 4N Low Alloy Steel Using a Thermodynamic Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Wee, Dang Moon; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang

    2007-01-01

    Low carbon low alloy steels, used as nuclear pressure vessels, steam generators and so on, hold a large portion of materials for nuclear power plants, and they are very important materials since they determine the safety and the life span of nuclear power plants. In addition, they are utilized for a long period under very severe conditions such as a high pressure, high temperature, neutron irradiation and corrosion, so they need a good combination of strength and toughness, a good weldability and an excellent neutron irradiation resistance and so on. SA508 Gr.3 steel shows the upper bainite microstructure, which is a less tough, so the steel is more difficult to obtain good toughness than to have good strength. And then, if a loss of toughness due to a neutron irradiation during service is considered, above all improving the toughness is important when a pressure vessel is fabricated It is known that a higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels could be achieved by increasing the Ni and Cr contents. In this study, we have performed a thermodynamic calculation based on the microstructure of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel which has higher Ni and Cr contents than SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steel. Based on the microstructure/property relations obtained from literature research experimental works on SA508 Gr.4N steels, and by predicting the constitutional changes with alloying elements (such as Mn, Cr) during individual steps of a steel making process a using thermodynamic calculation, fundamental information for an alloy design have been discussed

  3. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e. , no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  4. Thermo-mechanical modelling of high temperature crack growth in electron beam welding of a CuCrZr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisniewski, J.

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this research thesis is to find out which crack initiation criteria can be applied in the case of electron beam welding of CuCrZr alloy components. After a literature survey on the high temperature cracking phenomenon, the author describes its microscopic origins and presents the main high temperature crack growth criteria. He reports metallurgical, thermal and mechanical characterizations of the studied alloy performed by optical, scanning electronic and transmission electronic microscopy, crystallographic analysis, residual stress determination using the hole method, mechanical testing at room and high temperature (from room temperature to 1000 C), determination of solidification route and of thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion measurements. He describes electron beam weldability tests performed on the alloy. As these tests are performed on simple geometry samples, they allow the high temperature crack growth to be observed. These experiments are then modelled using two finite element codes, Castem and Calcosoft. Then, after a presentation of the main hypotheses used in these numerical models, the author applies the high temperature crack growth criteria. Results obtained for theses criteria are then analysed and discussed

  5. Study the microstructure of three and four component phases in Al-Ni-Fe-La alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Kolobylina, Natalia

    2016-12-21

    Aluminium alloys play a key role in modern engineering since they are the most used non-ferrous material. They have been widely used in automotive, aerospace, and construction engineering due to their good corrosion resistance, superior mechanical properties along with good machinability, weldability, and relatively low cost. The progress in practical application has been determined by intensive research and development works on the Al alloys. A new class of Al–REM–TM aluminum alloys (REM indicates rare earth metal and TM is transition metal) was revealed in the end of the last century. These alloys differ from conventional ones by their extraordinary ability to form metal glasses and nanoscale composites in a wide range of compositions. Having low density, these alloys possess unique mechanical characteristics and corrosion resistance. Two as received alloys, namely Al85Ni9Fe2La4 and Al85Ni7Fe4La4 were obtained in the form of ingots from melts of corresponding compositions upon cooling in air were studied by scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructural analyses were performed in a aberration corrected TITAN 80-300 TEM/STEM (FEI, USA) attached with EDX spectrometer with ultrathin window (EDAX, USA). The specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were prepared by an electrochemical or ion etching. It was found that the received alloys exhibits along with fcc Al and Al4La (Al11La3) particles, these alloys contain a ternary phase Al3Ni1 Fe isostructural to the Al3Ni phase and a quaternary phase Al8Fe2 NiLa isostructural to the Al8Fe2Eu phase and monoclinic phase Al9(Fe,Ni)2 isostructural to the Al9Co2. The study by HRSTEM together with a new atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis method demonstrated that Fe and Ni atoms substituted one another in the Al8Fe2–NiLa quaternary compound. Besides, several types of defects were determined: first

  6. WELDABILITY, WELDING METALLURGY, WELDING CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjito Jokosisworo

    2012-01-01

    Sambungan las merupakan bagian penting dari stuktur/bangunan yang dilas, dan kunci dari logam induk yang baik adalah kemampuan las (weld ability). Kemampuan las yang baik dan kemudahan dalam fabrikasi dari suatu logam merupakan pertimbangan dalam memilih suatu logam untuk konstruksi.

  7. Steel weldability. Underbead cold cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F.; Defourny, J.; Bragard, A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of underbead cold cracking has been studied by the implant technique. This approach allows to take into account in a quantitative manner the different factors acting on the cold cracking phenomenon: structure under the weld bead, level of restraint, hydrogen content in the molten metal. The influence of the metallurgical factors depending from the chemical composition of the steel has been examined. It appeared that carbon equivalent is an important factor to explain cold cracking sensitivity but that it is not sufficient to characterize the steel. The results have shown that vanadium may have a deleterious effect on the resistance to cold cracking when the hydrogen content is high and that small silicon additions are beneficient. The influence of the diffusible hydrogen content has been checked and the important action of pre- and postheating has been shown. These treatments allow the hydrogen to escape from the weld before the metal has been damaged. Some inclusions (sulphides) may also decrease the influence of hydrogen. A method based on the implant tests has been proposed which allows to choose and to control safe welding conditions regarding cold cracking

  8. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  9. Controlled Thermal Expansion Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There has always been a need for controlled thermal expansion alloys suitable for mounting optics and detectors in spacecraft applications.  These alloys help...

  10. Synthesis Of NiCrAlC alloys by mechanical alloying; Sintese de ligas NiCrAlC por moagem de alta energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.K.; Pereira, J.I.; Vurobi Junior, S.; Cintho, O.M., E-mail: alissonkws@gmail.co [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present paper is the synthesis of nickel alloys (NiCrAlC), which has been proposed like a economic alternative to the Stellite family Co alloys using mechanical alloying, followed by sintering heat treatment of milled material. The NiCrAlC alloys consist of a chromium carbides dispersion in a Ni{sub 3}Al intermetallic matrix, that is easily synthesized by mechanical alloying. The use of mechanical alloying enables higher carbides sizes and distribution control in the matrix during sintering. We are also investigated the compaction of the processed materials by compressibility curves. The milling products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and the end product was featured by conventional metallography and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), that enabled the identification of desired phases, beyond microhardness test, which has been shown comparable to alloys manufactured by fusion after heat treating. (author)

  11. Electronic structure of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenreich, H.; Schwartz, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    The description of electronic properties of binary substitutional alloys within the single particle approximation is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on a didactic exposition of the equilibrium properties of the transport and magnetic properties of such alloys. Topics covered include: multiple scattering theory; the single band alloy; formal extensions of the theory; the alloy potential; realistic model state densities; the s-d model; and the muffin tin model. 43 figures, 3 tables, 151 references

  12. Changes of structure and properties in the heat-affected zone during the welding of high-strength aluminium alloys. Gefuege- und Eigenschaftsaenderungen in der Waermeeinflusszone beim Schweissen hochfester Aluminiumlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umgeher, A. (Tyrolitschleifmittelwerke Swarovski KG, Schwaz (Austria)); Cerjak, H. (Technische Univ., Graz (Austria))

    High strength aluminium alloys like AlZnMgCu 1.5 are usually classified as 'non-weldable' alloys. If welding technologies such as TIG-plasma keyhole welding are used, it is possible to weld these alloys successfully. However, the heat input during welding affects the base material adjacent to the fusion zone. The main objective of this investigation was to study the change of microstructure and properties in this heat affected zone (HAZ) of high strength aluminium alloys. The base material was a high strength wrought aluminium alloy AlZnMgCu 1.5 (7075) in the T6 condition. The specimens were welded by TIG-plasma keyhole welding. Additionally, Gleeble welding simulation techniques were used. The specimens were investigated in the 'as welded' condition, 'naturally aged', 'artificially aged', and after a complete post weld heat treatment. The microstructure was investigated using light and electron microscopy. Hardness and electric resistivity measurements and DSC-analysis were made. (orig.)

  13. Stable carbides in transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work different techniques were employed for the identification of stable carbides in two sets of transition metal alloys of wide technological application: a set of three high alloy M2 type steels in which W and/or Mo were total or partially replaced by Nb, and a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy. The M2 steel is a high speed steel worldwide used and the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy is the base material for the pressure tubes in the CANDU type nuclear reactors. The stability of carbide was studied in the frame of Goldschmidt's theory of interstitial alloys. The identification of stable carbides in steels was performed by determining their metallic composition with an energy analyzer attached to the scanning electron microscope (SEM). By these means typical carbides of the M2 steel, MC and M 6 C, were found. Moreover, the spatial and size distribution of carbide particles were determined after different heat treatments, and both microstructure and microhardness were correlated with the appearance of the secondary hardening phenomenon. In the Zr-Nb alloy a study of the α and β phases present after different heat treatments was performed with optical and SEM metallographic techniques, with the guide of Abriata and Bolcich phase diagram. The α-β interphase boundaries were characterized as short circuits for diffusion with radiotracer techniques and applying Fisher-Bondy-Martin model. The precipitation of carbides was promoted by heat treatments that produced first the C diffusion into the samples at high temperatures (β phase), and then the precipitation of carbide particles at lower temperature (α phase or (α+β)) two phase field. The precipitated carbides were identified as (Zr, Nb)C 1-x with SEM, electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques. (Author) [es

  14. High strength alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  15. Evaluations of Mo-alloy for light water reactor fuel cladding to enhance accident tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum based alloy is selected as a candidate to enhance tolerance of fuel to severe loss of coolant accidents due to its high melting temperature of ∼2600 °C and ability to maintain sufficient mechanical strength at temperatures exceeding 1200 °C. An outer layer of either a Zr-alloy or Al-containing stainless steel is designed to provide corrosion resistance under normal operation and oxidation resistance in steam exceeding 1000 °C for 24 hours under severe loss of coolant accidents. Due to its higher neutron absorption cross-sections, the Mo-alloy cladding is designed to be less than half the thickness of the current Zr-alloy cladding. A feasibility study has been undertaken to demonstrate (1 fabricability of long, thin wall Mo-alloy tubes, (2 formability of a protective outer coating, (3 weldability of Mo tube to endcaps, (4 corrosion resistance in autoclaves with simulated LWR coolant, (5 oxidation resistance to steam at 1000–1500 °C, and (6 sufficient axial and diametral strength and ductility. High purity Mo as well as Mo + La2O3 ODS alloy have been successfully fabricated into ∼2-meter long tubes for the feasibility study. Preliminary results are encouraging, and hence rodlets with Mo-alloy cladding containing fuel pellets have been under preparation for irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR in Idaho National Laboratory. Additional efforts are underway to enhance the Mo cladding mechanical properties via process optimization. Oxidation tests to temperatures up to 1500 °C, and burst and creep tests up to 1000 °C are also underway. In addition, some Mo disks in close contact with UO2 from a previous irradiation program (to >100 GWd/MTU at the Halden Reactor have been subjected to post-irradiation examination to evaluate the chemical compatibility of Mo with irradiated UO2 and fission products. This paper will provide an update on results from the feasibility study and discuss the attributes of the

  16. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  17. On the Possibility of using Alluminium-Magnesium Alloys with Improved Mechanical Characteristics for Body Elements of Zenit-2S Launch Vehicle Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitalo, V.; Lytvyshko, T.

    2002-01-01

    Yuzhnoye SDO developed several generations of launch vehicles and spacecraft that are characterized by weight perfection, optimal cost, accuracy of output geometrical characteristics, stable strength characteristics, high tightness. The main structural material of launch vehicles are thermally welded non-strengthened aluminium- magnesium alloys. The aluminium-magnesium alloys in the annealed state have insufficiently high strength characteristics. Considerable increase of yield strength of sheets and plates can be reached by cold working but in this case, plasticity reduces. An effective way to improve strength of aluminium-magnesium alloys is their alloying with scandium. The alloying with scandium leads to modification of the structure of ingots (size reduction of cast grain) and formation of supersaturated solid solutions of scandium and aluminium during crystallization. During subsequent heatings (annealing of the ingots, heating for deformation) the solid solution disintegrates with the formation of disperse particles of Al3Sc type, that cause great strengthening of the alloy. High degree of dispersion and density of distribution in the matrix of secondary Al3Sc particles contribute to the considerable increase of the temperature of recrystallization of deformed intermediate products and to the formation of stable non-recrystallized structure. The alloying of alluminium-magnesium alloys with scandium increases their strength and operational characteristics, preserves their technological and corrosion properties, improves weldability. The alloys can be used within the temperature limits ­196-/+150 0C. The experimental structures of propellant tanks made of alluminium-magnesium alloys with scandium have been manufactured and tested. It was ascertained that the propellant tanks have higher margin of safety during loading with internal pressure and higher stability factor of the shrouds during loading with axial compression force which is caused by higher value

  18. Hermetic diamond capsules for biomedical implants enabled by gold active braze alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter, Samantha G; Escudié, Mathilde C; Stacey, Alastair D; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Fox, Kate; Ahnood, Arman; Apollo, Nicholas V; Kua, Dunstan C; Lee, Aaron Z; McGowan, Ceara; Saunders, Alexia L; Burns, Owen; Nayagam, David A X; Williams, Richard A; Garrett, David J; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    As the field of biomedical implants matures the functionality of implants is rapidly increasing. In the field of neural prostheses this is particularly apparent as researchers strive to build devices that interact with highly complex neural systems such as vision, hearing, touch and movement. A retinal implant, for example, is a highly complex device and the surgery, training and rehabilitation requirements involved in deploying such devices are extensive. Ideally, such devices will be implanted only once and will continue to function effectively for the lifetime of the patient. The first and most pivotal factor that determines device longevity is the encapsulation that separates the sensitive electronics of the device from the biological environment. This paper describes the realisation of a free standing device encapsulation made from diamond, the most impervious, long lasting and biochemically inert material known. A process of laser micro-machining and brazing is described detailing the fabrication of hermetic electrical feedthroughs and laser weldable seams using a 96.4% gold active braze alloy, another material renowned for biochemical longevity. Accelerated ageing of the braze alloy, feedthroughs and hermetic capsules yielded no evidence of corrosion and no loss of hermeticity. Samples of the gold braze implanted for 15 weeks, in vivo, caused minimal histopathological reaction and results were comparable to those obtained from medical grade silicone controls. The work described represents a first account of a free standing, fully functional hermetic diamond encapsulation for biomedical implants, enabled by gold active alloy brazing and laser micro-machining. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microstructure Stability During Creep of Friction Stir Welded AA2024-T3 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Michael; Rashkovsky, Tal; Cabibbo, Marcello; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The poor weldability of the AA2024 aluminum alloy limits its use in industrial applications. Because friction stir welding (FSW) is a non-fusion welding process, it seems to be a promising solution for welding this alloy. In the current study, FSW was applied to butt weld AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy plates. Creep tests were conducted at 250 and at 315 °C on both the parent material and the friction stir welded specimens. The microstructures of the welded and non-welded AA2024-T3 specimens before and after the creep tests were studied and compared. A comprehensive transmission electron microscopy study together with a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy study and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis was conducted to investigate the microstructure stability. The parent material seems to contain two kinds of Cu-rich precipitates—coarse precipitates of a few microns each and uniformly dispersed fine nanosized precipitates. Unlike the parent material, the crept specimens were found to contain the two kinds of precipitates mentioned above together with platelet-like precipitates. In addition, extensive decoration of the grain boundaries with precipitates was clearly observed in the crept specimens. Controlled aging experiments for up to 280 h at the relevant temperatures were conducted on both the parent material and the welded specimens in order to isolate the contribution of exposure to high temperatures to the microstructure changes. TEM study showed the development of dislocation networks into a cellular dislocation structure in the case of the parent metal. Changes in the dislocation structure as a function of the creep strain and the FSW process were recorded. A detailed creep data analysis was conducted, taking into account the instability of the microstructure.

  20. Design criteria for rhenium-reduced nickel-based single-crystal alloys. Identification and computer-assisted conversion; Designkriterien fuer rheniumreduzierte Nickelbasis-Einkristalllegierungen. Identifikation und rechnergestuetzte Umsetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goehler, Thomas

    2016-06-17

    In the present work, design criteria and property models for the creep strength optimization of rhenium-free nickel based single crystal Superalloys are investigated. The study focuses on a typical load condition of 1050 C and 150 MPa, which is representative for flight engine applications. Thereby the key aspect is to link chemical composition, manufacturing processes, microstructure formation and mechanistic understanding of dislocation creep through a computational materials engineering approach. Beside the positive effect of rhenium on solid solution hardening, a second mechanism in which rhenium increases high temperature creep strength is identified. It indirectly stabilizes precipitation hardening by reducing the coarsening kinetics of γ'-rafting. Five 1st and 2nd generation technical Superalloys show a comparable microstructure evolution for up to 2 % plastic elongation, while creep times differ by a factor of five. The application of a microstructure sensitive creep model shows that these coarsening processes can activate γ-cutting and thus lead to an increasing creep rate. Based on these calculations a threshold value of φ{sub γ/γ'} > 2,5 at 150 MPa is estimated. This ratio of matrix channel to raft thickness has been proofed for multiple positions by microstructure analysis of interrupted creep tests. The mechanism described previously can be decelerated by the enrichment of the γ-matrix with slow diffusing elements. The same principle also increases the solid solution strength of the γ-matrix. Therefore, the present work delivers an additional mechanistic explanation why creep properties of single phase nickel based alloys can be transferred to two phase technical Superalloys with rafted γ'-structure. Following, the best way to substitute both rhenium fundamental properties, namely a slow diffusion coefficient and a small solubility in g', has been investigated by means of CALPHAD-modeling. Only molybdenum and especially

  1. Hybrid laser-TIG welding, laser beam welding and gas tungsten arc welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Liming; Wang Jifeng; Song Gang

    2004-01-01

    Welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy was carried out using hybrid laser-TIG (LATIG) welding, laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc (TIG) welding. The weldability and microstructure of magnesium AZ31B alloy welded using LATIG, LBW and TIG were investigated by OM and EMPA. The experimental results showed that the welding speed of LATIG was higher than that of TIG, which was caught up with LBW. Besides, the penetration of LATIG doubles that of TIG, and was four times that of LBW. In addition, arc stability was improved in hybrid of laser-TIG welding compared with using the TIG welding alone, especially at high welding speed and under low TIG current. It was found that the heat affect zone of joint was only observed in TIG welding, and the size of grains in it was evidently coarse. In fusion zone, the equiaxed grains exist, whose size was the smallest welded by LBW, and was the largest by TIG welding. It was also found that Mg concentration of the fusion zone was lower than that of the base one by EPMA in three welding processes

  2. Laser beam welding of NiTi-shape memory alloys; Laserstrahl-Schweissen von NiTi-Formgedaechtnislegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, T.

    1996-04-01

    Using a Nd:YAG laser, the weldability of binary nickel-titanium shape memory alloys containing 50.0 and 48.5 at.-% Ti respectively was investigated. By tensile tests within a temperature range of -80 C to +200 C the mechanical properties of the laser welded joints were examined. Changes in the transformation behaviour were detected by calorimetric measurements (DSC method). The stress-strain behaviour was attributed to the microstructure of the welds, revealed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the mechanisms of failure were examined. Joints of the martensitic Ti-rich alloy were brittle, showing an ultimate tensile strength of 600 MPa, corresponding to half of the value of the base material. The reduction in strength was explained by the formation of Ti{sub 2}Ni precipitations along grain boundaries in the weld. Since the welds still exhibited twin deformation, pseudoplastic strains of 7% were achieved. Ultimate strength data showed a very low scatter. Therefore it was possible to use the shape memory effect up to a strain of 6% without failure. After a total elongation to 6% strain, the laser welded joints showed a free recovery with an amnesia of 0.3%. The shape memory effect was shown to be retained in the laser welded joints. 154 refs.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded and laser welded high entropy alloy CrMnFeCoNi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Min-Gu; Kim, Han-Jin; Kang, Minjung; Madakashira, Phaniraj P.; Park, Eun Soo; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Kim, Dong-Ik; Hong, Sung-Tae; Han, Heung Nam

    2018-01-01

    The high entropy alloy CrMnFeCoNi has been shown to have promising structural properties. For a new alloy to be used in a structural application it should be weldable. In the present study, friction stir welding (FSW) and laser welding (LW) techniques were used to butt weld thin plates of CrMnFeCoNi. The microstructure, chemical homogeneity and mechanical behavior of the welds were characterized and compared with the base metal. The tensile stress-strain behavior of the welded specimens were reasonable when compared with that of the base metal. FSW refined the grain size in the weld region by a factor of ˜14 when compared with the base metal. High-angle annular dark field transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed chemical inhomogeneity between dendritic and interdendritic regions in the fusion zone of LW. Large fluctuations in composition (up to 15 at%) did not change the crystal structure in the fusion zone. Hardness measurements were carried out in the weld cross section and discussed in view of the grain size, low angle grain boundaries and twin boundaries in FSW specimens and the dendritic microstructure in LW specimens.

  4. Low activation ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  5. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  6. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  7. High Temperature Analysis of Aluminum-Lithium 2195 Alloy to Aid in the Design of Improved Welding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, George E.; Widener, Christian

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have extraordinary properties. The addition of lithium to an aluminum alloy decreases its density, while making large increases in its strength and hardness. The down side is that they are unstable at higher temperatures, and are subsequently difficult to weld or even manufacture. Martin Marietta, though, developed an aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 that was reported to have exceptional properties and good weldability. Thus, it was chosen as the alloy for the space shuttles super light external tank. Unfortunately, welding 2195 has turned out to be much more of a challenge than anticipated. Thus, research has been undergone in order to understand the mechanisms that are causing the welding problems. Gas reactions have been observed to be detrimental to weld strength. Water vapor has often been identified as having a significant role in these reactions. Nitrogen, however, has also been shown to have a direct correlation to porosity. These reactions were suspected as being complex and responsible for the two main problems of welding 2195. One, the initial welds of 2195 are much weaker than the parent metal. Second, each subsequent welding pass increases the size and number of cracks and porosity, yielding significant reductions in strength. Consequently, the objective of this research was to characterize the high-temperature reactions of 2195 in order to understand the mechanisms for crack growth and the formation of porosity in welds. In order to accomplish that goal, an optical hot-stage microscope, HSM, was used to observe those reactions as they occurred. Surface reactions of 2195 were observed in a variety of environments, such as air, vacuum, nitrogen and helium. For comparison, some samples of Al-2219 were also observed. Some of the reacted surfaces were then analyzed on a scanning electron microscope, SEM. Additionally, a gas chromatograph was used to analyze the gaseous products of the high temperature reactions.

  8. Effects of Process Conditions on the Mechanical Behavior of Aluminium Wrought Alloy EN AW-2219 (AlCu6Mn Additively Manufactured by Laser Beam Melting in Powder Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cornelius Hermann Karg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing is especially suitable for complex-shaped 3D parts with integrated and optimized functionality realized by filigree geometries. Such designs benefit from low safety factors in mechanical layout. This demands ductile materials that reduce stress peaks by predictable plastic deformation instead of failure. Al–Cu wrought alloys are established materials meeting this requirement. Additionally, they provide high specific strengths. As the designation “Wrought Alloys” implies, they are intended for manufacturing by hot or cold working. When cast or welded, they are prone to solidification cracks. Al–Si fillers can alleviate this, but impair ductility. Being closely related to welding, Laser Beam Melting in Powder Bed (LBM of Al–Cu wrought alloys like EN AW-2219 can be considered challenging. In LBM of aluminium alloys, only easily-weldable Al–Si casting alloys have succeeded commercially today. This article discusses the influences of boundary conditions during LBM of EN AW-2219 on sample porosity and tensile test results, supported by metallographic microsections and fractography. Load direction was varied relative to LBM build-up direction. T6 heat treatment was applied to half of the samples. Pronounced anisotropy was observed. Remarkably, elongation at break of T6 specimens loaded along the build-up direction exceeded the values from literature for conventionally manufactured EN AW-2219 by a factor of two.

  9. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM) alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable high-strength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO 2 laser . This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloy, over the last years. (Author) 16 refs

  10. Etude expérimentale du soudage par laser YAG de l'alliage base nickel Hastelloy X Experimental study of YAG laser welding of nickel base alloy Hastelloy X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graneix Jérémie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Le procédé de soudage laser YAG est envisagé pour remplacer le procédé de soudage TIG manuel pour la réalisation de pièces de turboréacteur en alliage nickel-chrome-molybdène Hastelloy X. Cette étude expérimentale a permis de définir un domaine de soudabilité de cet alliage répondant aux critères spécifiques du secteur aéronautique. The YAG laser welding process is contemplated to replace the manual TIG welding process for the production of parts of turbojet in Hastelloy X. This experimental study has identified the field of weldability of this alloy to meet the specific requirements of the aerospace industry.

  11. Development of Metallic Sensory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Horne, Michael R.; Messick, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are inherently limited by the physical response of the structural material being inspected and are therefore not generally effective at the identification of small discontinuities, making the detection of incipient damage extremely difficult. One innovative solution to this problem is to enhance or complement the NDE signature of structural materials to dramatically improve the ability of existing NDE tools to detect damage. To address this need, a multifunctional metallic material has been developed that can be used in structural applications. The material is processed to contain second phase sensory particles that significantly improve the NDE response, enhancing the ability of conventional NDE techniques to detect incipient damage both during and after flight. Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys (FSMAs) are an ideal material for these sensory particles as they undergo a uniform and repeatable change in both magnetic properties and crystallographic structure (martensitic transformation) when subjected to strain and/or temperature changes which can be detected using conventional NDE techniques. In this study, the use of a ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) as the sensory particles was investigated.

  12. Metallurgical/Alloy Optimization of High Strength and Wear Resistant Structural Quench and Tempered Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalheim, Douglas G.; Peimao, Fu; Linhao, Gu; Yongqing, Zhang

    Structural steels with yield strength requirements greater or equal to 690 MPa can be produced through controlled recrystallization hot rolling coupled with precipitation strengthening or purposeful heat treatment through quench and tempering (Q&T). High strength structural steel and wear/abrasion resistant requirements greater or equal to 360 Brinell hardness (BHN) are produced by the development of microstructures of tempered lower bainite and/or martensite through the Q&T process. While these Q&T microstructures can produce very high strengths and hardness levels making them ideal for 690 MPa plus yield strength or wear/abrasion resistant applications, they lack toughness/ductility and hence are very brittle and prone to cracking. While tempering the microstructures helps in improving the toughness/ductility and reducing the brittleness, strength and hardness can be sacrificed. In addition, these steels typically consist of alloy designs containing boron with carbon equivalents (CE) greater than 0.50 to achieve the desired microstructures. The higher CE has a negative influence on weldability.

