WorldWideScience

Sample records for allosteric regulation

  1. Rational Engineering of Enzyme Allosteric Regulation through Sequence Evolution Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jae-Seong Yang; Sang Woo Seo; Sungho Jang; Gyoo Yeol Jung; Sanguk Kim

    2012-01-01

    Control of enzyme allosteric regulation is required to drive metabolic flux toward desired levels. Although the three-dimensional (3D) structures of many enzyme-ligand complexes are available, it is still difficult to rationally engineer an allosterically regulatable enzyme without decreasing its catalytic activity. Here, we describe an effective strategy to deregulate the allosteric inhibition of enzymes based on the molecular evolution and physicochemical characteristics of allosteric ligan...

  2. Rational engineering of enzyme allosteric regulation through sequence evolution analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seong Yang

    Full Text Available Control of enzyme allosteric regulation is required to drive metabolic flux toward desired levels. Although the three-dimensional (3D structures of many enzyme-ligand complexes are available, it is still difficult to rationally engineer an allosterically regulatable enzyme without decreasing its catalytic activity. Here, we describe an effective strategy to deregulate the allosteric inhibition of enzymes based on the molecular evolution and physicochemical characteristics of allosteric ligand-binding sites. We found that allosteric sites are evolutionarily variable and comprised of more hydrophobic residues than catalytic sites. We applied our findings to design mutations in selected target residues that deregulate the allosteric activity of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase. Specifically, charged amino acids at less conserved positions were substituted with hydrophobic or neutral amino acids with similar sizes. The engineered proteins successfully diminished the allosteric inhibition of E. coli FBPase without affecting its catalytic efficiency. We expect that our method will aid the rational design of enzyme allosteric regulation strategies and facilitate the control of metabolic flux.

  3. Pathways of allosteric regulation in Hsp70 chaperones

    OpenAIRE

    Kityk, Roman; Vogel, Markus; Schlecht, Rainer; Bukau, Bernd; Mayer, Matthias P

    2015-01-01

    Central to the protein folding activity of Hsp70 chaperones is their ability to interact with protein substrates in an ATP-controlled manner, which relies on allosteric regulation between their nucleotide-binding (NBD) and substrate-binding domains (SBD). Here we dissect this mechanism by analysing mutant variants of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 DnaK blocked at distinct steps of allosteric communication. We show that the SBD inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the NBD through a highly ...

  4. A unified framework and an alternative mechanism for allosteric regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, J

    2007-01-01

    Allosteric regulation is an important property for many proteins. Several models have been proposed to explain the allosteric effect, such as the concerted MWC (Monod, Wyman, Changeux) model, the sequential KNF (Koshland, Nemethy, Filmer) model, and recent population shift models. Here we discuss a unified theoretical framework to describe allosteric effects. The existing models appear as special cases of the framework. The theoretical work also reveals an alternative mechanism currently overlooked. Theoretically it is possible that the reactivity of a protein is limited by some internal conformational change step (due to slow effective diffusion along rugged potential surfaces). Effector binding may modify the ruggedness and thus the protein dynamics and reactivity. Compared to conventional models, the new mechanism has less requirements on the mechanical properties of an allosteric protein to propagate mechanical signals over long distances. Thus some signal transduction proteins may adopt the new mechanism...

  5. Pathways of allosteric regulation in Hsp70 chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kityk, Roman; Vogel, Markus; Schlecht, Rainer; Bukau, Bernd; Mayer, Matthias P

    2015-01-01

    Central to the protein folding activity of Hsp70 chaperones is their ability to interact with protein substrates in an ATP-controlled manner, which relies on allosteric regulation between their nucleotide-binding (NBD) and substrate-binding domains (SBD). Here we dissect this mechanism by analysing mutant variants of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 DnaK blocked at distinct steps of allosteric communication. We show that the SBD inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the NBD through a highly conserved hydrogen bond network, and define the signal transduction pathway that allows bound substrates to trigger ATP hydrolysis. We identify variants deficient in only one direction of allosteric control and demonstrate that ATP-induced substrate release is more important for chaperone activity than substrate-stimulated ATP hydrolysis. These findings provide evidence of an unexpected dichotomic allostery mechanism in Hsp70 chaperones and provide the basis for a comprehensive mechanical model of allostery in Hsp70s. PMID:26383706

  6. Study on the Model for Regulation of the Allosteric Enzyme Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Qian-Zhong(李前忠); LUO,Liao-Fu(罗辽复); ZHANG,Li-Rong(张利绒)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of activator molecule and repressive molecule on binding process between allosteric enzyme and substrate are disused by considering the heterotropic effect of the regulating molecule that binds to allosteric enzyme. A model of allosteric enzyme with heterotropic effect is presented. The cooperativity and anticooperativity in the regulation process are studied.

  7. Allosteric Regulation by a Critical Membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Kimchi, Ofer; Machta, Benjamin B

    2016-01-01

    Many of the processes that underly neural computation are carried out by ion channels embedded in the plasma membrane, a two-dimensional liquid that surrounds all cells. Recent experiments have demonstrated that this membrane is poised close to a liquid-liquid critical point in the Ising universality class. Here we use both exact and stochastic techniques on the lattice Ising model to explore the ramifications of proximity to criticality for proteins that are allosterically coupled to Ising composition modes. Owing to diverging generalized susceptibilities, such a protein's activity becomes strongly influenced by perturbations that influence the two relevant parameters of the critical point, especially the critical temperature. In addition, the protein's kinetics acquire a range of time scales from its surrounding membrane, naturally leading to non-Markovian dynamics.

  8. Orthosteric and Allosteric Regulation in Trypsin-Like Peptidases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann-Tofting, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Trypsin-like serine peptidases play an important role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, the latter including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Binding of natural ligands to functional sites on the peptidase surface balances the level of activity and substrate specificity of...... peptidase and allosterically modulate the function of the active site, represents two important activity-regulating mechanisms in trypsin-like serine peptidases. Development of specific orthosteric agents as therapeutics is a challenge due to similar active site topology within the trypsin-like serine...... peptidase. The thesis describes how X-ray crystal structure analysis and biochemical analysis were used to demonstrate new concepts for orthosteric regulation of activity in the trypsin-like serine peptidase urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), studying two types of orthosteric agents, namely cyclic...

  9. Positive allosteric feedback regulation of the stringent response enzyme RelA by its product

    OpenAIRE

    Shyp, Viktoriya; Tankov, Stoyan; Ermakov, Andrey; Kudrin, Pavel; English, Brian P.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Tenson, Tanel; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2012-01-01

    This report identifies a new mechanism of enzyme activation—positive allosteric regulation by the product—in the context of the bacterial stringent response, which is essential for bacterial adaptation to environmental conditions.

  10. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verespy Iii, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A; Desai, Umesh R

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80-100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  11. Rational design of allosteric regulation of homoserine dehydrogenase by a nonnatural inhibitor L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-02-20

    Allosteric proteins, which can sense different signals, are interesting biological parts for synthetic biology. In particular, the design of an artificial allosteric enzyme to sense an unnatural signal is both challenging and highly desired, for example, for a precise and dynamical control of fluxes of growth-essential but byproduct pathways in metabolic engineering of industrial microorganisms. In this work, we used homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH) of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is naturally allosterically regulated by threonine and isoleucine, as an example to demonstrate the feasibility of reengineering an allosteric enzyme to respond to an unnatural inhibitor L-lysine. For this purpose, the natural threonine binding sites of HSD were first predicted and verified by mutagenesis experiments. The threonine binding sites were then engineered to a lysine binding pocket. The reengineered HSD only responds to lysine inhibition but not to threonine. This is a significant step toward the construction of artificial molecular circuits for dynamic control of growth-essential byproduct formation pathway for lysine biosynthesis. PMID:24344690

  12. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  13. Novel Inhibitors Complexed with Glutamate Dehydrogenase: ALLOSTERIC REGULATION BY CONTROL OF PROTEIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J.; Walker, Matthew T.; Smith, Thomas J.; (Danforth)

    2009-12-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P){sup +} as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  14. Mechanisms of allosteric gene regulation by NMR quantification of microsecond-millisecond protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleckner, Ian R; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2012-01-13

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) is a paradigmatic allosteric protein that regulates the tryptophan biosynthetic genes associated with the trp operon in bacilli. The ring-shaped 11-mer TRAP is activated for recognition of a specific trp-mRNA target by binding up to 11 tryptophan molecules. To characterize the mechanisms of tryptophan-induced TRAP activation, we have performed methyl relaxation dispersion (MRD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that probe the time-dependent structure of TRAP in the microsecond-to-millisecond "chemical exchange" time window. We find significant side chain flexibility localized to the RNA and tryptophan binding sites of the apo protein and that these dynamics are dramatically reduced upon ligand binding. Analysis of the MRD NMR data provides insights into the structural nature of transiently populated conformations sampled in solution by apo TRAP. The MRD data are inconsistent with global two-state exchange, indicating that conformational sampling in apo TRAP is asynchronous. These findings imply a temporally heterogeneous population of structures that are incompatible with RNA binding and substantiate the study of TRAP as a paradigm for probing and understanding essential dynamics in allosteric, regulatory proteins. PMID:22115774

  15. Allosteric Regulation of Histidine Kinases by Their Cognate Response Regulator Determines Cell Fate

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Ralf; Jaeger, Tina; Abel, Sören; Wiederkehr, Irene; Folcher, Marc; Biondi, Emanuele G.; Laub, Michael T.; Jenal, Urs

    2008-01-01

    The two-component phosphorylation network is of critical importance for bacterial growth and physiology. Here, we address plasticity and interconnection of distinct signal transduction pathways within this network. In Caulobacter crescentus antagonistic activities of the PleC phosphatase and DivJ kinase localized at opposite cell poles control the phosphorylation state and subcellular localization of the cell fate determinator protein DivK. We show that DivK functions as an allosteric regulat...

  16. Structural Mechanisms of Peptide Recognition and Allosteric Modulation of Gene Regulation by the RRNPP Family of Quorum-Sensing Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hackwon; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2016-07-17

    The members of RRNPP family of bacterial regulators sense population density-specific secreted oligopeptides and modulate the expression of genes involved in cellular processes, such as sporulation, competence, virulence, biofilm formation, conjugative plasmid transfer and antibiotic resistance. Signaling by RRNPP regulators include several steps: generation and secretion of the signaling oligopeptides, re-internalization of the signaling molecules into the cytoplasm, signal sensing by the cytosolic RRNPP regulators, signal-specific allosteric structural changes in the regulators, and interaction of the regulators with their respective regulatory target and gene regulation. The recently determined structures of the RRNPP regulators provide insight into the mechanistic aspects for several steps in this signaling circuit. In this review, we discuss the structural principles underlying peptide specificity, regulatory target recognition, and ligand-induced allostery in RRNPP regulators and its impact on gene regulation. Despite the conserved tertiary structure of these regulators, structural analyses revealed unexpected diversity in the mechanism of activation and molecular strategies that couple the peptide-induced allostery to gene regulation. Although these structural studies provide a sophisticated understanding of gene regulation by RRNPP regulators, much needs to be learned regarding the target DNA binding by yet-to-be characterized RNPP regulators and the several aspects of signaling by Rgg regulators. PMID:27283781

  17. Structural Mechanism of Allosteric Activity Regulation in a Ribonucleotide Reductase with Double ATP Cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Renzo; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Kumar, Rohit; Nayeri, Niloofar; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders; Logan, Derek T

    2016-06-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) reduce ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Their overall activity is stimulated by ATP and downregulated by dATP via a genetically mobile ATP cone domain mediating the formation of oligomeric complexes with varying quaternary structures. The crystal structure and solution X-ray scattering data of a novel dATP-induced homotetramer of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR reveal the structural bases for its unique properties, namely one ATP cone that binds two dATP molecules and a second one that is non-functional, binding no nucleotides. Mutations in the observed tetramer interface ablate oligomerization and dATP-induced inhibition but not the ability to bind dATP. Sequence analysis shows that the novel type of ATP cone may be widespread in RNRs. The present study supports a scenario in which diverse mechanisms for allosteric activity regulation are gained and lost through acquisition and evolutionary erosion of different types of ATP cone. PMID:27133024

  18. Structural basis for allosteric regulation of human ribonucleotide reductase by nucleotide-induced oligomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairman, James Wesley; Wijerathna, Sanath Ranjan; Ahmad, Md Faiz; Xu, Hai; Nakano, Ryo; Jha, Shalini; Prendergast, Jay; Welin, R. Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Roos, Annette; Nordlund, Pär; Li, Zongli; Walz, Thomas; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey (Case Western); (Harvard-Med); (Karolinska); (Tennessee-K)

    2011-07-25

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is an {alpha}{sub n}{beta}{sub n} (RR1-RR2) complex that maintains balanced dNTP pools by reducing NDPs to dNDPs. RR1 is the catalytic subunit, and RR2 houses the free radical required for catalysis. RR is allosterically regulated by its activator ATP and its inhibitor dATP, which regulate RR activity by inducing oligomerization of RR1. Here, we report the first X-ray structures of human RR1 bound to TTP alone, dATP alone, TTP-GDP, TTP-ATP, and TTP-dATP. These structures provide insights into regulation of RR by ATP or dATP. At physiological dATP concentrations, RR1 forms inactive hexamers. We determined the first X-ray structure of the RR1-dATP hexamer and used single-particle electron microscopy to visualize the {alpha}{sub 6}-{beta}{beta}'-dATP holocomplex. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional assays confirm that hexamerization is a prerequisite for inhibition by dATP. Our data indicate a mechanism for regulating RR activity by dATP-induced oligomerization.

  19. The energetics of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Del R; Baker, Josh E

    2009-06-28

    Myosin molecules are involved in a wide range of transport and contractile activities in cells. A single myosin head functions through its ATPase reaction as a force generator and as a mechanosensor, and when two or more myosin heads work together in moving along an actin filament, the interplay between these mechanisms contributes to collective myosin behaviors. For example, the interplay between force-generating and force-sensing mechanisms coordinates the two heads of a myosin V molecule in its hand-over-hand processive stepping along an actin filament. In muscle, it contributes to the Fenn effect and smooth muscle latch. In both examples, a key force-sensing mechanism is the regulation of ADP release via interhead forces that are generated upon actin-myosin binding. Here we present a model describing the mechanism of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads as a change, DeltaDeltaG(-D), in the standard free energy for ADP release that results from the work, Deltamicro(mech), performed by that myosin head upon ADP release, or DeltaDeltaG(-D) = Deltamicro(mech). We show that this model is consistent with previous measurements for strain-dependent kinetics of ADP release in both myosin V and muscle myosin II. The model makes explicit the energetic cost of accelerating ADP release, showing that acceleration of ADP release during myosin V processivity requires approximately 4 kT of energy whereas the energetic cost for accelerating ADP release in a myosin II-based actin motility assay is only approximately 0.4 kT. The model also predicts that the acceleration of ADP release involves a dissipation of interhead forces. To test this prediction, we use an in vitro motility assay to show that the acceleration of ADP release from both smooth and skeletal muscle myosin II correlates with a decrease in interhead force. Our analyses provide clear energetic constraints for models of the allosteric regulation of ADP release and provide novel, testable insights

  20. Single Enzyme Studies Reveal the Existence of Discrete Functional States for Monomeric Enzymes and How They Are “Selected” upon Allosteric Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos S.; Wei, Li; Jørgensen, Sune Klamer;

    2012-01-01

    Allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity forms the basis for controlling a plethora of vital cellular processes. While the mechanism underlying regulation of multimeric enzymes is generally well understood and proposed to primarily operate via conformational selection, the mechanism underlying...... allosteric regulation of monomeric enzymes is poorly understood. Here we monitored for the first time allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity at the single molecule level. We measured single stochastic catalytic turnovers of a monomeric metabolic enzyme (Thermomyces lanuginosus Lipase) while titrating...... its proximity to a lipid membrane that acts as an allosteric effector. The single molecule measurements revealed the existence of discrete binary functional states that could not be identified in macroscopic measurements due to ensemble averaging. The discrete functional states correlate with the...

  1. Structural Features of Ion Transport and Allosteric Regulation in Sodium-Calcium Exchanger (NCX) Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giladi, Moshe; Tal, Inbal; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) proteins extrude Ca(2+) from the cell to maintain cellular homeostasis. Since NCX proteins contribute to numerous physiological and pathophysiological events, their pharmacological targeting has been desired for a long time. This intervention remains challenging owing to our poor understanding of the underlying structure-dynamic mechanisms. Recent structural studies have shed light on the structure-function relationships underlying the ion-transport and allosteric regulation of NCX. The crystal structure of an archaeal NCX (NCX_Mj) along with molecular dynamics simulations and ion flux analyses, have assigned the ion binding sites for 3Na(+) and 1Ca(2+), which are being transported in separate steps. In contrast with NCX_Mj, eukaryotic NCXs contain the regulatory Ca(2+)-binding domains, CBD1 and CBD2, which affect the membrane embedded ion-transport domains over a distance of ~80 Å. The Ca(2+)-dependent regulation is ortholog, isoform, and splice-variant dependent to meet physiological requirements, exhibiting either a positive, negative, or no response to regulatory Ca(2+). The crystal structures of the two-domain (CBD12) tandem have revealed a common mechanism involving a Ca(2+)-driven tethering of CBDs in diverse NCX variants. However, dissociation kinetics of occluded Ca(2+) (entrapped at the two-domain interface) depends on the alternative-splicing segment (at CBD2), thereby representing splicing-dependent dynamic coupling of CBDs. The HDX-MS, SAXS, NMR, FRET, equilibrium (45)Ca(2+) binding and stopped-flow techniques provided insights into the dynamic mechanisms of CBDs. Ca(2+) binding to CBD1 results in a population shift, where more constraint conformational states become highly populated without global conformational changes in the alignment of CBDs. This mechanism is common among NCXs. Recent HDX-MS studies have demonstrated that the apo CBD1 and CBD2 are stabilized by interacting with each other, while Ca(2+) binding to CBD1

  2. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Verespy III; Mehta, Akul Y.; Daniel Afosah; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated...

  3. Role of connecting loop I in catalysis and allosteric regulation of human glucokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Juliana A; Larion, Mioara; Conejo, Maria S; Porter, Carol M; Miller, Brian G

    2014-07-01

    Glucokinase (GCK, hexokinase IV) is a monomeric enzyme with a single glucose binding site that displays steady-state kinetic cooperativity, a functional characteristic that affords allosteric regulation of GCK activity. Structural evidence suggests that connecting loop I, comprised of residues 47-71, facilitates cooperativity by dictating the rate and scope of motions between the large and small domains of GCK. Here we investigate the impact of varying the length and amino acid sequence of connecting loop I upon GCK cooperativity. We find that sequential, single amino acid deletions from the C-terminus of connecting loop I cause systematic decreases in cooperativity. Deleting up to two loop residues leaves the kcat value unchanged; however, removing three or more residues reduces kcat by 1000-fold. In contrast, the glucose K0.5 and KD values are unaffected by shortening the connecting loop by up to six residues. Substituting alanine or glycine for proline-66, which adopts a cis conformation in some GCK crystal structures, does not alter cooperativity, indicating that cis/trans isomerization of this loop residue does not govern slow conformational reorganizations linked to hysteresis. Replacing connecting loop I with the corresponding loop sequence from the catalytic domain of the noncooperative isozyme human hexokinase I (HK-I) eliminates cooperativity without impacting the kcat and glucose K0.5 values. Our results indicate that catalytic turnover requires a minimal length of connecting loop I, whereas the loop has little impact upon the binding affinity of GCK for glucose. We propose a model in which the primary structure of connecting loop I affects cooperativity by influencing conformational dynamics, without altering the equilibrium distribution of GCK conformations. PMID:24723372

  4. Elastic network model of allosteric regulation in protein kinase PDK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Gareth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural switches upon binding of phosphorylated moieties underpin many signalling networks. The ligand activation is a form of allosteric modulation of the protein, where the binding site is remote from the structural change in the protein. Recently this structural switch has been elegantly demonstrated with the crystallisation of the activated form of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. The purpose of the present work is to determine whether the allosteric coupling in PDK1 emerges at the level of a simple coarse grained model of protein dynamics. Results It is shown here that the allosteric effects of the agonist binding to the small lobe upon the activation loop in the large lobe of PDK1 are explainable within a simple 'ball and spring' elastic network model (ENM of protein dynamics. In particular, the model shows that the bound phospho peptide mimetic fluctuations have a high degree of correlation with the activation loop of PDK1. Conclusions The ENM approach to small molecule activation of proteins may offer a first pass predictive methodology where affinity is encoded in residues remote from the active site, and aid in the design of specific protein agonists that enhance the allosteric coupling and antagonist that repress it.

  5. Computational study on the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism in hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HCV NS3/4A protein is an attractive therapeutic target responsible for harboring serine protease and RNA helicase activities during the viral replication. Small molecules binding at the interface between the protease and helicase domains can stabilize the closed conformation of the protein and thus block the catalytic function of HCV NS3/4A protein via an allosteric regulation mechanism. But the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, we aimed to provide some insight into the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein by using computational methods. Four simulation systems were investigated. They include: apo state of HCV NS3/4A protein, HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with an allosteric inhibitor and the truncated form of the above two systems. The molecular dynamics simulation results indicate HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 4VA adopts a closed conformation (inactive state, while the truncated apo protein adopts an open conformation (active state. Further residue interaction network analysis suggests the communication of the domain-domain interface play an important role in the transition from closed to open conformation of HCV NS3/4A protein. However, the inhibitor stabilizes the closed conformation through interaction with several key residues from both the protease and helicase domains, including His57, Asp79, Asp81, Asp168, Met485, Cys525 and Asp527, which blocks the information communication between the functional domains interface. Finally, a dynamic model about the allosteric regulation and conformational changes of HCV NS3/4A protein was proposed and could provide fundamental insights into the allosteric mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein function regulation and design of new potent inhibitors.

  6. Allosteric Mechanisms in Chaperonin Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Ranit; Horovitz, Amnon

    2016-06-01

    Chaperonins are nanomachines that facilitate protein folding by undergoing energy (ATP)-dependent movements that are coordinated in time and space owing to complex allosteric regulation. They consist of two back-to-back stacked oligomeric rings with a cavity at each end where protein substrate folding can take place. Here, we focus on the GroEL/GroES chaperonin system from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, on the more poorly characterized eukaryotic chaperonin CCT/TRiC. We describe their various functional (allosteric) states and how they are affected by substrates and allosteric effectors that include ATP, ADP, nonfolded protein substrates, potassium ions, and GroES (in the case of GroEL). We also discuss the pathways of intra- and inter-ring allosteric communication by which they interconvert and the coupling between allosteric transitions and protein folding reactions. PMID:26726755

  7. Elucidation of the ATP7B N-domain Mg2+-ATP coordination site and its allosteric regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Hercend

    Full Text Available The diagnostic of orphan genetic disease is often a puzzling task as less attention is paid to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of these rare disorders at the molecular level. We present here a multidisciplinary approach using molecular modeling tools and surface plasmonic resonance to study the function of the ATP7B protein, which is impaired in the Wilson disease. Experimentally validated in silico models allow the elucidation in the Nucleotide binding domain (N-domain of the Mg(2+-ATP coordination site and answer to the controversial role of the Mg(2+ ion in the nucleotide binding process. The analysis of protein motions revealed a substantial effect on a long flexible loop branched to the N-domain protein core. We demonstrated the capacity of the loop to disrupt the interaction between Mg(2+-ATP complex and the N-domain and propose a role for this loop in the allosteric regulation of the nucleotide binding process.

