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Sample records for alloy neck adapter

  1. Modular titanium alloy neck adapter failures in hip replacement - failure mode analysis and influence of implant material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloemer Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modular neck adapters for hip arthroplasty stems allow the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intraoperatively. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such a modular device due to high loads or surface contamination inside the modular coupling. Unfortunately we have experienced such a failure of implants and now report our clinical experience with the failures in order to advance orthopaedic material research and joint replacement surgery. The failed neck adapters were implanted between August 2004 and November 2006 a total of about 5000 devices. After this period, the titanium neck adapters were replaced by adapters out of cobalt-chromium. Until the end of 2008 in total 1.4% (n = 68 of the implanted titanium alloy neck adapters failed with an average time of 2.0 years (0.7 to 4.0 years postoperatively. All, but one, patients were male, their average age being 57.4 years (36 to 75 years and the average weight 102.3 kg (75 to 130 kg. The failures of neck adapters were divided into 66% with small CCD of 130° and 60% with head lengths of L or larger. Assuming an average time to failure of 2.8 years, the cumulative failure rate was calculated with 2.4%. Methods A series of adapter failures of titanium alloy modular neck adapters in combination with a titanium alloy modular short hip stem was investigated. For patients having received this particular implant combination risk factors were identified which were associated with the occurence of implant failure. A Kaplan-Meier survival-failure-analysis was conducted. The retrieved implants were analysed using microscopic and chemical methods. Modes of failure were simulated in biomechanical tests. Comparative tests included modular neck adapters made of titanium alloy and cobalt chrome alloy material. Results Retrieval examinations and biomechanical simulation revealed that primary micromotions initiated fretting within the modular tapered neck

  2. Neck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    3.1 Neck960630 Surgical treatment for occipito-cervical deformities. Jia Lianshun (贾连顺), etal. Dept Orthopaed Surg Changzheng Hosp,2nd Mil Med Univ, Shanghai 200030.Chin Or-thopaed 1996, 16(7): 451-454 Fifty-six patients with developmental mal-formation of the occipital-atlanto-axis regionwere treated with resection of the posterior archof the atlas, enlargement of the foramen mag-num and bridge grafting of the occipital andaxis. There were 35 males and 21 females with

  3. Low Temperature Shape Memory Alloys for Adaptive, Autonomous Systems Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Williams, Martha; Benafan, Othmane; Fesmire, James

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this joint activity between Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Glenn Research Center (GRC) is to develop and evaluate the applicability of 2-way SMAs in proof-of-concept, low-temperature adaptive autonomous systems. As part of this low technology readiness (TRL) activity, we will develop and train low-temperature novel, 2-way shape memory alloys (SMAs) with actuation temperatures ranging from 0 C to 150 C. These experimental alloys will also be preliminary tested to evaluate their performance parameters and transformation (actuation) temperatures in low- temperature or cryogenic adaptive proof-of-concept systems. The challenge will be in the development, design, and training of the alloys for 2-way actuation at those temperatures.

  4. Expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization: Implementation for offline head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy

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    Yan Di; Liang Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To construct expected treatment dose for adaptive inverse planning optimization, and evaluate it on head and neck (h and n) cancer adaptive treatment modification. Methods: Adaptive inverse planning engine was developed and integrated in our in-house adaptive treatment control system. The adaptive inverse planning engine includes an expected treatment dose constructed using the daily cone beam (CB) CT images in its objective and constrains. Feasibility of the adaptive inverse planning optimization was evaluated retrospectively using daily CBCT images obtained from the image guided IMRT treatment of 19 h and n cancer patients. Adaptive treatment modification strategies with respect to the time and the number of adaptive inverse planning optimization during the treatment course were evaluated using the cumulative treatment dose in organs of interest constructed using all daily CBCT images. Results: Expected treatment dose was constructed to include both the delivered dose, to date, and the estimated dose for the remaining treatment during the adaptive treatment course. It was used in treatment evaluation, as well as in constructing the objective and constraints for adaptive inverse planning optimization. The optimization engine is feasible to perform planning optimization based on preassigned treatment modification schedule. Compared to the conventional IMRT, the adaptive treatment for h and n cancer illustrated clear dose-volume improvement for all critical normal organs. The dose-volume reductions of right and left parotid glands, spine cord, brain stem and mandible were (17 {+-} 6)%, (14 {+-} 6)%, (11 {+-} 6)%, (12 {+-} 8)%, and (5 {+-} 3)% respectively with the single adaptive modification performed after the second treatment week; (24 {+-} 6)%, (22 {+-} 8)%, (21 {+-} 5)%, (19 {+-} 8)%, and (10 {+-} 6)% with three weekly modifications; and (28 {+-} 5)%, (25 {+-} 9)%, (26 {+-} 5)%, (24 {+-} 8)%, and (15 {+-} 9)% with five weekly modifications. Conclusions

  5. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006–2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  6. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

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    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: Alexandra.Jensen@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Clinical Co-Operation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Bendl, Rolf [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  7. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate and head-and-neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.

    In the current practice of radiation therapy, daily patient alignments have been based on external skin marks or on bone. However, internal organ variation (both motion and volumetric changes) between treatment fractions can displace the treatment target, causing target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. In order to deliver the radiation treatment as planned, more accurate knowledge of the daily internal anatomy was needed. Additionally, treatments needed to adapt to these variations by either shifting the patient to account for the daily target position or by altering the treatment plan. In this dissertation, the question of whether inter-fractional variations in internal patient anatomy combined with external set-up uncertainties produced measurable differences between planned and delivered doses for prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients was investigated. Image-guided adaptive treatment strategies to improve tumor coverage and/or reduce normal tissue dose were examined. Treatment deliveries utilizing various alignment procedures for ten prostate cancer patients and eleven head-and-neck cancer patients, each of whom received multiple CT scans over the course of treatment, were simulated. The largest prostate dose losses between planning and delivery were correlated with anterior/posterior and superior/inferior prostate displacement. Daily bone alignment sufficiently maintained target coverage for 70% of patients, ultrasound for 90%, and CT for 100%. A no-action-level correction protocol, which corrected the daily bone alignment for the systematic internal displacement of the prostate based on a pre-determined number of CT image sets, successfully improved the prostate and seminal vesicle dosimetric coverage. Three CT image sets were sufficient to accurately correct the bone alignment scheme for the prostate internal systematic shifts. For head-and-neck cancer patient treatment, setup uncertainties and internal organ variations did not greatly affect

  8. Dosimetric Evaluation of Automatic Segmentation for Adaptive IMRT for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Adaptive planning to accommodate anatomic changes during treatment requires repeat segmentation. This study uses dosimetric endpoints to assess automatically deformed contours. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with head-and-neck cancer had adaptive plans because of anatomic change during radiotherapy. Contours from the initial planning computed tomography (CT) were deformed to the mid-treatment CT using an intensity-based free-form registration algorithm then compared with the manually drawn contours for the same CT using the Dice similarity coefficient and an overlap index. The automatic contours were used to create new adaptive plans. The original and automatic adaptive plans were compared based on dosimetric outcomes of the manual contours and on plan conformality. Results: Volumes from the manual and automatic segmentation were similar; only the gross tumor volume (GTV) was significantly different. Automatic plans achieved lower mean coverage for the GTV: V95: 98.6 ± 1.9% vs. 89.9 ± 10.1% (p = 0.004) and clinical target volume: V95: 98.4 ± 0.8% vs. 89.8 ± 6.2% (p 3 of the spinal cord 39.9 ± 3.7 Gy vs. 42.8 ± 5.4 Gy (p = 0.034), but no difference for the remaining structures. Conclusions: Automatic segmentation is not robust enough to substitute for physician-drawn volumes, particularly for the GTV. However, it generates normal structure contours of sufficient accuracy when assessed by dosimetric end points.

  9. Shape memory alloy actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle for jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gangbing (Inventor); Ma, Ning (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The proposed adaptive exhaust nozzle features an innovative use of the shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for actively control of the opening area of the exhaust nozzle for jet engines. The SMA actuators remotely control the opening area of the exhaust nozzle through a set of mechanism. An important advantage of using SMA actuators is the reduction of weight of the actuator system for variable area exhaust nozzle. Another advantage is that the SMA actuator can be activated using the heat from the exhaust and eliminate the need of other energy source. A prototype has been designed and fabricated. The functionality of the proposed SMA actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle is verified in the open-loop tests.

  10. Radiation dose reduction in soft tissue neck CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR)

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    Vachha, Behroze, E-mail: bvachha@partners.org [Neuroradiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Brodoefel, Harald; Wilcox, Carol; Hackney, David B.; Moonis, Gul [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To compare objective and subjective image quality in neck CT images acquired at different tube current–time products (275 mA s and 340 mA s) and reconstructed with filtered-back-projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Materials and methods: HIPAA-compliant study with IRB approval and waiver of informed consent. 66 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to undergo contrast-enhanced neck CT at a standard tube-current–time-product (340 mA s; n = 33) or reduced tube-current–time-product (275 mA s, n = 33). Data sets were reconstructed with FBP and 2 levels (30%, 40%) of ASIR-FBP blending at 340 mA s and 275 mA s. Two neuroradiologists assessed subjective image quality in a blinded and randomized manner. Volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length-product (DLP), effective dose, and objective image noise were recorded. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was computed as mean attenuation in a region of interest in the sternocleidomastoid muscle divided by image noise. Results: Compared with FBP, ASIR resulted in a reduction of image noise at both 340 mA s and 275 mA s. Reduction of tube current from 340 mA s to 275 mA s resulted in an increase in mean objective image noise (p = 0.02) and a decrease in SNR (p = 0.03) when images were reconstructed with FBP. However, when the 275 mA s images were reconstructed using ASIR, the mean objective image noise and SNR were similar to those of the standard 340 mA s CT images reconstructed with FBP (p > 0.05). Subjective image noise was ranked by both raters as either average or less-than-average irrespective of the tube current and iterative reconstruction technique. Conclusion: Adapting ASIR into neck CT protocols reduced effective dose by 17% without compromising image quality.

  11. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

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    Hoeben, Bianca A. W.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], e-mail: b.hoeben@rther.umcn.nl; Oyen, Wim J. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Troost, Esther G. C. [Maastro Clinic, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer 18F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  12. The swan-neck lesion: proximal tubular adaptation to oxidative stress in nephropathic cystinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarreta, Carolina I; Forbes, Michael S; Thornhill, Barbara A; Antignac, Corinne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Nevo, Nathalie; Murphy, Michael P; Chevalier, Robert L

    2015-05-15

    Cystinosis is an inherited disorder resulting from a mutation in the CTNS gene, causing progressive proximal tubular cell flattening, the so-called swan-neck lesion (SNL), and eventual renal failure. To determine the role of oxidative stress in cystinosis, histologic sections of kidneys from C57BL/6 Ctns(-/-) and wild-type mice were examined by immunohistochemistry and morphometry from 1 wk to 20 mo of age. Additional mice were treated from 1 to 6 mo with vehicle or mitoquinone (MitoQ), an antioxidant targeted to mitochondria. The leading edge of the SNL lost mitochondria and superoxide production, and became surrounded by a thickened tubular basement membrane. Progression of the SNL as determined by staining with lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus accelerated after 3 mo, but was delayed by treatment with MitoQ (38 ± 4% vs. 28 ± 1%, P injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) nor cell death was observed. After 9 mo, clusters of proximal tubules exhibited localized oxidative stress (4-hydroxynonenal binding), expressed KIM-1, and underwent apoptosis, leading to the formation of atubular glomeruli and accumulation of interstitial collagen. We conclude that nephron integrity is initially maintained in the Ctns(-/-) mouse by adaptive flattening of cells of the SNL through loss of mitochondria, upregulation of transgelin, and thickened basement membrane. This adaptation ultimately fails in adulthood, with proximal tubular disruption, formation of atubular glomeruli, and renal failure. Antioxidant treatment targeted to mitochondria delays initiation of the SNL, and may provide therapeutic benefit in children with cystinosis. PMID:25694483

  13. Predicting the need for adaptive radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) can account for the dosimetric impact of anatomical change in head and neck cancer patients; however it can be resource intensive. Consequently, it is imperative that patients likely to require ART are identified. The purpose of this study was to find predictive factors that identify oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients more likely to need ART. Materials and methods: One hundred and ten patients with OPC or NPC were analysed. Patient demographics and tumour characteristics were compared between patients who were replanned and those that were not. Factors found to be significant were included in logistic regression models. Risk profiles were developed from these models. A dosimetric analysis was performed. Results: Nodal disease stage, pre-treatment largest involved node size, diagnosis and initial weight (categorised in 2 groups) were identified as significant for inclusion in the model. Two models were found to be significant (p = 0.001), correctly classifying 98.2% and 96.1% of patients respectively. Three ART risk profiles were developed. Conclusion: Predictive factors identifying OPC or NPC patients more likely to require ART were reported. A risk profile approach could facilitate the effective implementation of ART into radiotherapy departments through forward planning and appropriate resource allocation

  14. Adaptive radiotherapy for soft tissue changes during helical tomotherapy for head and neck cancer

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    Duma, M.N.; Kampfer, S.; Winkler, C.; Geinitz, H. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuster, T. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2012-03-15

    The goal of the present study was to assess the frequency and impact of replanning triggered solely by soft tissue changes observed on the daily setup mega-voltage CT (MVCT) in head and neck cancer (H and N) helical tomotherapy (HT). A total of 11 patients underwent adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using MVCT. Preconditions were a soft tissue change > 0.5 cm and a tight mask. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) derived from the initial planning kVCT (inPlan), the recalculated DVHs of the fraction (fx) when replanning was decided (actSit) and the DVHs of the new plan (adaptPlan) were compared. Assessed were the following: maximum dose (D{sub max}), minimum dose (D{sub min}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the planning target volume (PTV) normalized to the prescribed dose; the D{sub mean}/fx to the parotid glands (PG), oral cavity (OC), and larynx (Lx); and the D{sub max}/fx to the spinal cord (SC) in Gy/fx. No patient had palpable soft tissue changes. The median weight loss at the moment of replanning was 2.3 kg. The median PTV D{sub mean} was 100% for inPlan, 103% for actSit, and 100% for adaptPlan. The PTV was always covered by the prescribed dose. A statistically significant increase was noted for all organs at risk (OAR) in the actSit. The D{sub mean} to the Lx, the D{sub mean} to the OC and the D{sub max} to the SC were statistically better in the adaptPlan. No statistically significant improvement was achieved by ART for the PGs. No significant correlations between weight and volume loss or between the volume changes of the organs to each other were observed, except a strong positive correlation of the shrinkage of the PGs ({rho} = + 0.77, p = 0.005). Soft tissue shrinkage without clinical palpable changes will not affect the coverage of the PTV, but translates into a higher delivered dose to the PTV itself and the normal tissue outside the PTV. The gain by ART in individual patients - especially in patients who receive doses close to the tolerance doses of the OAR

  15. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board–approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13–45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  16. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  17. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceretti, Marco; Falez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient's original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture. PMID:27163109

  18. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceretti, Marco; Falez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient’s original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture. PMID:27163109

  19. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceretti Marco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient’s original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture.

  20. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Neck Disability Index and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale for patients with neck pain due to degenerative and discopathic disorders. Psychometric properties of the Polish versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glowacki Maciej

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though there are several region-specific functional outcome questionnaires measuring neck disorders that have been developed in English-speaking countries, no Polish version has ever been validated. The purpose of our study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Neck Disability Index (NDI and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale (CDS for Polish-speaking patients with neck pain. Methods The translation was carried out according to the International Quality of Life Association (IQOLA Project. Sixty patients were treated due to degenerative and discopathic disorders in the cervical spine filled out the NDI-PL and the CDS-PL. The pain level was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale. The mean age of the assessed group was 47.1 years (SD 8.9. We used Cronbach's alpha to assess internal consistency. We assessed the test-retest reliability using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rS was used to determine dependency between quantitative characteristics. The Mann-Whitney test was applied to determine dependency between quantitative and qualitative characteristics. Results The Cronbach's alpha values were excellent for the NDI-PL in the test and in the retest (0.84, 0.85, respectively, and for the CDS-PL (0.90 in the test and in the retest. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients were excellent for the CDS-PL and NDI-PL and equalled 0.93 (95% CI from 0.89 to 0.95 and 0.87 (95% CI from 0.80 to 0.92, respectively The concurrent validity was good in the test and in the retest (rs = 0.42 p Conclusions The present versions of the NDI-PL and CDS-PL, the first to be published in Polish, have proven to be reliable and valid for patients with degenerative changes in the cervical spine. The NDI-PL and CDS-PL have excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and good concurrent validity. The adapted questionnaires showed a strong inter-correlation both

  1. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 (VHNSS 2.0 for the assessment of oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Marçon Barroso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer have several symptoms, predominantly oral. The Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 is an American tool developed to evaluate oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to translate the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 into Brazilian Portuguese and cross-culturally adapt this tool for subsequent validation and application in Brazil. METHODS: A method used for the translation and cultural adaptation of tools, which included independent translations, synthesis of the translations, back-translations, expert committee, and pre-test, was used. The pre-test was performed with 37 head and neck cancer patients, who were divided into four groups, to assess the relevance and understanding of the assessed items. Data were submitted to descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: The overall mean of the content validity index was 0.79 for semantic and idiomatic equivalence, and it was higher than 0.8 for cultural and conceptual equivalence. The cognitive interview showed that patients were able to paraphrase the items, and considered them relevant and easily understood. CONCLUSION: The tool was translated and cross-culturally adapted to be used in Brazil. The authors believe this translation is suited for validation.

  2. Comparative dosimetry of three-phase adaptive and non-adaptive dose-painting IMRT for head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The anatomical changes, which occur during the radiotherapy treatment for head-and-neck cancer, may compromise the effectiveness of the treatment. This study compares dosimetrical effects of adaptive (ART) and non-adaptive (RT) dose-painted radiotherapy. Materials and methods: For 10 patients, three treatment phases were preceded by a planning PET/CT scan. In ART, phases II and III were planned using PET/CT2 and PET/CT3, respectively. In RT, phases II and III were planned on PET/CT1 and recalculated on PET/CT2 and PET/CT3. Deformable image co-registration was used to sum the dose distributions and to propagate regions-of-interest (ROIs) drawn on PET/CT1 to PET/CT2, PET/CT3 and a last-treatment-day CT-scan. Results: Re-adjusted dose-painting ART provided higher minimum and lower maximum doses in target ROIs in comparison to RT. On average, ART reduced the parotids’ median dose and swallowing structures mean dose by 4.6–7.1% (p > 0.05) and 3% (p = 0.06), respectively. Dose differences for targets were from −1.6% to 6.6% and for organs-at-risk from −7.1% to 7.1%. Analysis of individual patient data showed large improvements of ROI dose/volume metrics by ART, reaching a 24.4% minimum-dose increase in the elective neck planning target volume and 21.1% median-dose decrease in swallowing structures. Conclusion: Compared to RT, ART readjusts dose-painting, increases minimum and decreases maximum doses in target volumes and improves dose/volume metrics of organs-at-risk. The results favored the adaptive strategy, but also revealed considerable heterogeneity in patient-specific benefit. Reporting population-average effects underestimates the patient-specific benefits of ART

  3. The role of regularization in deformable image registration for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardo, D; Peroni, M; Riboldi, M; Alterio, D; Baroni, G; Orecchia, R

    2013-08-01

    Deformable image registration provides a robust mathematical framework to quantify morphological changes that occur along the course of external beam radiotherapy treatments. As clinical reliability of deformable image registration is not always guaranteed, algorithm regularization is commonly introduced to prevent sharp discontinuities in the quantified deformation and achieve anatomically consistent results. In this work we analyzed the influence of regularization on two different registration methods, i.e. B-Splines and Log Domain Diffeomorphic Demons, implemented in an open-source platform. We retrospectively analyzed the simulation computed tomography (CTsim) and the corresponding re-planning computed tomography (CTrepl) scans in 30 head and neck cancer patients. First, we investigated the influence of regularization levels on hounsfield units (HU) information in 10 test patients for each considered method. Then, we compared the registration results of the open-source implementation at selected best performing regularization levels with a clinical commercial software on the remaining 20 patients in terms of mean volume overlap, surface and center of mass distances between manual outlines and propagated structures. The regularized B-Splines method was not statistically different from the commercial software. The tuning of the regularization parameters allowed open-source algorithms to achieve better results in deformable image registration for head and neck patients, with the additional benefit of a framework where regularization can be tuned on a patient specific basis.

  4. Evaluation of Deformable Image Coregistration in Adaptive Dose Painting by Numbers for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olteanu, Luiza A.M., E-mail: AnaMariaLuiza.Olteanu@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan, Ghent (Belgium); Madani, Indira; De Neve, Wilfried; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of contour deformation and feasibility of dose summation applying deformable image coregistration in adaptive dose painting by numbers (DPBN) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Data of 12 head-and-neck-cancer patients treated within a Phase I trial on adaptive {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)-guided DPBN were used. Each patient had two DPBN treatment plans: the initial plan was based on a pretreatment PET/CT scan; the second adapted plan was based on a PET/CT scan acquired after 8 fractions. The median prescription dose to the dose-painted volume was 30 Gy for both DPBN plans. To obtain deformed contours and dose distributions, pretreatment CT was deformed to per-treatment CT using deformable image coregistration. Deformed contours of regions of interest (ROI{sub def}) were visually inspected and, if necessary, adjusted (ROI{sub def{sub ad}}) and both compared with manually redrawn ROIs (ROI{sub m}) using Jaccard (JI) and overlap indices (OI). Dose summation was done on the ROI{sub m}, ROI{sub def{sub ad}}, or their unions with the ROI{sub def}. Results: Almost all deformed ROIs were adjusted. The largest adjustment was made in patients with substantially regressing tumors: ROI{sub def} = 11.8 {+-} 10.9 cm{sup 3} vs. ROI{sub def{sub ad}} = 5.9 {+-} 7.8 cm{sup 3} vs. ROI{sub m} = 7.7 {+-} 7.2 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.57). The swallowing structures were the most frequently adjusted ROIs with the lowest indices for the upper esophageal sphincter: JI = 0.3 (ROI{sub def}) and 0.4 (ROI{sub def{sub ad}}); OI = 0.5 (both ROIs). The mandible needed the least adjustment with the highest indices: JI = 0.8 (both ROIs), OI = 0.9 (ROI{sub def}), and 1.0 (ROI{sub def{sub ad}}). Summed doses differed non-significantly. There was a trend of higher doses in the targets and lower doses in the spinal cord when doses were summed on unions. Conclusion: Visual inspection and adjustment were necessary for most ROIs. Fast automatic ROI

  5. Impact of head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy to spare the parotid glands and decrease the risk of xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large anatomical variations occur during the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). The risks are therefore a parotid glands (PG) overdose and a xerostomia increase. The purposes of the study were to estimate: - the PG overdose and the xerostomia risk increase during a “standard” IMRT (IMRTstd); - the benefits of an adaptive IMRT (ART) with weekly replanning to spare the PGs and limit the risk of xerostomia. Fifteen patients received radical IMRT (70 Gy) for LAHNC. Weekly CTs were used to estimate the dose distributions delivered during the treatment, corresponding either to the initial planning (IMRTstd) or to weekly replanning (ART). PGs dose were recalculated at the fraction, from the weekly CTs. PG cumulated doses were then estimated using deformable image registration. The following PG doses were compared: pre-treatment planned dose, per-treatment IMRTstd and ART. The corresponding estimated risks of xerostomia were also compared. Correlations between anatomical markers and dose differences were searched. Compared to the initial planning, a PG overdose was observed during IMRTstd for 59% of the PGs, with an average increase of 3.7 Gy (10.0 Gy maximum) for the mean dose, and of 8.2% (23.9% maximum) for the risk of xerostomia. Compared to the initial planning, weekly replanning reduced the PG mean dose for all the patients (p < 0.05). In the overirradiated PG group, weekly replanning reduced the mean dose by 5.1 Gy (12.2 Gy maximum) and the absolute risk of xerostomia by 11% (p < 0.01) (30% maximum). The PG overdose and the dosimetric benefit of replanning increased with the tumor shrinkage and the neck thickness reduction (p < 0.001). During the course of LAHNC IMRT, around 60% of the PGs are overdosed of 4 Gy. Weekly replanning decreased the PG mean dose by 5 Gy, and therefore by 11% the xerostomia risk

  6. Finishing of additively manufactured titanium alloy by shape adaptive grinding (SAG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, rapid prototyping of titanium alloy components for medical and aeronautics application has become viable thanks to advances in technologies such as electron beam melting (EBM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). However, for many applications the high surface roughness generated by additive manufacturing techniques demands a post-finishing operation to improve the surface quality prior to usage. In this paper, the novel shape adaptive grinding process has been applied to finishing titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) additively manufactured by EBM and SLS. It is shown that the micro-structured surface layer resulting from the melting process can be removed, and the surface can then be smoothed down to less than 10 nm Ra (starting from 4–5 μm Ra) using only three different diamond grit sizes. This paper also demonstrates application of the technology to freeform shapes, and documents the dimensional accuracy of finished artifacts. (paper)

  7. Electro-bending characterization of adaptive 3D fiber reinforced plastics based on shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashir, Moniruddoza; Hahn, Lars; Kluge, Axel; Nocke, Andreas; Cherif, Chokri

    2016-03-01

    The industrial importance of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) is growing steadily in recent years, which are mostly used in different niche products, has been growing steadily in recent years. The integration of sensors and actuators in FRP is potentially valuable for creating innovative applications and therefore the market acceptance of adaptive FRP is increasing. In particular, in the field of highly stressed FRP, structural integrated systems for continuous component parts monitoring play an important role. This presented work focuses on the electro-mechanical characterization of adaptive three-dimensional (3D)FRP with integrated textile-based actuators. Here, the friction spun hybrid yarn, consisting of shape memory alloy (SMA) in wire form as core, serves as an actuator. Because of the shape memory effect, the SMA-hybrid yarn returns to its original shape upon heating that also causes the deformation of adaptive 3D FRP. In order to investigate the influences of the deformation behavior of the adaptive 3D FRP, investigations in this research are varied according to the structural parameters such as radius of curvature of the adaptive 3D FRP, fabric types and number of layers of the fabric in the composite. Results show that reproducible deformations can be realized with adaptive 3D FRP and that structural parameters have a significant impact on the deformation capability.

  8. Principal component analysis-based anatomical motion models for use in adaptive radiation therapy of head and neck cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetvertkov, Mikhail A.

    Purpose: To develop standard and regularized principal component analysis (PCA) models of anatomical changes from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H&N) patients, assess their potential use in adaptive radiation therapy (ART), and to extract quantitative information for treatment response assessment. Methods: Planning CT (pCT) images of H&N patients were artificially deformed to create "digital phantom" images, which modeled systematic anatomical changes during Radiation Therapy (RT). Artificial deformations closely mirrored patients' actual deformations, and were interpolated to generate 35 synthetic CBCTs, representing evolving anatomy over 35 fractions. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between pCT and synthetic CBCTs (i.e., digital phantoms), and between pCT and clinical CBCTs. Patient-specific standard PCA (SPCA) and regularized PCA (RPCA) models were built from these synthetic and clinical DVF sets. Eigenvectors, or eigenDVFs (EDVFs), having the largest eigenvalues were hypothesized to capture the major anatomical deformations during treatment. Modeled anatomies were used to assess the dose deviations with respect to the planned dose distribution. Results: PCA models achieve variable results, depending on the size and location of anatomical change. Random changes prevent or degrade SPCA's ability to detect underlying systematic change. RPCA is able to detect smaller systematic changes against the background of random fraction-to-fraction changes, and is therefore more successful than SPCA at capturing systematic changes early in treatment. SPCA models were less successful at modeling systematic changes in clinical patient images, which contain a wider range of random motion than synthetic CBCTs, while the regularized approach was able to extract major modes of motion. For dose assessment it has been shown that the modeled dose distribution was different from the planned dose for the parotid glands due to their shrinkage and shift into

  9. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, N; Padgett, K [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Evans, J; Sleeman, W; Song, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fatyga, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients.

  10. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Uncertainties in dose warping due to the choice of deformable registration algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lourenço, Ana Mónica [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Acoustics and Ionizing Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Mouinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; McClelland, Jamie R. [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The aims of this work were to evaluate the performance of several deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms implemented in our in-house software (NiftyReg) and the uncertainties inherent to using different algorithms for dose warping. Methods: The authors describe a DIR based adaptive radiotherapy workflow, using CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The transformations that mapped the anatomy between the two time points were obtained using four different DIR approaches available in NiftyReg. These included a standard unidirectional algorithm and more sophisticated bidirectional ones that encourage or ensure inverse consistency. The forward (CT-to-CBCT) deformation vector fields (DVFs) were used to propagate the CT Hounsfield units and structures to the daily geometry for “dose of the day” calculations, while the backward (CBCT-to-CT) DVFs were used to remap the dose of the day onto the planning CT (pCT). Data from five head and neck patients were used to evaluate the performance of each implementation based on geometrical matching, physical properties of the DVFs, and similarity between warped dose distributions. Geometrical matching was verified in terms of dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transform, false positives, and false negatives. The physical properties of the DVFs were assessed calculating the harmonic energy, determinant of the Jacobian, and inverse consistency error of the transformations. Dose distributions were displayed on the pCT dose space and compared using dose difference (DD), distance to dose difference, and dose volume histograms. Results: All the DIR algorithms gave similar results in terms of geometrical matching, with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.08, but the underlying properties of the DVFs varied in terms of smoothness and inverse consistency. When comparing the doses warped by different algorithms, we found a root mean square DD of 1.9% ± 0.8% of the prescribed dose (pD) and that an average of 9% ± 4% of

  11. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients

  12. SU-E-J-74: Dosimetric Advantages of Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Are Confirmed with Weekly CBCT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Q; Li, Z; Qu, H; Ward, M; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Our previous study showed that weekly dose monitoring using cone-beam CT (CBCT) images can guide the timing and need for adaptive re-planning during the treatment of head and neck (HN) cancer. Here we aim to confirm the dosimetric improvement of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using weekly CBCTs. Methods: We randomly selected seven HN patients treated with ART due to noticeable anatomic changes. Twenty weekly images acquired during the second treatment course were included. These CBCTs were aligned with both the initial and re-planning simulation CTs according to the clinical shifts. Daily doses were re-calculated for both the initial and adaptive plans. Contours of the tumor and organs-at-risk (OARs) were manually delineated by a physician on the re-planning CT and then were transferred to the CBCTs for plan evaluation. Contour modifications were made based on the daily anatomic changes observed on CBCTs. All patients were treated with 70Gy to the primary tumor and 56Gy to the elective lymph nodes. Results: Volumetric changes of the tumor (range — 43.9%∼+15.9%) were observed. The average D99 to the primary tumor was (70.1±2.0)Gy (range 62.2∼72.5Gy) for the adaptive plan and (66.0±5.5)Gy (range 50.9∼70.7Gy) for the initial plan(p<<0.01). The average D99 to the elective neck was (56.3±1.3)Gy (range 52.8∼59.2Gy) for the adaptive plan and (52.4±7.0)Gy (range 37.7∼58.6Gy) for the initial plan(p=0.01). The parotid decreased in volume during the treatment course (range 7.3%∼42.2%). The average D-mean to the spared parotid decreased by 15.3% (p=0.002) for the adaptive plan when compared to the original. With ART, 4 out of 7 patients experienced better sparing of the spinal cord (D-max reduced by 2.5%∼10.2%) and the oral cavity (D-mean reduced by 3.5%∼20.1%). Conclusion: Weekly CBCT dosimetry confirms that ART is an effective method to accommodate on-treatment anatomic changes. In select patients, tumor coverage and OAR sparing may be improved

  13. SU-E-J-74: Dosimetric Advantages of Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Are Confirmed with Weekly CBCT Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Our previous study showed that weekly dose monitoring using cone-beam CT (CBCT) images can guide the timing and need for adaptive re-planning during the treatment of head and neck (HN) cancer. Here we aim to confirm the dosimetric improvement of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using weekly CBCTs. Methods: We randomly selected seven HN patients treated with ART due to noticeable anatomic changes. Twenty weekly images acquired during the second treatment course were included. These CBCTs were aligned with both the initial and re-planning simulation CTs according to the clinical shifts. Daily doses were re-calculated for both the initial and adaptive plans. Contours of the tumor and organs-at-risk (OARs) were manually delineated by a physician on the re-planning CT and then were transferred to the CBCTs for plan evaluation. Contour modifications were made based on the daily anatomic changes observed on CBCTs. All patients were treated with 70Gy to the primary tumor and 56Gy to the elective lymph nodes. Results: Volumetric changes of the tumor (range — 43.9%∼+15.9%) were observed. The average D99 to the primary tumor was (70.1±2.0)Gy (range 62.2∼72.5Gy) for the adaptive plan and (66.0±5.5)Gy (range 50.9∼70.7Gy) for the initial plan(p<<0.01). The average D99 to the elective neck was (56.3±1.3)Gy (range 52.8∼59.2Gy) for the adaptive plan and (52.4±7.0)Gy (range 37.7∼58.6Gy) for the initial plan(p=0.01). The parotid decreased in volume during the treatment course (range 7.3%∼42.2%). The average D-mean to the spared parotid decreased by 15.3% (p=0.002) for the adaptive plan when compared to the original. With ART, 4 out of 7 patients experienced better sparing of the spinal cord (D-max reduced by 2.5%∼10.2%) and the oral cavity (D-mean reduced by 3.5%∼20.1%). Conclusion: Weekly CBCT dosimetry confirms that ART is an effective method to accommodate on-treatment anatomic changes. In select patients, tumor coverage and OAR sparing may be improved

  14. Shape memory alloy adaptive control of gas turbine engine compressor blade tip clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetky, Lawrence M.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1998-06-01

    The ambient air ingested through the inlet of a gas turbine is first compressed by an axial compressor followed by further compression in a centrifugal compressor and then fed into the combustion chamber where ignition and expansion take place to produce the engine thrust. The axial compressor typically has five or more stages which consist of revolving blades and stators and the overall performance of the turbine is strongly affected by the compressor efficiency. When the turbine is turned on, to accommodate the rapid initial increase in the compressor blade length due to centrifugal force, the cold turbine has a built in clearance between the turbine blade tip and the casing. As the turbine reached its operating temperature there is a further increase in the blade length due to thermal expansion and, at the same time, the diameter of the casing increases. The net result is that when these various components have reached their equilibrium temperatures, the initial cold build clearance is reduced, but there remains a residual clearance. The magnitude of this clearance has a direct effect on the compressor efficiency and can be stated as: Δη/Δ CLR equals 0.5 where η is efficiency and CLR is the tip clearance. The concept of adaptive tip clearance control is based on the ability of a shape memory alloy ring to shrink to a predetermined diameter when heated to the temperature of a particular stage, and thus reducing the tip clearance. The ring is fabricated from a CuAlNi shape memory alloy and is mounted in the casing so as to be coaxial with the rotating blades of the particular stage. When cold, the ring dimensions are such as to provide the required cold build clearance, but when at operating temperature the reduced diameter creates a very small tip clearance. The clearance provided by this concept is much smaller than the clearance normally obtained for a turbine of the size being studied.

  15. A three-dimensional head-and-neck phantom for validation of multimodality deformable image registration for adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhrao, Kamal; Kirby, Neil; Pouliot, Jean, E-mail: jpouliot@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a three-dimensional (3D) deformable head-and-neck (H and N) phantom with realistic tissue contrast for both kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging modalities and use it to objectively evaluate deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: The phantom represents H and N patient anatomy. It is constructed from thermoplastic, which becomes pliable in boiling water, and hardened epoxy resin. Using a system of additives, the Hounsfield unit (HU) values of these materials were tuned to mimic anatomy for both kV and MV imaging. The phantom opens along a sagittal midsection to reveal radiotransparent markers, which were used to characterize the phantom deformation. The deformed and undeformed phantoms were scanned with kV and MV imaging modalities. Additionally, a calibration curve was created to change the HUs of the MV scans to be similar to kV HUs, (MC). The extracted ground-truth deformation was then compared to the results of two commercially available DIR algorithms, from Velocity Medical Solutions and MIM software. Results: The phantom produced a 3D deformation, representing neck flexion, with a magnitude of up to 8 mm and was able to represent tissue HUs for both kV and MV imaging modalities. The two tested deformation algorithms yielded vastly different results. For kV–kV registration, MIM produced mean and maximum errors of 1.8 and 11.5 mm, respectively. These same numbers for Velocity were 2.4 and 7.1 mm, respectively. For MV–MV, kV–MV, and kV–MC Velocity produced similar mean and maximum error values. MIM, however, produced gross errors for all three of these scenarios, with maximum errors ranging from 33.4 to 41.6 mm. Conclusions: The application of DIR across different imaging modalities is particularly difficult, due to differences in tissue HUs and the presence of imaging artifacts. For this reason, DIR algorithms must be validated specifically for this purpose. The developed H and N phantom is an effective tool

  16. Adaptive and innovative Radiation Treatment FOR improving Cancer treatment outcomE (ARTFORCE); a randomized controlled phase II trial for individualized treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure of locoregional control is the main cause of recurrence in advanced head and neck cancer. This multi-center trial aims to improve outcome in two ways. Firstly, by redistribution of the radiation dose to the metabolically most FDG-PET avid part of the tumour. Hereby, a biologically more effective dose distribution might be achieved while simultaneously sparing normal tissues. Secondly, by improving patient selection. Both cisplatin and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) antibodies like Cetuximab in combination with Radiotherapy (RT) are effective in enhancing tumour response. However, it is unknown which patients will benefit from either agent in combination with irradiation. We will analyze the predictive value of biological markers and 89Zr-Cetuximab uptake for treatment outcome of chemoradiation with Cetuximab or cisplatin to improve patient selection. ARTFORCE is a randomized phase II trial for 268 patients with a factorial 2 by 2 design: cisplatin versus Cetuximab and standard RT versus redistributed RT. Cisplatin is dosed weekly 40 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Cetuximab is dosed 250mg/m2 weekly (loading dose 400 mg/m2) for 6 weeks. The standard RT regimen consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks. Redistributed adaptive RT consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a SIB between 64-80 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks with redistributed dose to the gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV), and adaptation of treatment for anatomical changes in the third week of treatment. Patients with locally advanced, biopsy confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, oral cavity or hypopharynx are eligible. Primary endpoints are: locoregional recurrence free survival at 2 years, correlation of the median 89Zr-cetuximab uptake and biological markers with treatment specific outcome, and toxicity. Secondary endpoints are quality of life, swallowing function preservation

  17. Systematic evaluation of three different commercial software solutions for automatic segmentation for adaptive therapy in head-and-neck, prostate and pleural cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To validate, in the context of adaptive radiotherapy, three commercial software solutions for atlas-based segmentation. Fifteen patients, five for each group, with cancer of the Head&Neck, pleura, and prostate were enrolled in the study. In addition to the treatment planning CT (pCT) images, one replanning CT (rCT) image set was acquired for each patient during the RT course. Three experienced physicians outlined on the pCT and rCT all the volumes of interest (VOIs). We used three software solutions (VelocityAI 2.6.2 (V), MIM 5.1.1 (M) by MIMVista and ABAS 2.0 (A) by CMS-Elekta) to generate the automatic contouring on the repeated CT. All the VOIs obtained with automatic contouring (AC) were successively corrected manually. We recorded the time needed for: 1) ex novo ROIs definition on rCT; 2) generation of AC by the three software solutions; 3) manual correction of AC. To compare the quality of the volumes obtained automatically by the software and manually corrected with those drawn from scratch on rCT, we used the following indexes: overlap coefficient (DICE), sensitivity, inclusiveness index, difference in volume, and displacement differences on three axes (x, y, z) from the isocenter. The time saved by the three software solutions for all the sites, compared to the manual contouring from scratch, is statistically significant and similar for all the three software solutions. The time saved for each site are as follows: about an hour for Head&Neck, about 40 minutes for prostate, and about 20 minutes for mesothelioma. The best DICE similarity coefficient index was obtained with the manual correction for: A (contours for prostate), A and M (contours for H&N), and M (contours for mesothelioma). From a clinical point of view, the automated contouring workflow was shown to be significantly shorter than the manual contouring process, even though manual correction of the VOIs is always needed

  18. Evaluation of deformable image registration for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Zhang, Y Y; Shi, Y H; Zhou, L H; Zhen, X

    2016-04-29

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) to propagate contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contours mapping, seven intensity-based DIR strategies are tested on the planning CT and weekly CBCT images from six Head & Neck cancer patients who underwent a 6 ∼ 7 weeks intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e. the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), are employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician delineated ground truths. It is found that the performance of all the evaluated DIR algorithms declines as the treatment proceeds. No statistically significant performance difference is observed between different DIR algorithms (p> 0.05), except for the double force demons (DFD) which yields the worst result in terms of DSC and PE. For the metric HD, all the DIR algorithms behaved unsatisfactorily with no statistically significant performance difference (p= 0.273). These findings suggested that special care should be taken when utilizing the intensity-based DIR algorithms involved in this study to deform OAR contours between CT and CBCT, especially for those organs with low contrast. PMID:27259084

  19. SU-E-J-109: Evaluation of Deformable Accumulated Parotid Doses Using Different Registration Algorithms in Adaptive Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S [Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100084 China (China); Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853 China (China); Liu, B [Image processing center, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 China (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Three deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms are utilized to perform deformable dose accumulation for head and neck tomotherapy treatment, and the differences of the accumulated doses are evaluated. Methods: Daily MVCT data for 10 patients with pathologically proven nasopharyngeal cancers were analyzed. The data were acquired using tomotherapy (TomoTherapy, Accuray) at the PLA General Hospital. The prescription dose to the primary target was 70Gy in 33 fractions.Three DIR methods (B-spline, Diffeomorphic Demons and MIMvista) were used to propagate parotid structures from planning CTs to the daily CTs and accumulate fractionated dose on the planning CTs. The mean accumulated doses of parotids were quantitatively compared and the uncertainties of the propagated parotid contours were evaluated using Dice similarity index (DSI). Results: The planned mean dose of the ipsilateral parotids (32.42±3.13Gy) was slightly higher than those of the contralateral parotids (31.38±3.19Gy)in 10 patients. The difference between the accumulated mean doses of the ipsilateral parotids in the B-spline, Demons and MIMvista deformation algorithms (36.40±5.78Gy, 34.08±6.72Gy and 33.72±2.63Gy ) were statistically significant (B-spline vs Demons, P<0.0001, B-spline vs MIMvista, p =0.002). And The difference between those of the contralateral parotids in the B-spline, Demons and MIMvista deformation algorithms (34.08±4.82Gy, 32.42±4.80Gy and 33.92±4.65Gy ) were also significant (B-spline vs Demons, p =0.009, B-spline vs MIMvista, p =0.074). For the DSI analysis, the scores of B-spline, Demons and MIMvista DIRs were 0.90, 0.89 and 0.76. Conclusion: Shrinkage of parotid volumes results in the dose increase to the parotid glands in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy. The accumulated doses of parotids show significant difference using the different DIR algorithms between kVCT and MVCT. Therefore, the volume-based criterion (i.e. DSI) as a quantitative evaluation of

  20. Systematic evaluation of three different commercial software solutions for automatic segmentation for adaptive therapy in head-and-neck, prostate and pleural cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Macchia Mariangela

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To validate, in the context of adaptive radiotherapy, three commercial software solutions for atlas-based segmentation. Methods and materials Fifteen patients, five for each group, with cancer of the Head&Neck, pleura, and prostate were enrolled in the study. In addition to the treatment planning CT (pCT images, one replanning CT (rCT image set was acquired for each patient during the RT course. Three experienced physicians outlined on the pCT and rCT all the volumes of interest (VOIs. We used three software solutions (VelocityAI 2.6.2 (V, MIM 5.1.1 (M by MIMVista and ABAS 2.0 (A by CMS-Elekta to generate the automatic contouring on the repeated CT. All the VOIs obtained with automatic contouring (AC were successively corrected manually. We recorded the time needed for: 1 ex novo ROIs definition on rCT; 2 generation of AC by the three software solutions; 3 manual correction of AC. To compare the quality of the volumes obtained automatically by the software and manually corrected with those drawn from scratch on rCT, we used the following indexes: overlap coefficient (DICE, sensitivity, inclusiveness index, difference in volume, and displacement differences on three axes (x, y, z from the isocenter. Results The time saved by the three software solutions for all the sites, compared to the manual contouring from scratch, is statistically significant and similar for all the three software solutions. The time saved for each site are as follows: about an hour for Head&Neck, about 40 minutes for prostate, and about 20 minutes for mesothelioma. The best DICE similarity coefficient index was obtained with the manual correction for: A (contours for prostate, A and M (contours for H&N, and M (contours for mesothelioma. Conclusions From a clinical point of view, the automated contouring workflow was shown to be significantly shorter than the manual contouring process, even though manual correction of the VOIs is always needed.