  13. Tungsten alloy research at the US Army Materials Technology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowding, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that recent research into tungsten heavy alloys at the U. S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL) has explored many areas of processing and process development. The recrystallization and respheroidization of tungsten grains in a heavily cold worked heavy alloy has been examined and resulted in the identification of a method of grain refinement. Another area of investigation has been lightly cold worked. It was determined that it was possible to increase the strength and hardness of the tungsten grains by proper hat treatment. MTL has been involved in the Army's small business innovative research (SBIR) program and several programs have been funded. Included among these are a method of coating the tungsten powders with the alloying elements and the development of techniques of powder injection molding of heavy alloys

  14. Fundamental corrosion characterization of high-strength titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, R.W.; Grauman, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Many commercially available and several developmental high-strength titanium alloys were evaluated for application in chloride-containing environments with respect to general, crevice, and stress corrosion resistance. Studies in boiling reducing and oxidizing acid chloride media permitted identification of certain high-strength titanium alloys, containing ≥4 weight % molybdenum, which are significantly more resistant than unalloyed titanium with respect to general and crevice attack. Data regression analysis suggests that molybdenum and vanadium impart a significant positive effect on alloy corrosion resistance under reducing acid chloride conditions, whereas aluminum is detrimental. Little effect of metallurgical condition (that is, annealed versus aged) on corrosion behavior of the higher molybdenum-containing alloys was noted. No obvious susceptibility to chloride and sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was detected utilizing U-bend specimens at 177 0 C

  15. Microstructural-Scale Model for Surfaces Spreading of Intergranular Corrosion in Sensitized Stainless Steels and Aluminum-Magnesium (AA5XXX) Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati

    Components from AA5XXX (Al-Mg alloys with more than 3 wt% Mg) alloys are X attractive due to availability of low cost, high strength to weight ratio and good weldability. Therefore, these alloys have potential applications in Naval ships. However, these alloys become susceptible to IGC (intergranular corrosion) due to beta-phase precipitation due to improper heat treatment or inadvertent thermal exposure. Stainless steels may also become susceptible due to carbide precipitation and chromium depletion on grain boundaries. IGC susceptibility depends on the interplay between the metallurgical conditions, electrochemical conditions, and chemical conditions. Specific combinations cause IGC while others do not. The objective of this study is to investigate the conditions which bring about surface spreading of IGC in these alloy classes. To accomplish this goal, a microstructure scale model was developed with experimental inputs to understand the 2-D IGC spreading in stainless steels and AA5XXX alloys. The conditions strongly affecting IGC spreading were elucidated. Upon natural and artificial aging, the stainless steels become susceptible to intergranular corrosion because of chromium depletion in the grain boundaries. After aging Al-Mg (AA5XXX) alloys show susceptibility due to the precipitation of the beta-phase (Al3Mg7) in the grain boundaries. Chromium depleted grain boundaries in stainless steels are anodically more active as compared to the interior of the grains. (3-phase rich grain boundaries have lower OCP (open circuit potential) and pitting potentials as compared to the Al-Mg solid solutions. A new approach to modeling the IGC surface spreading in polycrystalline materials that is presented. This model is the first to couple several factors into one granular scale model that illustrates the way in which they interact and IGC occurs. It sheds new information on conditions which cause IGC spreading in two alloy classes and describes a new theory for the critical

  16. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  17. Shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA), when deformed, have the ability of returning, in certain circumstances, to their initial shape. Deformations related to this phenomenon are for polycrystals 1-8% and up to 15% for monocrystals. The deformation energy is in the range of 10 6 - 10 7 J/m 3 . The deformation is caused by martensitic transformation in the material. Shape memory alloys exhibit one directional or two directional shape memory effect as well as pseudoelastic effect. Shape change is activated by temperature change, which limits working frequency of SMA to 10 2 Hz. Other group of alloys exhibit magnetic shape memory effect. In these alloys martensitic transformation is triggered by magnetic field, thus their working frequency can be higher. Composites containing shape memory alloys can also be used as shape memory materials (applied in vibration damping devices). Another group of composite materials is called heterostructures, in which SMA alloys are incorporated in a form of thin layers The heterostructures can be used as microactuators in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Basic SMA comprise: Ni-Ti, Cu (Cu-Zn,Cu-Al, Cu-Sn) and Fe (Fe-Mn, Fe-Cr-Ni) alloys. Shape memory alloys find applications in such areas: automatics, safety and medical devices and many domestic appliances. Currently the most important appears to be research on magnetic shape memory materials and high temperature SMA. Vital from application point of view are composite materials especially those containing several intelligent materials. (author)

  18. Thermofluency in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco M, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented about the theoretical and experimental results obtained at present in thermofluency under radiation in zirconium alloys. The phenomenon of thermofluency is presented in a general form, underlining the thermofluency at high temperature because this phenomenon is similar to the thermofluency under radiation, which ocurrs in zirconium alloys into the operating reactor. (author)

  19. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  20. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  1. Neutron-absorbing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoi, K.I.; Arabei, L.B.; Gryaznov, G.M.; Levi, L.I.; Lunin, G.L.; Kozhukhov, V.M.; Markov, J.M.; Fedotov, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for the production of an alloy consiting of 1 to 20% In, 0.5 to 15% Sm, and from 3 to 18% Hf, the balance being Ni. Such alloys show a good absorption capacity for thermal and intermediate neutrons, good neutron capture efficiency, and good corrosion resistance, and find application in nuclear reactor automatic control and safety systems. The Hf provides for the maintenance of a reasonably high order of neutron capture efficiency throughout the lifetime of a reactor. The alloys are formed in a vacuum furnace operating with an inert gas atmosphere at 280 to 300 mm.Hg. They have a corrosion resistance from 3 to 3.5 times that of the Ag-based alloys commonly employed, and a neutron capture efficiency about twice that of the Ag alloys. Castability and structural strength are good. (U.K.)

  2. Alloying principles for magnesium base heat resisting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drits, M.E.; Rokhlin, L.L.; Oreshkina, A.A.; Nikitina, N.I.

    1982-01-01

    Some binary systems of magnesium-base alloys in which solid solutions are formed, are considered for prospecting heat resistant alloys. It is shown that elements having essential solubility in solid magnesium strongly decreasing with temperature should be used for alloying maqnesium base alloys with high strength properties at increased temperatures. The strengthening phases in these alloys should comprise essential quantity of magnesium and be rather refractory

  3. Physical metallurgy of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Researches in electric, magnetic, thermophysical properties of titanium alloys in the wide range of temperatures (from helium upto elevated one), as well as stability of phases in alloys of different types are generalized. Fundamental description of physical properties of binary model alloys is given. Acoustic emission, shape memory and Bauschinger effects, pseudoelasticity, aging and other aspects of physical metallurgy of titanium alloys are considered

  4. Technetium and technetium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijdo, W.L.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results of a literature survey on technetium and technetium alloys. The literature has been searched through 1993. The survey was focused on technetium and (binary cubic) technetium alloys, but other important information on technetium has not been omitted from this survey. This report has been written with the aim to collect more information about phase systems which could be of importance in the transmutation process by neutrons of technetium. With the information presented in this report, it should be possible to select a suitable technetium alloy for further investigation regarding to the transmutation process. (orig.)

  5. Joining of Dissimilar alloy Sheets (Al 6063&AISI 304 during Resistance Spot Welding Process: A Feasibility Study for Automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Sreenivasulu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Present design trends in automotive manufacture have shifted emphasis to alternative lightweight materials in order to achieve higher fuel efficiency and to bring down vehicle emission. Although some other joining techniques are more and more being used, spot welding still remains the primary joining method in automobile manufacturing so far. Spot welds for automotive applications should have a sufficiently large diameter, so that nugget pullout mode is the dominant failure mode. Interfacial mode is unacceptable due to its low load carrying and energy absorption capability. Strength tests with different static loading were performed in, to reveal the failure mechanisms for the lap-shear geometry and the cross-tension geometry. Based on the literature survey performed, venture into this work was amply motivated by the fact that a little research work has been conducted to joining of dissimilar materials like non ferrous to ferrous. Most of the research works concentrated on joining of different materials like steel to steel or aluminium alloy to aluminium alloy by resistance spot welding. In this work, an experimental study on the resistance spot weldability of aluminium alloy (Al 6063 and austenitic stainless steel (AISI304 sheets, which are lap joined by using a pedestal type resistance spot welding machine. Welding was conducted using a 45-deg truncated cone copper electrode with 10-mm face diameter. The weld nugget diameter, force estimation under lap shear test and T – peel test were investigated using digital type tensometer attached with capacitive displacement transducer (Mikrotech, Bangalore, Model: METM2000ER1. The results shows that joining of Al 6063 and AISI 304 thin sheets by RSW method are feasible for automotive structural joints where the loads are below 1000N act on them, it is observed that by increasing the spots per unit length, then the joint with standing strength to oppose failure is also increased linearly incase of

  6. Positrons in amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Pierre.

    1981-07-01

    Positron annihilation techniques give interesting informations about ''empty spaces'' in amorphous alloys. The results of an extensive research work on the properties of either pre-existing or irradiation induced ''empty spaces'' in four amorphous alloys are presented. The pre-existing empty spaces appear to be small vacancy-like defects. The irradiation induced defects are ''close pairs'' with widely distributed configurations. There is a strong interaction between vacancy like and interstitial like components. A model is proposed, which explains the radiation resistance mechanism of the amorphous alloys. An extensive joint research work to study four amorphous alloys, Fe 80 B 20 ,Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 , Cu 50 Ti 50 , Pd 80 Si 20 , is summarized

  7. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  8. Characteristics of mechanical alloying of Zn-Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.H.; Hong Kong Polytechnic; Perez Hernandez, A.; Lee, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Three pure elemental powder mixtures of Zn-22%Al-18%Cu, Zn-5%Al-11%Cu, and Zn-27%Al-3%Cu (in wt.%) were mechanically alloyed by steel-ball milling processing. The mechanical alloying characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. It was explored that mechanical alloying started with the formation of phases from pure elemental powders, and this was followed by mechanical milling-induced phase transformation. During mechanical alloying, phases stable at the higher temperatures formed at the near room temperature of milling. Nano-structure Zn-Al-based alloys were produced by mechanical alloying. (orig.)

  9. Effect of alloying elements on σ phase formation in Fe-Cr-Mn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Yoshimitsu; Miyahara, Kazuya; Hosoi, Yuzo; Tanino, Mitsuru; Komatsu, Hazime.

    1989-01-01

    Alloys of Fe-(8∼12%) Cr-(5∼30%) Mn were solution-treated at 1373 K for 3.6 ks, followed by cold-working of 50% reduction. Both solution-treated and 50% cold-worked materials were aged in the temperature range from 773 to 973 K for 3.6 x 10 3 ks. The identification of σ phase formation was made by using X-ray diffraction from the electrolytically extracted residues of the aged specimens. The region of σ phase formation determined by the present work is wider than that on the phase diagram already reported. It is to be noted that Mn promotes markedly the σ phase formation, and that three different types of σ phase formation are observed depending on Mn content: α→γ + α→γ + α + σ in 10% Mn, α→γ + σ in 15 to 20% Mn alloys, α→χ(Chi) →χ + σ + γ in 25 to 30% Mn alloys. An average electron concentration (e/a) in the σ phase was estimated by quantitative analysis of alloying elements using EPMA. The e/a value in the σ phase formed in Fe-(12∼16%) Cr-Mn alloys aged at 873 K for 3.6 x 10 3 ks is about 7.3, which is independent of Mn content. In order to prevent σ phase formation in Fe-12% Cr-15% Mn alloy, the value of Ni * eq of 11 (Ni * eq = Ni + 30(C) + 25(N)) is required. (author)

  10. Refractory alloy component fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this report is to describe joining procedures, primarily welding techniques, which were developed to construct reliable refractory alloy components and systems for advanced space power systems. Two systems, the Nb-1Zr Brayton Cycle Heat Receiver and the T-111 Alloy Potassium Boiler Development Program, are used to illustrate typical systems and components. Particular emphasis is given to specific problems which were eliminated during the development efforts. Finally, some thoughts on application of more recent joining technology are presented. 78 figures

  11. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  12. Electroplating technologies of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Seung Ho; Jeong, Hyun Kyu; Hwnag, Sung Sik; Seo, Yong Chil; Kim, Dong Jin; Seo, Moo Hong

    2001-12-01

    In localization of electrosleeving technique, there are some problems like the following articles. Firstly, Patents published by OHT have claimed Ni-P, Ni-B alloy plating and Mo, Mn Cr, W, Co as a pinning agent. Secondly, alloy platings have many restrictions. There are some method to get alloy plating in spite of the various restrictions. If current density increase above limiting current density in one of the metals, both of the metals discharge at the same time. The addition of surface active agent(sufactant) in the plating solution is one of the methods to get alloy plating. Alloy plating using pulse current easily controls chemical composition and structure of deposit. Ni-Fe alloy plating is known to exhibit anomalous type of plating behavior in which deposition of the less noble metal is favoured. Presence of hypophohphite ion can control the iron codeposition by changing the deposition mechanism. Hypophohphite suppresses the deposition of Fe and also promotes Ni. Composite plating will be considered to improve the strength at the high temperature. Addition of particle size of 10δ400μm makes residual stress compressive in plate layer and suppress the grain growth rate at the high temperature. Addition of particle makes suface roughness high and fracture stress low at high temperature. But, selection of the kinds of particle and control of additives amount overcome the problems above

  13. Identification for the optimal working parameters of Ti-6Al-4V-0.1Ru alloy in a wide deformation condition range by processing maps based on DMM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yu-feng; Long, Shuai; Zhou, Yu-ting; Zhao, Jia; Wang, Tian-yu; Zhou, Jie, E-mail: kkyttyls@vip.qq.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Chongqing University (China)

    2016-11-15

    The hot deformation behaviours of Ti-6Al-4V-0.1Ru alloy were investigated by isothermal hot compression tests in the temperature range of 1023-1423 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s{sup -1}. The β transus was determined to be 1198 K by continuous heating method. The values of deformation activation energy Q at the strain of 0.3 were calculated to be 630.01 kJ/mol in dual-phase field and 331.75 kJ/mol in β-phase field. Moreover, the processing maps at the strain of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 were developed based on dynamic materials model (DMM). To deeply understand the microstructure evolution mechanism during hot deformation processes and to verify the processing maps, the microstructures at different deformation conditions were observed. The stable microstructures (i.e. globularization, dynamic recovery (DRV) and β dynamic recrystallization (β-DRX)) and instable microstructures (i.e. lamellae kinking and flow localization) were obtained. To make it useful in the design of industrial hot working schedules for this material, a microstructural mechanism map was constructed on the basis of processing maps and microstructure observation. Deformation conditions in the vicinity of 1150 K & 0.01 s{sup -1} where globularization occurs and in the vicinity of 1323 K & 0.01 s{sup -1} where β-DRX occurs are recommended. (author)

  14. Welding Residual Stress Analysis and Fatigue Strength Assessment at Elevated Temperature for Multi-pass Dissimilar Material Weld Between Alloy 617 and P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhwa; Hwang, Jeongho; Bae, Dongho

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, welding residual stress analysis and fatigue strength assessment were performed at elevated temperature for multi-pass dissimilar material weld between Alloy 617 and P92 steel, which are used in thermal power plant. Multi-pass welding between Alloy 617 and P92 steel was performed under optimized welding condition determined from repeated pre-test welding. In particular, for improving dissimilar material weld-ability, the buttering welding technique was applied on the P92 steel side before multi-pass welding. Welding residual stress distribution at the dissimilar material weld joint was numerically analyzed by using the finite element method, and compared with experimental results which were obtained by the hole-drilling method. Additionally, fatigue strength of dissimilar material weld joint was assessed at the room temperature (R.T), 300, 500, and 700 °C. In finite element analysis results, numerical peak values; longitudinal (410 MPa), transverse (345 MPa) were higher than those of experiments; longitudinal (298 MPa), transverse (245 MPa). There are quantitatively big differences between numerical and experimental results, due to some assumption about the thermal conductivity, specific heat, effects of enforced convection of the molten pool, dilution, and volume change during phase transformation caused by actual shield gas. The low fatigue limit at R.T, 300 °C, 500 °C and 700 °C was assessed to be 368, 276, 173 and 137 MPa respectively.

  15. Vacuum brazing of aluminium metal matrix composite (55 vol.% SiC{sub p}/A356) using aluminium-based filler alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Jitai, E-mail: niujitai@163.com [Harbin Institute of Technology (China); Zhengzhou University (China); Luo, Xiangwei; Tian, Hao [Zhengzhou University (China); Brnic, Josip [University of Rijka (Croatia)

    2012-11-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proper filler metal has been developed, especially for contents of Mg and Si. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pressure device has been designed for specimen in vacuum brazing process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The accurate measurement method for shear strength of lap joint has been found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The brazing temperature of 560 Degree-Sign C has been optimised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The micro-mechanism has been discussed for SiC{sub p}/Al composites' brazing joint. - Abstract: Aluminium matrix composites with high volume fractions of SiC particles, as the reinforcements, are potentially suitable materials for electronic packaging. These composites, due to their poor weldability, however, have very limited applications. The microstructure and shear strengths of the bonds made in 55 vol.% SiC{sub p}/A356 composite, using an aluminium based filler alloy containing Cu, Si, Mg and Ni, were investigated in this paper. The brazing temperature had a clear effect on the bond integrity, and the samples brazed at 560 Degree-Sign C demonstrated good bonding between the filler alloy and the SiC particles. The maximum shear strength achieved in this work was 102 MPa.

  16. Welding Residual Stress Analysis and Fatigue Strength Assessment at Elevated Temperature for Multi-pass Dissimilar Material Weld Between Alloy 617 and P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhwa; Hwang, Jeongho; Bae, Dongho

    2018-07-01

    In this paper, welding residual stress analysis and fatigue strength assessment were performed at elevated temperature for multi-pass dissimilar material weld between Alloy 617 and P92 steel, which are used in thermal power plant. Multi-pass welding between Alloy 617 and P92 steel was performed under optimized welding condition determined from repeated pre-test welding. In particular, for improving dissimilar material weld-ability, the buttering welding technique was applied on the P92 steel side before multi-pass welding. Welding residual stress distribution at the dissimilar material weld joint was numerically analyzed by using the finite element method, and compared with experimental results which were obtained by the hole-drilling method. Additionally, fatigue strength of dissimilar material weld joint was assessed at the room temperature (R.T), 300, 500, and 700 °C. In finite element analysis results, numerical peak values; longitudinal (410 MPa), transverse (345 MPa) were higher than those of experiments; longitudinal (298 MPa), transverse (245 MPa). There are quantitatively big differences between numerical and experimental results, due to some assumption about the thermal conductivity, specific heat, effects of enforced convection of the molten pool, dilution, and volume change during phase transformation caused by actual shield gas. The low fatigue limit at R.T, 300 °C, 500 °C and 700 °C was assessed to be 368, 276, 173 and 137 MPa respectively.

  17. The Study of Heat Treatment Effects on Chromium Carbide Precipitation of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb Alloy for Repairing Furnace Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakarin Srisuwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a specific kind of failure in ethylene pyrolysis furnace tubes. It considers the case in which the tubes made of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb high temperature alloy failed to carburization, causing creep damage. The investigation found that used tubes became difficult to weld repair due to internal carburized layers of the tube. The microstructure and geochemical component of crystallized carbide at grain boundary of tube specimens were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM with back-scattered electrons mode (BSE, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Micro-hardness tests was performed to determine the hardness of the matrix and the compounds of new and used tube material. The testing result indicated that used tubes exhibited a higher hardness and higher degree of carburization compared to those of new tubes. The microstructure of used tubes also revealed coarse chromium carbide precipitation and a continuous carbide lattice at austenite grain boundaries. However, thermal heat treatment applied for developing tube weld repair could result in dissolving or breaking up chromium carbide with a decrease in hardness value. This procedure is recommended to improve the weldability of the 35Cr-45Ni-Nb used tubes alloy.

  18. An improved billet on billet extrusion process of continuous aluminium alloy shapes for cryogenic applications in the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, S S

    2003-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments being designed in the framework of the Large Hadron Collider accelerator at CERN. CMS will contain the largest and the most powerful superconducting solenoid magnet ever built in terms of stored energy. It will work at 4.2 K, will have a magnetic length of 12.5 m, with a free bore of 6m and will be manufactured as a layered and modular structure of NbTi cables embedded in a high purity (99.998%) Al- stabiliser. Each layer consists of a wound continuous length of 2.55 km. In order to withstand the high electromagnetic forces, two external aluminium alloy reinforcing sections are foreseen. These reinforcements, of 24 mm multiplied by 18 mm cross-section, will be continuously electron beam (EB) welded to the pure Al-stabiliser. The alloy EN AW-6082 has been selected for the reinforcements due to its excellent extrudability, high strength in the precipitation hardened state, high toughness and strength at cryogenic temperatures and ready EB weldability. Ea...

  19. Texture in low-alloyed uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sariel, J.

    1982-08-01

    The dependence of the preferred orientation of cast and heat-treated polycrystalline adjusted uranium and uranium -0.1 w/o chromium alloys on the production process was studied. The importance of obtaining material free of preferred orientation is explained, and a survey of the regular methods to determine preferred orientation is given. Dilatometry, tensile testing and x-ray diffraction were used to determine the extent of the directionality of these alloys. Data processing showed that these methods are insufficient in a case of a material without any plastic forming, because of unreproducibility of results. Two parameters are defined from the results of Schlz's method diffraction test. These parameters are shown theoretically and experimentally (by extreme-case samples) to give the deviation from isotropy. Application of these parameters to the examined samples showes that cast material has preferred orientation, though it is not systematic. This preferred orientation was reduced by adequate heat treatments

  20. WC-3015 alloy (high-temperature alloy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    WC-3015 Nb alloy containing 28 to 30 Hf, 1 to 2 Zr, 13 to 16 W, 0 to 4 Ta, 0 to 5 Ti, 0.07 to 0.33 C, less than or equal to 0.02 N, less than or equal to 0.03 O, less than or equal to 0.001 H was developed for use at high temperature in oxidizing environments. Its composition can be tailored to meet specific requirements. When WC-3015 is exposed to O at elevated temperature, Hf and Nb oxidized preferentially and HfO 2 dissolves in Nb 2 O 5 to form 6HfO-Nb 2 O 5 . This complex oxide has a tight cubic lattice which resists the diffusion of O into the substrate. During 24-h exposure to air at 2400 0 F, the alloy oxidizes to a depth of approximately 0.035 in. with a surface recession of 0 to 0.004 in. Oxidation resistance of WC-3015 welds and base material can be further enhanced greatly by applying silicide coatings. WC-3015 alloy can be machined by conventional and electrical-discharge methods. It can be hot worked readily by extrusion, forging or rolling. Cold working can be used at room or elevated temperature. It can be welded by the electron-beam or Tig processes. Physical constants, typical mechanical properties at 75 to 2400 0 F, and effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile and stress-rupture properties of the alloy are tabulated

  1. Aluminum fin-stock alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, R.M.; Mutasher, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum alloys have long been used in the production of heat exchanger fins. The comparative properties of the different alloys used for this purpose has not been an issue in the past, because of the significant thickness of the finstock material. However, in order to make fins lighter in weight, there is a growing demand for thinner finstock materials, which has emphasized the need for improved mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance. The objective of this project is to determine the effect of iron, silicon and manganese percentage increment on the required mechanical properties for this application by analyzing four different aluminum alloys. The four selected aluminum alloys are 1100, 8011, 8079 and 8150, which are wrought non-heat treatable alloys with different amount of the above elements. Aluminum alloy 1100 serve as a control specimen, as it is commercially pure aluminum. The study also reports the effect of different annealing cycles on the mechanical properties of the selected alloys. Metallographic examination was also preformed to study the effect of annealing on the precipitate phases and the distribution of these phases for each alloy. The microstructure analysis of the aluminum alloys studied indicates that the precipitated phase in the case of aluminum alloys 1100 and 8079 is beta-FeAI3, while in 8011 it is a-alfa AIFeSi, and the aluminum alloy 8150 contains AI6(Mn,Fe) phase. The comparison of aluminum alloys 8011 and 8079 with aluminum alloy 1100 show that the addition of iron and silicon improves the percent elongation and reduces strength. The manganese addition increases the stability of mechanical properties along the annealing range as shown by the comparison of aluminum alloy 8150 with aluminum alloy 1100. Alloy 8150 show superior properties over the other alloys due to the reaction of iron and manganese, resulting in a preferable response to thermal treatment and improved mechanical properties. (author)

  2. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells.......In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells....