  8. Role of a novel PH-kinase domain interface in PKB/Akt regulation: structural mechanism for allosteric inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Calleja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt belongs to the AGC superfamily of related serine/threonine protein kinases. It is a key regulator downstream of various growth factors and hormones and is involved in malignant transformation and chemo-resistance. Full-length PKB protein has not been crystallised, thus studying the molecular mechanisms that are involved in its regulation in relation to its structure have not been simple. Recently, the dynamics between the inactive and active conformer at the molecular level have been described. The maintenance of PKB's inactive state via the interaction of the PH and kinase domains prevents its activation loop to be phosphorylated by its upstream activator, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. By using a multidisciplinary approach including molecular modelling, classical biochemical assays, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET/two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM, a detailed model depicting the interaction between the different domains of PKB in its inactive conformation was demonstrated. These findings in turn clarified the molecular mechanism of PKB inhibition by AKT inhibitor VIII (a specific allosteric inhibitor and illustrated at the molecular level its selectivity towards different PKB isoforms. Furthermore, these findings allude to the possible function of the C-terminus in sustaining the inactive conformer of PKB. This study presents essential insights into the quaternary structure of PKB in its inactive conformation. An understanding of PKB structure in relation to its function is critical for elucidating its mode of activation and discovering how to modulate its activity. The molecular mechanism of inhibition of PKB activation by the specific drug AKT inhibitor VIII has critical implications for determining the mechanism of inhibition of other allosteric inhibitors and for opening up opportunities for the design of new generations of modulator drugs.

  9. Virus assembly and maturation: auto-regulation through allosteric molecular switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovic, Tatiana; Movahed, Navid; Bothner, Brian; Matsui, Tsutomu; Wang, Qiu; Doerschuk, Peter C; Johnson, John E

    2013-05-13

    We generalize the concept of allostery from the traditional non-active-site control of enzymes to virus maturation. Virtually, all animal viruses transition from a procapsid noninfectious state to a mature infectious state. The procapsid contains an encoded chemical program that is executed following an environmental cue. We developed an exceptionally accessible virus system for the study of the activators of maturation and the downstream consequences that result in particle stability and infectivity. Nudaurelia capensis omega virus (NωV) is a T=4 icosahedral virus that undergoes a dramatic maturation in which the 490-Å spherical procapsid condenses to a 400-Å icosahedral-shaped capsid with associated specific auto-proteolysis and stabilization. Employing X-ray crystallography, time-resolved electron cryo-microscopy and hydrogen/deuterium exchange as well as biochemistry, it was possible to define the mechanisms of allosteric communication among the four quasi-equivalent subunits in the icosahedral asymmetric unit. These gene products undergo proteolysis at different rates, dependent on quaternary structure environment, while particle stability is conferred globally following only a few local subunit transitions. We show that there is a close similarity between the concepts of tensegrity (associated with geodesic domes and mechanical engineering) and allostery (associated with biochemical control mechanisms). PMID:23485419

  10. Allosteric modulation of caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Hans-Georg; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Caspases are proteolytic enzymes mainly involved in the induction and execution phases of apoptosis. This type of programmed cell death is an essential regulatory process required to maintain the integrity and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Inappropriate apoptosis is attributed a key role in many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, ischemic damage, autoimmune diseases and cancer. Allosteric modulation of the function of a protein occurs when the regulatory trigger, such as the binding of a small effector or inhibitor molecule, takes place some distance from the protein's active site. In recent years, several caspases have been identified that possess allosteric sites and binding of small molecule to these sites resulted in the modulation of enzyme activities. Regulation of caspase activity by small molecule allosteric modulators is believed to be of great therapeutic importance. In this review we give brief highlights on recent developments in identifying and characterizing natural and synthetic allosteric inhibitors as well as activators of caspases and discuss their potential in drug discovery and protein engineering. PMID:21807025

  11. Accessibility of different histone H3-binding domains of UHRF1 is allosterically regulated by phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelato, Kathy A; Tauber, Maria; Ong, Michelle S; Winter, Stefan; Hiragami-Hamada, Kyoko; Sindlinger, Julia; Lemak, Alexander; Bultsma, Yvette; Houliston, Scott; Schwarzer, Dirk; Divecha, Nullin; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2014-06-19

    UHRF1 is a multidomain protein crucially linking histone H3 modification states and DNA methylation. While the interaction properties of its specific domains are well characterized, little is known about the regulation of these functionalities. We show that UHRF1 exists in distinct active states, binding either unmodified H3 or the H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) modification. A polybasic region (PBR) in the C terminus blocks interaction of a tandem tudor domain (TTD) with H3K9me3 by occupying an essential peptide-binding groove. In this state the plant homeodomain (PHD) mediates interaction with the extreme N terminus of the unmodified H3 tail. Binding of the phosphatidylinositol phosphate PI5P to the PBR of UHRF1 results in a conformational rearrangement of the domains, allowing the TTD to bind H3K9me3. Our results define an allosteric mechanism controlling heterochromatin association of an essential regulatory protein of epigenetic states and identify a functional role for enigmatic nuclear phosphatidylinositol phosphates. PMID:24813945

  12. The Role of Distant Mutations and Allosteric Regulation on LovD Active Site Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Osuna, Sílvia; Gao, Xue; Sawaya, Michael R.; Gilson, Lynne; Collier, Steven J.; Huisman, Gjalt W.; Yeates, Todd O; Tang, Yi; Houk, K. N.

    2014-01-01

    Natural enzymes have evolved to perform their cellular functions under complex selective pressures, which often require their catalytic activities to be regulated by other proteins. We contrasted a natural enzyme, LovD, which acts on a protein-bound (LovF) acyl substrate, with a laboratory-generated variant that was transformed by directed evolution to accept instead a small free acyl thioester, and no longer requires the acyl carrier protein. The resulting 29-mutant variant is 1000-fold more...

  13. Modulation of global low-frequency motions underlies allosteric regulation: demonstration in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Rodgers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein "design space" that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have

  14. Allosteric regulation of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase activity of fat body and flight muscle from the bloodsucking bug Rhodnius prolixus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutemberg G. Alves

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (phosphofructokinase; PFK activity from Rhodnius prolixus, a haematophagous insect which is usually a poor flyer, was measured and compared in two metabolically active tissues - flight muscle and fat body. The activity of this important regulatory glycolytic enzyme was much more pronounced in muscle (15.1 ± 1.4 U/mg than in fat body extracts (3.6±0.4 U/mg, although the latter presented higher levels of enzyme per protein content, as measured by western-blotting. Muscle extracts are more responsible than fat body to ATP and fructose 6-phosphate, both substrates of PFK. Allosteric regulation exerted by different effectors such as ADP, AMP and fructose 2,6-phosphate presented a singular pattern for each tissue. Optimal pH (8.0-8.5 and sensitivity to pH variation was very similar, and citrate was unable to inhibit PFK activity in both extracts. Our results suggest the existence of a particular PFK activity for each tissue, with regulatory patterns that are consistent with their physiological roles.A atividade da fosfofrutocinase (PFK de Rodnius prolixus, um inseto hematófago, o qual vôa somente pequenas distâncias, foi medida e comparada em dois tecidos metabolicamente ativos - músculo de asa e corpo gorduroso. A atividade desta importante enzima glicolítica regulatória foi muito mais pronunciada em músculo de asa (15,1 ±1,4 U/mg do que em extrato de corpo gorduroso (3,6 ±0,4 U/mg embora este último tenha apresentado níveis mais altos da enzima por quantidade de proteína, como medido por western-blotting. Extratos de músculo foram mais responsivos do que corpo gorduroso para ATP e frutose-6-fosfato, ambos substratos da PFK. A regulação alostérica exercida por diferentes efetores tais como ADP, AMP, frutose-2,6-bisfosfato apresentou um padrão singular para cada tecido. O pH ótimo (8,0-8,5 e a sensibilidade a variações de pH, foram muito similares e o citrato foi incapaz de inibir a atividade da PFK em

  15. Regulation of transcription attenuation and translation initiation by allosteric control of an RNA-binding protein: the Bacillus subtilis TRAP protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitzke, Paul

    2004-04-01

    Tryptophan allosterically controls the 11-subunit trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) of Bacillus subtilis. When activated by tryptophan, TRAP binds to multiple trinucleotide repeats in target transcripts. TRAP is responsible for the decision to terminate transcription in the leader region of the trpEDCFBA operon or to allow transcription to proceed into the structural genes. TRAP also regulates translation of trpE by promoting formation of an RNA structure that prevents ribosome binding. In addition, bound TRAP regulates translation initiation of pabA, trpP and ycbK by directly blocking ribosome binding. The anti-TRAP protein inhibits TRAP activity by competing with RNA for the RNA binding surface of TRAP. PMID:15063849

  16. Contrasting Effects of Allosteric and Orthosteric Agonists on M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Internalization and Down-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Rachel L.; Christopher J Langmead; Wood, Martyn D; Challiss, R.A. John

    2009-01-01

    A new class of subtype-selective muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor agonist that activates the receptor through interaction at a site distinct from the orthosteric acetylcholine binding site has been reported recently. Here, we have compared the effects of orthosteric (oxotremorine-M, arecoline, pilocarpine) and allosteric [4-n-butyl-1-[4-(2-methylphenyl)-4-oxo-1-butyl] piperidine (AC-42); 1-[3-(4-butyl-1-piperidinyl)propyl]-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone (77-LH-28-1)] agonists on M1 mAC...

  17. Ion-Regulated Allosteric Binding of Fullerenes (C-60 and C-70) by Tetrathiafulvalene-Calix[4]pyrroles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, C. M.; Lim, J. M.; Larsen, K. R.;

    2014-01-01

    The effect of ionic species on the binding of fullerenes (C-60 and C-70) by tetrathiafulvalene-calix[4]pyrrole (TTF-C4P) receptors and the nature of the resulting supramolecular complexes (TTF-C4P + fullerene + halide anion + tetraalkylammonium cation) was studied in the solid state through single...... the C4P in a ball-and-socket binding mode. The interactions between the TTF-C4P receptors and the fullerene guests are highly influenced by both the nature of halide anions and their counter tetraalkylammonium cations. Three halides (F-, Cl-, and Br-) were studied. All three potentiate the binding of...... the two test fullerenes by inducing a conformational change from the 1,3-alternate to the cone conformer of the TTF-C4Ps, thus acting as positive heterotropic allosteric effectors. For a particular halide anion, the choice of tetraalkylammonium salts serves to modulate the strength of the TTF-C4P...

  18. The Role of Protein-Ligand Contacts in Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli Catabolite Activator Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Philip D.; Rodgers, Thomas L.; Glover, Laura C.; Korhonen, Heidi J.; Richards, Shane A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Hodgson, David R. W.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distant site. Both experimental and theoretical evidence demonstrate that allostery can be communicated through altered slow relaxation protein dynamics without conformational change. The catabolite activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli is an exemplar for the analysis of such entropically driven allostery. Negative allostery in CAP occurs between identical cAMP binding sites. Changes to the cAMP-binding pocket can therefore impact the allosteric properties of CAP. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of coarse-grained modeling, isothermal calorimetry, and structural analysis, that decreasing the affinity of CAP for cAMP enhances negative cooperativity through an entropic penalty for ligand binding. The use of variant cAMP ligands indicates the data are not explained by structural heterogeneity between protein mutants. We observe computationally that altered interaction strength between CAP and cAMP variously modifies the change in allosteric cooperativity due to second site CAP mutations. As the degree of correlated motion between the cAMP-contacting site and a second site on CAP increases, there is a tendency for computed double mutations at these sites to drive CAP toward noncooperativity. Naturally occurring pairs of covarying residues in CAP do not display this tendency, suggesting a selection pressure to fine tune allostery on changes to the CAP ligand-binding pocket without a drive to a noncooperative state. In general, we hypothesize an evolutionary selection pressure to retain slow relaxation dynamics-induced allostery in proteins in which evolution of the ligand-binding site is occurring. PMID:26187469

  19. Experimentally guided structural modeling and dynamics analysis of Hsp90-p53 interactions: allosteric regulation of the Hsp90 chaperone by a client protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklock, Kristin; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2013-11-25

    A fundamental role of the Hsp90 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein clients is essential for the integrity of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Molecular characterization of Hsp90 interactions with client proteins is fundamental to understanding the activity of many tumor-inducing signaling proteins and presents an active area of structural and biochemical studies. In this work, we have probed mechanistic aspects of allosteric regulation of Hsp90 by client proteins via a detailed computational study of Hsp90 interactions with the tumor suppressor protein p53. Experimentally guided protein docking and molecular dynamics structural refinement have reconstructed the recognition-competent states of the Hsp90-p53 complexes that are consistent with the NMR studies. Protein structure network analysis has identified critical interacting networks and specific residues responsible for structural integrity and stability of the Hsp90-p53 complexes. Coarse-grained modeling was used to characterize the global dynamics of the regulatory complexes and map p53-induced changes in the conformational equilibrium of Hsp90. The variations in the functional dynamics profiles of the Hsp90-p53 complexes are consistent with the NMR studies and could explain differences in the functional role of the alternative binding sites. Despite the overall similarity of the collective movements and the same global interaction footprint, p53 binding at the C-terminal interaction site of Hsp90 may have a more significant impact on the chaperone dynamics, which is consistent with the stronger allosteric effect of these interactions revealed by the experimental studies. The results suggest that p53-induced modulation of the global dynamics and structurally stable interaction networks can target the regulatory hinge regions and facilitate stabilization of the closed Hsp90 dimer that underlies the fundamental stimulatory effect of the p53 client. PMID

  20. The cyclic di-nucleotide c-di-AMP is an allosteric regulator of metabolic enzyme function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precit, Mimi; Delince, Matthieu; Pensinger, Daniel; Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Jurado, Ashley R.; Goo, Young Ah; Sadilek, Martin; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Sauer, John-Demian; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a broadly conserved second messenger required for bacterial growth and infection. However, the molecular mechanisms of c-di-AMP signaling are still poorly understood. Using a chemical proteomics screen for c-di-AMP interacting proteins in the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, we identified several broadly conserved protein receptors, including the central metabolic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (LmPC). Biochemical and crystallographic studies of the LmPC-c-di-AMP interaction revealed a previously unrecognized allosteric regulatory site 25 Å from the active site. Mutations in this site disrupted c-di-AMP binding and affected enzyme catalysis of LmPC as well as PC from pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis. C-di-AMP depletion resulted in altered metabolic activity in L. monocytogenes. Correction of this metabolic imbalance rescued bacterial growth, reduced bacterial lysis, and resulted in enhanced bacterial burdens during infection. These findings greatly expand the c-di-AMP signaling repertoire and reveal a central metabolic regulatory role for a cyclic di-nucleotide. PMID:25215494

  1. An Allosteric Cross-Talk Between the Activation Loop and the ATP Binding Site Regulates the Activation of Src Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheta-Martínez, Encarna; Saladino, Giorgio; Morando, Maria Agnese; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Lelli, Moreno; Sutto, Ludovico; D’Amelio, Nicola; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation loop is a fundamental step in the activation of most protein kinases. In the case of the Src tyrosine kinase, a prototypical kinase due to its role in cancer and its historic importance, phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 in the activation loop is known to rigidify the structure and contribute to the switch from the inactive to a fully active form. However, whether or not phosphorylation is able per-se to induce a fully active conformation, that efficiently binds ATP and phosphorylates the substrate, is less clear. Here we employ a combination of solution NMR and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to fully map the effects of phosphorylation and ATP/ADP cofactor loading on the conformational landscape of Src tyrosine kinase. We find that both phosphorylation and cofactor binding are needed to induce a fully active conformation. What is more, we find a complex interplay between the A-loop and the hinge motion where the phosphorylation of the activation-loop has a significant allosteric effect on the dynamics of the C-lobe.

  2. Structural Fine-Tuning of MIT-Interacting Motif 2 (MIM2) and Allosteric Regulation of ESCRT-III by Vps4 in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Rieko; Obita, Takayuki; Onoue, Kousuke; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki

    2016-06-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) facilitates roles in membrane remodeling, such as multivesicular body biogenesis, enveloped virus budding and cell division. In yeast, Vps4 plays a crucial role in intraluminal vesicle formation by disassembling ESCRT proteins. Vps4 is recruited by ESCRT-III proteins to the endosomal membrane through the interaction between the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain of Vps4 and the C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM) of ESCRT-III proteins. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of Vps4-MIT in a complex with Vps20, a member of ESCRT-III, and revealed that Vps20 adopts a unique MIM2 conformation. Based on structural comparisons with other known MIM2s, we have refined the consensus sequence of MIM2. We have shown that another ESCRT-III protein, Ist1, binds to Vps4-MIT via its C-terminal MIM1 with higher affinity than Vps2, but lacks MIM2 by surface plasmon resonance. Surprisingly, the Ist1 MIM1 competed with the MIM2 of Vfa1, a regulator of Vps4, for binding to Vps4-MIT, even though these MIMs bind in non-overlapping sites on the MIT. These findings provide insight into the allosteric recognition of MIMs of ESCRT-III by Vps4 and also the regulation of ESCRT machinery at the last step of membrane remodeling. PMID:27075672

  3. Exploiting protein flexibility to predict the location of allosteric sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjkovich Alejandro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allostery is one of the most powerful and common ways of regulation of protein activity. However, for most allosteric proteins identified to date the mechanistic details of allosteric modulation are not yet well understood. Uncovering common mechanistic patterns underlying allostery would allow not only a better academic understanding of the phenomena, but it would also streamline the design of novel therapeutic solutions. This relatively unexplored therapeutic potential and the putative advantages of allosteric drugs over classical active-site inhibitors fuel the attention allosteric-drug research is receiving at present. A first step to harness the regulatory potential and versatility of allosteric sites, in the context of drug-discovery and design, would be to detect or predict their presence and location. In this article, we describe a simple computational approach, based on the effect allosteric ligands exert on protein flexibility upon binding, to predict the existence and position of allosteric sites on a given protein structure. Results By querying the literature and a recently available database of allosteric sites, we gathered 213 allosteric proteins with structural information that we further filtered into a non-redundant set of 91 proteins. We performed normal-mode analysis and observed significant changes in protein flexibility upon allosteric-ligand binding in 70% of the cases. These results agree with the current view that allosteric mechanisms are in many cases governed by changes in protein dynamics caused by ligand binding. Furthermore, we implemented an approach that achieves 65% positive predictive value in identifying allosteric sites within the set of predicted cavities of a protein (stricter parameters set, 0.22 sensitivity, by combining the current analysis on dynamics with previous results on structural conservation of allosteric sites. We also analyzed four biological examples in detail, revealing

  4. An allosteric synthetic DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, L.; Curran, J F

    1999-01-01

    Allosteric DNA oligonucleotides are potentially useful diagnostic reagents. Here we develop a model system for the study of allosteric interactions in DNAs. A DNA that binds either Cibacron blue or cholic acid was isolated and partially characterized. Isolation was performed using a multi-stage SELEX. First, short oligos that bind either Cibacron blue or cholic acid were enriched from random oligonucleotide pools. Then, members of the two pools were fused to form longer oligos, which were the...

  5. Metabolite Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP): ROLE OF AMP AS AN ALLOSTERIC INHIBITOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Jung, Hunmin; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Pawlosky, Robert; Takeshima, Tomomi; Lee, Wan-Ru; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Laxman, Sunil; Wynn, R Max; Tu, Benjamin P; MacMillan, John B; De Brabander, Jef K; Veech, Richard L; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2016-05-13

    The carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-responsive transcription factor that plays an essential role in converting excess carbohydrate to fat storage in the liver. In response to glucose levels, ChREBP is regulated by nuclear/cytosol trafficking via interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, CRM-1 (exportin-1 or XPO-1), or importins. Nuclear localization of ChREBP was rapidly inhibited when incubated in branched-chain α-ketoacids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide. Here, we discovered that protein-free extracts of high fat-fed livers contained, in addition to ketone bodies, a new metabolite, identified as AMP, which specifically activates the interaction between ChREBP and 14-3-3. The crystal structure showed that AMP binds directly to the N terminus of ChREBP-α2 helix. Our results suggest that AMP inhibits the nuclear localization of ChREBP through an allosteric activation of ChREBP/14-3-3 interactions and not by activation of AMPK. AMP and ketone bodies together can therefore inhibit lipogenesis by restricting localization of ChREBP to the cytoplasm during periods of ketosis. PMID:26984404

  6. Molecular Basis of Enhanced Activity in Factor VIIa-Trypsin Variants Conveys Insights into Tissue Factor-mediated Allosteric Regulation of Factor VIIa Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Anders B.; Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Svensson, L. Anders; Pedersen, Anette A.; Østergaard, Henrik; Overgaard, Michael T.; Olsen, Ole H.; Gandhi, Prafull S

    2016-01-01

    The complex of coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa), a trypsin-like serine protease, and membrane-bound tissue factor (TF) initiates blood coagulation upon vascular injury. Binding of TF to FVIIa promotes allosteric conformational changes in the FVIIa protease domain and improves its catalytic...... properties. Extensive studies have revealed two putative pathways for this allosteric communication. Here we provide further details of this allosteric communication by investigating FVIIa loop swap variants containing the 170 loop of trypsin that display TF-independent enhanced activity. Using x......-ray crystallography, we show that the introduced 170 loop from trypsin directly interacts with the FVIIa active site, stabilizing segment 215-217 and activation loop 3, leading to enhanced activity. Molecular dynamics simulations and novel fluorescence quenching studies support that segment 215-217 conformation is...

  7. The role of hydration on the mechanism of allosteric regulation: in situ measurements of the oxygen-linked kinetics of water binding to hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvay, Andrés G; Grigera, J Raúl; Colombo, Marcio F

    2003-01-01

    We report here the first direct measurements of changes in protein hydration triggered by a functional binding. This task is achieved by weighing hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin films exposed to an atmosphere of 98% relative humidity during oxygenation. The binding of the first oxygen molecules to Hb tetramer triggers a change in protein conformation, which increases binding affinity to the remaining empty sites giving rise to the appearance of cooperative phenomena. Although crystallographic data have evidenced that this structural change increases the protein water-accessible surface area, isobaric osmotic stress experiments in aqueous cosolutions have shown that water binding is linked to Hb oxygenation. Now we show that the differential hydration between fully oxygenated and fully deoxygenated states of these proteins, determined by weighing protein films with a quartz crystal microbalance, agree with the ones determined by osmotic stress in aqueous cosolutions, from the linkage between protein oxygen affinity and water activity. The agreements prove that the changes in water activity brought about by adding osmolytes to the buffer solution shift biochemical equilibrium in proportion to the number of water molecules associated with the reaction. The concomitant kinetics of oxygen and of water binding to Hb have been also determined. The data show that the binding of water molecules to the extra protein surface exposed on the transition from the low-affinity T to the high-affinity R conformations of hemoglobin is the rate-limiting step of Hb cooperative reaction. This evidences that water binding is a crucial step on the allosteric mechanism regulating cooperative interactions, and suggests the possibility that environmental water activity might be engaged in the kinetic control of some important reactions in vivo. PMID:12524309

  8. Allosteric regulation of glycerol kinase by enzyme IIIglc of the phosphotransferase system in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Novotny, M J; Frederickson, W L; Waygood, E B; Saier, M H

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism by which enzyme IIIglc of the bacterial phosphotransferase system regulates the activity of crystalline glycerol kinase from Escherichia coli has been studied, and the inhibitory effects have been compared with those produced by fructose-1,6-diphosphate. It was shown that the free, but not the phosphorylated, form of enzyme IIIglc inhibits the kinase. Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium were isolated which were resistant to inhibition by either enzyme IIIglc (glpKr mutants) or fru...