  1. Deformable Image Registration for Adaptive Radiation Therapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Accuracy and Precision in the Presence of Tumor Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mencarelli, Angelo, E-mail: a.mencarelli@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kranen, Simon Robert van; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Beek, Suzanne van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nico Rasch, Coenraad Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare deformable image registration (DIR) accuracy and precision for normal and tumor tissues in head and neck cancer patients during the course of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with oropharyngeal tumors, who underwent submucosal implantation of small gold markers (average 6, range 4-10) around the tumor and were treated with RT were retrospectively selected. Two observers identified 15 anatomical features (landmarks) representative of normal tissues in the planning computed tomography (pCT) scan and in weekly cone beam CTs (CBCTs). Gold markers were digitally removed after semiautomatic identification in pCTs and CBCTs. Subsequently, landmarks and gold markers on pCT were propagated to CBCTs, using a b-spline-based DIR and, for comparison, rigid registration (RR). To account for observer variability, the pair-wise difference analysis of variance method was applied. DIR accuracy (systematic error) and precision (random error) for landmarks and gold markers were quantified. Time trend of the precisions for RR and DIR over the weekly CBCTs were evaluated. Results: DIR accuracies were submillimeter and similar for normal and tumor tissue. DIR precision (1 SD) on the other hand was significantly different (P<.01), with 2.2 mm vector length in normal tissue versus 3.3 mm in tumor tissue. No significant time trend in DIR precision was found for normal tissue, whereas in tumor, DIR precision was significantly (P<.009) degraded during the course of treatment by 0.21 mm/week. Conclusions: DIR for tumor registration proved to be less precise than that for normal tissues due to limited contrast and complex non-elastic tumor response. Caution should therefore be exercised when applying DIR for tumor changes in adaptive procedures.

  2. The effect of fear of movement on muscle activation in posttraumatic neck pain disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhand, Marc J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Groothuis, Karin G.M.; Turk, Dennis C.

    2006-01-01

    Studies using surface electromyography have demonstrated a reorganization of muscle activation patterns of the neck and shoulder muscles in patients with posttraumatic neck pain disability. The neurophysiologically oriented "pain adaptation" model explains this reorganization as a useful adaptation

  3. SU-E-J-257: A PCA Model to Predict Adaptive Changes for Head&neck Patients Based On Extraction of Geometric Features From Daily CBCT Datasets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Using daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) to develop principal component analysis (PCA) models of anatomical changes in head and neck (H&N) patients and to assess the possibility of using these prospectively in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Planning CT (pCT) images of 4 H&N patients were deformed to model several different systematic changes in patient anatomy during the course of the radiation therapy (RT). A Pinnacle plugin was used to linearly interpolate the systematic change in patient for the 35 fraction RT course and to generate a set of 35 synthetic CBCTs. Each synthetic CBCT represents the systematic change in patient anatomy for each fraction. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between the pCT and synthetic CBCTs with random fraction-to-fraction changes were superimposed on the DVFs. A patient-specific PCA model was built using these DVFs containing systematic plus random changes. It was hypothesized that resulting eigenDVFs (EDVFs) with largest eigenvalues represent the major anatomical deformations during the course of treatment. Results: For all 4 patients, the PCA model provided different results depending on the type and size of systematic change in patient’s body. PCA was more successful in capturing the systematic changes early in the treatment course when these were of a larger scale with respect to the random fraction-to-fraction changes in patient’s anatomy. For smaller scale systematic changes, random changes in patient could completely “hide” the systematic change. Conclusion: The leading EDVF from the patientspecific PCA models could tentatively be identified as a major systematic change during treatment if the systematic change is large enough with respect to random fraction-to-fraction changes. Otherwise, leading EDVF could not represent systematic changes reliably. This work is expected to facilitate development of population-based PCA models that can be used to prospectively identify significant

  4. Preliminary clinical application of an adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction algorithm inhead and neck computed tomography angiography with low tube voltage and a low concentration of contrast medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Hu; Wenzhen Zhu; Daoyu Hu; XiaoYan Meng; Jinhua Zhang; Weijia Wan; Li Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of using a low concentration of contrast medium (Visipaque 270 mgI/mL), low tube voltage, and an advanced image reconstruction algorithm in head and neck computed tomography angiography (CTA). Methods Forty patients (22 men and 18 women; average age 48.7 ± 14.25 years; average body mass index 23.9 ± 3.7 kg/m2) undergoing CTA for suspected vascular diseases were randomly assigned into two groups. Group A (n = 20) was administered 370 mgI/mL contrast medium, and group B (n = 20) was administered 270 mgI/mL contrast medium. Both groups were administered at a rate of 4.8 mL/s and an injection volume of 0.8 mL/kg. Images of group A were obtained with 120 kVp and filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction, whereas images of group B were obtained with 80 kVp and 80% adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction algorithm (ASiR). The CT values and standard deviations of intracranial arteries and image noise on the corona radiata were measured to calculate the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The beam-hardening artifacts (BHAs) around the skul base were calculated. Two readers evaluated the image quality with volume rendered images using scores from 1 to 5. The values between the two groups were statistical y compared. Results The mean CT value of the intracranial arteries in group B was significantly higher than that in group A (P < 0.001). The CNR and SNR values in group B were also statistical y higher than those in group A (P < 0.001). Image noise and BHAs were not significantly dif erent between the two groups. The image quality score of VR images of in group B was significantly higher than that in group A (P = 0.001). However, the quality scores of axial enhancement images in group B became significantly smal er than those in group A (P< 0.001). The CT dose index volume and dose-length product were decreased by 63.8% and 64%, respectively, in group B (P < 0.001 for both). Conclusion Visipaque

  5. SU-E-J-220: Evaluation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation (ABAS) in Head-And-Neck Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the accuracy of atlas-based auto segmentation of organs at risk (OARs) on both helical CT (HCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) images in head and neck (HN) cancer adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Methods: Six HN patients treated in the ART process were included in this study. For each patient, three images were selected: pretreatment planning CT (PreTx-HCT), in treatment CT for replanning (InTx-HCT) and a CBCT acquired in the same day of the InTx-HCT. Three clinical procedures of auto segmentation and deformable registration performed in the ART process were evaluated: a) auto segmentation on PreTx-HCT using multi-subject atlases, b) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to InTx-HCT using deformable HCT-to-HCT image registration, and c) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to CBCT using deformable CBCT-to-HCT image registration. Seven OARs (brainstem, cord, L/R parotid, L/R submandibular gland and mandible) were manually contoured on PreTx-HCT and InTx-HCT for comparison. In addition, manual contours on InTx-CT were copied on the same day CBCT, and a local region rigid body registration was performed accordingly for each individual OAR. For procedures a) and b), auto contours were compared to manual contours, and for c) auto contours were compared to those rigidly transferred contours on CBCT. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean surface distances of agreement (MSDA) were calculated for evaluation. Results: For procedure a), the mean DSC/MSDA of most OARs are >80%/±2mm. For intra-patient HCT-to-HCT propagation, the Resultimproved to >85%/±1.5mm. Compared to HCT-to-HCT, the mean DSC for HCT-to-CBCT propagation drops ∼2–3% and MSDA increases ∼0.2mm. This Resultindicates that the inferior imaging quality of CBCT seems only degrade auto propagation performance slightly. Conclusion: Auto segmentation and deformable propagation can generate OAR structures on HCT and CBCT images with clinically acceptable accuracy. Therefore

  6. Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion. PMID:24099841

  7. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Moinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); D’Souza, Derek [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the “dose of the day” received by a head and neck patient. Methods: NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for “dose of the day” calculations in a deformed CT. A geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. Results: A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on

  8. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the “dose of the day” received by a head and neck patient. Methods: NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for “dose of the day” calculations in a deformed CT. A geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. Results: A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on

  9. Differential risk assessments from five hypoxia specific assays: The basis for biologically adapted individualized radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Gebski, Val;

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely relates with prognosis in human tumours. Five hypoxia specific predictive marker assays were compared and correlated with definitive radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven patients with advanced head and neck carcinomas were studied for pre-treatment plasma...... by competing risks HP(2.5) was the strongest variable to predict for loco-regional tumour control. CONCLUSION: There was diversity and lack of correlation among five different hypoxia assays within individual tumours. High plasma osteopontin, high HIF-1alpha and high proportion of tumour pO(2)2.5mmHg (HP(2...

  10. Adapt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  11. TO COMPARE THE EFFECTS OF DEEP NECK FLEXORS STRENGHTNING EXERCISE AND McKENZIE NECK EXERCISE IN SUBJECTS WITH FORWARD NECK POSTURE: A RANDOMISED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forward Neck Posture also called as Protracted neck, is one in which the head is positioned anteriorly and the normal anterior cervical convexity is increased with the apex of the lordotic cervical curve at a considerable distance from the LOG in comparison with optimal posture.Nowadays texting may play a significant role in forward neck posture. According to Wellness Centre “It is the repetition of forward head movements combined with poor ergonomic postures and/or trauma that causes the body to adapt to forward head posture. Purpose: To compare effects of deep flexor strengthening exercises and McKenzie neck exercises in subjects with forward neck posture. Materials and Methods: 30 Subjects clinically diagnosed with FNP meeting the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned into three groups. Group A received McKenzie neck exercises, Group B received Deep Neck Flexor Strengthening Exercises and both the groups commonly went for pectoralis minor stretching respectively for once daily for a total of 6 sessions. Results: The results suggested that all the outcome measure i.e Forward Neck Posture, flexibility of pectoralis minor and CROM values showed significant differences among both the groups. Conclusion: The present study concluded that the comparison of McKenzie neck Exercises and Deep Neck Flexor Strengthening Exercises revealed no statistically significant differences, However each group showed improvement in cervical range of motion and forward neck posture with increase in the pectoralis minor flexibility.

  12. Rotor-bearing system integrated with shape memory alloy springs for ensuring adaptable dynamics and damping enhancement-Theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-01-01

    Helical pseudoelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) springs are integrated into a dynamic system consisting of a rigid rotor supported by passive magnetic bearings. The aim is to determine the utility of SMAs for vibration attenuation via their mechanical hysteresis, and for adaptation of the dynamic...... behaviour via their temperature dependent stiffness properties. The SMA performance, in terms of vibration attenuation and adaptability, is compared to a benchmark configuration of the system having steel springs instead of SMA springs.A theoretical multidisciplinary approach is used to quantify the weakly...... on the SMA temperature. Examples show that vibration reduction at constant rotational speeds up to around 75 percent can be achieved by changing the SMA temperature, primarily because of stiffness change, whereas hysteresis only limits large vibrations. The model is able to capture and explain...

  13. Estimation of the Patients' Adaptation to Noble Alloy Dentures Relying on the Parameters of Biological Fluids in Oral Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEBEDENKO I. Yu.; PARUNOV V. A.; KITKINA T. B.

    2012-01-01

    For the study of the effect of Plagodent and Palladent noble alloy dentures (OJSC "SIC ‘Supermetal’",Russia),the elemental compositions of the fluids obtained from gingival sulcus of abutment teeth of metal-ceramic dentures with frames made of the above-stated dental alloys,have been investigated.Response of white blood cells and fibroblasts in the gingival fluid and the mixed saliva of the patients a long time after prosthetic repair,relying on the content of proinflammatory interleukins IL-1 β and IL-6,anti-inflammatory interleukins IL-4 and IL-10,the factor of tumor necrosis TNF-α and lactoferrin,has been investigated.The results obtained have convincingly proved the biosafety of the Plagodent and Palladent noble alloys.

  14. Forgotten triangles of neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Vashistha, Arpit; Chaudhary, Manoj; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to add some more information in the present scientific literature on these nearly forgotten triangles of surgical importance. The neck is an area that lends itself to anatomical geometry, such as triangles. Many triangles of the neck have been described, and some are well-known, yet, some have been nearly forgotten, i.e., Lesser's triangle, Farabeuf triangle, Pirogoff's triangle, and Beclard's triangle. From the anatomic and surgical point of view, the neck is an amazingly interesting place. It is like a connection where crucial functional units meet and pass. Added surgical landmarks are always helpful to the surgeon while dealing with the neck. Described triangles of neck in this article are always reliable and constant landmarks for head and neck surgeons. PMID:27563614

  15. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education American Head & Neck Society | AHNS Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  16. Head and Neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques......, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories....

  17. NECK PAIN: AN ANCIENT VIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Yogitha Bali

    2012-01-01

    Neck pain is one of the very common complaints across the globe. Common neck pain occurs due to problems in the neck muscles, ligaments and discs due to faulty neck postures and daily neck misadventures accounting for more than 80% of neck pains around the globe. Conventional treatment methods which include drugs, physiotherapy, exercises & operative care have their own limitations and are not entirely effective. Alternative therapeutic approach could complement or supplement the existing tre...

  18. J incision in neck dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, A; Dursun, G; Aydin, O; Akbaş, Y

    1998-01-01

    Metastasis in the neck lymph system of primary tumours of the head and neck is frequently seen. In order to prevent this metastasis, neck dissection is carried out by various types of skin incisions. In this study, types of skin incision used in neck dissections were defined, and the advantages, disadvantages and results of J incisions, which have been performed on 320 radical neck dissection patients in our clinic between 1985-1996, were compared with those of other incision types. PMID:9538447

  19. Head and neck teratomas

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ajaz; Latoo, Suhail; Ahmed, Irshad; Malik, Altaf H

    2009-01-01

    Teratomas are complex lesions composed of diverse tissues from all 3 germinal cell layers and may exhibit variable levels of maturity. Head and neck teratomas are most commonly cervical with the oropharynx (epignathus) being the second commonest location. In this article, clinical presentation, behaviour and associated significance of head and neck teratomas have been highlightened. Because of their obscure origin, bizarre microscopic appearance, unpredictable behaviour and often dramatic cli...

  20. A Triassic aquatic protorosaur with an extremely long neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Rieppel, Olivier; LaBarbera, Michael C

    2004-09-24

    By Middle Triassic time, a number of reptile lineages had diversified in shallow epicontinental seas and intraplatform basins along the margins of parts of Pangea, including the giraffe-necked protorosaurid reptile Tanystropheus from the Western Tethys (Europe and the Middle East), which grew to approximately 5 to 6 m long. Here we report another long-necked fossil, Dinocephalosaurus, from southwestern China, recently collected in Middle Triassic marine deposits approximately 230 million years old. This taxon represents unambiguous evidence for a fully aquatic protorosaur. Its extremely elongated neck is explained as an adaptation for aquatic life, perhaps for an increase in feeding efficiency. PMID:15448262

  1. 头颈部肿瘤自适应放射治疗的研究进展%Progress in Research of Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任刚; 徐寿平; 杜镭; 马林

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is as one of the most important treatment method for head and neck cancer. Compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has better conformal property and uniformity. Tumor target area receives higher doses of irradiation and organs at risk receive lower doses of irradiation using IMRT technology. At present, based on treatment prior to the localization of CT image design, inverse planning is completed during IMRT treatment, without regard to the difference between the actual dose and planning dose. The difference is for changes of organ anatomy, reduced tumor volume and body weight loss. Because of the difference dose between target area and surrounding organs at risk is very large in IMRT technology, anatomical changes greater impact the plan implementation compared to conventional radiotherapy. Therefore, only according to positioning CT image and not fully considering the course of organ anatomy changes, plan design is implemented. This method not only may cause target less, but also may cause additional complications. In order to solve this problem, adaptive radiotherapy (ART) is appeared, which has recently become a hot topic in the radiation oncology community. The so-called ART technology is a treatment technique or model, which analyzes the different anatomic shape and dose between the actual plan and original plan about target volume and organs at risk based on the treatment of feedback in the process, in order to adjust follow-up treatment plan timely. This paper reviews the research status of ART technology in head and neck cancer, retrospectively studying the related literature at home and abrdad, combineing with the experience of our department.%放疗已成为头颈部肿瘤治疗中重要的治疗手段之一.与三维适形放疗相比,调强放疗(Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy,IMRT)具有更好的适形性和均匀性,在高剂量照射肿瘤靶区的同时,减少了对周围

  2. TC pathological Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is about different imaging techniques such as ultrasound, CT, RNM, PET-CT. These techniques permit to detect head and neck tumors, breast and digestive pathologies as well as congenital diseases and glandular tumor in the thyroid, parathyroid, muscles, lymphatic, nerves and vessels

  3. Lipoblastoma of the neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Jacob C; Godballe, Christian; Kerndrup, Gitte B

    2005-01-01

    with lipoblastomatous tumours in the neck is presented. A 6-year-old boy with complains of stridorous respiration and significant reduction in physical capacity was referred to the ENT Department, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. He was treated with total surgical resection of a soft and slowly...

  4. Aggressive Fibromatosis in Neck.

    OpenAIRE

    Namita Kabdwal; Sanjeev Bhagat; Saurabh Varshney; Sampan Singh Bist; Sarita Mishra; Bhavna Singh

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a locally aggressive infiltrative low-grade benign tumor that accounts for approximately less than 3% of all soft tissue tumors. In the head and neck region this tumor tends to be more aggressive and associated with significant morbidity. Aggressive surgery is a viable management option and may be successfully used as a single modality treatment, or in combination with radiotherapy. We report a rare case of AF in a 38 year old female, who presented with a painl...

  5. Bladder neck contracture

    OpenAIRE

    Simhan, Jay; Ramirez, Daniel; Hudak, Steven J.; Morey, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-described complication of the surgical treatment of benign and malignant prostate conditions. Nevertheless, etiologies of BNC development are highly dependent on the primary treatment modality undertaken with BNC also occurring after pelvic radiation. The treatment options for BNC can range from simple, office-based dilation procedures to more invasive, complex abdomino-perineal reconstructive surgery. Although numerous strategies have been described, ...

  6. Gun shot wound neck

    OpenAIRE

    Kochhar, L K; Shukul, V. K.; Sharma, Rahul

    2004-01-01

    All penetrating neck wounds are potentially very dangerous and require emergency treatment. The choice of treatment for the stable patient remains controversial, a number of studies encouraging mandatory surgical exploration and a similar number encourage selective surgical exploration. Knowledge of the physical properties of the penetrating object or weapon can help to determine a treatment plan and predict the risk of injury- All tracheal and esophageal injuries with structural damage shoul...

  7. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation.

  8. Biogeometry of femoral neck for implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwa J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Treatment of fracture neck femur with three cannulated cancellous screws in an apex proximal configuration is practised in many parts of the world. Methods : Dimensions of femoral neck at the middle of transcervical neck using CT scan (live neck and vernier caliper (dry cadeveric neck in 20 subjects respectively were measured. Results : Inferior half of the neck is narrower than superior half. Conclusion : Biogeometry of the neck of femur does not accomodate two inferior screws and thus fixation of fracture neck femur with three canulated cancellous screws in an apex distal configuration is recommended.

  9. Neck fragmentation reaction mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, V; Di Toro, M

    2004-01-01

    Based on a microscopic transport model, we study the origin of nonstatistical Intermediate Mass Fragment ($IMF$) production in semicentral heavy ion collisions at the Fermi energies. We show that a fast, dynamical $IMF$ formation process, the {\\it neck fragmentation mechanism}, can explain the experimentally observed features: deviations from Viola systematics and anisotropic, narrow angular distributions. It may be regarded as the continuation of the multifragmentation mechanism towards intermediate impact parameters. Its relation to other dynamical mechanisms, the induced fission and the abrasion of the spectator zones, that can also contribute to mid-rapidity $IMF$ production, is discussed. The dependence on beam energy and centrality of the collision is carefully analysed. The competition between volume and surface instabilities makes this mechanism very sensitive to the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interactions, from the cross sections for hard collisions to the compressibility and other Equation of State (...

  10. Acute femoral neck fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten patients with traumatic femoral neck fracture were studied with MR imaging (0.5 T, Magnetom, Siemens): unenhanced (multiecho, TR/TE = 1,600/30--240 [repetition time/echo time, msec]; gradient echo, TR/TE = 315/14, θ = 90 degrees) and Gd-DTPA enhanced (0.1 mM/kg body weight, Magnevist, Schering; gradient echo, TR/TE = 315/14, θ = 90 degrees). MR images were compared with clinical-radiographic findings. Digital subtraction angiography of the femoral head (FH) in five patients showed complete interruption of blood supply to the FH in three patients (signal intensity of FH did not increase on postcontrast images) and intact FH arteries in two patients (FH signal increased on postcontrast images, as did the healthy-side signal)

  11. A pain in the neck-Imaging in neck sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep neck infection has a high morbidity and mortality and the extent of infection is often difficult to estimate clinically. The complex anatomy and the communication between neck spaces means that infection can spread along fascial planes leading to life-threatening complications such as airway compromise, vascular erosion/thrombosis, neural dysfunction, and ultimately descending necrotizing mediastinitis. Imaging has an important role to play in identifying the extent of infection and the presence of complications.

  12. A pain in the neck-Imaging in neck sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle, N.J., E-mail: nickylyle@doctors.org.uk [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Rutherford, E.E.; Batty, V.B. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Deep neck infection has a high morbidity and mortality and the extent of infection is often difficult to estimate clinically. The complex anatomy and the communication between neck spaces means that infection can spread along fascial planes leading to life-threatening complications such as airway compromise, vascular erosion/thrombosis, neural dysfunction, and ultimately descending necrotizing mediastinitis. Imaging has an important role to play in identifying the extent of infection and the presence of complications.

  13. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.113 Section 572.113... 50th Percentile Male § 572.113 Neck assembly. The head/neck assembly consists of the parts 78051-61X...) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head and neck assembly in a test environment at any temperature between...

  14. Neck pain in different cephalalgias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the literature related to the investigations of neck pain (cervicalgia in patients with headache (cephalalgia. Neck pain is second to lower back pain as a reason for considerable socioeconomic damage to society. The prevalence of cervicalgia in the population ranges from 5.9 to 38%; the annual incidence is 10.4–21.3%; 14.2 to 71% of people report to have neck pain at some time in their lifetime. Neck pain is concurrent with cephalalgia in 70% of cases. In patients with cervicalgia, the prevalence of headache is 20–40% higher than in those with musculoskeletal pain at another site. Neck pain is as a major risk factor for migraine and tension headache (TH. Neck pain in TH progresses with the increased intensity, frequency, and strength of headache. There is a direct relationship of the quality of life worsening associated withcervicalgia to the frequency of migraine attacks and the risk of its chronization. Neck pain is noted in cervicogenic headache belonging to secondary headaches. The identification of mixed headache in a patient with cervicalgia allows the prescription of a treatment option that may be effective in relieving both headache and neck pain. The paper discusses the causes and pathogenesis of cervicalgia in patients with headache, examination methods, and main approaches to drug and nondrug therapies in relation to the leading pathophysiological mechanism, as well as new possibilities for the effective and safe relief of pain syndrome in this category of patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myorelaxants,and their combination are observed to be effective in treating patients with cervicalgia and cephalalgia.

  15. Structural thermodynamics of alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Manenc, Jack

    1973-01-01

    Technical progress has for a very long time been directly dependent on progress in metallurgy, which is itself connected with improvements in the technology of alloys. Metals are most frequently used in the form of alloys for several reasons: the quantity of pure metal in its native state in the earth's crust is very limited; pure metals must be extracted from ores which are themselves impure. Finally, the methods of treatment used lead more easily to alloys than to pure metals. The most typical case is that of iron, where a pure ore may be found, but which is the starting point for cast iron or steel, alloys of iron and carbon. In addition, the properties of alloys are in general superior to those of pure metals and modem metallurgy consists of controlling these properties so as to make them conform to the requirements of the design office. Whilst the engineer was formerly compelled to adapt his designs and constructions to the materials available, such as wood, stone, bronze, iron, cast iron and ordinary st...

  16. Deep space infections of neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluskar, S; Bajaj, P; Bane, P

    2007-03-01

    A retrospective study was performed on fourteen cases of deep cervical space infections in the neck admitted for diagnosis and treatment to the ENT Department, during a period of seven years from 1989-1997. Of the fourteen, four patients had Ludwig's angina and of the fourteen, one had a very serious complication resulting in death. Early diagnosis and adequate treatment were of paramount importance. The role of tracheostomy and management of airway in deep cervical space infections of the neck is discussed to gether with bacteriology, antibiotic treatment and surgical management.

  17. Pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have seen two cases of traumatic subcapital fractures of the femoral neck which resembled pathologic fractures on plain radiography. We have named this entity pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck and offer suggestions for why it occurs. (orig.)

  18. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, YUE; AI, Zi Sheng; Shao, Jin; Yang, Tieyi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the factors affecting femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures. Methods: Eighty-six patients with femoral neck fractures were treated using three parallel cannulated screws between May 2004 and January 2011. The shortening of the femoral neck in the horizontal (X), vertical (Y), and along the resultant along the (Z) vector (XÆ, YÆ, ZÆ) was measured on anteroposterior radiographs corrected by screw diameter and ...

  19. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR 572.33) at the time the pendulum makes contact with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.183 Section 572.183... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.183 Neck assembly. (a) The neck assembly consists of parts...

  20. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  1. Planned Neck Dissection Following Radiation Treatment for Head and Neck Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Dautremont

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Optimal therapy for patients with metastatic neck disease remains controversial. Neck dissection following radiotherapy has traditionally been used to improve locoregional control. Methods. A retrospective review of 28 patients with node-positive head and neck malignancy treated with planned neck dissection following radiotherapy between January 2002 and December 2005 was performed to assess treatment outcomes. Results. Median interval to neck dissection was 9.6 weeks with a median number of 21 + 9 lymph nodes per specimen. Ten of 31 (32% neck dissection specimens demonstrated evidence of residual carcinoma. Overall survival at two years was 85%; five-year overall survival was 65%. Concurrent chemotherapy did not impact the presence of residual neck disease. Conclusion. Based on the frequency of residual malignancy in the neck of patients treated with primary radiotherapy, a planned, postradiotherapy neck dissection should be strongly advocated for all patients with advanced-stage neck disease.

  2. Increased neck muscle activity and impaired balance among females with whiplash-related chronic neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Clausen, Brian; Ris Hansen, Inge;

    2013-01-01

    To investigate neck muscle activity and postural control in patients with whiplash-associated disorder compared with healthy controls.......To investigate neck muscle activity and postural control in patients with whiplash-associated disorder compared with healthy controls....

  3. Nodal yield in selective neck dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norling, Rikke; Therkildsen, Marianne H; Bradley, Patrick J;

    2013-01-01

    The total lymph node yield in neck dissection is highly variable and depends on anatomical, surgical and pathological parameters. A minimum yield of six lymph nodes for a selective neck dissection (SND) as recommended in guidelines lies in the lower range of the reported clinical nodal yields....... A future application of a lymph node ratio may improve the risk stratification of head and neck cancer patients. However, this will require a higher number of retrieved lymph nodes....

  4. [Rare tumors of the head and neck; on behalf of the REFCOR, the French Network of rare head and neck tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baujat, Bertrand; Thariat, Juliette; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Costes, Valérie; Testelin, Sylvie; Reyt, Emile; Janot, François

    2014-05-01

    Malignant tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract may be rare by their histology (sarcoma, variants of conventional squamous cell carcinomas) and/or location (sinuses, salivary glands, ear, of various histologies themselves). They represent less than 10% of head and neck neoplasms. The confirmation of their diagnosis often requires a medical expertise and sometimes biomolecular techniques complementary to classical histology and immunohistochemistry. Due to their location, their treatment often requires a specific surgical technique. Radiation therapy is indicated based on histoclinical characteristics common to other head and neck neoplasms but also incorporate grade. Further, the technique must often be adapted to take into account the proximity of organs at risk. For most histologies, chemotherapy is relatively inefficient but current molecular advances may allow to consider pharmaceutical developments in the coming years. The REFCOR, the French Network of head and neck cancers aims to organize and promote the optimal management of these rare and heterogeneous diseases, to promote research and clinical trials.

  5. Infections of the deep neck spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedge, Amogh; Mohan, Suyash; Lim, Winston Eng Hoe

    2012-05-01

    Deep neck infections (DNI) have a propensity to spread rapidly along the interconnected deep neck spaces and compromise the airway, cervical vessels and spinal canal. The value of imaging lies in delineating the anatomical extent of the disease process, identifying the source of infection and detecting complications. Its role in the identification and drainage of abscesses is well known. This paper pictorially illustrates infections of important deep neck spaces. The merits and drawbacks of imaging modalities used for assessment of DNI, the relevant anatomy and the possible sources of infection of each deep neck space are discussed. Certain imaging features that alter the management of DNI have been highlighted. PMID:22584969

  6. Status quo and directions in deep head and neck hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The benefit of hyperthermia as a potent modifier of radiotherapy has been well established and more recently also the combination with chemotherapy was shown beneficial. Also for head and neck cancer, the impact of hyperthermia has been clinically demonstrated by a number of clinical trials. Unfortunately, the technology applied in these studies provided only limited thermal dose control, and the devices used only allowed treatment of target regions close to the skin. Over the last decade, we developed the technology for deep and controlled hyperthermia that allows treatment of the entire head and neck region. Our strategy involves focused microwave heating combined with 3D patient-specific electromagnetic and thermal simulations for conformal, reproducible and adaptive hyperthermia application. Validation of our strategy has been performed by 3D thermal dose assessment based on invasively placed temperature sensors combined with the 3D patient specific simulations. In this paper, we review the phase III clinical evidence for hyperthermia in head and neck tumors, as well as the heating and dosimetry technology applied in these studies. Next, we describe the development, clinical implementation and validation of 3D guided deep hyperthermia with the HYPERcollar, and its second generation, i.e. the HYPERcollar3D. Lastly, we discuss early clinical results and provide an outlook for this technology

  7. Incidence and severity of neck injury in Rugby Union: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Michael S; Lystad, Reidar P; Pollard, Henry; Bonello, Rod

    2011-09-01

    Objectives. To collate and appraise incidence and severity data for neck injury in Rugby Union. To report risk factors for neck injury in Rugby Union that are supported by incidence and severity data. Design. Systematic review. Methods. Original journal articles were retrieved from electronic searches of AusportMed, AUSPORT, Scopus, Medline (Ovid), CINAHL, Mantis, and Pubmed databases and relevant bibliographic hand searches. Selection criteria were restricted to: (a) prospective study designs including cohort, case-control, and intervention methodologies; (b) populations of Rugby Union players, either male or female of any age; (c) studies must report on neck injury incidence and/or severity specifically; (d) articles with republished neck injury data were excluded. The STROBE Statement was adapted for the quality assessment of included studies and categorised as either poor, moderate or good. Results. Thirty-three original articles met the selection criteria. Wide variation of injury and exposure definitions and population sampling was identified in the included articles. Neck injury incidence ranged between 0.26 (CI: 0.08, 0.93) and 9.17 (CI: 1.89, 26.81) per 1000 player hours for mixed populations that adopted an all inclusive sports injury definition. There is a paucity of severity data and analytical data which evaluates causal roles of risk factors for neck injury in Rugby Union. Conclusions. Meaningful understanding of neck injury incidence and severity in Rugby Union is restricted to a few studies which adopt comparable methodological construct. This paper provides an index for future neck injury studies in Rugby Union.

  8. Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mouth Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Main Content Are You Being Treated With Radiation ... How Does Head and Neck Radiation Affect the Mouth? Doctors use head and neck radiation to treat ...

  9. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...

  10. Initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Yi-Zhao; Liu, Shu-Xia; Yan, Shiwei

    2013-01-01

    How ATP binding initiates the docking process of kinesin's neck linker is a key question in understanding kinesin mechanism. It is believed that the formation of an extra turn structure by the first three amino acids of neck linker (LYS325, THR326, ILE327 in 2KIN) is crucial for initiating the docking process. But the initial conformation of neck linker (specially the three amino acids of the extra turn) and the neck linker docking initiation mechanism remain unclear. By using molecular dynamics method, we investigate the initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker in the docking process. We find that, in the initial state of NL docking process, NL still has interactions with {\\beta}0 and forms a conformation similar to the "cover-neck bundle" structure proposed by Hwang et al. [Structure 2008, 16(1): 62-71]. From this initial structure, the docking of the "cover-neck bundle" structure can be achieved. The motor head provides a forward force on the initial cover-neck bundle structure through ATP-induced rot...

  11. Inter-vertebral flexibility of the ostrich neck: implications for estimating sauropod neck flexibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Cobley

    Full Text Available The flexibility and posture of the neck in sauropod dinosaurs has long been contentious. Improved constraints on sauropod neck function will have major implications for what we know of their foraging strategies, ecology and overall biology. Several hypotheses have been proposed, based primarily on osteological data, suggesting different degrees of neck flexibility. This study attempts to assess the effects of reconstructed soft tissues on sauropod neck flexibility through systematic removal of muscle groups and measures of flexibility of the neck in a living analogue, the ostrich (Struthio camelus. The possible effect of cartilage on flexibility is also examined, as this was previously overlooked in osteological estimates of sauropod neck function. These comparisons show that soft tissues are likely to have limited the flexibility of the neck beyond the limits suggested by osteology alone. In addition, the inferred presence of cartilage, and varying the inter-vertebral spacing within the synovial capsule, also affect neck flexibility. One hypothesis proposed that flexibility is constrained by requiring a minimum overlap between successive zygapophyses equivalent to 50% of zygapophyseal articular surface length (ONP50. This assumption is tested by comparing the maximum flexibility of the articulated cervical column in ONP50 and the flexibility of the complete neck with all tissues intact. It is found that this model does not adequately convey the pattern of flexibility in the ostrich neck, suggesting that the ONP50 model may not be useful in determining neck function if considered in isolation from myological and other soft tissue data.

  12. Public knowledge of head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, T E

    2010-04-01

    Studies show 60% of patients with newly diagnosed Head & Neck Squamous Cell Cancer in Ireland, present with advanced disease. A poor level of knowledge and awareness among the public of Head & Neck Cancer, is an important consideration in the often delayed presentation for medical attention in many of these cases. Our study surveyed 200 members of the public to assess their knowledge and awareness of Head & Neck Cancer. One hundred and forty (70%) of respondents had never encountered the term "Head & Neck Cancer". One hundred and forty six (73%) failed to identify excessive alcohol consumption as a risk factor. Less than 100 (50%) would have concern about persisting hoarseness or a prolonged oral ulcer. An urgent need exists to raise awareness of Head & Neck Cancer among the public in Ireland.

  13. MALLASEZIA FOLLICULITIS ON THE NECK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzeziński Piotr

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Folliculitis caused by Malassezia spp. classified as yeasts in our climate (Poland is fairly rare disease . MF is most commonly found on the chest, back, upper arms, and less frequently on the face. Permanent symptom is persistent itching. The favorable external conditions, which are largely due to high temperature and humidity, and endogenous factors, such as immunosuppression, there is a lipophilic yeast multiplication in the hair follicles. The aim of this article is presentation of the patient with Malassezia Folliculitis on the neck. Patient age 33 with 1- to 2-mm monomorphic papules and pustules on chest. Skin lesions accompanied by itching. In the treatment used topical: ketoconazole containing shampoo, 1% clindamycin cream, 0,5% hydrocortisonum cream, fluconazole 400 mg once p.o.

  14. Dissolution ad uptake of cadmium from dental gold solder alloy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure metallic cadmium was irradiated by means of thermal neutrons. The irradiated cadmium (115Cd) was placed in bags of gold foil and the bags were implanted subcutaneously in the neck region of mice. Two and 3 d respectively after implantation the mice were killed, the bags removed and the animals subjected to whole-body autoradiography. The autoradiograms revealed an uptake of 115Cd in liver and kidney. In another experiment specimens of a cadmium-containing dental gold solder alloy, a cadmium-free dental casting gold alloy and soldered assemblies made of these two alloys were implanted subcutaneously in the neck region of mice. The animals were killed after 6 months; cadmium analysis showed significant increases in the cadmium concentration in liver and kidney of those mice which had been given implants of gold solder alloy. The study clearly shows that due to electrochemical corrosion cadmium can be released from implants and accumulated in the kidneys and the liver. (author)

  15. Alloy development and associated dimensional changes of aluminium alloys during liquid phase sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.M.; Castro, F. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Guipuzcoa (CEIT) and TECNUN, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    The sintering behaviour and microstructural evolution of two aluminium alloys, of the 2XXX and 7XXX series, has been studied under, both, laboratory and industrial conditions. Quenching experiments from selected temperatures during the heating cycles, coupled with microstructural characterisation by Electron Microscopy, were used to investigate the gradual approach towards equilibrium of the alloys, from the as-pressed powder mixtures to the consolidated state after sintering. Differential Scanning Calorimetry was used to identify the reactions leading to the formation of liquid phases during sintering while the associated dimensional changes were determined by Dilatometry. The sinterability of these alloys and the development of necks between the solid aluminium particles is based upon the initial formation of transient liquid phases that favour the incorporation of alloying additions, followed by the development of permanent liquid phases, mainly containing Zn/Mg/Al and Cu/Al for the 7XXX and 2XXX series, respectively, leading to the densification of the alloys. A series of geometrically complex components with adequate dimensional tolerance and properties were industrially produced for an automotive application using the 2XXX series P/M Al alloy. (orig.)

  16. Rupture of the neck in nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a degree of freedom to describe the rupture of the neck in nuclear fission and calculate the point at which the neck ruptures as the nucleus descends dynamically from its fission saddle point. This is done by mentally slicing the system into two portions at its minimum neck radius and calculating the force required to separate the two portions while keeping their shapes fixed. This force is obtained by differentiating with respect to separation the sum of the Coulomb and nuclear interaction energies between the two portions. For nuclei throughout the Periodic Table we calculate this force along dynamical paths leading from the fission saddle point. The force is initially attractive but becomes repulsive when the neck reaches a critical size. For actinide nuclei the neck radius at which rupture occurs is about 2 fm. This increases the calculated translational kinetic energy of the fission fragments at infinity relative to that calculated for scission occurring at zero neck radius. With the effect of neck rupture taken into account, we calculate and compare with experimental results fission-fragment kinetic energies for two types of nuclear dissipation: ordinary two-body viscosity and one-body dissipation

  17. MR of head and neck hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper defines the MR characteristics of head and neck hemangiomas and to evaluate the role of MR in their diagnosis and management. Eighteen pediatric and young adult patients with head and neck hemangiomas (six neck, six face, three eyelid, two scalp, and one parotid) underwent high-field-strength 1.5-T MR imaging. Conventional spin-echo sequences with T1 and T2 weighting were performed. In addition, one-third of patients underwent MR angiography and gadolinium enhancement. The hemangiomas were isointense to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images

  18. 49 CFR 572.123 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...), six-axis neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11), neck mounting adaptor (drawing TE-2208-001), and three... shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11) and 0.01778m is the distance from force... about the y-axis and FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11) and...

  19. A correlation between femoral neck shaft angle to femoral neck length

    OpenAIRE

    gujar, subhash moolchand; Vikani, Sanjay; Parmar, Jigna; Bondre, K V

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of proximal end of femur is a prerequisite for a complete understanding of the mechanics of the hip joint and serves as a basis for the treatment of pathological condition of the hip and femur. A total of 250 adult femora were used to  measure femoral neck shaft angle, femoral neck length & femoral total length at S.B.K.S Medical institute, Vadodara. The neck shaft angle range from 116o to 150o with means of 136.3o & no significant side difference. The neck le...

  20. Elective Neck Dissection in Patients With Head and Neck Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amit, Moran; Na'ara, Shorook; Sharma, Kanika;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) accounts for 3-5 % of all head and neck malignancies. Investigations of outcomes from elective neck dissection (END) for patients with ACC are sparse. This study aimed to assess the impact of END on the survival of patients with ACC. METHODS: This retros......BACKGROUND: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) accounts for 3-5 % of all head and neck malignancies. Investigations of outcomes from elective neck dissection (END) for patients with ACC are sparse. This study aimed to assess the impact of END on the survival of patients with ACC. METHODS...

  1. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P Playing-related neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing. PMID:26175099

  2. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Schwannomas of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Kanatas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign encapsulated nerve sheath tumors composed of Schwann cells. Malignant change in head and neck schwannomas is rare, with the incidence varying between 8 and 13.9%. In this review, we discuss the presentation and the management of head and neck schwannomas. The issues and difficulties based on our own experience as well as the experience of published reports from the literature are presented.

  4. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Nör, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signalin...

  5. Rational radical neck dissection for oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李龙江; 温玉明; 王昌美; 王莉娟

    2003-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is the most commonly seen route for the spread of malignant epithelial tumors. Oral cancers derived from epithelial tissue occur more often in the head and neck regions with a high lymphatic metastasis rate. According to reports from Chinese researchers, the lymphatic metastasis rate of oral cancer could be as high as 40%, and clearing those involved lymph nodes in neck is one of the most important methods to treat the disease.

  6. Multidisciplinary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varkey, Prashanth; Liu, Yi-Tien; Tan, Ngian Chye

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity worldwide. Multimodality treatment is often the only way to achieve improved function, quality of life, and survival, calling for a multidisciplinary team approach, particularly in view of the rapid advances being made in various fields. The roles of the head and neck surgeon and reconstructive surgeon are discussed, together with the input afforded by specialists in areas such as diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, medical onco...

  7. Bilateral femoral neck fractures following pelvic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 300 cases of femoral neck fractures following radiotherapy for intrapelvic malignant tumor have been reported in various countries since Baensch reported this disease in 1927. In Japan, 40 cases or so have been reported, and cases of bilateral femoral neck fractures have not reached to ten cases. The authors experienced a case of 75 year-old female who received radiotherapy for cancer of the uterus, and suffered from right femoral neck fracture 3 months after and left femoral neck fracture one year and half after. As clinical symptoms, she had not previous history of trauma in bilateral femurs, but she complained of a pain in a hip joint and of gait disturbance. The pain in left femoral neck continued for about one month before fracture was recognized with roentgenogram. As histopathological findings, increase of fat marrow, decrease of bone trabeculae, and its marked degeneration were recognized. Proliferation of some blood vessels was found out, but thickness of the internal membrane and thrombogenesis were not recognized. Treatment should be performed according to degree of displacement of fractures. In this case, artificial joint replacement surgery was performed to the side of fracture of this time, because this case was bilateral femoral neck fractures and the patient had received artificial head replacement surgery in the other side of fracture formerly. (Tsunoda, M.)

  8. Modeling neck mobility in fossil turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Hinz, Juliane K; Gumpenberger, Michaela; Volpato, Virginie; Natchev, Nikolay; Joyce, Walter G

    2015-05-01

    Turtles have the unparalleled ability to retract their heads and necks within their shell but little is known about the evolution of this trait. Extensive analysis of neck mobility in turtles using radiographs, CT scans, and morphometry reveals that basal turtles possessed less mobility in the neck relative to their extant relatives, although the anatomical prerequisites for modern mobility were already established. Many extant turtles are able to achieve hypermobility by dislocating the central articulations, which raises cautions about reconstructing the mobility of fossil vertebrates. A 3D-model of the Late Triassic turtle Proganochelys quenstedti reveals that this early stem turtle was able to retract its head by tucking it sideways below the shell. The simple ventrolateral bend seen in this stem turtle, however, contrasts with the complex double-bend of extant turtles. The initial evolution of neck retraction therefore occurred in a near-synchrony with the origin of the turtle shell as a place to hide the unprotected neck. In this early, simplified retraction mode, the conical osteoderms on the neck provided further protection.