  3. Elementary characterization of Ti metal alloys used in implant dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Catarina A. M. P.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Rocha, Anna S. S.; Corrêa, Janine Nicolosi [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Deniak, Valeriy [Instituto de Pesquisa Pelé Pequeno Príncipe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Camargo, Liliane [Universidade Paranaense, Umuarama, PR (Brazil); Assis, J.T, E-mail: cata-montenegro@bol.com.br, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com, E-mail: lili_camargo2@hotmail.com, E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The main goal of present work is analytical characterization of standard dental implants broadly used by Brazilian dentists. An ideal biological alloy for dental implants must have very high biocompatibility, which means that such material should not provoke any serious adverse tissue response. Dental implants are generally marketed as commercially pure titanium (TiCP) due to their excellent mechanical and physical properties. However, sometimes other alloys are employed and consequently it is essential to study the chemical elements present in those alloys that could bring prejudice for the health. Present work investigated TiCP metal alloys used for dental implant manufacturing and evaluated the presence of elements. For alloy characterization and identification of elements it was used EDXRF technique. This method allows to perform the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the materials using the spectra of the characteristic X-rays emitted by the elements present in the metal samples. The experimental setup was based on two X- ray tubes, Mini X model with Ag and Au targets and X-123SDD detector (AMPTEK) and a 0.5 mm Cu collimator, developed due to specific sample geometrical and topography characteristics. Obtained results showed that implant alloys are not exactly TiCP but were manufactured using Ti-Al-V alloy, which contained Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn. The presence of such metals as Al and V in all studied samples shows very clear that studied implants were not manufactured from TiCP alloy. Moreover, according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), these elements should not be present in TiCP. (author)

  4. Elementary characterization of Ti metal alloys used in implant dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Catarina A. M. P.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Rocha, Anna S. S.; Corrêa, Janine Nicolosi; Deniak, Valeriy; Camargo, Liliane; Assis, J.T

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of present work is analytical characterization of standard dental implants broadly used by Brazilian dentists. An ideal biological alloy for dental implants must have very high biocompatibility, which means that such material should not provoke any serious adverse tissue response. Dental implants are generally marketed as commercially pure titanium (TiCP) due to their excellent mechanical and physical properties. However, sometimes other alloys are employed and consequently it is essential to study the chemical elements present in those alloys that could bring prejudice for the health. Present work investigated TiCP metal alloys used for dental implant manufacturing and evaluated the presence of elements. For alloy characterization and identification of elements it was used EDXRF technique. This method allows to perform the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the materials using the spectra of the characteristic X-rays emitted by the elements present in the metal samples. The experimental setup was based on two X- ray tubes, Mini X model with Ag and Au targets and X-123SDD detector (AMPTEK) and a 0.5 mm Cu collimator, developed due to specific sample geometrical and topography characteristics. Obtained results showed that implant alloys are not exactly TiCP but were manufactured using Ti-Al-V alloy, which contained Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn. The presence of such metals as Al and V in all studied samples shows very clear that studied implants were not manufactured from TiCP alloy. Moreover, according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), these elements should not be present in TiCP. (author)

  5. INVESTIGATION OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS MACHINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berat Barıs BULDUM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Magnesium alloy developments have traditionally been driven by industry requirements for lightweight materials to operate under increasingly demanding conditions. Magnesium alloys have always been attractive to designers due to their low density, only two thirds that of aluminium and its alloys [1]. The element and its alloys take a big part of modern industry needs. Especially nowadays magnesium alloys are used in automotive and mechanical (trains and wagons manufacture, because of its lightness and other features. Magnesium and magnesium alloys are the easiest of all metals to machine, allowing machining operations at extremely high speed. All standard machining operations such as turning, drilling, milling, are commonly performed on magnesium parts.

  6. On-plant test of TUV HCM12 and ASME T23 alloys for use as waterwall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Asger; Rasmussen, Frands; Montgomery, Melanie

    2000-01-01

    to the stress' which appear in the water walls of an USC plant. The exposure was performed in the stress region close to the yield strength limit and cracks appeared in one of the materials. The tests have revealed that HCM12 is difficult to weld but develops no thermal fatigue crack whereas HCM2S is easy......The development of Ultra Super Critical power plants has emphasised the need for stronger alloys for use as water walls. For this purpose HCM12 and HCM2S have been tested at 2 Danish power plants. HCM12 and HCM2S have been tested for their weldability, for thermal fatigue properties...... and for their oxidation properties under steam conditions 435-520º C, 26-27 MPa. The test included application of different weld methods and testing of the mechanical properties of the weld seams. The weld parameters giving the optimal properties were chosen to manufacture two pieces of water wall (1 times 1.5 meter...

  7. Structural thermodynamics of alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Manenc, Jack

    1973-01-01

    Technical progress has for a very long time been directly dependent on progress in metallurgy, which is itself connected with improvements in the technology of alloys. Metals are most frequently used in the form of alloys for several reasons: the quantity of pure metal in its native state in the earth's crust is very limited; pure metals must be extracted from ores which are themselves impure. Finally, the methods of treatment used lead more easily to alloys than to pure metals. The most typical case is that of iron, where a pure ore may be found, but which is the starting point for cast iron or steel, alloys of iron and carbon. In addition, the properties of alloys are in general superior to those of pure metals and modem metallurgy consists of controlling these properties so as to make them conform to the requirements of the design office. Whilst the engineer was formerly compelled to adapt his designs and constructions to the materials available, such as wood, stone, bronze, iron, cast iron and ordinary st...

  8. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Peter [Houston, TX; Koh, Shirlaine [Houston, TX; Mani, Prasanna [Houston, TX; Ratndeep, Srivastava [Houston, TX

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  9. Analytical electron microscopy of neutron-irradiated reactor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure to the high neutron fluxes and temperatures from 400 to 650 0 C in the core region of a fast breeder reactor profoundly alters the microstructure and properties of structural steels and superalloys. The development of irradiation-induced voids, dislocations and precipitates, as well as segregation of alloying elements on a microscopic scale has been related to macroscopic swelling, creep, hardening and embrittlement which occur during prolonged exposures in reactor. Microanalytical studies using TEM/STEM methods, primarily energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) microanalysis, have greatly aided understanding of alloy behavior under irradiation. The main uses of analytical electron microscopy in studying irradiated alloys have been the identification of irradiation-induced precipitates and determination of the changes in local composition due to irradiation-induced solute segregation

  10. Morphology of intermetallic phases in Al-Si cast alloys and their fracture behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Hurtalová

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Al-Si cast alloys in recent years have increased especially in the automotive industry (dynamic exposed cast, en-gine parts, cylinder heads, pistons and so on. Controlling the microstructure of secondary aluminium cast alloys is very important, because these alloys contain more additional elements that form various intermetallic phases in the structure. Therefore, the contribution is dealing with the valuation type of intermetallic phases and their identification with using optical and scanning microscopy. Some of the intermetallic phases could be identified on the basis of morphology but some of them must be identified according EDX analysis. The properties of alu-minium alloy are affected by morphology of intermetallic phases and therefore it is necessary to study morphology and its fracture behav-iour. The present work shows morphology and typical fracture behaviour as the most common intermetallic phases forming in Al-Si alloys.

  11. Characterization of mechanical properties of pseudoelastic shape memory alloys under harmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, J.; Jahn, M.; Tatzko, S.

    2017-12-01

    Pseudoelastic shape memory alloys exhibit a stress-induced phase transformation which leads to high strains during deformation of the material. The stress-strain characteristic during this thermomechanical process is hysteretic and results in the conversion of mechanical energy into thermal energy. This energy conversion allows for the use of shape memory alloys in vibration reduction. For the application of shape memory alloys as vibration damping devices a dynamic modeling of the material behavior is necessary. In this context experimentally determined material parameters which accurately represent the material behavior are essential for a reliable material model. Subject of this publication is the declaration of suitable material parameters for pseudoelastic shape memory alloys and the methodology of their identification from experimental investigations. The used test rig was specifically designed for the characterization of pseudoelastic shape memory alloys.

  12. The Influence of T6 Heat Treatment to Hardness and Microstructure of Al-Si-Mg Alloys Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy Djatmiko; Budiarto

    2008-01-01

    Al-Si-Mg alloy is one of aluminium alloys that is suitable to be used as a car piston material. This is because it has some benefits such as light weight, corrosion resistance and interesting color but its mechanical properties do not meet criteria of JIS H5201. For that reason, to meet the standard, its mechanical properties need to be improved. Mechanical properties of this alloy can be improved using many ways. In this research the alloy was T6 heat treated (holding times 4 hour with treatment temperature variation of 30, 150, 180, 210, and 240 o C). Some tests were conducted to these new alloys including hardness test, impact test, phase identification and micro structural analysis. Test results showed that the change mechanical properties occurs due to increasing temperature during T6 heat treatment to these alloys. The optimum mechanical properties were obtained at treatment temperature of 210 o C. In this condition, the alloy has hardness of 93.30 HVN and impact strength of 5.13 J/cm 2 and these results fulfil JIS H5201 standard. The alloy microstructure showed hypoeutectic structure comprising primary aluminium dendrite and Al-Si-Mg eutectic mixture. The result of phase identification after T6 heat treatment showed that Al-Si-Mg alloys have α-Al phase, Si phase and MnAl 6 phase. (author)

  13. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  14. Alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Bellon, P.; Soisson, F.

    1997-01-01

    During the last two decades, some effort has been devoted to establishing a phenomenology for alloys under irradiation. Theoretically, the effects of the defect supersaturation, sustained defect fluxes and ballistic mixing on solid solubility under irradiation can now be formulated in a unified manner, at least for the most simple cases: coherent phase transformations and nearest-neighbor ballistic jumps. Even under such restrictive conditions, several intriguing features documented experimentally can be rationalized, sometimes in a quantitative manner and simple qualitative rules for alloy stability as a function of irradiation conditions can be formulated. A quasi-thermodynamic formalism can be proposed for alloys under irradiation. However, this point of view has limits illustrated by recent computer simulations. (orig.)

  15. Nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Nickel based alloy, the characteristic of which is that it mainly includes in percentages by weight: 57-63 Ni, 7-18 Cr, 10-20 Fe, 4-6 Mo, 1-2 Nb, 0.2-0.8 Si, 0.01-0.05 Zr, 1.0-2.5 Ti, 1.0-2.5 Al, 0.02-0.06 C and 0.002-0.015 B. The aim is to create new nickel-chromium alloys, hardened in a solid solution and by precipitation, that are stable, exhibit reduced swelling and resistant to plastic deformation inside the reactor. These alloys of the gamma prime type have improved mechanical strengthm swelling resistance, structural stability and welding properties compared with Inconel 625 [fr

  16. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, G.W.; Davis, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500 0 C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150 0 C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement

  17. Silumins alloy crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research, by ATD method, of hypo-, near- and hyperutectic silumins crystallization containing the following alloying additives: Mg, Ni, Cu, Cr, Mo, W, V. It has been shown that, depending on their concentration may crystallize pre-eutectic or eutectic multicomponent phases containing these alloy additives. It has been revealed that any subsequent crystallizable phase nucleate and grows near the liquid/former crystallized phase interface. In multiphases compound also falls the silicon, resulting in a reduction in its quantity and the fragmentation in the eutectic mixture. As a result, it gets a high hardness of silumins in terms of 110-220HB.

  18. Shape memory effect alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshimizu, S.

    1992-01-01

    Although the pseudo- or super-elasticity phenomena and the shape memory effect were known since the 1940's, the enormous curiosity and the great interest to their practical applications emerged with the development of the NITINOL alloy (Nickel-Titanium Naval Ordance Laboratory) by the NASA during the 1960's. This fact marked the appearance of a new class of materials, popularly known as shape memory effect alloys (SMEA). The objective of this work is to present a state-of-the-art of the development and applications for the SMEA. (E.O.)

  19. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of

  20. Coupling between Experimental Measurements and Finite Element Calculations for identification of crystallographic constitutive law. Application to zirconium alloys; Methode de couplage entre experimentations et simulations numeriques en vue de l'identification de lois de comportement intracristallin. Application aux alliages de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexet, M

    2006-10-15

    This thesis presents a methodology for multi scale coupling between the morphology and texture of a microstructure as has been characterised experimentally, and the results of mechanical strain field analysis. This methodology is based on a coupling between experimental characterisation of the microstructure, ex-situ mechanical tests, local strain field measurements performed at the grain scale, and finite element simulations. Then, a definition of a cost function is proposed in order to optimise the parameters of the crystallographic constitutive law. This method is applied to the studies of zirconium alloys in order to improve the understanding of their mechanical behaviour in relation with their microstructures, which is a key requirement for their use in the nuclear industries. This work was funded by the joint research program SMIRN between EDF, CEA and CNRS. (author)

  1. Galvanic corrosion in odontological alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesgo, O.; Bianchi, G.L.; Duffo, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Galvanic corrosion can occur when different alloys are placed in direct contact within the oral cavity or within tissues. Concern has been expressed associated with the coupling of selected restorative materials as well as implant material with various alloys used for restorative procedures. This could be critical if the crown or bridge had subgingival finish line with a metallic zone in contact with the tissue, and the implant was made in titanium alloy. The present work shows the results of galvanic coupling studies done on implants of titanium alloy connected to nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys. (Author)

  2. Borated aluminum alloy manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Kajihara, Katsura; Aruga, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    Borated aluminum alloy is used as the basket material of cask because of its light weight, thermal conductivity and superior neutron absorbing abilities. Kobe Steel has developed a unique manufacturing process for borated aluminum alloy using a vacuum induction melting method. In this process, aluminum alloy is melted and agitated at higher temperatures than common aluminum alloy fabrication methods. It is then cast into a mold in a vacuum atmosphere. The result is a high quality aluminum alloy which has a uniform boron distribution and no impurities. (author)

  3. Fracture of Shape Memory Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Shuichi; Otsuka, Kazuhiro

    1981-01-01

    The initiation and the propagation of cracks during both quenching and deformation in polycrystalline Cu-Al-Ni alloys have been investigated under various conditions. The fracture surfaces of Ti-Ni and Cu-Al-Ni alloys were also observed by a scanning electron microscope. From these results, it was concluded that the brittleness of Cu-Al-Ni alloy and other β phase alloys are due to large elastic anisotropy and large grain sizes, while that the large ductility in Ti-Ni alloy being due to the sm...

  4. Isotope Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  5. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  6. Ferromagnetic bulk glassy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akihisa; Makino, Akihiro; Mizushima, Takao

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the review on the formation, thermal stability and magnetic properties of the Fe-based bulk glassy alloys in as-cast bulk and melt-spun ribbon forms. A large supercooled liquid region over 50 K before crystallization was obtained in Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si), Fe-(Cr, Mo, Nb)-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B) and (Fe, Co, Ni)-Zr-M-B (M=Ti, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo and W) systems and bulk glassy alloys were produced in a thickness range below 2 mm for the Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) system and 6 mm for the Fe-Co-(Zr, Nb, Ta)-(Mo, W)-B system by copper-mold casting. The ring-shaped glassy Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) alloys exhibit much better soft magnetic properties as compared with the ring-shaped alloy made from the melt-spun ribbon because of the formation of the unique domain structure. The good combination of high glass-forming ability and good soft magnetic properties indicates the possibility of future development as a new bulk glassy magnetic material

  7. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Characteristic of DTA curves for cast ferrous alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The study presents DTA curves for selected grades of cast iron and cast steel. The thermal effects observed on derivative curves, caused by crystallisation of single phases and eutectic were discussed. The thermal effects having their origin in crystallisation of secondary carbides were determined. It has been indicated that the range of temperatures of their crystallisation can be determined from the cooling curve t = f(τ, from the solidification curve dt/dτ = f′(τ, and from the second derivative d2t/dτ2 = f″(τ. The crystallisation rate of single phases or of their mixture is indicated by the duration of thermal effect and by the slope angle of the curve responsible for a specific thermal effect before and after its maximum. A very high sensitivity of the derivative curve to temperature changes in liquid and solid alloy and to the phase (phases growth rate enables control of alloy before pouring of moulds. The control of alloy may consist in identification of phases the presence of which is indispensable in alloy microstructure and in determination of some important properties, e.g. Rp0,2, Rm, A5 and HB. In the latter case, the statistical relationships between the above mentioned characteristic parameters of DTA curves and the selected mechanical properties have been determined. The said relationships form a basis for construction of algorithms used in development of computer programs for control of individual alloys.

  9. Laser Welding Characterization of Kovar and Stainless Steel Alloys as Suitable Materials for Components of Photonic Devices Packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadhali, M. M. A.; Zainal, Saktioto J.; Munajat, Y.; Jalil, A.; Rahman, R.

    2010-01-01

    The weldability of Kovar and stainless steel alloys by Nd:YAG laser beam is studied through changing of some laser beam parameters. It has been found that there is a suitable interaction of the pulsed laser beam of low power laser pulse with both the two alloys. The change of thermophysical properties with absorbed energy from the laser pulse is discussed in this paper which reports the suitability of both Kovar and stainless steel 304 as the base materials for photonic devices packaging. We used laser weld system (LW4000S from Newport) which employs Nd:YAG laser system with two simultaneous beams output for packaging 980 nm high power laser module. Results of changing both laser spot weld width and penetration depth with changing both the pulse peak power density, pulse energy and pulse duration show that there are good linear relationships between laser pulse energy or peak power density and pulse duration with laser spot weld dimensions( both laser spot weld width and penetration depth). Therefore we concluded that there should be an optimization for both the pulse peak power and pulse duration to give a suitable aspect ratio (laser spot width to penetration depth) for achieving the desired welds with suitable penetration depth and small spot width. This is to reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ) which affects the sensitive optical components. An optimum value of the power density in the order of 10 5 w/cm 2 found to be suitable to induce melting in the welded joints without vaporization. The desired ratio can also be optimized by changing the focus position on the target material as illustrated from our measurements. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the temperature distribution during the laser pulse heating and predict the penetration depth inside the material. Samples have been investigated using SEM with EDS. The metallographic measurements on the weld spot show a suitable weld yield with reasonable weld width to depth ratio.

  10. Magnesium secondary alloys: Alloy design for magnesium alloys with improved tolerance limits against impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blawert, C., E-mail: carsten.blawert@gkss.d [GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Fechner, D.; Hoeche, D.; Heitmann, V.; Dietzel, W.; Kainer, K.U. [GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Zivanovic, P.; Scharf, C.; Ditze, A.; Groebner, J.; Schmid-Fetzer, R. [TU Clausthal, Institut fuer Metallurgie, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    The development of secondary magnesium alloys requires a completely different concept compared with standard alloys which obtain their corrosion resistance by reducing the levels of impurities below certain alloy and process depending limits. The present approach suitable for Mg-Al based cast and wrought alloys uses a new concept replacing the {beta}-phase by {tau}-phase, which is able to incorporate more impurities while being electro-chemically less detrimental to the matrix. The overall experimental effort correlating composition, microstructure and corrosion resistance was reduced by using thermodynamic calculations to optimise the alloy composition. The outcome is a new, more impurity tolerant alloy class with a composition between the standard AZ and ZC systems having sufficient ductility and corrosion properties comparable to the high purity standard alloys.

  11. Hardening of niobium alloys at precrystallization annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.V.; Pustovalov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Niobium base alloys were investigated. It is shown that precrystallization annealing of niobium-molybdenum, niobium-vanadium and niobium-zirconium alloys elevates much more sufficiently their resistance to microplastic strains, than to macroplastic strains. Hardening effect differs sufficiently for different alloys. The maximal hardening is observed for niobium-vanadium alloys, the minimal one - for niobium-zirconium alloys

  12. Thermomechanical behavior of Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni shape memory alloys modified with samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakoor, R.A.; Khalid, F. Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    The deformation and training behavior of Fe-14Mn-3Si-10Cr-5Ni (wt.%) shape memory alloys containing samarium addition has been studied in the iron-based shape memory alloys. It is noticed that thermomechanical treatment (training) has significant influence on proof stress, critical stress and shape memory behavior of the alloys. The improvement in shape memory behavior can be attributed to the decrease in the proof stress and critical stress which facilitates the formation of ε (hcp martensite). It is also observed that alloy 2 containing samarium undergoes less softening as compared to alloy 1 with training which inhibits the formation of α (bcc martensite) and thus enhances the shape memory behavior. The excessive thermomechanical treatment with increase in the training cycle has led to the formation of α (bcc martensite) along with ε (hcp martensite) in the alloy 1 which appeared to have decline in the shape memory effect. This has been demonstrated by the examination of microstructure and identification of α (bcc martensite) martensite in the alloy 1 as compared to alloy 2

  13. Grindability of dental magnetic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Eisei; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu; Kimura, Kohei

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the grindability of cast magnetic alloys (Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and magnetic stainless steel) was evaluated and compared with that of conventional dental casting alloys (Ag-Pd-Au alloy, Type 4 gold alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy). Grindability was evaluated in terms of grinding rate (i.e., volume of metal removed per minute) and grinding ratio (i.e., volume ratio of metal removed compared to wheel material lost). Solution treated Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy had a significantly higher grinding rate than the aged one at a grinding speed of 750-1500 m x min(-1). At 500 m x min(-1), there were no significant differences in grinding rate between solution treated and aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloys. At a lower speed of 500 m x min(-1) or 750 m x min(-1), it was found that the grinding rates of aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and stainless steel were higher than those of conventional casting alloys.

  14. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  15. Interphase thermodynamic bond in heterogeneous alloys: effects on alloy properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, A.M.; Konovalov, Yu.V.; Yuferov, O.I.

    2005-01-01

    Inconsistency between a conventional thermodynamic description of alloys as a mechanical mixture of phases and a real alloys state as a common thermodynamic system in which there is a complicated physical-chemical phases interaction has been considered. It is supposed that in heterogeneous alloys (eutectic ones, for instance), so called interphase thermodynamic bond can become apparent due to a partial electron levels splitting under phase interaction. Thermodynamic description of phase equilibrium in alloys is proposed taking into account a thermodynamic bond for the system with phase diagram of eutectic type, and methods of the value of this bond estimation are presented. Experimental evidence (Al-Cu-Si, Al-Si-Mg-Cu, U-Mo + Al) of the effect of interphase thermodynamic bond on temperature and enthalpy of melting of alloys are produced as well as possibility of its effects on alloys electrical conduction, strength, heat and corrosion resistance is substantiated theoretically [ru

  16. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  17. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  18. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  19. Metastable superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.

    1978-07-01

    The study of metastable metals and alloys has become one of the principal activities of specialists working in the field of superconducting materials. Metastable crystalline superconductors such as the A15-type materials have been given much attention. Non-crystalline superconductors were first studied over twenty years ago by Buckel and Hilsch using the technique of thin film evaporation on a cryogenic substrate. More recently, melt-quenching, sputtering, and ion implantation techniques have been employed to produce a variety of amorphous superconductors. The present article presents a brief review of experimental results and a survey of current work on these materials. The systematics of superconductivity in non-crystalline metals and alloys are described along with an analysis of the microscopic parameters which underlie the observed trends. The unique properties of these superconductors which arise from the high degree of structural disorder in the amorphous state are emphasized

  20. Rare earth metal alloy magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, I.R.; Evans, J.M.; Nyholm, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth metal alloy magnets and to methods for their production. The technique is based on the fact that rare earth metal alloys (for e.g. cerium or yttrium) which have been crumbled to form a powder by hydride formation and decomposition can be used for the fabrication of magnets without the disadvantages inherent in alloy particle size reduction by mechanical milling. (UK)

  1. Thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorev, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of the theory and practical application of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys are presented. On the basis of the systematic investigations developed are the methods of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys, established are the optimum procedures and produced are the bases of their industrial application with an account of alloy technological peculiarities and the procedure efficiency. It is found that those strengthening methods are more efficient at which the contribution of dispersion hardening prevails over the strengthening by phase hardening

  2. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  3. Superplasticity of amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Yu.B.; Likhachev, V.L.; Sen'kov, O.N.

    1988-01-01

    Results of mechanical tests of Co 57 Ni 10 Fe 5 Si 11 B 17 amorphous alloy are presented and the effect of crystallization, occurring during deformation process, on plastic low characteristics is investiagted. Superplasticity of amorphous tape is investigated. It is shown, that this effect occurs only when during deformation the crystallization takes place. Process model, based on the usage disclination concepts about glass nature, is suggested

  4. Shape memory alloy actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  5. Aluminum alloy impact sparkling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dudyk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cast machine parts are widely used in many branches of industry. A very important issue is gaining the appropriate knowledge relating to the application of castings in places of explosion risks including but not limited to mining, chemical industry and rescue works. A possibility of explosion risks occurrence following the impact sparkling of the cast metal parts is still not solved problem in scientific research. In relation to this issue, in this article, the results of the study are presented, and relating to the tendency to impact sparkling of the aluminium alloys used in machine building. On the grounds of the results obtained, it was demonstrated that the registered impact sparkles bunches of feathers from the analyzed alloys: AlSi7Mg, (AK7; AlSi9Mg, (AK9; AlSi6Cu4, (AK64 and AlSi11, (AK11 show significant differences between each other. The quantitative analysis of the temperature distribution and nuclei surface area performed on the example of the alloy AK9 (subjected to defined period of corrosion allows for the statement that they are dangerous in conditions of explosion risk. Following this fact, designers and users of machine parts made from these materials should not use them in conditions where the explosive mixtures occur.

  6. Lithium alloy negative electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Robert A.

    The 1996 announcement by Fuji Photo Film of the development of lithium batteries containing convertible metal oxides has caused a great deal of renewed interest in lithium alloys as alternative materials for use in the negative electrode of rechargeable lithium cells. The earlier work on lithium alloys, both at elevated and ambient temperatures is briefly reviewed. Basic principles relating thermodynamics, phase diagrams and electrochemical properties under near-equilibrium conditions are discussed, with the Li-Sn system as an example. Second-phase nucleation, and its hindrance under dynamic conditions plays an important role in determining deviations from equilibrium behavior. Two general types of composite microstructure electrodes, those with a mixed-conducting matrix, and those with a solid electrolyte matrix, are discussed. The Li-Sn-Si system at elevated temperatures, and the Li-Sn-Cd at ambient temperatures are shown to be examples of mixed-conducting matrix microstructures. The convertible oxides are an example of the solid electrolyte matrix type. Although the reversible capacity can be very large in this case, the first cycle irreversible capacity required to convert the oxides to alloys may be a significant handicap.

  7. Low activation vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzenburg, W. van.

    1991-01-01

    The properties and general characteristics of vanadium-base alloys are reviewed in terms of the materials requirements for fusion reactor first wall and blanket structures. In this review attention is focussed on radiation response including induced radioactivity, mechanical properties, compatibility with potential coolants, physical and thermal properties, fabricability and resources. Where possible, properties are compared to those of other leading candidate structural materials, e.g. austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels. Vanadium alloys appear to offer advantages in the areas of long-term activation, mechanical properties at temperatures above 600 deg C, radiation resistance and thermo-hydraulic design, due to superior physical and thermal properties. They also have a potential for higher temperature operation in liquid lithium systems. Disadvantages are associated with their ability to retain high concentrations of hydrogen isotopes, higher cost, more difficult fabrication and welding. A particular concern regarding use of vanadium alloys relates their reactivity with non-metallic elements, such as oxygen and nitrogen. (author). 33 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  8. Impact toughness of laser alloyed aluminium AA1200 alloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ),. 559-563. [2] T. Tomida, K. Nakata, S. Saji, T. Kubo, T, Formation of metal matrix composite layer on aluminium alloy with TiC-Cu powder by laser surface alloying process; Surface and Coatings Technology; vol. 142-144, 2001, 585-589. [3] L. A. B...