  9. Accessibility of different histone H3-binding domains of UHRF1 is allosterically regulated by phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate.

    OpenAIRE

    Gelato, K.; Tauber, M; Ong, M; Winter, S.; Hamada, K; Sindlinger, J.; Lemak, A.; Bultsma, Y.; Houliston, S.; Schwarzer, D; Divecha, N.; C. Arrowsmith; Fischle, W

    2014-01-01

    UHRF1 is a multidomain protein crucially linking histone H3 modification states and DNA methylation. While the interaction properties of its specific domains are well characterized, little is known about the regulation of these functionalities. We show that UHRF1 exists in distinct active states, binding either unmodified H3 or the H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) modification. A polybasic region (PBR) in the C terminus blocks interaction of a tandem tudor domain (TTD) with H3K9me3 by occ...

  10. Hemi-methylated DNA regulates DNA methylation inheritance through allosteric activation of H3 ubiquitylation by UHRF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joseph S; Cornett, Evan M; Goldfarb, Dennis; DaRosa, Paul A; Li, Zimeng M; Yan, Feng; Dickson, Bradley M; Guo, Angela H; Cantu, Daniel V; Kaustov, Lilia; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Erie, Dorothy A; Major, Michael B; Klevit, Rachel E; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Kuhlman, Brian; Strahl, Brian D; Rothbart, Scott B

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation requires UHRF1, a histone- and DNA-binding RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that recruits DNMT1 to sites of newly replicated DNA through ubiquitylation of histone H3. UHRF1 binds DNA with selectivity towards hemi-methylated CpGs (HeDNA); however, the contribution of HeDNA sensing to UHRF1 function remains elusive. Here, we reveal that the interaction of UHRF1 with HeDNA is required for DNA methylation but is dispensable for chromatin interaction, which is governed by reciprocal positive cooperativity between the UHRF1 histone- and DNA-binding domains. HeDNA recognition activates UHRF1 ubiquitylation towards multiple lysines on the H3 tail adjacent to the UHRF1 histone-binding site. Collectively, our studies are the first demonstrations of a DNA-protein interaction and an epigenetic modification directly regulating E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. They also define an orchestrated epigenetic control mechanism involving modifications both to histones and DNA that facilitate UHRF1 chromatin targeting, H3 ubiquitylation, and DNA methylation inheritance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17101.001 PMID:27595565

  11. Down-regulation of PAR1 activity with a pHLIP-based allosteric antagonist induces cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kelly E; Thévenin, Damien

    2015-12-15

    Even though abnormal expression of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and of their ligands is observed in many cancer cells of various origins, only a few anti-cancer compounds directly act on their signalling. One promising approach to modulate their activity consists of targeting the receptor cytoplasmic surfaces interacting with the associated G-proteins using peptides mimicking the intracellular loops of the receptor. Thus, to be fully effective, the peptide mimics must be selectively targeted to the tumour while sparing healthy tissues, translocated across the cell membrane and stay anchored to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the present study, we introduce a novel way to selectively target and inhibit the activity of a GPCR in cancer cells under acidic conditions, such as those found in solid tumours. We find that the conjugation of a peptide fragment derived from the third intracellular loop (i3) of the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) to a peptide that can selectively target tumours solely based on their acidity [pH(Low) Insertion Peptide (pHLIP)], produces a construct capable of effectively down-regulating PAR1 activity in a concentration- and pH-dependent manner and of inducing a potent cytotoxic effect in a panel of cancer cells that is proportional to the relative level of receptor expression at the cell surface. This strategy not only allows for a more selective targeting and specific intracellular delivery than current approaches, but also offers new possibilities for developing novel anti-cancer drugs targeting GPCRs. PMID:26424552

  12. Allosteric modulation of caspase 3 through mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jad Walters

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A mutation in the allosteric site of the caspase 3 dimer interface of Val266 to histidine abolishes activity of the enzyme, and models predict that the mutation mimics the action of small molecule allosteric inhibitors by preventing formation of the active site. Mutations were coupled to His266 at two sites in the interface, E124A and Y197C. We present results from X-ray crystallography, enzymatic activity and molecular dynamics simulations for seven proteins, consisting of single, double and triple mutants. The results demonstrate that considering allosteric inhibition of caspase 3 as a shift between discrete ‘off-state’ or ‘on-state’ conformations is insufficient. Although His266 is accommodated in the interface, the structural defects are propagated to the active site through a helix on the protein surface. A more comprehensive view of allosteric regulation of caspase 3 requires the representation of an ensemble of inactive states and shows that subtle structural changes lead to the population of the inactive ensemble.

  13. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether-phosphine or thioether-phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand-metal domains (RhI or CuI sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (ZnII sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, 'condensed' or 'open'. Combining the ether-phosphine ligand with the appropriate RhI or CuI transition-metal precursors results in 'open' macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether-phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their 'open' macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3- and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the 'open' macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the macrocyclic cavity.

  14. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveri, Christopher G.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.; Nguyen, Son Binh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pink, Maren (NWU); (Indiana)

    2008-04-12

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether-phosphine or thioether-phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand-metal domains (Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (Zn{sup II} sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, 'condensed' or 'open'. Combining the ether-phosphine ligand with the appropriate Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} transition-metal precursors results in 'open' macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether-phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their 'open' macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3- and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the 'open' macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the

  15. Intramolecular signal transmission in enterobacterial aspartate transcarbamylases II. Engineering co-operativity and allosteric regulation in the aspartate transcarbamylase of Erwinia herbicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunin, R; Rani, C S; Van Vliet, F; Wild, J R; Wales, M

    1999-12-17

    The aspartate transcarbamylase (ATCase) from Erwinia herbicola differs from the other investigated enterobacterial ATCases by its absence of homotropic co-operativity toward the substrate aspartate and its lack of response to ATP which is an allosteric effector (activator) of this family of enzymes. Nevertheless, the E. herbicola ATCase has the same quaternary structure, two trimers of catalytic chains with three dimers of regulatory chains ((c3)2(r2)3), as other enterobacterial ATCases and shows extensive primary structure conservation. In (c3)2(r2)3 ATCases, the association of the catalytic subunits c3 with the regulatory subunits r2 is responsible for the establishment of positive co-operativity between catalytic sites for the binding of aspartate and it dictates the pattern of allosteric response toward nucleotide effectors. Alignment of the primary sequence of the regulatory polypeptides from the E. herbicola and from the paradigmatic Escherichia coli ATCases reveals major blocks of divergence, corresponding to discrete structural elements in the E. coli enzyme. Chimeric ATCases were constructed by exchanging these blocks of divergent sequence between these two ATCases. It was found that the amino acid composition of the outermost beta-strand of a five-stranded beta-sheet in the effector-binding domain of the regulatory polypeptide is responsible for the lack of co-operativity and response to ATP of the E. herbicola ATCase. A novel structural element involved in allosteric signal recognition and transmission in this family of ATCases was thus identified. PMID:10600394

  16. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    CERN Document Server

    Amor, Benjamin R C; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric regulation is central to many biochemical processes. Allosteric sites provide a target to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methods to predict them. Here, we present an efficient graph-theoretical approach for identifying allosteric sites and the mediating interactions that connect them to the active site. Using an atomistic graph with edges weighted by covalent and non-covalent bond energies, we obtain a bond-to-bond propensity that quantifies the effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. We use this propensity to detect the sites and communication pathways most strongly linked to the active site, assessing their significance through quantile regression and comparison against a reference set of 100 generic proteins. We exemplify our method in detail with three well-studied allosteric proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting the location of the allosteric site and identifying key allosteric interactions. Consistent prediction of...

  17. Temperature-dependent effects of cadmium and purine nucleotides on mitochondrial aconitase from a marine ectotherm, Crassostrea virginica: a role of temperature in oxidative stress and allosteric enzyme regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkasov, Anton A; Overton, Robert A; Sokolov, Eugene P; Sokolova, Inna M

    2007-01-01

    Temperature and heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd) are important environmental stressors that can strongly affect mitochondrial function of marine poikilotherms. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of temperature (20 degrees C and 30 degrees C) and Cd stress on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in a marine poikilotherm Crassostrea virginica (the eastern oyster) using mitochondrial aconitase as a sensitive biomarker of oxidative damage. We also assessed potential involvement of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in antioxidant protection in oyster mitochondria using purine nucleotides (GDP, ATP and ADP) as specific inhibitors, and free fatty acids as stimulators, of UCPs. Our results show that exposure to Cd results in elevated ROS production and oxidative damage as indicated by aconitase inactivation which is particularly pronounced at elevated temperature. Unexpectedly, oyster mitochondrial aconitase was inhibited by physiologically relevant levels of ATP (IC(50)=1.93 and 3.04 mmol l(-1) at 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C, respectively), suggesting that allosteric regulation of aconitase by this nucleotide may be involved in regulation of the tricarboxylic acid flux in oysters. Aconitase was less sensitive to ATP inhibition at 30 degrees C than at 20 degrees C, consistent with the elevated metabolic flux at higher temperatures. ADP and GDP also inhibited mitochondrial aconitase but at the levels well above the physiological concentrations of these nucleotides (6-11 mmol l(-1)). Our study shows expression of at least three UCP isoforms in C. virginica gill tissues but provides no indication that UCPs protect mitochondrial aconitase from oxidative inactivation in oysters. Overall, the results of this study indicate that temperature stress exaggerates toxicity of Cd leading to elevated oxidative stress in mitochondria, which may have important implications for survival of poikilotherms in polluted environments during

  18. Allosteric Mechanism of Pyruvate Kinase from Leishmania mexicana Uses a Rock and Lock Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Hugh P.; McNae, Iain W.; Matthew W Nowicki; Hannaert, Véronique; Michels, Paul A M; Fothergill-Gilmore, Linda A.; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2010-01-01

    Allosteric regulation provides a rate management system for enzymes involved in many cellular processes. Ligand-controlled regulation is easily recognizable, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. We have obtained the first complete series of allosteric structures, in all possible ligated states, for the tetrameric enzyme, pyruvate kinase, from Leishmania mexicana. The transition between inactive T-state and active R-state is accompanied by a simple symmetrical 6° rigi...

  19. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 95-130. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulation * radioligand binding functional response Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  20. Metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins need the help of cofactors for their successful folding and functioning. Metal ions, i.e., Zn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ etc., are typical biological cofactors. Binding of metal ions can reshape the energy landscapes of proteins, thereby modifying the folding and allosteric motions. For example, such binding may make the intrinsically disordered proteins have funneled energy landscapes, consequently, ensures their spontaneous folding. In addition, the binding may activate certain biological processes by inducing related conformational changes of regulation proteins. However, how the local interactions involving the metal ion binding can induce the global conformational motions of proteins remains elusive. Investigating such question requires multiple models with different details, including quantum mechanics, atomistic models, and coarse grained models. In our recent work, we have been developing such multiscale methods which can reasonably model the metal ion binding induced charge transfer, protonation/deprotonation, and large conformational motions of proteins. With such multiscale model, we elucidated the zinc-binding induced folding mechanism of classical zinc finger and the calcium-binding induced dynamic symmetry breaking in the allosteric motions of calmodulin. In addition, we studied the coupling of folding, calcium binding and allosteric motions of calmodulin domains. In this talk, I will introduce the above progresses on the metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions. We thank the finacial support from NSFC and the 973 project.

  1. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam E. El-Fakahany

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An allosteric modulator is a ligand that binds to an allosteric site on the receptor and changes receptor conformation to produce increase (positive cooperativity or decrease (negative cooperativity in the binding or action of an orthosteric agonist (e.g., acetylcholine. Since the identification of gallamine as the first allosteric modulator of muscarinic receptors in 1976, this unique mode of receptor modulation has been intensively studied by many groups. This review summarizes over 30 years of research on the molecular mechanisms of allosteric interactions of drugs with the receptor and for new allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors with potential therapeutic use. Identification of positive modulators of acetylcholine binding and function that enhance neurotransmission and the discovery of highly selective allosteric modulators are mile-stones on the way to novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders involving impaired cognitive function.

  2. Allosteric regulation of protein kinase PKCζ by the N-terminal C1 domain and small compounds to the PIF-pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Garcia, Laura A; Schulze, Jörg O; Fröhner, Wolfgang;

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases are key mediators of cellular signaling, and therefore, their activities are tightly controlled. AGC kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and by N- and C-terminal regions. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism of inhibition of atypical PKCζ and found that the inhibition by ...

  3. Type I and II positive allosteric modulators differentially modulate agonist-induced up-regulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    Long-term treatment with nicotine or selective α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists increases the number of α7 nAChRs and this up-regulation may be involved in the mechanism underlying the sustained procognitive effect of these compounds. Here, we investigate the influence of type...

  4. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors.

  5. Allosteric transition: a comparison of two models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Two recent models are in use for analysis of allosteric drug action at receptor sites remote from orthosteric binding sites. One is an allosteric two-state mechanical model derived in 2000 by David Hall. The other is an extended operational model developed in 2007 by Arthur Christopo......Introduction Two recent models are in use for analysis of allosteric drug action at receptor sites remote from orthosteric binding sites. One is an allosteric two-state mechanical model derived in 2000 by David Hall. The other is an extended operational model developed in 2007 by Arthur...

  6. Allosteric Optical Control of a Class B G-Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Johnston, Natalie R; von Ohlen, Yorrick; Meyer-Berg, Helena; Jones, Ben J; Bloom, Stephen R; Rutter, Guy A; Trauner, Dirk; Hodson, David J

    2016-05-01

    Allosteric regulation promises to open up new therapeutic avenues by increasing drug specificity at G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, drug discovery efforts are at present hampered by an inability to precisely control the allosteric site. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and testing of PhotoETP, a light-activated positive allosteric modulator of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), a class B GPCR involved in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in humans. PhotoETP potentiates Ca(2+) , cAMP, and insulin responses to glucagon-like peptide-1 and its metabolites following illumination of cells with blue light. PhotoETP thus provides a blueprint for the production of small-molecule class B GPCR allosteric photoswitches, and may represent a useful tool for understanding positive cooperativity at the GLP-1R. PMID:27059784

  7. Allosteric activation of coagulation factor VIIa visualized by hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Jørgensen, Thomas; Olsen, Ole H; Persson, Egon; Jensen, Ole; Stennicke, Henning R; Andersen, Mette

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) is a serine protease that, after binding to tissue factor (TF), plays a pivotal role in the initiation of blood coagulation. We used hydrogen exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to visualize the details of FVIIa activation by comparing the exchange kinetics of ...... provide novel insights into the cofactor-induced activation of this important protease and reveal the potential for allosteric regulation in the trypsin family of proteases....

  8. Structure-Based Statistical Mechanical Model Accounts for the Causality and Energetics of Allosteric Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnera, Enrico; Berezovsky, Igor N

    2016-03-01

    Allostery is one of the pervasive mechanisms through which proteins in living systems carry out enzymatic activity, cell signaling, and metabolism control. Effective modeling of the protein function regulation requires a synthesis of the thermodynamic and structural views of allostery. We present here a structure-based statistical mechanical model of allostery, allowing one to observe causality of communication between regulatory and functional sites, and to estimate per residue free energy changes. Based on the consideration of ligand free and ligand bound systems in the context of a harmonic model, corresponding sets of characteristic normal modes are obtained and used as inputs for an allosteric potential. This potential quantifies the mean work exerted on a residue due to the local motion of its neighbors. Subsequently, in a statistical mechanical framework the entropic contribution to allosteric free energy of a residue is directly calculated from the comparison of conformational ensembles in the ligand free and ligand bound systems. As a result, this method provides a systematic approach for analyzing the energetics of allosteric communication based on a single structure. The feasibility of the approach was tested on a variety of allosteric proteins, heterogeneous in terms of size, topology and degree of oligomerization. The allosteric free energy calculations show the diversity of ways and complexity of scenarios existing in the phenomenology of allosteric causality and communication. The presented model is a step forward in developing the computational techniques aimed at detecting allosteric sites and obtaining the discriminative power between agonistic and antagonistic effectors, which are among the major goals in allosteric drug design. PMID:26939022

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel's ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  11. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  12. Modeling amperometric biosensors based on allosteric enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liutauras Ričkus

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of a biosensor with allosteric enzyme layer was investigated in this study. The operation of the biosensor is modeled using non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves three regions: the allosteric enzyme layer where the allosteric enzyme reactions as well as then mass transport by diffusion take place, the diffusion region where the mass transport by diffusion and non-enzymatic reactions take place and the convective region in which the analyte concentration is maintained constant. The biosensor response on dependency substrate concentration, cooperativity coefficient and the diffusion layer thickness on the same parameters have been studied.

  13. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity.

  14. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Zachariah H; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T; Shaw, David E; Seeliger, Markus A

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  15. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 9 (2010), s. 2838-2860. ISSN 1424-8247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * allosteric modulation * Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  16. Structural Analysis of Iac Repressor Bound to Allosteric Effectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daber,R.; Stayrook, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lac operon is a model system for understanding how effector molecules regulate transcription and are necessary for allosteric transitions. The crystal structures of the lac repressor bound to inducer and anti-inducer molecules provide a model for how these small molecules can modulate repressor function. The structures of the apo repressor and the repressor bound to effector molecules are compared in atomic detail. All effectors examined here bind to the repressor in the same location and are anchored to the repressor through hydrogen bonds to several hydroxyl groups of the sugar ring. Inducer molecules form a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network compared to anti-inducers and neutral effector molecules. The structures of these effector molecules suggest that the O6 hydroxyl on the galactoside is essential for establishing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network that bridges the N-terminal and C-terminal sub-domains. The altered hydrogen bonding can account in part for the different structural conformations of the repressor, and is vital for the allosteric transition.

  17. The allosteric regulation of axial/rhombic population in a “Type 1” copper site. Multi-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopic and density functional studies of pseudoazurin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The co-existence of “axial” and “rhombic” coordination environments has been demonstrated in a “Type 1” copper site of Pseudoazurin. This observation opens up previously not considered interpretations for the relationship between geometry and electronic structure of the four coordinate copper site. The Met16 variants of pseudoazurin were considered as model systems for investigating the effect of weak interactions from the second coordination sphere. The correlation between geometric and electronic structures of “Type 1” copper site was evaluated by the multi-edge (Cu K-edge and S K-edge) X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of Met16 variants of pseudoazurin. The co-existing axial and rhombic sites in pseudoazurin were characterized by Cu–ligand distances, effective nuclear charge, and Cu–S(Cys) covalency from XAS. The XAS results were correlated with DFT calculations for investigating the effect of protein environment from the inner-sphere and beyond around the Cu site. The combined experimental and theoretical results support the presence of a close correlation between outer sphere environment and inner sphere coordination environment. This is achieved in pseudoazurin by a previously undisclosed allosteric effect that involves a rearrangement of the protein tertiary structure. (author)

  18. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1.

  19. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, B. R. C.; Schaub, M. T.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites. PMID:27561351

  20. Molecular Mechanism of Allosteric Communication in Hsp70 Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Colombo, Giorgio; Milanesi, Luciano; Morra, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Allostery, or the capability of proteins to respond to ligand binding events with a variation in structure or dynamics at a distant site, is a common feature for biomolecular function and regulation in a large number of proteins. Intra-protein connections and inter-residue coordinations underlie allosteric mechanisms and react to binding primarily through a finely tuned modulation of motions and structures at the microscopic scale. Hence, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations...

  1. Structural Determinants Defining the Allosteric Inhibition of an Essential Antibiotic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Desbois, Sebastien; Dogovski, Con; Gorman, Michael A; Ketaren, Natalia E; Paxman, Jason J; Siddiqui, Tanzeela; Zammit, Leanne M; Abbott, Belinda M; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Parker, Michael W; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Hall, Nathan E; Panjikar, Santosh; Perugini, Matthew A

    2016-08-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) catalyzes the first committed step in the lysine biosynthesis pathway of bacteria. The pathway can be regulated by feedback inhibition of DHDPS through the allosteric binding of the end product, lysine. The current dogma states that DHDPS from Gram-negative bacteria are inhibited by lysine but orthologs from Gram-positive species are not. The 1.65-Å resolution structure of the Gram-negative Legionella pneumophila DHDPS and the 1.88-Å resolution structure of the Gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae DHDPS bound to lysine, together with comprehensive functional analyses, show that this dogma is incorrect. We subsequently employed our crystallographic data with bioinformatics, mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and microscale thermophoresis to reveal that lysine-mediated inhibition is not defined by Gram staining, but by the presence of a His or Glu at position 56 (Escherichia coli numbering). This study has unveiled the molecular determinants defining lysine-mediated allosteric inhibition of bacterial DHDPS. PMID:27427481

  2. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecule kinase inhibitors are invaluable targeted therapeutics for the treatment of various human diseases, especially cancers. While the majority of approved and developed preclinical small-molecule inhibitors are characterized as type I or type II inhibitors that target the ATP......-binding pocket of kinases, the remarkable sequential and structural similarity among ATP pockets renders the selective inhibition of kinases a daunting challenge. Therefore, targeting allosteric pockets of kinases outside the highly conversed ATP pocket has been proposed as a promising alternative to overcome...