  9. Experimental issues and interpretation of the necking phenomena in the dynamic characterization via Hopkinson bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirone Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The usual procedures for processing experimental data from Hopkinson bars (HB are based on modeling hypotheses which, in some cases, may lead to considerable approximations. The effects of the specimen geometry and of the necking are analysed, both experimentally and by FE analyses, for assessing how much the conventional values of strain rate, strain and stress, based on strain gauges readings along the HB, are affected by approximations in different testing conditions. Also, from the way the necking affects the load/area ratio, useful considerations arise about the hardening response of metal alloys under high strain rates. The sensitivity of stress-strain curves to the time-translations of strain waves along the bars is assessed by comparing the above curves to others where the strain, the strain rate and the current cross section come from speed camera image analyses. This clearly shows that the effective strain rate in the most strained areas of the specimens is many times higher than the nominal value, and also allows to explore how much the engineering curve is poorly representative of the material response, due to strain localization in the post-necking phase. The necking-affected length compared to the total gauge length is also found to significantly influence the strain response of the specimens, in a way that can easily mislead the experimenters in the derivation of the material ductility. An empirical relationship, already found to be valid in the post-necking quasi-static regime for transforming the true stress (load / current area into an estimation of the cross section-averaged equivalent stress, is also found to apply at high strain rates if only the appropriate considerations are done on the way the equivalent stress is considered.

  10. Experimental issues and interpretation of the necking phenomena in the dynamic characterization via Hopkinson bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirone, Giuseppe; Corallo, Domenico

    2015-09-01

    The usual procedures for processing experimental data from Hopkinson bars (HB) are based on modeling hypotheses which, in some cases, may lead to considerable approximations. The effects of the specimen geometry and of the necking are analysed, both experimentally and by FE analyses, for assessing how much the conventional values of strain rate, strain and stress, based on strain gauges readings along the HB, are affected by approximations in different testing conditions. Also, from the way the necking affects the load/area ratio, useful considerations arise about the hardening response of metal alloys under high strain rates. The sensitivity of stress-strain curves to the time-translations of strain waves along the bars is assessed by comparing the above curves to others where the strain, the strain rate and the current cross section come from speed camera image analyses. This clearly shows that the effective strain rate in the most strained areas of the specimens is many times higher than the nominal value, and also allows to explore how much the engineering curve is poorly representative of the material response, due to strain localization in the post-necking phase. The necking-affected length compared to the total gauge length is also found to significantly influence the strain response of the specimens, in a way that can easily mislead the experimenters in the derivation of the material ductility. An empirical relationship, already found to be valid in the post-necking quasi-static regime for transforming the true stress (load / current area) into an estimation of the cross section-averaged equivalent stress, is also found to apply at high strain rates if only the appropriate considerations are done on the way the equivalent stress is considered.

  11. Evaluation of comorbidity in 9388 head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Charlotte Rotbøl; Dalton, Susanne O; Primdahl, Hanne;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Comorbidity is common in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients due to the etiology of the disease being primarily smoking. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of comorbidity on survival in a national population-based cohort study on 9388 HNSCC-patients......BACKGROUND: Comorbidity is common in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients due to the etiology of the disease being primarily smoking. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of comorbidity on survival in a national population-based cohort study on 9388 HNSCC...... diagnosed from 1992 to 2008 was identified from the DAHANCA-database. Data on comorbidity prior to HNSCC-diagnosis was obtained from the National Patient Registry and adapted to the CCI. RESULTS: By dividing the patients into two groups, we tested and validated which type of comorbidities within the CCI...... affected overall survival (OS) and cancer specific death (CSD). In total, 36% of patients had comorbidity. Six comorbid conditions within the CCI significantly reduced five-year OS probability: congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, chronic pulmonary disease, peptic ulcer disease, liver disease...

  12. Neck Pain and Disability Scale and Neck Disability Index : validity of Dutch language versions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wim; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Knol-de Vries, Grietje; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the validity of the Neck Pain and Disability Scale Dutch Language Version (NPAD-DLV) and the Neck Disability Index (NDI)-DLV. NPAD-DLV, NDI-DLV, Short-Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36)-DLV, visual analog scale (VAS)(pain) and VAS(disability) were administered to 112 patients with non-spec

  13. Piperlongumine selectively kills cancer cells and increases cisplatin antitumor activity in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Eun Hye; Park, Jin Young; Kim, Ji Won; Kwon, Minsu; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to cellular stress is not a vital function of normal cells but is required of cancer cells, and as such might be a sensible target in cancer therapy. Piperlongumine is a naturally occurring small molecule selectively toxic to cancer cells. This study assesses the cytotoxicity of piperlongumine and its combination with cisplatin in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) cells in vitro and in vivo. The effect of piperlongumine, alone and in combination with cisplatin, was assessed in human HNC c...

  14. Cooperation between medicine and sociology in head and neck oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Emmanuel; Grandazzi, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-first-century medicine is facing many challenges--knowledge and command of technical advances, research development, team management, knowledge transmission, and adaptation to economic constraints--without neglecting "human" aspects, via transformed carer-patient relationships, social change, and so on. The "modern" physicians know that simply treating disease is no longer enough. One of their essential missions lies in offering the individual patient overall care, which implies acknowledging the latter as an individual within a family, social, and professional environment. Indeed, medical practice requires pluridimensional knowledge of the patients' experience of their disease. Yet the contribution sociology can offer to health care remains largely unknown to many physicians, and medical training includes only limited instruction in the human sciences. On the basis of a few observations taken from sociological research, we would like to demonstrate how, in head and neck oncology, interdisciplinary collaboration between medicine and sociology can prove propitious to improving patient care and attention to their close relations.

  15. Metal alloy identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  16. Perfusion CT of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek Abdel, E-mail: arazek@mans.edu.eg; Tawfik, Ahmed Mohamed, E-mail: ahm_m_tawfik@hotmail.com; Elsorogy, Lamiaa Galal Ali, E-mail: lamia2elsorogy@hotmail.com; Soliman, Nermin Yehia, E-mail: nermin_eid@hotmail.com

    2014-03-15

    We aim to review the technique and clinical applications of perfusion CT (PCT) of head and neck cancer. The clinical value of PCT in the head and neck includes detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) as it allows differentiation of HNSCC from normal muscles, demarcation of tumor boundaries and tumor local extension, evaluation of metastatic cervical lymph nodes as well as determination of the viable tumor portions as target for imaging-guided biopsy. PCT has been used for prediction of treatment outcome, differentiation between post-therapeutic changes and tumor recurrence as well as monitoring patient after radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. PCT has a role in cervical lymphoma as it may help in detection of response to chemotherapy and early diagnosis of relapsing tumors.

  17. Participation of osteoporosis in femoral neck fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) was used to measure bone mineral contents of the proximal femur. First, 62 specimens of cancellous bones of the proximal femur obtained at operation were burnt for mineral determination after preoperative QCT measurement to evaluate the relationship between QCT values and ash weight. The findings indicated that QCT measurement of proximal femur was as useful as that of the lumbar spine. Next, 10 groups of 50 men and 50 women ranging in age from the 5th to the 9th decade were tested to define the control mean and range of QCT mineral content of proximal femur, to compare with 32 cases of femoral neck fracture. In women with femoral neck fracture, QCT values of the femoral neck were less than those of the same normal age group except for cases of medial fracture in the 9th decade. This measurement might provide an index for fracture risk. (author)

  18. Management of patients with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neck pain (cervicalgia occupies one of the leading places among the reasons for outpatient visits, 75% of people have experienced neck pain at least once in their lives. In most cases, neck pain regresses; however, it recurs in almost one half of patients. The paper gives data on the risk factors, mechanisms, course, and prognosis of cervicalgia. It discusses the issues of differential diagnosis, examination, and approaches to treating this condition in these patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are most effective in treating patients with acute cervicalgia. Therapeutic exercises and manual therapy are indicated in patients with chronic cervicalgia. There is evidence on the efficacy and safety of meloxicam for the management of acute and chronic cervicalgia.

  19. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  20. Psychometric properties of the Neck OutcOme Score (NOOS), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short form-36 (SF-36) were evaluated in patients with neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Søgaard, Karen; Davis, Aileen M;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess reliability, construct validity, responsiveness and interpretability for Neck OutcOme Score (NOOS), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short-form-36 (SF-36) in neck pain patients. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Test-retest reliab......OBJECTIVE: To assess reliability, construct validity, responsiveness and interpretability for Neck OutcOme Score (NOOS), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short-form-36 (SF-36) in neck pain patients. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Test...... correlating subscale scores from NOOS and SF-36 and NDI items. RESULTS: At baseline 196 neck pain patients were included. Cronbach's α was adequate for most NOOS subscales, NDI and SF-36 with few exceptions. Good to excellent reliability was found for NOOS subscales (ICC 0.88-0.95), for NDI and for SF-36...

  1. Adaptive Lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive LightingAdaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled i...

  2. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log–rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

  3. INTRAOPERATIVE NEUROMONITORING DURING HEAD AND NECK SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Rumyantsev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical trial comparatively analyzed the frequency of postoperative neurological complications due to damage to motor (facial, recurrent, laryngeal, and accessory nerves after head and neck operations using the traditional procedure or intraoperative neuromonitoring. Neuromonitoring made during operations on the thyroid and level VI central neck could reduce the rate of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis by more than twice (OR = 0.32; 95 % CI 0.11–0.86; p = 0.028. The author considers the absolute indication for intraoperative neuromonitoring to be high-risk surgery for nondeliberate damage to the motor nerves and impossibility of their visual detection.

  4. Penetrating wounds of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahrsdoerfer, R A; Johns, M E; Cantrell, R W

    1979-12-01

    Wounding capability of bullets is primarily releated to velocity. Bullet mass and shape, and specific gravity of body tissues being struck by the missile, are lesser factors. Seventy cases of penetrating wounds of the head and neck were treated during a six-year period. Vascular injuries were more common with neck wounds, while face and head injuries (extracranial) were similar to maxillofacial trauma. It is recognized that hemorrhage at the base of the skull is difficult to treat, and contemporary training in temporal bone and base of skull surgery is mandatory for the critical management of these wounds.

  5. [Photodynamic therapy for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, C.B.; Specht, Lena; Kirkegaard, J.;

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new treatment for head and neck cancer. The principle of the treatment is a photochemical reaction initiated by light activation of a photosensitizer, which causes the death of the exposed tissue. This article presents the modes of action of PDT and the techniques as...... well as the clinical procedure. A critical review of the literature is also presented, regarding treatment results of the different techniques and indications for treatments. The possibilities for PDT for head and neck cancer in Denmark are mentioned Udgivelsesdato: 2006/6/5...

  6. Congenital neck masses: embryological and anatomical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahida Rasool

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neck masses are a common problem in paediatric age group. They tend to occur frequently and pose a diagnostic dilemma to the ENT surgeons. Although the midline and lateral neck masses differ considerably in their texture and presentation but the embryological perspective of these masses is not mostly understood along with the fundamental anatomical knowledge. The article tries to correlate the embryological, anatomical and clinical perspectives for the same. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 329-332

  7. ASSESSMENT OF RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NECK SHAFT ANGLE AND NECK LENGTH WITH INTEREPICONDYLAR DISTANCE IN FEMUR

    OpenAIRE

    Ishita Ghosh; Gairik Sengupta; Pallab Basu; Alpana De

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femur is the longest and strongest bone of the body. It transmits body weight from hip bone to tibia in standing position. Femoral neck is a constricted part connecting head with shaft at an angle of about 125°-known as angle of inclination or neck shaft angle (NSA); this facilitates the movement of hip joint enabling the limb to swing clear of pelvis. Abnormal femoral neck angle (FNA) may be associated with various clinical problems ranging from harmless in toeing gait in childho...

  8. PET-CT–Guided Surveillance of Head and Neck Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  9. PREVALENCE OF NECK DISABILITY AMONG DENTAL PROFESSIONALS IN NORTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshul

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: AIM: (The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of neck pain in dentists of north India [h1]. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Following ethical approval, a cross sectional study was conducted on 74 randomly selected dentists. Questionnaires were used to collect personal and occupational characteristics as well as the prevalence and risk factors of neck pain. Subjects were assessed by visual analogue scale and neck disability questionnaires for pain intensity and functional disability of neck, respectively. RESULTS : Point and last 12 months prevalence of neck pain were 27% and 76%, respect ively. Mean VAS for neck pain is 2.48. CONCLUSION : Results indicated that the prevalence of neck pain and neck disability in dentists appears to be high

  10. 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Patient Health Information News ... particular strain of HPV. 66% of the time, oral cancers will be found as late stage three and ...

  11. Discovery of a short-necked sauropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period of Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhut, Oliver W M; Remes, Kristian; Fechner, Regina; Cladera, Gerardo; Puerta, Pablo

    2005-06-01

    Sauropod dinosaurs are one of the most conspicuous groups of Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrates. They show general trends towards an overall increase in size and elongation of the neck, by means of considerable elongation of the length of individual vertebrae and a cervical vertebra count that, in some cases, increases to 19 (ref. 1). The long neck is a particular hallmark of sauropod dinosaurs and is usually regarded as a key feeding adaptation. Here we describe a new dicraeosaurid sauropod, from the latest Jurassic period of Patagonia, that has a particularly short neck. With a neck that is about 40% shorter than in other known dicraeosaurs, this taxon demonstrates a trend opposite to that seen in most sauropods and indicates that the ecology of dicraeosaurids might have differed considerably from that of other sauropods. The new taxon indicates that there was a rapid radiation and dispersal of dicraeosaurids in the Late Jurassic of the Southern Hemisphere, after the separation of Gondwana from the northern continents by the late Middle Jurassic.

  12. Advances in Supportive Care for Late Effects of Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Barbara A; Deng, Jie

    2015-10-10

    As the population of head and neck cancer survivors increases, it has become increasingly important for health care providers to understand and manage late complications of therapy. Functional deficits can be categorized as general health deficits resulting in frailty or debility, head and neck-specific functional deficits such as swallowing and speech, and musculoskeletal impairment as a result of tumor and treatment. Of critical importance is the growing data indicating that swallow therapy and physical therapy may prevent or ameliorate long-term functional deficits. Oral health complications of head and neck therapy may manifest months or years after the completion of treatment. Patients with hyposalivation are at high risk for dental caries and thus require aggressive oral hygiene regimens and routine dental surveillance. Swallowing abnormalities, xerostomia, and poor dentition may result in dietary adaptations that may cause nutritional deficiencies. Identification and management of maladaptive dietary strategies are important for long-term health. Follow-up with primary care physicians for management of comorbidities such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia may help to limit late vascular complications caused by radiation therapy. Herein, we review late effects of head and neck cancer therapy, highlighting recent advances. PMID:26351334

  13. Alloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition and properties are listed of alloyed steel for use in the manufacture of steam generators, collectors, spacers, emergency tanks, and other components of nuclear power plants. The steel consists of 0.08 to 0.11% w.w. C, 0.6 to 1.4% w.w. Mn, 0.35 to 0.6% w.w. Mo, 0.02 to 0.07% w.w. Al, 0.17 to 0.37% w.w. Si, 1.7 to 2.7% w.w. Ni, 0.03 to 0.07% w.w. V, 0.005 to 0.012% w.w. N, and the rest is Fe. The said steel showed a sufficiently low transition temperature between brittle and tough structures, a greater depth of hardenability, and better weldability than similar steels. (B.S.)

  14. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Offergeld; Christoph Brase; Svetlana Yaremchuk; Irina Mader; Hans Christian Rischke; Sven Gläsker; Kurt W Schmid; Thorsten Wiech; Preuss, Simon F.; Carlos Suárez; Tomasz Kopć; Attila Patocs; Nelson Wohllk; Mahdi Malekpour; Boedeker, Carsten C.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom rel...

  15. Recurrence and survival after neck dissections in cutaneous head and neck melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Stemann; Chakera, Annette Hougaard; Thamsborg, Andreas Key Milan;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An important prognostic factor in head and neck melanoma is the status of the regional lymph nodes since the presence of metastatic disease in the nodes greatly aggravates the prognosis. There is no consensus on the surgical treatment algorithm for this group. Our aim was to study...... if there is a difference in nodal recurrence and survival after radical, modified or selective neck dissection. METHODS: A total of 57 patients treated for regional meta-stases of head and neck melanoma were analysed retrospectively with respect to type of neck dissection, use of sentinel node biopsy, nodal recurrence...... benefit for patients who undergo completion lymph node dissection following a positive sentinel node biopsy. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  16. Atlas of head and neck imaging. The extracranial head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designed for easy use at the PACS station or viewbox, here is your right-hand tool and pictorial guide for locating, identifying, and accurately diagnosing lesions of the extracranial head and neck. This beautifully produced atlas employs the 'spaces' concept of analysis, which helps radiologists directly visualize complex head and neck anatomy and pathology. With hundreds of high-quality illustrations, this book makes the difficult identification and localization of complex neck masses relatively simple. This book provides CT and MR examples for more than 200 different diseases of the suprahyoid and infrahyoid neck, as well as clear and concise information on the epidemiology, clinical findings, pathology, and treatment guidelines for each disease. (orig.)

  17. Chondrosarcomas of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coca-Pelaz, A.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Triantafyllou, A.; Hunt, J.L.; Fernandez-Miranda, J.C.; Strojan, P.; Bree, R. de; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Ferlito, A.

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma represents approximately 11 % of all primary malignant bone tumors. It is the second most common sarcoma arising in bone after osteosarcoma. Chondrosarcomas of the head and neck are rare and may involve the sinonasal tract, jaws, larynx or skull base. Depending on the anatomical locat

  18. Malignant triton tumor (MTT) of the neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristine Bjørndal; Godballe, Christian; Krogdahl, Annelise

    2006-01-01

    Malignant Triton Tumor (MTT) is a rare, malignant periphere nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. One third of described MTT's were located at the head and neck region. One third of these are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. MTT most often appears in the third decade...

  19. Anatomy of lithosphere necking during orthogonal rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, Yago; Cavozzi, Cristian; Storti, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of lithosphere necking is a fundamental parameter controlling the structural architecture and thermal-state of rifted margin. The necking shape depends on several parameters, including the extensional strain-rate and thermal layering of the lithosphere. Despite a large number of analogue and numerical modelling studies on lithosphere extension, a quantitative description of the evolution of necking through time is still lacking. We used analogue modelling to simulate in three-dimension the progression of lithosphere thinning and necking during orthogonal rifting. In our models we simulated a typical "cold and young" 4-layer lithosphere stratigraphy: brittle upper crust (loose quartz sand), ductile lower crust (silicon-barite mixture), brittle upper mantle (loose quartz sand), and ductile lower mantle (silicon-barite mixture). The experimental lithosphere rested on a glucose syrup asthenosphere. We monitored model evolution by periodic and coeval laser scanning of both the surface topography and the lithosphere base. After model completion, each of the four layers was removed and the top of the underlying layer was scanned. This technical approach allowed us to quantify the evolution in space and time of the thinning factors for both the whole lithosphere (βz) and the crust (γ). The area of incremental effective stretching (βy) parallel to the extensional direction was obtained from the βz maps.

  20. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49 CFR 572.33) in either the left or right lateral impact orientations, respectively, so that...

  1. Head and neck cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, S; Nör, J E

    2012-04-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the "drivers" of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  2. Anatomy of neck configuration in fission decay

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, S K; Satpathy, L

    2010-01-01

    The anatomy of neck configuration in the fission decay of Uranium and Thorium isotopes is investigated in a microscopic study using Relativistic mean field theory. The study includes $^{236}U$ and $^{232}Th$ in the valley of stability and exotic neutron rich isotopes $^{250}U$, $^{256}U$, $^{260}U$, $^{240}Th$, $^{250}Th$, $^{256}Th$ likely to play important role in the r-process nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution. Following the static fission path, the neck configurations are generated and their composition in terms of the number of neutrons and protons are obtained showing the progressive rise in the neutron component with the increase of mass number. Strong correlation between the neutron multiplicity in the fission decay and the number of neutrons in the neck is seen. The maximum neutron-proton ratio is about 5 for $^{260}$U and $^{256}$Th suggestive of the break down of liquid-drop picture and inhibition of the fission decay in still heavier isotopes. Neck as precursor of a new mode of fission decay li...

  3. 49 CFR 572.17 - Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 30 21 2.2 60 36 4.3 Maximum 62 5.8 60 91 4.3 30 108 2.2 0 123 0 (c) Test procedure. (1) Mount the... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.17 Neck. (a)(1)...

  4. Manipulation or Mobilisation for Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gross; J. Miller; J. D'Sylva; S.J. Burnie; C.H. Goldsmith; N. Graham; T. Haines; G. Brønfort; J.L. Hoving

    2010-01-01

    Background Manipulation and mobilisation are often used, either alone or combined with other treatment approaches, to treat neck pain. Objectives To assess if manipulation or mobilisation improves pain, function/disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life, and global perceived effect in adults

  5. The effect of cocontraction of the masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercises on thickness of the neck flexors

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Hyun-Ju; Goo, Bong-Oh; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the cocontraction of masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercises on changes in the thickness of the neck flexors. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects performed neck stabilization only exercise and neck stabilization exercise with simultaneous contraction of the masticatory muscles. Changes in the thickness of the longus colli and sternocleidomastoid were then measured by ultrasound. [Results] The thickness of th...

  6. Mechanical alloying in immiscible alloy systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, mechanical alloying (MA) of immiscible alloy systems characterized by positive heat of mixing has been extensively investigated. The present article reviews the latest progress in MA of immiscible alloy systems including the mechanisms of non-equilibrium phase transformation and metastable phase formation of the MA-driven supersaturated solid solutions, amorphous phases and nanophase composites as well as their mechanical and physical properties related to those metastable phases.

  7. [Rare giant salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma on the neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dongling; Li, Qinghuai

    2013-12-01

    The patient has found his neck mass for more than 30 years, and the neck mass has slowly growed into giant tumor. Five days ago, the neck giant mass suddenly burst, hemorrhage and overflow liquid. The giant mass with irregular in shape, surface uneven, skin highly tension and superficial venous engorgement, was seen in left lateral neck. CT scan demonstrates a mixture of solid, cystic and lobulated mass shadow within subcutaneous fat spaces of left lateral neck. Postoperative pathological examination proved that it is salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:24620671

  8. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  9. Short Term Effects of Mobilization Techniques on Neck Pain and Deep Neck Flexor Muscle Endurance in Patients with Mechanical Chronic Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, Hasan Erkan; Harput, Gülcan; Baltacı, Gül; İnce, Deniz İnal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate short term effects of cervical and scapular mobilization techniques on neck pain and deep cervical muscles endurance in chronical mechanical neck pain patients. Methods: 22 chronical mechanic neck pain patients four male 18 female (mean age: mean±sd 35.59± 15.85) were included. Before treatment, neck pain level (visual analog scale) and deep neck flexor muscles endurance (in supine position with digital chronometer) of all patients were evaluated. Cyriax cervical mobilization for 10 minutes and scapular mobilization for 10 repetition 10 sets were performed to patients as treatment protocol. After treatment, 24 hours after and a week after evaluations of neck pain and deep cervical muscles endurance were repeated. Results: Before treatment Neck pain Visual Analog Scale scores was 5.78±1.43 point, 2.80±1.99 point after treatment, 24 hours later 3.36±2.12 point, one week later 3.91±2.24 point. This alteration was found significant statistically (p<0.01). Before treatment deep cervical flexor muscle endurance score was 27.25±17.74 sec, after treatment 39.46±25.20 sec, 24 hours later 38.67±28.43 and one week later 40.11±27.82 sec. This alteration was also found significant statistically (p=0.01). Conclusion: Initially neck pain scores in our subjects decreased quickly, after 24 hours these scores increased but last scores were below first neck pain level in a week follow-up. Deep neck cervical flexor muscles test scores also increased quickly, after 24 hours later this scores were stable along a week. Mobilization techniques are effective methods on neck pain and endurance in chronical mechanic neck pain patients.

  10. The tripartite origins of the tonic neck reflex: Gesell, Gerstmann, and Magnus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevell, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The standard neurologic examination of the newborn and infant includes the elicitation of the tonic neck reflex. Normally present, its persistence is suggestive of neurologic dysfunction and a prognostic marker highly suggestive of an adverse outcome. Working in different fields, with different approaches and largely independently, three leaders of early 20th century neurosciences (Rudolf Magnus, Josef Gerstmann, and Arnold Gesell) elaborated different aspects of this primitive reflex. Magnus provided the first description in an animal model utilizing a meticulously prepared decerebrate cat correctly identifying the reflex's reliance on proprioceptors in the neck and processing in the upper cervical segment. Gerstmann first described its occurrence in the setting of neurologic disease, providing a meticulous written description in an early description of the index case of what would later be eponymously designated Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. Gesell initially described the reflex's fundamental occurrence in normal young infants, highlighting its adaptive role in early development and its persistence as a hallmark of neurologic pathology.

  11. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... distributed differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial...

  12. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  13. How common is hypothyroidism after external radiotherapy to neck in head and neck cancer patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Srikantia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the occurrence of clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism among head and neck cancer patients receiving radiation to the neck and to justify routine performing of thyroid function tests during follow-up. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective nonrandomized study of 45 patients of head and neck cancer, receiving radiotherapy (RT. Thyroid stimulating hormone and T4 estimations were done at baseline and at 4 months and 9 months following RT. Results: Of the 45 patients, 37(82.2 % were males and eight (17.8 % were females. All patients received radiation to the neck to a dose of >40Gy. 35.6% received concurrent chemotherapy. Two patients underwent prior neck dissection. Fourteen patients (31.1% were found to have clinical hypothyroidism (P value of 0.01. Five (11.1% patients were found to have subclinical hypothyroidism with a total 19 of 45 (42.2% patients developing radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Nine of 14 patients with clinical hypothyroidism were in the age group of 51 to 60 years (P=0.0522. Five of 16 patients who received chemoradiation and nine of 29 who received RT alone developed clinical hypothyroidism. Above 40 Gy radiation dose was not a relevant risk factor for hypothyroidism. Conclusion: Hypothyroidism (clinical or subclinical is an under-recognized morbidity of external radiation to the neck which is seen following a minimum dose of 40 Gy to neck. Recognizing hypothyroidism (clinical or subclinical early and treating it prevents associated complications. Hence, thyroid function tests should be made routine during follow-up.

  14. Neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis after neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy for oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinu; Shin, Eun Seow; Kim, Jeong Eon; Yoon, Sang Pil [Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Suk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Late complications of head and neck cancer survivors include neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis. We present an autopsy case of neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis (sternocleidomastoid, omohyoid, digastric, sternohyoid, sternothyroid, and platysma muscles) within the radiation field after modified radical neck dissection type I and postoperative radiotherapy for floor of mouth cancer. A 70-year-old man underwent primary tumor resection of the left floor of mouth, left marginal mandibulectomy, left modified radical neck dissection type I, and reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy. The dose to the primary tumor bed and involved neck nodes was 63 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks. Areas of subclinical disease (left lower neck) received 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Adjuvant chemotherapy was not administered.

  15. Malnutrition associated with head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifeh Haghjoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancerous patients, under the chemotherapy or radiotherapy, are at high risk of malnutrition due to the associated complications with the treatment procedures such as chewing problems, dysphagia, nausea etc. Considering the patients’ history of alcohol consumption, smoking or any other diseases and performing several physical examinations are essential in early identification of high-risk patients for nutritional complications, losing unintentional weight and fat free mass. In this review, we tried to briefly explain the risk of malnutrition in patients with head and neck cancers who are undergoing surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oral nutrition, nasogastric tube and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy  are different methods of nutritional interventions, which have been compared due to their efficacy in maintaining the patients’ weight. In this study, we reviewed the results obtained in clinical trials about the efficacy of intense nutritional intervention on limiting the chemoradiotherapy-associated complications in patients with head and neck cancers.

  16. Hidden Beauty in Twisted Viking Neck Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    Many hoards found in Ireland, Scotland, Orkney Islands, and Scandinavia demonstrate the vikings ability to fabricate beautiful arm and neck rings of twisted silver and gold rods. Characteristic for such rings is the uniform appearance of the twisted pattern along the length of the arm ring, as well as from one arm ring to another, also when found at distant geographical locations. How can the appearance of the twisted wires be so perfectly repetitive? We demonstrate that the answer is that the vikings utilized a self-forming motif: The pattern arises from a twisting of the wires to a maximally rotated configuration. That is why the twist patterns in these arm and neck rings are beautiful, repetitive, and universal.

  17. Imaging of head and neck venous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flis, Christine M.; Connor, Stephen E. [King' s College Hospital, Neuroradiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are non proliferative lesions that consist of dysplastic venous channels. The aim of imaging is to characterise the lesion and define its anatomic extent. We will describe the plain film, ultrasound (US) (including colour and duplex Doppler), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conventional angiographic and direct phlebographic appearances of venous malformations. They will be illustrated at a number of head and neck locations, including orbit, oral cavity, superficial and deep facial space, supraglottic and intramuscular. An understanding of the classification of such vascular anomalies is required to define the correct therapeutic procedure to employ. Image-guided sclerotherapy alone or in combination with surgery is now the first line treatment option in many cases of head and neck venous malformations, so the radiologist is now an integral part of the multidisciplinary management team. (orig.)

  18. Pain in the Neck Following Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cubas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Colonoscopy remains a widely used diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. However, like any invasive investigation it has the potential of complications; extraperitoneal perforation with pneumoretroperitoneum and subcutaneous emphysema being an extremely rare example. We report such a case in a57 year old woman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and diffuse chest, neck and facial surgical emphysema following a routine colonoscopy with hot snarepolypectomy.

  19. Femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The incidence and risk factors are evaluated for femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The radiation therapy records of 1313 patients with advanced and recurrent cancer of the vagina, vulva, cervix, and endometrium, treated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology from 1954 to 1992, were reviewed. Median follow-up was 12.7 years. From this group, 207 patients were identified who received irradiation to the pelvis and groins with anterposterior-posterior anterior (AP-PA), 18 MV photons. Data were reviewed regarding irradiation dose to the femoral neck and other presumed risk factors including age, primary site, stage, groin node status, menopausal status, estrogen use, cigarette use, alcohol consumption, and osteoporosis. Results: The per-patient incidence of femoral neck fracture was 4.8% (10 out of 207). Four patients developed bilateral fractures. However, the cumulative actuarial incidence of fracture was 11% at 5 years and 15% at 10 years. Cox multivariate analysis of age, weight, and irradiation dose showed that only irradiation dose may be important to developing fracture. Step-wise logistic regression of presumed prognostic factors revealed that only cigarette use and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis prior to irradiation treatment were predictive of fracture. Conclusion: Femoral head fracture is a common complication of groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Fracture in our database appears to be related to irradiation dose, cigarette use, and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis. Special attention should be given in treatment planning (i.e., shielding of femoral head/neck and use of appropriate electron beam energies for a portion of treatment) to reduce the incidence of this complication

  20. Neck injury response to direct head impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Previous in vivo studies have observed flexion of the upper or upper/middle cervical spine and extension at inferior spinal levels due to direct head impacts. These studies hypothesized that hyperflexion may contribute to injury of the upper or middle cervical spine during real-life head impact. Our objectives were to determine the cervical spine injury response to direct head impact, document injuries, and compare our results with previously reported in vivo data. Our model consisted of a human cadaver neck (n=6) mounted to the torso of a rear impact dummy and carrying a surrogate head. Rearward force was applied to the model's forehead using a cable and pulley system and free-falling mass of 3.6kg followed by 16.7kg. High-speed digital cameras tracked head, vertebral, and pelvic motions. Average peak spinal rotations observed during impact were statistically compared (P<0.05) to physiological ranges obtained from intact flexibility tests. Peak head impact force was 249 and 504N for the 3.6 and 16.7kg free-falling masses, respectively. Occipital condyle loads reached 205.3N posterior shear, 331.4N compression, and 7.4Nm extension moment. We observed significant increases in intervertebral extension peaks above physiologic at C6/7 (26.3° vs. 5.7°) and C7/T1 (29.7° vs. 4.6°) and macroscopic ligamentous and osseous injuries at C6 through T1 due to the 504N impacts. Our results indicate that a rearward head shear force causes complex neck loads of posterior shear, compression, and extension moment sufficient to injure the lower cervical spine. Real-life neck injuries due to motor vehicle crashes, sports impacts, or falls are likely due to combined loads transferred to the neck by direct head impact and torso inertial loads. PMID:22613632

  1. Hidden Beauty in Twisted Viking Neck Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Kasper; Bohr, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Many hoards found in Ireland, Scotland, Orkney Islands, and Scandinavia demonstrate the vikings ability to fabricate beautiful arm and neck rings of twisted silver and gold rods. Characteristic for such rings is the uniform appearance of the twisted pattern along the length of the arm ring, as well as from one arm ring to another, also when found at distant geographical locations. How can the appearance of the twisted wires be so perfectly repetitive? We demonstrate that the answer is that th...

  2. Femoral Neck Version Affects Medial Femorotibial Loading

    OpenAIRE

    T. A. Papaioannou; Georgios Digas; Ch. Bikos; Karamoulas, V.; E. A. Magnissalis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (−10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (F...

  3. Skin Cancer of the Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Yun-Hsuan

    2010-01-01

    The majority of skin cancers of the head and neck are nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of NMSC. Malignant melanoma is an aggressive neoplasm of skin, and the ideal adjuvant therapy has not yet been found, although various options for treatment of skin cancer are available to the patient and physician, allowing high cure rate and excellent functional and cosmetic outcomes. Sunscreen protection and early evaluation of ...

  4. The Indications and Clinical Curative Effects of Modified Neck Dissection in Head and Neck Cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuohaoWu; WeiweiUu; FujinChen; ZongyuanZeng; HaoLi; MingSong; MaowenWei; QuanZhang; AnkuiYang; WenkuanChen

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Functional neck dissection was first described by Bocca and Pignataro in 1967. It has been used in clinical practice for years, but remains controversial among neck-surgery experts. This study was designed to evaluate indications and curative effects of functional-neck dissection (FND). METHODS One hundred and fifty-two cases which underwent FND were reviewed with an analysis of pathological specimens and follow-up datas. RESULTS The series of FND included 20 cases of tongue carcinoma, 23 cases of larynx carcinoma, 96 cases of thyroid papillary adenocarcinoma, 9 cases of follicular adenocarcinoma and 4 cases of medullary adenocarcinoma; the five-year recurrence rate for tongue carcinoma was 12.5%, 14.3%, 40.0% and for a larynx carcinoma was 20.0%, 16.7%, 50.0% in N0 stage, N1 stage, N2a stage, respectively. The 5-year recurrence rate of thyroid papillary adenocarcinoma was 6.5%, 7.1% in N1a, N1b, respectively. CONCLUSION Functional neck dissection is indicated in early and low malignant head and neck neoplasms and results in satisfactory curative effects.

  5. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  6. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  7. HAEMATOLOGICAL INDICES OF CAPTIVE BLACK NECK OSTRICHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.MOHAMED AHMED

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted at Sudan University of Science and Technology College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production Department of fisheries science and wildlife in June 20 11 to determine hematological values of Black Neck Ostrich Struthio Camelus massaicus collected from El Safa farm North Khartoum. Values of some hematological parameters of 14 Black Neck Ostrich 7 male and 7 female age from 3-4 year, and 70–75 kg in weight were examined to determine the mean values obtained for White Blood cells Count (WBC, Erythrocytes Count (RBC, Hemoglobin Concentration Rates (Hb, Packed Cell Volume (PCV, Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV/cl and Erythrocytes Sedimentation Rate (ESR. The result of this study show that there are no significant different in all blood values between samples collected from male and female at p (P<0.05, expect in Red Blood Cells (RBC there is significant different at (P<0.05. The main target of this study is to comparison between hematological values of Black Neck Ostrich in both male and female.

  8. HAEMATOLOGICAL INDICES OF CAPTIVE BLACK NECK OSTRICHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. MOHAMED AHMED

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted at Sudan University of Science and Technology College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production Department of fisheries science and wildlife in June 2011 to determine hematological values of Black Neck Ostrich Struthio Camelus massaicus collected from El Safa farm North Khartoum. Values of some hematological parameters of 14 Black Neck Ostrich 7 male and 7 female age from 3-4 year, and 70–75 kg in weight were examined to determine the mean values obtained for White Blood cells Count (WBC, Erythrocytes Count (RBC, Hemoglobin Concentration Rates (Hb, Packed Cell Volume (PCV, Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV/cl and Erythrocytes Sedimentation Rate (ESR. The result of this study show that there are no significant different in all blood values between samples collected from male and female at p (P<0.0٥, expect in Red Blood Cells (RBC there is significant different at (P<0.05. The main target of this study is to comparison between hematological values of Black Neck Ostrich in both male and female.

  9. Quality of life and neck pain in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Joslin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the association between neck pain and psychological stress in nurses. Material and Methods: Nurses from the Avon Orthopaedic Centre completed 2 questionnaires: the Short Form-36 (SF-36 and 1 exploring neck pain and associated psychological stress. Results: Thirty four nurses entered the study (68% response. Twelve (35.3% had current neck pain, 13 (38.2% reported neck pain within the past year and 9 (26.5% had no neck pain. Subjects with current neck pain had significantly lower mental health (47.1 vs. 70.4; p = 0.002, physical health (60.8 vs. 76.8; p = 0.010 and overall SF-36 scores (56.8 vs. 74.9; p = 0.003. Five (41.7% subjects with current neck pain and 5 (38.5% subjects with neck pain in the previous year attributed it to psychological stress. Conclusions: Over 1/3 of nurses have symptomatic neck pain and significantly lower mental and physical health scores. Managing psychological stress may reduce neck pain, leading to improved quality of life for nurses, financial benefits for the NHS, and improved patient care.

  10. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... the investigations of lighting scenarios carried out in two test installations: White Cube and White Box. The test installations are discussed as large-scale experiential instruments. In these test installations we examine what could potentially occur when light using LED technology is integrated and...

  11. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  12. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  13. Adaptive Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Provides information on various adaptive technology resources available to people with disabilities. (Contains 19 references, an annotated list of 129 websites, and 12 additional print resources.) (JOW)

  14. ADAPT Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT) Project Lead: Scott Poll Subject Fault diagnosis in electrical power systems Description The Advanced...

  15. Crystallization characteristics of cast aluminum alloys during a unidirectional solidification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: mitsuhiro.okayasu@utoronto.ca; Takeuchi, Shuhei

    2015-05-01

    The crystal orientation characteristics of cast Al–Si, Al–Cu and Al–Mg alloys produced by a unidirectional solidification process are examined. Two distinct crystal orientation patterns are observed: uniform and random formation. A uniform crystal orientation is created by columnar growth of α-Al dendrites in the alloys with low proportions of alloying element, e.g., the Al–Si alloy (with Si <12.6%) and the Al–Cu and Al–Mg alloys (with Cu and Mg <2%). A uniformly organized crystal orientation with [100] direction is created by columnar growth of α-Al dendrites. With increasing proportion of alloying element (>2% Cu or Mg), the uniform crystal orientations collapse in the Al–Cu and Al–Mg alloys, owing to interruption of the columnar α-Al dendrite growth as a result of different dynamics of the alloying atoms and the creation of a core for the eutectic phases. For the hypo-eutectic Al–Si alloys, a uniform crystal orientation is obtained. In contrast, a random orientation can be detected in the hyper-eutectic Al–Si alloy (15% Si), which results from interruption of the growth of the α-Al dendrites due to precipitation of primary Si particles. There is no clear effect of crystal formation on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), whereas crystal orientation does influence the material ductility, with the alloys with a uniform crystal orientation being elongated beyond their UTS points and with necking occurring in the test specimens. In contrast, the alloys with a nonuniform crystal orientation are not elongated beyond their UTS points.

  16. Are People With Whiplash Associated Neck Pain Different to People With Non-Specific Neck Pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anstey, Ricci; Kongsted, Alice; Kamper, Steven;

    2016-01-01

    -specific neck pain, in terms of their baseline characteristics, and pain and disability outcomes over 1 year. Methods Consecutive patients with neck pain presenting to a secondary care spine centre answered a comprehensive self-report questionnaire and underwent a physical examination. Patients were classified...... into either WAD or non-specific neck pain groups. We compared the outcomes of baseline characteristics of the 2 groups, as well as pain intensity and activity limitation at 6 and 12-month follow-up. Results 2578 participants were included in the study. Of these 488 (19%) were classified as having WAD...... and memory difficulties were substantial. The between group differences in pain and disability increased significantly (P

  17. UNILATERAL BIG HOCKEY STICK INCISION FOR NECK DISSECTION IN HEAD AND NECK CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宝国; 赵振生; 李明强; 陈荣鋭; 王建军; 张乃嵩

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate for the feasibility and advantages performed by the unilateral big hockey stick incision (BHSI) in head and neck carcinoma. Methods: Neck dissection by using the unilateral big hockey stick incision (BHSI) was performed on 93 patients with head and neck carcinoma. Results: The big hockey stick incision has a cosmetic scar and not scar contraction and is barely visible and easily covered in hair and clothing; sufficient exposure of the operation field; a small area of marginal necrosis was occasionally seen at the apex of the skin flap due to having preoperative radiotherapy. Conclusion: The unilateral big hockey stick incision has adequate surgical access, good healing of skin flaps, and a good cosmetic result.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NECK SHAFT ANGLE AND NECK LENGTH WITH INTEREPICONDYLAR DISTANCE IN FEMUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishita Ghosh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Femur is the longest and strongest bone of the body. It transmits body weight from hip bone to tibia in standing position. Femoral neck is a constricted part connecting head with shaft at an angle of about 125°-known as angle of inclination or neck shaft angle (NSA; this facilitates the movement of hip joint enabling the limb to swing clear of pelvis. Abnormal femoral neck angle (FNA may be associated with various clinical problems ranging from harmless in toeing gait in childhood to disabling osteoarthritis in adults. The current study attempted to find out if a co-relation exists between those parameters and other clinically measurable variables like inter-epicondylar distance or distance between greater trochanter to lateral epicondyle. This may help to predict the risk of fracture neck femur without any risk of radiation exposure and proper prophylactic measures can be undertaken (Vit-D, calcium to decrease risk of fracture. Results: Measurements were taken in dry femora mostly in East Indian population. Variables that were measured in 158 dry femora (85 femora from left side and 73 from the right side are: - a Neck shaft angle of femur, b Neck length of femur, c Neck circumference of femur, d Inter-epicondylar distance of femur, e Distance between lateral epicondyle and greater trochanter of femur. No significant difference was found between the right and left sided femoral groups regarding any of the study variables. From the analysis it was revealed that no positive or negative correlation exists between the study variables. Therefore, it is not possible to predict the value of one or more of them from the magnitude of the other variable(s. Conclusions: Our study attempted to find out if it was possible to predict the risk of fracture neck femur by simple clinical procedure without exposing the subjects to radiation hazards associated with a radiological imaging. A screening test and subsequent prophylactic measures could

  19. Modeling selective intergranular oxidation of binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 μm ahead of grain boundary crack tips was documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (˜100 s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner's model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al.

  20. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offergeld, Christian; Brase, Christoph; Yaremchuk, Svetlana; Mader, Irina; Rischke, Hans Christian; Gläsker, Sven; Schmid, Kurt W; Wiech, Thorsten; Preuss, Simon F; Suárez, Carlos; Kopeć, Tomasz; Patocs, Attila; Wohllk, Nelson; Malekpour, Mahdi; Boedeker, Carsten C; Neumann, Hartmut P H

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I-III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5), and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies. PMID:22584701

  1. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Offergeld

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I-III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5, and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies.

  2. Cortical bone distribution in the femoral neck of strepsirhine primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demes, B; Jungers, W L; Walker, C

    2000-10-01

    The thickness of the inferior and superior cortices of the femoral neck was measured on X-rays of 181 strepsirhine primate femora representing 24 species. Neck length, neck depth and neck-shaft angle were also measured. The strength of the femoral neck in frontal bending was estimated by modeling the neck as a hollow cylinder, with neck depth as the outer diameter and cortical thickness representing the superior and inferior shell dimensions. Results indicate that the inferior cortex is always thicker than the superior cortex. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is highly variable but distinguishes two of the three locomotor groups in the sample. Vertical clingers and leapers have higher ratios (i.e., a more even distribution of cortical bone) than quadrupeds. The slow climbers tend to have the lowest ratios, although they do not differ significantly from the leapers and quadrupeds. These results do not confirm prior theoretical expectations and reported data for anthropoid primates that link greater asymmetry of the cortical shell to more stereotypical hip excursions. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is unrelated to body mass, femoral neck length, and neck-shaft angle, calling into question whether the short neck of strepsirhine primates acts as a cantilever beam in bending. On the other hand, the estimated section moduli are highly correlated with body mass and neck length, a correlation that is driven primarily by body mass. In conclusion, we believe that an alternative interpretation to the cantilever beam model is needed to explain the asymmetry in bone distribution in the femoral neck, at least in strepsirhine primates (e.g., a thicker inferior cortex is required to reinforce the strongly curved inferior surface). As in prior studies of cross-sectional geometry of long bones, we found slightly positive allometry of cortical dimensions with body mass. PMID:11006046

  3. Neck Proprioception Shapes Body Orientation and Perception of Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Vito Enrico Pettorossi; Marco Schieppati

    2014-01-01

    This review article deals with some effects of neck muscle proprioception on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead, and self-motion perception. These effects are easily observed during neck muscle vibration, a strong stimulus for the spindle primary afferent fibers. We first remind the early findings on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead, induced by limb and neck muscle vibration. Then, more recent findings on self-motion perception of vestibular...