  9. New X-Ray Technique to Characterize Nanoscale Precipitates in Aged Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitdikov, V. D.; Murashkin, M. Yu.; Valiev, R. Z.

    2017-10-01

    This paper puts forward a new technique for measurement of x-ray patterns, which enables to solve the problem of identification and determination of precipitates (nanoscale phases) in metallic alloys of the matrix type. The minimum detection limit of precipitates in the matrix of the base material provided by this technique constitutes as little as 1%. The identification of precipitates in x-ray patterns and their analysis are implemented through a transmission mode with a larger radiation area, longer holding time and higher diffractometer resolution as compared to the conventional reflection mode. The presented technique has been successfully employed to identify and quantitatively describe precipitates formed in the Al alloy of the Al-Mg-Si system as a result of artificial aging. For the first time, the x-ray phase analysis has been used to identify and measure precipitates formed during the alloy artificial aging.

  10. Electron backscatter diffraction as a useful method for alloys microstructure characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimek, Leszek; Pietrzyk, Bozena

    2004-11-17

    Microstructure examination of cast Co-Cr-Mo alloy is presented in this paper. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the alloy were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). An identification of alloy phases was carried out using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Two different kinds of precipitates in metallic matrix were found. They were identified as MC and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type of carbides in Co-lattice solid solution. The advantages and limits of the EBSD method are described. It is presented that EBSD, as excellent tool for phase identification, is a valuable supplementary method for materials research.

  11. Titanium alloys. Advances in alloys, processes, products and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blenkinsop, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The last few years have been a period of consolidation of existing alloys and processes. While the aerospace industry remains the principal driving force for alloy development, the paper illustrates examples of new markets being established in 'older' alloys, by a combination of product/process development and a re-examination of engineering design parameters. Considerable attention is still being directed towards the titanium aluminide systems, but other more conventional alloy developments are underway aimed at specific engineering and process requirements, both in the aerospace and non-aerospace sectors. Both the advanced high temperature and conventional alloy developments are considered, before the paper goes on to assess the potential of new processes and products, like spray-forming, metal matrix composites and shaped-plate rolling. (orig.)

  12. Alloy development for cladding and duct applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straalsund, J.L.; Johnson, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Three general classes of materials under development for cladding and ducts are listed. Solid solution strengthened, or austenitic, alloys are Type 316 stainless steel and D9. Precipitation hardened (also austenitic) alloys consist of D21, D66 and D68. These alloys are similar to such commercial alloys as M-813, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Nimonic PE-16. The third general class of alloys is composed of ferritic alloys, with current emphasis being placed on HT-9, a tempered martensitic alloy, and D67, a delta-ferritic steel. The program is comprised of three parallel paths. The current reference, or first generation alloy, is 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel. Second generation alloys for near-term applications include D9 and HT-9. Third generation materials consist of the precipitation strengthened steels and ferritic alloys, and are being considered for implementation at a later time than the first and second generation alloys. The development of second and third generation materials was initiated in 1974 with the selection of 35 alloys. This program has proceeded to today where there are six advanced alloys being evaluated. These alloys are the developmental alloys D9, D21, D57, D66 and D68, together with the commerical alloy, HT-9. The status of development of these alloys is summarized

  13. ODS Alloys for Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Sung

    2006-01-01

    ODS (oxide dispersion strengthening) alloy is one of the potential candidate alloys for the cladding or in reactor components of Generation IV reactors and for the structural material even for fusion reactors. It is widely accepted as very resistant material to neutron irradiation as well as strong material at high temperature due to its finely distributed and stable oxide particles. Among Generation IV reactors SFR and SCWR are anticipated in general to run in the temperature range between 300 and 550 .deg. C, and the peak cladding temperature is supposed to reach at about 620 .deg. C during the normal operation. Therefore Zr.base alloys, which have been widely known and adopted for the cladding material due to their excellent neutron economics, are no more adequate at these operating conditions. Fe-base ODS alloys in general has a good high temperature strength at the above high temperature as well as the neutron resistance. In this study a range of commercial grade ODS alloys and their applications are reviewed, including an investigation of the stability of a commercial grade 20% Cr Fe-base ODS alloy(MA956). The alloy was evaluated in terms of the fracture toughness change along with the aging treatment. Also an attempt of the development of 9% Cr Fe-base ODS alloys is introduced

  14. Oxidation properties of laser clad Nb-Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, S.K.; Mazumder, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on laser cladding parameters for non-equilibrium synthesis for several ternary and complex Nb-Al base alloys containing Ti, Cr, Si, Ni, B and C that have been established. Phase transformations occurring below 1500 degrees C have been determined using differential thermal analysis. Ductility of the clads is qualitatively evaluated from the extent of cracking around the microhardness indentations. Oxidation resistance of the clads in flowing air is measured at 800 degrees C, 1200 degrees C and 1400 degrees C and parabolic rate constants are calculated. Microstructure of the clads is studied using optical and scanning electron microscopes. X-ray diffraction and EDX techniques are used for identification of the oxides formed and the phases formed in as clad material. Oxide morphology is studied using SEM. Effect of alloying additions on the ductility and oxidation resistance of the laser clad Nb-Al alloys is discussed. The results are compared with those reported in literature for similar alloys produced by conventional processing methods

  15. Low cycle lifetime assessment of Al2024 alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shehzad Saleem

    2012-07-01

    The 2024-T351 aluminium alloy is extensively used for fabricating aircraft parts. This alloy shows a relatively low ductility at room temperature and is generally heat treated in various conditions to suit particular applications. The present study experimentally and numerically analyses the damage mechanism of the aforementioned alloy subjected to multi-axial stress states. The purpose of this work is to predict the cyclic lifetime of the considered alloy, based on the local approach of damage evolution using continuum damage modelling (CDM). The experimental program involves different kinds of specimens and loading conditions. According to the experimental observations, the material response of Al2024 is highly direction-dependent showing a material behaviour between ductile and brittle. In particular, in its corresponding (small transversal) S-direction, the material behaviour can be characterised as quasi-brittle. For the modelling of such a mechanical response, a novel, fully coupled isotropic ductile-brittle continuum damage mechanics model is proposed. Since the resulting model shows a large number of material parameters, an efficient, hybrid parameter identification strategy is discussed. Within this strategy, as many parameters as possible have been determined a priori by exploiting analogies to established theories (like Paris law), while the remaining free unknowns are computed by solving an optimisation problem. Comparisons between the experimentally observed and the numerically simulated lifetimes reveal the prediction capability of the proposed model. (orig.)

  16. Nickel alloys and high-alloyed special stainless steels. Properties, manufacturing, applications. 4. compl. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heubner, Ulrich; Kloewer, Jutta; Alves, Helena; Behrens, Rainer; Schindler, Claudius; Wahl, Volker; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the following eight topics: 1. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels - Material overview and metallurgical principles (U. Heubner); 2. Corrosion resistance of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (U. Heubner); 3. Welding of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (T. Hoffmann, M. Wolf); 4. High-temperature materials for industrial plant construction (J. Kloewer); 5. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels as hot roll clad composites-a cost-effective alternative (C. Schindler); 6. Selected examples of the use of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels in chemical plants (H. Alves); 7. The use of nickel alloys and stainless steels in environmental engineering (V. Wahl); 8: Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels for the oil and gas industry (R. Behrens).

  17. Corrosion of aluminum alloys as a function of alloy composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1969-10-01

    A study was initiated which included nineteen aluminum alloys. Tests were conducted in high purity water at 360 0 C and flow tests (approx. 20 ft/sec) in reactor process water at 130 0 C (TF-18 loop tests). High-silicon alloys and AlSi failed completely in the 360 0 C tests. However, coupling of AlSi to 8001 aluminum suppressed the failure. The alloy compositions containing iron and nickel survived tht 360 0 C autoclave exposures. Corrosion rates varied widely as a function of alloy composition, but in directions which were predictable from previous high-temperature autoclave experience. In the TF-18 loop flow tests, corrosion penetrations were similar on all of the alloys and on high-purity aluminum after 105 days. However, certain alloys established relatively low linear corrosion rates: Al-0.9 Ni-0.5 Fe-0.1 Zr, Al-1.0 Ni-0.15 Fe-11.5 Si-0.8 Mg, Al-1.2 Ni-1.8 Fe, and Al-7.0 Ni-4.8 Fe. Electrical polarity measurements between AlSi and 8001 alloys in reactor process water at temperatures up to 150 0 C indicated that AlSi was anodic to 8001 in the static autoclave system above approx. 50 0 C

  18. Aluminum alloy and associated anode and battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarcy, G.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an aluminum alloy. It comprises: eutectic amounts of at least two alloying elements selected from the group consisting of bismuth, cadmium, scandium, gallium, indium, lead, mercury, thallium, tin, and zinc with the balance being aluminum and the alloying elements being about 0.01 to 3.0 percent by weight of the alloy

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  20. General characteristics of eutectic alloy solidification mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaignan, Clement.

    1977-01-01

    The eutectic alloy sodification was studied in binary systems: solidification of non facetted - non facetted eutectic alloy (theoretical aspects, variation of the lamellar spacing, crystallographic relation between the various phases); solidification of facetted - non facetted eutectic alloy; coupled growth out of eutectic alloy; eutectic nucleation [fr

  1. Pareto-optimal alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bligaard, Thomas; Johannesson, Gisli Holmar; Ruban, Andrei

    2003-01-01

    Large databases that can be used in the search for new materials with specific properties remain an elusive goal in materials science. The problem is complicated by the fact that the optimal material for a given application is usually a compromise between a number of materials properties and the ......Large databases that can be used in the search for new materials with specific properties remain an elusive goal in materials science. The problem is complicated by the fact that the optimal material for a given application is usually a compromise between a number of materials properties...... and the cost. In this letter we present a database consisting of the lattice parameters, bulk moduli, and heats of formation for over 64 000 ordered metallic alloys, which has been established by direct first-principles density-functional-theory calculations. Furthermore, we use a concept from economic theory......, the Pareto-optimal set, to determine optimal alloy solutions for the compromise between low compressibility, high stability, and cost....

  2. Density of Liquid Ni-Cr Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The density of liquid Ni-Cr alloy was measured by a modified sessile drop method. The density of liquid Ni-Cr alloywas found to decrease with increasing temperature and Cr concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of liquidNi-Cr alloy increases with increasing the Cr concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of Ni-Cr alloy determinedin the present work shows a positive deviation from the linear molar volume.

  3. Whale Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    R:BASE for DOS, a computer program developed under NASA contract, has been adapted by the National Marine Mammal Laboratory and the College of the Atlantic to provide and advanced computerized photo matching technique for identification of humpback whales. The program compares photos with stored digitized descriptions, enabling researchers to track and determine distribution and migration patterns. R:BASE is a spinoff of RIM (Relational Information Manager), which was used to store data for analyzing heat shielding tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. It is now the world's second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software.

  4. SCC of Alloy 600 components in PWR primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Briceno, Dolores; Lapena, Jesus; Castano, M. Luisa; Blazquez, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Cracking due to PWSCC in PWR CRDM nozzles and other VHP nozzles fabricated from Alloy 600 is not a new issue. In 1991, a leak was discovered on one CRDM nozzle at Bugey 3 PWR plant in France. The cause of the cracking was identified as primary water stress corrosion cracking. From then, similar cracks have been found in other European and USA PWR plants. The cracks were predominantly axial in orientation and it was accepted that CRDM nozzles and weld cracking in PWR was not a immediate safety concern. However, this consideration has to be reassessed in light of the recent identification of circumferential cracking in CRDM nozzles at Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 2 and 3 along with axial cracking in the Alloy 182 J-groove welds at these two units and at Oconee Nuclear Station 1 and Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1. Alloy 600 susceptibility in primary water has received an enormous research effort for many years since the Alloy 600 steam generators tube degradation started. A significant amount of information is available to characterise the susceptibility of Alloy 600. However, Alloy 600 susceptibility is strongly dependent on the heat thermomechanical history and both the crack initiation time and the crack growth rate data obtained from representative materials of the VHP nozzles seem to be necessary for the structural integrity assessment of cracking nozzles. An extensive experimental program has been performed at CIEMAT, to study the behaviour of Alloy 600 VHP nozzles in PWR primary conditions. Crack initiation and crack propagation tests have been performed using different types of products (forged bar, tube, plate and steam generator tubing). Long duration crack initiation tests have been carried out, at 330 deg. C and 360 deg. C in water and at 400 deg. C in steam, using ten Alloy 600 heats with yield strength ranging from 291 MPa to 489 MPa. The influence of several parameters (grain boundary carbide distribution, grain size and yield strength) on crack

  5. Alloying Solid Solution Strengthening of Fe-Ga Alloys: A First-Principle Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Kuiying; Cheng, Leon M

    2006-01-01

    ... and Co in cubic solid solution of Fe-Ga alloys. Mayer bond order "BO" values were used to evaluate the atomic bond strengths in the alloys, and were then used to assess the alloying strengthening characteristics...

  6. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of laser-clad iron-based alloy on Al-Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Z.; Wang, W.Y.; Wang, A.H.

    2006-01-01

    Microstructure characterization is important for controlling the quality of laser cladding. In the present work, a detailed microstructure characterization by transmission electron microscopy was carried out on the iron-based alloy laser-clad on Al-Si alloy and an unambiguous identification of phases in the coating was accomplished. It was found that there is austenite, Cr 7 C 3 and Cr 23 C 6 in the clad region; α-Al, NiAl 3 , Fe 2 Al 5 and FeAl 2 in the interface region; and α-Al and silicon in the heat-affected region. A brief discussion was given for their existence based on both kinetic and thermodynamic principles

  7. Non-destructive Residual Stress Analysis Around The Weld-Joint of Fuel Cladding Materials of ZrNbMoGe Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikin

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The residual stress measurements around weld-joint of ZrNbMoGe alloy have been carried out by using X-ray diffraction technique in PTBIN-BATAN. The research was performed to investigate the structure of a cladding material with high temperature corrosion resistance and good weldability. The equivalent composition of the specimens (in %wt. was 97.5%Zr1%Nb1%Mo½%Ge. Welding was carried out by using TIG (tungsten inert gas technique that completed butt-joint with a current 20 amperes. Three region tests were taken in specimen while diffraction scanning, While diffraction scanning, tests were performed on three regions, i.e., the weldcore, the heat-affected zone (HAZ and the base metal. The reference region was determined at the base metal to be compared with other regions of the specimen, in obtaining refinement structure parameters. Base metal, HAZ and weldcore were diffracted by X-ray, and lattice strain changes were calculated by using Rietveld analysis program. The results show that while the quantity of minor phases tend to increase in the direction from the base metal to the HAZ and to the weldcore, the quantity of the ZrGe phase in the HAZ is less than the quantity of the ZrMo2 phase due to tGe element evaporation. The residual stress behavior in the material shows that minor phases, i.e., Zr3Ge and ZrMo2, are more dominant than the Zr matrix. The Zr3Ge and ZrMo2 experienced sharp straining, while the Zr phase was weak-lined from HAZ to weldcore. The hydrostatic residual stress ( in around weld-joint of ZrNbMoGe alloy is compressive stress which has minimum value at about -2.73 GPa in weldcore region

  8. ALLOY DESIGN AND PROPERTY EVALUATION OF TI ALLOY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    1,2 DEPARTMENT OF METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA, NSUKKA, NIGERIA. 2 DEPT ... a result of this structural change, titanium alloys fall ... the phase stability and mechanical behaviours of Ti-.

  9. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida, A.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable highstrength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO2 laser. This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloys, over the last years.

    En el presente trabajo se estudia la aleación superficial mediante láser de aluminio con metales de transición. El cromo y el molibdeno son particularmente interesantes porque producen aleaciones de alta resistencia y por el bajo coeficiente de difusión y solución sólida en aluminio. Para producir estas aleaciones se ha seguido un procedimiento desarrollado en dos partes. En primer lugar, el material se alea usando una baja velocidad de procesado y en segundo lugar la estructura se modifica mediante un refinamiento posterior. Este procedimiento se ha empleado en la producción de aleaciones Al-Cr, Al-Mo y Al-Nb mediante aleación con láser de CO2 de polvos de Cr, Mo o Nb en aluminio y la aleación 7175. Este trabajo es una revisión del desarrollado en el Instituto Superior Técnico de Lisboa en los últimos años.

  10. Zinc Alloys for the Fabrication of Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yungryel; Lee, Tae S.

    2009-01-01

    ZnBeO and ZnCdSeO alloys have been disclosed as materials for the improvement in performance, function, and capability of semiconductor devices. The alloys can be used alone or in combination to form active photonic layers that can emit over a range of wavelength values. Materials with both larger and smaller band gaps would allow for the fabrication of semiconductor heterostructures that have increased function in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum. ZnO is a wide band-gap material possessing good radiation-resistance properties. It is desirable to modify the energy band gap of ZnO to smaller values than that for ZnO and to larger values than that for ZnO for use in semiconductor devices. A material with band gap energy larger than that of ZnO would allow for the emission at shorter wavelengths for LED (light emitting diode) and LD (laser diode) devices, while a material with band gap energy smaller than that of ZnO would allow for emission at longer wavelengths for LED and LD devices. The amount of Be in the ZnBeO alloy system can be varied to increase the energy bandgap of ZnO to values larger than that of ZnO. The amount of Cd and Se in the ZnCdSeO alloy system can be varied to decrease the energy band gap of ZnO to values smaller than that of ZnO. Each alloy formed can be undoped or can be p-type doped using selected dopant elements, or can be n-type doped using selected dopant elements. The layers and structures formed with both the ZnBeO and ZnCdSeO semiconductor alloys - including undoped, p-type-doped, and n-type-doped types - can be used for fabricating photonic and electronic semiconductor devices for use in photonic and electronic applications. These devices can be used in LEDs, LDs, FETs (field effect transistors), PN junctions, PIN junctions, Schottky barrier diodes, UV detectors and transmitters, and transistors and transparent transistors. They also can be used in applications for lightemitting display, backlighting for displays, UV and

  11. Effect of Y on the bio-corrosion behavior of extruded Mg-Zn-Mn alloy in Hank's solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Weiwei; Zhang Erlin; Yang Ke

    2010-01-01

    The bio-corrosion properties of Mg-Zn-Mn alloys with and without Y in Hank's solution at 37 deg. C were investigated by using electrochemical test and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The results of open circuit potential (OCP) and polarization tests indicated that Y could reduce the cathodic current density. A passivative stage appeared in the Tafel curve of the Y containing magnesium alloy, indicating that a passivative film was formed on the surface of the Y containing magnesium alloy. EIS results showed that the Y containing alloy had higher charge transfer resistance and film resistance, but lower double layer capacity than the alloy without the Y element. The surface reaction product identification by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that the surface corrosion products were hydroxide and phosphate (Mg 3 Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 4 ) for Mg-Zn-Mn alloy and phosphate (MgNaPO 4 ) for the Y containing Mg-Zn-Mn alloys. The XPS results also showed that a Y 2 O 3 protective film was formed on the surface of the Y containing magnesium alloy which contributed mainly to the low cathodic current density and the high resistance.

  12. Manufacturing of High Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion they have high configurational entropy, and thus they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and phase stability. The present study investigates the microstructure of two single-phase face-centered cubic (FCC) HEAs, CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn, with special attention given to melting, homogenization and thermo-mechanical processing. Large-scale ingots were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent in small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was applied to both alloys in order to eliminate segregation due to normal ingot solidification. The alloys fabricated well, with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters being employed.

  13. Nickel and cobalt base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlle, P.

    1994-01-01

    Nickel base alloys have a good resistance to pitting, cavernous or cracks corrosion. Nevertheless, all the nickel base alloys are not equivalent. Some differences exit between all the families (Ni, Ni-Cu, Ni-Cr-Fe, Ni-Cr-Fe-Mo/W-Cu, Ni-Cr-Mo/W, Ni-Mo). Cobalt base alloys in corrosive conditions are generally used for its wear and cracks resistance, with a compromise to its localised corrosion resistance properties. The choice must be done from the perfect knowledge of the corrosive medium and of the alloys characteristics (chemical, metallurgical). A synthesis of the corrosion resistance in three medium (6% FeCl 3 , 4% NaCl + 1% HCl + 0.1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 , 11.5% H 2 SO 4 + 1.2% HCl + 1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 + 1% CuCl 2 ) is presented. (A.B.). 11 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs

  14. Magnetoimpedance effect in Nanoperm alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernando, B.; Alvarez, P.; Santos, J.D.; Gorria, P.; Sanchez, M.L.; Olivera, J.; Perez, M.J.; Prida, V.M.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of isothermal annealing (1 h at 600 deg. C in Ar atmosphere) on the soft magnetic properties and magnetoimpedance (MI) effect has been studied in ribbons of the following Nanoperm alloys: Fe 91 Zr 7 B 2 , Fe 88 Zr 8 B 4 , Fe 87 Zr 6 B 6 Cu 1 and Fe 8 Zr 1 B 1 . A maximum MI ratio of about 27% was measured for the nanocrystalline alloy Fe 87 Zr 6 B 6 Cu 1 at a driving frequency of 0.2 MHz. The thermal annealing led to magnetic softening for this alloy, while a hardening is observed for the Fe 8 Zr 1 B 1 alloy

  15. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo, L. del; Perez-Saez, R.B.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, L.; Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I.; Gonzalez-Martin, P.; Tello, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 μm), sample temperature (200-650 o C) and emission angle (0-85 o ) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  16. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, L. del, E-mail: leire.del-campo@cnrs-orleans.f [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Perez-Saez, R.B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.e [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Gonzalez-Fernandez, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Planta de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Gonzalez-Martin, P. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Parque empresarial San Fernando, Avda. Castilla 2, 28830 San Fernando de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Tello, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-01-21

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 {mu}m), sample temperature (200-650 {sup o}C) and emission angle (0-85{sup o}) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  17. First principles thermodynamics of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducastelle, F.

    1993-01-01

    We present a brief report on the methods of solid state physics (electronic structure, statistical thermodynamics) that allow us to discuss the phase stability of alloys and to determine their phase diagrams. (orig.)

  18. Auger electron spectroscopy of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijers, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis describes how the surface compositions of some alloys can be determined by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The motivation for this research and the reasons for the choice of alloy systems studied are formulated. The theoretical background of AES is briefly discussed and the apparatus used and the experimental procedures applied are described. Four alloy systems have been investigated in this thesis - Ni-Cu and Pd - Ag (consisting of a component active in most cataytic reactions - Ni and Pd; and a component which is almost inactive for a number of reactions - Cu and Ag) and Pt - Pd and Pt-Ir (consisting of two active components). Knowledge of the surface composition of the various alloy systems is shown to be essential for the interpretation of catalytic results. (Auth./C.F.)

  19. Derivative spectrophotometry of cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of derivative spectrophotometry is briefly described, and derivative absorption spectra are presented for samarium, cobalt, and commercial Sm-Co alloys. It is shown that the use of derivative spectrophotometry not only improves the accuracy and selectivity of element determinations but also simplifies the analysis of alloys. Results of a statistical evaluation of the metrological characteristics of the analytical procedure described here are presented. 8 references

  20. Volatilization from PCA steel alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Petti, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    The mobilizations of key components from Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) steel alloy have been measured with laboratory-scale experiments. The experiments indicate most of the mobilization from PCA steel is due to oxide formation and spalling but that the spalled particles are large enough to settle rapidly. Based on the experiments, models for the volatization of iron, manganese, and cobalt from PCA steel in steam and molybdenum from PCA steel in air have been derived.

  1. The microstructures of ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, G.M.K.; Ranganathan, S.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomenon of ordering in substitutional alloys confers special properties on them by introducing various types of structures and structural defects. Some of the important structural defects (translational and rotational antiphase boundaries, dissociated antiphase boundaries and superdislocations) and their observation by various microscopical methods, with particular emphasis on the applications of the electron microscope are described with illustrations drawn from the studies on nickel-molybdenum and nickel-tungsten alloys. (M.G.B.)

  2. Laser welding of aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    This thesis treats laser welding of aluminium alloys from a practical perspective with elements of mathematical analysis. The theoretical work has in all cases been verified experimentally. The aluminium alloys studied are from the 5xxx and 6xxx groups which are common for example in the automotive industry. Aluminium has many unique physical properties. The properties which more than others have been shown to influence the welding process is its high reflection, high thermal conductivity, lo...

  3. Electrical conductivity in random alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, A.; Thakur, P.K.; Yussouff, M.

    1984-12-01

    Based on the augmented space formalism introduced by one of us and the use of the Ward identity and the Bethe-Sapeter equation, a formalism has been developed for the calculation of electrical conductivity for random alloys. A simple application is made to a model case, and it is argued that the formalism enables us to carry out viable calculations on more realistic models of alloys. (author)

  4. Electrical conductivity in random alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, A.; Yussouff, M.

    1983-06-01

    Starting from the augmented space formalism by one of us, and the use of the Ward identity and Bethe Salpeter equation, a complete formalism for the calculation of the electrical conductivity in tight-binding models of random binary alloys has been developed. The formalism is practical in the sense that viable calculations may be carried out with its help for realistics models of alloy systems. (author)

  5. Diamond identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of producing sets of records of the internal defects of diamonds as a means of identification of the gems by x-ray topography are described. To obtain the records one can either use (a) monochromatic x-radiation reflected at the Bragg angle from crystallographically equivalent planes of the diamond lattice structure, Bragg reflections from each such plane being recorded from a number of directions of view, or (b) white x-radiation incident upon the diamond in directions having a constant angular relationship to each equivalent axis of symmetry of the diamond lattice structure, Bragg reflections being recorded for each direction of the incident x-radiation. By either method an overall point-to-point three dimensional representation of the diamond is produced. (U.K.)

  6. Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Ni-Alloy/CrN Nanolayered Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Hsiang Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ni-alloy/CrN nanolayered coatings, Ni-Al/CrN and Ni-P/CrN, were deposited on (100 silicon wafer and AISI 420 stainless steel substrates by dual-gun sputtering technique. The influences of the layer microstructure on corrosion behavior of the nanolayered thin films were investigated. The bilayer thickness was controlled approximately 10 nm with a total coating thickness of 1m. The single-layer Ni-alloy and CrN coatings deposited at 350∘C were also evaluated for comparison. Through phase identification, phases of Ni-P and Ni-Al compounds were observed in the single Ni-alloy layers. On the other hand, the nanolayered Ni-P/CrN and Ni-Al/CrN coatings showed an amorphous/nanocrystalline microstructure. The precipitation of Ni-Al and Ni-P intermetallic compounds was suppressed by the nanolayered configuration of Ni-alloy/CrN coatings. Through Tafel analysis, the corr and corr values ranged from –0.64 to –0.33 V and 1.42×10−5 to 1.14×10−6 A/cm2, respectively, were deduced for various coating assemblies. The corrosion mechanisms and related behaviors of the coatings were compared. The coatings with a nanolayered Ni-alloy/CrN configuration exhibited a superior corrosion resistance to single-layer alloy or nitride coatings.