  3. Coupled Dynamics and Entropic Contribution to the Allosteric Mechanism of Pin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Arghya; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-08-25

    Allosteric communication in proteins regulates a plethora of downstream processes in subcellular signaling pathways. Describing the effects of cooperative ligand binding on the atomic level is a key to understanding many regulatory processes involving biomolecules. Here, we use microsecond-long molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the allosteric mechanism of Pin1, a potential therapeutic target and a phosphorylated-Ser/Thr dependent peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that regulates several subcellular processes and has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's. Experimental studies suggest that the catalytic domain and the noncatalytic WW domain are allosterically coupled; however, an atomic level description of the dynamics associated with the interdomain communication is lacking. We show that binding of the substrate to the WW domain is directly coupled to the dynamics of the catalytic domain, causing rearrangement of the residue-residue contact dynamics from the WW domain to the catalytic domain. The binding affinity of the substrate in the catalytic domain is also enhanced upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain. Modulation of the dynamics of the catalytic domain upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain leads to prepayment of the entropic cost of binding the substrate to the catalytic domain. This study shows that Ile 28 at the interfacial region between the catalytic and WW domains is certainly one of the residues responsible for bridging the communication between the two domains. The results complement previous experiments and provide valuable atomistic insights into the role of dynamics and possible entropic contribution to the allosteric mechanism of proteins. PMID:27077947

  4. Allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptors by chloride ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tora, Amélie S; Rovira, Xavier; Dione, Ibrahima; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Brabet, Isabelle; De Koninck, Yves; Doyon, Nicolas; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Acher, Francine; Goudet, Cyril

    2015-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) play key roles in the modulation of many synapses. Chloride (Cl(-)) is known to directly bind and regulate the function of different actors of neuronal activity, and several studies have pointed to the possible modulation of mGluRs by Cl(-). Herein, we demonstrate that Cl(-) behaves as a positive allosteric modulator of mGluRs. For example, whereas glutamate potency was 3.08 ± 0.33 μM on metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 4 receptors in high-Cl(-) buffer, signaling activity was almost abolished in low Cl(-) in cell-based assays. Cl(-) potency was 78.6 ± 3.5 mM. Cl(-) possesses a high positive cooperativity with glutamate (Hill slope ≈6 on mGlu4), meaning that small variations in [Cl(-)] lead to large variations in glutamate action. Using molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified 2 well-conserved Cl(-) binding pockets in the extracellular domain of mGluRs. Moreover, modeling of activity-dependent Cl(-) variations at GABAergic synapses suggests that these variations may be compatible with a dynamic modulation of the most sensitive mGluRs present in these synapses. Taken together, these data reveal a necessary role of Cl(-) for the glutamate activation of many mGluRs. Exploiting Cl(-) binding pockets may yield to the development of innovative regulators of mGluR activity. PMID:26116702

  5. Structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase from Maricaulis maris with the allosteric inhibitor L-arginine bound

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    Maricaulis maris N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (mmNAGS/K) catalyzes the first two steps in L-arginine biosynthesis and has a high degree of sequence and structural homology to human N-acetylglutamate synthase, a regulator of the urea cycle. The synthase activity of both mmNAGS/K and human NAGS are regulated by L-arginine, although L-arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of mmNAGS/K, but an activator of human NAGS. To investigate the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K by L-argini...

  6. Allosteric modulation of G-protein coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, Tracy A

    2004-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has more than 1000 members and is the largest family of proteins in the body. GPCRs mediate signalling of stimuli as diverse as light, ions, small molecules, peptides and proteins and are the targets for many pharmaceuticals. Most GPCR ligands...... are believed to activate (agonists) or inhibit (competitive antagonists) receptor signalling by binding the receptor at the same site as the endogenous agonist, the orthosteric site. In contrast, allosteric ligands modulate receptor function by binding to different regions in the receptor, allosteric...... outlines the current status and perspectives of allosteric modulation of GPCR function with emphasis on the pharmacology of endogenous and synthesised modulators, their receptor interactions and the therapeutic prospects of allosteric ligands compared to orthosteric ligands....

  7. Designing allosteric control into enzymes by chemical rescue of structure

    OpenAIRE

    Deckert, Katelyn; Budiardjo, S. Jimmy; Brunner, Luke C.; Lovell, Scott; Karanicolas, John

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activity has been engineered into enzymes for purposes ranging from controlling cell morphology to reprogramming cellular signaling pathways. Where these successes have typically fused a naturally allosteric domain to the enzyme of interest, here we instead demonstrate an approach for designing a de novo allosteric effector site directly into the catalytic domain of an enzyme. This approach is distinct from traditional chemical rescue of enzymes in that it relies on disruptio...

  8. Positive allosteric action of eburnamonine on cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proska, J; Tucek, S

    1996-06-01

    It was discovered recently that alcuronium and strychnine (which is a precursor of alcuronium) allosterically increase the affinity of cardiac muscarinic receptors for the antagonist, N-methylscopolamine. We have now investigated the effects of l-eburnamonine and vincamine, which are both closely related to strychnine. In experiments on rat heart atria, l-eburnamonine was found to increase the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine with Ehlert's cooperativity coefficient alpha = 0.35, which indicates that the strength of its allosteric action is close to that of alcuronium and strychnine (alpha = 0.31 and 0.44, respectively). However, the affinity of l-eburnamonine for the cardiac muscarinic receptors is lower than the affinities of alcuronium and strychnine (KAR = 22.6 microM, 0.15 microM, and 3.4 microM, respectively). In spite of its extremely close similarity to l-eburnamonine, vincamine has a negative allosteric effect on the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine (alpha = 4.1; KAR = 22.8 microM). It is likely that a systematic investigation of the allosteric effects of the analogues of strychnine will not only yield new allosteric effectors on muscarinic receptors, but also clarify the structural features responsible for the direction (positive or negative) of their allosteric effect. PMID:8813554

  9. Directed evolution of the tryptophan synthase β-subunit for stand-alone function recapitulates allosteric activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Andrew R; Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Romney, David K; Herger, Michael; Murciano-Calles, Javier; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-11-24

    Enzymes in heteromeric, allosterically regulated complexes catalyze a rich array of chemical reactions. Separating the subunits of such complexes, however, often severely attenuates their catalytic activities, because they can no longer be activated by their protein partners. We used directed evolution to explore allosteric regulation as a source of latent catalytic potential using the β-subunit of tryptophan synthase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTrpB). As part of its native αββα complex, TrpB efficiently produces tryptophan and tryptophan analogs; activity drops considerably when it is used as a stand-alone catalyst without the α-subunit. Kinetic, spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic data show that this lost activity can be recovered by mutations that reproduce the effects of complexation with the α-subunit. The engineered PfTrpB is a powerful platform for production of Trp analogs and for further directed evolution to expand substrate and reaction scope. PMID:26553994

  10. A Potential Yeast Actin Allosteric Conduit Dependent on Hydrophobic Core Residues Val-76 and Trp-79*

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Stokasimov, Ema; Fields, Jonathon; Rubenstein, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Intramolecular allosteric interactions responsible for actin conformational regulation are largely unknown. Previous work demonstrated that replacing yeast actin Val-76 with muscle actin Ile caused decreased nucleotide exchange. Residue 76 abuts Trp-79 in a six-residue linear array beginning with Lys-118 on the surface and ending with His-73 in the nucleotide cleft. To test if altering the degree of packing of these two residues would affect actin dynamics, we constructed V76I, W79F, and W79Y...

  11. Allosteric vs. spontaneous exit-site (E-site) tRNA dissociation early in protein synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2011-01-01

    During protein synthesis, deacylated transfer RNAs leave the ribosome via an exit (E) site after mRNA translocation. How the ribosome regulates tRNA dissociation and whether functional linkages between the aminoacyl (A) and E sites modulate the dynamics of protein synthesis have long been debated. Using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments, we find that, during early cycles of protein elongation, tRNAs are often held in the E site until being allosterically relea...

  12. The Structural Basis for Allosteric Inhibition of a Threonine-sensitive Aspartokinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuying; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Viola, Ronald E.

    2008-01-01

    The commitment step to the aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is the phosphorylation of aspartic acid catalyzed by aspartokinase (AK). Most microorganisms and plants have multiple forms of this enzyme, and many of these isofunctional enzymes are subject to feedback regulation by the end products of the pathway. However, the archeal species Methanococcus jannaschii has only a single, monofunctional form of AK. The substrate l-aspartate binds to this recombinant enzyme in two different orientations, providing the first structural evidence supporting the relaxed regiospecificity previously observed with several alternative substrates of Escherichia coli AK (Angeles, T. S., Hunsley, J. R., and Viola, R. E. (1992) Biochemistry31 ,799 -8051731937). Binding of the nucleotide substrate triggers significant domain movements that result in a more compact quaternary structure. In contrast, the highly cooperative binding of the allosteric regulator l-threonine to multiple sites on this dimer of dimers leads to an open enzyme structure. A comparison of these structures supports a mechanism for allosteric regulation in which the domain movements induced by threonine binding causes displacement of the substrates from the enzyme, resulting in a relaxed, inactive conformation. PMID:18334478

  13. The Structural Basis for Allosteric Inhibition of a Threonine-sensitive Aspartokinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuying; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Viola, Ronald E. (Toledo)

    2008-10-08

    The commitment step to the aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is the phosphorylation of aspartic acid catalyzed by aspartokinase (AK). Most microorganisms and plants have multiple forms of this enzyme, and many of these isofunctional enzymes are subject to feedback regulation by the end products of the pathway. However, the archeal species Methanococcus jannaschii has only a single, monofunctional form of AK. The substrate l-aspartate binds to this recombinant enzyme in two different orientations, providing the first structural evidence supporting the relaxed regiospecificity previously observed with several alternative substrates of Escherichia coli AK. Binding of the nucleotide substrate triggers significant domain movements that result in a more compact quaternary structure. In contrast, the highly cooperative binding of the allosteric regulator l-threonine to multiple sites on this dimer of dimers leads to an open enzyme structure. A comparison of these structures supports a mechanism for allosteric regulation in which the domain movements induced by threonine binding causes displacement of the substrates from the enzyme, resulting in a relaxed, inactive conformation.

  14. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Fleck, Oliver; Watson, Adam T; Poitelea, Marius; O'Shea, Charlotte; Chahwan, Charly; Holmberg, Christian; Kragelund, Birthe B; Nielsen, Olaf; Osborne, Mark; Carr, Antony M; Liu, Cong

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  15. Targeting PARP-1 allosteric regulation offers therapeutic potential against cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Jamin D.; Tholey, Renee M.; Langelier, Marie-France; Planck, Jamie L.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; Lal, Shruti; Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A.; Yeo, Charles J.; Knudsen, Karen E.; Brody, Jonathan R; Pascal, John M.

    2013-01-01

    PARP-1 is a nuclear protein that has important roles in maintenance of genomic integrity. During genotoxic stress, PARP-1 recruits to sites of DNA damage where PARP-1 domain architecture initiates catalytic activation and subsequent poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent DNA repair. PARP-1 inhibition is a promising new way to selectively target cancers harboring DNA repair deficiencies. However, current inhibitors target other PARPs raising important questions concerning long-term off-target effects. Her...

  16. Regulation of human D1, D2(long), D2(short), D3 and D4 dopamine receptors by amiloride and amiloride analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Hoare, S R J; Coldwell, M C; Armstrong, D.; Strange, P G

    2000-01-01

    The modulatory effects of the allosteric effectors methylisobutylamiloride (MIA), benzamil and amiloride have been examined at human D1, D2, D3 and D4 dopamine receptors. The subtype selectivity and the mechanism of action of this allosteric regulation was examined.In radioligand dissociation experiments each modulator accelerated dissociation from all four receptor subtypes indicating allosteric regulation. MIA displayed selectivity for the D3 subtype for acceleration of radioligand dissocia...

  17. Biomimetic Design Results in a Potent Allosteric Inhibitor of Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase from Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovpen, Yulia V; Conly, Cuylar J T; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2016-02-17

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), an enzyme required for bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis, catalyzes the condensation of pyruvate and β-aspartate semialdehyde (ASA) to form a cyclic product which dehydrates to form dihydrodipicolinate. DHDPS has, for several years, been considered a putative target for novel antibiotics. We have designed the first potent inhibitor of this enzyme by mimicking its natural allosteric regulation by lysine, and obtained a crystal structure of the protein-inhibitor complex at 2.2 Å resolution. This novel inhibitor, which we named "bislysine", resembles two lysine molecules linked by an ethylene bridge between the α-carbon atoms. Bislysine is a mixed partial inhibitor with respect to the first substrate, pyruvate, and a noncompetitive partial inhibitor with respect to ASA, and binds to all forms of the enzyme with a Ki near 200 nM, more than 300 times more tightly than lysine. Hill plots show that the inhibition is cooperative, indicating that the allosteric sites are not independent despite being located on opposite sides of the protein tetramer, separated by approximately 50 Å. A mutant enzyme resistant to lysine inhibition, Y110F, is strongly inhibited by this novel inhibitor, suggesting this may be a promising strategy for antibiotic development. PMID:26836694

  18. Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphate Is an Allosteric Activator of Pyrophosphate:Fructose-6-Phosphate 1-Phosphotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T. H.

    1995-05-01

    The activity of highly purified pyrophosphate:fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase (PFP) from barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves was studied under conditions where the catalyzed reaction was allowed to approach equilibrium. The activity of PFP was monitored by determining the changes in the levels of fructose-6-phosphate, orthophosphate, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (Fru-1,6-bisP). Under these conditions PFP activity was not dependent on activation by fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-bisP). Inclusion of aldolase in the reaction mixture temporarily restored the dependence of PFP on Fru-2,6-bisP. Alternatively, PFP was activated by Fru-1,6-bisP in the presence of aldolase. It is concluded that Fru-1,6-bisP is an allosteric activator of barley PFP, which can substitute for Fru-2,6-bisP as an activator. A significant activation was observed at a concentration of 5 to 25 [mu]M Fru-1,6-bisP, which demonstrates that the allosteric site of barley PFP has a very high affinity for Fru-1,6-bisP. The high affinity for Fru-1,6-bisP at the allosteric site suggests that the observed activation of PFP by Fru-1,6-bisP constitutes a previously unrecognized in vivo regulation mechanism. PMID:12228454

  19. The positive allosteric GABAB receptor modulator rac-BHFF enhances baclofen-mediated analgesia in neuropathic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemoura, Khaled; Ralvenius, William T; Malherbe, Pari; Benke, Dietmar

    2016-09-01

    Neuropathic pain is associated with impaired inhibitory control of spinal dorsal horn neurons, which are involved in processing pain signals. The metabotropic GABAB receptor is an important component of the inhibitory system and is highly expressed in primary nociceptors and intrinsic dorsal horn neurons to control their excitability. Activation of GABAB receptors with the orthosteric agonist baclofen effectively reliefs neuropathic pain but is associated with severe side effects that prevent its widespread application. The recently developed positive allosteric GABAB receptor modulators lack most of these side effects and are therefore promising drugs for the treatment of pain. Here we tested the high affinity positive allosteric modulator rac-BHFF for its ability to relief neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve in mice. rac-BHFF significantly increased the paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation in healthy mice, indicating an endogenous GABABergic tone regulating the sensitivity to mechanical stimuli. Surprisingly, rac-BHFF displayed no analgesic activity in neuropathic mice although GABAB receptor expression was not affected in the dorsal horn as shown by quantitative receptor autoradiography. However, activation of spinal GABAB receptors by intrathecal injection of baclofen reduced hyperalgesia and its analgesic effect was considerably potentiated by co-application of rac-BHFF. These results indicate that under conditions of neuropathic pain the GABAergic tone is too low to provide a basis for allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors. However, allosteric modulators would be well suited as an add-on to reduce the dose of baclofen required to achieve analgesia. PMID:27108932

  20. Extracellular loop 2 of the free Fatty Acid receptor 2 mediates allosterism of a phenylacetamide ago-allosteric modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Nicola J; Ward, Richard J; Stoddart, Leigh A; Hudson, Brian D; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Morris, Joanne C; Tränkle, Christian; Tikhonova, Irina G; Adams, David R; Milligan, Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Allosteric agonists are powerful tools for exploring the pharmacology of closely related G protein-coupled receptors that have nonselective endogenous ligands, such as the short chain fatty acids at free fatty acid receptors 2 and 3 (FFA2/GPR43 and FFA3/GPR41, respectively). We explored the molec...

  1. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  2. The Allosteric Switching Mechanism in Bacteriophage MS2

    CERN Document Server

    Perkett, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    In this article we use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopt different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We disc...

  3. Detailed kinetics and regulation of mammalian 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Dash Ranjan K; Pradhan Ranjan K; Qi Feng; Beard Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC), a key regulatory point of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, plays vital roles in multiple pathways of energy metabolism and biosynthesis. The catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of this large enzyme complex are not fully understood. Here computer simulation is used to test possible catalytic mechanisms and mechanisms of allosteric regulation of the enzyme by nucleotides (ATP, ADP), pH, an...

  4. Assessing the structural conservation of protein pockets to study functional and allosteric sites: implications for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daura Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the classical, active-site oriented drug-development approach reaching its limits, protein ligand-binding sites in general and allosteric sites in particular are increasingly attracting the interest of medicinal chemists in the search for new types of targets and strategies to drug development. Given that allostery represents one of the most common and powerful means to regulate protein function, the traditional drug discovery approach of targeting active sites can be extended by targeting allosteric or regulatory protein pockets that may allow the discovery of not only novel drug-like inhibitors, but activators as well. The wealth of available protein structural data can be exploited to further increase our understanding of allosterism, which in turn may have therapeutic applications. A first step in this direction is to identify and characterize putative effector sites that may be present in already available structural data. Results We performed a large-scale study of protein cavities as potential allosteric and functional sites, by integrating publicly available information on protein sequences, structures and active sites for more than a thousand protein families. By identifying common pockets across different structures of the same protein family we developed a method to measure the pocket's structural conservation. The method was first parameterized using known active sites. We characterized the predicted pockets in terms of sequence and structural conservation, backbone flexibility and electrostatic potential. Although these different measures do not tend to correlate, their combination is useful in selecting functional and regulatory sites, as a detailed analysis of a handful of protein families shows. We finally estimated the numbers of potential allosteric or regulatory pockets that may be present in the data set, finding that pockets with putative functional and effector characteristics are widespread across

  5. Allosteric process of human glucokinase conducive to fight against diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ More than 200 million people worldwide have diabetes. In China alone, about 60 million people are suffering from the disease.Fortunately, scientists are pushing back its boundaries. For instance, a recent study by CAS researchers may shed new light on the treatment of the disease by making cutting-edge progress on studies of the allosteric process of human glucokinase, which has been published by the latest issue of the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences.

  6. Are AMPA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators Potential Pharmacotherapeutics for Addiction?

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas R. Watterson; M. Foster Olive

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these m...

  7. Divergent allosteric patterns verify the regulatory paradigm for aspartate transcarbamylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, M E; Madison, L L; Glaser, S S; Wild, J R

    1999-12-17

    The native Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase, E.C. 2.1.3.2) provides a classic allosteric model for the feedback inhibition of a biosynthetic pathway by its end products. Both E. coli and Erwinia herbicola possess ATCase holoenzymes which are dodecameric (2(c3):3(r2)) with 311 amino acid residues per catalytic monomer and 153 and 154 amino acid residues per regulatory (r) monomer, respectively. While the quaternary structures of the two enzymes are identical, the primary amino acid sequences have diverged by 14 % in the catalytic polypeptide and 20 % in the regulatory polypeptide. The amino acids proposed to be directly involved in the active site and nucleotide binding site are strictly conserved between the two enzymes; nonetheless, the two enzymes differ in their catalytic and regulatory characteristics. The E. coli enzyme has sigmoidal substrate binding with activation by ATP, and inhibition by CTP, while the E. herbicola enzyme has apparent first order kinetics at low substrate concentrations in the absence of allosteric ligands, no ATP activation and only slight CTP inhibition. In an apparently important and highly conserved characteristic, CTP and UTP impose strong synergistic inhibition on both enzymes. The co-operative binding of aspartate in the E. coli enzyme is correlated with a T-to-R conformational transition which appears to be greatly reduced in the E. herbicola enzyme, although the addition of inhibitory heterotropic ligands (CTP or CTP+UTP) re-establishes co-operative saturation kinetics. Hybrid holoenzymes assembled in vivo with catalytic subunits from E. herbicola and regulatory subunits from E. coli mimick the allosteric response of the native E. coli holoenzyme and exhibit ATP activation. The reverse hybrid, regulatory subunits from E. herbicola and catalytic subunits from E. coli, exhibited no response to ATP. The conserved structure and diverged functional characteristics of the E. herbicola enzyme provides an opportunity

  8. The structural basis of ATP as an allosteric modulator.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaoyong Lu; Wenkang Huang; Qi Wang; Qiancheng Shen; Shuai Li; Ruth Nussinov; Jian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP...

  9. The Structural Basis of ATP as an Allosteric Modulator

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP...

  10. An allosteric mechanism inferred from molecular dynamics simulations on phospholamban pentamer in lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lian

    Full Text Available Phospholamban functions as a regulator of Ca(2+ concentration of cardiac muscle cells by triggering the bioactivity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase. In order to understand its dynamic mechanism in the environment of bilayer surroundings, we performed long time-scale molecular dynamic simulations based on the high-resolution NMR structure of phospholamban pentamer. It was observed from the molecular dynamics trajectory analyses that the conformational transitions between the "bellflower" and "pinwheel" modes were detected for phospholamban. Particularly, the two modes became quite similar to each other after phospholamban was phosphorylated at Ser16. Based on these findings, an allosteric mechanism was proposed to elucidate the dynamic process of phospholamban interacting with Ca(2+-ATPase.