  4. A CLINICORADIOLOGICAL STUDY OF NECK INJURIES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash; Sangma

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To study the incidence of various neck injuries in patients attending ENT OPD/admitted in ENT ward. 2. To evaluate the distribution in age, sex, modes of presentation and nature of injury (suicidal, homicidal or accidental) 3. To categorize neck injuries according to zones of involvement. 4. To study cases of neck injuries where tracheostomy was needed/blood transfusion was required. TYPE OF STUDY: A prospective clinical study. MATERIALS AND METHODS...

  5. Predicting Neck Abscess with Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Lim Seer Yee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neck abscesses are difficult to diagnose and treat. Currently, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT is the imaging modality of choice. The study aims to determine the predictive value of CECT findings in diagnosing neck abscess, causes of neck abscess and the most common neck space involved in the local population. 84 consecutive patients clinically suspected to have neck abscess who underwent CECT and surgical confirmation of pus were included. Demographic and clinical data were recorded. 75 patients were diagnosed as having neck abscess on CECT; out of those 71 patients were found to have pus. Overall CECT findings were found to have a high sensitivity (98.6% and positive predictive value (PPV (94.7% but lower specificity (67.2% in diagnosing neck abscess. The CECT diagnostic criterion with the highest PPV is the presence of rim irregularity (96%. The most common deep neck space involved is the submandibular compartment, which correlates with the finding that odontogenic cause was the most common identifiable cause of abscess in the study population. Thus, in a patient clinically suspected of having neck abscess, CECT findings of a hypodense mass with rim irregularity are helpful in confirming the diagnosis and guiding clinical management.

  6. Femoral neck buttressing: a radiographic and histologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To examine the incidence, radiographic and histologic findings of medial femoral neck buttressing in a consecutive group of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty.Design. Biomechanical parameters were evaluated on standard anteroposterior pelvic radiographs of 113 patients prior to hip replacement surgery. Demographic information on all patients was reviewed and histologic evaluation was performed on specimens obtained at the time of surgery.Results. The incidence of medial femoral neck buttressing was found to be 50% in a consecutive series of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. The incidence was slightly higher in women (56% vs 41%). Patients with buttressing had increased neck-shaft angles and smaller femoral neck diameters than were seen in patients without buttressing. Histologic evaluation demonstrated that the buttress resulted from deposition bone by the periosteum on the femoral neck in the absence of any evidence of femoral neck fracture.Conclusion. It would appear that femoral neck buttressing occurs in response to increased joint reactive forces seen at the hip being transmitted through the femoral neck. The increased joint reactive force can be related to the increased neck shaft angle seen in patients with buttressing. (orig.)

  7. Digital subtraction angiography in head and neck radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmody, R.F.; Seeger, J.F.; Smith, R.L.; Horsley, W.W.; Miller, R.W.

    1984-07-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used to evaluate 44 patients with suspected otolaryngologic abnormalities. Sixteen had IVDSA for pulsatile tinnitus or suspected glomus tumor of the petrous bone. Nine patients were evaluated because of pulsatile neck masses, and 12 others had suspected tumors of the neck, face, and paranasal sinuses. Seven had IVDSA following head and neck trauma. The technique of examination is described. The current indications of IVDSA in head and neck radiology are discussed. It is concluded that IVDSA is a suitable substitute for conventional angiography for many otolaryngologic conditions and, because of its safety, can be used more liberally.

  8. Wound botulism presenting as a deep neck space infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Christopher; Mookherjee, Somnath; Russell, Matthew S

    2012-12-01

    Otolaryngologists commonly evaluate patients with findings suspicious for deep space soft tissue infections of the neck. In this case, a woman with a history of injection drug use (IDU) presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and neck pain. Multiple neck abscesses, too small to drain, were seen on imaging. Despite broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, she unexpectedly and rapidly developed respiratory failure requiring intubation. Further work-up diagnosed wound botulism (WB). To our knowledge, this is the first report of WB presenting as a deep neck space infection, and illustrates the importance of considering this deadly diagnosis in patients with IDU history and bulbar symptoms.

  9. Cervicopectoral flap in head and neck cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivrioglu Nazan S

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstruction of the head and neck after adequate resection of primary tumor and neck dissection is a challenge. It should be performed at one sitting in advanced tumors. Defects caused by the resection should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Cervicopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the cheek defects. Methods This study included twelve patients presenting with cancer of the head and neck to Izmir Ataturk Training Hospital and Adnan Menderes University Hospital. Tumor resection and neck dissection was performed in one session by the same surgeon. A single incision was made and a medially based cervicopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure in neck dissection and for closure of defects after tumor resection. Results There was no major complication. Two flaps had partial superficial epidermolysis at the suture line. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Conclusion The cervicopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation. This flap achieves perfect surgical exposure, makes neck dissection easy and allows one to perform both tumor resection and neck dissection in one session.

  10. Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired Mechanical and Corrosion Properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Muralidharan, G.

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this project was to adapt and use an advanced semi-stochastic algorithm for constrained multiobjective optimization and combine it with experimental testing and verification to determine optimum concentrations of alloying elements in heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant H-series stainless steel alloys that will simultaneously maximize a number of alloy's mechanical and corrosion properties.

  11. Head and neck cancer patients' experiences of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding: a Q-methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, S; Farrell, D

    2012-07-01

    Head and neck cancer patients are at high risk of malnutrition and its complications and therefore often undergo non-oral nasogastric or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) nutrition support. However, there is little evidence that either approach is effective in this group. While one possible explanation for these findings relates to the relationship between artificial tube feeding and poor quality of life, there is little research that examines the patient's subjective experience of nutrition support. This study investigated the experiences of PEG tube feeding in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radical treatment. Conventional Q-methodology was used with 15 head and neck cancer patients, who rank-ordered 36 statements according to the extent to which these reflected their experiences of PEG tube feeding. The sorted statements were factor-analysed case-wise to provide clusters of similar experiences. Three perspectives emerged. Factor 1, labelled 'Constructive cognitive appraisal', focused around positive adaptation to, and acceptance of, PEG feeding. Factor 2, labelled 'Cognitive-affective dissonance', reflected ambivalence between cognitive acceptance and affective rejection of the PEG tube. Factor 3, labelled 'Emotion-focused appraisal', was characterised by tube-focused anxiety and fear. The findings broadly confirm Levanthal et al.'s Self-Regulatory Model of coping and support the need for genuine and individualised patient-centred nutritional care. PMID:22329827

  12. Translation and validation of the German version of the Bournemouth Questionnaire for Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soklic Marina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical outcome measures are important tools to monitor patient improvement during treatment as well as to document changes for research purposes. The short-form Bournemouth questionnaire for neck pain patients (BQN was developed from the biopsychosocial model and measures pain, disability, cognitive and affective domains. It has been shown to be a valid and reliable outcome measure in English, French and Dutch and more sensitive to change compared to other questionnaires. The purpose of this study was to translate and validate a German version of the Bournemouth questionnaire for neck pain patients. Methods German translation and back translation into English of the BQN was done independently by four persons and overseen by an expert committee. Face validity of the German BQN was tested on 30 neck pain patients in a single chiropractic practice. Test-retest reliability was evaluated on 31 medical students and chiropractors before and after a lecture. The German BQN was then assessed on 102 first time neck pain patients at two chiropractic practices for internal consistency, external construct validity, external longitudinal construct validity and sensitivity to change compared to the German versions of the Neck Disability Index (NDI and the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD. Results Face validity testing lead to minor changes to the German BQN. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient for the test-retest reliability was 0.99. The internal consistency was strong for all 7 items of the BQN with Cronbach α's of .79 and .80 for the pre and post-treatment total scores. External construct validity and external longitudinal construct validity using Pearson's correlation coefficient showed statistically significant correlations for all 7 scales of the BQN with the other questionnaires. The German BQN showed greater responsiveness compared to the other questionnaires for all scales. Conclusions The German BQN is a valid and

  13. The burden of neck pain: its meaning for persons with neck pain and healthcare providers, explored by concept mapping

    OpenAIRE

    van Randeraad-van der Zee, Carlijn H.; Beurskens, Anna J. H. M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Pool, Jan J. M.; Batterham, Roy W.; Osborne, Richard H; de Vet, Henrica C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To empirically define the concept of burden of neck pain. The lack of a clear understanding of this construct from the perspective of persons with neck pain and care providers hampers adequate measurement of this burden. An additional aim was to compare the conceptual model obtained with the frequently used Neck Disability Index (NDI). Methods Concept mapping, combining qualitative (nominal group technique and group consensus) and quantitative research methods (cluster analysis and mu...

  14. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coskun, H.H.; Medina, J.E.; Robbins, K.T.; Silver, C.E.; Strojan, P.; Teymoortash, A.; Pellitteri, P.K.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Stoeckli, S.J.; Shaha, A.R.; Suarez, C.; Hartl, D.M.; Bree, R. de; Takes, R.P.; Hamoir, M.; Pitman, K.T.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.

    2015-01-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore, nonsur

  15. Neck Strength, Position Sense, and Motion in Military Helicopter Crew With and Without Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A.H. van den Oord; V. de Loose; J.K. Sluiter; M.H.W. Frings-Dresen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Neck pain in military helicopter pilots and rear aircrew is an occupational health problem that may interfere with flying performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in the physical abilities of the cervical spines of helicopter pilots and rear air

  16. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Head and Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    In medicine, an eponym is a word-typically referring to an anatomic structure, disease, or syndrome-that is derived from a person's name. Medical eponyms are ubiquitous and numerous. They are also at times controversial. Eponyms reflect medicine's rich and colorful history and can be useful for concisely conveying complex concepts. Familiarity with eponyms facilitates correct usage and accurate communication. In this article, 22 eponyms used to describe anatomic structures of the head and neck are discussed. For each structure, the author first provides a biographical account of the individual for whom the structure is named. An anatomic description and brief discussion of the structure's clinical relevance follow. PMID:27283070

  17. [Head and neck cancer--history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Anna; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Szyfter, Witold; Florek, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    According to epidemiological data head and neck cancers constitute for 12% of all malignancies in the world. It is estimated that a total of 400 000 cases of the mouth and throat and of 160 000 cases of laryngeal cancer, 300 000 people die each year. History of head and neck cancers developed and underwent many changes at the turn of the century. Treatment, pathogenesis and possessed state of knowledge on the subject has changed. Starting from the ancient times there were texts on how to treat and examine patients. The Edwin Smith and Ebers Papyrus are two of the oldest medical documents describing the treatment of cancer patients. Hippocrates was the first person who used the word "cancer" and probably he was the first who divided the tumors into benign and malignant. In a document known as the Doctrine of Hippocrates he described skin cancer and cancer treatments. Over the next centuries, medical science did not develop because of religious concerns about autopsy and surgical procedures. The 17th century is a period in which there were a lot of new information about how to treat such oral cancer. Cancer of the tongue was removed by cauterization, which in the 18th century was replaced by the use of surgical instruments. In the same age glossectomy has been accepted as the treatment of choice performed in the treatment of cancer. The 19th century brought a major breakthrough in the treatment of surgical, diagnostic, anesthetic techniques and understanding of the pathological mechanisms. Histological evaluation of tumors has become mandatory and standard practice in the assessment of cancer. Laryngectomy and neck lymph nodes removal has become commonplace. Modified Radical Neck Dissection (MRND), became popularized as another cancer treatment technique. Describing ways to treat cancer, radiotherapy can not be ignored - there are several new techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and hypofractionation currently used. Chemotherapy and the

  18. Computer tomographic anatomy of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.

    1984-01-01

    The structures in the neck which can be recognised by computer tomography, and their course, is described. The cartilagenous larynx and trachea, the oesophagus, thyroid, sternocleidomastoid muscle, common carotid arteries and internal jugular veins can be recognised regularly. In addition, one can identify smaller muscles, vessels and nerves, such as the sterno-hyoid, omo-hyoid, anterior and medial scalenus muscles, the superior and inferior thyroid arteries and the suprascapular, internal thoracic and vertebral arteries, the thyro-cervical trunk and the vagus and phrenic nerves. An accurate knowledge of the anatomy is essential for the recognition of enlarged parathyroid glands.

  19. Superplasticity in titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    J. Sieniawski; Motyka, M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper reports characteristic of superplasticity phenomenon in titanium alloys and possibility of its applications.Design/methodology/approach: The main objective of the paper is to show features of superplastic forming of titanium alloys and current research trends aiming at widespread application of this technology.Findings: In the paper characteristic of selected superplastic titanium alloys was presented. The effect of microstructural parameters on superplasticity was consider...

  20. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  1. The role of FDG PET in management of neck metastasis from head-and-neck cancer after definitive radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The role of neck dissection after definitive radiation for head-and-neck cancer is controversial. We select patients for neck dissection based on postradiation therapy (post-RT), computed tomography (CT), and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). We summarize the clinical outcomes of patients treated with this policy to further elucidate the role of FDG PET in decision making for neck dissection after primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 1999 and February 2004, 53 eligible patients were identified. These patients had stage N2A or higher head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and had complete response of the primary tumor after definitive radiation with or without chemotherapy. PET or computed tomography (CT) scans were performed within 6 months after treatment. Neck dissection was performed in patients with residual lymphadenopathy (identified by clinical examination or CT) and a positive PET scan. Those without residual lymph nodes and a negative PET were observed without neck dissection. For patients with residual lymphadenopathy, but a negative PET scan, neck dissection was performed at the discretion of the attending surgeon and decision of the patient. There was a total of 70 heminecks available for analysis (17 patients had bilateral neck disease). Results: There were 21 heminecks with residual lymphadenopathy identified on CT imaging or clinical examination and negative PET. Of these, 4 had neck dissection and were pathologically negative. The remaining 17 were observed without neck dissection. There was a total of 42 heminecks without residual lymph nodes on post-RT CT imaging or clinical examination with a negative PET. They were also observed without neck dissection. Seven heminecks had a positive PET scan and residual lymphadenopathy. Six of them had neck dissection and 1 had fine-needle aspiration of a residual node; 3 contained residual viable cancer and 4 were pathologically negative. At

  2. Measurement properties of translated versions of neck-specific questionnaires: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vet Henrica C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several disease-specific questionnaires to measure pain and disability in patients with neck pain have been translated. However, a simple translation of the original version doesn't guarantee similar measurement properties. The objective of this study is to critically appraise the quality of the translation process, cross-cultural validation and the measurement properties of translated versions of neck-specific questionnaires. Methods Bibliographic databases were searched for articles concerning the translation or evaluation of the measurement properties of a translated version of a neck-specific questionnaire. The methodological quality of the selected studies and the results of the measurement properties were critically appraised and rated using the COSMIN checklist and criteria for measurement properties. Results The search strategy resulted in a total of 3641 unique hits, of which 27 articles, evaluating 6 different questionnaires in 15 different languages, were included in this study. Generally the methodological quality of the translation process is poor and none of the included studies performed a cross-cultural adaptation. A substantial amount of information regarding the measurement properties of translated versions of the different neck-specific questionnaires is lacking. Moreover, the evidence for the quality of measurement properties of the translated versions is mostly limited or assessed in studies of poor methodological quality. Conclusions Until results from high quality studies are available, we advise to use the Catalan, Dutch, English, Iranian, Korean, Spanish and Turkish version of the NDI, the Chinese version of the NPQ, and the Finnish, German and Italian version of the NPDS. The Greek NDI needs cross-cultural validation and there is no methodologically sound information for the Swedish NDI. For all other languages we advise to translate the original version of the NDI.

  3. Corrosion resistant amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publication data on corrosion resistance of amorphous alloys and the methods of amorphization of surface layers of massive materials (laser treatment, iron implantation, detonation-gas spraying, cathode and ion sputtering, electrodeposition) was made. A study was made on corrosion properties of Fe66Cr11B10Si4 alloy in cast state and after laser irradiation, rendering the surface amorphous as well as the samples of Arenco iron and steel 20 with ion-plasma coatings of Fe-Cr-Ni-Ti alloy. It was established that amorphous coatings posses much higher corrosion resistance as compared to crystalline alloys on the same base

  4. Corrosion Analysis of an Experimental Noble Alloy on Commercially Pure Titanium Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortagaray, Manuel Alberto; Ibañez, Claudio Arturo Antonio; Ibañez, Maria Constanza; Ibañez, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the Noble Bond® Argen® alloy was electrochemically suitable for the manufacturing of prosthetic superstructures over commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) implants. Also, the electrolytic corrosion effects over three types of materials used on prosthetic suprastructures that were coupled with titanium implants were analysed: Noble Bond® (Argen®), Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®), and commercially pure titanium. Materials and Methods: 15 samples were studied, consisting in 1 abutment and one c.p. titanium implant each. They were divided into three groups, namely: Control group: five c.p Titanium abutments (B&W®), Test group 1: five Noble Bond® (Argen®) cast abutments and, Test group 2: five Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®) abutments. In order to observe the corrosion effects, the surface topography was imaged using a confocal microscope. Thus, three metric parameters (Sa: Arithmetical mean height of the surface. Sp: Maximum height of peaks. Sv: Maximum height of valleys.), were measured at three different areas: abutment neck, implant neck and implant body. The samples were immersed in artificial saliva for 3 months, after which the procedure was repeated. The metric parameters were compared by statistical analysis. Results: The analysis of the Sa at the level of the implant neck, abutment neck and implant body, showed no statistically significant differences on combining c.p. Ti implants with the three studied alloys. The Sp showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. The Sv showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. Conclusion: The effects of electrogalvanic corrosion on each of the materials used when they were in contact with c.p. Ti showed no statistically significant differences. PMID:27733875

  5. Evaluation of dried salted pork ham and neck quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Kunová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was analysed chemical and physical parameters of dried salted pork ham and neck. Dry-cured meat is a traditional dry-cured product obtained after 12 - 24 months of ripening under controlled environmental conditions.  Ham and neck was salted by nitrite salt mixture during 1 week. Salted meat products were dried at 4 °C and relative humidity 85% 1 week after salting. The quality of dry-cured meat is influenced by the processing technology, for example length of drying and ripening period. The average moisture of dried salted pork ham was 63.77% and dried salted pork neck was 59.26%. The protein content was 24.87% in dried salted pork ham and significantly lower (20.51% in dried salted pork neck. The value of intramuscular fat in dried salted pork ham was 4.97% and 14.40% in dried salted pork neck. The salt content was 5.39% in dried salted pork ham and 4.83% in dried salted pork neck. The cholesterol content was 1.36 g.kg-1 in dried salted pork ham and significant lower in dried salted pork neck (0.60 g.kg-1. The value of lightness was 44.36 CIE L* in dried salted pork ham and significantly lower in dried salted pork neck (40.74 CIE L*. The pH value was 5.84 in dried salted pork ham and 5.80 in dried salted pork neck. The shear work was 9.99 kg.s-1 in dried salted pork ham and 6.34 in dried salted pork neck. The value of water activity (aw was 0.929 in dried salted pork ham and similar 0.921 in dried salted pork neck

  6. Giant Arteriovenous Malformation of the Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Dieng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arteriovenous malformations (AVM have a wide range of clinical presentations. Operative bleeding is one of the most hazardous complications in the surgical management of high-flow vascular malformations. In the cervical region, the presence of vital vascular structures, such as the carotid artery and jugular vein, may increase this risk. This is a case of massive arteriovenous malformation deforming the neck and the face aspect of this aged lady and growing for several years. A giant mass of the left neck occupied the carotid region and the subclavian region. The AVM was developed between the carotid arteries, jugular veins, and vertebral and subclavian vessels, with arterial and venous flux. The patient underwent surgery twice for the cure of that AVM. The first step was the ligation of the external carotid. Seven days later, the excision of the mass was done. In postoperative period the patient presented a peripheral facial paralysis which completely decreased within 10 days. The first ligation of the external carotid reduces significantly the blood flow into the AVM. It permitted secondarily the complete ablation of the AVM without major bleeding even though multiple ligations were done.

  7. Manual of head and neck imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, Prashant [Maryland University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mukherjee, Sugoto [Virginia University Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Div. of Neuroradiology; Jameson, Mark J. [Virginia University Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Div. of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology; Wintermark, Max [Virginia University Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Medical Imaging

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read short chapters. Tables, checklists, and algorithms to assist in arriving at a quick diagnosis. Clinical pearls that will enable the radiologist to issue a relevant report. One-stop resource when preparing for radiology and otolaryngology exams. Line diagrams to illustrate key concepts. This book is designed as an easily readable manual that will be of great practical value for radiology and otolaryngology residents during their clinical rotations. Key facts on head and neck imaging are presented in short chapters written in an easily readable style. Line drawings are used to illustrate key concepts, and tables, checklists, and algorithms will enable the readers to arrive at a quick diagnosis. In addition, emphasis is placed on clinical pearls that will assist them in preparing suitable reports. The Manual of Head and Neck Imaging is sized to allow residents to read it completely within a matter of days, and it will also serve as an ideal quick reference guide as different clinical situations arise.

  8. Femoral neck version affects medial femorotibial loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, T A; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch; Karamoulas, V; Magnissalis, E A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (-10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  9. Photodynamic therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H Nelke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a special type of treatment involving the use of a photosensitizer or a photosensitizing agent along with a special type of light, which, combined together, induces production of a form of oxygen that is used to kill surrounding cells in different areas of the human body. Specification of the head and neck region requires different approaches due to the surrounding of vital structures. PDT can also be used to treat cells invaded with infections such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. The light beam placed in tumor sites activates locally applied drugs and kills the cancer cells. Many studies are taking place in order to invent better photosensitizers, working on a larger scale and to treat deeply placed and larger tumors. It seems that PDT could be used as an alternative surgical treatment in some tumor types; however, all clinicians should be aware that the surgical approach is still the treatment of choice. PDT is a very accurate and effective therapy, especially in early stages of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC, and can greatly affect surgical outcomes in cancerous patients. We present a detailed review about photosensitizers, their use, and therapeutic advantages and disadvantages.

  10. Resonance and Neck Length for a Spherical Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Corning

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the neck length of a spherical resonator and its period of fundamental resonance was investigated. This was done by measuring the frequency of fundamental resonance of the resonator at 6 different neck lengths. It was found that its resonance resembled Helmholtz resonance but was not that of ideal Helmholtz resonance.

  11. The Blue Neck Syndrome : Nematode Larvae in Skin Scrapings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugathan P

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel non-inflammatory type of pigmentation of the neck associated with nematode larvae on affected skin is described. The name ′Blue neck syndrome′ is suggested for this condition because of the characteristic clinical appearance. Antinematode agents such as albendazole and neem oil have been found to be effective in the treatment.

  12. Surgery versus conservative care for neck pain: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); S.M. Rubinstein (Sidney); R.W.J.G. Ostelo (Raymond); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); W.C. Peul (Wilco); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: General practitioners refer patients with continued neck pain that do not respond well to conservative care frequently to secondary care for further assessment. Are surgical interventions to the cervical spine effective when compared to conservative care for patients with neck

  13. EVALUATION OF NECK SHAFT ANGLE OF FEMUR ON DRY BONES

    OpenAIRE

    Radha; Ravi Shankar; Naveen; Roopa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of the neck shaft angle of femur helps to understand clinical relevance in bio mechanics of the hip joint. It helps for the better treatment of different pathological conditions of hip and femur and also to design prosthesis. Femoral neck shaft angle is important to convey the information regarding the race to ...

  14. Contribution to the method for determining femoral neck axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Femoral neck axis plotting is of great significance in measuring parameters that define femoral head-neck junction sphericity in the group of patients with the femoroacetabular impingement. Literature methods of femoral neck axis determination have weaknesses associated with the risk of obtaining inaccurate values of certain parameters. Objective. Method of plotting of the femoral neck axis by two parallel lines that belong to the medial quarter of the femoral neck is proposed. Method was tested on the anatomic specimens and the respective radiograms. Methods. A total of 31 anatomic specimens of the proximal femur and respective radiographs were used, on which three axes of the femoral neck were plotted; accordingly, alpha angle value was determined and tested with corresponding parametric tests, with the measurement error of less than 5% and the strength of the applied tests of 80%. Results. Alpha angle values obtained by plotting femoral neck axis using the literature and methods we have proposed were not significantly different in our series, and, in more than a half of the specimens, the two axes overlapped each other. Conclusion. The advantage of the proposed method does not depend on the position of the femoral head rotation center in relation to the femoral neck, which favors proposed method for measuring the angles of femoral head sphericity in patients with the femoral head translation. Disadvantage of the study is a small sample size for valid conclusions about the applicability of this method in clinical practice.

  15. Gene therapy in head and neck cancer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Chisholm, E; Bapat, U.; Chisholm, C; Alusi, G.; Vassaux, G

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy for cancer is a rapidly evolving field with head and neck squamous cell cancer being one of the more frequently targeted cancer types. The number of clinical trials in the UK is growing and there is already a commercially available agent in China. Various gene therapy strategies along with delivery mechanisms for targeting head and neck cancer are reviewed.

  16. Therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alshadwi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Botulinum neurotoxin therapy provides viable alternatives to traditional treatment modalities for some conditions affecting the head and neck region that have neurological components. This therapy can overcome some of the morbidities associated with conventional therapy. More research is needed to determine the ideal doses of botulinum neurotoxin to treat different diseases affecting the head and neck regions.

  17. Head and Neck Teratomas in Children: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravarti, Arunabh; Shashidhar, T. B.; Naglot, Shakuntala; J K Sahni

    2011-01-01

    Teratomas of the head and neck due to their obscure origin, bizarre microscopic appearance, unpredictable behaviour and often dramatic clinical presentation are a clinical surprise. This article focuses on pediatric head and neck teratomas and on their diversity and rarity and also reviews the recent terminology of this group of tumours.

  18. Exercise therapy for trismus in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Sterken, M.W.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.; Pater, R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively effects of exercise therapy on trismus related to head and neck cancer or as a consequence of its treatment, and to compare these effects with trismus not related to head and neck cancer. Medical records of patients referred to the department of p

  19. Deep-neck space infections - a diagnostic dilemma!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shraddha; Kumar, Sunil; Kumar, Nishant; Puttewar, M P; Nagpure, P S

    2008-12-01

    Deep Neck Space Infections (DNI) are a potentially life threatening condition. This paper highlights the importance of their early diagnosis and early intervention. The deep-neck space infections may be odontogenic in origin. The severe airway compromise caused by them may make diagnosis difficult. Suspicion of simultaneous occurrence of tetanus and retropharyngeal space infection in a child can further increase the dilemma.

  20. Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation? Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Flores Nogueira Diniz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition, joined with the study of recycling, remaking, and every form of retelling. The film deals with the attempt by the scriptwriter Charles Kaufman, cast by Nicholas Cage, to adapt/translate a non-fictional book to the cinema, but ends up with a kind of film which is by no means what it intended to be: a film of action in the model of Hollywood productions. During the process of creation, Charles and his twin brother, Donald, undergo a series of adventures involving some real persons from the world of film, the author and the protagonist of the book, all of them turning into fictional characters in the film. In the film, adaptation then signifies something different from itstraditional meaning. The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition

  1. Copper-tantalum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  2. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  3. Thermofluency in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is presented about the theoretical and experimental results obtained at present in thermofluency under radiation in zirconium alloys. The phenomenon of thermofluency is presented in a general form, underlining the thermofluency at high temperature because this phenomenon is similar to the thermofluency under radiation, which ocurrs in zirconium alloys into the operating reactor. (author)

  4. Developing prospects of NiAlMn high temperature shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reason and information on high temperature shape memory alloy research are introduced briefly Also, referring to some experimental reports on NiAlMn high temperature shape memory alloy, it is pointed out that ductility and memory property of this alloy can be improved by adapting proper composition and procedure to control its microstructure. Meanwhile, the engineering details must be considered when NiAlMn high temperature shape memory alloy being developed so as to resolve the problems of its practical use

  5. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  6. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  7. A pain in the neck--a review of deep space neck infections in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, T; Mullarkey, C; O'Donnell, J

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of prevertebral abscess in a 37-year-old male, presenting with a 2-day history of neck pain radiating to the right shoulder. We also review the current literature relating to the presentation and the emergency management of deep neck space infections.

  8. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  9. Alloys in energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new and advanced energy systems often requires the tailoring of new alloys or alloy combinations to meet the novel and often stringent requirements of those systems. Longer life at higher temperatures and stresses in aggressive environments is the most common goal. Alloy theory helps in achieving this goal by suggesting uses of multiphase systems and intermediate phases, where solid solutions were traditionally used. However, the use of materials under non-equilibrium conditions is now quite common - as with rapidly solidified metals - and the application of alloy theory must be modified accordingly. Under certain conditions, as in a reactor core, the rate of approach to equilibrium will be modified; sometimes a quasi-equilibrium is established. Thus an alloy may exhibit enhanced general diffusion at the same time as precipitate particles are being dispersed and solute atoms are being carried to vacancy sinks. We are approaching an understanding of these processes and can begin to model these complex systems

  10. Assembly force and taper angle difference influence the relative motion at the stem-neck interface of bi-modular hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haschke, Henning; Jauch-Matt, Sabrina Y; Sellenschloh, Kay; Huber, Gerd; Morlock, Michael M

    2016-07-01

    Bi-modular hip arthroplasty prostheses allow adaptation to the individual patient anatomy and the combination of different materials but introduce an additional interface, which was related lately to current clinical issues. Relative motion at the additional taper interface might increase the overall risk of fretting, corrosion, metallic debris and early failure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the assembly force influences the relative motion and seating behaviour at the stem-neck interface of a bi-modular hip prosthesis (Metha(®); Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany) and whether this relation is influenced by the taper angle difference between male and female taper angles. Neck adapters made of titanium (Ti6Al4V) and CoCr (CoCr29Mo) were assembled with a titanium stem using varying assembly forces and mechanically loaded. A contactless eddy current measurement system was used to record the relative motion between prosthesis stem and neck adapter. Higher relative motion was observed for Ti neck adapters compared to the CoCr ones (p < 0.001). Higher assembly forces caused increased seating distances (p < 0.001) and led to significantly reduced relative motion (p = 0.019). Independent of neck material type, prostheses with larger taper angle difference between male and female taper angles exhibited decreased relative motion (p < 0.001). Surgeons should carefully use assembly forces above 4 kN to decrease the amount of relative motion within the taper interface. Maximum assembly forces, however, should be limited to prevent periprosthetic fractures. Manufacturers should optimize taper angle differences to increase the resistance against relative motion. PMID:27170535

  11. Adaptive test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lars Peter; Eriksen, Mette Rose

    2010-01-01

    Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale.......Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale....

  12. Strategic Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of theoretical contributions that have influenced the discourse around strategic adaptation including contingency perspectives, strategic fit reasoning, decision structure, information processing, corporate entrepreneurship, and strategy process. The related...... concepts of strategic renewal, dynamic managerial capabilities, dynamic capabilities, and strategic response capabilities are discussed and contextualized against strategic responsiveness. The insights derived from this article are used to outline the contours of a dynamic process of strategic adaptation....... This model incorporates elements of central strategizing, autonomous entrepreneurial behavior, interactive information processing, and open communication systems that enhance the organization's ability to observe exogenous changes and respond effectively to them....

  13. Adaptive management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  14. Reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emami, B.; Bignardi, M.; Spector, G.J.; Devineni, V.R.; Hederman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ninety-nine patients with recurrent cancers of the head and neck region were treated with surgery, radiation therapy, or combination therapy. The follow-up period ranged from 18 months to 18 years. An initial overall complete response rate of 67% and a partial response rate of 7% (overall response rate-74%) were achieved. The eventual tumor control rate was 15%. Although equal initial response rates were achieved in recurrences at the primary site and the cervical nodes, the eventual local control was better for the former (21% vs. 10%). Patients receiving less than 5,000 rad radiotherapy had a 44% complete response and an 11% eventual tumor control. Patients receiving over 5,000 rad had an 80% complete response and a 25% eventual tumor control.

  15. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, B.A.

    1982-04-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is an uncommon neoplasm that is seen in the head and neck area. Since the symptoms of rhabdomyosarcoma, such as aural discharge and nasal obstruction, mimic common disease states, the clinical diagnosis is often delayed. Case reports and a literature review are presented to emphasize the clinical and roentgenological findings in rhabdomyosarcoma. Misinterpretation of microscopic findings can delay the histological diagnosis. Cross-striations, the hallmark of rhabdomyosarcoma, are not always found, while racquet and spindle cells may be seen. Special stains and electron microscopy can assist the pathologist. The pathological findings of the different variants of rhabdomyosarcoma and a review of cases accessioned by the A.F.I.P. Otolaryngic Registry are presented. Early diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma is important because the disease, once inevitably fatal, can now be controlled and apparently cured in most cases by a combination of surgery, radiation, and multidrug chemotherapy. This therapeutic approach, its results, complications, and support measures are considered.

  16. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head

  17. Sex differences in heritability of neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Hartvigsen, Jan; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    Experimental studies have suggested biological factors as a possible explanation for gender disparities in perception of pain. Recently, heritability of liability to neck pain (NP) has been found to be statistically significantly larger in women compared to men. However, no studies have been...... conducted to determine whether the sex differences in heritability of NP are due to sex-specific genetic factors. Data on lifetime prevalence of NP from a population-based cross-sectional survey of 33,794 Danish twins were collected and age-stratified univariate biometrical modeling using sex......-limitation models was performed based on 10,605 dizygotic (DZ) twins of opposite sex to estimate the qualitative sex differences. In a full sex-limitation model the genetic component in females were higher than in males, but the genetic and the shared environmental correlations were equal to what is normally...

  18. Radiotherapeutic management of head and neck neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgery and radiation therapy are the established curative treatment modalities for carcinoma in the head and neck region. Assuming a comparable cure rate, the advantages of irradiation may include the absence of a major operation and its mortality (1% - 2%), the avoidance of tissue loss, without functional or cosmetic defect, and the fact that the surgical salvage of irradiation failure is on the whole more successful than vice versa. However, medically infirm or elderly patients are often referred for irradiation. One must be aware of the fact that the lengthy course of irradiation (6 - 8 weeks) and its side effects may be more draining on the patients than an operation which may require 1 - 2 weeks of hospital stay

  19. Metrology and detonics: analysis of necking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, G.; Etchessahar, B.; Lagrange, J.-M.; Voltz, C.; Hild, F.; Roux, S.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of the experiment discussed in the present paper is to study the deformation of a structure (here a copper cylinder) induced by explosives. During its expansion, the (initially 3-mm thick) cylinder keeps on thinning until fracture appears. Some tens of microseconds before failure, strain localization occurs, which induces mechanical necking. In order to characterize the time for the onset of localization and the necking development, two diagnostic techniques are designed to provide images: one based on X ray observations (for total thickness variations) and a second consisting in 25 stereoscopic acquisitions at about 400,000 frames per second. The latter enables us to estimate the three dimensional shape changes of the cylinder with time. The 3D reconstructions from the single X radiograph and stereoscopic films are described. Both techniques require calibration as a first stage. For the X view, a self calibration is performed in order to convert X measurements (a radiographic stack with 12 detection levels) to total dose in rad using a flashlight on a steel mock-up with calibrated defects. For stereovision, a controlled calibration object is used. The second stage is the reconstruction. For X radiographs, the results of a 2D hydrodynamic computation of the expansion at radiographic time coupled with an X photon transport code provide us an estimate of the scatter field and allow us to perform attenuation evaluations of copper alone, and to estimate its thickness. In stereovision, the reconstruction is achieved by an image correlation software which exploits the random patterns marking on the object outer surface.

  20. [Plasmacytomas of the head and neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, E; Marzetti, A; Palma, O; Pezzuto, R W

    1996-02-01

    Neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells results in a population of immunologically homogeneous cells that can produce diffuse (multiple myeloma) or localized (extramedullary plasmacytomas and solitary plasmacytoma of bone) disease. In otorhinolaryngologic literature these neoplasms are rarely described and their nosological arrangement is often confused. The presence of a plasma cell neoplasm can be a surprise and sometimes a diagnostic challenge to the head and neck surgeon. Proper management of such lesions needs to be individualized according to their expected biologic behaviour. The recent observation of a case of maxillary sinus plasmacytoma suggested the Authors to carefully review the literature, drawing their attention mainly on the current histogenetic hypotheses and their consequences in therapeutic strategy. The correct diagnostic procedure is also explained, highlighting the difficulties due to both the protean nature of the disease and the still existing nosological confusion. The possibility of a plasma cell tumour should be never forgotten in presence of an head and neck neoplasm. Because these neoplasms may signal the presence of multiple mieloma, full evaluation is required to exclude disseminated disease. In light of recent histogenetic acquisitions it is suggested that extramedullary plasmacytomas can be classified among the so-called "mucosa-associated" lymphomas. Possible following differences in therapeutic approach and long-term follow-up are also indicated, stressing the role of surgery in managing these disorders. Surgical excision of extramedullary plasmacytomas followed by complementary radiotherapy on the site of tumour is proposed as the best treatment for these kind of neoplasms. This is in opposition with "classical" statement considering radiotherapy the only treatment for this kind of disorders. PMID:8984843

  1. Shoulder morbidity after non-surgical treatment of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Reports on shoulder function after non-surgical treatment are not available. In the present study shoulder morbidity after surgical and non-surgical treatment of the neck is determined and compared. Materials and methods: In 100 head and neck cancer patients 174 neck sides were treated by surgery (n = 51) or (chemo)radiation (n = 123). Abduction, anteflexion, endorotation and exorotation were assessed. Subjective measurements were performed using the Visual Analogue Scale for pain, the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) and stiffness reporting. Results: Predictive factors for SDQ-score > 0 (n = 54) were VAS pain score, stiffness, abduction, anteflexion, physiotherapy, low shoulder position and surgical treatment. The SDQ, stiffness and pain scores were significantly higher in the surgically treated group than in the non-surgical group (p < 0.01). Anteflexion, abduction and exorotation were less impaired in the non-surgically treated group than in the surgically treated group (p < 0.01). No differences between neck dissection and neck dissection with post-operative radiotherapy, and radiotherapy and chemoradiation were found for these movements. Conclusions: Shoulder morbidity is often present after non-surgical treatment of the neck, but to a lesser extent compared to surgical treatment. Radiotherapy adds no morbidity to neck dissection and chemotherapy does not add extra morbidity to primary radiation

  2. Turnover in intracranial aneurysm phantoms: its relation to neck size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Tae Sub; Lee, Young Jun [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Yoon Chul [School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineerig, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-11-01

    To evaluate the physiologic background of aneurysms poorly visualized during 3D-TOF MRA, contrast-enhanced MRA (CEMRA) and DSA due to hemodynamic isolation. Using handmade elastic silicon phantoms to represent terminal basilar tip aneurysms, 3D-TOF MRA, CEMRA and DSA were used to determine blood turnover. Aneurysmal neck size was 2 mm and 10 mm, and the use of a pulsatile pump also helped recreate human physiologic parameters. We compared the results with those of computational fluid dynamics. DSA images of the narrow-necked aneurysm showed that a small volume of contrast medium washed into it during the systolic phase. As the width of its neck increased, the turnover volume of fragments of contrast bolus also increased. At CEMRA, the broad-necked aneurysm was visualized as the main bolus of Gd-DTPA passed through it, and at delayed CEMRA, the narrow-necked aneurysm was visualized faintly after the passage of bolus Gd-DTPA. The results correlated closely with those of 3D-TOF MRA and computational fluid dynamics. The visualization of intracranial aneurysms at 3D-TOF MRA, CEMRA and DSA was greatly dependent upon blood turnover, which varied according to aneurysmal neck size. A narrow-necked aneurysm might be missed at 3D-TOF MRA, CEMRA and DSA due to hemodynamic isolation.

  3. Change in neck circumference after shoulder arthroscopy: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrividya Chellam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Shoulder arthroscopy requires fluid irrigation, which causes soft-tissue oedema around chest, neck, and arm intraoperatively, leading to postoperative airway complications. We decided to study the incidence of increase in the neck circumference in shoulder arthroscopy and its effects on the airway. Methods: We studied 32 cases of shoulder arthroscopies over a period of 1-year, performed under general anaesthesia with interscalene block. The neck circumference of patients before and after the procedure was measured along with other parameters. The endotracheal tube cuff was deflated at the end of surgery to determine air leak around the tube. The negative leak test suggested airway oedema. Results: Thirty out of 32 patients showed positive air leak test. The average change in neck circumference was 1.17 ± 1.16 cm and all could be extubated uneventfully. Two showed negative leak test with an increase in neck circumference by 4.5 and 6.4 cm and were not extubated. Multiple regression analysis for risk factors showed intraoperative hypertension as a single predictor for an increase in neck circumference. Conclusion: Change in the neck circumference beyond 4 cm may suggest airway compromise and below 4 cm, airway compromise is unlikely even in the presence of extensive soft-tissue oedema around the shoulder, upper arm and chest.

  4. Treatment for pyriform sinus carcinoma with N2 neck metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, Hirokazu; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Fujii, Takashi; Kurita, Tomoyuki; Akahane, Homare; Saeki, Nobuo; Nishiyama, Kinji; Sato, Takeo [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Clinical and therapeutic data were reviewed from the records of 80 consecutive patients with N2-3 pyriform sinus carcinoma treated at our institution from 1989 to 1998. All of the patients were previously untreated. Tumor stages were 5 for T1, 21 for T2, 28 for T3, and 26 for T4. The overall 5-year crude survival rates for the patients treated surgically, and the patients irradiated postoperatively were 24.1 and 53.4%, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p<0.087) but showed possibility that postoperative radiation therapy decreased neck recurrence. Uncontrolled neck disease and/or distant metastasis occurred in both groups with high incidence; in the latter group, however, less uncontrolled neck disease occurred. These results suggest that postoperative radiation is advisable to improve the prognosis and control neck disease. In addition, 10 patients with T1-2N2-3 pyriform sinus carcinoma, who were irradiated for the primary tumors and the necks after neck dissection, were reviewed. In eight of those patients, control of neck disease was successful. The therapy led to laryngeal preservation without disease in 6 patients. Considering quality of life (QOL) of laryngeal preservation, this can be a useful therapeutic option. (author)

  5. Treatment of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-qiang; HAN Yi-sheng; LI Xin-kui; LI Ming-quan; WEI Yi-yong; WU Zi-xiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics, treatment options and causes of misdiagnosis of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures. Methods: Among 20 patients with ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, 19 were treated operatively and 1 was treated conservatively. Sixteen cases of femoral shaft fractures were treated by open reduction and internal fixation with compressive plate, and 2 cases were treated with interlocking intramedullary nailing. Eighteen femoral neck fractures were treated with cannulated screws. Another patient was treated with proximal femoral nail to fix both the neck and shaft. Delayed diagnosis for femoral neck frac tures occurred in 2 cases preoperatively. Results: A total of 19 patients were followed up. The follow up period ranged from 5 to 48 months with an average of 15 months. All the fractures were healed. Conclusion: For case of femoral shaft fracture caused by high energy injury, an AP pelvic film should be routinely taken. Once the femoral neck fracture is recognized, operative reduction and fixation should be performed in time. Femoral neck and shaft fractures should be fixed separately.