  7. Surface modification of 5083 Al alloy by electrical discharge alloying processing with a 75 mass% Si-Fe alloy electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambekova, Kuralay [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Rd., Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hung-Mao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Rd., Xinshi Dist., Tainan City 74448, Taiwan (China); Uan, Jun-Yen, E-mail: jyuan@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Rd., Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-01

    This study experimentally investigates the surface modification of 5083 Al alloy by the electrical discharge alloying (EDA) process with a Si-Fe alloy as an electrode. Samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and corrosion resistance tests. The micro-hardness of EDA alloyed layer was evidently higher than that of the base metal (5083 Al alloy). The TEM results show that the matrix of the alloyed layer has an amorphous-like structure; the matrix contains fine needle-like Si particles, block-like Si particles and nano-size Al{sub 4.5}FeSi and Al{sub 13}Fe{sub 4} particles. The TEM results support experimental results for the high hardness of the alloyed layer. Moreover, the EDA alloyed layer with composite microstructures has good corrosion resistance in NaCl aqueous solution.

  8. Relationships Between Solidification Parameters in A319 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersluis, E.; Ravindran, C.

    2018-03-01

    The design of high-performance materials depends on a comprehensive understanding of the alloy-specific relationships between solidification and properties. However, the inconsistent use of a particular solidification parameter for presenting materials characterization in the literature impedes inter-study comparability and the interpretation of findings. Therefore, there is a need for accurate expressions relating the solidification parameters for each alloy. In this study, A319 aluminum alloy castings were produced in a permanent mold with various preheating temperatures in order to control metal cooling. Analysis of the cooling curve for each casting enabled the identification of its liquidus, Al-Si eutectic, and solidus temperatures and times. These values led to the calculation of the primary solidification rate, total solidification rate, primary solidification time, and local solidification time for each casting, which were related to each other as well as to the average casting SDAS and material hardness. Expressions for each of their correlations have been presented with high coefficients of determination, which will aid in microstructural prediction and casting design.

  9. Electron-beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillant, Marcel; de Bony, Yves

    1980-08-15

    The objective of this article is to describe the status of the application of electron-beam welding to aluminum alloys. These alloys are widely employed in the aeronautics, space and nuclear industries.

  10. Application of the Materials-by-Design Methodology to Redesign a New Grade of the High-Strength Low-Alloy Class of Steels with Improved Mechanical Properties and Processability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.

    2016-01-01

    An alternative to the traditional trial-and-error empirical approach for the development of new materials is the so-called materials-by-design approach. Within the latter approach, a material is treated as a complex system and its design and optimization is carried out by employing computer-aided engineering analyses, predictive tools, and available material databases. In the present work, the materials-by-design approach is utilized to redesign a grade of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) class of steels with improved mechanical properties (primarily strength and fracture toughness), processability (e.g., castability, hot formability, and weldability), and corrosion resistance. Toward that end, a number of material thermodynamics, kinetics of phase transformations, and physics of deformation and fracture computational models and databases have been developed/assembled and utilized within a multi-disciplinary, two-level material-by-design optimization scheme. To validate the models, their prediction is compared against the experimental results for the related steel HSLA100. Then the optimization procedure is employed to determine the optimal chemical composition and the tempering schedule for a newly designed grade of the HSLA class of steels with enhanced mechanical properties, processability, and corrosion resistance.

  11. Thermodynamic Database for Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerlerud Perez, Rosa

    2003-05-01

    For many decades zirconium alloys have been commonly used in the nuclear power industry as fuel cladding material. Besides their good corrosion resistance and acceptable mechanical properties the main reason of using these alloys is the low neutron absorption. Zirconium alloys are exposed to a very severe environment during the nuclear fission process and there is a demand for better design of this material. To meet this requirement a thermodynamic database is developed to support material designers. In this thesis some aspects about the development of a thermodynamic database for zirconium alloys are presented. A thermodynamic database represents an important facility in applying thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for a given material providing: 1) relevant information about the thermodynamic properties of the alloys e.g. enthalpies, activities, heat capacity, and 2) significant information for the manufacturing process e.g. heat treatment temperature. The basic information in the database is first the unary data, i.e. pure elements; those are taken from the compilation of the Scientific Group Thermodata Europe (SGTE) and then the binary and ternary systems. All phases present in those binary and ternary systems are described by means of the Gibbs energy dependence on composition and temperature. Many of those binary systems have been taken from published or unpublished works and others have been assessed in the present work. All the calculations have been made using Thermo C alc software and the representation of the Gibbs energy obtained by applying Calphad technique

  12. Quasicrystal-reinforced Mg alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyun Kim, Young; Tae Kim, Won; Hyang Kim, Do

    2014-04-01

    The formation of the icosahedral phase (I-phase) as a secondary solidification phase in Mg-Zn-Y and Mg-Zn-Al base systems provides useful advantages in designing high performance wrought magnesium alloys. The strengthening in two-phase composites (I-phase + α -Mg) can be explained by dispersion hardening due to the presence of I-phase particles and by the strong bonding property at the I-phase/matrix interface. The presence of an additional secondary solidification phase can further enhance formability and mechanical properties. In Mg-Zn-Y alloys, the co-presence of I and Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 phases by addition of Ca can significantly enhance formability, while in Mg-Zn-Al alloys, the co-presence of the I-phase and Mg 2 Sn phase leads to the enhancement of mechanical properties. Dynamic and static recrystallization are significantly accelerated by addition of Ca in Mg-Zn-Y alloy, resulting in much smaller grain size and more random texture. The high strength of Mg-Zn-Al-Sn alloys is attributed to the presence of finely distributed Mg 2 Sn and I-phase particles embedded in the α -Mg matrix.

  13. Carbon Alloys-Multi-functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Eiichi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)], E-mail: yasuda.e.aa.@m.titech.ac.jp; Enami, Takashi; Hoteida, Nobuyuki [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Lanticse-Diaz, L.J. [University of the Philippines (Philippines); Tanabe, Yasuhiro [Nagoya University (Japan); Akatsu, Takashi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Last decade after our proposal of the 'Carbon Alloys' concept, many different kinds of Carbon Alloys, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, graphene sheet with magnetism, semi-conducting BCN compounds, graphite intercalation compounds, exfoliated carbon fiber, etc. have been found and developed. To extend the concept further, it is important to make it into intelligent materials by incorporating multiple functions. One example of the multi-functionalization is the development of homo-atomic Carbon Alloys from glassy carbon (GC) that exhibits high electrical conductivity and low gas permeability after treatment at critical conditions. Glassy carbon underwent metamorphosis to graphite spheres at HIP condition, and improved resistance to oxidation after alloying with Ta. The other one is shape utilization of the nano-sized carbon by understanding the effect of its large surfaces or interfaces in nanotechnology treatment. Recently carbon nanofiber was produced by polymer blend technology (PB) which was proposed by Prof. A. Oya during the Carbon Alloy project and progressed into intelligent carbon nanofiber (CNF) materials. CNF is combined into the polymer composites which is a candidate material for the bipolar separator in fuel cell. The superior properties, i.e., high electrical conductivity, high modulus, high strength, etc., of the CNF is being utilized in the preparation of this polymer composite.

  14. Synthesis of Nb-18%Al alloy by mechanical alloying method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymek, S.; Wrobel, M.; Dollar, M.

    1999-01-01

    The main goal of this study was attempt to employ by mechanical alloying to produce Nb-Al alloy. The Nb-rich alloy composition was selected in order to receive the ductile niobium solid solution (Nb ss ) phase in the final, equilibrium state. This ductile phase was believed to prevent crack propagation in the consolidated alloy and thus to improve its ductility and toughness. Elemental powders of niobium (99.8% pure and -325 mesh) and aluminium (99.9% pure and -325 mesh) were used as starting materials. These powders were mixed to give the nominal compositions od 82% Nb and 18% Al (atomic percent). Mechanical alloying was carried out in a Szegvari laboratory attritor mill in an argon atmosphere with the controlled oxygen level reduced to less than 10 ppm. The total milling time was 86 hours. During the course of milling powder samples were taken out after 5, 10 and 20 hours, which allowed characterization of the powder morphology and progress of the mechanical alloying process. The changes in particle morphology during milling were examined using a scanning electron microscope and the phase analysis was performed in a X-ray diffractometer with CoK α radiation. Initially, particles' size increased and their appearance changed from the regular to one of the flaky shape. X-ray diffraction patterns of examined powders as a function of milling time are presented. Peaks from Al, through much weaker than in the starting material, were still present after 5 hours of milling but disappeared completely after 10 hours of milling. With increasing milling time, the peaks became broader and their intensities decreased. Formation of amorphous phase was observed after 86 hours of milling. This was deducted from a diffuse halo observed at the 2Θ angle of about 27 o . Intermetallic phases Nb 3 Al and Nb 2 Al were found in the consolidated material only. (author)

  15. The mirostructure and surface hardness of Ti6Al4V alloy implanted with nitrogen ions at an elevated temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčák, P.; Černý, F.; Drahokoupil, Jan; Sepitka, J.; Tolde, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 620, Jan (2015), 48-54 ISSN 0925-8388 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hardening * microstructure * phase identification * phase quantification * ion implantation * titanium alloy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  16. Characterization of phases in complex metallic alloys Al73Mn27-xFex (x=2, 4 and 6)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Priputen, P.; Kusý, M.; Kriška, M.; Lipka, R.; Illeková, E.; Švec, P.; Buršík, Jiří; Svoboda, Milan; Dolinšek, J.; Janovec, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 12 (2009), s. 1047-1051 ISSN 0966-9795 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/1259 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : ternary alloy systems * phase identification * phase transformations Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 2.231, year: 2009

  17. Progress in development of iron base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackay, V.V.; Parker, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    The ways of development of new iron base high-strength alloys are considered. Perspectiveness of ferritic steel strengthening with intermetallides (TaFe 2 , for instance) is shown. Favourable combination of plasticity, strength and fracture toughness in nickel-free iron-manganese alloys (16-20%) is also pointed out. A strength level of alloyed maraging steels can be achieved by changes in chemical composition and by proper heat treatments of low- and medium-alloyed steels

  18. Fe-Cr-Ni system alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    Phase diagram of Fe-Cr-Ni system, which is the basic one for production of corrosion resistant alloys, is considered. Data on corrosion resistance of such alloys are correlated depending on a number of factors: quality and composition of modifying elements, corrosion medium, temperature, alloy structure, mechanical and thermal treatment. Grades of Fe-Ni-Cr alloys are presented, and fields of their application are pointed out

  19. Mechanical behaviour of aluminium-lithium alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aluminium-lithium alloys hold promise of providing a breakthrough response to the crying need for lightweight alloys for use as structurals in aerospace applications. Considerable worldwide research has gone into developing a range of these alloys over the last three decades. As a result, substantial understanding has ...

  20. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...

  1. Ti-Pt Alloys form mechanical milling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nxumalo, S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available C maximum in these alloys. A few researchers have studied the martensitic transformation in TiPt alloys using arc melted cast samples. In this work high temperature shape memory alloys are targeted using powder metallurgy as a processing route....

  2. Magnesium and related low alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.; Caillat, R.; Darras, R.

    1959-01-01

    In the first part the authors examine the comparative corrosion of commercial magnesium, of a magnesium-zirconium alloy (0,4 per cent ≤ Zr ≤ 0,7 per cent) of a ternary magnesium-zinc-zirconium alloy (0,8 per cent ≤ Zn ≤ 1,2 per cent) and of english 'Magnox type' alloys, in dry carbon dioxide-free air, in damp carbon dioxide-free air, and in dry and damp carbon dioxide, at temperatures from 300 to 600 deg. C. In the second part the structural stability of these materials is studied after annealings, of 10 to 1000 hours at 300 to 450 deg. C. Variations in grain after these heat treatments and mechanical stretching properties at room temperature are presented. Finally various creep rate and life time diagrams are given for these materials, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 450 deg. C. (author) [fr

  3. Chloride removal from plutonium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP

  4. beta Phase Growth and Precipitation in the 5xxx Series Aluminum Alloy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotto D'Antuono, Daniel

    The 5xxx series aluminum alloys are commonly used for structural applications due to their high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and weldability. This material system is a non-heat treatable aluminum and derives its strength from a super saturation of magnesium (3%>), and from cold rolling. While these materials have many admiral properties, they can undergo a process known as sensitization when exposed to elevated temperatures (50-280°C) for extended periods of time. During this process, magnesium segregates toward the grain boundaries and forms the secondary precipitate β phase (Al3Mg2). When exposed to harsh environments such as sea water, a galvanic couple is formed between the Al matrix and the β phase precipitates. The precipitates become anodic to the matrix and preferentially dissolve leaving gaps along the boundary network, ultimately leading to stress corrosion cracking. While this problem has been known to occur for some time now, questions relating to nucleation sites, misorientation dependence, effect of prior strain, and preferred temperature regimes remain unanswered. The work contained in this thesis attempted to better understand the kinetics, growth, and misorientation dependence, of β phase precipitation using in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments which allowed for direct visualization of the precipitation process. Orientation imaging using a Nanomegas/ASTAR system (OIM in TEM) coupled with the in situ experiments, along with elemental STEM EELs mapping were used to better understand the diffusion of Mg and found low angle boundaries as potential sites for nucleation. The resulting STEM EELs experiments also showed that Mg is much more stable at the grain boundaries than previously thought. Concurrent bulk ex-situ studies were used to compare various heat treatments, as well as to failed in service material showing that the low temperature treatments yield the metastable β’ phase more readily than the

  5. Hardness survey of cold-worked and heat-treated JBK-75 stainless steel alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Lucas, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The alloy JBK-75, an age-hardenable austenitic stainless steel, is similar to commercial A-286, but has certain chemistry modifications to improve weldability and hydrogen compatibility. The principal changes are an increase in nickel and a decrease in manganese with lower limits on carbon, phosphorus, sulfur, silicon, and boron. In this study, the effects of solutionizing time and temperature, quench rate, cold working, and the effects of cold working on precipitation kinetics were examined. Findings show that the solutionizing temperature has a moderate effect on the as-quenched hardness, while times greater than that required for solutionizing do not significantly affect hardness. Quench rate was found to have a small effect on as-quenched hardness, however, hardness gradients did not develop in small bars. It was found that JBK-75 can be significantly strengthened by cold working. Cold working alone produced hardness increases from Rockwell-A 49 to R/sub A/ 68. A recovery-related hardness change was noted on heat treating at 300 and 400 0 C for both as-quenched and as-worked JBK-75. Significant age-hardening was observed at temperatures as low as 500 0 C for as-worked metal. Aging at 600 0 C resulted in maximum hardness in the 75 percent worked sample at about 6 hours (R/sub A/ 73.5) while the 50 percent worked sample was near maximum hardness (R/sub A 72.5) after seven days. THE 25 and 0 percent worked samples were considerably underaged after seven days. Similar type kinetic data were obtained for worked and nonworked metal at 650, 700, 800, 850, 900, 1000, and 1100 0 C for times from 10 minutes to 10,000 minutes (6.7 days). The overall purpose of the hardness survey was to better define the effects of cold work on the stress-relieving range, coherent precipitation range, incoherent precipitation range, recrystallization range, solutionizing range, and grain-growth range

  6. Alloy phase stability and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocks, G.M.; Pope, E.P.; Giamei, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    At the level of basic quantum theory the papers in this symposium reflect the great progress that has been made in understanding the physical properties of both ordered and disordered alloys based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). DFT provides a quantitative parameter-free (often referred to as first principles) theory of the ground state properties of these systems. This general approach has also been used in combination with classical elasticity and dislocation theory to provide the first quantitative understanding of some of the mechanical properties of intermetallic alloys. Recent advances have built on DFT theory to provide the first glimpses of a theory of the finite temperature phase stability of alloys. It is the strength of these first principles theories that the understanding of materials properties is in terms of the underlying electronic structure. At the level of atomistic simulation, based on semi-empirical potentials, again much progress has been made in understanding the properties of extended defects such as grain boundaries and dislocations. On the experimental front increasingly sophisticated tools are being brought to bear in order to understand both the underlying electronic structure and detailed atomic arrangements. This information, together with input from theory, is playing an increasing role in guiding alloy design efforts. At the more practical level a number of these sophisticated alloy design efforts have in recent years produced impressive results across a broad front. The properties of existing materials are continually being improved and new ones developed. Often this progress is based on a deeper understanding of the properties at the atomistic and electronic level. The design of new ordered intermetallic alloys that have reached or are reaching commercialization represents one of the major achievements of this investment of intellectual resources

  7. Theoretical studies of metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, J.S.; Wille, L.T.

    1991-07-01

    A new method to predict and understand the structure and phase stability of solid-solution alloys from a knowledge only of the atomic numbers of the constituent atoms is being developed. The coherent potential approximation will be used to obtain the electronic contribution to the energy and the Monte Carlo method of statistical mechanics will be used for the thermodynamic part of the calculation. An improved coherent potential approximation will be developed by combining the standard approach with the quadratic KKR (QKKR) band theory method. This will make it easier to predict the properties of alloys from first principles. The QKKR method will be developed further

  8. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  9. Hydrogen effects in aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Dexter, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The permeability of six commercial aluminum alloys to deuterium and tritium was determined by several techniques. Surface films inhibited permeation under most conditions; however, contact with lithium deuteride during the tests minimized the surface effects. Under these conditions phi/sub D 2 / = 1.9 x 10 -2 exp (--22,400/RT) cc (NTP)atm/sup -- 1 / 2 / s -1 cm -1 . The six alloys were also tested before, during, and after exposure to high pressure hydrogen, and no hydrogen-induced effects on the tensile properties were observed

  10. Phosphorus containing sintered alloys (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchnik, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus additives are considered for their effect on the properties of sintered alloys of different applications: structural, antifriction, friction, magnetic, hard, superhard, heavy etc. Data are presented on compositions and properties of phosphorus-containing materials produced by the powder metallurgy method. Phosphorus is shown to be an effective activator of sintering in some cases. When its concentration in the material is optimal it imparts the material such properties as strength, viscosity, hardness, wear resistance. Problems concerning powder metallurgy of amorphous phosphorus-containing alloys are reported

  11. Hot workability of aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yeon Chul; Oh, Kyung Jin

    1986-01-01

    Hot Workability of aluminium alloys, 2024, 6061 and 7075, has been studied by hot torsion tests at temperatures from 320 to 515 deg C and at strain rates from 1.26 x 10 -3 to 5.71 x 10 -3 sec -1 . Hot working condition of these aluminium alloys was determined quantitatively from the constitutive equations obtained from flow stress curves in torsion. Experimental data of the logarith of the Zener-Hollomonn parameter showed good linear relationships to the logarith of sinh(ασ-bar)

  12. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples.

  13. Mechanical properties of ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1977-06-01

    A survey is given of the metallophysical fundamentals of the mechanical properties of ordered two-phase alloys. Alloys of this type have a superlattice structure in a substitution mixed crystal. Ordering is achieved by slow cooling or by annealing below the critical temperature, during which ordering domains (antiphase domains) are formed. At a high degree of ordering, the dislocations are concentrated to form pairs, so-called super-dislocations. The mechanical properties may be selectively changed by varying different parameters (size of the ordering domains, degree of ordering, energy of the antiphase boundaries) by a special composition and heat treatment.(GSC) [de

  14. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  15. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  16. An introduction to surface alloying of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Hosmani, Santosh S; Goyal, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    An Introduction to Surface Alloying of Metals aims to serve as a primer to the basic aspects of surface alloying of metals. The book serves to elucidate fundamentals of surface modification and their engineering applications. The book starts with basics of surface alloying and goes on to cover key surface alloying methods, such as carburizing, nitriding, chromizing, duplex treatment, and the characterization of surface layers. The book will prove useful to students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, as also to researchers and practitioners looking for a quick introduction to surface alloying.

  17. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  18. Hot deformation behavior of AA5383 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rou; Giraud, Eliane; Mareau, Charles; Ayed, Yessine; Santo, Philippe Dal

    2018-05-01

    Hot forming processes are widely used in deep drawing applications due to the ability of metallic materials to sustain large deformations. The optimization of such forming processes often requires the mechanical behavior to be accurately described. In this study, the hot temperature behavior of a 5383 aluminum alloy is investigated. In this perspective, different uniaxial tension tests have been carried out on dog-bone shaped specimens using a specific experimental device. The temperature and strain rate ranges of interest are 623˜723 K and 0.0001˜0.1 s-1, respectively. An inverse method has been used to determine the flow curves from the experimental force-displacement data. The material exhibits a slight flow stress increase beyond the yield point for most configurations. Softening phenomenon exists at high strain rates and high temperatures. A new model based on the modification of a modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is proposed to describe the stress-strain responses. Genetic algorithm optimization method is used for the identification of parameters for the new model. It is found that the new model has a good predictability under the experimental conditions. The application of this model is validated by shear and notched tension tests.

  19. Investigating aluminum alloy reinforced by graphene nanoflakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S.J., E-mail: shaojiuyan@126.com [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Dai, S.L.; Zhang, X.Y.; Yang, C.; Hong, Q.H.; Chen, J.Z. [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Lin, Z.M. [Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2014-08-26

    As one of the most important engineering materials, aluminum alloys have been widely applied in many fields. However, the requirement of enhancing their mechanical properties without sacrificing the ductility is always a challenge in the development of aluminum alloys. Thanks to the excellent physical and mechanical properties, graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) have been applied as promising reinforcing elements in various engineering materials, including polymers and ceramics. However, the investigation of GNFs as reinforcement phase in metals or alloys, especially in aluminum alloys, is still very limited. In this study, the aluminum alloy reinforced by GNFs was successfully prepared via powder metallurgy approach. The GNFs were mixed with aluminum alloy powders through ball milling and followed by hot isostatic pressing. The green body was then hot extruded to obtain the final GNFs reinforced aluminum alloy nanocomposite. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope analysis show that GNFs were well dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix and no chemical reactions were observed at the interfaces between the GNFs and aluminum alloy matrix. The mechanical properties' testing results show that with increasing filling content of GNFs, both tensile and yield strengths were remarkably increased without losing the ductility performance. These results not only provided a pathway to achieve the goal of preparing high strength aluminum alloys with excellent ductilitybut they also shed light on the development of other metal alloys reinforced by GNFs.

  20. Environmental fatigue in aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit similar environmental fatigue crack growth characteristics compared to conventional 2000 series alloys and are more resistant to environmental fatigue compared to 7000 series alloys. The superior fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 is due to crack closure caused by tortuous crack path morphology and crack surface corrosion products. At high R and reduced closure, chemical environment effects are pronounced resulting in accelerated near threshold da/dN. The beneficial effects of crack closure are minimized for small cracks resulting in rapid growth rates. Limited data suggest that the 'chemically small crack' effect, observed in other alloy system, is not pronounced in Al-Li alloys. Modeling of environmental fatigue in Al-Li-Cu alloys related accelerated fatigue crack growth in moist air and salt water to hydrogen embrittlement.

  1. Applications of shape memory alloys in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, a first application of shape memory TiNi alloy was a moving flap in an air-conditioner which was developed as sensing function of shape memory alloy at Matsushista Electric Industrial Co. Then, shape memory utilized in a coffee maker, an electric rice-cooker, a thermal mixing valve and etc. were commercialized in Japan. And brassiere wires, a guide wire for medical treatment, an antenna for portable telephone and others were commercialized utilizing superelasticity. At the same time with these commercial products, there was not only progress in fabrication technology to effect accurate transformation temperature, but also the discovery of small hysteresis alloy such as R-phase or TiNiCu alloy and low transformation temperature alloy such as TiNiFe, TiNiV and TiNiCo alloys. Therefore the shape memory alloy market has expanded widely to electric appliances, automobile, residence, medical care and other field today. (orig.)

  2. Requirements of titanium alloys for aeronautical industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiban, Brânduşa; Bran, Dragoş-Teodor; Elefterie, Cornelia Florina

    2018-02-01

    The project presents the requirements imposed for aeronatical components made from Titanium based alloys. Asignificant portion of the aircraft pylons are manufactured from Titanium alloys. Strength, weight, and reliability are the primary factors to consider in aircraft structures. These factors determine the requirements to be met by any material used to construct or repair the aircraft. Many forces and structural stresses act on an aircraft when it is flying and when it is static and this thesis describes environmental factors, conditions of external aggression, mechanical characteristics and loadings that must be satisfied simultaneously by a Ti-based alloy, compared to other classes of aviation alloys (as egg. Inconel super alloys, Aluminum alloys). For this alloy class, the requirements are regarding strength to weight ratio, reliability, corrosion resistance, thermal expansion and so on. These characteristics additionally continue to provide new opportunities for advanced manufacturing methods.

  3. Aeronautical Industry Requirements for Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bran, D. T.; Elefterie, C. F.; Ghiban, B.

    2017-06-01

    The project presents the requirements imposed for aviation components made from Titanium based alloys. A significant portion of the aircraft pylons are manufactured from Titanium alloys. Strength, weight, and reliability are the primary factors to consider in aircraft structures. These factors determine the requirements to be met by any material used to construct or repair the aircraft. Many forces and structural stresses act on an aircraft when it is flying and when it is static and this thesis describes environmental factors, conditions of external aggression, mechanical characteristics and loadings that must be satisfied simultaneously by a Ti-based alloy, compared to other classes of aviation alloys (as egg. Inconel super alloys, Aluminum alloys).For this alloy class, the requirements are regarding strength to weight ratio, reliability, corrosion resistance, thermal expansion and so on. These characteristics additionally continue to provide new opportunities for advanced manufacturing methods.