  11. Computational approaches to detect allosteric pathways in transmembrane molecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Michino, Mayako; LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Many of the functions of transmembrane proteins involved in signal processing and transduction across the cell membrane are determined by allosteric couplings that propagate the functional effects well beyond the original site of activation. Data gathered from breakthroughs in biochemistry, crystallography, and single molecule fluorescence have established a rich basis of information for the study of molecular mechanisms in the allosteric couplings of such transmembrane proteins. The mechanistic details of these couplings, many of which have therapeutic implications, however, have only become accessible in synergy with molecular modeling and simulations. Here, we review some recent computational approaches that analyze allosteric coupling networks (ACNs) in transmembrane proteins, and in particular the recently developed Protein Interaction Analyzer (PIA) designed to study ACNs in the structural ensembles sampled by molecular dynamics simulations. The power of these computational approaches in interrogating the functional mechanisms of transmembrane proteins is illustrated with selected examples of recent experimental and computational studies pursued synergistically in the investigation of secondary active transporters and GPCRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26806157

  12. Allosteric indicator displacement enzyme assay for a cyanogenic glycoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, D Amilan; Elstner, Martin; Schiller, Alexander

    2013-10-18

    Indicator displacement assays (IDAs) represent an elegant approach in supramolecular analytical chemistry. Herein, we report a chemical biosensor for the selective detection of the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin in aqueous solution. The hybrid sensor consists of the enzyme β-glucosidase and a boronic acid appended viologen together with a fluorescent reporter dye. β-Glucosidase degrades the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin into hydrogen cyanide, glucose, and benzaldehyde. Only the released cyanide binds at the allosteric site of the receptor (boronic acid) thereby inducing changes in the affinity of a formerly bound fluorescent indicator dye at the other side of the receptor. Thus, the sensing probe performs as allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) for cyanide in water. Interference studies with inorganic anions and glucose revealed that cyanide is solely responsible for the change in the fluorescent signal. DFT calculations on a model compound revealed a 1:1 binding ratio of the boronic acid and cyanide ion. The fluorescent enzyme assay for β-glucosidase uses amygdalin as natural substrate and allows measuring Michaelis-Menten kinetics in microtiter plates. The allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) probe can also be used to detect cyanide traces in commercial amygdalin samples. PMID:24123550

  13. Allosteric function and dysfunction of the prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Rafael; Cordeiro, Yraima; Lima, Luis Mauricio T R

    2012-04-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are neurodegenerative diseases associated with progressive oligo- and multimerization of the prion protein (PrP(C)), its conformational conversion, aggregation and precipitation. We recently proposed that PrP(C) serves as a cell surface scaffold protein for a variety of signaling modules, the effects of which translate into wide-range functional consequences. Here we review evidence for allosteric functions of PrP(C), which constitute a common property of scaffold proteins. The available data suggest that allosteric effects among PrP(C) and its partners are involved in the assembly of multi-component signaling modules at the cell surface, impose upon both physiological and pathological conformational responses of PrP(C), and that allosteric dysfunction of PrP(C) has the potential to entail progressive signal corruption. These properties may be germane both to physiological roles of PrP(C), as well as to the pathogenesis of the TSEs and other degenerative/non-communicable diseases. PMID:21984610

  14. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W. (U. Sao Paulo); (Kentucky)

    2012-05-25

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the A{beta} peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  15. Exploring the allosteric mechanism of dihydrodipicolinate synthase by reverse engineering of the allosteric inhibitor binding sites and its application for lysine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Feng; Chen, Zhen; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2013-03-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) catalyzes the first committed reaction of L-lysine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants and is allosterically regulated by L-lysine. In previous studies, DHDPSs from different species were proved to have different sensitivity to L-lysine inhibition. In this study, we investigated the key determinants of feedback regulation between two industrially important DHDPSs, the L-lysine-sensitive DHDPS from Escherichia coli and L-lysine-insensitive DHDPS from Corynebacterium glutamicum, by sequence and structure comparisons and site-directed mutation. Feedback inhibition of E. coli DHDPS was successfully alleviated after substitution of the residues around the inhibitor's binding sites with those of C. glutamicum DHDPS. Interestingly, mutagenesis of the lysine binding sites of C. glutamicum DHDPS according to E. coli DHDPS did not recover the expected feedback inhibition but an activation of DHDPS by L-lysine, probably due to differences in the allosteic signal transduction in the DHDPS of these two organisms. Overexpression of L-lysine-insensitive E. coli DHDPS mutants in E. coli MG1655 resulted in an improvement of L-lysine production yield by 46 %. PMID:22644522

  16. Structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase from Maricaulis maris with the allosteric inhibitor L-arginine bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Jin, Zhongmin; M Allewell, Norma; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-08-01

    Maricaulis maris N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (mmNAGS/K) catalyzes the first two steps in L-arginine biosynthesis and has a high degree of sequence and structural homology to human N-acetylglutamate synthase, a regulator of the urea cycle. The synthase activity of both mmNAGS/K and human NAGS are regulated by L-arginine, although L-arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of mmNAGS/K, but an activator of human NAGS. To investigate the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K by L-arginine, we have determined the structure of the mmNAGS/K complexed with L-arginine at 2.8 Å resolution. In contrast to the structure of mmNAGS/K in the absence of L-arginine where there are conformational differences between the four subunits in the asymmetric unit, all four subunits in the L-arginine liganded structure have very similar conformations. In this conformation, the AcCoA binding site in the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain is blocked by a loop from the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, as a result of a domain rotation that occurs when L-arginine binds. This structural change provides an explanation for the allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K and related enzymes by L-arginine. The allosterically regulated mechanism for mmNAGS/K differs significantly from that for Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS (ngNAGS). To define the active site, several residues near the putative active site were mutated and their activities determined. These experiments identify roles for Lys356, Arg386, Asn391 and Tyr397 in the catalytic mechanism. PMID:23850694

  17. Intramolecular allosteric communication in dopamine D2 receptor revealed by evolutionary amino acid covariation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yun-Min; Wilkins, Angela D; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Wensel, Theodore G; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-03-29

    The structural basis of allosteric signaling in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important in guiding design of therapeutics and understanding phenotypic consequences of genetic variation. The Evolutionary Trace (ET) algorithm previously proved effective in redesigning receptors to mimic the ligand specificities of functionally distinct homologs. We now expand ET to consider mutual information, with validation in GPCR structure and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) function. The new algorithm, called ET-MIp, identifies evolutionarily relevant patterns of amino acid covariations. The improved predictions of structural proximity and D2R mutagenesis demonstrate that ET-MIp predicts functional interactions between residue pairs, particularly potency and efficacy of activation by dopamine. Remarkably, although most of the residue pairs chosen for mutagenesis are neither in the binding pocket nor in contact with each other, many exhibited functional interactions, implying at-a-distance coupling. The functional interaction between the coupled pairs correlated best with the evolutionary coupling potential derived from dopamine receptor sequences rather than with broader sets of GPCR sequences. These data suggest that the allosteric communication responsible for dopamine responses is resolved by ET-MIp and best discerned within a short evolutionary distance. Most double mutants restored dopamine response to wild-type levels, also suggesting that tight regulation of the response to dopamine drove the coevolution and intramolecular communications between coupled residues. Our approach provides a general tool to identify evolutionary covariation patterns in small sets of close sequence homologs and to translate them into functional linkages between residues. PMID:26979958

  18. Allosteric Inhibitors of the NS3 Protease from the Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abian, Olga; Vega, Sonia; Sancho, Javier; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) from the hepatitis C virus processes the non-structural region of the viral precursor polyprotein in infected hepatic cells. The NS3 protease activity has been considered a target for drug development since its identification two decades ago. Although specific inhibitors have been approved for clinical therapy very recently, resistance-associated mutations have already been reported for those drugs, compromising their long-term efficacy. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new anti-HCV agents with low susceptibility to resistance-associated mutations. Regarding NS3 protease, two strategies have been followed: competitive inhibitors blocking the active site and allosteric inhibitors blocking the binding of the accessory viral protein NS4A. In this work we exploit the intrinsic Zn+2-regulated plasticity of the protease to identify a new type of allosteric inhibitors. In the absence of Zn+2, the NS3 protease adopts a partially-folded inactive conformation. We found ligands binding to the Zn+2-free NS3 protease, trap the inactive protein, and block the viral life cycle. The efficacy of these compounds has been confirmed in replicon cell assays. Importantly, direct calorimetric assays reveal a low impact of known resistance-associated mutations, and enzymatic assays provide a direct evidence of their inhibitory activity. They constitute new low molecular-weight scaffolds for further optimization and provide several advantages: 1) new inhibition mechanism simultaneously blocking substrate and cofactor interactions in a non-competitive fashion, appropriate for combination therapy; 2) low impact of known resistance-associated mutations; 3) inhibition of NS4A binding, thus blocking its several effects on NS3 protease. PMID:23936097

  19. The therapeutic potential of allosteric ligands for free fatty acid sensitive GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Brian D; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    identifying allosteric leads and their often flat or confusing SAR. The present review will consider the advantages and challenges associated with allosteric GPCR ligands, and examine how the particular properties of these ligands may be exploited to uncover the therapeutic potential for free fatty acid...

  20. Activation and Allosteric Modulation of Human μ Opioid Receptor in Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartuzi, Damian; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Matosiuk, Dariusz

    2015-11-23

    Allosteric protein modulation has gained increasing attention in drug design. Its application as a mechanism of action could bring forth safer and more effective medicines. Targeting opioid receptors with allosteric modulators can result in better treatment of pain, depression, and respiratory and immune disorders. In this work we use recent reports on negative modulators of μ opioid receptor as a starting point for identification of allosteric sites and mechanisms of opioid receptor modulation using homology modeling and docking and molecular dynamics studies. An allosteric binding site description is presented. Results suggest a shared binding region for lipophilic allosteric ligands, reveal possible differences in the modulation mechanism between cannabinoids and salvinorin A, and show ambiguous properties of the latter. Also, they emphasize the importance of native-like environment in molecular dynamics simulations and uncover relationships between modulator and orthosteric ligand binding and receptor behavior. Relationships between ligands, transmission switch, and hydrophobic lock are analyzed. PMID:26517559

  1. Allosteric activation mechanism of the cys-loop receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-chang CHANG; Wen WU; Jian-liang ZHANG; Yao HUANG

    2009-01-01

    Binding of a neurotransmitter to its ionotropic receptor opens a distantly located ion channel, a process termed allosteric activation. Here we review recent advances in the molecular mechanism by which the cys-loop receptors are activated with emphasis on the best studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). With a combination of affinity labeling, mutagenesis, electrophysiology, kinetic modeling, electron microscopy (EM), and crystal structure analysis, the allosteric activation mechanism is emerging. Specifically, the binding domain and gating domain are interconnected by an allosteric activation network. Agonist binding induces conformational changes, resulting in the rotation of a β sheet of amino-terminal domain and outward movement of loop 2, loop F, and cys-loop, which are coupled to the M2-M3 linker to pull the channel to open. However, there are still some controversies about the movement of the channel-lining domain M2. Nine angstrom resolution EM structure of a nAChR imaged in the open state suggests that channel opening is the result of rotation of the M2 domain. In contrast, recent crystal structures of bacterial homologues of the cys-loop receptor family in apparently open state have implied an M2 tilting model with pore dilation and quaternary twist of the whole pentameric receptor. An elegant study of the nAChR using protonation scanning of M2 domain supports a similar pore dilation activation mechanism with minimal rotation of M2. This remains to be validated with other approaches including high resolution structure determination of the mammalian cys-loop receptors in the open state.

  2. Structural insights into Ca(2+)-activated long-range allosteric channel gating of RyR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Risheng; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xinrui; Jing, Shan; Liu, Congcong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Yaofang; Zhu, Sujie; Williams, Alan J; Sun, Fei; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca(2+)-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure has an overall resolution of 4.9 Å and a resolution of 4.2 Å for the core region. In comparison with the previously determined apo/closed-state structure, we observed long-range allosteric gating of the channel upon Ca(2+) activation. In-depth structural analyses elucidated a novel channel-gating mechanism and a novel ion selectivity mechanism of RyR1. Our work not only provides structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and regulation of RyRs, but also sheds light on structural basis for channel-gating and ion selectivity mechanisms for the six-transmembrane-helix cation channel family. PMID:27573175

  3. Bioinformatic scaling of allosteric interactions in biomedical isozymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-09-01

    Allosteric (long-range) interactions can be surprisingly strong in proteins of biomedical interest. Here we use bioinformatic scaling to connect prior results on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to promising new drugs that inhibit cancer cell metabolism. Many parallel features are apparent, which explain how even one amino acid mutation, remote from active sites, can alter medical results. The enzyme twins involved are cyclooxygenase (aspirin) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). The IDH results are accurate to 1% and are overdetermined by adjusting a single bioinformatic scaling parameter. It appears that the final stage in optimizing protein functionality may involve leveling of the hydrophobic limits of the arms of conformational hydrophilic hinges.

  4. Allosteric modulators of the hERG K{sup +} channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhiyi, E-mail: z.yu@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl; Klaasse, Elisabeth, E-mail: elisabethklaasse@hotmail.com; Heitman, Laura H., E-mail: l.h.heitman@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl; IJzerman, Adriaan P., E-mail: ijzerman@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that block the cardiac K{sup +} channel encoded by the human ether-à-go-go gene (hERG) have been associated with QT interval prolongation leading to proarrhythmia, and in some cases, sudden cardiac death. Because of special structural features of the hERG K{sup +} channel, it has become a promiscuous target that interacts with pharmaceuticals of widely varying chemical structures and a reason for concern in the pharmaceutical industry. The structural diversity suggests that multiple binding sites are available on the channel with possible allosteric interactions between them. In the present study, three reference compounds and nine compounds of a previously disclosed series were evaluated for their allosteric effects on the binding of [{sup 3}H]astemizole and [{sup 3}H]dofetilide to the hERG K{sup +} channel. LUF6200 was identified as an allosteric inhibitor in dissociation assays with both radioligands, yielding similar EC{sub 50} values in the low micromolar range. However, potassium ions increased the binding of the two radioligands in a concentration-dependent manner, and their EC{sub 50} values were not significantly different, indicating that potassium ions behaved as allosteric enhancers. Furthermore, addition of potassium ions resulted in a concentration-dependent leftward shift of the LUF6200 response curve, suggesting positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them. In conclusion, our investigations provide evidence for allosteric modulation of the hERG K{sup +} channel, which is discussed in the light of findings on other ion channels. - Highlights: • Allosteric modulators on the hERG K{sup +} channel were evaluated in binding assays. • LUF6200 was identified as a potent allosteric inhibitor. • Potassium ions were found to behave as allosteric enhancers. • Positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them were proposed.

  5. The allosteric switching mechanism in bacteriophage MS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkett, Matthew R.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    We use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopts different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We discuss changes in molecular interactions responsible for this shift. We then identify networks of amino acids with correlated motions to reveal the mechanism by which effects of TR binding span the protein. We find that TR binding strongly affects residues located at the 5-fold and quasi-sixfold interfaces in the assembled capsid, suggesting a mechanism by which the TR binding could direct formation of the native capsid geometry. The analysis predicts amino acids whose substitution by mutagenesis could alter populations of the conformational substates or their transition rates.

  6. Differentiating a Ligand's Chemical Requirements for Allosteric Interactions from Those for Protein Binding. Phenylalanine Inhibition of Pyruvate Kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isoform of pyruvate kinase from brain and muscle of mammals (M1-PYK) is allosterically inhibited by phenylalanine. Initial observations in this model allosteric system indicate that Ala binds competitively with Phe, but elicits a minimal allosteric response. Thus, the allosteric ligand of this system must have requirements for eliciting an allosteric response in addition to the requirements for binding. Phe analogues have been used to dissect what chemical properties of Phe are responsible for eliciting the allosteric response. We first demonstrate that the L-2-aminopropanaldehyde substructure of the amino acid ligand is primarily responsible for binding to M1-PYK. Since the allosteric response to Ala is minimal and linear addition of methyl groups beyond the -carbon increase the magnitude of the allosteric response, we conclude that moieties beyond the -carbon are primarily responsible for allostery. Instead of an all-or-none mechanism of allostery, these findings support the idea that the bulk of the hydrophobic side chain, but not the aromatic nature, is the primary determinant of the magnitude of the observed allosteric inhibition. The use of these results to direct structural studies has resulted in a 1.65 Angstroms structure of M1-PYK with Ala bound. The coordination of Ala in the allosteric amino acid binding site confirms the binding role of the L-2-aminopropanaldehyde substructure of the ligand. Collectively, this study confirms that a ligand can have chemical regions specific for eliciting the allosteric signal in addition to the chemical regions necessary for binding

  7. Allosteric and orthosteric sites in CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), a chimeric receptor approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Steen, Anne; Jensen, Pia C;

    2011-01-01

    -allosteric molecules. A chimera was successfully constructed between CCR5 and the closely related CCR2 by transferring all extracellular regions of CCR2 to CCR5, i.e. a Trojan horse that resembles CCR2 extracellularly but signals through a CCR5 transmembrane unit. The chimera bound CCR2 (CCL2 and CCL7), but not CCR5...... preserved, the allosteric enhancement of chemokine binding was disrupted. In summary, the Trojan horse chimera revealed that orthosteric and allosteric sites could be structurally separated and still act together with transmission of agonism and antagonism across the different receptor units....

  8. Ago-allosteric modulation and other types of allostery in dimeric 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Birgitte

    concept for 7TM receptors, it is proposed that the ago-allosteric modulators bind in the orthosteric binding site, but-importantly-in the "other" or allosteric protomer of the dimer. Hereby, they can act both as additive co-agonists, and through intermolecular cooperative effects between the protomers......, they may influence the potency of the endogenous agonist. It is of interest that at least some endogenous agonists can only occupy one protomer of a dimeric 7TM receptor complex at a time and thereby they leave the orthosteric binding site in the allosteric protomer free, potentially for binding of...

  9. Effects of the dopamine D2 allosteric modulator, PAOPA, on the expression of GRK2, arrestin-3, ERK1/2, and on receptor internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipannita Basu

    Full Text Available The activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is intricately regulated by a range of intracellular proteins, including G protein-coupled kinases (GRKs and arrestins. Understanding the effects of ligands on these signaling pathways could provide insights into disease pathophysiologies and treatment. The dopamine D2 receptor is a GPCR strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Previous studies from our lab have shown the preclinical efficacy of a novel allosteric drug, 3(R-[(2(S-pyrrolidinylcarbonylamino]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide (PAOPA, in attenuating schizophrenia-like behavioural abnormalities in rodent models of the disease. As an allosteric modulator, PAOPA binds to a site on the D2 receptor, which is distinct from the endogenous ligand-binding site, in order to modulate the binding of the D2 receptor ligand, dopamine. The exact signaling pathways affected by this allosteric modulator are currently unknown. The objectives of this study were to decipher the in vivo effects, in rats, of chronic PAOPA administration on D2 receptor regulatory and downstream molecules, including GRK2, arrestin-3 and extracellular receptor kinase (ERK 1/2. Additionally, an in vitro cellular model was also used to study PAOPA's effects on D2 receptor internalization. Results from western immunoblots showed that chronic PAOPA treatment increased the striatal expression of GRK2 by 41%, arrestin-3 by 34%, phospho-ERK1 by 51% and phospho-ERK2 by 36%. Results also showed that the addition of PAOPA to agonist treatment in cells increased D2 receptor internalization by 33%. This study provides the foundational evidence of putative signaling pathways, and changes in receptor localization, affected by treatment with PAOPA. It improves our understanding on the diverse mechanisms of action of allosteric modulators, while advancing PAOPA's development into a novel drug for the

  10. Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulations of Allosteric Cooperativity

    CERN Document Server

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between a protein and a ligand are often accompanied by a redistribution of the population of thermally accessible conformations. This dynamic response of the protein's functional energy landscape enables a protein to modulate binding affinities and control binding sensitivity to ligand concentration. In this paper, we investigate the structural origins of binding affinity and allosteric cooperativity of binding two calcium ions to each domain of calmodulin (CaM) through simulations of a simple coarse-grained model. In this model, the protein's conformational transitions between open and closed conformational ensembles are simulated explicitly and ligand binding and unbinding is treated implicitly at the mean field level. Ligand binding is cooperative because the binding sites are coupled through a shift in the dominant conformational ensemble upon binding. The classic Monod-Wyman-Changeux model of allostery with appropriate binding free energy to the open and closed ensembles accurately describe...

  11. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Noah D; Garruss, Alexander S; Moretti, Rocco; Chan, Sum; Arbing, Mark A; Cascio, Duilio; Rogers, Jameson K; Isaacs, Farren J; Kosuri, Sriram; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Church, George M; Raman, Srivatsan

    2016-02-01

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. We engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol and sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits. PMID:26689263

  12. Architecture and Co-Evolution of Allosteric Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Le; Brito, Carolina; Wyart, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a numerical scheme to evolve functional materials that can accomplish a specified mechanical task. In this scheme, the number of solutions, their spatial architectures and the correlations among them can be computed. As an example, we consider an "allosteric" task, which requires the material to respond specifically to a stimulus at a distant active site. We find that functioning materials evolve a less-constrained trumpet-shaped region connecting the stimulus and active sites and that the amplitude of the elastic response varies non-monotonically along the trumpet. As previously shown for some proteins, we find that correlations appearing during evolution alone are sufficient to identify key aspects of this design. Finally, we show that the success of this architecture stems from the emergence of soft edge modes recently found to appear near the surface of marginally connected materials. Overall, our in silico evolution experiment offers a new window to study the relationship between structure, ...

  13. Structure and allosteric effects of low-molecular-weight activators on the protein kinase PDK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindie, Valerie; Stroba, Adriana; Zhang, Hua;

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation transduces a large set of intracellular signals. One mechanism by which phosphorylation mediates signal transduction is by prompting conformational changes in the target protein or interacting proteins. Previous work described an allosteric site mediating phosphorylation-d...

  14. Fumarate analogs act as allosteric inhibitors of the human mitochondrial NAD(P+-dependent malic enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Yi Hsieh

    Full Text Available Human mitochondrial NAD(P+-dependent malic enzyme (m-NAD(P-ME is allosterically activated by the four-carbon trans dicarboxylic acid, fumarate. Previous studies have suggested that the dicarboxylic acid in a trans conformation around the carbon-carbon double bond is required for the allosteric activation of the enzyme. In this paper, the allosteric effects of fumarate analogs on m-NAD(P-ME are investigated. Two fumarate-insensitive mutants, m-NAD(P-ME_R67A/R91A and m-NAD(P-ME_K57S/E59N/K73E/D102S, as well as c-NADP-ME, were used as the negative controls. Among these analogs, mesaconate, trans-aconitate, monomethyl fumarate and monoethyl fumarate were allosteric activators of the enzyme, while oxaloacetate, diethyl oxalacetate, and dimethyl fumarate were found to be allosteric inhibitors of human m-NAD(P-ME. The IC50 value for diethyl oxalacetate was approximately 2.5 mM. This paper suggests that the allosteric inhibitors may impede the conformational change from open form to closed form and therefore inhibit m-NAD(P-ME enzyme activity.

  15. An allosteric model of the inositol trisphosphate receptor with nonequilibrium binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inositol trisphosphate receptor (IPR) is a crucial ion channel that regulates the Ca2+ influx from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cytoplasm. A thorough study of the IPR channel contributes to a better understanding of calcium oscillations and waves. It has long been observed that the IPR channel is a typical biological system which performs adaptation. However, recent advances on the physical essence of adaptation show that adaptation systems with a negative feedback mechanism, such as the IPR channel, must break detailed balance and always operate out of equilibrium with energy dissipation. Almost all previous IPR models are equilibrium models assuming detailed balance and thus violate the dissipative nature of adaptation. In this article, we constructed a nonequilibrium allosteric model of single IPR channels based on the patch-clamp experimental data obtained from the IPR in the outer membranes of isolated nuclei of the Xenopus oocyte. It turns out that our model reproduces the patch-clamp experimental data reasonably well and produces both the correct steady-state and dynamic properties of the channel. Particularly, our model successfully describes the complicated bimodal [Ca2+] dependence of the mean open duration at high [IP3], a steady-state behavior which fails to be correctly described in previous IPR models. Finally, we used the patch-clamp experimental data to validate that the IPR channel indeed breaks detailed balance and thus is a nonequilibrium system which consumes energy. (paper)

  16. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Nan P; LaMarche, Matthew J; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G; Dobson, Jason R; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J; Sellers, William R; Stams, Travis; Fortin, Pascal D

    2016-07-01

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers. PMID:27362227

  17. Are AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulators potential pharmacotherapeutics for addiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Lucas R; Olive, M Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  18. Computational Investigation on the Allosteric Modulation of Androgen Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Min-Rui; LI Jun-Qian

    2012-01-01

    Androgens have similar structures with different biological activities. To identify molecular determinants responsible for the activity difference, we have docked six steroidal androgens to the binding site or the surface of androgen receptor by using molecular docking with computational investigation. The energy was calculated respectively based on the QM (quantum mechanics) and MM (molecular mechanics) methods. The result shows that the allosteric modulation of androgen receptor plays an important role in the binding process between androgens and receptor. The open state receptor is less stable than the close state one, but the latter is more favorable for binding with androgens. It is worthy of note that when the androgen receptors binding or without binding with androgen are in close state, they are difficult to return to their open state. This phenomenon is an exception of the well known two-state model theory in which the two states are reversible. Whether the internal of close state androgen receptor has a combination of androgen or not, the androgen receptor surface can be combined with another androgen, and their surface binding energies could be very close. The result is consistent with the experimental observations, but this phenomenon of continuous combination from open state is also an exception of the two-state model theory.