  6. Management of the neck in maxillary sinus carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Laura; Shah, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review To discuss and review the role for elective treatment of the neck in maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. Improvements in survival have been seen due to improved local therapies and control, therefore the treatment of the neck has become a topic of debate. Recent findings The risk of occult metastases in neck nodes is higher for T 3-4 tumors. The rate of nodal relapse in the N0 neck without elective treatment is 8-15%. With elective irradiation the nodal relapse rate decreases. However, most nodal relapses are accompanied by local failure or distant disease. Local failure remains the most common site of failure and cause of death in this patient population. Summary Treatment failure occurs overall in 62% of all patients, with local recurrence by far the most common site of treatment failure which is rarely amenable to salvage therapy. Therefore elective neck irradiation is not routinely indicated in the clinically N0 neck; those who recur only in the neck can be surgically salvaged more than 50% of the time. PMID:25692625

  7. EVALUATION OF NECK SHAFT ANGLE OF FEMUR ON DRY BONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evaluation of the neck shaft angle of femur helps to understand clinical relevance in bio mechanics of the hip joint. It helps for the better treatment of different pathological conditions of hip and femur and also to design prosthesis. Femoral neck shaft angle is important to convey the information regarding the race to which they belong. Hence the present study was under taken to determine the neck shaft angle of femur in humans. OBJECTIVE: 1. To correct the different types of deformity and to have a normal good walking Mechanism. 2. To know the recent methodology and attempt to evaluate the range of normal Angles of femora and their sex differences. METHODS: ANTHROPOMETRIC: 100 Adult dry bones were studied and analyzed . The neck shaft angle of femur was measured by tracing outlines of contours of all femora. RESULTS: The neck shaft angle of the femur have revealed that there is no much difference in between males and females. There was slightly higher 0.2° in females. INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSION: There was no significant gender difference in neck shaft angle. The Knowledge of knowing the neck shaft angle helps to understand the Biomechanics of the hip joint and also for better treatment of pathological condition of hip and femur.

  8. Sentinel node biopsy in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Gary L; Soutar, David S; Gordon MacDonald, D;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to determine the reliability and reproducibility of sentinel node biopsy (SNB) as a staging tool in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for T1/2 clinically N0 patients by means of a standardized technique. METHODS: Between June 1998 and June 2002, 227 SNB...... sectioning and immunohistochemistry, with a follow-up of at least 12 months. In 79 cases SNB alone was used to stage the neck carcinoma, and in 55 cases SNB was used in combination with an elective neck dissection (END). RESULTS: In 125/134 cases (93%) a sentinel node was identified. Of 59 positive nodes, 57...

  9. Fenestrated internal jugular vein: a rare finding in neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Sánchez, M; Hernández Vila, C; González-García, R; Monje, F

    2015-09-01

    Fenestration of the internal jugular vein (IJV) is an extremely rare phenomenon. An 85-year-old woman was referred to our department with T2N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the right floor of the mouth. The patient underwent local resection, an ipsilateral modified type 3 radical neck dissection, and microsurgical reconstruction. During neck dissection, a fenestration was observed in the middle of the IJV. No structure passed through the fenestration. Such anatomical variations are rare, but clinicians and surgeons should be aware of them in order to avoid damage to the important vascular structures, especially if a neck dissection is performed.

  10. Tuberculosis in the head and neck - a forgotten differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, S., E-mail: vaids@vsnl.co [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Grant Medical Foundation, Pune (India); Lee, Y.Y.P. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Rawat, S.; Luthra, A.; Shah, D. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Grant Medical Foundation, Pune (India); Ahuja, A.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hongkong, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of the present review is to illustrate the pathogenesis and imaging findings of tuberculosis in specific head and neck regions to avoid pitfalls in diagnosis. It is imperative to be aware of, and provide an early diagnosis for, extra-pulmonary tubercular lesions in the head and neck. A high index of suspicion combined with an appropriate clinical setting serves as an important background to diagnose tubercular lesions in the head and neck region and differentiate them from malignancy and other disease entities. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent irreversible and debilitating complications and mortality from disseminated tuberculosis.

  11. Unusual presentation of a radial neck fracture in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Poduval

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture of the radial neck are uncommon injuries. In children, they may present as radial neck fractures, a components of forearm fracture dislocations, or as isolated fracture dislocations. Here, we present an unusual and previously undescribed variant of radial neck fracture with dislocation of the radial head to the medial side and ulnar nerve injury. The fracture dislocation was openly reduced and fixed with a small fragment plate. The fracture healed with some loss of rotational movements. At short followup of 6 months patient had useful elbow function but ulnar nerve did not recover.

  12. Injuries to the head and neck in Homer's Odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Ghaly, Ghaly Adly; Azari, Afroditi

    2016-07-01

    The Odyssey and the Iliad are the most prominent works of ancient Greek epic poetry, and we have retrieved injuries to the head and neck mentioned in the Odyssey. We studied the texts both in ancient Greek and the translations in modern Greek and English and searched for references to trauma to the head and neck. We recorded the injuries, the attacker and defender, the weapons used, the site, and the result. There were 11 injuries of the head and neck, nine of which were fatal. PMID:26586491

  13. Deep Neck Space Infection Caused by Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji-Su; Kim, Su-Gwan; You, Jae-Seek; Min, Hong-Gi; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Eun-Sik; Kim, Cheol-Man; Lim, Kyung-Seop

    2014-03-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign cystic intraosseous tumor of odontogenic origin. An infection of a KCOT is not common because KCOT is a benign developmental neoplasm. Moreover, a severe deep neck space infection with compromised airway caused by infected KCOT is rare. This report presents a 60-year-old male patient with a severe deep neck space infection related to an infected KCOT due to cortical bone perforation and rupture of the exudate. Treatment of the deep neck space infection and KCOT are reported.

  14. The structural kinetics of switch-1 and the neck linker explain the functions of kinesin-1 and Eg5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muretta, Joseph M; Jun, Yonggun; Gross, Steven P; Major, Jennifer; Thomas, David D; Rosenfeld, Steven S

    2015-12-01

    Kinesins perform mechanical work to power a variety of cellular functions, from mitosis to organelle transport. Distinct functions shape distinct enzymologies, and this is illustrated by comparing kinesin-1, a highly processive transport motor that can work alone, to Eg5, a minimally processive mitotic motor that works in large ensembles. Although crystallographic models for both motors reveal similar structures for the domains involved in mechanochemical transduction--including switch-1 and the neck linker--how movement of these two domains is coordinated through the ATPase cycle remains unknown. We have addressed this issue by using a novel combination of transient kinetics and time-resolved fluorescence, which we refer to as "structural kinetics," to map the timing of structural changes in the switch-1 loop and neck linker. We find that differences between the structural kinetics of Eg5 and kinesin-1 yield insights into how these two motors adapt their enzymologies for their distinct functions.

  15. Associations among temporomandibular disorders, chronic neck pain and neck pain disability in computer office workers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragatto, M M; Bevilaqua-Grossi, D; Regalo, S C H; Sousa, J D; Chaves, T C

    2016-05-01

    Neck pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint among computer office workers. There are several reports about the coexistence of neck pain and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, there are no studies investigating this association in the context of work involving computers. The purpose of this study was to verify the association between TMD and neck pain in computer office workers. Fifty-two female computer workers who were divided into two groups: (i) those with self-reported chronic neck pain and disability (WNP) (n = 26) and (ii) those without self-reported neck pain (WONP) (n = 26), and a control group (CG) consisting of 26 women who did not work with computers participated in this study. Clinical assessments were performed to establish a diagnosis of TMD, and craniocervical mechanical pain was assessed using manual palpation and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The results of this study showed that the WNP group had a higher percentage of participants with TMD than the WONP group (42·30% vs. 23·07%, χ(2) = 5·70, P = 0·02). PPTs in all cervical sites were significantly lower in the groups WNP and WONP compared to the CG. Regression analysis revealed TMD, neck pain and work-related factors to be good predictors of disability (R(2) = 0·93, P workplace conditions. Consequently, this study attempted to emphasise the importance of considering work activity for minimising neck pain-related disability. PMID:26732204

  16. Psychological Care, Patient Education, Orthotics, Ergonomics and Prevention Strategies for Neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gross, Anita R; Kaplan, Faith; Huang, Stacey;

    2013-01-01

    To conduct an overview on psychological interventions, orthoses, patient education, ergonomics, and 1⁰/2⁰ neck pain prevention for adults with acute-chronic neck pain.......To conduct an overview on psychological interventions, orthoses, patient education, ergonomics, and 1⁰/2⁰ neck pain prevention for adults with acute-chronic neck pain....

  17. Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

  18. Fracture performance of high strength steels, aluminium and magnesium alloys during plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of uniaxial tension tests were performed for 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys, AZ31B magnesium alloy, TRIP600 and DP600 steels, to obtain a better understanding of their fracture performance. Scanning electron microscope (SEM observation of the microstructure evolution was conducted. The dimple structure, orientation relationship between the fracture surface and tensile direction, necking behavior were analyzed. The fracture mechanism and fracture mode of each material was discussed in detail. The results show that TRIP600 steel is subject to a typical inter-granular ductile fracture combined by shear fracture. DP600 steel belongs to mainly ductility mixed with normal fracture. Both 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys are subject to a mixed ductility fracture and brittle fracture. AA5052 and AA6061 belong to a typical shear fracture and a normal fracture, respectively. Magnesium AZ31B is typical of a brittle fracture combined with normal fracture.

  19. Adaptation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, Saleemul

    2011-11-15

    Efforts to help the world's poor will face crises in coming decades as climate change radically alters conditions. Action Research for Community Adapation in Bangladesh (ARCAB) is an action-research programme on responding to climate change impacts through community-based adaptation. Set in Bangladesh at 20 sites that are vulnerable to floods, droughts, cyclones and sea level rise, ARCAB will follow impacts and adaptation as they evolve over half a century or more. National and international 'research partners', collaborating with ten NGO 'action partners' with global reach, seek knowledge and solutions applicable worldwide. After a year setting up ARCAB, we share lessons on the programme's design and move into our first research cycle.

  20. Adaptive ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berth, Mette

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of an adaptive ethnography when studying such phenomena as young people's use of mobile media in a learning perspective. Mobile media such as PDAs and mobile phones have a number of affordances which make them potential tools for learning. However, before we begin...... formal and informal learning contexts. The paper also proposes several adaptive methodological techniques for studying young people's interaction with mobiles....... to design and develop educational materials for mobile media platforms we must first understand everyday use and behaviour with a medium such as a mobile phone. The paper outlines the research design for a PhD project on mobile learning which focuses on mobile phones as a way to bridge the gap between...

  1. Hedonic "adaptation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available People live in a world in which they are surrounded by potential disgust elicitors such as ``used'' chairs, air, silverware, and money as well as excretory activities. People function in this world by ignoring most of these, by active avoidance, reframing, or adaptation. The issue is particularly striking for professions, such as morticians, surgeons, or sanitation workers, in which there is frequent contact with major disgust elicitors. In this study, we study the ``adaptation'' process to dead bodies as disgust elicitors, by measuring specific types of disgust sensitivity in medical students before and after they have spent a few months dissecting a cadaver. Using the Disgust Scale, we find a significant reduction in disgust responses to death and body envelope violation elicitors, but no significant change in any other specific type of disgust. There is a clear reduction in discomfort at touching a cold dead body, but not in touching a human body which is still warm after death.

  2. Adaptive noise

    OpenAIRE

    Viney, Mark; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    In biology, noise implies error and disorder and is therefore something which organisms may seek to minimize and mitigate against. We argue that such noise can be adaptive. Recent studies have shown that gene expression can be noisy, noise can be genetically controlled, genes and gene networks vary in how noisy they are and noise generates phenotypic differences among genetically identical cells. Such phenotypic differences can have fitness benefits, suggesting that evolution can shape noise ...

  3. Adaptable positioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the circuits and programs in assembly language, developed to control the two DC motors that give mobility to a mechanical arm with two degrees of freedom. As a whole, the system is based in a adaptable regulator designed around a 8 bit microprocessor that, starting from a mode of regulation based in the successive approximation method, evolve to another mode through which, only one approximation is sufficient to get the right position of each motor. (Author) 22 fig. 6 ref

  4. Refractory alloy component fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of this report is to describe joining procedures, primarily welding techniques, which were developed to construct reliable refractory alloy components and systems for advanced space power systems. Two systems, the Nb-1Zr Brayton Cycle Heat Receiver and the T-111 Alloy Potassium Boiler Development Program, are used to illustrate typical systems and components. Particular emphasis is given to specific problems which were eliminated during the development efforts. Finally, some thoughts on application of more recent joining technology are presented. 78 figures

  5. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  6. Radiotherapy for head and neck cancer in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Elderly patients with head and neck cancer may not be treated aggressively with radiotherapy, due to concerns regarding tolerance of treatment and toxicity. A retrospective study was undertaken of patients aged 80 years and over, treated by definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Material and methods: 98 patients aged 80-92 received radiotherapy for carcinoma of the head and neck between 1991 and 1995. All patients received beam directed radiotherapy with radical intent using an immobilisation shell. Results: Cancer specific survival was 59% and overall local control was 70% at 5 years. Both were significantly affected by T stage and site of disease. Cancer specific survival was comparable to that of patients aged below 80 years. Seven patients died within 6 months of the treatment. Three patients developed severe late toxicity. Metastatic disease occurred in eight patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a beneficial and well tolerated treatment in elderly patients with carcinoma of the head and neck

  7. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complications, the oncologist will work closely with your dentist and may refer you to other health professionals ... the head or neck. Make sure that your dentist knows your health history and the cancer treatments ...

  8. Role of Met Axis in Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yiru, E-mail: xuyiru@umich.edu; Fisher, Gary J., E-mail: xuyiru@umich.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-26

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer worldwide. Despite advances in aggressive multidisciplinary treatments, the 5-year survival rate for this dreadful disease is only 50%, mostly due to high rate of recurrence and early involvement of regional lymph nodes and subsequent metastasis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for invasion and metastasis is one of the most pressing goals in the field of head and neck cancer. Met, also known as hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR), is a member of the receptor protein tyrosine kinase (RPTK) family. There is compelling evidence that Met axis is dysregulated and plays important roles in tumorigenesis, progression, metastasis, angiogenesis, and drug resistance in head and neck cancer. We describe in this review current understanding of Met axis in head and neck cancer biology and development of therapeutic inhibitors targeting Met axis.

  9. Advances in otolaryngology-Head and neck surgery. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, E.N. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Bluestone, C.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 sections. The section titles are: The impact of AIDS on otolaryngology--head and neck surgery; The management of sleep apneas and snoring; Antimicrobial agents for infections in the ear, nose, and throat--head and neck; Nasal allergy: Medical and surgical treatment; Uses of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in temporal bone imaging; Surgical management of otitis media with effusion; middle ear reconstruction: Current status; Cochlear implants: an overview; Diagnosis and management of acute facial paralysis; The use of the laser in head and neck surgery; The management and prevention of subglottic stenosis in infants and children; Management of the mass in the thyroid; Suction-assisted lipectomy of the head and neck area; and Ambulatory surgery.

  10. The Trail Inventory of Mason Neck NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  11. [Tissue expansion in head and neck regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, P G; Marconi, F; Pistorale, T; Cavina, C

    1994-01-01

    The Authors describe their experience with the use of 56 tissue expanders implanted in the head and neck regions of 45 patients observed in a follow-up of an average of 25 months. They emphasize the various possibilities of reconstructive surgery with the use of tissue expanders and the different mental approach required in order to organize surgical when this technique is employed. The criteria used in the selection of the type of tissue expanders is outlined and useful advice concerning the formulation of a surgical plan which employs the most favourable approach in making to avoid poor functional or aesthetic results or secondary complications is presented. Furthermore the surgical technique used to obtain adequate pockets for the insertion of tissue expanders in the different anatomical areas of the head and neck is described. The Authors affiem that in order to avoid damage to the surrounding neurovascular structures and to obtain good tissue expansion, the correct level of dissection is imperative. The options of using different anatomical areas during reconstructive surgery are discussed. For example, the insertion of a tissue expander in the forehead permits the availability of a large amount of usable tissue during nasal reconstruction, thus leaving the donor area without tension and with minimal scarring. Many different causes of baldness can be treated with the use of tissue expanders, such as posttraumatic injury, burns or infections. Tissue expansion can be utilized in the cheek area for the reconstruction of the lower eyelids, the paranasal and the mandibular area. Tissue expanders used in the cervical area can be utilized for reconstructive surgery of the lower lip or the mandibular area. In addition, the Authors discuss possible complications of this technique such as infection, suture distension and tissue expander extrusion. Recommendations are discussed in order to prevent these major complications. Having reviewed their personal experience the

  12. Head-neck-radiology; Kopf-Hals-Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohnen, Mathias (ed.) [Staedtische Kliniken Neuss Lukaskrankenhaus GmbH (Germany). Institut fuer klinische Radiologie

    2012-11-01

    The book on head-neck-radiology covers the following issues: (1) Methodic fundamentals: conventional radiography, angiography, sonography, computerized tomography, digital volume tomography, NMR imaging, nuclear medicine. (2) Base of the skull. (3) Petrous bone. (4) Pharynx. (5) Paranasal sinuses. (6) Eye socket. (7) Temporomandibular joint. (8) Salivary gland. (9) Oral cavity. (19) Parynx. (11) Neck soft tissue and lymph nodes. (12) Thyroid and parathyroid. (13) Teeth and jaw. (14) Interventions.

  13. Clinicopathological correlates of pediatric head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta Subhabrata; Pal Ranabir

    2009-01-01

    Background : The spectrum of head and neck tumors in children continues to be the cause of diverse, diagnostically challenging issues. Aims : To demonstrate and compare the unique clinicopathological features in our study population and their correlations with the final histopathological diagnosis. Methods : Fifty-three children with head and neck cancer were examined thoroughly at the Otorhinolaryngology department in a tertiary care teaching hospital followed by histopathological studies...

  14. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TMJ DISORDER AND HEAD AND NECK POSTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Sesi R. Puspita Dewi; Laura Susanti Himawan; Lindawati Khusdany

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders may be caused by variety of factors; one of which is the posture of head and neck. However, this remains controversial and a subject of debate by experts. The objective of this study was to know whether there was a relation between temporomandibular disorders and the head and neck posture seen radiographically. Subjects were 40 dental students from University of Indonesia who met the inclusion criteria, selected through questionnaire, and subjective examinati...

  15. A rare cystic lesion of the neck: parathyroid cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplanoglu, Veysel; Kaplanoglu, Hatice; Cılız, Deniz Sözmen; Duran, Semra

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid cysts are rarely observed neck masses. Their physical examination is not specific and preoperative diagnosis is usually difficult. Imaging findings and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration with hormone analysis evaluation are important diagnostic criteria. A 48-year-old female patient admitted to our hospital with a symptom of swelling on the left side of the neck was diagnosed with parathyroid cyst by imaging methods (ultrasonography, MRI, parathyroid scintigraphy) and labora...

  16. Femoral neck radiography: effect of flexion on visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garry, S.C. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Walter C Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Jhangri, G.S. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. Public Health Sciences, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Lambert, R.G.W. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept.of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Walter C Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)]. E-mail: rglamber@cha.ab.ca

    2005-06-15

    To determine whether flexion improves radiographic visualization of the femoral neck when the femur is externally rotated. Five human femora, with varying neck-shaft and anteversion angles, were measured and immobilized. Degree of flexion required to bring the femoral neck horizontal was measured, varying the rotation. Next, one bone was radiographed in 16 positions, varying rotation in 15{sup o} and flexion in 10{sup o} increments. Radiographs were presented in randomized blinded fashion to 15 staff radiologists for scoring of femoral neck visualization. Following this, all 5 bones were radiographed in 4 positions of rotation and at 0{sup o} and 20{sup o} flexion, and blinded randomized review of radiographs was repeated. Comparisons between angles and rotations were made using the Mann-Whitney test. The flexion angle required to bring the long axis of the femoral neck horizontal correlated directly with the degree of external rotation ({rho} < 0.05). Visualization of the femoral neck in the extended position progressively deteriorated from 15{sup o} internal rotation to 30{sup o} external rotation ({rho} <0.01). However, when 20{sup o} flexion was applied to bones in external rotation, visualization significantly improved at 15{sup o} ({rho} <0.05) and 30{sup o} ({rho} <0.01). Flexion of the externally rotated femur can bring the femoral neck into horizontal alignment, and a relatively small amount (20{sup o}) of flexion can significantly improve radiographic visualization. This manoeuvre could be useful for radiography of the femoral neck when initial radiographs are inadequate because of external rotation of the leg. (author)

  17. Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin Wolfgang; Ito Shigeki; Ivancic Paul C; Valenson Arnold J; Coe Marcus P; Ndu Anthony B; Tominaga Yasuhiro; Panjabi Manohar M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of whiplash-exposed human cervical spine ligaments. Additiona...

  18. ROLE OF MULTIDETECTOR CT IN EVALUATION OF NECK LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Mathur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To find out the role of multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of neck lesions with respect to evaluation of the size, location and extent of tumour. Extension of tumour infiltrating into surrounding vascular and visceral structures. To correlate the findings of MD-CT with final diagnosis by biopsy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Data for the study was collected from patients with suspected neck lesions attending Department of Radio-diagnosis, J.L.N. Medical College and Associated Group of Hospitals, Ajmer, Rajasthan. A prospective study was conducted over a period (From 1st March 2014 to 31 Aug. 2015 on patients with clinically suspected neck lesions or patients who were diagnosed to have neck lesion on ultrasound and were referred to CT for further characterisation. The patients presented with symptoms of palpable neck mass and neck pain. Patients were evaluated using multidetector CT. A provisional diagnosis was made after CT scan and these findings were correlated with histopathology/surgical findings as applicable. RESULT In the present study, 97 out of 100 cases were correctly characterised by computed tomography giving an accuracy of 97%. One case of buccal carcinoma was wrongly diagnosed as benign lesion and another case of malignant lymph node was inaccurately diagnosed as benign lymph node, also another case of benign lymph node was inaccurately diagnosed as malignant lymph node. CONCLUSION Multidetector Computed Tomography of the neck has improved the localisation and characterisation of neck lesions. Accurate delineation of disease by CT scan provides a reliable preoperative diagnosis, plan for radiotherapy ports and posttreatment followup. However, histopathology still remains the gold standard as CT is not 100% accurate.

  19. A Rare Cause of Fetal Neck Mass: Cervical Lymphangioma

    OpenAIRE

    Hicran Acar; Işıl Turan Bakırcı; Basak Baksu; Orkun Cetin; Mertihan Kurdoglu

    2016-01-01

    ntroduction: Fetal neck masses are rare. In general, cystic hygroma is the most frequent form of fetal neck masses. It is essential to differentiate between different pathologies since this will affect prenatal counselling, antenatal and postnatal management. We aimed to present a case of cervical lymphangioma who was referred to our perinatology outpatient clinic with a diagnosis of an occipital encephalocele. Case Presentation: A 26-year-old nulliparous woman was referred to our perinato...

  20. Penetrating nontorso trauma: the head and the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G

    2015-08-01

    Acute penetrating injuries to the head and neck cause considerable anxiety for most clinicians owing to concern for airway control and neurologic injury and to limited clinician experience in most centres. This article discusses an organized approach to the evaluation and initial treatment of penetrating injuries to the head and neck based on regional anatomy and clinical examination. The approach is particularly helpful in the context of ongoing hemorrhage and/or airway compromise.

  1. Brodie's abscess of the femoral neck simulating osteoid osteoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Yash; Maheshwari, Aditya V

    2007-10-01

    Subacute osteomyelitis (Brodie's abscess) is essentially a problem of diagnosis, and there may be considerable difficulty in distinguishing it from other benign and malignant bone lesions. Though reported in the metaphyseal region of the femur, Brodie's abscess is rarer in the femoral neck. The authors present a case of Brodie's abscess in the femoral neck, which clinico-radiologically simulated an osteoid osteoma. Retrospectively, the presence of a cortical sinus tract should have aroused suspicion.

  2. Prediction of three dimensional maximum isometric neck strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fice, Jason B; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    We measured maximum isometric neck strength under combinations of flexion/extension, lateral bending and axial rotation to determine whether neck strength in three dimensions (3D) can be predicted from principal axes strength. This would allow biomechanical modelers to validate their neck models across many directions using only principal axis strength data. Maximum isometric neck moments were measured in 9 male volunteers (29±9 years) for 17 directions. The 3D moments were normalized by the principal axis moments, and compared to unity for all directions tested. Finally, each subject's maximum principal axis moments were used to predict their resultant moment in the off-axis directions. Maximum moments were 30±6 N m in flexion, 32±9 N m in lateral bending, 51±11 N m in extension, and 13±5 N m in axial rotation. The normalized 3D moments were not significantly different from unity (95% confidence interval contained one), except for three directions that combined ipsilateral axial rotation and lateral bending; in these directions the normalized moments exceeded one. Predicted resultant moments compared well to the actual measured values (r2=0.88). Despite exceeding unity, the normalized moments were consistent across subjects to allow prediction of maximum 3D neck strength using principal axes neck strength.

  3. Femoral neck radiography: effect of flexion on visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether flexion improves radiographic visualization of the femoral neck when the femur is externally rotated. Five human femora, with varying neck-shaft and anteversion angles, were measured and immobilized. Degree of flexion required to bring the femoral neck horizontal was measured, varying the rotation. Next, one bone was radiographed in 16 positions, varying rotation in 15o and flexion in 10o increments. Radiographs were presented in randomized blinded fashion to 15 staff radiologists for scoring of femoral neck visualization. Following this, all 5 bones were radiographed in 4 positions of rotation and at 0o and 20o flexion, and blinded randomized review of radiographs was repeated. Comparisons between angles and rotations were made using the Mann-Whitney test. The flexion angle required to bring the long axis of the femoral neck horizontal correlated directly with the degree of external rotation (ρ o internal rotation to 30o external rotation (ρ o flexion was applied to bones in external rotation, visualization significantly improved at 15o (ρ o (ρ o) of flexion can significantly improve radiographic visualization. This manoeuvre could be useful for radiography of the femoral neck when initial radiographs are inadequate because of external rotation of the leg. (author)

  4. A Rare Cause of Fetal Neck Mass: Cervical Lymphangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicran Acar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: Fetal neck masses are rare. In general, cystic hygroma is the most frequent form of fetal neck masses. It is essential to differentiate between different pathologies since this will affect prenatal counselling, antenatal and postnatal management. We aimed to present a case of cervical lymphangioma who was referred to our perinatology outpatient clinic with a diagnosis of an occipital encephalocele. Case Presentation: A 26-year-old nulliparous woman was referred to our perinatology clinic at 38 weeks’ gestation with an ultrasound diagnosis of occipital encephalocele so that postnatal surgery could be planned at our hospital. During obstetric ultrasonography examination, we identified a 4.7×4.5 cm, multiloculated cystic mass on the left lateral side of the fetal neck. The provisional diagnosis was lymphangioma. Fetal magnetic resonance (MR revealed a multiloculated cystic mass with smooth counters of 4.5×3.5×3.0 cm in size, originating from the soft tissues of the left side of the neck and it was not connected with the cervical spinal canal. The pathology report confirmed cervical lymphangioma. Conclusions: We would like to highlight the importance of differential diagnosis and follow up scans for any neck mass identified during scan to reach the final accurate diagnosis. This will enable that fetal neck masses could be diagnosed correctly in a more cautious manner.

  5. 3D-conformal-intensity modulated radiotherapy with compensators for head and neck cancer: clinical results of normal tissue sparing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koscielny Sven

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the potential of parotic gland sparing of intensity modulated radiotherapy (3D-c-IMRT performed with metallic compensators for head and neck cancer in a clinical series by analysis of dose distributions and clinical measures. Materials and methods 39 patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck irradiated using 3D-c-IMRT were evaluable for dose distribution within PTVs and at one parotid gland and 38 patients for toxicity analysis. 10 patients were treated primarily, 29 postoperatively, 19 received concomittant cis-platin based chemotherapy, 20 3D-c-IMRT alone. Initially the dose distribution was calculated with Helax ® and photon fluence was modulated using metallic compensators made of tin-granulate (n = 22. Later the dose distribution was calculated with KonRad ® and fluence was modified by MCP 96 alloy compensators (n = 17. Gross tumor/tumor bed (PTV 1 was irradiated up to 60–70 Gy, [5 fractions/week, single fraction dose: 2.0–2.2 (simultaneously integrated boost], adjuvantly irradiated bilateral cervical lymph nodes (PTV 2 with 48–54 Gy [single dose: 1.5–1.8]. Toxicity was scored according the RTOG scale and patient-reported xerostomia questionnaire (XQ. Results Mean of the median doses at the parotid glands to be spared was 25.9 (16.3–46.8 Gy, for tin graulate 26 Gy, for MCP alloy 24.2 Gy. Tin-granulate compensators resulted in a median parotid dose above 26 Gy in 10/22, MCP 96 alloy in 0/17 patients. Following acute toxicities were seen (°0–2/3: xerostomia: 87%/13%, dysphagia: 84%/16%, mucositis: 89%/11%, dermatitis: 100%/0%. No grade 4 reaction was encountered. During therapy the XQ forms showed °0–2/3: 88%/12%. 6 months postRT chronic xerostomia °0–2/3 was observed in 85%/15% of patients, none with °4 xerostomia. Conclusion 3D-c-IMRT using metallic compensators along with inverse calculation algorithm achieves sufficient parotid gland sparing in virtually all advanced

  6. Hemodynamic Responses to Head and Neck Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Carbo, Jorge E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide head and neck cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objective of this study was to measure the scalp temperature and circulatory responses during use of one commercially available thermal control system. The Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used in this study. Two EEG electrodes and one skin temperature transducer were placed on the anterior midline of the scalp to measure the scalp blood and temperature. Blood flow was measured using a bipolar impedance rheograph. Ten subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature, were tested at high, medium, moderate, moderate-low and low coolant temperatures. Scalp blood flow was recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Scalp temperature and cooling helmet Inlet temperature was logged periodically during the test period. This study quantifies the effect of head cooling upon scalp temperature and blood flow. These data may also be used to select operational specifications of the head cooling system for biomedical applications such as the treatment of migraine headaches, scalp cooling during chemotherapy, and cooling of multiple sclerosis patients.

  7. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W.; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV−) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC. PMID:27527216

  8. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-08-05

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV-) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC.

  9. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV-) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC. PMID:27527216

  10. Effects of scapular stabilization exercise on neck posture and muscle activation in individuals with neck pain and forward head posture

    OpenAIRE

    Im, Boyoung; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of scapular stabilization exercise on neck posture, muscle activity, pain, and quality of life in individuals with neck pain and forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen participants were recruited according to the selection criteria and were randomly allocated to the scapular stabilization group (n=8) and the control group (n=7). The scapular stabilization group underwent training for 30 minutes a day, 3 times a w...

  11. Titanium alloys. Advances in alloys, processes, products and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Blenkinsop, P.

    1993-01-01

    The last few years have been a period of consolidation of existing alloys and processes. While the aerospace industry remains the principal driving force for alloy development, the paper illustrates examples of new markets being established in "older" alloys, by a combination of product/process development and a re-examination of engineering design parameters. Considerable attention is still being directed towards the titanium aluminide systems, but other more conventional alloy developments ...

  12. A Promising New Class of High-Temperature Alloys: Eutectic High-Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-08-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility.

  13. 3D Variation in delineation of head and neck organs at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consistent delineation of patient anatomy becomes increasingly important with the growing use of highly conformal and adaptive radiotherapy techniques. This study investigates the magnitude and 3D localization of interobserver variability of organs at risk (OARs) in the head and neck area with application of delineation guidelines, to establish measures to reduce current redundant variability in delineation practice. Interobserver variability among five experienced radiation oncologists was studied in a set of 12 head and neck patient CT scans for the spinal cord, parotid and submandibular glands, thyroid cartilage, and glottic larynx. For all OARs, three endpoints were calculated: the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), the Concordance Index (CI) and a 3D measure of variation (3D SD). All endpoints showed largest interobserver variability for the glottic larynx (ICC = 0.27, mean CI = 0.37 and 3D SD = 3.9 mm). Better agreement in delineations was observed for the other OARs (range, ICC = 0.32-0.83, mean CI = 0.64-0.71 and 3D SD = 0.9-2.6 mm). Cranial, caudal, and medial regions of the OARs showed largest variations. All endpoints provided support for improvement of delineation practice. Variation in delineation is traced to several regional causes. Measures to reduce this variation can be: (1) guideline development, (2) joint delineation review sessions and (3) application of multimodality imaging. Improvement of delineation practice is needed to standardize patient treatments

  14. Semiaquatic adaptations in a giant predatory dinosaur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nizar; Sereno, Paul C; Dal Sasso, Cristiano; Maganuco, Simone; Fabbri, Matteo; Martill, David M; Zouhri, Samir; Myhrvold, Nathan; Iurino, Dawid A

    2014-09-26

    We describe adaptations for a semiaquatic lifestyle in the dinosaur Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. These adaptations include retraction of the fleshy nostrils to a position near the mid-region of the skull and an elongate neck and trunk that shift the center of body mass anterior to the knee joint. Unlike terrestrial theropods, the pelvic girdle is downsized, the hindlimbs are short, and all of the limb bones are solid without an open medullary cavity, for buoyancy control in water. The short, robust femur with hypertrophied flexor attachment and the low, flat-bottomed pedal claws are consistent with aquatic foot-propelled locomotion. Surface striations and bone microstructure suggest that the dorsal "sail" may have been enveloped in skin that functioned primarily for display on land and in water.

  15. INVESTIGATION OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS MACHINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berat Barıs BULDUM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Magnesium alloy developments have traditionally been driven by industry requirements for lightweight materials to operate under increasingly demanding conditions. Magnesium alloys have always been attractive to designers due to their low density, only two thirds that of aluminium and its alloys [1]. The element and its alloys take a big part of modern industry needs. Especially nowadays magnesium alloys are used in automotive and mechanical (trains and wagons manufacture, because of its lightness and other features. Magnesium and magnesium alloys are the easiest of all metals to machine, allowing machining operations at extremely high speed. All standard machining operations such as turning, drilling, milling, are commonly performed on magnesium parts.

  16. INVESTIGATION OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS MACHINABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Berat Barıs BULDUM; Aydın SIK; Iskender OZKUL

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Magnesium alloy developments have traditionally been driven by industry requirements for lightweight materials to operate under increasingly demanding conditions. Magnesium alloys have always been attra...

  17. Productive Machining of Titanium Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Čejka, Libor

    2013-01-01

    This diploma thesis is focused on a productive machining of titanium alloys. At the beginning it deals about titanium and its alloys. It describes chip generation mechanism, tool blunting and surface quality. Further it contains modern strategies of efficient titanium alloys machining. Then it analyzes contemporary manufacturing technology of hinge made of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V in Frentech Aerospace s.r.o. company, and at the end finds possibility of savings by inovation of roughing process.

  18. Ultrasonographic examination of the ventral neck region in cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, U; Föhn, J; Pusterla, N

    1994-01-01

    The position, dimensions, and structure of the thyroid gland, the portion of the esophagus in the neck, the cervical lymph nodes, and the major blood vessels of the neck were determined via ultrasonography in cattle. The left and right ventral neck regions of 30 healthy Swiss Braunvieh cows were examined ultrasonographically, using 3.5- and 5.0-MHz linear transducers and a 3.5-MHz convex transducer. The external jugular vein was situated directly beneath the skin in the upper and middle parts of the neck and 2.7 to 6.6 cm from the body surface in the lower part of the neck. In contrast, the common carotid artery was located further from the body surface along the entire ventral neck region; depending on the measuring point, this distance varied from 2.6 to 10.9 cm. The external jugular vein narrowed from caudad to craniad. The diameter of the common carotid artery remained fairly constant along its course in the ventral part of the neck and varied from 0.9 to 1.4 cm. The thyroid gland was identified via ultrasonography caudodorsal to the larynx. It appeared as an echogenic spindle-shaped structure with finely granular echogenic pattern. The esophagus appeared as a band-shaped structure in longitudinal section, and it could be followed to the thoracic inlet. Its width increased from craniad to caudad, and mean +/- SD diameter was 2.9 +/- 0.23 cm. The medulla, hilus, cortex, and capsule of the cervical lymph nodes could be clearly differentiated via ultrasonography. Mean length and width of the left cervical lymph node were 3.0 +/- 0.45 and 1.8 +/- 0.23 cm, respectively.

  19. Reirradiation in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, Francois; Thariat, Juliette; Daly-Schweitzer, Nicolas

    2011-08-01

    Salvage surgery is the mainstay of treatment for recurrences or secondary primary tumors in areas that were irradiated earlier. However, locoregional recurrence remains the main cause of death after surgery. Adjuvant reirradiation dramatically reduces locoregional recurrences but the risk-benefit ratio seems to be advantageous mostly for residual microscopic disease. In contrast, the rate of distant metastasis among reirradiated patients indicates that the local treatment alone is not sufficient. Full-dose exclusive chemo-reirradiation (over 60 Gy) can cure a subset of patients when surgery is not feasible. However, reirradiation is associated with a significant rate of severe toxicity and should, therefore, be compared with chemotherapy in randomized trials. Accrual may be difficult because of selection biases such as tumor volume, small volumes (largest axis less than 3-4 cm) being more likely to be irradiated. In addition, patients in poor general condition with severe comorbidities, organ dysfunction, or incomplete healing after salvage surgery, are unlikely to benefit from reirradiation. Noteworthy volumes to be reirradiated must be established between the head and neck surgeon and the radiation oncologist: the definition of the clinical target volume should be taken into account, the natural history of recurrent tumors, especially with regard to extension modalities, and the absence of strict correlation between imaging and histological real extension. This is even more critical with the advent of new irradiation techniques. Chemotherapy associations and new radiosensitizing agents are also under investigation. Comparison between reirradiation modalities is difficult because most trials are phase 2 mono-institutional trials. As selection of patients is a key issue, only phase 3 multiinstitutional trials can provide definitive results.

  20. Selective neck dissection in the treatment of pN1/2 neck lymph-node metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Rajko M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction As yet there is no single reliable and accurate method for detection of neck lymph node metastases. Therapeutic approaches differ from one author to other. The aim of this paper was to establish the extent to which, with good control of primary process, we can control spreading of malignant disease by means of selective neck dissection. Material and method This retrospective study included 595 surgically treated patients in the period 1990 - 1998. There were 525 patients with malignant laryngeal tumors, and 70 patients with malignant hypopharyngeal tumors. Preoperative diagnostics of enlarged lymph nodes was based on palpation of the neck without CT, US, NMR diagnostics. With all risky N0 patients, selective neck dissection was performed for presence of occult metastases. Intraoperative frozen section analysis was not performed. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed in all patients in whom presence of neck lymph node metastases was histologically proved. Results Selective lateral neck dissection was performed in 389 (65.4% patients. In 78 (20% patients, lymph node metastases were patohistologically detected. In 5 (6.4% transitional cellular cancer was histologically diagnosed, and the remaining 73 (93.6% presented with squamous cell cancer. Postoperative radiation therapy was applied in 54 patients (69.2% while 24 (30.8% were not irradiated. 5-year survival was achieved in 18 (23.1%, and 3-year survival was achieved in 15 (19.2% patients. Out of 45 patients who lived less than tree year, 18 (40% presented with metastatic relapse and fatal outcome. Relapse of neck metastases appeared in 12 (11.9% on the side and in the zones of lymph nodes which were included in neck dissection. Recurrence of neck metastases appeared in 8.3% of patients who were not irradiated postoperatively and in 32.1% of cases irradiated postoperatively. Discussion This study includes comparison of our results with results of literature data. Conclusion Neck lymph

  1. [Intensity-modulated radiotherapy of head and neck cancers. Dose constraint for spinal cord and brachial plexus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisselier, P; Racadot, S; Thariat, J; Graff, P; Pointreau, Y

    2016-10-01

    Given the ballistic opportunities it offers, intensity-modulated radiotherapy has emerged as the gold standard treatment for head and neck cancers. Protection of organs at risk is one of the objectives of optimization during the planning process. The compliance of dose constraints to the nervous system must be prioritized over all others. To avoid complications, it is recommended to respect a maximum dose of 50Gy to the spinal cord, and 60Gy to the brachial plexus using conventional fractionation of 2Gy per fraction. These constraints can be adapted depending on the clinical situation; they will probably be refocused by the follow-up of the IMRT studies. PMID:27614529

  2. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Mani, Prasanna; Ratndeep, Srivastava

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  3. Adaptive management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Lucy; Campbell, Bruce Morgan; Frost, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in scientific articles, policy documents and management plans, but both understanding and application of the concept is mixed. This paper reviews recent literature from conservation and natural resource management journals to assess diversity in how the term is used, highlight ambiguities and consider how...... a management framework, as well as of identified challenges and pathologies, are needed. Further discussion and systematic assessment of the approach is required, together with greater attention to its definition and description, enabling the assessment of new approaches to managing uncertainty, and AM itself.......Adaptive management (AM) emerged in the literature in the mid-1970s in response both to a realization of the extent of uncertainty involved in management, and a frustration with attempts to use modelling to integrate knowledge and make predictions. The term has since become increasingly widely used...

  4. Stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) addiction: driving force behind head and neck cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Muneyuki; Wakasaki, Takahiro; Toh, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent results of the Cancer Genome Atlas on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) revealed that HNSCC lacked predominant gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes, whereas an essential role for epigenetics in oncogenesis has become apparent. In parallel, it has gained general acceptance that cancer is considered as complex adaptive system, which evolves responding environmental selective pressures. This somatic evolution appears to proceed concurrently with the acquisition of an atavistic pluripotent state (i.e., "stemness"), which is inducible by intrinsic epigenetic reprogramming program as demonstrated by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This Nobel prize-winning discovery has markedly accelerated and expanded cancer stem cell research from the point of epigenetic reprogramming. Taken together, we hypothesize that stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) may be the major driving force of HNSCC evolution. In this perspective, we discuss the possible mechanisms of STAR in HNSCC, focusing on recent topics of epigenetic reprogramming in developmental and cancer cell biology.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking growth rate of TT alloy 690 and its weld joint in simulated PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, some researchers reported that the SCC growth rate (SCCGR) of cold worked thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 was significantly different in heat by heat. But, author has hypothesized that these high SCCGRs in cold worked TT Alloy 690 could be due to the metallurgical characteristics of these heats. In order to confirm this hypothesis, this study has been started in the author's laboratory, and the following 4 new evidences were obtained. First, microcracks of carbides and voids were observed in eutectic M23C6 GB carbides (primary carbides) for cold rolled laboratory heat after as cast or lightly forged condition or for chemical composition simulated Bettis'TT Alloy 690 heat, after cold rolling, before SCC test. However, microcracks in primary carbides along grain boundaries and voids were rarely detected in the cold rolled commercial heat of TT Alloy 690 used for CRDM penetrations. Secondly, the SCCGR observed in TT Alloy 690 was different in each hot working process and each heat. Comparing the SCCGRs for all heats of cold worked TT Alloy 690, the SCCGR decreased with increasing of Vickers hardness. However, in same heats of cold worked TT Alloy 690, the SCCGR increased with increasing of Vickers hardness. Thirdly, the SCCGR in cold rolled TT Alloy 690 should be integrated by the effect of hardness or cold working ratio and by the effect of existing ratio of primary M23C6 carbides with cracks and Voids due to chemical composition and the fabrication process of TT Alloy 690. Fourthly, it is argued that the high SCCGRs in highly cold rolled TT Alloy 690 are not representative of the practical situation with TT Alloy 690 in service for CRDM adapter nozzles etc. The high SCCGR of highly cold rolled TT Alloy 690 is not thought to be an accurate tool in predicting the possibility of cracking of TT Alloy 690 for CRDM adapter nozzles. (author)

  6. Shape Memory Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deexith Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are metals that "remember" their original shapes. SMAs are useful for such things as actuators which are materials that "change shape, stiffness, position, natural frequency, and other mechanical characteristics in response to temperature or electromagnetic fields" The potential uses for SMAs especially as actuators have broadened the spectrum of many scientific fields. The study of the history and development of SMAs can provide an insight into a material involved in cutting-edge technology. The diverse applications for these metals have made them increasingly important and visible to the world. This paper presents the working of shape memory alloys , the phenomenon of super-elasticity and applications of these alloys.