  4. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids

  5. Irradiation effects in magnesium and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure, mechanical properties and swelling of several magnesium and aluminium alloys were studied. The neutron fluences of 2-3 X 10 22 n/cm 2 , >0.2 MeV produced displacement doses of 20 to 45 displacements per atom (dpa). Ductility of the magnesium alloys was severely reduced by irradiation induced recrystallization and precipitation of various forms. Precipitation of transmuted silicon occurred in the aluminium alloys. However, the effect on ductility was much less than for the magnesium alloys. The magnesium and aluminium alloys had excellent resistance to swelling: The best magnesium alloy was Mg/3.0 wt% Al/0.19 wt% Ca; its density decreased by only 0.13%. The best aluminium alloy was 6063, with a density decrease of 0.22%. (Auth.)

  6. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  7. Heat treatment of nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.F. Jr.; Clatworthy, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    A heat treating process is described that can be used to produce desired combinations of strength, ductility, and fabricability characteristics in heat resistant age-hardenable alloys having precipitation-hardening amounts of niobium, titanium, and/or tantalum in a nickel-containing matrix. (U.S.)

  8. Electroplated zinc-cobalt alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.E.O.S.; Farr, J.P.G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on the deposition and use of ectrodeposited zinc-cobalt alloys is surveyed. Alloys containing lower of Nuclear quantities of cobalt are potentially more useful. The structures of the deposits is related to their chemical and mechanical properties. The inclusion of oxide and its role in the deposition mechanism may be significant. Chemical and engineering properties relate to the metallurgical structure of the alloys, which derives from the mechanism of deposition. The inclusion of oxides and hydroxides in the electroplate may provide evidence for this mechanism. Electrochemical impedance measurements have been made at significant deposition potentials, in alkaline electrolytes. These reveal a complex electrode behaviour which depends not only on the electrode potential but on the Co content of the electrolyte. For the relevant range of cathodic potential zinc-cobalt alloy electrodeposition occurs through a stratified interface. The formation of an absorbed layer ZnOH/sup +/ is the initial step, this inhibits the deposition of cobalt at low cathodic potentials, so explaining its 'anomalous deposition'. A porous layer of zinc forms on the adsorbed ZnOH/sup +/ at underpotential. As the potential becomes more cathodic, cobalt co- deposits from its electrolytic complex forming a metallic solid solution of Co in Zn. In electrolytes containing a high concentration of cobalt a mixed entity (ZnCo)/sub +/ is assumed to adsorb at the cathode from which a CoZn intermetallic deposits. (author)

  9. Research on modulated structure alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Tokuzo; Saito, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Kenki

    1982-01-01

    Research was carried out for the purposes of clarifying the cause of modulated structure formation, developing the structure control method utilizing modulated structure and clarifying the suitability of modulated structure alloys as radiation damage-resisting materials. The research on structure control method encountered a difficulty in the analysis of experimental results, bu the following results were obtained in the other items. The method of solving a diffusion equation including a nonlinear term was found in course of the clarification of the cause of modulated structure formation. As a means of detecting faint unevenness in solid solution, of which the deviation of composition is a few %, the structure analysis method utilizing magnetic property was developed. This method was applied to Ni-9.6 at.% Ti alloy, and the process of expanding amplitude in composition variation in spinodal decomposition and the formation of solute atomshort region at the time of nucleation-growth were confirmed. Utilizing the high energy electron beam generated in a superhigh voltage electron microscope, electron beam irradiation experiment was carried out on precipitation hardening alloys with modulated structure. As the result, it was found that in Ni-Ti alloy, the amount of void swelling resistance showed the change with the increase of modulated structure period. (Kako, I.)

  10. Palladium alloys for hydrogen diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A palladium-base alloy with tin and/or a silicon addition and its use in the production of hydrogen from water via a cycle of chemical reactions, of which the decomposition of HI into H 2 and I 2 is the most important, is described

  11. Introduction to hydrogen in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westlake, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    Substitutional alloys, both those that form hydrides and those that do not, are discussed, but with more emphasis on the former than the latter. This overview includes the following closely related subjects: (1) the significant effects of substitutional solutes on the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) equilibria of metal-hydrogen systems, (2) the changes in thermodynamic properties resulting from differences in atom size and from modifications of electronic structure, (3) attractive and repulsive interactions between H and solute atoms and the effects of such interactions on the pressure dependent solubility for H, (4) H trapping in alloys of Group V metals and its effect on the terminal solubility for H (TSH), (5) some other mechanisms invoked to explain the enhancement (due to alloying) of the (TSH) in Group V metals, and (6) H-impurity complexes in alloys of the metals Ni, Co, and Fe. Some results showing that an enhanced TSH may ameliorate the resistance of a metal to hydrogen embrittlement are presented

  12. Iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A specification is given for iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloys suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding, which utilize the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and are characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. A range of compositions is given. (author)

  13. Electroless alloy/composite coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The market for these coatings is expanding fast as the potential applications are on the rise. In the present article, an attempt has been made to review different electroless alloy/composite coatings with respect to bath types and their composition, properties and applications. Different characterisation studies have been ...

  14. Hydrostatic extrusion of magnesium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillekens, W.H.; Bohlen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with the capabilities and limitations of the hydrostatic extrusion process for the manufacturing of magnesium alloy sections. Firstly, the process basics for the hydrostatic extrusion of materials in general and of magnesium in particular are introduced. Next, some recent research

  15. A Fundamental Study of Laser Beam Welding Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2195 for Cryogenic Tank Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martukanitz, R. P.; Jan. R.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the potential for decreasing costs of joining stiffeners to skin by laser beam welding, a fundamental research program was conducted to address the impediments identified during an initial study involving laser beam welding of aluminum-lithium alloys. Initial objectives of the program were the identification of governing mechanism responsible for process related porosity while establishing a multivariant relationship between process parameters and fusion zone geometry for laser beam welds of alloy 2195. A three-level fractional factorial experiment was conducted to establish quantitative relationships between primary laser beam processing parameters and critical weld attributes. Although process consistency appeared high for welds produced during partial completion of this study, numerous cracks on the top-surface of the welds were discovered during visual inspection and necessitated additional investigations concerning weld cracking. Two experiments were conducted to assess the effect of filler alloy additions on crack sensitivity: the first experiment was used to ascertain the effects of various filler alloys on cracking and the second experiment involved modification to process parameters for increasing filler metal dilution. Results indicated that filler alloys 4047 and 4145 showed promise for eliminating cracking.

  16. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed Ali, Samar Reda; Hussein, Abdel Hamid Ahmed; Nofal, Adel Abdel Menam Saleh; Elgazzar, Haytham Abdelrafea; Sabour, Hassan Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm−2. An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times. PMID:29036935

  17. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Reda Al-Sayed Ali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm−2. An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times.

  18. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed Ali, Samar Reda; Hussein, Abdel Hamid Ahmed; Nofal, Adel Abdel Menam Saleh; Hasseb Elnaby, Salah Elden Ibrahim; Elgazzar, Haytham Abdelrafea; Sabour, Hassan Abdel

    2017-10-15

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm -2 . An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times.

  19. Stability study of the γ phase in U-Nb-Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arico, S.F; Hermida, J.D; Gribaudo, L.M

    2006-01-01

    The development of new low enrichment nuclear fuels for research and radioisotope production reactors imposes the knowledge of properties and behaviors about a series of alloys which the reducing of U 235 (fissionable) concentration is compensated with a greater density of this element inside the fuel. One of these series is composed by U alloys with different contents of alloying, that allow to retain the body centered cubic structure solid solution recognized as phase α in metastable condition at low temperatures. For the present work 10 U based alloys were manufactured with different concentrations containing up to 43,7 % zirconium weight and up to 7,3 % niobium weight. An arch oven was utilized with argon atmosphere. The identification of the present phases in massive samples from the melting was carried out through X-rays diffraction analysis. The results obtained in this work are compared with others results published since the year 1957. In the samples melted the intermetallic UZr 2 diminishes in quantity with the reduction of the composition of Zr in the alloys. In all of them were identified, besides, Zr 6 Fe 3 O, ZrO 0,35 , α and U 3 O 8 present in quantities reduced. The quantity of the two last phases diminishes at the same time with the content in Zr. The parameter of network of the cubic phase γU in these alloys can be represented for the equation: α=(3,5796 -0,1616.x Nb +0,1155.x Zr )/(1.0306+0,003.x Nb -0,0068.x Zr . The parameter of network of the γ phase was measured. Comparing it measured with the value calculated, for eight alloys, the proposed equation showed a very good adjustment (HC)

  20. Studies on neutron irradiation effects of iron alloys and nickel-base heat resistant alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Katsutoshi

    1987-09-01

    The present paper describes the results of neutron irradiation effects on iron alloys and nickel-base heat resistant alloys. As for the iron alloys, irradiation hardening and embrittlement were investigated using internal friction measurement, electron microscopy and tensile testings. The role of alloying elements was also investigated to understand the irradiation behavior of iron alloys. The essential factors affecting irradiation hardening and embrittlement were thus clarified. On the other hand, postirradiation tensile and creep properties were measured of Hastelloy X alloy. Irradiation behavior at elevated temperatures is discussed. (author)

  1. Oxide characterization and hydrogen behaviors of Zr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Kim, D. J.; Kwon, S. H.; Lee, H. S.; Oh, S. J.; Yim, B. J.; Son, S. B.; Yun, S. P.

    2006-03-01

    The work scope and contents of the research are as follows : basic properties of zirconium alloys, hydrogen pick-up mechanism of zirconium alloy, effects of hydride on the corrosion behaviors of zirconium alloys, estimation on stress of oxide layer in the zirconium alloy, microstructure and characteristic of oxide in pre-hydrided zirconium alloys

  2. Structures and Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage Properties of the As-Spun RE-Mg-Ni-Co-Al-Based AB2-Type Alloys Applied to Ni-MH Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanghuan; Yuan, Zeming; Shang, Hongwei; Li, Yaqin; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Dongliang

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the La0.8- x Ce0.2Y x MgNi3.5Co0.4Al0.1 ( x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2) alloys were synthesized via smelting and melt spinning. The effect of Y content on the structure and electrochemical hydrogen storage characteristics of the as-cast and spun alloys was investigated. The identifications of XRD and SEM demonstrate that the experimental alloys possess a major phase LaMgNi4 and a minor phase LaNi5. The variation of Y content results in an obvious transformation of the phase abundance rather than phase composition in the alloys, namely LaMgNi4 phase increases while LaNi5 phase decreases with Y content growing. Furthermore, the replacement of Y for La causes the lattice constants and cell volume to clearly decrease and markedly refines the alloy grains. The electrochemical tests reveal that these alloys can obtain the maximum values of discharge capacity at the first cycling without any activation needed. With Y content growing, the discharge capacity of the alloys obviously declines, but its cycle stability remarkably improves. Moreover, the electrochemical dynamics of the alloys, involving the high-rate discharge ability, hydrogen diffusion coefficient ( D), limiting current density ( I L), and charge transfer rate, initially augment and then decrease with rising Y content.

  3. Progressive degradation of alloy 690 and the development of a significant improvement in alloy 800CR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staehle, Roger W.; Arioka, Koji; Tapping, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The present most widely used alloys for tubing in steam generators and structural materials in water cooled reactors are Alloy 690 and Alloy 800. However, both alloys, while improved over Alloy 600 may not meet the needs of longer range applications in the range of 80-100 years. Alloy 690 sustains damage resulting from the formation of cavities at grain boundaries which eventually cover about 50% of the area of the grain boundaries with the remainder covering being covered with carbides. The cavities seem to nucleate on the carbides leaving the grain boundaries a structure of cavities and carbides. Such a structure will lead the Alloy 690 to fail completely. Normal Alloy 800 does not produce such cavities and probably retains a large amount of its corrosion resistance but does sustain progressive SCC at low rate. A new alloy, 800CR, has been developed in a collaboration among Arioka, Tapping, and Staehle. This alloy is based on a Cr composition of 23.5-27% with the remainder retaining the previous Alloy 800 composition. 800CR sustains a crack velocity about 100 times less than Alloy 690 and a negligible rate of initiation. The 800CR, alloy is now seeking a patent. (authors)

  4. Muon identification in JADE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of identification of high energy muons in the JADE detector is described in detail. The performance of the procedure is discussed in detail for the case of prompt identification in multihadronic final states. (orig.)

  5. Identification for Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøffner-Clausen, S.

    1995-01-01

    Identification of model error bounds for robust control design has recently achieved much attention.......Identification of model error bounds for robust control design has recently achieved much attention....

  6. Phase formation in multicomponent monotectic aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirkovic, Djordje; Groebner, Joachim; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer [Institute of Metallurgy, Clausthal University of Technology (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Alloys with a miscibility gap in the liquid state are potential materials for advanced bearings in automotive and other applications. While binary alloys, such as Al-Pb or Al-Bi, are well known, the information available for ternary monotectic Al-alloys is scarce. However, the phase formation in multicomponent alloys is not only more challenging from a scientific aspect, it is also a prerequisite for a focused development of advanced alloys. This motivated our detailed study of monotectic Al-Bi-Cu-Sn alloys including both experimental and computational thermodynamic methods. Based on the initially established systematic classification of monotectic ternary Al-alloys, the first promising monotectic reaction was observed in the ternary Al-Bi-Zn system. Further ternary systems Al-Cu-Sn, Al-Bi-Sn, Al-Bi-Cu and Bi-Cu-Sn were investigated as basis for quaternary Al-Bi-Cu-Sn alloys. Experimental investigations of phase equilibria, enthalpies and solidification microstructures were combined with thermodynamic modeling. The results demonstrate that the developed precise thermodynamic description is vital to reveal the distinct multicomponent monotectic features of pertinent phase diagrams. The solidification paths of ternary monotectic alloy systems, Al-Bi-Zn, Al-Sn-Cu and Al-Bi-Cu, were also studied using thermodynamic calculations, revealing specific details of phase formation during solidification of selected alloys.

  7. Equiatomic quaternary Heusler alloys: A material perspective for spintronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bainsla, Lakhan, E-mail: lakhanbainsla@gmail.com, E-mail: suresh@phy.iitb.ac.in; Suresh, K. G., E-mail: lakhanbainsla@gmail.com, E-mail: suresh@phy.iitb.ac.in [Magnetic Materials Lab, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-09-15

    found to be in agreement with those estimated using the Slater-Pauling rule in most of the cases. Electrical resistivity and Hall measurements are being used to distinguish between SGS and HMF nature in detail. The current spin polarization value, P = 0.70 ± 0.01, for CoFeMnGe is found to be highest among the EQHAs. CoFeMnSi and CoFeCrGa are found to show SGS behavior with high Curie temperatures, thus making them suitable substitutes for diluted magnetic semiconductors. CoRuFeSi is found to have the highest T{sub C} among EQHAs. Theoretical prediction of magnetic properties on the basis of electronic structure calculations has also been reported in a few systems, which are also discussed in this review. Thus, this review presents a consolidated picture of the magnetic and spintronic properties of this important, but relatively new class of Heusler alloys. It is expected that this will stimulate further interest in these alloys, thereby paving the way for the identification of more HMF and SGS materials. As a result of this, it is expected that more efficient spintronic devices using these alloys would emerge in the near future.

  8. Corrosion-electrochemical behaviour and mechanical properties ofaluminium alloy-321, alloyed by barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiev, I.; Mukhiddinov, G.N.; Kargapolova, T.V.; Mirsaidov, U.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of present work is studying of influence of barium additionson electrochemical corrosion of casting aluminium-copper alloy Al-321,containing as base alloying components copper, chromium, manganese, titanium,zirconium, cadmium

  9. Investigation on mechanical alloying process for v-cr-ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanciulescu, M.; Carlan, P.; Mihalache, M.; Bucsa, G.; Abrudeanu, M.; Galateanu, A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical alloying (MA) is an efficient approach for fabricating oxide-dispersion alloys and structural materials including vanadium alloys for fusion and fission application. Dissolution behaviour of the alloying elements is a key issue for optimizing the mechanical alloying process in fabricating vanadium alloys. This paper studies the MA process of V-4wt.%Cr-4wt.%Ti alloy. The outcomes of the MA powders in a planetary ball mill are reported in terms of powder particle size and morphology evolution and elemental composition. The impact of spark-plasma sintering process on the mechanically alloyed powder is analysed. An optimal set of sintering parameters, including the maximum temperature, the dwell time and the heating rate are determined. (authors)

  10. Crevice corrosion propagation on alloy 625 and alloy C276 in natural seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCafferty, E.; Bogar, F.D.; Thomas, E.D. II; Creegan, C.A.; Lucas, K.E.; Kaznoff, A.I.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical composition of the aqueous solution within crevices on two different Ni-Cr-Mo-Fe alloys immersed in natural seawater was determined using a semiquantitative thin-layer chromatographic method. Active crevices were found to contain concentrated amounts of dissolved Ni 2+ , Cr 3+ , Mo 3+ , and Fe 2+ ions. Propagation of crevice corrosion for the two alloys was determined from anodic polarization curves in model crevice solutions based upon stoichiometric dissolution or selective dissolution of alloy components. Both alloys 625 (UNS N06625) and C276 (UNS N10276) underwent crevice corrosion in the model crevice electrolytes. For the model crevice solution based upon selective dissolution of alloy constituents, the anodic dissolution rate for alloy 625 was higher than that for alloy C276. This trend was reversed for the model crevice solution based upon uniform dissolution of alloy constituents

  11. Effects of segregation of primary alloying elements on the creep response in magnesium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Y.D.; Dieringa, H.; Hort, N.

    2008-01-01

    The segregation of primary alloying elements deteriorates the high temperature creep resistance of magnesium alloys. Annealing at high temperatures alleviating their segregations can improve the creep resistance. Present investigation on the effect of segregation of primary alloying elements...... on the creep response may provide some useful information about how to improve the creep resistance of magnesium alloys in the future. (c) 2008 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Swelling in neutron-irradiated titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.T.

    1982-04-01

    Immersion density measurements have been performed on a series of titanium alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a fluence of 5 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 450 and 550 0 C. The materials irradiated were the near-alpha alloys Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S, the alpha-beta alloy Ti-64, and the beta alloy Ti-38644. Swelling was observed in all alloys with the greater swelling being observed at 550 0 C. Microstructural examination revealed the presence of voids in all alloys. Ti-38644 was found to be the most radiation resistant. Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S also displayed good radiation resistance, whereas considerable swelling and precipitation were observed in Ti-64 at 550 0 C

  13. A highly ductile magnesium alloy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W; Liu, H

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are finding increasing applications in industry mainly due to their high strength-to-weight ratio. However, they have intrinsically poor plastic deformation ability at room temperature. Therefore, the vast majority of Mg alloys are used only in cast state, severely limiting the development of their applications. We have recently discovered a new Mg alloy system that possesses exceptionally high ductility as well as good mechanical strength. The superior plasticity allows this alloy system to be mechanically deformed at room temperature, directly from an as-cast alloy plate, sheet or ingot into working parts. This type of cold mechanical forming properties has never been reported with any other Mg alloy systems.

  14. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  15. Corrosion resistance of titanium alloys for dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskawiec, J.; Michalik, R.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys belong to biomaterials which the application scope in medicine increases. Some properties of the alloys, such as high mechanical strength, low density, low Young's modulus, high corrosion resistance and good biotolerance decide about it. The main areas of the application of titanium and its alloys are: orthopedics and traumatology, cardiosurgery, faciomaxillary surgery and dentistry. The results of investigations concerning the corrosion resistance of the technical titanium and Ti6Al14V alloy and comparatively a cobalt alloy of the Vitallium type in the artificial saliva is presented in the work. Significantly better corrosion resistance of titanium and the Ti6Al14V than the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was found. (author)

  16. Anodic oxidation of Ta/Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mato, S.; Alcala, G.; Thompson, G.E.; Skeldon, P.; Shimizu, K.; Habazaki, H.; Quance, T.; Graham, M.J.; Masheder, D.

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of iron during anodizing of sputter-deposited Ta/Fe alloys in ammonium pentaborate electrolyte has been examined by transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anodic films on Ta/1.5 at.% Fe, Ta/3 at.% Fe and Ta/7 at.% Fe alloys are amorphous and featureless and develop at high current efficiency with respective formation ratios of 1.67, 1.60 and 1.55 nm V -1 . Anodic oxidation of the alloys proceeds without significant enrichment of iron in the alloy in the vicinity of the alloy/film interface and without oxygen generation during film growth, unlike the behaviour of Al/Fe alloys containing similar concentrations of iron. The higher migration rate of iron species relative to that of tantalum ions leads to the formation of an outer iron-rich layer at the film surface

  17. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.T.

    1998-03-10

    Alloys are disclosed for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1{+-}0.8%)Al--(1.0{+-}0.8%)Mo--(0.7 + 0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques. 4 figs.

  18. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co 71 4 Fe 4 6 Si 9 6 B 14 4 were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400 0 C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400 0 C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation

  19. Phase transformations during sintering of mechanically alloyed TiPt

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nxumalo, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Page 307 SMA alloys have been successfully used in several applications including medical, automotive and aerospace as stents, couplings and actuators. The most successful shape memory alloys currently are the NiTi alloys. These are however...

  20. Laser cladding of quasicrystalline alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audebert, F.; Sirkin, H.; Colaco, R.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Quasicrystals are a new class of ordinated structures with metastable characteristics room temperature. Quasicrystalline phases can be obtained by rapid quenching from the melt of some alloys. In general, quasicrystals present properties which make these alloys promising for wear and corrosion resistant coatings applications. During the last years, the development of quasicrystalline coatings by means of thermal spray techniques has been impulsed. However, no references have been found of their application by means of laser techniques. In this work four claddings of quasicrystalline compositions formed over aluminium substrate, produced by a continuous CO 2 laser using simultaneous powders mixture injection are presented. The claddings were characterized by X ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness. (Author) 18 refs

  1. Digital Alloy Absorber for Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the spectral response range and improve the mobility of the photo-generated carriers (e.g. in an nBn photodetector), a digital alloy absorber may be employed by embedding one (or fraction thereof) to several monolayers of a semiconductor material (insert layers) periodically into a different host semiconductor material of the absorber layer. The semiconductor material of the insert layer and the host semiconductor materials may have lattice constants that are substantially mismatched. For example, this may performed by periodically embedding monolayers of InSb into an InAsSb host as the absorption region to extend the cutoff wavelength of InAsSb photodetectors, such as InAsSb based nBn devices. The described technique allows for simultaneous control of alloy composition and net strain, which are both key parameters for the photodetector operation.

  2. Phonons in fcc binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Amita; Rathore, R.P.S.

    1992-01-01

    Born-Mayer potential has been modified to account for the unpaired (three body) forces among the common nearest neighbours of the ordered binary fcc alloys i.e. Ni 3 Fe 7 , Ni 5 Fe 5 and Ni 75 Fe 25 . The three body potential is added to the two body form of Morse to formalize the total interaction potential. Measured inverse ionic compressibility, cohesive energy, lattice constant and one measured phonon frequency are used to evaluate the defining parameters of the potential. The potential seeks to bring about the binding among 140 and 132 atoms though pair wise (two body) and non-pair wise (three body) forces respectively. The phonon-dispersion relations obtained by solving the secular equation are compared with the experimental findings on the aforesaid alloys. (author). 19 refs., 3 figs

  3. Sulfidation/oxidation resistant alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.D.; Tassen, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The patent describes a nickel-base, high chromium alloy. It is characterized by excellent resistance to sulfidation and oxidation at elevated temperatures as high as 2000 degrees F. (1093 degrees C.) and higher, a stress-rupture life of about 200 hours or more at a temperature at least as high as 1800 degrees F. (990:0083 degrees C.) and under a stress of 2000 psi, good tensile strength and good ductility both at room and elevated temperature. The alloy consists essentially of about 27 to 35% chromium, about 2.5 to 5% aluminum, about 2.5 to about 6% iron, 0.5 to 2.5% columbium, up to 0.1% carbon, up to 1% each of titanium and zirconium, up to 0.05% cerium, up to 0.05% yttrium, up to 1% silicon, up to 1% manganese, and the balance nickel

  4. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Heats of transformation of eutectic alloys were measured for many binary and ternary systems by differential scanning calorimetry and thermal analysis. Only the relatively cheap and plentiful elements Mg, Al, Si, P, Ca, Cu, Zn were considered. A method for measuring volume change during transformation was developed using x-ray absorption in a confined sample. Thermal expansion coefficients of both solid and liquid states of aluminum and of its eutectics with copper and with silicon also were determined. Preliminary evaluation of containment materials lead to the selection of silicon carbide as the initial material for study. Possible applications of alloy PCMs for heat storage in conventional and solar central power stations, small solar receivers and industrial furnace operations are under consideration.

  5. Stochastic simulation of nucleation in binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    L’vov, P. E.; Svetukhin, V. V.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, we simulate nucleation in binary alloys with respect to thermal fluctuations of the alloy composition. The simulation is based on the Cahn–Hilliard–Cook equation. We have considered the influence of some fluctuation parameters (wave vector cutoff and noise amplitude) on the kinetics of nucleation and growth of minority phase precipitates. The obtained results are validated by the example of iron–chromium alloys.

  6. Recent developments in advanced aircraft aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dursun, Tolga; Soutis, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • To compete with composites, performance of aluminium alloys should be increased. • Al–Li alloys have higher strength, fracture and fatigue/corrosion resistance. • Improvements of aerospace Al alloys are due to optimised solute content and ratios. • In selecting new materials, there should be no reduction in the level of safety. • The use of hybrid materials could provide additional opportunities for Al alloys. - Abstract: Aluminium alloys have been the primary material for the structural parts of aircraft for more than 80 years because of their well known performance, well established design methods, manufacturing and reliable inspection techniques. Nearly for a decade composites have started to be used more widely in large commercial jet airliners for the fuselage, wing as well as other structural components in place of aluminium alloys due their high specific properties, reduced weight, fatigue performance and corrosion resistance. Although the increased use of composite materials reduced the role of aluminium up to some extent, high strength aluminium alloys remain important in airframe construction. Aluminium is a relatively low cost, light weight metal that can be heat treated and loaded to relatively high level of stresses, and it is one of the most easily produced of the high performance materials, which results in lower manufacturing and maintenance costs. There have been important recent advances in aluminium aircraft alloys that can effectively compete with modern composite materials. This study covers latest developments in enhanced mechanical properties of aluminium alloys, and high performance joining techniques. The mechanical properties on newly developed 2000, 7000 series aluminium alloys and new generation Al–Li alloys are compared with the traditional aluminium alloys. The advantages and disadvantages of the joining methods, laser beam welding and friction stir welding, are also discussed

  7. Characterization of aluminium alloys rapidly solidified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discussed the investigation of the microstructural and mechanical properties of the aluminium alloys (3003; 7050; Al-9% Mg) rapidly solidified by melt spinning process (cooling rate 10 4 - 10 6 K/s). The rapidly solidification process of the studied aluminium alloys brought a microcrystallinity, a minimum presence of coarse precipitation and, also, better mechanical properties of them comparing to the same alloys using ingot process. (author) [pt

  8. Fuel powder production from ductile uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C.R.; Meyer, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Metallic uranium alloys are candidate materials for use as the fuel phase in very-high-density LEU dispersion fuels. These ductile alloys cannot be converted to powder form by the processes routinely used for oxides or intermetallics. Three methods of powder production from uranium alloys have been investigated within the US-RERTR program. These processes are grinding, cryogenic milling, and hydride-dehydride. In addition, a gas atomization process was investigated using gold as a surrogate for uranium. (author)

  9. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  10. Oxidation And Hot Corrosion Of ODS Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Report reviews oxidation and hot corrosion of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, intended for use at high temperatures. Classifies environmental resistances of such alloys by rates of growth of oxides, volatilities of oxides, spalling of oxides, and limitations imposed by hot corrosion. Also discusses environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. Concludes ODS NICrAl and FeCrAl alloys highly resistant to oxidation and corrosion and can be used uncoated.