  19. Are AMPA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators Potential Pharmacotherapeutics for Addiction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R. Watterson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications.

  20. Allosteric receptor activation by the plant peptide hormone phytosulfokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jizong; Li, Hongju; Han, Zhifu; Zhang, Heqiao; Wang, Tong; Lin, Guangzhong; Chang, Junbiao; Yang, Weicai; Chai, Jijie

    2015-09-10

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a disulfated pentapeptide that has a ubiquitous role in plant growth and development. PSK is perceived by its receptor PSKR, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). The mechanisms underlying the recognition of PSK, the activation of PSKR and the identity of the components downstream of the initial binding remain elusive. Here we report the crystal structures of the extracellular LRR domain of PSKR in free, PSK- and co-receptor-bound forms. The structures reveal that PSK interacts mainly with a β-strand from the island domain of PSKR, forming an anti-β-sheet. The two sulfate moieties of PSK interact directly with PSKR, sensitizing PSKR recognition of PSK. Supported by biochemical, structural and genetic evidence, PSK binding enhances PSKR heterodimerization with the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinases (SERKs). However, PSK is not directly involved in PSKR-SERK interaction but stabilizes PSKR island domain for recruitment of a SERK. Our data reveal the structural basis for PSKR recognition of PSK and allosteric activation of PSKR by PSK, opening up new avenues for the design of PSKR-specific small molecules. PMID:26308901

  1. A potential yeast actin allosteric conduit dependent on hydrophobic core residues val-76 and trp-79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Stokasimov, Ema; Fields, Jonathon; Rubenstein, Peter A

    2010-07-01

    Intramolecular allosteric interactions responsible for actin conformational regulation are largely unknown. Previous work demonstrated that replacing yeast actin Val-76 with muscle actin Ile caused decreased nucleotide exchange. Residue 76 abuts Trp-79 in a six-residue linear array beginning with Lys-118 on the surface and ending with His-73 in the nucleotide cleft. To test if altering the degree of packing of these two residues would affect actin dynamics, we constructed V76I, W79F, and W79Y single mutants as well as the Ile-76/Phe-79 and Ile-76/Tyr-79 double mutants. Tyr or Phe should decrease crowding and increase protein flexibility. Subsequent introduction of Ile should restore packing and dampen changes. All mutants showed decreased growth in liquid medium. W79Y alone was severely osmosensitive and exhibited vacuole abnormalities. Both properties were rescued by Ile-76. Phe-79 or Tyr decreased the thermostability of actin and increased its nucleotide exchange rate. These effects, generally greater for Tyr than for Phe, were reversed by introduction of Ile-76. HD exchange showed that the mutations caused propagated conformational changes to all four subdomains. Based on results from phosphate release and light-scattering assays, single mutations affected polymerization in the order of Ile, Phe, and Tyr from least to most. Introduction of Ile-76 partially rescued the polymerization defects caused by either Tyr-79 or Phe-79. Thus, alterations in crowding of the 76-79 residue pair can strongly affect actin conformation and behavior, and these results support the theory that the amino acid array in which they are located may play a central role in actin regulation. PMID:20442407

  2. Identifying allosteric fluctuation transitions between different protein conformational states as applied to Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Jenny

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms underlying protein function and associated conformational change are dominated by a series of local entropy fluctuations affecting the global structure yet are mediated by only a few key residues. Transitional Dynamic Analysis (TDA is a new method to detect these changes in local protein flexibility between different conformations arising from, for example, ligand binding. Additionally, Positional Impact Vertex for Entropy Transfer (PIVET uses TDA to identify important residue contact changes that have a large impact on global fluctuation. We demonstrate the utility of these methods for Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2, a system with crystal structures of this protein in multiple functionally relevant conformations and experimental data revealing the importance of local fluctuation changes for protein function. Results TDA and PIVET successfully identified select residues that are responsible for conformation specific regional fluctuation in the activation cycle of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2. The detected local changes in protein flexibility have been experimentally confirmed to be essential for the regulation and function of the kinase. The methodologies also highlighted possible errors in previous molecular dynamic simulations that need to be resolved in order to understand this key player in cell cycle regulation. Finally, the use of entropy compensation as a possible allosteric mechanism for protein function is reported for CDK2. Conclusion The methodologies embodied in TDA and PIVET provide a quick approach to identify local fluctuation change important for protein function and residue contacts that contributes to these changes. Further, these approaches can be used to check for possible errors in protein dynamic simulations and have the potential to facilitate a better understanding of the contribution of entropy to protein allostery and function.

  3. Positive cooperativity of acetylcholine and other agonists with allosteric ligands on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; El-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors can both diminish and increase the affinity of receptors for their antagonists. We investigated whether the allosteric modulators can also increase the affinity of receptors for their agonists. Twelve agonists and five allosteric modulators were tested in experiments on membranes of CHO cells that had been stably transfected with genes for the M1-M4 receptor subtypes. Allosterically induced changes in the affinities for agonists were computed from changes in the ability of a fixed concentration of each agonist to compete with [3H]N-methylscopolamine for the binding to the receptors in the absence and the presence of varying concentrations of allosteric modulators. The effects of allosteric modulators varied greatly depending on the agonists and the subtypes of receptors. The affinity for acetylcholine was augmented by (-)-eburnamonine on the M2 and M4 receptors and by brucine on the M1 and M3 receptors. Brucine also enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pilocarpine, 3-(3-pentylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1- methylpyridine (pentylthio-TZTP), oxotremorine-M, and McN-A-343 on the M1, M3, and M4 receptors, for pentylthio-TZTP on the M2 receptors, and for arecoline on the M3 receptors. (-)-Eburnamonine enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pentylthio-TZTP, pilocarpine, oxotremorine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors and for pilocarpine on the M4 receptors. Vincamine, strychnine, and alcuronium displayed fewer positive allosteric interactions with the agonists, but each allosteric modulator displayed positive cooperativity with at least one agonist on at least one muscarinic receptor subtype. The highest degrees of positive cooperativity were observed between (-)-eburnamonine and pilocarpine and (-)-eburnamonine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors (25- and 7-fold increases in

  4. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Ron O.; Green, Hillary F.; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W.; Valcourt, James R.; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J. Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E.

    2013-11-01

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15Å from the classical, `orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators.

  6. Allosteric inhibition of the NS2B-NS3 protease from dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Muslum; Ghosh, Sumana; Bell, Jeffrey A; Sherman, Woody; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2013-12-20

    Dengue virus is the flavivirus that causes dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic disease, and dengue shock syndrome, which are currently increasing in incidence worldwide. Dengue virus protease (NS2B-NS3pro) is essential for dengue virus infection and is thus a target of therapeutic interest. To date, attention has focused on developing active-site inhibitors of NS2B-NS3pro. The flat and charged nature of the NS2B-NS3pro active site may contribute to difficulties in developing inhibitors and suggests that a strategy of identifying allosteric sites may be useful. We report an approach that allowed us to scan the NS2B-NS3pro surface by cysteine mutagenesis and use cysteine reactive probes to identify regions of the protein that are susceptible to allosteric inhibition. This method identified a new allosteric site utilizing a circumscribed panel of just eight cysteine variants and only five cysteine reactive probes. The allosterically sensitive site is centered at Ala125, between the 120s loop and the 150s loop. The crystal structures of WT and modified NS2B-NS3pro demonstrate that the 120s loop is flexible. Our work suggests that binding at this site prevents a conformational rearrangement of the NS2B region of the protein, which is required for activation. Preventing this movement locks the protein into the open, inactive conformation, suggesting that this site may be useful in the future development of therapeutic allosteric inhibitors. PMID:24164286

  7. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  8. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca; Kleinjung, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Allostery offers a highly specific way to modulate protein function. Therefore, understanding this mechanism is of increasing interest for protein science and drug discovery. However, allosteric signal transmission is difficult to detect experimentally and to model because it is often mediated by local structural changes propagating along multiple pathways. To address this, we developed a method to identify communication pathways by an information-theoretical analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. Signal propagation was described as information exchange through a network of correlated local motions, modeled as transitions between canonical states of protein fragments. The method was used to describe allostery in two-component regulatory systems. In particular, the transmission from the allosteric site to the signaling surface of the receiver domain NtrC was shown to be mediated by a layer of hub residues. The location of hubs preferentially connected to the allosteric site was found in close agreement with key residues experimentally identified as involved in the signal transmission. The comparison with the networks of the homologues CheY and FixJ highlighted similarities in their dynamics. In particular, we showed that a preorganized network of fragment connections between the allosteric and functional sites exists already in the inactive state of all three proteins.—Pandini, A., Fornili, A., Fraternali, F., Kleinjung, J. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics. PMID:22071506

  9. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoto, Phillip C.; Martin, Bryan T.; Wright, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways.

  10. Identifying Allosteric Hotspots with Dynamics: Application to Inter- and Intra-species Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Declan; Sethi, Anurag; Li, Shantao; Kumar, Sushant; Chang, Richard W F; Chen, Jieming; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The rapidly growing volume of data being produced by next-generation sequencing initiatives is enabling more in-depth analyses of conservation than previously possible. Deep sequencing is uncovering disease loci and regions under selective constraint, despite the fact that intuitive biophysical reasons for such constraint are sometimes absent. Allostery may often provide the missing explanatory link. We use models of protein conformational change to identify allosteric residues by finding essential surface pockets and information-flow bottlenecks, and we develop a software tool that enables users to perform this analysis on their own proteins of interest. Though fundamentally 3D-structural in nature, our analysis is computationally fast, thereby allowing us to run it across the PDB and to evaluate general properties of predicted allosteric residues. We find that these tend to be conserved over diverse evolutionary time scales. Finally, we highlight examples of allosteric residues that help explain poorly understood disease-associated variants. PMID:27066750

  11. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoto, Phillip C; Martin, Bryan T; Wright, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways. PMID:27353957

  12. Selective Negative Allosteric Modulation Of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors - A Structural Perspective of Ligands and Mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Isberg, Vignir; Tehan, Benjamin G;

    2015-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors have a wide range of modulatory functions in the central nervous system. They are among the most highly pursued drug targets, with relevance for several neurological diseases, and a number of allosteric modulators have entered clinical trials. However, so far...... this has not led to a marketed drug, largely because of the difficulties in achieving subtype-selective compounds with desired properties. Very recently the first crystal structures were published for the transmembrane domain of two metabotropic glutamate receptors in complex with negative allosteric...... modulators. In this analysis, we make the first comprehensive structural comparison of all metabotropic glutamate receptors, placing selective negative allosteric modulators and critical mutants into the detailed context of the receptor binding sites. A better understanding of how the different m...

  13. Hemoglobin and the origins of the concept of allosterism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, J T

    1980-02-01

    heterotropic interactions. Brief final comments relate to the evolution of the concept of reversible conformational transitions as the basis for both homotropic and heterotropic interactions in allosteric proteins. PMID:6986293

  14. Optimization of a Dibenzodiazepine Hit to a Potent and Selective Allosteric PAK1 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Alexei S; Amiri, Payman; Bellamacina, Cornelia; Bellance, Marie-Helene; Breitenstein, Werner; Daniel, Dylan; Denay, Regis; Fabbro, Doriano; Fernandez, Cesar; Galuba, Inga; Guerro-Lagasse, Stephanie; Gutmann, Sascha; Hinh, Linda; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Klopp, Julia; Lai, Albert; Lindvall, Mika K; Ma, Sylvia; Möbitz, Henrik; Pecchi, Sabina; Rummel, Gabriele; Shoemaker, Kevin; Trappe, Joerg; Voliva, Charles; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Marzinzik, Andreas L

    2015-07-01

    The discovery of inhibitors targeting novel allosteric kinase sites is very challenging. Such compounds, however, once identified could offer exquisite levels of selectivity across the kinome. Herein we report our structure-based optimization strategy of a dibenzodiazepine hit 1, discovered in a fragment-based screen, yielding highly potent and selective inhibitors of PAK1 such as 2 and 3. Compound 2 was cocrystallized with PAK1 to confirm binding to an allosteric site and to reveal novel key interactions. Compound 3 modulated PAK1 at the cellular level and due to its selectivity enabled valuable research to interrogate biological functions of the PAK1 kinase. PMID:26191365

  15. Shift in the Equilibrium between On and Off States of the Allosteric Switch in Ras-GppNHp Affected by Small Molecules and Bulk Solvent Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, Genevieve; Buhrman, Greg; Mattos, Carla (NCSU)

    2012-08-31

    Ras GTPase cycles between its active GTP-bound form promoted by GEFs and its inactive GDP-bound form promoted by GAPs to affect the control of various cellular functions. It is becoming increasingly apparent that subtle regulation of the GTP-bound active state may occur through promotion of substates mediated by an allosteric switch mechanism that induces a disorder to order transition in switch II upon ligand binding at an allosteric site. We show with high-resolution structures that calcium acetate and either dithioerythritol (DTE) or dithiothreitol (DTT) soaked into H-Ras-GppNHp crystals in the presence of a moderate amount of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can selectively shift the equilibrium to the 'on' state, where the active site appears to be poised for catalysis (calcium acetate), or to what we call the 'ordered off' state, which is associated with an anticatalytic conformation (DTE or DTT). We also show that the equilibrium is reversible in our crystals and dependent on the nature of the small molecule present. Calcium acetate binding in the allosteric site stabilizes the conformation observed in the H-Ras-GppNHp/NOR1A complex, and PEG, DTE, and DTT stabilize the anticatalytic conformation observed in the complex between the Ras homologue Ran and Importin-{beta}. The small molecules are therefore selecting biologically relevant conformations in the crystal that are sampled by the disordered switch II in the uncomplexed GTP-bound form of H-Ras. In the presence of a large amount of PEG, the ordered off conformation predominates, whereas in solution, in the absence of PEG, switch regions appear to remain disordered in what we call the off state, unable to bind DTE.

  16. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  17. Adaptive response and genomic instability: allosteric response of genome to negative impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, there is an upsurge concern on the unique response of living cells to low dose ionizing radiation for its inconformity to the existing paradigm of the biological action of radiation and its impact on the current understanding of risk evaluation of health effect of radiation in our workplace and environment. For the allosteric response to have significance, the cells must have an excellent sensing mechanism to discriminate tolerable and intolerable signals. In a series of experiments with mammalian, including human, cells, we demonstrated a novel sensing and signaling mechanism in the low-dose irradiated cells that was mediated by a PKCα-p3BMAPK-PLCδ1 feedback regulatory loop. Upon irradiation, PKCα is immediately activated, which in turn activate p38MAPK. The activation of p38MAPK is feedbacked to the activation of PKCα via PLCδ1, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of PtdInsP2 to generate PKCα-directed second messengers DAG and lnsP3. At low doses, the PKCα and p38MAPK continue to be activated for long time through this feedback loop, but when the cells encounter the high dose (>10 cGy or equivalent), the feedback loop is immediately comes to shutdown by deprivation of PKCα protein, known as down-regulation of PKC signaling. Thus, PKCα plays a key role in the long lasting nature of adaptive response to low doses and a binary switch to the genomic instability by too much signals. Tumor suppressor protein, p53, is a downstream effecter

  18. Mutations in Antibody Fragments Modulate Allosteric Response Via Hydrogen-Bond Network Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Livesay, Dennis R; Jacobs, Donald J

    2016-05-10

    A mechanical perturbation method that locally restricts conformational entropy along the protein backbone is used to identify putative allosteric sites in a series of antibody fragments. The method is based on a distance constraint model that integrates mechanical and thermodynamic viewpoints of protein structure wherein mechanical clamps that mimic substrate or cosolute binding are introduced. Across a set of six single chain-Fv fragments of the anti-lymphotoxin-β receptor antibody, statistically significant responses are obtained by averaging over 10 representative structures sampled from a molecular dynamics simulation. As expected, the introduced clamps locally rigidify the protein, but long-ranged increases in both rigidity and flexibility are also frequently observed. Expanding our analysis to every molecular dynamics frame demonstrates that the allosteric responses are modulated by fluctuations within the hydrogen-bond network where the native ensemble is comprised of conformations that both are, and are not, affected by the perturbation in question. Population shifts induced by the mutations alter the allosteric response by adjusting which hydrogen-bond networks are the most probable. These effects are compared using response maps that track changes across each single chain-Fv fragment, thus providing valuable insight into how sensitive allosteric mechanisms are to mutations. PMID:27166802

  19. Coevolutionary analysis enabled rational deregulation of allosteric enzyme inhibition in Corynebacterium glutamicum for lysine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Meyer, Weiqian; Rappert, Sugima; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Product feedback inhibition of allosteric enzymes is an essential issue for the development of highly efficient microbial strains for bioproduction. Here we used aspartokinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAK), a key enzyme controlling the biosynthesis of industrially important aspartate family amino acids, as a model to demonstrate a fast and efficient approach to the deregulation of allostery. In the last 50 years many researchers and companies have made considerable efforts to deregulate this enzyme from allosteric inhibition by lysine and threonine. However, only a limited number of positive mutants have been identified so far, almost exclusively by random mutation and selection. In this study, we used statistical coupling analysis of protein sequences, a method based on coevolutionary analysis, to systematically clarify the interaction network within the regulatory domain of CgAK that is essential for allosteric inhibition. A cluster of interconnected residues linking different inhibitors' binding sites as well as other regions of the protein have been identified, including most of the previously reported positions of successful mutations. Beyond these mutation positions, we have created another 14 mutants that can partially or completely desensitize CgAK from allosteric inhibition, as shown by enzyme activity assays. The introduction of only one of the inhibition-insensitive CgAK mutations (here Q298G) into a wild-type C. glutamicum strain by homologous recombination resulted in an accumulation of 58 g/liter L-lysine within 30 h of fed-batch fermentation in a bioreactor. PMID:21531824

  20. Allosteric ligands for the pharmacologically dark receptors GPR68 and GPR65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xi-Ping; Karpiak, Joel; Kroeze, Wesley K; Zhu, Hu; Chen, Xin; Moy, Sheryl S; Saddoris, Kara A; Nikolova, Viktoriya D; Farrell, Martilias S; Wang, Sheng; Mangano, Thomas J; Deshpande, Deepak A; Jiang, Alice; Penn, Raymond B; Jin, Jian; Koller, Beverly H; Kenakin, Terry; Shoichet, Brian K; Roth, Bryan L

    2015-11-26

    At least 120 non-olfactory G-protein-coupled receptors in the human genome are 'orphans' for which endogenous ligands are unknown, and many have no selective ligands, hindering the determination of their biological functions and clinical relevance. Among these is GPR68, a proton receptor that lacks small molecule modulators for probing its biology. Using yeast-based screens against GPR68, here we identify the benzodiazepine drug lorazepam as a non-selective GPR68 positive allosteric modulator. More than 3,000 GPR68 homology models were refined to recognize lorazepam in a putative allosteric site. Docking 3.1 million molecules predicted new GPR68 modulators, many of which were confirmed in functional assays. One potent GPR68 modulator, ogerin, suppressed recall in fear conditioning in wild-type but not in GPR68-knockout mice. The same approach led to the discovery of allosteric agonists and negative allosteric modulators for GPR65. Combining physical and structure-based screening may be broadly useful for ligand discovery for understudied and orphan GPCRs. PMID:26550826

  1. Allosteric transition and binding of small molecule effectors causes curvature change in central β-sheets of selected enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Ellen; Bueno, Brenda; Kulshreshta, Sanjeev; Cieplak, Piotr; Argáez, Miguel; Velázquez, Leticia; Stec, Boguslaw

    2011-04-01

    A quantitative description of allosteric transition remains a significant science challenge. Many allosteric enzymes contain a central β-sheet in their catalytic domain. When an allosteric protein undergoes the transition between T (tense) and R (relaxed) allosteric states, this central β-sheet undergoes a conformational change. A traditional method of measuring this change, the root mean square deviation (RMSD), appears to be inadequate to describe such changes in meaningful quantitative manner. We designed a novel quantitative method to demonstrate this conformational transition by measuring the change in curvature of the central β-sheet when enzymes transition between allosteric states. The curvature was established by calculating the semiaxes of a 3-D hyperboloid fitted by least squares to the Cα atomic positions of the β-sheet. The two enzymes selected for this study, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) from pig kidney and aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ATCase) from E. coli, showed while transitioning between the allosteric states (T ⇔ R) a notable change in β-sheet curvature (∼5%) that results in a large lateral shift at the sheet's edge, which is necessary to convey the signal. The results suggest that the β-sheet participates in storing elastic energy associated with the transition. Establishing a tentative link between the energetics of the β-sheet in different allosteric states provides a more objective basis for the naming convention of allosteric states (tense or relaxed), and provides insight into the hysteretic nature of the transition. The approach presented here allows for a better understanding of the internal dynamics of allosteric enzymes by defining the domains that directly participate in the transition. PMID:20602244

  2. Purification and characterization of recombinant sugarcane sucrose phosphate synthase expressed in E. coli and insect Sf9 cells: an importance of the N-terminal domain for an allosteric regulatory property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitri, Widhi Dyah; Narita, Hirotaka; Ishizaka-Ikeda, Etsuko; Sugiharto, Bambang; Hase, Toshiharu; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyses the transfer of glycosyl group of uridine diphosphate glucose to fructose-6-phosphate to form sucrose-6-phosphate. Plant SPS plays a key role in photosynthetic carbon metabolisms, which activity is modulated by an allosteric activator glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). We produced recombinant sugarcane SPS using Escherichia coli and Sf9 insect cells to investigate its structure-function relationship. When expressed in E. coli, two forms of SPS with different sizes appeared; the larger was comparable in size with the authentic plant enzyme and the shorter was trimmed the N-terminal 20 kDa region off. In the insect cells, only enzyme with the authentic size was produced. We purified the trimmed SPS and the full size enzyme from insect cells and found their enzymatic properties differed significantly; the full size enzyme was activated allosterically by G6P, while the trimmed one showed a high activity even without G6P. We further introduced a series of N-terminal truncations up to 171 residue and found G6P-independent activity was enhanced by the truncation. These combined results indicated that the N-terminal region of sugarcane SPS is crucial for the allosteric regulation by G6P and may function like a suppressor domain for the enzyme activity. PMID:26826371

  3. Modulation of Pantothenate Kinase 3 Activity by Small Molecules that Interact with the Substrate/Allosteric Regulatory Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Zhou, Ruobing; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Lin, Wenwei; Cui, Jimmy; Chen, Taosheng; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.; Jackowski, Suzanne (SJCH)

    2010-09-27

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the rate-controlling step in coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. PanK3 is stringently regulated by acetyl-CoA and uses an ordered kinetic mechanism with ATP as the leading substrate. Biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants indicates that pantothenate binds in a tunnel adjacent to the active site that is occupied by the pantothenate moiety of the acetyl-CoA regulator in the PanK3 acetyl-CoA binary complex. A high-throughput screen for PanK3 inhibitors and activators was applied to a bioactive compound library. Thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas and steroids were inhibitors, and fatty acyl-amides and tamoxifen were activators. The PanK3 activators and inhibitors either stimulated or repressed CoA biosynthesis in HepG2/C3A cells. The flexible allosteric acetyl-CoA regulatory domain of PanK3 also binds the substrates, pantothenate and pantetheine, and small molecule inhibitors and activators to modulate PanK3 activity.