  7. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloyed Burn-resistant Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGPing-ze; XUZhong; HEZhi-yong; ZHANGGao-hui

    2004-01-01

    Conventional titanium alloy may be ignited and burnt under high temperature, high pressure and high gas flow velocity condition. In order to avoid this problem, we have developed a new kind of burn-resistant titanium alloy-double glow plasma surface alloying burn-resistant titanium alloy. Alloying element Cr, Mo, Cu are induced into the Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-1.5Zr-0.25Si substrates according to double glow discharge phenomenon, Ti-Cr ,Ti-Mo, Ti-Cu binary burn-resistant alloy layers are formed on the surface of Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-1.5Zr-0.25Si alloys. The depth of the surface burn-resistant alloy layer can reach to above 200 microns and alloying element concentration can reach 90%. Burn-resistant property experiments reveal that if Cr concentration reach to 14%, Cu concentration reach to 12%, Mo concentration reach to 10% in the alloying layers, ignition and burn of titanium alloy can be effectively avoided.

  8. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloyed Burn-resistant Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ping-ze; XU Zhong; HE Zhi-yong; ZHANG Gao-hui

    2004-01-01

    Conventional titanium alloy may be ignited and burnt under high temperature, high pressure and high gas flow velocity condition. In order to avoid this problem, we have developed a new kind of burn-resistant titanium alloy-double glow plasma surface alloying burn-resistant titanium alloy. Alloying element Cr, Mo, Cu are induced into the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-l.5Zr-0.25Si substrates according to double glow discharge phenomenon, Ti-Cr ,Ti-Mo, Ti-Cu binary burn-resistant alloy layers are formed on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6.5Al-0.3Mo-l.5Zr-0.25Si alloys. The depth of the surface burn-resistant alloy layer can reach to above 200 microns and alloying element concentration can reach 90%.Burn-resistant property experiments reveal that if Cr concentration reach to 14%, Cu concentration reach to 12%, Mo concentration reach to 10% in the alloying layers, ignition and burn of titanium alloy can be effectively avoided.

  9. SIMULATION OF THE CHANGE OF SINTERING NECK BETWEEN TWO GRAINS IN TWO DIMENSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Y. Zhu; S.H. Liang; Z.J. Zhan; P. Xiao; Z.K. Fan

    2006-01-01

    A modified two-sphere model of sintering neck has been proposed, wherein three diffusion mechanisms including surface diffusion, grain-boundary diffusion and coupled surface and grain-boundary diffusion are assumed. Sintering neck is appropriately simulated using the modified model. The dynamic change of sintering neck is presented using the simulation. The variational shape of sintering neck in surface diffusion mechanism is continuous, whereas in grain-boundary diffusion mechanism, besides the variational shape of sintering neck being continuous, the center distance between the particles is also assumed to contract. However, the variational shape of sintering neck in coupling diffusion mechanism is integrated using the two diffusion mechanisms mentioned above.

  10. Misconceived Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis during Management of Myofascial Neck Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Youn; Lim, Jin Hun; Kim, Yong Seok; Kwon, Young Eun; Yu, Jae Yong; Lee, Jun Hak

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of posterior neck pain is very challenging based on symptoms and physical examination only. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is a rare and frequently misdiagnosed entity in various causes of neck pain. It results from calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscle which is characterized by severe neck pain, painful restriction of neck movement, dysphagia, and odynophagia. We herein report a case of a patient with acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis, who complained of posterior neck pain, initially diagnosed and treated as a myofascial neck pain syndrome.

  11. Recent advances and controversies in head and neck reconstructive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuriakose Moni

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in head and neck reconstruction has made significant improvement in the quality of life and resectability of head and neck cancer. Refinements in microsurgical free tissue transfer leave made restoration of form and complex functions of head and region a reality. Standardized reconstructive algorithms for common head and neck defects have been developed with predictable results. Some of the major advances in the field include- sensate free tissue transfer, osseo integrated implant and dental rehabilitation, motorized tissue transfer and vascularized growth center transfer for pediatric mandible reconstruction. However there exist several controversies in head and neck reconstructive surgery. Some are old; resolved partially in the light of recent clinical evidences and others are new, developed as a result of newly introduced reconstructive techniques. These include, primary versus secondary reconstruction, pedicled versus free flaps, primary closure versus free tissue transfer for partial glossectomy defects, reconstruction of posterior mandible and reconstruction of orbital exenteration defects. Rapid advances in the field of tissue engineering and stem cell research is expected to make radical change in the field of reconstructive surgery. This manuscript review progress in head and neck reconstructive surgery during the last decade, current controversies and outline a road map for the future.

  12. Risk of marginal mandibular nerve injury in neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2012-02-01

    The immediate and permanent frequency of injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve (MMN) after neck dissection has only scarcely been addressed in the medical literature. We investigated the risk of injury in 159 consecutive patients after neck dissection for various reasons in level I B and level II A, respectively. In 95 patients with oral cancer 13 (14%) of the cases had malfunction of the lower lip domain 2 weeks after neck dissection in level I B indicating paresis to the MMN. Follow-up analyses 1-2 years after the operation showed permanent paralysis in 4 to 7% of the cases in whom two of them had the nerve sacrificed for oncologic reasons during the operation. In 18 patients with parotic cancer the corresponding permanent frequency of MMN paralysis was 11.1%. In 46 patients with neck dissection in level II A but not in level I B, no paresis of the MMN was registered. Recognition of the MMN during the operation, pre- or postoperative radiation therapy, re-operation for deep hemorrhage, age, gender or postoperative infection did not have any statistically significant influence on the frequency of MMN injury. In conclusion we found a moderate risk of injury to the MMN after neck dissection in level I B whereas the corresponding risk after level II A dissection was negligible. PMID:21553271

  13. Analysis on Femoral Neck Fractures Using Morphological Variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that the femoral morphology has a major correlation to femoral neck fractures(FNF). Previous studies to analyze these correlations have relied on mechanical testing and finite element methods. However, these methods have not been widely applied to various femur samples and models. It is because of the availability of the samples from both patients and cadavers, and also of the geometric limitations in changing the shape of the models. In this study we analyzed femoral neck fractures using a parameterized femoral model that could provide flexibility in changing the geometry of the model for the wide applications of FNF analysis. With the parameterization a variety of models could be generated by changing four major dimensions: femoral head diameter(FHD), femoral neck diameter(FND), femoral neck length(FNL), and neck-shaft angle(NSA). We have performed FEA on the models to compute the stress distributions and reaction forces, and compare them with the data previously generated from mechanical testing. The analysis results indicate that the FND is significantly related with the FNF and the FHD is not significantly related with the FNF

  14. A Review of Direct Neck Measurement in Occupational Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenice J. C. Gil Coury

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available No guidelines are available to orient researchers on the availability and applications of equipment and sensors for recording precise neck movements in occupational settings. In this study reports on direct measurements of neck movements in the workplace were reviewed. Using relevant keywords two independent reviewers searched for eligible studies in the following databases: Cinahal, Cochrane, Embase, Lilacs, PubMed, MEDLINE, PEDro, Scopus and Web of Science. After applying the inclusion criteria, 13 articles on direct neck measurements in occupational settings were retrieved from among 33,666 initial titles. These studies were then methodologically evaluated according to their design characteristics, exposure and outcome assessment, and statistical analysis. The results showed that in most of the studies the three axes of neck movement (flexion-extension, lateral flexion and rotation were not simultaneously recorded. Deficiencies in available equipment explain this flaw, demonstrating that sensors and systems need to be improved so that a true understanding of real occupational exposure can be achieved. Further studies are also needed to assess neck movement in those who perform heavy-duty work, such as nurses and electricians, since no report about such jobs was identified.

  15. Analysis on Femoral Neck Fractures Using Morphological Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Sang; Park, Byoung Keon; Kim, Jay Jung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Je Wook [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    It has been reported that the femoral morphology has a major correlation to femoral neck fractures(FNF). Previous studies to analyze these correlations have relied on mechanical testing and finite element methods. However, these methods have not been widely applied to various femur samples and models. It is because of the availability of the samples from both patients and cadavers, and also of the geometric limitations in changing the shape of the models. In this study we analyzed femoral neck fractures using a parameterized femoral model that could provide flexibility in changing the geometry of the model for the wide applications of FNF analysis. With the parameterization a variety of models could be generated by changing four major dimensions: femoral head diameter(FHD), femoral neck diameter(FND), femoral neck length(FNL), and neck-shaft angle(NSA). We have performed FEA on the models to compute the stress distributions and reaction forces, and compare them with the data previously generated from mechanical testing. The analysis results indicate that the FND is significantly related with the FNF and the FHD is not significantly related with the FNF.

  16. Femoral Neck Shaft Angle in Men with Fragility Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Tuck

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Femoral neck shaft angle (NSA has been reported to be an independent predictor of hip fracture risk in men. We aimed to assess the role of NSA in UK men. Methods. The NSA was measured manually from the DXA scan printout in men with hip (62, 31 femoral neck and 31 trochanteric, symptomatic vertebral (91, and distal forearm (67 fractures and 389 age-matched control subjects. Age, height, weight, and BMD (g/cm2: lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total femur measurements were performed. Results. There was no significant difference in mean NSA between men with femoral neck and trochanteric hip fractures, so all further analyses of hip fractures utilised the combined data. There was no difference in NSA between those with hip fractures and those without (either using the combined data or analysing trochanteric and femoral neck shaft fractures separately, nor between fracture subjects as a whole and controls. Mean NSA was smaller in those with vertebral fractures (129.2° versus 131°: P=0.001, but larger in those with distal forearm fractures (129.8° versus 128.5°: P=0.01. Conclusions. The conflicting results suggest that femoral NSA is not an important determinant of hip fracture risk in UK men.

  17. Clinicopathological correlates of pediatric head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The spectrum of head and neck tumors in children continues to be the cause of diverse, diagnostically challenging issues. Aims : To demonstrate and compare the unique clinicopathological features in our study population and their correlations with the final histopathological diagnosis. Methods : Fifty-three children with head and neck cancer were examined thoroughly at the Otorhinolaryngology department in a tertiary care teaching hospital followed by histopathological studies. Results : Lymphomas were the most common malignant lesions seen followed by rhabdomyosarcomas, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, and others like thyroid carcinomas and eosinophilic granulomas. In the neck, the commonest cause of primary malignant disease was lymphoma; however, the most frequent lesion was reactive lymphadenitis. In the sinonasal region, the commonest malignancy was rhabdomyosarcoma, which often had extension to the orbit and the face. Recurrent epistaxis was found universally in the malignant cases of this region. In the facial region, disfiguring swelling with proptosis was mainly caused by rhabdomyosarcoma. The only case of tonsillar malignancy was due to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The duration of disease was less than 1 year. Conclusion : The most common manifestation of the malignant lesions in the pediatric age group was with a history of an enlarging, painless neck swelling. Still, an insignificant lump in the neck or recurrent bleeding from nose may be the manifestation of an underlying cancer.

  18. Airway management in patients with burn contractures of the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Smita; Mullick, Parul

    2015-12-01

    Airway management of patients with burn contracture of the neck (PBC neck) is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Patient evaluation includes history, physical and airway examination. A safe approach in the airway management of a patient with moderate to severe PBC neck is to secure the airway with the patient awake. The anesthesiologist should have a pre-planned strategy for intubation of the difficult airway. The choices advocated for airway management of such patients include awake fiberoptic-guided intubation, use of intubating laryngeal mask airway, intubation without neuromuscular blocking agents, intubation with neuromuscular blocking agents after testing the ability to ventilate by mask, pre-induction neck scar release under local anesthesia and ketamine or sedation followed by direct laryngoscopy and intubation and video-laryngoscope guided intubation, amongst others. Preparation of the patient includes an explanation of the proposed procedure, sedation, administration of antisialogogues and regional anesthesia of the airway. The various options for intubation of patients with PBC neck, intraoperative concerns and safe extubation are described. Back-up plans, airway rescue strategies and a review of literature on this subject are presented.

  19. Effects of Annealing Process on the Formability of Friction Stir Welded Al-Li Alloy 2195 Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Bradford, Vann; Russell, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Large rocket cryogenic tank domes have typically been fabricated using Al-Cu based alloys like Al-Cu alloy 2219. The use of aluminum-lithium based alloys for rocket fuel tank domes can reduce weight because aluminum-lithium alloys have lower density and higher strength than Al-Cu alloy 2219. However, Al-Li alloys have rarely been used to fabricate rocket fuel tank domes because of the inherent low formability characteristic that make them susceptible to cracking during the forming operations. The ability to form metal by stretch forming or spin forming without excessive thinning or necking depends on the strain hardening exponent "n". The stain hardening exponent is a measure of how rapidly a metal becomes stronger and harder. A high strain hardening exponent is beneficial to a material's ability to uniformly distribute the imposed strain. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a novel annealing process that can achieve a work hardening exponent on the order of 0.27 to 0.29, which is approximately 50% higher than what is typically obtained for Al-Li alloys using the conventional method. The strain hardening exponent of the Al-Li alloy plates or blanks heat treated using the conventional method is typically on the order of 0.17 to 0.19. The effects of this novel annealing process on the formability of friction stir welded Al-Li alloy blanks are being studied at Marshall Space Flight Center. The formability ratings will be generated using the strain hardening exponent, strain rate sensitivity and forming range. The effects of forming temperature on the formability will also be studied. The objective of this work is to study the deformation behavior of the friction stir welded Al-Li alloy 2195 blank and determine the formability enhancement by the new annealing process.

  20. Machining of Titanium Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Karásek, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of this work is the analysis of manufacturing costs for the component of wheel´s blower. Followed by setting up the size of specific cutting force for milling operation of the titanium alloy Ti-Al6-Mo2-Cr2-Fe-Si, the used tool was a milling cutter which is made out of sintered carbide with conical and spherical face. The final values which are at intervals of 1500 to 1800 MPa were compared with the values of the Sandvik Coromant firm kc = 1690 MPa, for titanium alloy with the st...

  1. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of

  2. Galvanic corrosion in odontological alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvanic corrosion can occur when different alloys are placed in direct contact within the oral cavity or within tissues. Concern has been expressed associated with the coupling of selected restorative materials as well as implant material with various alloys used for restorative procedures. This could be critical if the crown or bridge had subgingival finish line with a metallic zone in contact with the tissue, and the implant was made in titanium alloy. The present work shows the results of galvanic coupling studies done on implants of titanium alloy connected to nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys. (Author)

  3. Tensile behavior of orthorhombic α''-titanium alloy studied by in situ X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: To our knowledge, the tensile behavior of single orthorhombic α'' phase was not reported previously. Here we studied a Ti-11%Zr-14%Nb-10%Sn alloy by in situ synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction. It is found that the alloy only contains α'' phase and no phase transformation happens during the whole tensile process. The 'double-yielding' platforms of this alloy are indeed due to a low stress (∼ 400 MPa) yielding followed with a significant work-hardening before necking fracture. In this process, the [0 2 2] orientation of grains more approaches the tensile direction and the [2 0 0] moves to the transverse, causing the lattice parameter a to be shrunk, and b and c elongated, and the formation of texture. The similar texture can also be produced upon cold rolling by which the yield strength of the α'' phase is largely improved to be over 900 MPa. - Abstract: The tensile behavior of a Ti-11%Zr-14%Nb-10%Sn alloy with pure orthorhombic α'' phase was studied by in situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. It is found that no phase transformation happens during the whole tensile process. The 'double-yielding' platforms of this alloy are indeed due to a low stress yielding (∼400 MPa) followed with a significant work-hardening before necking and fracture. In this process, the [0 2 2] orientation of grains more approaches the tensile direction and the [2 0 0] moves to the transverse, causing the lattice parameter a to be shrunk, and b and c elongated, and the formation of texture. The similar texture can also be produced upon cold rolling by which the yield strength of the α' phase is largely improved to be over 900 MPa.

  4. Femoral neck trabecular patterns predict osteoporotic fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we show that texture analysis of femoral neck trabecular patterns can be used to predict osteoporotic fractures. The study is based on a sample of 123 women aged 44-66 years with and without fractures. We analyzed trabecular patterns using the Co-occurrence Matrix texture analysis algorithm and compared the predictive utility of the textural data with densitometry. Logistic regression was used to estimate the predictive utility, exp(B), of clinical and textural data per standard deviation. Reproducibility was also demonstrated using paired films at 1-year intervals (CoV=4.5%). Bone mass estimated by DEXA measurements of the spine and hip were the most predictive of fractures giving a two-fold increase in fractures per s.d. bone mass loss (95% CI: 1.2-3.1, p<0.005). Age was also highly predictive with fracture risk increasing by 1.07-fold per year (95% CI: 1.01-1.14, p<0.02). Trabecular texture was found to give a lower, but significant, prediction of fracture of 1.5-fold per s.d. trabecular pattern loss (95% CI: 0.96-2.31, p<0.05). Combining age, weight, and trabecular texture increased the fracture prediction to 1.78-fold per s.d. (95% CI: 1.19-2.67). Combining trabecular texture with densitometry increased the predictive ability to 2.06-fold per s.d. (95% CI: 1.32-3.22) and combined with age and weight as well increased exp(B) to 2.1-fold per s.d. (95% CI: 1.32-3.35). This shows that osteoporotic trabecular texture changes can be ''measured.'' Moreover, the combination of age, weight, and trabecular texture is more predictive than either alone. We propose therefore that this trabecular texture analysis is both reproducible and clinically meaningful. The application of such methods could be used to improve the estimation of fracture risk in conjunction with other clinical data, or where densitometry data cannot be obtained (e.g., in retrospective studies)

  5. Replacement of alloy 600 by alloy 690 for steam generator tubes and closure heads in PWR; Gains apportes par le changement de materiau dans les generateurs de vapeur et les couvercles de cuve des REP: passage de l'alliage 600 a l'alliage 690

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bioulac, M.; Cipiere, M.F.; Poudroux, G. [FRAMATOME ANP, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Champigny, F.; Mercier, L.; Rouillon, Y.; Vaillant, F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-07-01

    The replacement of alloy 600 by alloy 690 for steam generator tubes, tube plugs and closure head penetrations has well fulfilled its expectation concerning resistance to stress corrosion. The first steam generators fitted with tubes in alloy 690 have been operating for 14 years, the first plugs were set more than 20 years ago and the first closure head equipped with adapters in alloy 690 was installed in 1993. The feedback experience on non-destructive testing for these 3 components have shown no cracks. As a consequence the maintenance program has been reduced. A majority of nuclear power plant operators throughout the world have also selected the alloy 690. (A.C.)

  6. Thyroid shields and neck exposures in cephalometric radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha-Cruz Joana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thyroid is among the more radiosensitive organs in the body. The goal of this study was twofold: (1 to evaluate age-related changes in what is exposed to ionizing radiation in the neck area, and (2 to assess thyroid shield presence in cephalometric radiographs Methods Cephalometric radiographs at one academic setting were sampled and neck exposure was related to calendar year and patient's gender and age. Results In the absence of shields, children have more vertebrae exposed than adults (p Conclusion In the absence of a thyroid shield, children have more neck structure exposed to radiation than adults. In agreement with other reports, thyroid shield utilization in this study was low, particularly in children.

  7. MR evaluation of femoral neck version and tibial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, James Karl; Dwek, Jerry R. [University of California, San Diego, Children' s Hospital and Health Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Pring, Maya E. [Rady Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Abnormalities of femoral neck version have been associated with a number of hip abnormalities in children, including slipped capital femoral epiphysis, proximal femoral focal deficiency, coxa vara, a deep acetabulum and, rarely, developmental dysplasia of the hip. Orthopedic surgeons also are interested in quantifying the femoral neck anteversion or retroversion in children especially to plan derotational osteotomies. Historically, the angle of femoral version and tibial torsion has been measured with the use of radiography and later by CT. Both methods carry with them the risks associated with ionizing radiation. Techniques that utilize MR are used less often because of the associated lengthy imaging times. This article describes a technique using MRI to determine femoral neck version and tibial torsion with total scan times of approximately 10 min. (orig.)

  8. Femoral neck fractures complicating gaucher disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In normal children, fractures of the femoral neck are uncommon and accompany severe trauma and multiple injuries elsewhere in the skeleton. In children with Gaucher disease, a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism, midcervical or basicervical fractures can occur with minor or no trauma and without other injury to the skeleton. Three children with Gaucher disease who developed pathologic fractures of the femoral neck are described. In all three, the fractures occurred between five and nine years of age, and the fracture lines passed through areas of abnormal bone characterized by poorly defined patches of increased and decreased density and cortical thinning along the medial femoral necks. In the affected hips, there was no evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral heads at the time of injury. One child's fracture was preceeded by multiple bone 'crisis' localized to the proximal femora. (orig.)

  9. Backrest Shape Affects Head–Neck Alignment and Seated Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuki Ukita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unstable back support against gravity results in a forward head posture and contributes to buttocks pressure ulcers. However, the association between these health problems and a wheelchair backrest is unclear. Our newly developed wheelchair (N-WC supports the back of the pelvis and thorax from obliquely underneath. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different backrest shapes on head–neck alignment and seated pressure. Data from 28 healthy subjects were analyzed. Outcome measures were head–neck alignment angles, support angles of the backrest, and pressure distributions on the supporting surfaces. Compared with a typical wheelchair that has a flat backrest, the seat pressure decreased and the center of pressure was located in the middle of both the seat and backrest in the N-WC. Moreover, the head–neck alignment when seated in the N-WC was upright. These results highlight the importance of the shape of the wheelchair backrest.

  10. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T. (Pulmonary Disease Service, Presidio of San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema.

  11. MR imaging evaluation of neck anatomy in sleep apnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neck anatomy was evaluated by MR imaging in sleep apnea patients and healthy volunteers. The fascial layers of the neck divide the neck into an inner rigid compartment (muscle groups, vertebrae, and pharynx) and an outer flaccid compartment (skin, subcutaneous fat). Although the flaccid compartment doubled in cross-sectional area in patients with sleep apnea, the area of the rigid compartment also increased by over 30% relative to the area in healthy volunteers, resulting in airway narrowing. Rigid compartment enlargement resulted from an increase in the bulk of muscular groups, as well as from increased intermuscular fat. The epiglottis was not enlarged, while the volume of the tongue increased proportionately with the rigid compartment. No significant changes were detected in the relaxation times of either muscle or fat

  12. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema

  13. [Robot-assisted surgery in the head and neck region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, T K; Friedrich, D T; Schuler, P J

    2016-09-01

    Robot-assisted surgery (RAS) in the head and neck region is believed to have a large potential for the improvement of patient care. Several systems with a master-slave setup are already in routine clinical use, particularly for oncologic surgery. Although specific patient groups may benefit from RAS, there is a lack of randomized clinical studies validating the advantages of these new technological systems in comparison to the existing standard procedures. On the other hand, RAS in the head and neck region is being constantly developed. Currently, the main limitations are the technical miniaturization of the tools and the loss of haptic feedback, as well as the high costs for acquisition and maintenance without financial reimbursement. In any case, the current generation of head and neck surgeons will face the technical, scientific, and ethical challenges of RAS.

  14. Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among fighter pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke;

    intervention could reduce the high prevalence of neck pain among fighter pilots. Methods F-16 pilots were randomized in a controlled intervention trial, to either an exercise-training-group (ET, n=27) or reference-group (REF, n=28). ET underwent 24 weeks of strength, endurance, and coordination training, 3......Introduction Neck and shoulder pain is a common complaint among fighter pilots and a growing aero-medical concern. Unfortunately, previous intervention studies have been unsuccessful in relieving such pain within this occupational group. The aim of this study was to investigate if an exercise......, from 807.0 N/s ± 286.2 to 867.8 N/s ± 274.3 (P = 0.33). No difference was found between groups at follow-up. Discussion The exercise intervention reduced neck pain among F-16 pilots with a modest effect size. Compliance according to the questionnaire correlated well with participation based on the...

  15. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  16. Role of platysma muscle flap in depressed scars of neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K Sandhir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depressed scars in the neck pose a cosmetic problem. There is a need to fill the lost tissue volume defect between the surface and deeper tissues. It is preferable that the filling is done by autologous tissue which is available in substantial amount in the adjoining area. There should be no donor site morbidity. Platysma muscle flap meets these criteria. Materials and Methods: Platysma muscle flap was advanced into the defect after excision of depressed scar. The procedure was done under local anesthetic in two patients. Result: The result was a ′good scar′ with scar lying in the transversely oriented neck lines. Conclusions: Platysma muscle flap has a definitive role in revision surgery of depressed scars in neck as it provides an ideal tissue for lost tissue volume.

  17. Spectrum of head and neck cancer in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the incidence of different head and neck cancers in pediatric age group in a referral hospital. Methods: In this prospective study, children below the age of 12 years underwent a thorough clinical, ENT examination and the diagnosis was conformed histologically in all the cases. Results: Fifty-three were diagnosed to be suffering from different head and neck neoplasms among 21,216 children (0.25%. Male-to-female sex distribution was 1.78:1. The lymphomas were the most common (43.39% followed by the rhabdomyosarcoma (20.75% and the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (15.09%. Of the lymphomas, the non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma was predominant (26.41%. Other lesions were thyroid carcinomas and mucoepidermoid carcinoma of parotid. Conclusions: Malignancy should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of masses in the head and neck region in children.

  18. [Robot-assisted surgery in the head and neck region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, T K; Friedrich, D T; Schuler, P J

    2016-09-01

    Robot-assisted surgery (RAS) in the head and neck region is believed to have a large potential for the improvement of patient care. Several systems with a master-slave setup are already in routine clinical use, particularly for oncologic surgery. Although specific patient groups may benefit from RAS, there is a lack of randomized clinical studies validating the advantages of these new technological systems in comparison to the existing standard procedures. On the other hand, RAS in the head and neck region is being constantly developed. Currently, the main limitations are the technical miniaturization of the tools and the loss of haptic feedback, as well as the high costs for acquisition and maintenance without financial reimbursement. In any case, the current generation of head and neck surgeons will face the technical, scientific, and ethical challenges of RAS. PMID:27510228

  19. Neck stoma patients: is vital information displayed at the bedside?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, Adnan; Siddiq, Somiah; Jolly, Karan; Spinou, Catherine

    Tracheostomies are common procedures in head and neck and critical care practice, with 50% of airway-related deaths attributable to complications such as occlusion or displacement. The National Tracheostomy Safety Project (NTSP) published guidance regarding emergency management of neck stoma patients. A prospective multicentre regional audit of all neck stoma inpatients (ward and intensive care unit (ICU) settings) was conducted. Bed spaces were assessed for tracheostomy care bundles and essential stoma information, as recommended by the NTSP guidelines. The results demonstrate inadequate ward compliance across all three trusts, with ICU compliance greater in comparison to a ward environment. Of note, crucial information regarding the nature of stoma and whom to contact in the event of an emergency, was not displayed in the majority of cases. A greater awareness of the NTSP guidance and implementation of vital information is a necessity across all disciplines in order to reduce stoma complication-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:26972996

  20. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  1. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jundt K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12% to after childbirth (21 and 28% in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women.

  2. An outline of the history of head and neck oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folz, Benedikt J; Silver, Carl E; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Fagan, Johannes J; Pratt, Loring W; Weir, Neil; Seitz, Daniela; Ferlito, Alfio

    2008-01-01

    This review analyzes the development of head and neck oncology as outlined in medical history articles. A systematic literature survey was conducted with the search engines "Google Scholar" and "PubMed" and the retrieved publications were cross-referenced. In addition, books and, when possible, original sources were consulted. While most of the material was obtained from publications from the modern era reviewing historical data, some of the information was derived from original source material. The obtained articles on the history of cancer were then analyzed for details on head and neck oncology. The cradle of oncology was located in ancient Egypt and Greece. The search showed that the first tumors treated in the head and neck were either cutaneous malignancies or cancers on the mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity. The origin, diagnosis and treatment of more deeply situated tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx remained obscure for many centuries. The medieval age brought little progress to medicine in general, and in head and neck oncology in particular, due to religious concerns. Renaissance medicine was characterized by advances in medicine and oncology made by systematic dissection studies of normal and pathologic anatomy. The 19th and 20th century reflect the development of head and neck oncology in the era of science based medicine. Almost all of our current understanding of head and neck oncology, our diagnostic methods and treatment strategies have been developed in these two centuries. The analysis showed that many oncologic problems, which occupy our minds today, were also concerns of our medical ancestors. PMID:17659999

  3. CT findings of palpable neck masses in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed this study to assess the value of CT in the differential diagnosis of palpable neck masses in children. We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of the palpable neck masses in 30 children. The masses were proved histopathologically and classified into cystic, solid, and inflammatory mass and their CT findings were analyzed. Twelve cases were cystic masses, 4 were solid masses, and 14 were inflammatory lesions. Cystic masses included cystic lymphangiomas (n=6), branchial cleft cysts (n=3), thyroglossal duct cysts (n=2), and ranula (n=1). Cystic lymphangiomas showed insinuating appearances into adjacent structures and 4 cases occurred in the posterior cervical space. All branchial cleft cysts were round cystic masses with smooth wall and displaced the submandibular gland anteriorly and the sternocleidomastoid muscle posteriorly. Two thyroglossal duct cysts occurred centrally adjacent to the hyoid bone and 1 ranula in the submental area. Solid masses were juvenile hemangioma, pleomorphic adenoma in submandibular gland, neurilemmoma, and fibromatosis colli. Juvenile hemangioma showed well-enhancing mass with indistinct margin and the other solid masses had well-defined margin with their characteristic location. Inflammatory lesions were abscess (n=4), deep neck infections with lymphadenopathy (n=4), submandibular gland inflammation (n=3), and tuberculous lymphadenitis (n=3) and they showed strand-like enhancement in adjacent subcutaneous tissues. Tuberculous lymphadenitis had multiple lymph node enlargement with internal low attenuation areas and showed less surrounding strand-like enhancement than suppurative lymphadenopathies. Most neck masses in infants and children were of congenital or inflammatory origin. CT is useful for the evaluation of the child presenting with a neck mass, because it can differentiate various forms of neck masses and is able to reveal the relationship of the masses to the adjacent structures with their characteristic location

  4. CT findings of palpable neck masses in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Sup; Chung, Won Mo; Seok, Eul Hye; Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Won Kyun [College of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    We performed this study to assess the value of CT in the differential diagnosis of palpable neck masses in children. We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of the palpable neck masses in 30 children. The masses were proved histopathologically and classified into cystic, solid, and inflammatory mass and their CT findings were analyzed. Twelve cases were cystic masses, 4 were solid masses, and 14 were inflammatory lesions. Cystic masses included cystic lymphangiomas (n=6), branchial cleft cysts (n=3), thyroglossal duct cysts (n=2), and ranula (n=1). Cystic lymphangiomas showed insinuating appearances into adjacent structures and 4 cases occurred in the posterior cervical space. All branchial cleft cysts were round cystic masses with smooth wall and displaced the submandibular gland anteriorly and the sternocleidomastoid muscle posteriorly. Two thyroglossal duct cysts occurred centrally adjacent to the hyoid bone and 1 ranula in the submental area. Solid masses were juvenile hemangioma, pleomorphic adenoma in submandibular gland, neurilemmoma, and fibromatosis colli. Juvenile hemangioma showed well-enhancing mass with indistinct margin and the other solid masses had well-defined margin with their characteristic location. Inflammatory lesions were abscess (n=4), deep neck infections with lymphadenopathy (n=4), submandibular gland inflammation (n=3), and tuberculous lymphadenitis (n=3) and they showed strand-like enhancement in adjacent subcutaneous tissues. Tuberculous lymphadenitis had multiple lymph node enlargement with internal low attenuation areas and showed less surrounding strand-like enhancement than suppurative lymphadenopathies. Most neck masses in infants and children were of congenital or inflammatory origin. CT is useful for the evaluation of the child presenting with a neck mass, because it can differentiate various forms of neck masses and is able to reveal the relationship of the masses to the adjacent structures with their characteristic location.

  5. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  6. Evaluation of dried salted pork ham and neck quality

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Kunová; Juraj Čuboň; Ondřej Bučko; Miroslava Kačániová; Jana Tkáčová; Lukáš Hleba; Peter Haščík; Ľubomír Lopašovský

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was analysed chemical and physical parameters of dried salted pork ham and neck. Dry-cured meat is a traditional dry-cured product obtained after 12 - 24 months of ripening under controlled environmental conditions.  Ham and neck was salted by nitrite salt mixture during 1 week. Salted meat products were dried at 4 °C and relative humidity 85% 1 week after salting. The quality of dry-cured meat is influenced by the processing technology, f...

  7. Anesthesia for plastic reconstruction surgery of radiation injury of neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of anesthesia used in the plastic reconstruction of 18 cases of radiation injury of neck is reported. 17 cases were malignant tumor patients. After radiotherapy, their general condition was weak. The injury of neck skin and surrounding tissues was severe. Most operations were excision of the focus and repairing the wound using adjacent flap. The choice of anesthesia depended on the general condition, degree of injury and the procedure. Good pre-operative preparation, close monitoring and satisfactory airway control during operation are very important

  8. Prognosis of thin cutaneous head and neck melanoma (

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A P; Dahlstrøm, Karin Kjærgaard; Drzewiecki, K T

    1996-01-01

    Thin malignant melanomas, i.e. tumours less than 1 mm, are generally considered to have a good prognosis. The records of 148 patients with thin invasive melanomas located to the head and neck region were reviewed. All patients were followed for the excision of the primary tumour until death...... of these 16 patients (75%) died of disseminated melanoma. We conclude that thin head and neck melanomas do not necessarily carry an excellent prognosis. Prognosis is not dependent upon tumour thickness when less than 1.00 mm....

  9. Etymology of homeric anatomical terms for the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni KONSOLAKI, Panagiotis AGGOURIDAKIS, Georgia FRAGAKI, Georgios ROMANOS,

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: The search for the origin of medical terms used in every day practice has started since the distant past. Words that refer to the head and the neck can be found as early as in the Homeric epics; many of these have survived in some form in modern languages. Both doctors and philosophers have been concerned with the etymology of medical terminology in studies and dictionaries. This paper presents etymological suggestions for the anatomical terminology of the head and the neck as a useful aid to the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

  10. Supportive care for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently (chemo-)radiotherapy has been widely used in head and neck cancer with definite evidence. As long survivor has increased, social problems associated with late toxicity have become more. Late toxicities induced by radiotherapy for head and neck lesion are often severe. Xerostomia is one of the severe late toxicities conventionally and dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is a new topic. Some industrial development (ex. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: IMRT) play a great role in toxicity management. Multidisciplinary approach (cooperation between not only physicians but also nurses and dentists) is necessary to control toxicities. The research of supportive care will be needed same as definitive treatment in the future. (author)

  11. Neck-band retention for Canada geese in the Mississippi (USA) flyway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, M.D.; Weiss, N.T.; Rusch, D.H.; Craven, S.R.; Trost, R.E.; Caswell, F.D.

    1990-01-01

    We used capture, harvest, and observation histories of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) banded in the Mississippi flyway, 1974-88, to examine the problem of neck-band retention. Methods for the analysis of survival data were used to estimate rates of neck-band retention and to evaluate factors associated with neck-band loss. Sex, age of bird at banding, rivet use, and neck-band type significantly influenced neck-band retention. For most of the resulting cohorts (e.g., sex, age, rivet, and neck-band type categories), neck-band retention rates decreased through time. We caution against using small samples or data collected during short-term studies to determine retention rates. We suggest that observation data be used in neck-band retention studies to increase the efficiency of estimating retention time.

  12. 78 FR 65451 - Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...- ] NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire).'' SUPPLEMENTARY...

  13. Stress fracture of the femoral neck in a child (stress fracture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Femoral neck stress fracture is extremely rare in childhood. We report a case of femoral neck stress fracture in an 11-year-old girl. Differentials diagnosis and a brief review of the literature follow. (orig.)

  14. A rare differential diagnosis to occupational neck pain: bilateral stylohyoid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel Tobias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic neck pain is widely prevalent and a common source of disability in the working-age population. Etiology of chronic neck pain includes neck sprain, mechanical or muscular neck pain, myofascial pain syndrome, postural neck pain as well as pain due to degenerative changes. We report the case of a 42 year old secretary, complaining about a longer history of neck pain and limited movement of the cervical spine. Surprisingly, the adequate radiologic examination revealed a bilateral ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex. Her symptoms remained intractable from conservative treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory medication as well as physical therapy. Hence the patient was admitted to surgical resection of the ossified stylohyoid ligament complex. Afterwards she was free of any complaints and went back to work. Therefore, ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex causing severe neck pain and movement disorder should be regarded as a rare differential diagnosis of occupational related neck pain.

  15. A rare differential diagnosis to occupational neck pain: bilateral stylohyoid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Gertrud; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Buhmann, Sonja; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Lenz, Miriam; Vogel, Tobias; Kichhoff, Rainer Maria

    2006-06-26

    Chronic neck pain is widely prevalent and a common source of disability in the working-age population. Etiology of chronic neck pain includes neck sprain, mechanical or muscular neck pain, myofascial pain syndrome, postural neck pain as well as pain due to degenerative changes. We report the case of a 42 year old secretary, complaining about a longer history of neck pain and limited movement of the cervical spine. Surprisingly, the adequate radiologic examination revealed a bilateral ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex. Her symptoms remained intractable from conservative treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory medication as well as physical therapy. Hence the patient was admitted to surgical resection of the ossified stylohyoid ligament complex. Afterwards she was free of any complaints and went back to work. Therefore, ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex causing severe neck pain and movement disorder should be regarded as a rare differential diagnosis of occupational related neck pain.

  16. The in-situ Ti alloying of aluminum alloys and its application in A356 alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This research has investigated the in-situ Ti alloying of aluminum alloys and its application to A356 alloys and wheels through the evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties, The results showed that stable titanium content can be obtained by adding a small quantity of TiO2 into electrolyte of pure aluminum. Under this approach, a greater than 95% absorptivity of titanium was achieved, and the microstructure of the specimens was changed to fine equiaxed grains from coarse columnar grains in the pure aluminum. In comparison with the tradition A356 alloys and wheels, the corresponding microstructure in the testing A356 alloys and wheels was finer. Although the tensile strength was similar between the testing and the tradition A356 alloys and wheels, the ductility of the former (testing) is superior to that of the later (tradition), leading to an excellent combination of strength and ductility from the testing alloys and wheels.

  17. Point defects and diffusion in alloys: correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic models in alloys aim at predicting the transport properties of a system starting from the microscopic jump frequencies of defects. Such properties are of prior importance in systems which stay out of equilibrium for a long time, as for example irradiated alloys in nuclear reactors. We hereby propose several developments of the recent self-consistent mean field (SCMF) kinetic theory, which deals particularly with the correlation effects due to the coupling of atomic and defect fluxes. They are taken into account through a non-equilibrium distribution function of the system, which is derived from the time evolution of small clusters (of two or more atoms or defects). We therefore introduce a set of 'dynamic' interactions called effective Hamiltonian. The SCMF theory is extended to treat high jump frequency ratios for the vacancy mechanism, as well as the transport through interstitial defects. We use in both cases an atomic model which accounts for the thermodynamic properties of the alloy, as e.g. the short-range order. Those models are eventually applied to predict the diffusion properties in two model alloys of nuclear interest: the concentrated Fe-Ni-Cr solid solution and the dilute Fe(P) alloy. We present adapted atomic models and compare our predictions to experimental data. (author)

  18. Development of the Neck in Fusion Reactions 40Ca+90,96Zr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 吴锡真; 李祝霞

    2003-01-01

    The neck dynamics and nucleon transfer through the neck in fusion reactions 40 Ca +90,96Zr are studied by applying the improved quantum molecular dynamics model. A special attention is paid to the dynamic behaviour of the neck development at touching point and to the contribution of excess neutrons in a neutron-rich target (or projectile) to neck formation and nucleon transfer.

  19. The association between physical activity and neck and low back pain: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Sitthipornvorakul, E.; Janwantanakul, P.; Purepong, N.; Pensri, P.; Beek, van de, A.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of physical activity on neck and low back pain is still controversial. No systematic review has been conducted on the association between daily physical activity and neck and low back pain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between physical activity and the incidence/prevalence of neck and low back pain. Publications were systematically searched from 1980 to June 2009 in several databases. The following key words were used: neck pain, back pain, physical a...

  20. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  1. Is neck pain associated with worse health-related quality of life 6 months later? A population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolet, P. S.; Cote, P.; Kristman, V. L.;

    2015-01-01

    and t tests were used to measure the crude association among four possible courses of neck pain and HRQoL at 6 months. The neck pain trajectories over 6 months were no or mild neck pain, improving neck pain, worsening neck pain, and persistent neck pain. Finally, analysis of variance was used to examine...

  2. Effect of Targeted Strength, Endurance, and Coordination Exercise on Neck and Shoulder Pain Among Fighter Pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Britt; Toft, Palle; Myburgh, Corrie;

    2013-01-01

    : To explore in Danish F-16 pilots: (1) the effect on neck and shoulder pain of a 24-week training intervention including targeted training of the deep neck muscles; (2) selected clinical signs and symptoms at baseline; (3) the prevalence and intensity of neck and shoulder pain....

  3. Dynamic neck development in a polymer tube under internal pressure loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Britta; Tvergaard, Viggo; Needleman, Alan

    2008-01-01

    and a short wave length imperfection. After some thinning down at the necks, the mode of deformation switches to neck propagation along the circumference of the tube. A case is shown in which the necks have propagated along the entire tube wall, so that network locking in the polymer results in high stiffness...

  4. Factors that influence femoral neck length. Analysis of 1543 patients with advanced osteoarthritis of the hip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Wybren; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Ettema, Harmen B.; Verheyen, Cees C. P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is little known about the relationship between patient characteristic and the variance in geometrical properties of the femoral neck. The length of the femoral neck is relevant when considering a femoral neck preserving hip replacement. Based on surgical experience we h

  5. Soft tissue hematoma of the neck due to thyroid rupture with unusual mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Tsukahara

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although hemorrhage from the thyroid gland without blunt trauma is rare, emergency physicians should regard possible thyroid gland rupture in patients with swelling of the neck or acute respiratory failure after direct/indirect trauma to the neck. Observation or operative management for limited or expanding hematoma are appropriately based on fundamental neck trauma principles.

  6. Germ cell tumor located in the midline of the anterior neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirdopska, Tatyana; Terziev, Ivan; Hristova, Sv; Mladenovsky, W; Petkov, R

    2011-01-01

    Primary germ cell tumors involving midline of the anterior neck are extremely rare. Here we report a 68-year-old male who was operated due to a mass lesion in the anterior neck with infiltration of the isthmus of the thyroid gland. Histopathological examination revealed a germ cell tumor with extragonadal localization in the anterior neck infiltrating the isthmus of the thyroid gland.

  7. Some aspects of the plastic deformation of phase mixtures with coarse microstructures. [Two-phase alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurland, J.

    1982-10-01

    This paper discusses plastic deformation of two-phase alloys, the partititon of stress and strain between the soft and hard constituents, and the applicability of mixture laws. Dual-phase steels are considered in particular. At all strains, plastic deformation takes place mainly in the ferrite. The martensite resists plastic deformation at low strain but is ductile. The martensite particles supplies the desirable dispersion hardening effect, enhanced strain hardening rate and resistance to plastic instability such as necking, while yielding plastically at high strains. 12 figures. (DLC)

  8. Adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xianqiang; YANG Yuanxi

    2006-01-01

    The key problems in applying the adaptively robust filtering to navigation are to establish an equivalent weight matrix for the measurements and a suitable adaptive factor for balancing the contributions of the measurements and the predicted state information to the state parameter estimates. In this paper, an adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors was proposed, based on the principles of the adaptively robust filtering and bi-factor robust estimation for correlated observations. According to the constant velocity model of Kalman filtering, the state parameter vector was divided into two groups, namely position and velocity. The estimator of the adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors was derived, and the calculation expressions of the classified adaptive factors were presented. Test results show that the adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors is not only robust in controlling the measurement outliers and the kinematic state disturbing but also reasonable in balancing the contributions of the predicted position and velocity, respectively, and its filtering accuracy is superior to the adaptively robust filter with single adaptive factor based on the discrepancy of the predicted position or the predicted velocity.