  11. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  12. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M [Sandia Park, NM; Powers, Dana A [Albuquerque, NM; Zhang, Zhenyuan [Durham, NC

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  13. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  14. Microstructural characterization of EXCEL alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroza Z E, Celiz; Saumell M, Lani; Versaci, R A; Bozzano, P B

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure of Excel alloy was studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the present phases. Characteristic peaks of α-Zr (HCP), β-Zr (BCC) and δhydride (FCC) were identified. The high relatives intensities of certain peaks suggest that samples are textured. Basal poles were dominant in radial-longitudinal planes and prismatic poles have the highest concentration in radial-tangential planes (author)

  15. Chitosan patterning on titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Gilabert Chirivella, Eduardo; Pérez Feito, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Clarisse; Ribeiro, Sylvie; Correia, Daniela; González Martin, María Luisa; Manero Planella, José María; Lanceros Méndez, Senentxu; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in medical implants because of their excellent properties. However, bacterial infection is a frequent cause of titanium-based implant failure and also compromises its osseointegration. In this study, we report a new simple method of providing titanium surfaces with antibacterial properties by alternating antibacterial chitosan domains with titanium domains in the micrometric scale. Surface microgrooves were etched on pure titanium disks at i...

  16. Identification and sorting of materials with portable LIBS before decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vors, Evelyne; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Dehayem-Massop, Alix; Gallou, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique of elemental analysis. A laser beam is focused on the surface of the sample to be analyzed. A small quantity of matter is ablated and a plasma formed by the atomized compounds is created. The spectral lines of the light emitted by the plasma are detected by an optical spectrometer. LIBS is a fully optical, multi-elementary and fast analytical technique, requiring no or little sample preparation. These features make the LIBS technique particularly suited for in situ measurements, and portable instruments are currently developed. LIBS analysis can be applied to the identification of materials using chemometric statistical methods (multivariate analysis) connecting the spectrum to the nature of the sample. Such methods have been successfully applied in our laboratory to the determination of the geographical origin of yellow cakes and to the identification of alloys. We present here the work performed with a portable LIBS instrument to meet the needs of waste sorting in industrial domain and in nuclear domain (inventory before decommissioning). A data base of LIBS spectra was built with a commercial instrument (IVEA SAS Easylibs) with samples of four categories of interest for industrial waste sorting: alloys, plastics, concrete and glasses. Different correct identification rates are requested by categories. The alloy spectra contain characteristic spectral lines and sub-categories can be easily discriminated (for example, different steel classes can be identified). The components of the plastics (mainly C, H, O and N) give rise to less characteristic lines and the plastics identification requires a separate study. Supervised statistical models are built with the data base spectra and predictions are instantly calculated for the spectra of unknown materials to identify in order to direct them to the correct waste stream. (authors)

  17. Spray rolling aluminum alloy strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kevin M.; Delplanque, J.-P.; Johnson, S.B.; Lavernia, E.J.; Zhou, Y.; Lin, Y

    2004-10-10

    Spray rolling combines spray forming with twin-roll casting to process metal flat products. It consists of atomizing molten metal with a high velocity inert gas, cooling the resultant droplets in flight and directing the spray between mill rolls. In-flight convection heat transfer from atomized droplets teams with conductive cooling at the rolls to rapidly remove the alloy's latent heat. Hot deformation of the semi-solid material in the rolls results in fully consolidated, rapidly solidified product. While similar in some ways to twin-roll casting, spray rolling has the advantage of being able to process alloys with broad freezing ranges at high production rates. This paper describes the process and summarizes microstructure and tensile properties of spray-rolled 2124 and 7050 aluminum alloy strips. A Lagrangian/Eulerian poly-dispersed spray flight and deposition model is described that provides some insight into the development of the spray rolling process. This spray model follows droplets during flight toward the rolls, through impact and spreading, and includes oxide film formation and breakup when relevant.

  18. Electrodeposition of engineering alloy coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lasse

    Nickel based electrodeposited alloys were investigated with respect to their deposition process, heat treatment, hardness, corrosion resistance and combined wear-corrosion resistance. The investigated alloys were Ni-B, Ni-P and Ni-W, which are not fully developed for industrial utilisation...... are written in brackets). Temperature and especially pH influenced the cathodic efficiency of the electrodeposition processes for Ni-W and Ni-P. Mass balance problems of the development alloy processes are identified.Heat treatment for one hour at approx. 350°C, 400°C and 600°C of electrodeposited Ni-B, Ni......-P and Ni-W, respectively, resulted in hardness values of approx. 1000 HV0.1 in the case of Ni-P(6), approx. 1100 HV0.1 in the case of Ni-W(40-53) and approx. 1300 HV0.1 in the case of Ni-B(5). Cracks, which emerged during electrodeposition and heat treatment, were observed on Ni-W and Ni-B.The corrosion...

  19. Nanodispersed boriding of titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuk, K.O.; Kostyuk, V.O.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of improving the operational reliability of machines is becoming increasingly important due to the increased mechanical, thermal and other loads on the details. There are many surface hardening methods for machines parts which breakdown begins with surface corruption. The most promising methods are chemical-thermal treatment. The aim of this work is to study the impact of boriding on the structure and properties of titanium alloy. Materials and Methods: The material of this study is VT3-1 titanium alloy. The boriding were conducted using nanodispersed powder blend based on boric substances. It is established that boriding of paste compounds allows obtaining the surface hardness within 30 - 29 GPa and with declining to 27- 26 GPa in layer to the transition zone (with total thickness up to 110 μm) owing to changes of the layer phase composition where T 2 B, TiB, TiB 2 titanium borides are formed. The increasing of chemical-thermal treatment time from 15 minutes to 2 hours leads to thickening of the borated layer (30 - 110 μm) and transition zone (30 - 190 μm). Due to usage of nanodispersed boric powder, the boriding duration is decreasing in 2 - 3 times. This allows saving time and electric energy. The developed optimal mode of boriding the VT3-1 titanium alloy allows obtaining the required operational characteristics and to combine the saturation of the surface layer with atomic boron and hardening

  20. Liquid metal corrosion considerations in alloy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid metal corrosion can be an important consideration in developing alloys for fusion and fast breeder reactors and other applications. Because of the many different forms of liquid metal corrosion (dissolution, alloying, carbon transfer, etc.), alloy optimization based on corrosion resistance depends on a number of factors such as the application temperatures, the particular liquid metal, and the level and nature of impurities in the liquid and solid metals. The present paper reviews the various forms of corrosion by lithium, lead, and sodium and indicates how such corrosion reactions can influence the alloy development process

  1. Use of low fusing alloy in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, A G; Schneider, R L; Aquilino, S A

    1998-11-01

    Low fusing alloy has been used in dentistry for remount procedures in both fixed and removable prosthodontics, in implant prosthodontics for the fabrication of solid implant casts, in maxillofacial prosthetics as oral radiation shields, and in dental research for its unique properties. Previously, the use of low fusing alloy was thought to offer a high degree of dimensional accuracy. However, multiple in vitro studies have shown that its presumed dimensional accuracy may be questionable. This article reviews the physical properties, metallurgical considerations of low fusing alloy, its applications in dentistry, and a safe, simple method of using low fusing alloy.

  2. Synthesis of shape memory alloys using electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, Timothy Roy

    Shape memory alloys are used in a variety of applications. The area of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) is a developing field for thin film shape memory alloys for making actuators, valves and pumps. Until recently thin film shape memory alloys could only be made by rapid solidification or sputtering techniques which have the disadvantage of being "line of sight". At the University of Missouri-Rolla, electrolytic techniques have been developed that allow the production of shape memory alloys in thin film form. The advantages of this techniques are in-situ, non "line of sight" and the ability to make differing properties of the shape memory alloys from one bath. This research focused on the electrodeposition of In-Cd shape memory alloys. The primary objective was to characterize the electrodeposited shape memory effect for an electrodeposited shape memory alloy. The effect of various operating parameters such as peak current density, temperature, pulsing, substrate and agitation were investigated and discussed. The electrodeposited alloys were characterized by relative shape memory effect, phase transformation, morphology and phases present. Further tests were performed to optimize the shape memory by the use of a statistically designed experiment. An optimized shape memory effect for an In-Cd alloy is reported for the conditions of the experiments.

  3. Characterization of a NIMONIC TYPE super alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora Rangel, L.; Martinez Martinez, E.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical properties of strength and thermofluence of a NIMONIC type super alloy under thermal treatment was determined. The relationship between microstructure, phases and precipitates was also studied. (author)

  4. Precipitation and Hardening in Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jian-Feng

    2012-11-01

    Magnesium alloys have received an increasing interest in the past 12 years for potential applications in the automotive, aircraft, aerospace, and electronic industries. Many of these alloys are strong because of solid-state precipitates that are produced by an age-hardening process. Although some strength improvements of existing magnesium alloys have been made and some novel alloys with improved strength have been developed, the strength level that has been achieved so far is still substantially lower than that obtained in counterpart aluminum alloys. Further improvements in the alloy strength require a better understanding of the structure, morphology, orientation of precipitates, effects of precipitate morphology, and orientation on the strengthening and microstructural factors that are important in controlling the nucleation and growth of these precipitates. In this review, precipitation in most precipitation-hardenable magnesium alloys is reviewed, and its relationship with strengthening is examined. It is demonstrated that the precipitation phenomena in these alloys, especially in the very early stage of the precipitation process, are still far from being well understood, and many fundamental issues remain unsolved even after some extensive and concerted efforts made in the past 12 years. The challenges associated with precipitation hardening and age hardening are identified and discussed, and guidelines are outlined for the rational design and development of higher strength, and ultimately ultrahigh strength, magnesium alloys via precipitation hardening.

  5. Surface treatment of new type aluminum lithium alloy and fatigue crack behaviors of this alloy plate bonded with Ti–6Al–4V alloy strap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhen-Qi; Huang, Ming-Hui; Hu, Guo-Huai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new generation aluminum lithium alloy which special made for Chinese commercial plane was investigated. ► Pattern of aluminum lithium alloy and Ti alloy were shown after anodization. ► Crack propagation of samples bonded with different wide Ti straps were studied in this paper. -- Abstract: Samples consisting of new aluminum lithium alloy (Al–Li alloy) plate developed by the Aluminum Company of America and Ti–6Al–4V alloy (Ti alloy) plate were investigated. Plate of 400 mm × 140 mm × 2 mm with single edge notch was anodized in phosphoric solution and Ti alloy plate of 200 mm × 20 (40) mm × 2 mm was anodized in alkali solution. Patterns of two alloys were studied at original/anodized condition. And then, aluminum alloy and Ti alloy plates were assembled into a sample with FM 94 film adhesive. Fatigue crack behaviors of the sample were investigated under condition of nominal stress σ = 36 MPa and 54 MPa, stress ratio of 0.1. Testing results show that anodization treatment modifies alloys surface topography. Ti alloy bonding to Al–Li alloy plate effectively retards crack growth than that of Al–Li alloy plate. Fatigue life of sample bonded with Ti alloy strap improves about 62.5% than that of non-strap plate.

  6. Fracture characteristics of uranium alloys by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koger, J.W.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.

    1976-10-01

    The fracture characteristics of uranium alloys were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The fracture mode of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of uranium-7.5 weight percent niobium-2.5 weight percent zirconium (Mulberry) alloy, uranium--niobium alloys, and uranium--molybdenum alloys in aqueous chloride solutions is intergranular. The SCC fracture surface of the Mulberry alloy is characterized by very clean and smooth grain facets. The tensile-overload fracture surfaces of these alloys are characteristically ductile dimple. Hydrogen-embrittlement failures of the uranium alloys are brittle and the fracture mode is transgranular. Fracture surfaces of the uranium-0.75 weight percent titanium alloys are quasi cleavage

  7. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking in HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Hyatt, B.Z.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded compact tension specimens was performed in 360 C water to determine the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) behavior of HTH Alloy X-750 and direct-aged Alloy 625. New data confirm previous results showing that high irradiation levels reduce SCC resistance in Alloy X-750. Heat-to-heat variability correlates with boron content, with low boron heats showing improved IASCC properties. Alloy 625 is resistant to IASCC, as no cracking was observed in any Alloy 625 specimens. Microstructural, microchemical and deformation studies were performed to characterize the mechanisms responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750 and the lack of an effect in Alloy 625. The mechanisms under investigation are: boron transmutation effects, radiation-induced changes in microstructure and deformation characteristics, and radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation of Alloy X-750 caused significant strengthening and ductility loss that was associated with the formation of cavities and dislocation loops. High irradiation levels did not cause significant segregation of alloying or trace elements in Alloy X-750. Irradiation of Alloy 625 resulted in the formation of small dislocation loops and a fine body-centered-orthorhombic phase. The strengthening due to the loops and precipitates was apparently offset by a partial dissolution of γ double-prime precipitates, as Alloy 625 showed no irradiation-induced strengthening or ductility loss. In the nonirradiated condition, an IASCC susceptible HTH heat containing 28 ppm B showed grain boundary segregation of boron, whereas a nonsusceptible HTH heat containing 2 ppm B and Alloy 625 with 20 ppm B did not show significant boron segregation. Transmutation of boron to helium at grain boundaries, coupled with matrix strengthening, is believed to be responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750, and the absence of these two effects results in the superior IASCC resistance displayed by Alloy 625

  8. Application of mechanical alloying to synthesis of intermetallic phases based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymek, S.

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical alloying is the process of synthesis of powder materials during milling in high energetic mills, usually ball mills. The central event in mechanical alloying is the ball-powder-ball collision. Powder particles are trapped between the colliding balls during milling and undergo deformation and/or fracture. Fractured parts are cold welded. The continued fracture and cold welding results in a uniform size and chemical composition of powder particles. The main applications of mechanical alloying are: processing of ODS alloys, syntheses of intermetallic phases, synthesis of nonequilibrium structures (amorphous alloys, extended solid solutions, nanocrystalline, quasi crystals) and magnetic materials. The present paper deals with application of mechanical alloying to synthesis Ni A l base intermetallic phases as well as phases from the Nb-Al binary system. The alloy were processed from elemental powders. The course of milling was monitored by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. After milling, the collected powders were sieved by 45 μm grid and hot pressed (Nb alloys and NiAl) or hot extruded (NiAl). The resulting material was fully dense and exhibited fine grain (< 1 μm) and uniform distribution of oxide dispersoid. The consolidated material was compression and creep tested. The mechanical properties of mechanically alloys were superior to properties of their cast counterparts both in the room and elevated temperatures. Higher strength of mechanically alloyed materials results from their fine grains and from the presence of dispersoid. At elevated temperatures, the Nb-Al alloys have higher compression strength than NiAl-based alloys processed at the same conditions. The minimum creep rates of mechanically alloyed Nb alloys are an order of magnitude lower than analogously processed NiAl-base alloys. (author)

  9. Optimization of mechanical properties, biocorrosion properties and antibacterial properties of as-cast Ti-Cu alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Erlin; Ren, Jing; Li, Shengyi; Yang, Lei; Qin, Gaowu

    2016-10-21

    Ti-Cu sintered alloys have shown good antibacterial abilities. However, the sintered method (powder metallurgy) is not convenient to produce devices with a complex structure. In this paper, Ti-Cu alloys with 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 wt.% Cu were prepared in an arc melting furnace and subjected to different heat treatments: solid solution and ageing, to explore the possibility of preparing an antibacterial Ti-Cu alloy by a casting method and to examine the effect of Cu content. Phase identification was conducted on an XRD diffraction meter, and the microstructure was observed by a metallographic microscope, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness and the compressive property of Ti-Cu alloys were tested, and the corrosion resistance and antibacterial activity were assessed in order to investigate the effect of the Cu content. Results showed that the as-cast Ti-Cu alloys exhibited a very low antibacterial rate against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Heat treatment improved the antibacterial rate significantly, especially after a solid and ageing treatment (T6). Antibacterial rates as high as 90.33% and 92.57% were observed on Ti-3Cu alloy and Ti-4Cu alloy, respectively. The hardness, the compressive yield strength, the anticorrosion resistance and the antibacterial rate of Ti-Cu alloys increased with an increase of Cu content in all conditions. It was demonstrated that homogeneous distribution and a fine Ti 2 Cu phase played a very important role in the mechanical property, anticorrosion and antibacterial properties. Furthermore, it should be pointed out that the Cu content should be at least 3 wt.% to obtain good antibacterial properties (>90% antibacterial rate) as well as satisfactory mechanical properties.

  10. The Properties of 7xxx Series Alloys Formed by Alloying Additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwak Z.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently there is a constant development in the field of aluminium alloys engineering. This results from, i.a., better understanding of the mechanisms that direct strengthening of these alloys and the role of microalloying. Now it is microalloying in aluminum alloys that is receiving a lot of attention. It affects substantially the macro- and microstructure and kinetics of phase transformation influencing the properties during production and its exploitation. 7xxx series aluminum alloys, based on the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu system, are high-strength alloys, moreover, the presence of Zr and Sr further increases their strength and improves resistance to cracking.

  11. Synthesis of Amorphous Powders of Ni-Si and Co-Si Alloys by Mechanical Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omuro, Keisuke; Miura, Harumatsu

    1991-05-01

    Amorphous powders of the Ni-Si and Co-Si alloys are synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) from crystalline elemental powders using a high energy ball mill. The alloying and amorphization process is examined by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy. For the Ni-Si alloy, it is confirmed that the crystallization temperature of the MA powder, measured by DSC, is in good agreement with that of the powder sample prepared by mechanical grinding from the cast alloy ingot products of the same composition.

  12. A Shape Memory Alloy Application for Compact Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Ameduri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys materials, SMA, offer several advantages that designers can rely on such as the possibility of transmitting large forces and deformations, compactness, and the intrinsic capability to absorb loads. Their use as monolithic actuators, moreover, can lead to potential simplifications of the system, through a reduction of number of parts and the removal of many free play gaps among mechanics. For these reasons, technological aerospace research is focusing on this kind of technology more and more, even though fatigue life, performance degradation, and other issues are still open. In the work at hand, landing gear for unmanned aerial vehicles, UAV, is presented, integrated with shape memory alloys springs as actuation devices. A conceptual prototype has been realized to verify the system ability in satisfying specs, in terms of deployment and retraction capability. Starting from the proposed device working principle and the main design parameters identification, the design phase is faced, setting those parameters to meet weight, deployment angle, energy consumption, and available room requirements. Then, system modeling and performance prediction is performed and finally a correlation between numerical and experimental results is presented.

  13. The Evaluation of the Corrosion Resistance of the Al-Si Alloys Antimony Alloyed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svobodova J.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of the corrosion resistance of the Al-Si alloys alloyed with the different amount of antimony. Specifically it goes about the alloy AlSi7Mg0,3 which is antimony alloyed in the concentrations 0; 0,001; 0,005; 0,01 a 0,05 wt. % of antimony. The introduction of the paper is dedicated to the theory of the aluminium alloys corrosion resistance, testing and evaluation of the corrosion resistance. The influence of the antimony to the Al-Si alloys properties is described further in the introduction. The experimental part describes the experimental samples which were prepared for the experiment and further they were exposed to the loading in the atmospheric conditions for a period of the 3 months. The experimental samples were evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. The results of the experiment were documented and the conclusions in terms of the antimony impact to the corrosion resistance of the Al-Si alloy were concluded. There was compared the corrosion resistance of the Al-Si alloy antimony alloyed (with the different antimony content with the results of the Al-Si alloy without the alloying after the corrosion load in the atmospheric conditions in the experiment.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Low Density Alloys at Cryogenic Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, X. D.; Liu, H. J.; Li, L. F.; Yang, K.

    2006-01-01

    Low-density alloys include aluminum alloys, titanium alloys and magnesium alloys. Aluminum alloys and titanium alloys have been widely investigated and used as structural materials for cryogenic applications because of their light weight and good low-temperature mechanical properties.For aerospace applications, persistent efforts are being devoted to reducing weight and improving performance. Magnesium alloys are the lightest structural alloys among those mentioned above. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to magnesium alloys and to investigate their behaviors at cryogenic temperatures. In this paper, we have investigated the mechanical properties and microstructures of some magnesium alloys at cryogenic temperatures. Experimental results on both titanium and magnesium alloys are taken into account in considering these materials for space application

  15. Grain refinement of 7075Al alloy microstructures by inoculation with Al-Ti-B master alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotea, V.; Juhasz, J.; Cadar, F.

    2017-05-01

    This paper aims to bring some clarification on grain refinement and modification of high strength alloys used in aerospace technique. In this work it was taken into account 7075 Al alloy, and the melt treatment was carried out by placing in the form of master alloy wire ternary AlTiB the casting trough at 730°C. The morphology of the resulting microstructures was characterized by optical microscopy. Micrographs unfinished and finished with pre-alloy containing ternary Al5Ti1B evidence fine crystals, crystal containing no columnar structure and highlights the size of the dendrites, and intermetallic phases occurring at grain boundaries in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy. It has been found that these intermetallic compounds are MgZn2 type. AlTiB master alloys finishing ensures a fine eutectic structure, which determines the properties of hardware and improving the mechanical properties of aluminum alloys used in aeronautical engineering.

  16. Combinatorial thin film materials science: From alloy discovery and optimization to alloy design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebhardt, Thomas, E-mail: gebhardt@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Music, Denis; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2012-06-30

    This paper provides an overview of modern alloy development, from discovery and optimization towards alloy design, based on combinatorial thin film materials science. The combinatorial approach, combining combinatorial materials synthesis of thin film composition-spreads with high-throughput property characterization has proven to be a powerful tool to delineate composition-structure-property relationships, and hence to efficiently identify composition windows with enhanced properties. Furthermore, and most importantly for alloy design, theoretical models and hypotheses can be critically appraised. Examples for alloy discovery, optimization, and alloy design of functional as well as structural materials are presented. Using Fe-Mn based alloys as an example, we show that the combination of modern electronic-structure calculations with the highly efficient combinatorial thin film composition-spread method constitutes an effective tool for knowledge-based alloy design.

  17. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  18. Combinatorial thin film materials science: From alloy discovery and optimization to alloy design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, Thomas; Music, Denis; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of modern alloy development, from discovery and optimization towards alloy design, based on combinatorial thin film materials science. The combinatorial approach, combining combinatorial materials synthesis of thin film composition-spreads with high-throughput property characterization has proven to be a powerful tool to delineate composition–structure–property relationships, and hence to efficiently identify composition windows with enhanced properties. Furthermore, and most importantly for alloy design, theoretical models and hypotheses can be critically appraised. Examples for alloy discovery, optimization, and alloy design of functional as well as structural materials are presented. Using Fe-Mn based alloys as an example, we show that the combination of modern electronic-structure calculations with the highly efficient combinatorial thin film composition-spread method constitutes an effective tool for knowledge-based alloy design.

  19. Progress in identification of radiation embrittlement mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This report outlines recent advances in the isolation and understanding of mechanisms behind known composition influences on he radiation embrittlement sensitivity of reactor pressure vessel steels at 288 deg. C. The advances are largely the product of joint investigations by Materials Engineering Associates (MEA) and other laboratories in the U.S. and overseas under cooperative and subcontract arrangements. Specific objectives were: confirmation of the suspect Cu mechanism, identification of the process for the Cu:Ni synergism, and isolation of the P mechanism in radiation sensitivity development. The investigations proceeded with MEA-supplied steels and iron alloys from 4-way split laboratory melts; research tools included Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Field Ion Microscopy (FIM), Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS), Positron Annihilation (PA) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Experimental results show that P and Cu enhance the radiation elevation of yield strength and that the associated mechanisms are a radiation-induced precipitation of P or Cu-rich clusters which impede dislocation motion. With high Cu alloys, a Cu phosphide is formed in preference to P precipitates and the P contribution is greatly reduced. Effects of postirradiation annealing and reirradiation are also reported. (author)

  20. Modification of Sr on 4004 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Erjun; Cao, Guojian; Feng, Yicheng; Wang, Liping; Wang, Guojun; Lv, Xinyu

    2013-05-01

    As a brazing foil, 4004 Al alloy has good welding performance. However, the high Si content decreases the plasticity of the alloy. To improve the plasticity of 4004 Al alloy and subsequently improve the productivity of 4004 Al foil or 434 composite foil, 4004 Al alloy was modified by Al-10%Sr master alloy. Modification effects of an additional amount of Sr, modification temperature, and holding time on 4004 aluminum alloy were studied by orthogonal design. The results showed that the greatest impact parameter of 4004 aluminum alloy modification was the additional amount of Sr, followed by holding time and modification temperature. The optimum modification parameters obtained by orthogonal design were as follows: Sr addition of 0.04%, holding time of 60 min, and modification temperature of 760°C. The effect of Sr addition on modification was analyzed in detail based on orthogonal results. With increasing of Sr addition, elongation of 4004 alloy increased at first, and decreased after reaching the maximum value.