  4. Allosteric vs. spontaneous exit-site (E-site) tRNA dissociation early in protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2011-10-11

    During protein synthesis, deacylated transfer RNAs leave the ribosome via an exit (E) site after mRNA translocation. How the ribosome regulates tRNA dissociation and whether functional linkages between the aminoacyl (A) and E sites modulate the dynamics of protein synthesis have long been debated. Using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments, we find that, during early cycles of protein elongation, tRNAs are often held in the E site until being allosterically released when the next aminoacyl tRNA binds to the A site. This process is regulated by the length and sequence of the nascent peptide and by the conformational state, detected by tRNA proximity, prior to translocation. In later cycles, E-site tRNA dissociates spontaneously. Our results suggest that the distribution of pretranslocation tRNA states and posttranslocation pathways are correlated within each elongation cycle via communication between distant subdomains in the ribosome, but that this correlation between elongation cycle intermediates does not persist into succeeding cycles. PMID:21969541

  5. Heat Capacity Changes and Disorder-to-Order Transitions in Allosteric Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressman, William J; Beckett, Dorothy

    2016-01-19

    Allosteric coupling in proteins is ubiquitous but incompletely understood, particularly in systems characterized by coupling over large distances. Binding of the allosteric effector, bio-5'-AMP, to the Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase, BirA, enhances the protein's dimerization free energy by -4 kcal/mol. Previous studies revealed that disorder-to-order transitions at the effector binding and dimerization sites, which are separated by 33 Å, are integral to functional coupling. Perturbations to the transition at the ligand binding site alter both ligand binding and coupled dimerization. Alanine substitutions in four loops on the dimerization surface yield a range of energetic effects on dimerization. A glycine to alanine substitution at position 142 in one of these loops results in a complete loss of allosteric coupling, disruption of the disorder-to-order transitions at both functional sites, and a decreased affinity for the effector. In this work, allosteric communication between the effector binding and dimerization surfaces in BirA was further investigated by performing isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on nine proteins with alanine substitutions in three dimerization surface loops. In contrast to BirAG142A, at 20 °C all variants bind to bio-5'-AMP with free energies indistinguishable from that measured for wild-type BirA. However, the majority of the variants exhibit altered heat capacity changes for effector binding. Moreover, the ΔCp values correlate with the dimerization free energies of the effector-bound proteins. These thermodynamic results, combined with structural information, indicate that allosteric activation of the BirA monomer involves formation of a network of intramolecular interactions on the dimerization surface in response to bio-5'-AMP binding at the distant effector binding site. PMID:26678378

  6. Structure-based network analysis of activation mechanisms in the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases: the regulatory spine residues are global mediators of structural stability and allosteric interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A James

    Full Text Available The ErbB protein tyrosine kinases are among the most important cell signaling families and mutation-induced modulation of their activity is associated with diverse functions in biological networks and human disease. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations of the ErbB kinases with the protein structure network modeling to characterize the reorganization of the residue interaction networks during conformational equilibrium changes in the normal and oncogenic forms. Structural stability and network analyses have identified local communities integrated around high centrality sites that correspond to the regulatory spine residues. This analysis has provided a quantitative insight to the mechanism of mutation-induced "superacceptor" activity in oncogenic EGFR dimers. We have found that kinase activation may be determined by allosteric interactions between modules of structurally stable residues that synchronize the dynamics in the nucleotide binding site and the αC-helix with the collective motions of the integrating αF-helix and the substrate binding site. The results of this study have pointed to a central role of the conserved His-Arg-Asp (HRD motif in the catalytic loop and the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG motif as key mediators of structural stability and allosteric communications in the ErbB kinases. We have determined that residues that are indispensable for kinase regulation and catalysis often corresponded to the high centrality nodes within the protein structure network and could be distinguished by their unique network signatures. The optimal communication pathways are also controlled by these nodes and may ensure efficient allosteric signaling in the functional kinase state. Structure-based network analysis has quantified subtle effects of ATP binding on conformational dynamics and stability of the EGFR structures. Consistent with the NMR studies, we have found that nucleotide-induced modulation of the residue interaction networks is not

  7. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Thomas T; Mincer, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  8. Targeted Chemical Wedges Reveal the Role of Allosteric DNA Modulation in Protein — DNA Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Moretti, Rocco; Donato, Leslie J.; Brezinski, Mary L.; Stafford, Ryan L.; Hoff, Helena; Thorson, Jon S.; Dervan, Peter B.; Ansari, Aseem Z.

    2008-01-01

    The cooperative assembly of multiprotein complexes results from allosteric modulations of DNA structure as well as direct intermolecular contacts between proteins. Such cooperative binding plays a critical role in imparting exquisite sequence specificity on the homeobox transcription factor (Hox) family of developmental transcription factors. A well-characterized example includes the interaction of Hox proteins with extradenticle (Exd), a highly conserved DNA binding transcription factor. Alt...

  9. Markov propagation of allosteric effects in biomolecular systems: application to GroEL–GroES

    OpenAIRE

    Chennubhotla, Chakra; Bahar, Ivet

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for elucidating the potential pathways of allosteric communication in biomolecular systems. The methodology, based on Markov propagation of ‘information' across the structure, permits us to partition the network of interactions into soft clusters distinguished by their coherent stochastics. Probabilistic participation of residues in these clusters defines the communication patterns inherent to the network architecture. Application to bacterial chaperonin complex ...

  10. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase

    OpenAIRE

    Tiraidis, C.; Alexacou, K. M.; Zographos, Spyros E.; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Gimisis, T.; Oikonomakos, Nikos G.

    2007-01-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b–FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where th...

  11. Coevolutionary Analysis Enabled Rational Deregulation of Allosteric Enzyme Inhibition in Corynebacterium glutamicum for Lysine Production ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhen; Meyer, Weiqian; Rappert, Sugima; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Product feedback inhibition of allosteric enzymes is an essential issue for the development of highly efficient microbial strains for bioproduction. Here we used aspartokinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAK), a key enzyme controlling the biosynthesis of industrially important aspartate family amino acids, as a model to demonstrate a fast and efficient approach to the deregulation of allostery. In the last 50 years many researchers and companies have made considerable efforts to deregul...

  12. Characterization of an allosteric citalopram-binding site at the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Breum Larsen, Mads; Neubauer, Henrik Amtoft;

    2005-01-01

    -citalopram, sertraline,       serotonin and paroxetine. EC50 values for S- and R-citalopram are 3.6 +/-       0.4 microm and 19.4 +/- 2.3 microm, respectively. Fluoxetine, venlafaxine       and duloxetine have no significant effect on the dissociation of       [3H]S-citalopram. Allosteric modulation of dissociation is...

  13. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING ALLOSTERIC SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN THE ATPASE DOMAIN OF MOLECULAR CHAPERONES

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ying; Bahar, Ivet

    2010-01-01

    The ATPase cycle of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is largely dependent on the ability of its nucleotide binding domain (NBD), also called ATPase domain, to undergo structural changes between its open and closed conformations. We present here a combined study of the Hsp70 NBD sequence, structure and dynamic features to identify the residues that play a crucial role in mediating the allosteric signaling properties of the ATPase domain. Specifically, we identify the residues involved in the ...

  14. High affinity and temperature sensitivity of blood oxygen binding in Pangasianodon hypophthalmus due to lack of chloride-hemoglobin allosteric interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Phuong, Le My; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Jensen, Frank Bo; Wang, Tobias; Bayley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Air-breathing fishes represent interesting organisms in terms of understanding the physiological changes associated with the terrestrialization of vertebrates, and, further, are of great socio-economic importance for aquaculture in Southeast Asia. To understand how environmental factors, such as...... high temperature, affect O2 transport in air-breathing fishes, this study assessed the effects of temperature on O2 binding of blood and Hb in the economically important air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus. To determine blood O2 binding properties, blood was drawn from resting cannulated...... fishes and O2 binding curves made at 25°C and 35°C. To determine the allosteric regulation and thermodynamics of Hb O2 binding, Hb was purified, and O2 equilibria were recorded at five temperatures in the absence and presence of ATP and Cl-. Whole blood had a high O2 affinity (O2 tension at half...

  15. Structural insights into the allosteric effects of 4EBP1 on the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Nadeem; Tempel, Wolfram; Nedyalkova, Lucy; Volpon, Laurent; Wernimont, Amy K; Osborne, Michael J.; Park, Hee-won; Borden, Katherine L. B.

    2011-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E plays key roles in cap dependent translation and mRNA export. These functions rely on binding the 7-methylguanosine moiety (5′cap) to the 5′-end of all mRNAs. eIF4E is regulated by proteins such as eIF4G and eIF4E binding proteins (4EBPs) that bind the dorsal surface of eIF4E, distal to the cap binding site, and modulate cap binding activity. Both proteins increase the affinity of eIF4E for 5′cap. Our understanding of the allosteric effects a...

  16. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-08-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  17. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Gimisis, Thanasis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2007-08-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b-FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 A resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. The contacts from FR258900 to glycogen phosphorylase are dominated by nonpolar van der Waals interactions with Gln71, Gln72, Phe196, and Val45' (from the symmetry-related subunit), and also by ionic interactions from the carboxylate groups to the three arginine residues (Arg242, Arg309, and Arg310) that form the allosteric phosphate-recognition subsite. The binding of FR258900 to the protein promotes conformational changes that stabilize an inactive T-state quaternary conformation of the enzyme. The ligand-binding mode is different from those of the potent phenoxy-phthalate and acyl urea inhibitors, previously described, illustrating the broad specificity of the allosteric site. PMID:17600143

  18. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A

    2016-08-23

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor-translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  19. Intrinsic Enzyme Dynamics in the Unbound State and Relation to Allosteric Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bahar, Ivet; Chennubhotla, Chakra; Tobi, Dror

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge in the number of studies exploring the relationship between proteins’ equilibrium dynamics and structural changes involved in function. An emerging concept, supported by both theory and experiments, is that under native state conditions proteins have an intrinsic ability to sample conformations that meet functional requirements. A typical example is the ability of enzymes to sample open and closed forms, irrespective of substrate, succeeded by the stabi...

  20. Allosteric regulation of the P2X4 receptor channel pore dilation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Khadra, A.; Rokic, Milos Boro; Tvrdoňová, Vendula; Sherman, A.; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 467, č. 4 (2015), s. 713-726. ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP * purinergic receptor channel * ivermectin * pore dilation * Markov state model Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.101, year: 2014

  1. Allosteric Regulation of Fibronectin/α5β1 Interaction by Fibronectin-Binding MSCRAMMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaowen; Garcia, Brandon L.; Visai, Livia; Prabhakaran, Sabitha; Meenan, Nicola A. G.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Humphries, Martin J.; Höök, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Adherence of microbes to host tissues is a hallmark of infectious disease and is often mediated by a class of adhesins termed MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules). Numerous pathogens express MSCRAMMs that specifically bind the heterodimeric human glycoprotein fibronectin (Fn). In addition to roles in adhesion, Fn-binding MSCRAMMs exploit physiological Fn functions. For example, several pathogens can invade host cells by a mechanism whereby MSCRAMM-bound Fn bridges interaction with α5β1 integrin. Here, we investigate two Fn-binding MSCRAMMs, FnBPA (Staphylococcus aureus) and BBK32 (Borrelia burgdorferi) to probe structure-activity relationships of MSCRAMM-induced Fn/α5β1integrin activation. Circular dichroism, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and dynamic light scattering techniques uncover a conformational rearrangement of Fn involving domains distant from the MSCRAMM binding site. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrate a significant enhancement of Fn/α5β1 integrin affinity in the presence of FnBPA or BBK32. Detailed kinetic analysis of these interactions reveal that this change in affinity can be attributed solely to an increase in the initial Fn/α5β1 on-rate and that this rate-enhancement is dependent on high-affinity Fn-binding by MSCRAMMs. These data implicate MSCRAMM-induced perturbation of specific intramolecular contacts within the Fn heterodimer resulting in activation by exposing previously cryptic α5β1 interaction motifs. By correlating structural changes in Fn to a direct measurement of increased Fn/α5β1 affinity, this work significantly advances our understanding of the structural basis for the modulation of integrin function by Fn-binding MSCRAMMs. PMID:27434228

  2. Asymmetric allosteric activation of the symmetric ArgR hexamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lihua; Xue, Wei-Feng; Fukayama, June Wong; Yetter, Jaclyn; Pickering, Michael; Carey, Jannette

    2005-02-11

    Hexameric arginine repressor, ArgR, bound to L-arginine serves both as the master transcriptional repressor/activator at diverse regulons in a wide range of bacteria and as a required cofactor for resolution of ColE1 plasmid multimers. Multifunctional ArgR is thus unusual in possessing features of specific gene regulators, global regulators, and non-specific gene organizers; its closest functional analog is probably CAP, the cyclic AMP receptor/activator protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and proteolysis indicate that binding of a single L-argine [corrected] per ArgR hexamer triggers a global conformation [corrected] change and resets the affinities of the remaining five sites, making them 100-fold weaker. The analysis suggests a novel thermodynamic signature for this mechanism of activation. PMID:15663926

  3. Allosteric interactions between the oxytocin receptor and the β2-adrenergic receptor in the modulation of ERK1/2 activation are mediated by heterodimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzal, Paulina K; Devost, Dominic; Pétrin, Darlaine; Goupil, Eugénie; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Laporte, Stéphane A; Zingg, Hans H; Hébert, Terence E

    2012-01-01

    The oxytocin receptor (OTR) and the β(2)-adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR) are key regulators of uterine contraction. These two receptors are targets of tocolytic agents used to inhibit pre-term labor. Our recent study on the nature of OTR- and β(2)AR-mediated ERK1/2 activation in human hTERT-C3 myometrial cells suggested the presence of an OTR/β(2)AR hetero-oligomeric complex (see companion article). The goal of this study was to investigate potential allosteric interactions between OTR and β(2)AR and establish the nature of the interactions between these receptors in myometrial cells. We found that OTR-mediated ERK1/2 activation was attenuated significantly when cells were pretreated with the β(2)AR agonist isoproterenol or two antagonists, propranolol or timolol. In contrast, pretreatment of cells with a third β(2)AR antagonist, atenolol resulted in an increase in OTR-mediated ERK1/2 activation. Similarly, β(2)AR-mediated ERK1/2 activation was strongly attenuated by pretreatment with the OTR antagonists, atosiban and OTA. Physical interactions between OTR and β(2)AR were demonstrated using co-immunoprecipitation, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and protein-fragment complementation (PCA) assays in HEK 293 cells, the latter experiments indicating the interactions between the two receptors were direct. Our analyses suggest physical interactions between OTR and β(2)AR in the context of a new heterodimer pair lie at the heart of the allosteric effects. PMID:21963428

  4. Dynamics of allosteric action in multisite protein modification

    CERN Document Server

    Milotti, E; Fabbro, A D; Pellegrina, C D; Chignola, Roberto; Fabbro, Alessio Del; Milotti, Edoardo; Pellegrina, Chiara Dalla

    2006-01-01

    Protein functions in cells may be activated or modified by the attachment of several kinds of chemical groups. While protein phosphorylation, i.e. the attachment of a phosphoryl (PO$_3^-$) group, is the most studied form of protein modification, and is known to regulate the functions of many proteins, protein behavior can also be modified by nitrosylation, acetylation, methylation, etc. A protein can have multiple modification sites, and display some form of transition only when enough sites are modified. In a previous paper we have modeled the generic equilibrium properties of multisite protein modification (R.Chignola, C. Dalla Pellegrina, A. Del Fabbro, E.Milotti, Physica A {\\bf 371}, 463 (2006)) and we have shown that it can account both for sharp, robust thresholds and for information transfer between processes with widely separated timescales. Here we use the same concepts to expand that analysis and describe multisite modification dynamics with a nonlinear differential system. We utilize the differenti...

  5. A negative allosteric modulator modulates GABAB-receptor signalling through GB2 subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Chen, Linhai; Liu, Lei; Xia, Zhixiong; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Nan, Fajun; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-03-15

    An γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB)-receptor mediates slow and prolonged synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system, which represents an interesting target for the treatment of various diseases and disorders of the central nervous system. To date, only one activator of the GABAB-receptor, baclofen, is on the market for the treatment of spasticity. Inhibitors of the GABAB-receptor, such as antagonists, show anti-absence seizure activity and pro-cognitive properties. In a search for allosteric compounds of the GABAB-receptor, although several positive allosteric modulators have been developed, it is only recently that the first negative allosteric modulator (NAM), CLH304a (also named Compound 14), has been reported. In the present study, we provide further information on the mechanism of action of CLH304a, and also show the possibility of designing more NAMs, such as CLH391 and CLH393, based on the structure of CLH304a. First we show that CLH304a inhibits native GABAB-receptor activity in cultured cerebellar granular neurons. We then show that CLH304a has inverse agonist properties and non-competitively inhibits the effect of agonists, indicating that it binds at a different site to GABA. The GABAB-receptor is a mandatory heterodimer made of GB1 subunits, in which agonists bind, and GB2 subunits, which activate G-proteins. By using various combinations made up of wild-type and/or mutated GB1 and GB2 subunits, we show that CLH304a acts on the heptahelical domain of GB2 subunits. These data revealed the possibility of designing innovative NAMs acting in the heptahelical domain of the GB2 subunits, offering novel possibilities for therapeutic intervention based on GABAB-receptor inhibition. PMID:26772870

  6. Targeting the Akt1 allosteric site to identify novel scaffolds through virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Oya Gursoy; Olmez, Elif Ozkirimli; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2014-02-01

    Preclinical data and tumor specimen studies report that AKT kinases are related to many human cancers. Therefore, identification and development of small molecule inhibitors targeting AKT and its signaling pathway can be therapeutic in treatment of cancer. Numerous studies report inhibitors that target the ATP-binding pocket in the kinase domains, but the similarity of this site, within the kinase family makes selectivity a major problem. The sequence identity amongst PH domains is significantly lower than that in kinase domains and developing more selective inhibitors is possible if PH domain is targeted. This in silico screening study is the first time report toward the identification of potential allosteric inhibitors expected to bind the cavity between kinase and PH domains of Akt1. Structural information of Akt1 was used to develop structure-based pharmacophore models comprising hydrophobic, acceptor, donor and ring features. The 3D structural information of previously identified allosteric Akt inhibitors obtained from literature was employed to develop a ligand-based pharmacophore model. Database was generated with drug like subset of ZINC and screening was performed based on 3D similarity to the selected pharmacophore hypotheses. Binding modes and affinities of the ligands were predicted by Glide software. Top scoring hits were further analyzed considering 2D similarity between the compounds, interactions with Akt1, fitness to pharmacophore models, ADME, druglikeness criteria and Induced-Fit docking. Using virtual screening methodologies, derivatives of 3-methyl-xanthine, quinoline-4-carboxamide and 2-[4-(cyclohexa-1,3-dien-1-yl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]phenol were proposed as potential leads for allosteric inhibition of Akt1. PMID:24291487

  7. ThermoTRP channels as modular proteins with allosteric gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Ramon; Brauchi, Sebastian; Orta, Gerardo; Zaelzer, Cristián; Vargas, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    . Caspani, P.A. Heppenstall, Direct activation of the ion channel TRPA1 by Ca(2+), Nat. Neurosci. 10 (2007) 277-279]. These stimuli include voltage, pH, agonist binding, and temperature. Understanding how each of these distinct physiological signals regulate channel opening will be informative about the mechanical linkages that can act either independently or in concert to influence channel activation. In this paper we show that thermoTRP channel-forming proteins are modular in the sense that certain structure or structures (modules) confer temperature-dependent regulation, whereas others confer voltage-dependent regulation. We also discuss the thermodynamic basis of heat and cold activation in an effort to elucidate what confer to these channels the capability to be gated by temperature directly. PMID:17499848

  8. Ultrasensitivity and heavy-metal selectivity of the allosterically modulated MerR transcription complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Ralston, D M; O'Halloran, T V

    1990-01-01

    The MerR metalloregulatory protein is a heavy-metal receptor that functions as the repressor and Hg(II)-responsive transcription activator of the prokaryotic mercury-resistance (mer) genes. We demonstrate that this allosterically modulated regulatory protein is sensitive to HgCl2 concentrations of 1.0 +/- 0.3 x 10(-8) M in the presence of 1.0 x 10(-3) M dithiothreitol for half-maximal induction of transcription of the mer promoter by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in vitro. Transcription med...

  9. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein-Seetharaman Judith

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%, the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%, the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86% and 8/9 (89% for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71% and 7/9 (78% for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by

  10. Ibuprofen impairs allosterically peroxynitrite isomerization by ferric human serum heme-albumin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra; Coletta, Massimo; Ciaccio, Chiara; Fanali, Gabriella; Nicoletti, Francesco P; Smulevich, Giulietta; Fasano, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) participates in heme scavenging; in turn, heme endows HSA with myoglobin-like reactivity and spectroscopic properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen on peroxynitrite isomerization to NO3− catalyzed by ferric human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) is reported. Data were obtained at 22.0 °C. HSA-heme-Fe(III) catalyzes peroxynitrite isomerization in the absence and presence of CO2; the values of the second order catalytic rate constant (kon) are 4.1 × 10...

  11. Complex pharmacology of novel allosteric free fatty acid 3 receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Brian D; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Murdoch, Hannah; Jenkins, Laura; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Madsen, Ole; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    this series resulted in compounds completely lacking activity, acting as FFA3 PAMs, or appearing to act as FFA3-negative allosteric modulators. However, the pharmacology of this series was further complicated in that certain analogs displaying overall antagonism of FFA3 function actually appeared to...... chemical series, considerable care must be taken to define the pharmacological characteristics of specific compounds before useful predictions of their activity and their use in defining specific roles of FFA3 in either in vitro and in vivo settings can be made....

  12. Dynamical Allosterism in the Mechanism of Action of DNA Mismatch Repair Protein MutS

    OpenAIRE

    Pieniazek, Susan N.; Hingorani, Manju M.; Beveridge, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The multidomain protein Thermus aquaticus MutS and its prokaryotic and eukaryotic homologs recognize DNA replication errors and initiate mismatch repair. MutS actions are fueled by ATP binding and hydrolysis, which modulate its interactions with DNA and other proteins in the mismatch-repair pathway. The DNA binding and ATPase activities are allosterically coupled over a distance of ∼70 Å, and the molecular mechanism of coupling has not been clarified. To address this problem, all-atom molecul...

  13. Substituted 3-Benzylcoumarins as Allosteric MEK1 Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation as Antiviral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to find novel antiviral agents, a series of allosteric MEK1 inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Based on docking results, multiple optimizations were made on the coumarin scaffold. Some of the derivatives showed excellent MEK1 binding affinity in the appropriate enzymatic assays and displayed obvious inhibitory effects on the ERK pathway in a cellular assay. These compounds also significantly inhibited virus (EV71 replication in HEK293 and RD cells. Several compounds showed potential as agents for the treatment of viral infective diseases, with the most potent compound 18 showing an IC50 value of 54.57 nM in the MEK1 binding assay.