  9. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  10. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  11. Trismus in head and neck oncology : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Kalk, WWI; Roodenburg, JLN

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify systematically, criteria for trismus in head and neck cancer, the evidence for risk factors for trismus and the interventions to treat trismus. Three databases were searched (time period 1966 to June 2003) for the text "trismus" or "restricted mouth opening". I

  12. Is open surgery for head and neck cancers truly declining?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartl, D.M.; Brasnu, D.F.; Shah, J.P.; Hinni, M.L.; Takes, R.P.; Olsen, K.D.; Kowalski, L.P.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Strojan, P.; Wolf, G.T.; Rinaldo, A.; Suarez, C.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Paleri, V.; Forastiere, A.A.; Werner, J.A.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, major modifications in the way we treat head and neck cancers, due to advances in technology and medical oncology, have led to a decline in the use of open surgery as first-line treatment of cancers arising from several primary tumor sites. The incidence of tobacco- and alco

  13. A case report of brachial cleft cyst in the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Mi; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-08-15

    Branchial cleft cyst is the most common lateral neck cyst ; the vast majority are of the second branchial cleft origin. This presumably reflects the greater depth and longer persistence of the second cleft, compared with the first, third, and fourth clefts. We experienced a 49-year-old male whose chief complaint was a abnormal mass of the cleft parotid gland area and neck. As a result of careful analysis of clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. We diagnosed it as a second branchial cleft cyst in the neck and obtained results as follows: 1. In clinical examination, there was a 10 X 15 cm sized, fluctuant painful mass in the left neck and parotid area. 2. In radiographic examination, a low echogenic mass with internal cystic change in the inferior parotid gland area was noted sonographically. Computed tomograph showed a 3 X 4 cm sized, well-defined cystic mass with heterogenous solid component in the anterior border of sternocleidomastoid muscle. MRI revealed 5 X 6 cm sized, well-marginated multiseparated mass in the same area. 3. In histopathological examination, lining of cyst was stratified squamous epithelium with typical lymph node pattern and inflammatory cell infiltration.

  14. A head and neck hyperthermia applicator: Theoretical antenna array design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulides, M.M.; Bakker, J.F.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.; Rhoon, G.C. van

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Investigation into the feasibility of a circular array of dipole antennas to deposit RF-energy centrally in the neck as a function of: 1) patient positioning, 2) antenna ring radius, 3) number of antenna rings, 4) number of antennas per ring and 5) distance between antenna rings. Materials

  15. A head and neck hyperthermia applicator: Theoretical antenna array design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Paulides (Margarethus); J.F. Bakker (Jurriaan); A.P.M. Zwamborn; G.C. van Rhoon (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Investigation into the feasibility of a circular array of dipole antennas to deposit RF-energy centrally in the neck as a function of: (1) patient positioning, (2) antenna ring radius, (3) number of antenna rings, (4) number of antennas per ring and (5) distance between antenna

  16. Approaching airways in oncology surgery of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A descriptive prospective study was conducted in 'Maria Curie' Oncology Teaching Provincial Hospital during the period from January 2010 to December 2010. The sample included 210 patients studied with the purpose of identifying morbimortality of the difficult airway in Oncology Surgery of the head and neck in our institution

  17. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TMJ DISORDER AND HEAD AND NECK POSTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sesi R. Puspita Dewi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint disorders may be caused by variety of factors; one of which is the posture of head and neck. However, this remains controversial and a subject of debate by experts. The objective of this study was to know whether there was a relation between temporomandibular disorders and the head and neck posture seen radiographically. Subjects were 40 dental students from University of Indonesia who met the inclusion criteria, selected through questionnaire, and subjective examination based on Helkimo’s dysfunction index. Then, lateral cephalometric radiographs were done to all subjects. In the radiogram, a horizontal line was made from the nasion point to the sella tursica, and a vertical line was drawn along the prominent bone of C1 – C5. The angle between the two lines was measured, and used to represent the head and neck posture. The design of the study was cross sectional. Based on statistical analysis, there was no significant relationship between the anamnestic dysfunction index as well as the clinical dysfunction index that represented the temporomandibular joint disorders and the posture of the head and neck seen radiographically.

  18. Concurrent chemoradiation for unresectable advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Ishikura, Satoshi [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East] [and others

    1998-03-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy were performed for 18 patients with unresectable head and neck squamous cell cancer. Chemotherapy, consisting of CDDP (40 mg/m{sup 2}, Day 1 and 8) and 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}, 24-h continuous infusion through Day 1-5 and 8-12), with concurrent radiotherapy (2 Gy/day, 5 days/w) were administered and repeated 2-3 courses in every 5 weeks. Mucositis and myelo-suppression were the main side effects observed, but all of them were tolerable. Total response rate and complete response rate was 94.4% and 55.6%, respectively. Out of six patients requiring tracheotomy for airway obstruction due to bulky tumor, four achieved sufficient tumor shrinkage by the treatment and could obtain closure of the stoma. Two patients whose neck lymph nodes were still remaining after chemoradiotherapy, could obtain local control by supplemental neck dissection surgery. These regimen is feasible and effective for locally advanced head and neck cancer. (author)

  19. Cisplatin, fluorouracil, and docetaxel in unresectable head and neck cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermorken, J.B.; Remenar, E.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Gorlia, T.; Mesia, R.; Degardin, M.; Stewart, J.S.; Jelic, S.; Betka, J.; Preiss, J.H.; Weyngaert, D. van den; Awada, A.; Cupissol, D.; Kienzer, H.R.; Rey, A.; Desaunois, I.; Bernier, J.; Lefebvre, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase 2 studies suggest that the standard regimen of cisplatin and fluorouracil (PF) plus docetaxel (TPF) improves outcomes in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck. We compared TPF with PF as induction chemotherapy in patients with locoregionally advanced, unresectable disease. M

  20. Size-effects in plane strain sheet-necking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Redanz, Pia

    2004-01-01

    A finite strain generalization of the strain gradient plasticity theory by Fleck and Hutchinson (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49 (2001a) 2245) is proposed and used to study size effects in plane strain necking of thin sheets using the finite element method. Both sheets with rigid grips at the ends and...

  1. Size-effects in plane strain sheet-necking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Redanz, Pia

    2003-01-01

    A finite strain generalization of the strain gradient plasticity theory by Fleck and Hutchinson (2001) is proposed and used to study size effects in plane strain necking of thin sheets using the finite element method. Both sheets with rigid grips at the ends and specimens with shear free ends are...

  2. Why does necking ignore notches in dynamic tension?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotbaum Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental work has revealed that necking of tensile specimens, subjected to dynamic loading, is a deterministic phenomenon, governed by the applied boundary conditions. Furthermore it was shown that the potential sited, dictated by the boundary conditions, may prevail even in the presence of a notch, thus necking may occur away of the notched region. The present paper combines experimental and numerical work to address this issue. Specifically, it is shown that the dynamic tensile failure locus is dictated by both the applied velocity boundary condition and the material mechanical properties, specifically strain-rate sensitivity and strain-rate hardening. It is shown that at sufficiently high impact velocities, the flows stress in the notch vicinity becomes quite higher than in the rest of the specimen, so that while the former resists deformation, it transfers the load to the latter, resulting in the formation of a local neck and failure away from the notch. Small local perturbations in the material properties are shown to be sufficient to stabilize the structure under local failure until a neck forms elsewhere. While the physical observations are quite counterintuitive with respect to the engineering views of stress concentrator's effect, the present work rationalizes those observations and also provides information for the designers of dynamically tensioned structures that may contain notches or similar flaws.

  3. Neurologic and Head and Neck Manifestations of Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Andrew; Raghavan, Prashant; Rath, Tanya J; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-08-01

    Sickle cell disease is a common, inherited disordered characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia with repetitive episodes of vasoocclusion resulting from deformed red blood cells. This article reviews the most significant neurologic and head and neck manifestations of this disease. PMID:27443997

  4. Risk of marginal mandibular nerve injury in neck dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2012-01-01

    The immediate and permanent frequency of injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve (MMN) after neck dissection has only scarcely been addressed in the medical literature. We investigated the risk of injury in 159 consecutive patients after neck dissection for various reasons...... in level I B and level II A, respectively. In 95 patients with oral cancer 13 (14%) of the cases had malfunction of the lower lip domain 2 weeks after neck dissection in level I B indicating paresis to the MMN. Follow-up analyses 1-2 years after the operation showed permanent paralysis in 4 to 7......% of the cases in whom two of them had the nerve sacrificed for oncologic reasons during the operation. In 18 patients with parotic cancer the corresponding permanent frequency of MMN paralysis was 11.1%. In 46 patients with neck dissection in level II A but not in level I B, no paresis of the MMN was registered...

  5. The scapular neck fracture : biomechanical, clinical and surgical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, Arthur van

    2005-01-01

    After a short introduction to the topics of this thesis, in chapter 2 we described the functional and radiological results of a retrospective study in patients with an ipsilateral scapular neck and clavicular shaft fracture (floating shoulder). Forty-six patients were treated between 1991 and 1996.

  6. Neck forces and moments and head accelerations in side impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoganandan, N.; Pintar, F.A.; Maiman, D.J.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Although side-impact sled studies have investigated chest, abdomen, and pelvic injury mechanics, determination of head accelerations and the associated neck forces and moments is very limited. The purpose of the present study was therefore to determine the temporal forces and moments at

  7. RADIATION-INDUCED TUMORS OF THE HEAD AND NECK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, B.F.A.M.; BARIS, G; GREGOR, RT; HILGERS, FJM; BALM, AJM

    1995-01-01

    In order to study the induction of malignancy in normal tissues due to ionizing radiation, we reviewed the files of 2500 patients with a tumour of the head and neck treated at the Netherlands Cancer Institute (Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Ziekenhuis), Amsterdam, from 1977 to 1993. We then checked whether

  8. Unstable femoral neck fractures in children - A new treatment option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruthi K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Femoral neck fractures in children are an uncommon but difficult situation. The aim of our study was to evaluate clinical results of closed reduction internal fixation and primary valgus osteotomy fixed with a tension band wire loop in high angled pediatric femoral neck fractures. Methods : In a prospective nonrandomized study conducted at 2 centres, sixteen children and adolescents with a Pauwel type 2/3 fracture neck femur were taken as participants. The femoral neck fractures were stabilized using closed reduction and internal fixation (6.5 mm noncannulated screw and a primary valgus osteotomy fixed with a tension band wire loop preferably within 24-36 hours of injury. Patients were evaluated to determine complications, clinical and radiological outcome. Results : At a mean post operative follow up of 5 years, union was achieved in all cases. Three patients had AVN and one developed coxavara. Results were evaluated using IOWA hip scores. Thirteen patients had an excellent result while 3 patients had a good result. Conclusion : Use of this technique holds promise in treating these difficult unstable fractures. Although results from a larger series are still awaited yet the use of this technique can safely be extended to stable fractures also, to minimize the incidence of complications as nonunion and AVN.

  9. Tool Neck Geometry Design to Improve Stiffness of Micro Endmills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, P.; Rozing, M.; Oosterling, J.A.J.; Hoogstrate, A.M.; Langen, H.H.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the scaling effect, micro endmills have low stiffness in nature, which will result in lose of form accuracy in workpiece and vibration of micro tools during micromilling process. Through analytical modeling, it is found that the neck geometry of the micro endmill has a big influence on the to

  10. MPR realignment increases accuracy when measuring femoral neck anteversion angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tommy Hemmert; Torfing, Trine; Overgaard, Søren

    2013-01-01

    To compare two methods of measuring femoral neck anteversion angle (FNA): A 2D method used at Odense University Hospital until 2010, and a method labeled 3D-OUH. The latter method makes corrections to compensate for errors introduced by the individual placement of patients in the CT scanner....

  11. A case report of brachial cleft cyst in the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branchial cleft cyst is the most common lateral neck cyst ; the vast majority are of the second branchial cleft origin. This presumably reflects the greater depth and longer persistence of the second cleft, compared with the first, third, and fourth clefts. We experienced a 49-year-old male whose chief complaint was a abnormal mass of the cleft parotid gland area and neck. As a result of careful analysis of clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. We diagnosed it as a second branchial cleft cyst in the neck and obtained results as follows: 1. In clinical examination, there was a 10 X 15 cm sized, fluctuant painful mass in the left neck and parotid area. 2. In radiographic examination, a low echogenic mass with internal cystic change in the inferior parotid gland area was noted sonographically. Computed tomograph showed a 3 X 4 cm sized, well-defined cystic mass with heterogenous solid component in the anterior border of sternocleidomastoid muscle. MRI revealed 5 X 6 cm sized, well-marginated multiseparated mass in the same area. 3. In histopathological examination, lining of cyst was stratified squamous epithelium with typical lymph node pattern and inflammatory cell infiltration.

  12. Alternative PET tracers in head and neck cancer. A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedman, Jan; Pruim, Jan; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Halmos, Gyorgy; Langedijk, Johannes A.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a standard in staging Head and Neck cancer. While F-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) is the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical, glycolysis is not the only metabolic process that can be visualized. Different PET tracers can also be used to visualiz

  13. The accuracy of CT - determined femoral neck anteversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish the accuracy of CT determination of femoral neck anteversion, two models were constructed; one an idealized Plexiglas model and the other from a real femur. Experiments were carried out by pre-setting angles on the phantoms, and then determining these angles by CT. The results, which show a high degree of accuracy, are analyzed statistically. (orig.)

  14. [Resolution of a neck chylous fistula with oral diet treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, B; Morlán, M A; Familiar, C; Sastre, J; Marco, A; López, J

    2005-01-01

    Chylous fistula after neck dissection is a well-described complication. This pHatology can lead to serious respiratory and nutritional complications. Therapeutical options for chylous fistula remains controversial. On last reviews, there are an agreement on the conservative management. Within of this management, low long-chain triglycerides fat diet is an essential part.

  15. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Miller; A. Gross; J. D'Sylva; S.J. Burnie; C.H. Goldsmith; N. Graham; T. Haines; G. Brønfort; J.L. Hoving

    2010-01-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient sa

  16. Predicting recurrence after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begg, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Radiotherapy is a mainstay of treatment, either alone for early stage tumors or combined with chemotherapy for late stage tumors. An overall 5-year survival rate of around 50% for HNSCC demonstrates that treatme

  17. Development and testing of a flexible ballistic neck protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.; Rensink, P.

    2016-01-01

    Sufficient ballistic protection of the neck area would significantly reduce the vulnerability of an infantry soldier. So far this protection is offered by extensions on the ballistic vest or combat helmet. However, the requirements for head agility and the various body to head positions combined wit

  18. AN ABERRANT MUSCLE IN THE NECK – A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: During routine dissection of a 65 year old male cad aver, an unusual muscle was found on the right side of the neck. The aberrant muscle had a common origin with sternothyroid. Its distal end was a fleshy belly attached to the posterior as pects of manubrium sternum and medial end of first costal cartilage. The muscle ascended in supe ro-lateral direction crossing anterior to the common carotid artery and ascended as a slender ten don along the anterior wall of carotid sheath. In the middle third of the neck, it was accompanied by descendens hypoglossi. The tendon merged with the anterior wall of the carotid sheath in the uppe r part of the neck and was not discernible as a separate entity. Along with the carotid sheath, it was inserted to the base of the skull. Developmentally, the muscle appears to be the separ ated fibres from stylohyoid and sternohyoid line (supra- and infra- hyoid muscles that has lost its intermittent attachment to hyoid bone. Based on its attachments, the muscle can assi st sternocleidomastoid in ipsilateral tilting of th e head. As the muscle was found to be crossing in fro nt of the common carotid artery, the contraction of this muscle could compress the artery resulting in clinical symptoms. The opposite side of the neck did not show similar muscle. We did not find s imilar case reported in the literature

  19. Head and neck paragangliomas : genetics, heredity and clinical characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, Erik Frans

    2012-01-01

    Paragangliomas are rare neoplasms that occur predominantly in the head and neck region. They originate from the neural crest derived cells within paraganglions, and are closely related to the pheochromocytomas of the adrenal medulla. In contrast to other European countries, the majority of head and

  20. Thyroid malignomas after irradiation of the neck (eight own observations)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, G.A.; Hering, K.

    1981-01-01

    Eight cases of thyroid neoplasias are presented the anamnesis of which shows an irradiation in the head-neck region. After a short survey of the existing literature, the authors discuss the influence of the dose, the relatively long latent time and the different tissular tumor types (carcinomas and sarcomas in dependence on the age of the patient at the time of irradiation.

  1. The nutritional assessment of head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnano, Mauro; Mola, Patrizia; Machetta, Giacomo; Maffeis, Paola; Forestiero, Ilenia; Cavagna, Roberta; Artino, Elena; Boffano, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Patients affected by head and neck cancer are particularly at risk for nutritional depletion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of patients affected by head and neck cancer at diagnosis. All adult patients with head and neck cancer between January 2009 and December 2013 were included. The following data were recorded: demographics, tobacco and/or alcohol consumption, weight, height, the reference weight 6 months before the diagnosis, tumor site, tumor stage, and laboratory data. Then, Body mass index (BMI), and Buzby nutrition risk index (NRI) were calculated. Statistical analysis was used to search for associations among multiple variables. 122 men and 22 women were enrolled. As for reference BMI, 77 patients were overweight, whereas just 7 subjects were underweight. At diagnosis, 72 subjects were overweight according to BMI, whereas 52 patients were underweight. Instead, according to NRI, 96 patients were severely malnourished, 42 patients were moderately malnourished, whereas just 6 patients had a normal value of NRI. The assessment of nutrition by BMI excluded from a thorough consideration all overweight and obese patients with head and neck cancer. Instead, NRI correctly identified both undernourished and overweight/obese patients as "malnourished" subjects. PMID:25534287

  2. Acute neck cellulitis and mediastinitis complicating a continuous interscalene block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdevila, Xavier; Jaber, Samir; Pesonen, Pertti; Borgeat, Alain; Eledjam, Jean-Jacques

    2008-10-01

    We report a case of acute neck cellulitis and mediastinitis complicating a continuous interscalene brachial plexus block. A 61-yr-old man was scheduled for an elective arthroscopic right shoulder rotator cuff repair. A continuous interscalene block was done preoperatively and 20 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine and 20 mL of 2% mepivacaine were injected through the catheter. Postoperative analgesia was provided by a continuous infusion of bupivacaine, 0.25% at 5 mL/h for 39 h using a 240-mL elastomeric disposable pump. The day after surgery, the patient complained of neck pain. The analgesic block was not fully effective. He was discharged home. Three days later, the patient was readmitted with neck edema and erythema, fever and fatigue. Neck ultrasonography and computed tomographic scan revealed an abscess of the interscalene and sternocleidomastiod muscles and cellulitis, as well as acute mediastinitis. Two blood cultures and surgical samples were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was treated with surgery, the site was surgically debrided, and a 2-mo course of vancomycin, imipenem, and oxacilline. The technique of drawing local anesthetic from the bottle and filling the elastomeric pump was the most likely cause of infection. This case emphasizes the importance of strict aseptic conditions during puncture, catheter insertion, and management of the local anesthetic infusate. PMID:18806062

  3. 49 CFR 572.163 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.123 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly and test procedure. 572.163 Section... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST...

  4. Cardiovascular and respiratory complications after major head and neck surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Buitelaar; A.J.M. Balm; N. Antonini; H. van Tinteren; J.M. Huitink

    2006-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to gain insight into the incidence rates for, distribution of, and risk factors of postoperative cardiovascular and respiratory complications in major head and neck surgery. Methods. We performed a retrospective review of 469 patients who had undergone primary major head and

  5. Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyash S Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head and neck pathologies. Advances in angiographic technologies including flat panel detector systems, biplane, and 3-dimensional rotational angiography have consolidated and expanded the role of IR in the management of various ECHN pathologies. The ECHN is at cross roads between the origins of great vessels and the cerebral vasculature. Thorough knowledge of functional and technical aspects of neuroangiography is essential before embarking on head and neck vascular interventions. The vessels of the head and neck can be involved by infectious and inflammatory conditions, get irradiated during radiotherapy and injured due to trauma or iatrogenic cause. The ECHN is also a common site for various hypervascular neoplasms and vascular malformations, which can be treated with endovascular and percutaneous embolization. This pictorial essay provides a review of variety of ECHN pathologies which were managed by various IR procedures using different approaches.

  6. Preradiation dental decisions in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, H.H. (Hubert Herman)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of studies that investigated preradiation dental decision making in patients with head and neck cancer. In Chapter 1, it is ascertained that in view of the risk for oral sequelae resulting from high-dose radiotherapy, special attention to preradiation dental planning ap

  7. Genetic alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic alterations observed in head and neck cancer are mainly due to oncogene activation (gain of function mutations and tumor suppressor gene inactivation (loss of function mutations, leading to deregulation of cell proliferation and death. These genetic alterations include gene amplification and overexpression of oncogenes such as myc, erbB-2, EGFR and cyclinD1 and mutations, deletions and hypermethylation leading to p16 and TP53 tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In addition, loss of heterozygosity in several chromosomal regions is frequently observed, suggesting that other tumor suppressor genes not yet identified could be involved in the tumorigenic process of head and neck cancers. The exact temporal sequence of the genetic alterations during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC development and progression has not yet been defined and their diagnostic or prognostic significance is controversial. Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of head and neck cancer should help in the identification of new markers that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease.

  8. Concurrent chemoradiation for unresectable advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy were performed for 18 patients with unresectable head and neck squamous cell cancer. Chemotherapy, consisting of CDDP (40 mg/m2, Day 1 and 8) and 5-FU (200 mg/m2, 24-h continuous infusion through Day 1-5 and 8-12), with concurrent radiotherapy (2 Gy/day, 5 days/w) were administered and repeated 2-3 courses in every 5 weeks. Mucositis and myelo-suppression were the main side effects observed, but all of them were tolerable. Total response rate and complete response rate was 94.4% and 55.6%, respectively. Out of six patients requiring tracheotomy for airway obstruction due to bulky tumor, four achieved sufficient tumor shrinkage by the treatment and could obtain closure of the stoma. Two patients whose neck lymph nodes were still remaining after chemoradiotherapy, could obtain local control by supplemental neck dissection surgery. These regimen is feasible and effective for locally advanced head and neck cancer. (author)

  9. Experimental neck muscle pain impairs standing balance in humans

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; 10.1007/s00221-008-1639-7

    2009-01-01

    Impaired postural control has been reported in patients with chronic neck pain of both traumatic and non-traumatic etiologies, but whether painful stimulation of neck muscle per se can affect balance control during quiet standing in humans remains unclear. The purpose of the present experiment was thus to investigate the effect of experimental neck muscle pain on standing balance in young healthy adults. To achieve this goal, 16 male university students were asked to stand upright as still as possible on a force platform with their eyes closed in two conditions of No pain and Pain of the neck muscles elicited by experimental painful electrical stimulation. Postural control and postural performance were assessed by the displacements of the center of foot pressure (CoP) and of the center of mass (CoM), respectively. The results showed increased CoP and CoM displacements variance, range, mean velocity, and mean and median frequencies in the Pain relative to the No pain condition. The present findings emphasize t...

  10. High-temperature Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Gogia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of high-temperature titanium alloys has contributed significantly to the spectacular progress in thrust-to-weight ratio of the aero gas turbines. This paper presents anoverview on the development of high-temperature titanium alloys used in aero engines and potential futuristic materials based on titanium aluminides and composites. The role of alloychemistry, processing, and microstructure, in determining the mechanical properties of titanium alloys is discussed. While phase equilibria and microstructural stability consideration haverestricted the use of conventional titanium alloys up to about 600 "C, alloys based on TiPl (or,, E,AINb (0, TiAl (y, and titaniumltitanium aluminides-based composites offer a possibility ofquantum jump in the temperature capability of titanium alloys.

  11. Rare earth ferrosilicon alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain RE ferrosilicon alloy with good quality and competitive price, it is essential that proper choice of raw materials, processing technology and equipments should be made based on the characteristics of Bai-Yun-Ebo mineral deposits. Experimental work and actual production practice indicate that pyrometallurgical method is suitable for the extraction and isolation of the rare earths and comprehensive utilization of the metal values contained in the feed material is capable of reducing cost of production of RE ferrosilicon alloy. In the Bai-Yun-Ebo deposit, the fluorite type medium lean ore (with respect to iron content) makes a reserve of considerable size. The average content of the chief constituents are given

  12. High-temperature Titanium Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    A.K. Gogia

    2005-01-01

    The development of high-temperature titanium alloys has contributed significantly to the spectacular progress in thrust-to-weight ratio of the aero gas turbines. This paper presents anoverview on the development of high-temperature titanium alloys used in aero engines and potential futuristic materials based on titanium aluminides and composites. The role of alloychemistry, processing, and microstructure, in determining the mechanical properties of titanium alloys is discussed. While phase eq...

  13. Multicomponent and High Entropy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cantor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes some underlying principles of multicomponent and high entropy alloys, and gives some examples of these materials. Different types of multicomponent alloy and different methods of accessing multicomponent phase space are discussed. The alloys were manufactured by conventional and high speed solidification techniques, and their macroscopic, microscopic and nanoscale structures were studied by optical, X-ray and electron microscope methods. They exhibit a variety of amorphous, quasicrystalline, dendritic and eutectic structures.

  14. A review of scientific papers about head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head and neck cancer is one of the 10 most frequent cancers worldwide, with an estimated 500000 new cases diagnosed annually. Treatment of head and neck cancers require a multidisciplinary approach due their complexity and the functional and esthetic alterations that cancer can cause. The interest of the scientific community in a specific subject can be evaluated by analyzing of the number and the quality of published papers on the topic. The information obtained from PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez) has been used as a tool in various publications to aid the evaluation of the scientific interest in specific research areas The aim of this work is to evaluate, using PubMed, the scientific interest in studies of head and neck cancer treatments such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. The searches were performed on PubMed for publications from the period of 1949 to 2008 using the search terms 'head and neck cancer' and 'surgery' or 'radiotherapy' or 'chemotherapy'. The number of publications per year was determined in each search. The percentage of publications was also calculated for each subject in each year. An interest factor in a subject (IFS) was also determined. The number of publications was higher for surgery than chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The calculated 1964 IFS for surgery was 14.79, 12.74 for radiotherapy, and 19.58 for chemotherapy. The 1995 IFS for surgery was 1.99, 2.09 for radiotherapy, and 2.08 for chemotherapy. The relation obtained for 1995 was maintained in the subsequent years. There are more publications related to surgical treatment for head and neck cancer when compared with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Moreover, in the recent years there has an increased interest in treatments utilizing chemotherapy, or this associated to radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eSunderland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 x 6 s before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0  0.2 ºC; 53 ± 2% relative humidity. Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC. Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively. The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51 – 0.88 after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P 0.05. There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE. Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 minutes onwards (interaction trial x time P=0.04. RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial x time P = 0.01. Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement.

  16. Fractionation schedules for cancers of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: This refresher course reviews current research activity and treatment results in the field of radiation therapy fractionation. The presentation emphasizes worldwide studies of altered fractionation, highlighting head and neck cancer as the primary teaching model. Basic radiobiological principles guiding the development of altered fractionation regimens, and advancing the understanding of fractionation effects on normal and tumor tissue are reviewed. A 'standard' prescription of 2 Gy x 35 fractions = 70 Gy may not provide the optimal balance between primary tumor control and late normal tissue effects for all patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The last decade has witnessed the treatment of thousands of head and neck cancer patients with curative radiotherapy using altered fractination schedules designed to improve overall treatment results. Although the number of different fractionation regimens currently being investigated continues to increase, the common guiding principles behind their design are relatively simple. Common fractionation terminology (i.e., accelerated hyperfractionation) will be reviewed, as well as a brief summary of radiobiological concepts pertaining to tumor potential doubling time, tumor proliferation kinetics, overall treatment time and fraction size-dependence of acute and late tissue effects. Several well known head and neck fractionation schedules from around the world (Manchester Christie Hospital-United Kingdom, Princess Margaret Hospital-Canada, Massachusetts General Hospital-USA, MD Anderson Hospital-USA, University of Florida-USA, Mount Vernon Hospital CHART-United Kingdom, RTOG and EORTC trials-USA and Europe) will be summarized with regard to design-rationale, treatment technique and results. The design of several current cooperative group trials investigating altered head and neck fractionation will be presented, as well as concepts prompting the pilot evaluation of several brand new

  17. Pareto-optimal alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bligaard, Thomas; Johannesson, Gisli Holmar; Ruban, Andrei;

    2003-01-01

    Large databases that can be used in the search for new materials with specific properties remain an elusive goal in materials science. The problem is complicated by the fact that the optimal material for a given application is usually a compromise between a number of materials properties and the ......, the Pareto-optimal set, to determine optimal alloy solutions for the compromise between low compressibility, high stability, and cost....

  18. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  19. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27416593

  20. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueland, Stian M.; Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-05-23

    Copper-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit excellent shape memory properties in single crystalline form. However, when they are polycrystalline, their shape memory properties are severely compromised by brittle fracture arising from transformation strain incompatibility at grain boundaries and triple junctions. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys (oSMAs) are microstructurally designed SMA structures in which the total surface area exceeds the total grain boundary area, and triple junctions can even be completely absent. Here it is shown how an oligocrystalline structure provides a means of achieving single crystal-like SMA properties without being limited by constraints of single crystal processing. Additionally, the formation of oSMAs typically involves the reduction of the size scale of specimens, and sample size effects begin to emerge. Recent findings on a size effect on the martensitic transformation in oSMAs are compared and a new regime of heat transfer associated with the transformation heat evolution in these alloys is discussed. New results on unassisted two-way shape memory and the effect of loading rate in oSMAs are also reported. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Aluminum alloy impact sparkling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dudyk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cast machine parts are widely used in many branches of industry. A very important issue is gaining the appropriate knowledge relating to the application of castings in places of explosion risks including but not limited to mining, chemical industry and rescue works. A possibility of explosion risks occurrence following the impact sparkling of the cast metal parts is still not solved problem in scientific research. In relation to this issue, in this article, the results of the study are presented, and relating to the tendency to impact sparkling of the aluminium alloys used in machine building. On the grounds of the results obtained, it was demonstrated that the registered impact sparkles bunches of feathers from the analyzed alloys: AlSi7Mg, (AK7; AlSi9Mg, (AK9; AlSi6Cu4, (AK64 and AlSi11, (AK11 show significant differences between each other. The quantitative analysis of the temperature distribution and nuclei surface area performed on the example of the alloy AK9 (subjected to defined period of corrosion allows for the statement that they are dangerous in conditions of explosion risk. Following this fact, designers and users of machine parts made from these materials should not use them in conditions where the explosive mixtures occur.

  2. Effects of scapular stabilization exercise on neck posture and muscle activation in individuals with neck pain and forward head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Boyoung; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of scapular stabilization exercise on neck posture, muscle activity, pain, and quality of life in individuals with neck pain and forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen participants were recruited according to the selection criteria and were randomly allocated to the scapular stabilization group (n=8) and the control group (n=7). The scapular stabilization group underwent training for 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week for 4 weeks; the control group performed relaxation exercises for 4 weeks. [Results] After training the scapular stabilization group showed significant improvement on the craniovertebral angle, upper trapezius muscle activity, serratus anterior muscle activity, Neck Disability Index scores, Visual Analog Scale scores, and World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-BREF scores compared to those in the control group. [Conclusion] Scapular stabilization exercise can help improve the head posture and pain in the patients with neck pain and forward head posture. Controlling the muscular activities through scapular stabilization exercise also improves the patients' quality of life. PMID:27134391

  3. STUDY ON NECK SHAFT ANGLE AND FEMORAL LENGTH OF SOUTH INDIAN FEMURS

    OpenAIRE

    Shakil Mohamad Khan; Shaik Hussain Saheb

    2014-01-01

    Back ground: Femoral nek anteversion describes the angle subtended by the femoral neck with reference to the transcondylar plane of the distal end of the femur and is usually 15° to 45°. This along with the neck shaft angle, hip axis length, femoral neck width influence the risk of femoral neck fracture. Femoral neck anteversion angle has to be taken into consideration when reduction and fixation is selected as a method of treatment. Objectives: The objectives of present study to find out ...

  4. Gradation of Neck Muscle Responses and Head/Neck Kinematics to Acceleration and Speed Change in Rear-end Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Sanderson, David J; Inglis, J Timothy

    2004-11-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that the potential for whiplash injury varies with both the average acceleration and speed change of a rear-end collision. The goal of this study was to examine the gradation of neck muscle responses and the head and neck kinematics to rear-end collision pulses in which the acceleration and speed change were independently varied. Thirty subjects (15F, 15M) underwent 36 consecutive rear-end collisions consisting of three different average accelerations (ā = 0.5, 0.9 and 1.3 g) and three different speed changes (Deltav = 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 m/s). Onset and amplitude of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and cervical paraspinal (PARA) muscle responses were measured using surface electromyography. Kinematic measures included linear and angular accelerations and displacements of the head and torso. The results showed that the amplitude of the muscle and kinematics responses was graded to both collision acceleration and speed change. The magnitude of early peaks in the head/neck kinematics correlated more strongly with collision acceleration (r(2) = 0.63 to 0.69), whereas the magnitude of later kinematic peaks correlated more strongly with collision speed change (r(2) = 0.59 to 0.95). Onset of the SCM muscle response correlated only weakly with collision acceleration and speed change (r(2) acceleration and speed change (āDeltav) yielded the strongest and most consistent correlations with neck muscle (r(2) = 0.48 to 0.58) and head/neck kinematic responses (r(2) = 0.78 to 0.94). This measure of collision severity is also consistent with the recent epidemiological evidence that whiplash symptom intensity and duration increases with both average acceleration and speed change.

  5. Evaluation of an automatic segmentation algorithm for definition of head and neck organs at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate definition of organs at risk (OARs) is required to fully exploit the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. However, manual delineation is time-consuming and there is considerable inter-observer variability. This is pertinent as function-sparing and adaptive IMRT have increased the number and frequency of delineation of OARs. We evaluated accuracy and potential time-saving of Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) automatic segmentation to define OARs for salivary-, swallowing- and cochlea-sparing IMRT. Five clinicians recorded the time to delineate five organs at risk (parotid glands, submandibular glands, larynx, pharyngeal constrictor muscles and cochleae) for each of 10 CT scans. SPICE was then used to define these structures. The acceptability of SPICE contours was initially determined by visual inspection and the total time to modify them recorded per scan. The Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm created a reference standard from all clinician contours. Clinician, SPICE and modified contours were compared against STAPLE by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean/maximum distance to agreement (DTA). For all investigated structures, SPICE contours were less accurate than manual contours. However, for parotid/submandibular glands they were acceptable (median DSC: 0.79/0.80; mean, maximum DTA: 1.5 mm, 14.8 mm/0.6 mm, 5.7 mm). Modified SPICE contours were also less accurate than manual contours. The utilisation of SPICE did not result in time-saving/improve efficiency. Improvements in accuracy of automatic segmentation for head and neck OARs would be worthwhile and are required before its routine clinical implementation

  6. Neck-controlled sensitivity study on nano-grain SnO2 gas sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The electrical potential inside a cylinder with a space charge layer is used to express the neck potential barrier of nano-SnO2 gas elements, and the neck-controlled sensitivity and the grain size effect are studied. It is shown that the sensing properties are influenced by the microstructural features, such as the grain size, the geometry and connectivity between grains,and that the neck controlled sensitivity alone is higher than the neck-grain controlled sensitivity and the difference between the neck controlled sensitivity and the neck-grain controlled sensitivity is large in the high sensitivity range for nano-SnO2 gas elements, which suggests a possible approach to the improvement of the sensitivity of a sensor by decreasing the number of necks of a nano-grain SnO2 gas element.

  7. Influence of sintering necks on the spectral behaviour of ITO clusters using the Discrete Dipole Approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we study the spectral behaviour of indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticle clusters using different sinter neck models for the connections between the primary particles. The investigations include light scattering calculations based on the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA). The corresponding clusters are generated using the Cluster–Cluster algorithm proposed by Filippov et al. Different sintering neck models led to significantly different spectral features. A spectral neck factor that reveals the thickness of the necks connecting the primary particles with a simple measurement method is introduced. - Highlights: • We investigate the necking phenomenon in ITO fractal-like aggregates. • Extinction diagrams are sensitive to changes of the neck size. • We propose a simple procedure for measuring the neck size in ITO aggregates

  8. Adaptive Modular Playware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Þorsteinsson, Arnar Tumi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the concept of adaptive modular playware, where the playware adapts to the interaction of the individual user. We hypothesize that there are individual differences in user interaction capabilities and styles, and that adaptive playware may adapt to the individual user’s...

  9. Outcomes and Prognostic Factors of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hye Doo; Lee, Yun Young; Lee, Seung Jin; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Jung, Sang Young [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Nam Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, St. Carollo Hospital, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jae Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Donggunsan Hospital, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate the outcomes and find the prognostic factors of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with hostile neck anatomy of the abdominal aorta. This study was performed on 100 patients with abdominal aneurysm who were treated with EVAR between March 2006 and December 2010. We divided the patients into two groups: good neck anatomy (GNA), and hostile neck anatomy (HNA) and then compared the primary success rate and the incidence rate of complications with EVAR between the two groups. Our aim was to determine the factors related to the complications of EVAR among HNA types. There were no significant differences of primary success rate and incidence rate of complications between the two groups. Among the types of HNA, the short neck angle [odd ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-18.70; p = 0.023] and large neck angle (OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 0.15-11.85; p = 0.031) showed a low primary success rate. The short neck angle (OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.18-12.29; p = 0.002) and large neck angle (OR, 4.67; 95% CI, 0.14-19.07; p = 0.032) showed a high incidence rate of early type 1 complication. In the case of the large neck angle (OR, 3.78; 95% CI, 0.96-20.80; p = 0.047), the large neck thrombus (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 0.24-7.12; p = 0.035) and large neck calcification (OR, 2.50; 95% CI, 0.08-18.37; p 0.043) showed a high incidence rate of complications within a year. The results suggest that patients with hostile neck anatomy can be treated with EVAR successfully, although there was a higher incidence of complications in patients with a short neck length, severe neck angulation, circumferential thrombosis, and calcified proximal neck.

  10. Implantation of iodine-125 seed for head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the technological feasibility, efficacy and morbidity of 125I-seed implantation for head and neck cancer. Methods: Forty patients with head and neck cancer were treated with 125I-seed intersitial brachytherapy guided by uhrasound or CT. Among them thirty-six patients were performed under local anesthesia and four were under general anesthesia. Thirty-six patients were treated with 125I-seed implantation under ultrasound guidance and four cases under CT guidance. Seed needles were implanted in parallel with each other, 1-1.5 cm apart. Mick applicator was used to each needle to implant seed. The radioactive activity ranged 0.40-0.70 mCi, and the matched peripheral doses were 90-145 Gy. The mean number of 125I-seed was 3-84. Five cases received external beam irradiation one week after seed implantation, and the total doses were 45-50 Gy(200 cGy/f). All the cases were examined by X-ray or CT after implantation for quality evaluation and by routine chest X ray within twenty-four to forty-eight hours after seed implantation. Results: These patients were followed-up for 3-33 months. In 10 tongue carcinoma patients, complete response was shown in 3 cases, partial response in three cases, no change in three cases and progressive disease in one case. The local control rate was 60%, the median survival time was 11 monthes, and the one-year and two year survival rates were 87.50% and 35%, respectively. In 14 patients with recurrent cancer of head and neck the local control rate was 76.47% ,the one-year and two-year survival rates were 66.08% and 24%, respectively, and the median survival time was 9 months. In 16 patients with metastatic cancer of head and neck the local control rate was 95.23%, the one-year and two-year survival rates were 54.55% and 32.73%, and the median survival time was 9 months. One seed migrated to the maxilla and loss of seeds happened in two cases, but there was no clinically related mobidity. Conclusion: 125I

  11. Pathology-based validation of FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinagl, Dominic A.X. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (874), P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogen, Frank J.A. van den [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A.W. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Slootweg, Piet J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    FDG PET is increasingly incorporated into radiation treatment planning of head and neck cancer. However, there are only limited data on the accuracy of radiotherapy target volume delineation by FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to validate FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer against the pathological method as the standard. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer and 28 metastatic lymph nodes eligible for therapeutic neck dissection underwent preoperative FDG PET/CT. The metastatic lymph nodes were delineated on CT (Node{sub CT}) and ten PET segmentation tools were used to assess FDG PET-based nodal volumes: interpreting FDG PET visually (PET{sub VIS}), applying an isocontour at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 (PET{sub SUV}), two segmentation tools with a fixed threshold of 40 % and 50 %, and two adaptive threshold based methods. The latter four tools were applied with the primary tumour as reference and also with the lymph node itself as reference. Nodal volumes were compared with the true volume as determined by pathological examination. Both Node{sub CT} and PET{sub VIS} showed good correlations with the pathological volume. PET segmentation tools using the metastatic node as reference all performed well but not better than PET{sub VIS}. The tools using the primary tumour as reference correlated poorly with pathology. PET{sub SUV} was unsatisfactory in 35 % of the patients due to merging of the contours of adjacent nodes. FDG PET accurately estimates metastatic lymph node volume, but beyond the detection of lymph node metastases (staging), it has no added value over CT alone for the delineation of routine radiotherapy target volumes. If FDG PET is used in radiotherapy planning, treatment adaptation or response assessment, we recommend an automated segmentation method for purposes of reproducibility and interinstitutional comparison. (orig.)

  12. Pathology-based validation of FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FDG PET is increasingly incorporated into radiation treatment planning of head and neck cancer. However, there are only limited data on the accuracy of radiotherapy target volume delineation by FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to validate FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer against the pathological method as the standard. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer and 28 metastatic lymph nodes eligible for therapeutic neck dissection underwent preoperative FDG PET/CT. The metastatic lymph nodes were delineated on CT (NodeCT) and ten PET segmentation tools were used to assess FDG PET-based nodal volumes: interpreting FDG PET visually (PETVIS), applying an isocontour at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 (PETSUV), two segmentation tools with a fixed threshold of 40 % and 50 %, and two adaptive threshold based methods. The latter four tools were applied with the primary tumour as reference and also with the lymph node itself as reference. Nodal volumes were compared with the true volume as determined by pathological examination. Both NodeCT and PETVIS showed good correlations with the pathological volume. PET segmentation tools using the metastatic node as reference all performed well but not better than PETVIS. The tools using the primary tumour as reference correlated poorly with pathology. PETSUV was unsatisfactory in 35 % of the patients due to merging of the contours of adjacent nodes. FDG PET accurately estimates metastatic lymph node volume, but beyond the detection of lymph node metastases (staging), it has no added value over CT alone for the delineation of routine radiotherapy target volumes. If FDG PET is used in radiotherapy planning, treatment adaptation or response assessment, we recommend an automated segmentation method for purposes of reproducibility and interinstitutional comparison. (orig.)

  13. A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2–N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2–N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5–16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6–16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR→pCR, and cPR→pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR→pCR, and cPR→pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2–N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

  14. A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltys, Scott G., E-mail: sgsoltys@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Choi, Clara Y.H. [Department of Neurosugery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Fee, Willard E. [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Pinto, Harlan A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Veterans Affairs, Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

  15. Effectiveness of a tailored neck training program on neck strength, movement, and fatigue in under-19 male rugby players: a randomized controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrett MD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Matthew D Barrett,1 Terence F McLoughlin,2 Kieran R Gallagher,1 Don Gatherer,3 Michael TR Parratt,1 Jonathan R Perera,1 Tim WR Briggs1 1Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex, United Kingdom; 2Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, Mersey Deanery, United Kingdom; 3The Gatherer Partnership, Aylesbury, United Kingdom Purpose: To investigate the effect of a tailored neck muscle conditioning program on neck muscle strength, neck muscle fatigue, and range of neck movement in 16–18-year-old male rugby players. Materials and methods: Thirty-four male rugby players were divided into forward and back playing positions and randomized within these groups. Seventeen players were randomly assigned to each group. The test group was given a tailored 6-week exercise regime based on their baseline measurements to be performed three times a week in addition to their normal training and playing. The control group trained and played as normal. The outcome measures used were cervical spine range of movement, neck strength, and neck muscle fatigability. Results: There were no clinically relevant statistically significant differences between the two groups. Trends identified between the two groups suggest that a tailored neck exercise program increases neck strength, particularly neck extension, and increases resistance to fatigue, as well as influencing right- and left-sided neck muscle balance. A reduction in range of movement was also demonstrated in the test group. There was a great deal of variability in range of movement and strength within this age group. No previously undiagnosed neck conditions were detected, and there were no adverse events reported. Conclusion: This study has shown that neck strength, range of movement, and susceptibility of the neck muscles to fatigue can be influenced using a focused neck training regime. It forms an important basis for a larger, multicenter study to ensure the neck is given due attention in

  16. Image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account anatomical variations occurring during irradiation by visualization of anatomical structures. It may consist of a rigid registration of the tumour by moving the patient, in case of prostatic irradiation for example. IGRT associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is strongly recommended when high-dose is delivered in the prostate, where it seems to reduce rectal and bladder toxicity. In case of significant anatomical deformations, as in head and neck tumours (tumour shrinking and decrease in volume of the salivary glands), re-planning appears to be necessary, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy. This should ideally be 'monitored' and possibly triggered based on a calculation of cumulative dose, session after session, compared to the initial planning dose, corresponding to the concept of dose-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The creation of 'planning libraries' based on predictable organ positions (as in cervical cancer) is another way of adaptive radiotherapy. All of these strategies still appear very complex and expensive and therefore require stringent validation before being routinely applied. (authors)

  17. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  18. Mo-Si alloy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this task is to develop new-generation corrosion-resistant Mo-Si intermetallic alloys as hot components in advanced fossil energy conversion and combustion systems. The initial effort is devoted to Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3}-base (MSB) alloys containing boron additions. Three MSB alloys based on Mo-10.5Si-1.1B (wt %), weighing 1500 g were prepared by hot pressing of elemental and alloy powders at temperatures to 1600{degrees}C in vacuum. Microporosities and glassy-phase (probably silicate phases) formations are identified as the major concerns for preparation of MSB alloys by powder metallurgy. Suggestions are made to alleviate the problems of material processing.