  1. METHOD AND ALLOY FOR BONDING TO ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCuaig, F.D.; Misch, R.D.

    1960-04-19

    A brazing alloy can be used for bonding zirconium and its alloys to other metals, ceramics, and cermets, and consists of 6 to 9 wt.% Ni, 6 to 9 wn~.% Cr, Mo, or W, 0 to 7.5 wt.% Fe, and the balance Zr.

  2. Electrodeposition of zinc--nickel alloys coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, J W; Johnson, H R

    1977-10-01

    One possible substitute for cadmium in some applications is a zinc--nickel alloy deposit. Previous work by others showed that electrodeposited zinc--nickel coatings containing about 85 percent zinc and 15 percent nickel provided noticeably better corrosion resistance than pure zinc. Present work which supports this finding also shows that the corrosion resistance of the alloy deposit compares favorably with cadmium.

  3. Development of high performance ODS alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Garner, Frank [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2018-01-29

    This project aims to capitalize on insights developed from recent high-dose self-ion irradiation experiments in order to develop and test the next generation of optimized ODS alloys needed to meet the nuclear community's need for high strength, radiation-tolerant cladding and core components, especially with enhanced resistance to void swelling. Two of these insights are that ferrite grains swell earlier than tempered martensite grains, and oxide dispersions currently produced only in ferrite grains require a high level of uniformity and stability to be successful. An additional insight is that ODS particle stability is dependent on as-yet unidentified compositional combinations of dispersoid and alloy matrix, such as dispersoids are stable in MA957 to doses greater than 200 dpa but dissolve in MA956 at doses less than 200 dpa. These findings focus attention on candidate next-generation alloys which address these concerns. Collaboration with two Japanese groups provides this project with two sets of first-round candidate alloys that have already undergone extensive development and testing for unirradiated properties, but have not yet been evaluated for their irradiation performance. The first set of candidate alloys are dual phase (ferrite + martensite) ODS alloys with oxide particles uniformly distributed in both ferrite and martensite phases. The second set of candidate alloys are ODS alloys containing non-standard dispersoid compositions with controllable oxide particle sizes, phases and interfaces.

  4. TERNARY ALLOYS OF URANIUM, COLUMBIUM, AND ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, F.G.

    1960-08-01

    Ternary alloys of uranium are described which are useful as neutron- reflecting materials in a fast neutron reactor. They are especially resistant to corrosion caused by oxidative processes of gascous or aqueous origin and comprise uranium as the predominant metal with zirconiunn and niobium wherein the total content of the minor alloying elements is between 2 and 8% by weight.

  5. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    are discussed in this paper. On the basis of these measurements phase diagrams of the different systems were constructed. Finally, it is demonstrated that when pressing the bulk amorphous alloy onto a metallic dies at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region, the alloy faithfully replicates the surface...

  6. Titanium and titanium alloys: fundamentals and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyens, C; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    ... number of titanium alloys have paved the way for light metals to vastly expand into many industrial applications. Titanium and its alloys stand out primarily due to their high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, at just half the weight of steels and Ni-based superalloys. This explains their early success in the aerospace and the...

  7. Iron titanium manganase alloy hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, James J.; Wiswall, Jr., Richard H.

    1979-01-01

    A three component alloy capable of reversible sorption of hydrogen having the chemical formula TiFe.sub.1-x Mn.sub.x where x is in the range of about 0.02 to 0.5 and the method of storing hydrogen using said alloy.

  8. Irradiation of copper alloys in FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    Nine copper-base alloys in thirteen material conditions have been inserted into the MOTA-18 experiment for irradiation in FFTF at approx.450 0 C. The alloy Ni-1.9Be is also included in this experiment, which includes both TEM disks and miniature tensile specimens

  9. Additive Manufacturing of Metastable Beta Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannetta, Christopher J.

    Additive manufacturing processes of many alloys are known to develop texture during the deposition process due to the rapid reheating and the directionality of the dissipation of heat. Titanium alloys and with respect to this study beta titanium alloys are especially susceptible to these effects. This work examines Ti-20wt%V and Ti-12wt%Mo deposited under normal additive manufacturing process parameters to examine the texture of these beta-stabilized alloys. Both microstructures contained columnar prior beta grains 1-2 mm in length beginning at the substrate with no visible equiaxed grains. This microstructure remained constant in the vanadium system throughout the build. The microstructure of the alloy containing molybdenum changed from a columnar to an equiaxed structure as the build height increased. Eighteen additional samples of the Ti-Mo system were created under different processing parameters to identify what role laser power and travel speed have on the microstructure. There appears to be a correlation in alpha lath size and power density. The two binary alloys were again deposited under the same conditions with the addition of 0.5wt% boron to investigate the effects an insoluble interstitial alloying element would have on the microstructure. The size of the prior beta grains in these two alloys were reduced with the addition of boron by approximately 50 (V) and 100 (Mo) times.

  10. Phase transformations on Zr-Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Sergio Norifumi

    1980-01-01

    This research intended the laboratory scale experimental development of Zr-Nb alloys with adequate characteristics for use as fuel element cladding or for the making of irradiation capsules. Zr-Nb alloys with different Nb contents were melted and the resulting material was characterised. The following metallurgical aspects were considered: preparation of Zr-Nb alloys with various Nb contents; heat and thermomechanical treatments; microstructural characterization; mechanical properties; oxidation properties. The influence of the heat treatment and thermomechanical treatment, on the out-of-pile mechanical and oxidation properties of the Zr-Nb alloys were studied. It was found that the alloy microhardness increases with the Nb content and/or with the thermomechanical treatment. Mechanical properties such as yield and ultimate tensile strength as well as elongation were determined by means of compression tests. The results showed that the alloy yield stress increases with the Nb content and with the thermomechanical treatment, while its elongation decreases. Thermogravimetric analysis determined the alloy oxidation kinetics, in the 400 - 800 deg C interval, at 1 atm. oxygen pressure. The results showed that the alloy oxidation rate increases with the temperature and Nb content. It was also observed that the oxidation rate increases considerably for temperatures higher than 600 deg C.(author)

  11. Theory of Rare-Earth Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    A mean-field random alloy theory combined with a simple calculation of the exchange interaction J(c,Q) is shown to quantitatively account for the phase diagrams for alloys of rare-earth metals with Y, Lu, Sc, and other rare-earth metals. A concentration-dependent J(c,Q) explains the empirical 2...

  12. Intermetallic alloys: Deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, B.

    1988-01-01

    The state of the art in intermetallic alloys development with particular emphasis on deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour is documented. This review paper is prepared to lay the ground stones for a future work on mechanical property characterization and fracture behaviour of intermetallic alloys at GKSS. (orig.)

  13. Review of tantalum and niobium alloy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the current state of niobium- and tantalum-base alloy production. The materials requirements, alloy compositions of interest, and production status are discussed. Finally, a list of developments needed to support the SP-100 program will be identified. A bibliography is included

  14. Electrocatalysis on bimetallic and alloy surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, M.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Bimetallic surfaces and alloys are well known to have unique catalytic properties for many important chemical transformations [1]. In electrocatalysis, bimetallic and alloy catalysts have been a particularly active area of research in relation to low-temperature fuel cells [2]. On the anode side,

  15. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  16. Alloys of clathrate allotropes for rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Candace K; Miller, Michael A; Chan, Kwai S

    2014-12-09

    The present disclosure is directed at an electrode for a battery wherein the electrode comprises clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin. In method form, the present disclosure is directed at methods of forming clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin which methods lead to the formation of empty cage structures suitable for use as electrodes in rechargeable type batteries.

  17. Impact toughness of laser surface alloyed Aluminium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available with intermetallic phases and metal matrix composites were achieved during laser alloying. Brittle fracture of the SiC particles and transgranular cracking of the intermetallic phases was observed for the laser alloyed samples, while ductile fracture was observed...

  18. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  19. Grain refinement of zinc-aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2006-01-01

    It is now well-established that the structure of the zinc-aluminum die casting alloys can be modified by the binary Al-Ti or the ternary Al-Ti-B master alloys. in this paper, grain refinement of zinc-aluminum alloys by rare earth materials is reviewed and discussed. The importance of grain refining of these alloys and parameters affecting it are presented and discussed. These include parameters related to the Zn-Al alloys cast, parameters related to the grain refining elements or alloys and parameters related to the process. The effect of addition of other alloying elements e.g. Zr either alone or in the presence of the main grain refiners Ti or Ti + B on the grain refining efficiency is also reviewed and discussed. Furthermore, based on the grain refinement and the parameters affecting it, a criterion for selection of the optimum grain refiner is suggested. Finally, the recent research work on the effect of grain refiners on the mechanical behaviour, impact strength, wear resistance, and fatigue life of these alloys are presented and discussed. (author)

  20. Fundamental irradiation studies on vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Garner, F.A.; Ermi, A.M.

    1985-05-01

    A joint experiment on the irradiation response of simple vanadium alloys has been initiated under the auspices of the DAFS and BES progams. Specimen fabrication is nearly complete and the alloys are expected to be irradiated in lithium in FFTF-MOTA Cycles 7 and 8

  1. Solid - solid and solid - liquid phase transitions of iron and iron alloys under laser shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, M.; Krygier, A.; Appel, K.; Galtier, E.; Hartley, N.; Konopkova, Z.; Lee, H. J.; McBride, E. E.; Miyanishi, K.; Nagler, B.; Nemausat, R.; Vinci, T.; Zhu, D.; Ozaki, N.; Fiquet, G.

    2017-12-01

    An accurate knowledge of the properties of iron and iron alloys at high pressures and temperatures is crucial for understanding and modelling planetary interiors. While Earth-size and Super-Earth Exoplanets are being discovered in increasingly large numbers, access to detailed information on liquid properties, melting curves and even solid phases of iron and iron at the pressures and temperatures of their interiors is still strongly limited. In this context, XFEL sources coupled with high-energy lasers afford unique opportunities to measure microscopic structural properties at far extreme conditions. Also the achievable time resolution allows the shock history and phase transition mechanisms to be followed during laser compression, improving our understanding of the high pressure and high strain experiments. Here we present recent studies devoted to investigate the solid-solid and solid-liquid transition in laser-shocked iron and iron alloys (Fe-Si, Fe-C and Fe-O alloys) using X-ray diffraction and X-ray diffuse scattering. Experiment were performed at the MEC end-station of the LCLS facility at SLAC (USA). Detection of the diffuse scattering allowed the identification of the first liquid peak position along the Hugoniot, up to 4 Mbar. The time resolution shows ultrafast (between several tens and several hundreds of picoseconds) solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transitions. Future developments at XFEL facilities will enable detailed studies of the solid and liquid structures of iron and iron alloys as well as out-of-Hugoniot studies.

  2. Zirconium alloy barrier having improved corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, R.B.; Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor has a composite cladding container having a substrate and a dilute zirconium alloy liner bonded to the inside surface of the substrate. The dilute zirconium alloy liner forms about 1 to about 20 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of zirconium and a metal selected from the group consisting of iron, chromium, iron plus chromium, and copper. The dilute zirconium alloy liner shields the substrate from impurities or fission products from the nuclear fuel material and protects the substrate from stress corrosion and stress cracking. The dilute zirconium alloy liner displays greater corrosion resistance, especially to oxidation by hot water or steam than unalloyed zirconium. The substrate material is selected from conventional cladding materials, and preferably is a zirconium alloy. (author)

  3. Corrosion resistance improvement of titanium base alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Popa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion resistance of the new Ti-6Al-4V-1Zr alloy in comparison with ternary Ti-6Al-4V alloy in Ringer-Brown solution and artificial Carter-Brugirard saliva of different pH values was studied. In Ringer-Brown solution, the new alloy presented an improvement of all electrochemical parameters due to the alloying with Zr; also, impedance spectra revealed better protective properties of its passive layer. In Carter-Brugirard artificial saliva, an increase of the passive film thickness was proved. Fluoride ions had a slight negative influence on the corrosion and ion release rates, without to affect the very good stability of the new Ti-6Al-4V-1Zr alloy.

  4. Nature of negative microplastic deformation in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palatnik, L.S.; Ivantsov, V.I.; Kagan, Ya.I.; Papirov, I.I.; Fat'yanova, N.B.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.)

    1985-01-01

    The paper deals with investigation of microplastic deformation of corrosion resistant aging 40KhNYU alloy and the study of physical nature of negative microdeformation in this alloy under tension. Investigation of microplasticity of 40KhNYU alloy was conducted by the method of mechanostatic hysteresis using resistance strain gauge for measuring stresses and deformations. Microplasticity curves for 40KhNYU alloy were obtained. They represent the result of competition between usual (positive) microdeformation and phase (negative) deformation under tensile effect on the alloy. It was established that the negative microdeformation increment occurs during secondary aging of the phase precipitated from initial supersat urated solid solution (primary decomposition product). This phase decomposes under tension with disperse phase precipitation which promotes decreasing its specific volume and specimen volume as a whole

  5. Refining processes of selected copper alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rzadkosz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the refining effectiveness of the liquid copper and selected copper alloys by various micro additions and special refiningsubstances – was performed. Examinations of an influence of purifying, modifying and deoxidation operations performed in a metal bath on the properties of certain selected alloys based on copper matrix - were made. Refining substances, protecting-purifying slag, deoxidation and modifying substances containing micro additions of such elements as: zirconium, boron, phosphor, sodium, lithium, or their compounds introduced in order to change micro structures and properties of alloys, were applied in examinations. A special attention was directed to macro and micro structures of alloys, their tensile and elongation strength and hot-cracks sensitivity. Refining effects were estimated by comparing the effectiveness of micro structure changes with property changes of copper and its selected alloys from the group of tin bronzes.

  6. Underwater laser beam welding of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Kono, Wataru; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Clacking (SCC) has been reported at Alloy 600 welds between nozzles and safe-end in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. Alloy 690, which has higher chromium content than Alloy 600, has been applied for cladding on Alloy 600 welds for repairing damaged SCC area. Toshiba has developed Underwater Laser Beam Welding technique. This method can be conducted without draining, so that the repairing period and the radiation exposure during the repair can be dramatically decreased. In some old PWRs, high-sulfur stainless steel is used as the materials for this section. It has a high susceptibility of weld cracks. Therefore, the optimum welding condition of Alloy 690 on the high-sulfur stainless steel was investigated with our Underwater Laser Beam Welding unit. Good cladding layer, without any crack, porosity or lack of fusion, could be obtained. (author)

  7. Machinability of experimental Ti-Ag alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Okuno, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the machinability of experimental Ti-Ag alloys (5, 10, 20, and 30 mass% Ag) as a new dental titanium alloy candidate for CAD/CAM use. The alloys were slotted with a vertical milling machine and carbide square end mills under two cutting conditions. Machinability was evaluated through cutting force using a three-component force transducer fixed on the table of the milling machine. The horizontal cutting force of the Ti-Ag alloys tended to decrease as the concentration of silver increased. Values of the component of the horizontal cutting force perpendicular to the feed direction for Ti-20% Ag and Ti-30% Ag were more than 20% lower than those for titanium under both cutting conditions. Alloying with silver significantly improved the machinability of titanium in terms of cutting force under the present cutting conditions.

  8. Internal chlorination of Ni-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berztiss, D.; Hennesen, K.; Grabke, H.J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In contrast to internal oxidation, sulfidation and carburization, very little information is available regarding internal chlorination, especially diffusion of chlorine in metallic alloys. This paper describes results of experiments on Ni-Cr alloys (<10 wt% Cr) exposed in an atmosphere containing radioactive HCl. The diffusion of chlorine in the alloy can be determined by measurement of residual {beta}-activity from the sample surface. Successively thin layers (0.5-10 {mu}m) of the alloy were removed by lapping and the surface activity was measured to obtain a depth profile. Both single and polycrystalline materials were tested. Through this work it should be determined if there is in fact solubility and diffusion of chlorine in Ni-based alloys as some authors have proposed or if the ingress of chlorine is mainly a grain boundary phenomenon. (orig.)

  9. Beryllium-aluminum alloys for investment castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtrab, W.T.; Levoy, N.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium-aluminum alloys containing greater than 60 wt % beryllium are very favorable materials for applications requiring light weight and high stiffness. However, when produced by traditional powder metallurgical methods, these alloys are expensive and have limited applications. To reduce the cost of making beryllium-aluminum components, Nuclear Metals Inc. (NMI) and Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles have recently developed a family of patented beryllium-aluminum alloys that can be investment cast. Designated Beralcast, the alloys can achieve substantial weight savings because of their high specific strength and stiffness. In some cases, weight has been reduced by up to 50% over aluminum investment casting. Beralcast is now being used to make thin wall precision investment castings for several advanced aerospace applications, such as the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and F-22 jet fighter. This article discusses alloy compositions, properties, casting method, and the effects of cobalt additions on strength

  10. Enthalpies of a binary alloy during solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, D. R.; Nandapurkar, P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present a method of calculating the enthalpy of a dendritic alloy during solidification. The enthalpies of the dendritic solid and interdendritic liquid of alloys of the Pb-Sn system are evaluated, but the method could be applied to other binaries, as well. The enthalpies are consistent with a recent evaluation of the thermodynamics of Pb-Sn alloys and with the redistribution of solute in the same during dendritic solidification. Because of the heat of mixing in Pb-Sn alloys, the interdendritic liquid of hypoeutectic alloys (Pb-rich) of less than 50 wt pct Sn has enthalpies that increase as temperature decreases during solidification.

  11. Magnesium and related low alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, J; Caillat, R; Darras, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    In the first part the authors examine the comparative corrosion of commercial magnesium, of a magnesium-zirconium alloy (0,4 per cent {<=} Zr {<=} 0,7 per cent) of a ternary magnesium-zinc-zirconium alloy (0,8 per cent {<=} Zn {<=} 1,2 per cent) and of english 'Magnox type' alloys, in dry carbon dioxide-free air, in damp carbon dioxide-free air, and in dry and damp carbon dioxide, at temperatures from 300 to 600 deg. C. In the second part the structural stability of these materials is studied after annealings, of 10 to 1000 hours at 300 to 450 deg. C. Variations in grain after these heat treatments and mechanical stretching properties at room temperature are presented. Finally various creep rate and life time diagrams are given for these materials, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 450 deg. C. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie les auteurs etudient la corrosion comparee du magnesium commercial, d'un alliage magnesium-zirconium (0,4 pour cent {<=} Zr {<=} 0,7 pour cent), d'un alliage ternaire magnesium-zinc-zirconium (0,8 pour cent {<=} Zn {<=} 1,2 pour cent), et d'alliages anglais 'type Magnox', dans l'air sec decarbonate, l'air humide decarbonate, le gaz carbonique sec et humide a des temperatures de 300 a 600 deg. C. Dans une seconde partie, est etudiee la stabilite structurale de ces materiaux apres des recuits de 300 a 450 deg. C, et de 10 a 1000 heures. Sont presentees les variations, apres ces traitements thermiques, de la grosseur du grain, et des caracteristiques mecaniques de traction a la temperature ambiante. Enfin, quelques diagrammes de vitesse de fluage et de durees de vie sont presentes sur ces materiaux pour des temperatures variant entre 300 et 450 deg. C. (auteur)

  12. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate

  13. Phase diagrams for surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn; Ruban, Andrei; Stoltze, Per

    1997-01-01

    We discuss surface alloy phases and their stability based on surface phase diagrams constructed from the surface energy as a function of the surface composition. We show that in the simplest cases of pseudomorphic overlayers there are four generic classes of systems, characterized by the sign...... is based on density-functional calculations using the coherent-potential approximation and on effective-medium theory. We give self-consistent density-functional results for the segregation energy and surface mixing energy for all combinations of the transition and noble metals. Finally we discuss...

  14. Corrosion and protection of magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghali, E. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Metallurgy

    2000-07-01

    The oxide film on magnesium offers considerable surface protection in rural and some industrial environments and the corrosion rate lies between that of aluminum and low carbon steels. Galvanic coupling of magnesium alloys, high impurity content such as Ni, Fe, Cu and surface contamination are detrimental for corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. Alloying elements can form secondary particles which are noble to the Mg matrix, thereby facilitating corrosion, or enrich the corrosion product thereby possibly inhibiting the corrosion rate. Bimetallic corrosion resistance can be increased by fluxless melt protection, choice of compatible alloys, insulating materials, and new high-purity alloys. Magnesium is relatively insensible to oxygen concentration. Pitting, corrosion in the crevices, filiform corrosion are observed. Granular corrosion of magnesium alloys is possible due to the cathodic grain-boundary constituent. More homogeneous microstructures tend to improve corrosion resistance. Under fatigue loading conditions, microcrack initiation in Mg alloys is related to slip in preferentially oriented grains. Coating that exclude the corrosive environments can provide the primary defense against corrosion fatigue. Magnesium alloys that contain neither aluminum nor zinc are the most SCC resistant. Compressive surface residual stresses as that created by short peening increase SCC resistance. Cathodic polarization or cladding with a SCC resistant sheet alloy are good alternatives. Effective corrosion prevention for magnesium alloy components and assemblies should start at the design stage. Selective surface preparation, chemical treatment and coatings are recommended. Oil application, wax coating, anodizing, electroplating, and painting are possible alternatives. Recently, it is found that a magnesium hydride layer, created on the magnesium surface by cathodic charging in aqueous solution is a good base for painting. (orig.)

  15. Processing and properties of Nb-Ti-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.

    1992-01-01

    The processing characteristics, tensile properties, and oxidation response of two Nb-Ti-Al-Cr alloys were investigated. One creep test at 650 C and 172 MPa was conducted on the base alloy which contained 40Nb-40Ti-10Al-10Cr. A second alloy was modified with 0.11 at. % carbon and 0.07 at. % yttrium. Alloys were arc melted in a chamber backfilled with argon, drop cast into a water-cooled copper mold, and cold rolled to obtain a 0.8-mm sheet. The sheet was annealed at 1,100 C for 0.5 h. Longitudinal tensile specimens and oxidation specimens were obtained for both the base alloy and the modified alloy. Tensile properties were obtained for the base alloy at room temperature, 400, 600, 700, 800, 900, and 1,000 C, and for the modified alloy at room temperature, 400, 600, 700, and 800 C. Oxidation tests on the base alloy and modified alloy, as measured by weight change, were carried out at 600, 700, 800, and 900 C. Both the base alloy and the modified alloy were extremely ductile and were cold rolled to the final sheet thickness of 0.8 mm without an intermediate anneal. The modified alloy exhibited some edge cracking during cold during cold rolling. Both alloys recrystallized at the end of a 0.5-h annealing treatment. The alloys exhibited moderate strength and oxidation resistance below 600 C, similar to the results of alloys reported in the literature

  16. Characterization of zinc–nickel alloy electrodeposits obtained from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc alloy offers superior sacrificial protection to steel as the alloy dissolves more slowly than pure zinc. The degree of protection and the rate of dissolution depend on the alloying metal and its composition. Zinc-nickel alloy may also serve as at less toxic substitute for cadmium. In this paper the physico-chemical ...

  17. Study of fatigue behaviour of 7475 aluminium alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    controlled toughness alloy developed for applications that require a combination of high strength, superior fracture toughness and resistance to fatigue crack propagation both in air and aggressive environment. The 7475 alu- minium alloy is basically a modified version of 7075 alloy. Properties in 7075 alloy are improved by ...

  18. Characteristics of Film Formed on Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in Water Containing lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Ju Yup

    1999-01-01

    Anodic polarization behaviors of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 have been studied as a function of lead content in the solution of pH 4 and 10 at 90 .deg. C. As the amount of lead in the solution increased, critical current densities and passive current densities of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 increased, while the breakdown potential of the alloys decreased. The high critical current density in the high lead solution was thought to come from the combination of an enhanced dissolution of constituents on the surface of the alloys by the lead and an anodic dissolution of metallic lead deposited on the surface of the specimens. The morphology of lead precipitated on the specimen after the anodic scan changed with the pH of solution: small irregular particles were precipitated on the surface of the specimen in the solution of pH 4, while the high density of regular sized particles was formed on it in the solution of pH 10.Pb was observed to enhance Cr depletion from the outer surface of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 and also to increase the ratio of O 2- /OH - in the surface film formed in the high lead solution. The SCC resistance of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 may have decreased due to the poor quality of the passive film formed and the enhanced oxygen evolution in the solution containing lead

  19. Properties of low content uranium-molybdenum alloys which may be used as nuclear fuels; Proprietes des alliages uranium-molybdene de faibles teneurs utilisables comme materiaux combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J; Decours, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Metallurgical properties are given in this report of uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 3 per cent of molybdenum. Since some of these alloys are used in EDF power reactors are given: briefly the operating conditions imposed on nuclear fuels: maximum temperature, temperature gradient and external pressure. In the first part are considered the structural properties of the alloys correlation with the phase transformation kinetics; a description is given of the effects of certain physico-metallurgical factors on the morphology and the crystalline structure of the materials: - solidification conditions and the heredity of the {gamma} structure, - cooling rate at the transformation points, - whether or not the intermediate {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation is suppressed In the second part we show how a knowledge of the phase transformation processes has made it possible to define the optimum preparation conditions for these materials in the form of fuel tubes intended for the EDF reactors: casting conditions, controlled cooling treatments, weldability. In the third part we study the thermal, stability during the long duration high temperature treatments and the cycles in the two zones of the diagram {alpha} + {gamma}; {beta} + {gamma} the effects of the morphology (in particular the two types of {alpha} pseudo-grains observed) and of the cooling rate during the transformation point transitions are described. In the fourth part are discussed the mechanical properties: resistance to a tractive force, resistance to creep, resilience. These properties can also be affected by the {gamma} structure heredity and by the cooling rate to which the alloy has been subjected. In conclusion we discuss the reasons which led to the choice of some of these alloys for the first EDF reactors in particular the advantages of their high creep resistance between 450 and 600 deg C for use in the form of tubes subjected to an external pressure. (authors) [French] Dans ce rapport

  20. A sulfidation-resistant nickel-base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.

    1989-01-01

    For applications in mildly to moderately sulfidizing environments, stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys (e.g., alloys 800 and 330), and more recently Fe-Ni-Cr-Co alloys (e.g., alloy 556) are frequently used for construction of process equipment. However, for many highly sulfidizing environments, few existing commercial alloys have adequate performance. Thus, a new nickel-based alloy containing 27 wt.% Co, 28 wt.% Cr, 4 wt.% Fe, 2.75 wt.% Si, 0.5 wt.% Mn and 0.05 wt.% C (Haynes alloy HR-160) was developed