  19. Glass formation in eutectic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the glass forming ability around eutectic composition in terms of the competitive growth/formation of primary dendrites, eutectic and glass. It is concluded that the glass forming ability of a eutectic alloy system depends on the type of the eutectics, i.e. symmetric or asymmetric eutectic coupled zone. For the alloy systems with symmetric eutectic coupled zone, the best glass forming alloys should be at or very close to the eutectic composition. For the alloys with asymmetric eutectic coupled zone, which is associated with the irregular eutectic, the best glass forming alloys should be at off-eutectic compositions, probably towards the side of the faceted phase with a high entropy in the phase diagram. (orig.)

  20. Use of surface electromyography to estimate neck muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerich, C M; Joines, S M; Hermans, V; Moon, S D

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the literature concerning the use of surface electromyography (sEMG) for the study of the neck musculature in response to work and workplace design during light work and semi-static tasks. The paper also draws upon basic research and biomechanical modeling in order to provide methodological recommendations for the use of surface electromyography in this region of the body and to identify areas which require further investigation. The paper includes review and discussion of electrode site location, methods of normalization, data reliability, and factors that can affect sEMG signals from this region, including noise, physiologic artifact, stress, visual deficiencies, and pain. General guidance for maximum exertions with the neck musculature, for sEMG normalization or other purposes, is also included.

  1. The role of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Christel Braemer; Buchwald, Christian von

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing awareness of a subset of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC), i.e. HPV-positive HNSCC. These cancers seem to differ somewhat from HPV-negative HNSCC. Patients with HPV-positive HNSCC tend to be younger and have a lower intake...... of tobacco and alcohol. Distinct molecular profiles separate them from HPV-negative cancers and show similarities with HPV-positive cervical SCC. There is evidence that HPV-positive HNSCC is a sexually transmitted disease. Patients with HPV-positive HNSCC are often diagnosed at a late stage with large cystic...... lymph nodes in the neck. HPV-positive HNSCC show an affinity for the oropharynx, especially the tonsils and the base of the tongue, and tend to show low differentiation histopathologically. There is a better prognosis regardless of the treatment regimen for HPV-positive HNSCC compared with HPV...

  2. Huge Facial Desmoid Tumors with Neck Extension: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghazipour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Desmoid tumors are very rare, benign fibrous neoplasms arise from the musculoaponeurotic structures throughout the body.   Case Report: The patient was a   seven-year old boy with a large mandibular mass growing over a period of six months. His CT-scan showed a large mass, 13 cm in diameter in the cheek area extending to the neck and trachea. Biopsy was compatible with desmoid fibromatosis.  He was given neoadjovant treatment with vinblastin and methotrexate. The patient underwent a tracheostomy. Then a complete hemimandibulectomy and submandibular gland excision was performed.  Finally reconstruction with latisimus dorsi free flap was performed.   Conclusion: Despite rarity desmoid tumors should be kept in mind of an otorhinolaryngologist as a differential diagnosis in children with head and neck mass.  

  3. Ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures: An overlooked association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 304 patients with injuries to the femoral shaft and ipsilateral hip presented between 1984 and 1990. Some 253 of them suffered fractures of the femoral shaft and dislocated hips or fractures of the acetabulum, and 51 of these sustained fractures of the femoral shaft and neck or trochanteric region. All of the trochanteric injuries were demonstrated on the initial radiographs. However, in 11 of the patients with combined femoral shaft and neck fractures, the diagnosis was delayed by as much as 4 weeks. This delay related to the fact that these fractures tended not to separate in the initial evaluation period and that there was external rotation of the proximal femoral fragment due to the femoral shaft fracture. (orig./GDG)

  4. Photodynamic therapy for treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, V G

    1990-03-01

    Since 1975, photodynamic therapy has reportedly been effective in a variety of head and neck malignancies that failed traditional (conventional) therapy, including surgery, cryotherapy, chemotherapy, hyperthermia, and radiation therapy. Photodynamic therapy consists of the intravenous administration of (di)hematoporphyrin ether, a chemosensitizing drug selectively retained by neoplastic and reticuloendothelial tissues which, when exposed to a 630-nm argon laser, catalyzes a photochemical reaction to release free oxygen radicals, "the cytotoxic" agents responsible for cell death and tumor necrosis. Preliminary investigations have assessed the efficacy of photodynamic therapy in treatment of: (1) superficial "condemned mucosa" or "field cancerization" of the oral cavity and (2) stage III and IV head and neck carcinomas that had unsuccessful conventional therapy. Complete and/or partial remissions were obtained in 11 of 12 patients (16 treatments) with a variety of carcinomas of the nasopharynx, palate and uvula, retromolar trigone, temporal bone, cervical esophagus, and AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma of the oral cavity. PMID:2108409

  5. Lymphangioma of the head and neck: Four case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymphangiomas are uncommon benign congenital tumors. Most occur in the head and neck and most lesions present by the age of 2 years. We present our experience with four patients who have lymphangiomas of the head and neck with tongue involvement. First case is a 7-year-old male who has the cystic lymphangioma of left submandibular area. Second a 22-year-old female has a lesion involving the border of right tongue. Third case is the lymphangioma which occur in the right upper lip of a 6-year old male. The last patient is a 28-year old male who fell down and whose right face was swollen up. He had undergone an operation and treated with steroid before. The characteristic appearances of imaging methods were described and all lesions best depicted on T2-weighted images. Our experience indicates that MRI is useful in the diagnosis and treatment planning of lymphangioma.

  6. Neck pain and anxiety do not always go together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Roessler, Kirsten K; Larsen, Anders H;

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Chronic pain and psychosocial distress are generally thought to be associated in chronic musculoskeletal disorders such as non-specific neck pain. However, it is unclear whether a raised level of anxiety is necessarily a feature of longstanding, intense pain amongst patient and general...... population sub-groups. In a cohort of 70 self-selected female, non-specific neck pain sufferers, we observed relatively high levels of self-reported pain of 4.46 (measured on the 11 point numerical pain rating scale (NRS-101)) and a longstanding duration of symptoms (156 days/year). However, the mean anxiety...... scores observed (5.49), fell well below the clinically relevant threshold of 21 required by the Beck Anxiety Inventory. The cohort was stratified to further distinguish individuals with higher pain intensity (NRS>6) and longer symptom duration (>90 days). Although a highly statistically significant...

  7. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  8. Iridescence in the neck feathers of domestic pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haiwei; Shi, Lei; Sha, Jing; Li, Yizhou; Qin, Youhua; Dong, Biqin; Meyer, Serge; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhao, Li; Zi, Jian

    2006-11-01

    We conducted structural characterizations, reflection measurements, and theoretical simulations on the iridescent green and purple neck feathers of domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica). We found that both green and purple barbules are composed of an outer keratin cortex layer surrounding a medullary layer. The thickness of the keratin cortex layer shows a distinct difference between green and purple barbules. Green barbules vary colors from green to purple with the observing angle changed from normal to oblique, while purple barbules from purple to green in an opposite way. Both the experimental and theoretical results suggest that structural colors in green and purple neck feathers should originate from the interference in the top keratin cortex layer, while the structure beyond acts as a poor mirror.

  9. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction and expression, mediation of apoptosis and clinical response including pathological complete responses. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current available gene therapies for head and neck cancer.

  10. Current Concepts in Osteoradionecrosis after Head and Neck Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanda, J; Pasquier, D; Newman, L; Shaw, R

    2016-07-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws is a feared complication of head and neck radiotherapy. ORN causes significant morbidity for patients and controversy among clinicians. This overview considers the variations in definition and classification of the condition that affect estimates of incidence and also the interpretation of evidence. The influence of newer radiotherapy techniques in reducing ORN through reduced dose and xerostomia is balanced against a probable increase in a vulnerable population through a rising head and neck cancer incidence. Theories of pathophysiology of ORN include radiation-induced osteomyelitis, hypoxic and hypovascular theory and fibroatrophic theory. Prevention strategies include restorative dentistry and radiation planning techniques. Treatments range from conservative 'watch and wait' through to more radical surgical strategies. Newer medical management strategies are available with a limited evidence base. The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy remains controversial and the background and need for newer hyperbaric oxygen trials is discussed. PMID:27038708

  11. Systemic chemotherapy of advanced head and neck malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, K E; Armstrong, D M; Aust, J B; Cruz, A B

    1975-04-01

    Several Phase II chemotherapy protocols were evaluated in patients with advanced malignancies; 158 were evaluable head and neck cases. The protocols were as follows: five-drug combination (COMFP), four-drug (COMF), (CCNU, Adriamycin, DTIC, and cytosine arabinoside. Insufficient numbers and data were received to adequately evaluate Yoshi 864, 5 Azacytidine, porfiromycin, BCNU, and Azaserine. Significant responses to therapy were noted in the four and five-drug combinations in which 30-44% of the patients had 50% or greater regression, with an average duration of 2.2 months. Adriamycin and CCNU demonstrated lesser antitumor effects, while DTIC and cytosine arabinoside did not demonstrate significant antitumor activity in the head and neck areas. Usual toxicity consisted largely of nausea and vomiting, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Alopecia was not pronouced in Adriamycin-treated patients. It appears that combination chemotherapy had a higher response rate compared to single agents used in the different cooperative protocols. PMID:1116105

  12. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Nakayama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is a malignant neoplasm derived from nonkeratinizing cells that originate from the basal layer of the epidermis and is the most frequent type of skin cancer in humans, with cumulative exposure to ultraviolet radiation as an important risk factor. BCC occurs most frequently at sun-exposed sites, with the head and neck being common areas. Tumors can be classified as nodular, superficial, morpheaform, infiltrating, metatypic, and fibroepithelioma of Pinkus. Several treatment options such as surgical excision and nonsurgical procedures are available. The choice of treatment should be determined based on the histological subtype of a lesion, cost, its size and location, patient age, medical condition of the patient, treatment availability, and the patient's wishes. The aim of any therapy selected for BCC treatment involving the head and neck is to ensure complete removal, the preservation of function, and a good cosmetic outcome.

  13. Benign anlage tumour: a very unusual neck mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Shivani; Gohil, Rohit; Oparka, Richie; Kennedy, Ceilidh

    2016-05-18

    A 44-year-old woman presented with a slow-growing asymptomatic neck swelling at the left medial clavicle. Haematological and biochemical work up was normal and an ultrasound confirmed the swelling, but needle aspiration was non-diagnostic. As lymphoma was the main differential diagnosis, the swelling was completely excised. Immunohistochemistry yielded a rare lesion, suspected to represent a myoepithelial/mixed cellularity tumour of soft tissue. The extreme rarity of these tumours required a confirmatory secondary opinion, which ultimately led to it being identified as a benign anlage tumour (previously known as an ectopic hamartomatous thymoma) This case highlights the fact that thorough assessment of patients with neck swellings should be undertaken to rule out sinister causes-keeping in mind more rare differentials-helping to guide final management.

  14. Effect of Individual Layer Shape on the Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Al Alloys Laminated Metal Composite Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zejun; Wu, Xia; Hu, Hongbo; Chen, Quanzhong; Liu, Qing

    2014-03-01

    For the dissimilar laminated metal composite sheets (LMCS) fabricated by roll bonding technology, the great differences of mechanical properties between the constituent metals lead to the non-uniform deformation and individual layer necking. The individual layer shape affects the mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar LMCS. The Al/Al alloy (1100/7075) LMCS with the same thickness and ratio of dissimilar metals, but different individual layer shapes, have been successfully fabricated by hot accumulative roll bonding in conjunction with cold rolling technology. Some effective methods (such as sheet crown, warp degree, and slant angle) were presented to quantitatively evaluate the individual layer shape and necking of constituent metals. The microstructure and mechanical properties of 1100/7075 LMCS with different individual layer shapes were investigated. The effects of bonding interface on the mechanical properties were obtained based on the assessment of individual layer shapes and necking. The strength and elongation of LMCS decrease with the increase of variation of individual layer shapes and necking when the number of layers keeps constant. The research results offer some theoretical guides and references for adjusting the control measures of compatibility deformation, optimizing the hot roll bonding technologies, and designing the novel high-performance dissimilar LMCS.

  15. Reduction in thermal conductivity of Bi–Te alloys through grain refinement method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soma Dutta; V Shubha; T G Ramesh

    2013-10-01

    Ternary alloys of thermoelectric materials Bi–Sb–Te and Bi–Se–Te of molecular formula, Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 ( type) and Bi0.36Se0.064Te0.576 ( type), were prepared by mechanical alloying method. The preparation of materials by mechanical alloying method has effectively reduced the thermal conductivity by generating a large number of induced grain boundaries with required degree of disorder. The process of frequent milling was adapted for grain refinement. Substantial reduction in thermal conductivity was achieved due to nano-structuring of these alloys. Thermal conductivity values were found to be very low at room temperature, 0.5W/mK and 0.8W/mK, respectively for p and n type materials.

  16. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  17. Heating uranium alloy billets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data were obtained for the surface heat transfer coefficient of uranium and the alloys of uranium-0.75 wt percent titanium, uranium-6 wt percent niobium, and uranium-7.5 wt percent niobium-2.5 wt percent zirconium. Samples were heated to 8500C in both a molten salt bath and an argon-purged air furnace, then the samples were cooled in air. Surface heat transfer coefficients were calculated from the experimental data for both heating and cooling of the metals. 4 fig, 4 tables

  18. 49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (drawing SA572-S11), and either three accelerometers (drawing SA572-S4) or their mass equivalent installed... neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11), and 0.01778m is the distance from force to occipital condyle. (2... transducer (drawing SA5572-S11), about the occipital condyles shall be not more than −53 N-m (−39 ft-lbf)...

  19. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND SOCIAL BURDEN OF THE FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlin Filipov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of femoral neck fractures, one of the most common traumatic injuries in the elderly increases continuously due to the ageing of population on the planet and urbanization. In terms of global economic instability, increasingly more funds would have to be paid by the health systems for treatment of those fractures. Probably it will be necessary to revise and optimize some current therapeutic standards.

  20. Pneumoperitoneum in a patient with pneumothorax and blunt neck trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Yaqoob Hakim

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Free air in the abdomen after blunt traumatic neck injury is very rare. If pneumoperitoneum is suspected in the presence of pneumothorax, exploratory laparotomy should be performed to rule out intraabdominal injury. As, there is no consensus for this plan yet, further prospective studies are warrant. Conservative management for pneumoperitoneum in the absence of viscus perforation is still a safe option in carefully selected cases.

  1. TWO INTERESTING CASES OF THE HEAD AND NECK REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayasree; Sunethri; Nalini; Sathyanarayana

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-five to 45 percent of all schwannomas occur in the head and neck. Most of them arise along the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve (acoustic neurinoma). They rarely originate from the peripheral facial nerve or other nerves within the parotid gland. Less than 4% of schwannomas involve the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. They arise from the branches of the trigeminal nerve and autonomic nervous system. We report two cases of schwannomas arising from in...

  2. Rapid Arc for heat and Neck cancer (200 patients experience)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Triana, G.; Gesto, C.; Diaz, I.; Candal, A.; Fernandez, C.; Izquierdo, P.; Poncet, M.; Silva, M. C.; Soto, M.; Losada, C.; Marino, A.

    2013-07-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy is increasingly standard for head and neck cancer. These advances have resulted in longer treatment times when compared to 3D Conformal Radiotherapy. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy potentially enables shorter treatment time, achieving similar dose results. We report feasibility and acute toxicity profile of patients treated with moderate hypo fractionation and simultaneous integrated boost by means of Image Guided- Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy technique in the first two years from its clinical implementation at COG. (Author)

  3. Craniosacral Therapy for the Treatment of Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Haller, Heidemarie; Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix J.; Ostermann, Thomas; Dobos, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: With growing evidence for the effectiveness of craniosacral therapy (CST) for pain management, the efficacy of CST remains unclear. This study therefore aimed at investigating CST in comparison with sham treatment in chronic nonspecific neck pain patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 blinded patients were randomized into either 8 weekly units of CST or light-touch sham treatment. Outcomes were assessed before and after treatment (week 8) and again 3 months later (week 20)...

  4. Minimizing Liability Risks of Head and Neck Injuries in Football

    OpenAIRE

    Heck, Jonathan F.; Weis, Michael P.; Gartland, James M.; Weis, Craig R.

    1994-01-01

    Although catastrophic head and neck injuries in football occur infrequently, their occurrence is almost always followed by litigation. The athletic trainer has to be sure he/she has adequate liability insurance to cover the costs of a defense and a possible judgment. General claims filed against athletic staffs usually deal with instruction, equipment, matching of participants, supervision, and/or postinjury care. The defenses to these claims include: statutory immunity, assumption of risk, r...

  5. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Bali; Deepika Bali; Ashutosh Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction...

  6. Heterotopic Pancreatic Tissue Obstructing the Gallbladder Neck: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Justin L Weppner; Wilson, Matthew R.; Robert Ricca; Paul A Lucha Jr

    2009-01-01

    Context Heterotopic pancreatic tissue is defined as pancreatic tissue outside the boundaries of the pancreas that has neither anatomic nor vascular continuity with the pancreas. Heterotopic pancreatic tissue in the gallbladder is uncommon and has rarely been reported to cause symptoms. We report a case of heterotopic pancreatic tissue obstructing the gallbladder neck resulting in cholecystitis. Case report A 26-year-old female presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and fever. On p...

  7. [Lymphatic malformations in the head and neck area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, S; Werner, J A

    2016-02-01

    Lymphatic malformations are congenital malformations of the lymphatic system. They are mainly located in the head and neck area, and grow proportional to the patients' body growth. Depending on the morphology, it can be distinguished between macrocystic, microcystic and mixed lymphatic malformations. Due to their infiltrative growth, microcystic lymphatic malformations are particularly difficult to treat. Therapeutic approaches include conventional surgical resection, laser therapy, sclerotherapy and systemic drug therapies. PMID:26820157

  8. Femoral neck non-union treatment by valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy in femoral neck non-union. METHODS : Forty-two patients with femoral neck fractures with non-union treated using Pauwels' intertrochanteric osteotomy were reviewed. Demographics, time elapsed between fracture and surgery, follow--up, osteosynthesis used, Garden's classification, limb shortening, and x-rays were evaluated. RESULTS : Twenty-two men and 20 women were reviewed. The youngest patient was 18 years old and the oldest 65 years old, with a mean age of 42.4 years (±11.2). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, with a mean of 10.2 years. The average time elapsed between initial fracture and osteotomy was 6.5 months. Twel-ve cases were neglected femoral neck fractures. Nineteen patients were classified as Garden III, and 23 patients as Garden IV. After valgus osteotomy, non-union healing was observed in 38 patients (38/42; 90.4%). Healing of thirty-seven cases of pseudoarthrosis were obtained after the first-attempt osteotomy, and one case required two operations for healing. The osteotomy failed in four cases. Conside-ring the healed osteotomies, good to excellent functional results were achieved in 80.9% (34/42) of the patients. Total hip replacement was subsequently performed in 14.2% (6/42) of the patients for unfavoura-ble outcomes (two for cutting out, two for osteonecrosis, and two for osteoarthritis). CONCLUSIONS : Valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy has a high success rate in archiving healing in femoral neck non-union with good functional results. It is a biological and effective method. Level of Evidence IV, Therapeutic Study. PMID:27057146

  9. Prolonged bleeding on the neck in leech therapy: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Atakan Savrun; Selim Bozkurt; Mehmet Okumus; Emre Gokcen; Murat Turkaslan

    2015-01-01

    Superficial skin bleeding can usually be stopped by applying short-time compression, unless the patient suffers from coagulation disorders or uses anticoagulant. Because of the anticoagulant component of leech saliva, a leech bite may cause long-time bleeding, which cannot be stopped via compression. In this study, the case of a patient who applied leech therapy on her neck for the treatment of migraine has been presented. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000): 234-237

  10. Psychological functioning of caregivers for head and neck cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Longacre, Margaret L.; Ridge, John A.; Burtness, Barbara A.; Galloway, Thomas J.; Fang, Carolyn Y.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often require assistance from family caregivers during the treatment and post-treatment period. This review article sought to summarize current findings regarding the psychological health of HNSCC caregivers, including factors that may be associated with poorer psychological health. Online databases (PUBMED, MEDLINE and PSYCINFO) were searched for papers published in English through September 2010 reporting on the psychological healt...

  11. Unusual neck pathology in a Nevisian prehistoric individual

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Elaine; Zakrzewski, Sonia R.

    2007-01-01

    Over the years, a small series of skeletal remains have been collected by the Nelson Museum. Despite the poor preservation of the material, several specimens exhibited pathological changes. Severe neck pathology was found in one specimen deriving from the prehistoric site of Coconut Walk. This paper presents the changes in the vertebrae and elsewhere within this individual and proposes block vertebrae (possibly even Klippel-Feil syndrome) as the diagnosis.

  12. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Robots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngealtumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots inoropharyngealreconstruction is newbut essentialfor oropharyngeal defectsthatresultfromrobotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction ofhead and neck defectsto exemplify the necessity forrobotic reconstruction.Methods  We investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgeryand free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 andMarch 31, 2012, 5 caseswereperformed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstructionmethods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time wereinvestigated.Results  Among five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and onewas an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and oneflap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flapinsetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured roboticinstrument. The total operation timewas 1,041.0 minutes(range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, andcomplicationsincluding flap necrosis, hematoma, andwound dehiscence did not occur.Conclusions  Thisstudy demonstratesthe clinically applicable use ofrobotsin oropharyngealreconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insettingthe flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditionalmandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methodsand is accepted asthemost up-to-datemethod.

  13. Pancreaticogastrostomy: a salvage procedure for pancreatic body and neck resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Prasoon, Pankaj; Hong, Wu; Lu, Hui Min; Zhang, Zhao Da; Zhaoda, Zhang

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the technological viability, basic safety and consequence of central pancreatectomy (CP) with pancreaticogastrostomy in properly chosen sufferers with noncancerous central pancreatic pathology. This research is centered on the infirmary charts of West China hospital. We recruited 20 individuals from 2007 to 2009 diagnosed with benign cancerous growth of pancreatic body and neck. They underwent pancreatic body and neck resection adhering to pancreaticogastrostomy. We carried out central pancreatectomy following pancreaticogastrostomy in 20 patients: 8 with serous cyst adenomas, 11 with mucinous cystadenomas, and 1 with neuroendocrine tumor. The position of all tumors was restricted to body and neck of the pancreas, measuring a mean ± standard deviation of 2.6±1.3cm. The mean post-operative hospital stay was 7 days (ranging from 6 to 16 days).There was no intraoperative additional complications. From a technical perspective, CP is a safe and sound, pancreas-preserving pancreatectomy for non-enucleable non-cancerous pancreatic pathology restricted to the pancreatic body. PMID:23396710

  14. Head and neck cancer: from research to therapy and cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelas, Xaralabos; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2014-12-01

    Cumulative findings from many research groups have identified new signaling mechanisms associated with head and neck cancers. We summarize these findings, including discussion of aberrant NOTCH, PI3K, STAT3, immune recognition, oxidative pathway, and regulation of cell cycle and cell death. The genomic landscape of head and neck cancers has been shown to differ depending on human papillomavirus (HPV) status. We discuss studies examining the integration of HPV into genomic regions, as well as the epigenetic alterations that occur in response to HPV infection, and how these may help reveal new biomarker and treatment predictors. The characterization of premalignant lesions is also highlighted, as is evidence indicating that the surgical removal of these lesions is associated with better clinical outcomes. Current surgical methods are also discussed, including several less aggressive approaches such as minimal invasive robotic surgery. While much remains to be done in the fight against head and neck cancer, continued integration of basic research with new treatment options will likely lead to more effective therapeutic strategies directed against this disease. PMID:25532687

  15. Simple overlay device for determining radial head and neck height

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jun-Gyu; Southgate, Richard D.; Fitzsimmons, James S.; O' Driscoll, Shawn W. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a simple overlay device can be used on radiographs to measure radial head and neck height. Thirty anteroposterior elbow radiographs from 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis were examined to measure radial head and neck height. Three methods using different points along the bicipital tuberosity as a landmark were used. Method 1 used the proximal end of the bicipital tuberosity, method 2 used the most prominent point of the bicipital tuberosity, and method 3 used a simple overlay device (SOD) template that was aligned with anatomic reference points. All measurements were performed three times by three observers to determine interobserver and intraobserver reliability. Intraclass correlation coefficients revealed higher interobserver and intraobserver correlations for the SOD template method than for the other two methods. The 95% limits of agreement between observers were markedly better (-1.8 mm to +1.0 mm) for the SOD template method than for the proximal point method (-3.8 mm to +3.4 mm) or the prominent point method (-5.9 mm to +4.9 mm). We found that the SOD template method was reliable for assessing radial head and neck height. It had less variability than other methods, its 95% limit of agreement being less than 2 mm. This method could be helpful for assessing whether or not the insertion of a radial head prosthesis has resulted in over-lengthening of the radius. (orig.)

  16. Metabolic microscopy of head and neck cancer organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amy T.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Studies for head and neck cancer have primarily relied on cell lines or in vivo animal studies. However, a technique that combines the benefits of high-throughput in vitro studies with a complex, physiologically relevant microenvironment would be advantageous for understanding drug effects. Organoids provide a unique platform that fulfills these goals. Organoids are generated from excised and digested tumor tissue and are grown in culture. Fluorescence microscopy provides high-resolution images on a similar spatial scale as organoids. In particular, autofluorescence imaging of the metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD can provide insight into response to anti-cancer treatment. The optical redox ratio reflects relative amounts of NAD(P)H and FAD, and the fluorescence lifetime reflects enzyme activity of NAD(P)H and FAD. This study optimizes and characterizes the generation and culture of organoids grown from head and neck cancer tissue. Additionally, organoids were treated for 24 hours with a standard chemotherapy, and metabolic response in the organoids was measured using optical metabolic imaging. Ultimately, combining head and neck cancer organoids with optical metabolic imaging could be applied to test drug sensitivity for drug development studies as well as treatment planning for cancer patients.

  17. Heterotopic Pancreatic Tissue Obstructing the Gallbladder Neck: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L Weppner

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Heterotopic pancreatic tissue is defined as pancreatic tissue outside the boundaries of the pancreas that has neither anatomic nor vascular continuity with the pancreas. Heterotopic pancreatic tissue in the gallbladder is uncommon and has rarely been reported to cause symptoms. We report a case of heterotopic pancreatic tissue obstructing the gallbladder neck resulting in cholecystitis. Case report A 26-year-old female presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and fever. On physical examination the right upper quadrant was tender to palpation with a positive Murphy’s sign. Laboratory tests were significant for elevated aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. Transabdominal sonography showed gallbladder wall thickening, a positive sonographic Murphy’s sign, and an apparent large non-mobile stone at the gallbladder neck. Pathologic examination revealed cholecystitis but instead of a large stone there was a tan-yellow necrotic mass at the gallbladder neck. Microscopically, the mass consisted of heterotopic pancreatic tissue containing exocrine pancreatic acini, ducts, and islets of Langerhans. The final diagnosis was acute cholecystitis secondary to obstruction by heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Conclusion Although heterotopic pancreatic tissue is usually an incidental finding on pathologic exam, one should not exclude it in the differential diagnosis of symptomatic gallbladder disease of indefinite etiology.

  18. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. (Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, TX (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  19. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27002678

  20. Deep neck abscess. A 42-case retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reviewed 42 cases of deep neck abscess drained surgically or treated conservatively between February 2001 and August 2008, based on age, gender, primary focus, main symptom, abscess location, systemic disease, pathogenic bacteria, hospital treatment, hospitalization length, complications and long-term hospitalization. Of the 42, 26 were men and 16 women aged 14 to 80 (central age: 54.5 years). Abscess was caused most by tonsil inflammation (38.1%). Main symptom were sore throat (54.8%) and neck swelling (35.7%). Abscesses were found in the supra- and infrahyoid region in 30 cases and extended to the mediastinum in 2. Of the 42, 14 (33.3%) had hypertension and 11 (26.2%) diabetes mellitus (DM). Inflammation was due to aerobic bacteria (mainly Streptococcus milleri) in 23 cases (54.8%) and to anaerobic bacteria (mainly Peptostreptococcus) in 11 cases (26.2%). Flexible fiberscopic examination was important in evaluating pharyngeal and laryngeal mucosal disorders and enhanced computed tomography was useful in both diagnosis and postoperative observation. Of the 42, 38 required surgical drainage and 4 were cured using needle aspiration and antibiotics. Of the 38 undergoing surgery-tracheostomy was required in 22. Hospitalization for those with tracheostomy and DM was longer than in those without these factors. Complications included 2 cases each of, mediastinal abscess, sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), acute renal failure, severe pneumonia, upper digestive tract bleeding and swallowing disorder. Early surgical drainage and intravenous antibiotic administration are thus essential for treating deep neck abscesses. (author)

  1. Keratin 8 expression in head and neck epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berghaus Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intermediate filament forming protein keratin 8 (K8 is a tumour-associated antigen, which was shown to be over-expressed in a variety of malignancies. Here, we present a study of K8 expression in squamous epithelia of the head and neck area, including normal mucosa, hyperplastic and dysplastic leukoplakia, carcinomas of different sub-localisations, and lymph node metastases. Methods K8 expression was assessed upon immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies in cryosections of primary tumours of the head and neck area. Results K8 expression was characteristic of transformed tissue and marked early stages of disease, i.e. dysplastic oral leukoplakia, but not normal or hyperplastic epithelium. With the exception of carcinomas of the larynx and the tongue, K8 expression also strictly differentiated carcinomas from normal epithelium of the same origin. Furthermore, K8high was characteristic of cells, which had detached from the sites of primary tumours and had been invading the surrounding tissue at the time point of surgery. Conclusion K8 is an excellent marker for head and neck malignancies, which allows for early detection as well as for visualisation of potentially disseminating tumour cells in vivo.

  2. Stable palladium alloys for diffusion of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patapoff, M.

    1973-01-01

    Literature search on hydrogen absorption effect on palladium alloys revealed existence of alloy compositions in which alpha--beta transition does not take place. Survey conclusions: 40 percent gold alloy of palladium should be used in place of palladium; alloy must be free of interstitial impurities; and metallic surfaces of tube must be clean.

  3. Corrosion of aluminum alloys as a function of alloy composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was initiated which included nineteen aluminum alloys. Tests were conducted in high purity water at 3600C and flow tests (approx. 20 ft/sec) in reactor process water at 1300C (TF-18 loop tests). High-silicon alloys and AlSi failed completely in the 3600C tests. However, coupling of AlSi to 8001 aluminum suppressed the failure. The alloy compositions containing iron and nickel survived tht 3600C autoclave exposures. Corrosion rates varied widely as a function of alloy composition, but in directions which were predictable from previous high-temperature autoclave experience. In the TF-18 loop flow tests, corrosion penetrations were similar on all of the alloys and on high-purity aluminum after 105 days. However, certain alloys established relatively low linear corrosion rates: Al-0.9 Ni-0.5 Fe-0.1 Zr, Al-1.0 Ni-0.15 Fe-11.5 Si-0.8 Mg, Al-1.2 Ni-1.8 Fe, and Al-7.0 Ni-4.8 Fe. Electrical polarity measurements between AlSi and 8001 alloys in reactor process water at temperatures up to 1500C indicated that AlSi was anodic to 8001 in the static autoclave system above approx. 500C

  4. Clinical Practice Guidance for Radiotherapy Planning After Induction Chemotherapy in Locoregionally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of induction chemotherapy (IC) for locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer is increasing. The response to IC often causes significant alterations in tumor volume and location and shifts in normal anatomy. Proper determination of the radiotherapy (RT) targets after IC becomes challenging, especially with the use of conformal and precision RT techniques. Therefore, a consensus conference was convened to discuss issues related to RT planning and coordination of care for patients receiving IC. Methods and Materials: Ten participants with special expertise in the various aspects of integration of IC and RT for the treatment of locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer, including radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, and a medical physicist, participated. The individual members were assigned topics for focused, didactic presentations. Discussion was encouraged after each presentation, and recommendations were formulated. Results: Recommendations and guidelines emerged that emphasize up-front evaluation by all members of the head-and-neck management team, high-quality baseline and postinduction planning scans with the patient in the treatment position, the use of preinduction target volumes, and the use of full-dose RT, even in the face of a complete response. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary approach is strongly encouraged. Although these recommendations were provided primarily for patients treated with IC, many of these same principles apply to concurrent chemoradiotherapy without IC. A rapid response during RT is quite common, requiring the development of two or more plans in a sizeable fraction of patients, and suggesting the need for similar guidance in the rapidly evolving area of adaptive RT.

  5. The industrial applications of shape memory alloys in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature in the recent past on shape memory effect alloys dwelt principally on the physical metallurgy, crystallography and kinetics of the shape memory phenomenon. By contrast, we now have books and conference proceedings devoted to the engineering aspects of SMAs, their technology and application. The dominant role SMAs now play in the field of medical and orthodontic devices is well documented and will be reviewed by others in this conference. In this paper we will discuss the commercial applications for shape memory alloy devices in the North American market; applications which are in many cases also produced in European countries and Japan. The early success of shape memory alloy couplings for joining tubing and pipe in the late 1960's was not followed by other large volume applications until the advent of shape memory eyeglass frames, brassiere underwires and cellular phone antennas. Many other applications have now evolved into mature markets and these will be reviewed. In addition to the many commercial applications cited, there are a number of other fields in which shape memory alloys are destined to play a major role; these include smart materials and adaptive structures, MEMS devices, infrastructure systems and electrical power generation and distribution. These applications are being developed with private and government funding and will also be briefly discussed. (orig.)

  6. STUDY ON NECK SHAFT ANGLE AND FEMORAL LENGTH OF SOUTH INDIAN FEMURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakil Mohamad Khan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: Femoral nek anteversion describes the angle subtended by the femoral neck with reference to the transcondylar plane of the distal end of the femur and is usually 15° to 45°. This along with the neck shaft angle, hip axis length, femoral neck width influence the risk of femoral neck fracture. Femoral neck anteversion angle has to be taken into consideration when reduction and fixation is selected as a method of treatment. Objectives: The objectives of present study to find out the measurements of Neck shaft angle, Femoral Length and Neck Length of femur. Materials and Methods: In present study have used 250 femurs from different colleges in south India. The following measurements were conducted Neck shaft angle, Femoral Length and Neck Length of femur. Results: The results of present study are the length of femur was 446.2+26.39mm, right femur was 446.6+26.66mm and left femur was 445.8+26.12mm, the Neck Length femur was 36.3+4.2mm, right femur was 36.1+4.1mm and left femur was 36.4+4.3m. the neck shaft angle of femur was 137.10 , right femur was 137.30 and left femur was 136.90. Conclusion: There is no significance difference between right and left femur measurements. Orthopaedists and Radiologists use the normal range and means of the neck shaft angle in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease of the hip. The angle is increased in congenital subluxation and dislocation of the hip, poliomyelitis, cerebral palsy and idiopathic scoliosis and decreased in the congenital coxavara , post traumatic coxa vara due to malunited femoral neck and inter trochanteric fractures.

  7. Practical measurement of silicon in low alloy steels by differential pulse stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry has been adapted to allow the determination of Si in low-alloy steels using a hanging mercury drop electrode. The method has been qualified using certified ASTM standards and is now running in routine. The present report describes the experimental details, thereby allowing the reader to carry out the measurements precisely. (author)

  8. CrossNeck 1.0 XSLT-SVG cross-section analysis tool for analyzing necking state of a sphere bed

    CERN Document Server

    Pouchon, M A

    2002-01-01

    A tool for analyzing ceramographic cuts of sphere beds was programmed. The parameter of interest was the neck ratio being formed during sintering. A neck investigation based on such a cross section was programmed in a way, that the cross section discs could be entered graphically, and that the necking data was extracted from this information. In a resulting graphic the neck information on the surface was overlaid and could be crosschecked with the actual visible necking data. This allowed a quality control of the extracted data but was also necessary to exclude some false solution being introduced by the principle how the data was extracted. Some test on cross sections of a Cer-Med Sphere-Bed showed good results.

  9. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  10. Expressing Adaptation Strategies Using Adaptation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, N.; Bourda, Y.; Reynaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a real challenge to enable personalized access to information. Several systems have been proposed to address this challenge including Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs). However, the specification of adaptation strategies remains a difficult task for creators of such systems. In this paper, we consider the problem of the definition…

  11. Osteocondrite de Van Neck-Odelberg: relato de 4 casos Van neck-odelberg osteochondritis: report on 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Akkari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A osteocondrite de Van Neck-Odelberg é uma doença rara, que acomete a sincondrose isquiopúbica. Foram avaliados quatro crianças em idade escolar com queixa de dor súbita no quadril esquerdo. As radiografias mostravam alteração da sincondrose isquiopúbica. Os casos foram confirmados com ressonância magnética. Todos os casos foram tratados com marcha sem carga no membro acometido por duas a quatro semanas com melhora completa do quadro.The Van Neck-Odelberg osteochondritis is a rare disease that affects the ischiopubic synchondrosis. We evaluated four school-age children with complaints of acute pain in the left hip. Radiographs showed a change in the ischiopubic synchondrosis. The cases were confirmed with MRI. All cases were treated with walking withno weight bearing on the affected limb for two to four weeks with complete improvement of symptoms.

  12. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132464

  13. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132470

  14. Electronic structure of nanosized bcc Cu precipitates in Fe-Cu alloys studied by positron 2D-ACAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the finding with the use of the coincidence Doppler measurements that the nanosized Cu precipitates are coherently embedded in the Fe-Cu matrix alloy, taking a bcc structure and acting as efficient positron traps, we measured 2D-ACARs of carefully grown and heat treated single crystals of Fe-Cu. We found that the precipitates have a Fermi surface with 12 necks touching the {110} Bragg planes of the bcc Brillouin zone, which contrasts distinctly with that of the bulk Cu with 8 necks touching the {111} Bragg planes of the fcc Brillouin zone. The 3 dimensional momentum reconstruction of the 2D-ACAR data showed that the Fermi surface cutoff of the Cu precipitates is blurred considerably as compared with that of bulk fcc Cu, suggesting a marked size effect in the momentum distribution. (orig.)

  15. Density of Liquid Ni-Cr Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The density of liquid Ni-Cr alloy was measured by a modified sessile drop method. The density of liquid Ni-Cr alloywas found to decrease with increasing temperature and Cr concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of liquidNi-Cr alloy increases with increasing the Cr concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of Ni-Cr alloy determinedin the present work shows a positive deviation from the linear molar volume.

  16. Mechanically Alloyed High Entropy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, G.; Adrian, M. M.; Csaki, I.; Popescu, C. A.; Mitrică, D.; Vasile, S.; Carcea, I.

    2016-08-01

    In the last years high entropy alloys have been investigated due to their high hardness, high temperature stability and unusual properties that make these alloys to have significant interest. In comparison with traditional alloys that are based on two or three major elements, this new generation alloys consists at least of 5 principal elements, with the concentration between 5 and 35 at.%. The present paper reports synthesis of high entropy alloys (HEA) and high entropy composites (HEC) synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA). The equiatomic AlCrFeNiMn matrix was used for creating the HEA matrix, starting from elemental powders and as reinforcing material for composites was used pure graphite. The mechanical alloying process was carried out at different duration, in a high energy planetary ball mill, under argon atmosphere. The elemental powders alloying began after '5 hours of milling and was complete after 40 hours. The mechanical alloyed matrix and composite was pressed and heat treated under argon protection. The elemental powers were investigated for physical - technological properties, and by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Phase pressing operation was realized with a hydraulic press and the applied pressure was progressive. The sintering process was carried out at 850°C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction revealed that the MA process resulted in solid solutions formation and also revealed body- centred cubic (BCC) and face-centred cubic (FCC) structures with average grain size around 40 nm. In addition, nanoscale particles were highlighted by scanning electron microscopy, as well as the homogeneity of the chemical composition of the matrix and composite that was confirmed by EDX microanalysis. It was noted that HEA matrix and HEA composites were processed with a high degree of compaction and with a quite large capacity of mixed powder densification (around 70%).

  17. Neck circumference as a potential marker of metabolic syndrome among college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Christina Rodrigues Pereira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to relate neck circumference with metabolic syndrome and its criteria among college students.METHOD: cross-sectional study conducted with 702 college students in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil from September 2010 to June 2011. Socio-demographic data, waist circumference and neck circumference were collected together with blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, triglyceride levels, and HDL-C.RESULTS: 1.7% of the studied sample presented metabolic syndrome. Of these, 58.3% presented altered neck circumference (p<0.006. As neck circumference decreases, pressure levels improve (p<0.001. Additionally, college students with high fasting blood sugar (p=0.003 and high triglyceride levels (p<0.001 presented higher values of neck circumference.CONCLUSION: neck circumference is a potential predictive marker in the detection of metabolic syndrome and its components among college students.

  18. Unicentric Castleman Disease: An Unusual Cause of An Isolated Neck Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anjay; Aggarwal, Krittika; Agrawal, Himanshu; Sharma, Sonal; Garg, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown aetiology. It manifests in two distinct clinical presentations: unicentric and multicentric. Unicentric CD is rare and may present as an isolated neck mass. A 22-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of right neck swelling that occupied the posterior triangle of the right neck region. After surgical exploration, a solitary, well defined, and hyper vascular mass was excise. A histopathological examination confirmed the lesion as CD, hyaline-vascular variant. CD of the neck is a diagnosis that is usually not taken into consideration while evaluating neck masses due to its rarity and unassuming presentation. It should be keep in the differential diagnosis of neck masses as the clinical and radiological features evade a firm diagnosis. The treatment of unicentric CD is complete surgical excision, which cures the patient. PMID:27660550

  19. Chyle Fistula after Neck Dissection for an Unusual Breast Cancer Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlak, Ali; Karahatay, Serdar; Onguru, Onder; Mentes, Oner; Gerek, Mustafa; Tufan, Turgut

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chyle fistula is one of the rare complications of neck dissections. Even though no consented algorithm for the management of this entity has been established yet, conservative treatment options including somatostatin analogues have been suggested as an adequate modality for low output fistulas. CASE REPORT: Here we present a patient with a right-sided neck fistula which was resistant to conventional treatment, and was finally treated by surgery. The neck dissection was performed for a malignant right neck mass that was accepted as the lymph node metastasis of formerly treated papillary thyroid carcinoma. The pathology of the specimen revealed a contralateral neck metastasis of previously treated breast carcinoma. CONCLUSION: We assume that consecutive surgeries on axillary and neck lymph pathways resulted in such a complicated and exceptional case. PMID:21076608

  20. Alloying and Casting Furnace for Shape Memory Alloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The concept in the proposed project is to create a melting, alloying and casting furnace for the processing titanium based SMA using cold crucible techniques. The...