  14. Chemogenomic discovery of allosteric antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.; Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan; Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Phonekeo, Karina; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2011-01-01

    pharmacological character: (1) chemogenomic lead identification through the first, to our knowledge, ligand inference between two different GPCR families, Families A and C; and (2) the discovery of the most selective GPRC6A allosteric antagonists discovered to date. The unprecedented inference of...... pharmacological activity across GPCR families provides proof-of-concept for in silico approaches against Family C targets based on Family A templates, greatly expanding the prospects of successful drug design and discovery. The antagonists were tested against a panel of seven Family A and C G protein-coupled receptors...

  15. M2 pyruvate kinase provides a mechanism for nutrient sensing and regulation of cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Hugh P.; O???Reilly, Francis J.; Wear, Martin A.; O'Neill, Robert; Fothergill-Gilmore, Linda A.; Hupp, Ted; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2013-01-01

    We show that the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (M2PYK) exists in equilibrium between monomers and tetramers regulated by allosteric binding of naturally occurring small-molecule metabolites. Phenylalanine stabilizes an inactive T-state tetrameric conformer and inhibits M2PYK with an IC50 value of 0.24 mM, whereas thyroid hormone (triiodo-l-thyronine, T3) stabilizes an inactive monomeric form of M2PYK with an IC50 of 78 nM. The allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate [F16BP, AC50 (conce...

  16. Steric hindrance mutagenesis in the conserved extracellular vestibule impedes allosteric binding of antidepressants to the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Shi, Lei; Beuming, Thijs;

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) controls synaptic serotonin levels and is the primary target for antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (e.g. (S)-citalopram) and tricyclic antidepressants (e.g. clomipramine). In addition to a high affinity binding site, SERT possesses a...... involved in the allosteric binding in the extracellular vestibule located above the central substrate binding (S1) site. Indeed, mutagenesis of selected residues in the vestibule reduces the allosteric potency of (S)-citalopram and clomipramine. The identified site is further supported by the inhibitory...

  17. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  18. Engineering and optimization of an allosteric biosensor protein for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Gierach, Izabela; Gillies, Alison R; Warden, Charles D; Wood, David W

    2011-11-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ or PPARG) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, and is a potential drug target for a variety of diseases. In this work, we constructed a series of bacterial biosensors for the identification of functional PPARγ ligands. These sensors entail modified Escherichia coli cells carrying a four-domain fusion protein, comprised of the PPARγ ligand binding domain (LBD), an engineered mini-intein domain, the E. coli maltose binding protein (MBD), and a thymidylate synthase (TS) reporter enzyme. E. coli cells expressing this protein exhibit hormone ligand-dependent growth phenotypes. Unlike our published estrogen (ER) and thyroid receptor (TR) biosensors, the canonical PPARγ biosensor cells displayed pronounced growth in the absence of ligand. They were able to distinguish agonists and antagonists, however, even in the absence of agonist. To improve ligand sensitivity of this sensor, we attempted to engineer and optimize linker peptides flanking the PPARγ LBD insertion point. Truncation of the original linkers led to decreased basal growth and significantly enhanced ligand sensitivity of the PPARγ sensor, while substitution of the native linkers with optimized G(4)S (Gly-Gly-Gly-Gly-Ser) linkers further increased the sensitivity. Our studies demonstrate that the properties of linkers, especially the C-terminal linker, greatly influence the efficiency and fidelity of the allosteric signal induced by ligand binding. Our work also suggests an approach to increase allosteric behavior in this multidomain sensor protein, without modification of the functional LBD. PMID:21893405

  19. Allosteric effects of chromophore interaction with dimeric near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacterial phytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Olesya V; Baloban, Mikhail; Bublikov, Grigory S; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Stepanenko, Olga V; Turoverov, Konstantin K; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes attract attention as probes for in vivo imaging due to their near-infrared (NIR) spectra and use of available in mammalian cells biliverdin (BV) as chromophore. We studied spectral properties of the iRFP670, iRFP682 and iRFP713 proteins and their mutants having Cys residues able to bind BV either in both PAS (Cys15) and GAF (Cys256) domains, in one of these domains, or without these Cys residues. We show that the absorption and fluorescence spectra and the chromophore binding depend on the location of the Cys residues. Compared with NIR FPs in which BV covalently binds to Cys15 or those that incorporate BV noncovalently, the proteins with BV covalently bound to Cys256 have blue-shifted spectra and higher quantum yield. In dimeric NIR FPs without Cys15, the covalent binding of BV to Сys256 in one monomer allosterically inhibits the covalent binding of BV to the other monomer, whereas the presence of Cys15 allosterically promotes BV binding to Cys256 in both monomers. The NIR FPs with both Cys residues have the narrowest blue-shifted spectra and the highest quantum yield. Our analysis resulted in the iRFP713/Val256Cys protein with the highest brightness in mammalian cells among available NIR FPs. PMID:26725513

  20. Identifying paths of allosteric communication in the protein BirA through simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Gregory; Beckett, Dorothy; Matysiak, Silvina

    Biotin ligase/repressor (BirA) is a bifunctional enzyme which adenylates biotin and transfers the product, biotinyl-5'-AMP (bio-5'-AMP) to biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). In the absence of BCCP, bio-5'-AMP promotes the dimerization of BirA. In dimer form, the BirA.bio-5'-AMP complex is able to bind to the biotin operator and prevents further synthesis of biotin. The bio-5'-AMP binds away from the dimer interface, so it is acting as an allosteric activator. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with BirA to look at fluctuations within the protein at equilibrium. We simulate apoBirA, liganded BirA, as well as two mutants, M211A and V219A. In agreement with experimental observations, several loops of the protein become stabilized for the liganded BirA when compared to the apo protein. In addition, changes in the dimer interface are observed for the M211A and V219A mutations, which are located in the ligand binding region. Using inter-residue correlation coefficients and pair energies a communication network through the protein is constructed. With this network we have identified paths which have the potential to be important in allosteric activation of BirA. These paths and the methods we use to identify them will be presented.

  1. An external sodium ion binding site controls allosteric gating in TRPV1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Oseguera, Andres; Bae, Chanhyung; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons are integrators of painful stimuli and heat, yet how they integrate diverse stimuli and sense temperature remains elusive. Here, we show that external sodium ions stabilize the TRPV1 channel in a closed state, such that removing the external ion leads to channel activation. In studying the underlying mechanism, we find that the temperature sensors in TRPV1 activate in two steps to favor opening, and that the binding of sodium to an extracellular site exerts allosteric control over temperature-sensor activation and opening of the pore. The binding of a tarantula toxin to the external pore also exerts control over temperature-sensor activation, whereas binding of vanilloids influences temperature-sensitivity by largely affecting the open/closed equilibrium. Our results reveal a fundamental role of the external pore in the allosteric control of TRPV1 channel gating and provide essential constraints for understanding how these channels can be tuned by diverse stimuli. PMID:26882503

  2. Allosteric role of the large-scale domain opening in biological catch-binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2009-05-01

    The proposed model demonstrates the allosteric role of the two-domain region of the receptor protein in the increased lifetimes of biological receptor/ligand bonds subjected to an external force. The interaction between the domains is represented by a bounded potential, containing two minima corresponding to the attached and separated conformations of the two protein domains. The dissociative potential with a single minimum describing receptor/ligand binding fluctuates between deep and shallow states, depending on whether the domains are attached or separated. A number of valuable analytic expressions are derived and are used to interpret experimental data for two catch bonds. The P-selectin/P-selectin-glycoprotein-ligand-1 (PSGL-1) bond is controlled by the interface between the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and lectin domains of P-selectin, and the type 1 fimbrial adhesive protein (FimH)/mannose bond is governed by the interface between the lectin and pilin domains of FimH. Catch-binding occurs in these systems when the external force stretches the receptor proteins and increases the interdomain distance. The allosteric effect is supported by independent measurements, in which the domains are kept separated by attachment of another ligand. The proposed model accurately describes the experimentally observed anomalous behavior of the lifetimes of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 and FimH/mannose complexes as a function of applied force and provides valuable insights into the mechanism of catch-binding.

  3. Structural Insights into the Allosteric Operation of the Lon AAA+ Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Chu; Su, Shih-Chieh; Su, Ming-Yuan; Liang, Pi-Hui; Feng, Chia-Cheng; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Chang, Chung-I

    2016-05-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease (LonA) is an evolutionarily conserved protease that couples the ATPase cycle into motion to drive substrate translocation and degradation. A hallmark feature shared by AAA+ proteases is the stimulation of ATPase activity by substrates. Here we report the structure of LonA bound to three ADPs, revealing the first AAA+ protease assembly where the six protomers are arranged alternately in nucleotide-free and bound states. Nucleotide binding induces large coordinated movements of conserved pore loops from two pairs of three non-adjacent protomers and shuttling of the proteolytic groove between the ATPase site and a previously unknown Arg paddle. Structural and biochemical evidence supports the roles of the substrate-bound proteolytic groove in allosteric stimulation of ATPase activity and the conserved Arg paddle in driving substrate degradation. Altogether, this work provides a molecular framework for understanding how ATP-dependent chemomechanical movements drive allosteric processes for substrate degradation in a major protein-destruction machine. PMID:27041592

  4. Enzyme activity and allosteric characteristics of gamma-irradiated solid aspartate transcarbamylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspartate transcarbamylase purified from E. coli was lyophilized, irradiated in vacuo with γ radiation from a cesium-137 source, redissolved in buffer under a nitrogen atmosphere, and assayed for enzyme activity. Lyophilized and redissolved enzyme had normal catalytic and allosteric kinetic characteristics. The average D37 observed with saturating substrate, 25 mM aspartate, was 4.1 Mrad. With less than saturating substrate, 5 mM aspartate, the activity increases from zero to 1.6 Mrad and then decreases with a D37 of 7.2 Mrad. Inclusion of 1 mM CTP, an allosteric inhibitor, in the 5 mM aspartate assays results in a more pronounced maximum in the activity curve occurring at slightly higher dose, 2.2 Mrad. Inhibitability by CTP has a D37 of 2.3 Mrad with doses below the activity maximum. Enzyme lyophilized in the presence of 1 mM CTP has a D37 of 2.9 Mrad. ATCase activity changes caused by irradiation of lyophylized bacteria were qualitatively like the changes observed in the detailed studies with the purified enzyme. Apparent radiation sensitivities of ATCase in lyophilized bacteria were observed to vary with the technique used to disrupt the resuspended bacteria

  5. Regulation of nitrite transport in red blood cells by hemoglobin oxygen fractional saturation

    OpenAIRE

    Vitturi, Dario A; Teng, Xinjun; Toledo, José C.; Matalon, Sadis; Lancaster, Jack R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2009-01-01

    Allosteric regulation of nitrite reduction by deoxyhemoglobin has been proposed to mediate nitric oxide (NO) formation during hypoxia. Nitrite is predominantly an anion at physiological pH, raising questions about the mechanism by which it enters the red blood cell (RBC) and whether this is regulated and coupled to deoxyhemoglobin-mediated reduction. We tested the hypothesis that nitrite transport by RBCs is regulated by fractional saturation. Using human RBCs, nitrite consumption was faster ...

  6. Allosteric Inactivation of a Trypsin-Like Serine Protease by An Antibody Binding to the 37- and 70-Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Lund, Ida K; Liu, Zhuo;

    2013-01-01

    for elucidating fundamental allosteric mechanisms. The monoclonal antibody mU1 has previously been shown to be able to inhibit the function of murine urokinase-type plasminogen activator in vivo. We have now mapped the epitope of mU1 to the catalytic domain's 37- and 70-loops, situated about 20 Å from...

  7. Positive allosteric modulation of the human metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (hmGluR4) by SIB-1893 and MPEP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Svendsen, Nannette; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans;

    2003-01-01

    We have identified 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine (SIB-1893) and 2-methyl-6-phenylethynyl pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP) as positive allosteric modulators for the hmGluR4. SIB-1893 and MPEP enhanced the potency and efficacy of L-2-amino-4-phophonobutyrate (L-AP4) in guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]...

  8. Mapping of the Allosteric Site in Cholesterol Hydroxylase CYP46A1 for Efavirenz, a Drug That Stimulates Enzyme Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kyle W; Mast, Natalia; Hudgens, Jeffrey W; Lin, Joseph B; Turko, Illarion V; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-05-27

    Cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is a microsomal enzyme and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase that controls cholesterol elimination from the brain. This P450 is also a potential target for Alzheimer disease because it can be activated pharmacologically by some marketed drugs, as exemplified by efavirenz, the anti-HIV medication. Previously, we suggested that pharmaceuticals activate CYP46A1 allosterically through binding to a site on the cytosolic protein surface, which is different from the enzyme active site facing the membrane. Here we identified this allosteric site for efavirenz on CYP46A1 by using a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to MS, computational modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and analysis of the CYP46A1 crystal structure. We also mapped the binding region for the CYP46A1 redox partner oxidoreductase and found that the allosteric and redox partner binding sites share a common border. On the basis of the data obtained, we propose the mechanism of CYP46A1 allostery and the pathway for the signal transmission from the P450 allosteric site to the active site. PMID:27056331

  9. Thermodynamics and structural analysis of positive allosteric modulation of the ionotropic glutamate receptor GluA2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Christian; Frydenvang, Karla; Olsen, Lars; Kristensen, Maria T; de Barrios, Oriol; Naur, Peter; Francotte, Pierre; Pirotte, Bernard; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2012-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of the ionotropic glutamate receptor-2 (GluA2) are promising compounds for the treatment of cognitive disorders, e.g. Alzheimer's disease. These modulators bind within the dimer interface of the ligand-binding domain and stabilize the agonist-bound conformation slow...

  10. In silico-screening approaches for lead generation: identification of novel allosteric modulators of human-erythrocyte pyruvate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ashutosh; Safo, Martin K

    2012-01-01

    Identification of allosteric binding site modulators have gained increased attention lately for their potential to be developed as selective agents with a novel chemotype and targeting perhaps a new and unique binding site with probable fewer side effects. Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (R-PK) is an important glycolytic enzyme that can be pharmacologically modulated through its allosteric effectors for the treatment of hemolytic anemia, sickle-cell anemia, hypoxia-related diseases, and other disorders arising from erythrocyte PK malfunction. An in-silico screening approach was applied to identify novel allosteric modulators of pyruvate kinase. A small-molecules database of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), was virtually screened based on structure/ligand-based pharmacophore. The virtual screening campaign led to the identification of several compounds with similar pharmacophoric features as fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), the natural allosteric activator of the kinase. The compounds were subsequently docked into the FBP-binding site using the programs FlexX and GOLD, and their interactions with the protein were analyzed with the energy-scoring function of HINT. Seven promising candidates were obtained from the NCI and subjected to kinetics analysis, which revealed both activators and inhibitors of the R-isozyme of PK (R-PK). PMID:22052500

  11. Modulation of Ultrafast Conformational Dynamics in Allosteric Interaction of Gal Repressor Protein with Different Operator DNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Susobhan; Naiya, Gitashri; Singh, Priya; Lemmens, Peter; Roy, Siddhartha; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Although all forms of dynamical behaviour of a protein under allosteric interaction with effectors are predicted, little evidence of ultrafast dynamics in the interaction has been reported. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of a combined approach involving picosecond-resolved FRET and polarisation-gated fluorescence for the exploration of ultrafast dynamics in the allosteric interaction of the Gal repressor (GalR) protein dimer with DNA operator sequences OE and OI . FRET from the single tryptophan residue to a covalently attached probe IAEDANS at a cysteine residue in the C-terminal domain of GalR shows structural perturbation and conformational dynamics during allosteric interaction. Polarisation-gated fluorescence spectroscopy of IAEDANS and another probe (FITC) covalently attached to the operator directly revealed the essential dynamics for cooperativity in the protein-protein interaction. The ultrafast resonance energy transfer from IAEDANS in the protein to FITC also revealed different dynamic flexibility in the allosteric interaction. An attempt was made to correlate the dynamic changes in the protein dimers with OE and OI with the consequent protein-protein interaction (tetramerisation) to form a DNA loop encompassing the promoter segment. PMID:26914958

  12. A3 Adenosine Receptor Allosteric Modulator Induces an Anti-Inflammatory Effect: In Vivo Studies and Molecular Mechanism of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Cohen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR is overexpressed in inflammatory cells and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals with inflammatory conditions. Agonists to the A3AR are known to induce specific anti-inflammatory effects upon chronic treatment. LUF6000 is an allosteric compound known to modulate the A3AR and render the endogenous ligand adenosine to bind to the receptor with higher affinity. The advantage of allosteric modulators is their capability to target specifically areas where adenosine levels are increased such as inflammatory and tumor sites, whereas normal body cells and tissues are refractory to the allosteric modulators due to low adenosine levels. LUF6000 administration induced anti-inflammatory effect in 3 experimental animal models of rat adjuvant induced arthritis, monoiodoacetate induced osteoarthritis, and concanavalin A induced liver inflammation in mice. The molecular mechanism of action points to deregulation of signaling proteins including PI3K, IKK, IκB, Jak-2, and STAT-1, resulting in decreased levels of NF-κB, known to mediate inflammatory effects. Moreover, LUF6000 induced a slight stimulatory effect on the number of normal white blood cells and neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effect of LUF6000, mechanism of action, and the differential effects on inflammatory and normal cells position this allosteric modulator as an attractive and unique drug candidate.

  13. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  14. Discovery of a novel allosteric modulator of 5-HT3 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Harpsøe, Kasper; Thygesen, Sarah B; Rahr, Louise M; Ahring, Philip K; Balle, Thomas; Jensen, Anders A

    2012-01-01

    class of negative allosteric modulators of the 5HT3 receptors (5HT3Rs). PU02 (6[(1naphthylmethyl)thio]9Hpurine) is a potent and selective antagonist displaying IC50 values ~1 µM at 5-HT3Rs and substantially lower activities at other Cys-loop receptors. In an elaborate mutagenesis study of the 5HT3A...... molecular determinants of PU02 activity with minor contributions from Ser292 and Val310, and we propose that the naphthalene group of PU02 docks into the hydrophobic cavity formed by these. Interestingly, specific mutations of Ser248, Thr294 and Gly306 convert PU02 into a complex modulator, potentiating and...

  15. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-01-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM–MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM–MS data. PMID:27418477

  16. Allosteric inhibitors of plasma membrane Ca2+ pumps: Invention and applications of caloxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jyoti; Pande; M; Szewczyk; Ashok; K; Grover

    2011-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+pumps(PMCA)play a major role in Ca2+homeostasis and signaling by extruding cellular Ca2+with high affinity.PMCA isoforms are encoded by four genes which are expressed differentially in various cell types in normal and disease states.Therefore, PMCA isoform selective inhibitors would aid in delineating their role in physiology and pathophysiology.We are testing the hypothesis that extracellular domains of PMCA can be used as allosteric targets to obtain a novel class of PMCA-specific inhibitors termed caloxins. This review presents the concepts behind the invention of caloxins and our progress in this area.A section is also devoted to the applications of caloxins in literature. We anticipate that isoform-selective caloxins will aid in understanding PMCA physiology in health and disease. With strategies to develop therapeutics from bioactive peptides,caloxins may become clinically useful in car diovascular diseases,neurological disorders,retinopathy,cancer and contraception.

  17. pH dependence of the kinetic properties of allosteric phosphofructokinase from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville-Bonne, D; Bourgain, F; Garel, J R

    1991-06-11

    The pH dependence of the activity of the allosteric phosphofructokinase from Escherichia coli has been studied in the pH range from 6 to 9, in the absence or presence of allosteric effectors. The sigmoidal cooperative saturation of phosphofructokinase by fructose 6-phosphate has been analyzed according to the Hill equation, and the following results have been obtained: (i) the apparent affinity for Fru-6P, as measured by the half-saturating concentration, [Fru-6P]0.5, does not change with pH; (ii) the cooperativity, as measured empirically by the Hill coefficient, nH, increases markedly with pH and reaches a value of 5.5-6 at pH 9; (iii) the catalytic rate constant, kcat, is controlled by the ionization of a critical group which has a pK of 7 in the absence of effector and must be deprotonated for phosphofructokinase to be active. The observation that pH affects both the cooperativity and the maximum velocity suggests that the catalytic efficiency of a given active site could be modified by the binding of fructose 6-phosphate to other remote sites. Finding values of the cooperativity coefficient larger than the number of substrate binding sites indicates that slow conformational changes may occur in phosphofructokinase. The cooperative saturation of phosphofructokinase by fructose 6-phosphate appears more complex than described by the classical concerted model at steady state and could involve two slowly interconverting states which differ in both their turnover rate constants and their affinities for fructose 6-phosphate. The presence of GDP shifts the pK of the critical group which controls kcat from 7 to 6.6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1828369

  18. Positive allosteric modulators to peptide GPCRs:a promising class of drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamas BARTFAI; Ming-wei WANG

    2013-01-01

    The task of finding selective and stable peptide receptor agonists with low molecular weight,desirable pharmacokinetic properties and penetrable to the blood-brain barrier has proven too difficult for many highly coveted drug targets,including receptors for endothelin,vasoactive intestinal peptide and galanin.These receptors and ligand-gated ion channels activated by structurally simple agonists such as glutamate,glycine and GABA present such a narrow chemical space that the design of subtype-selective molecules capable of distinguishing a dozen of glutamate and GABA receptor subtypes and possessing desirable pharmacokinetic properties has also been problematic.In contrast,the pharmaceutical industry demonstrates a remarkable success in developing 1,4-benzodiazepines,positive allosteric modulators (PMAs) of the GABAA receptor.They were synthesized over 50 years ago and discovered to have anxiolytic potential through an in vivo assay.As exemplified by Librium,Valium and Dormicum,these allosteric ligands of the receptor became the world's first blockbuster drugs.Through molecular manipulation over the past 2 decades,including mutations and knockouts of the endogenous ligands or their receptors,and by in-depth physiological and pharmacological studies,more peptide and glutamate receptors have become well-validated drug targets for which an agonist is sought.In such cases,the pursuit for PAMs has also intensified,and a working paradigm to identify drug candidates that are designed as PAMs has emerged.This review,which focuses on the general principles of finding PAMs of peptide receptors in the 21st century,describes the workflow and some of its resulting compounds such as PAMs of galanin receptor 2 that act as potent anticonvulsant agents.

  19. Assessment of direct gating and allosteric modulatory effects of meprobamate in recombinant GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Dillon, Glenn H

    2016-03-15

    Meprobamate is a schedule IV anxiolytic and the primary metabolite of the muscle relaxant carisoprodol. Meprobamate modulates GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid Type A) receptors, and has barbiturate-like activity. To gain insight into its actions, we have conducted a series of studies using recombinant GABAA receptors. In αxβzγ2 GABAA receptors (where x=1-6 and z=1-3), the ability to enhance GABA-mediated current was evident for all α subunit isoforms, with the largest effect observed in α5-expressing receptors. Direct gating was present with all α subunits, although attenuated in α3-expressing receptors. Allosteric and direct effects were comparable in α1β1γ2 and α1β2γ2 receptors, whereas allosteric effects were enhanced in α1β2 compared to α1β2γ2 receptors. In "extrasynaptic" (α1β3δ and α4β3δ) receptors, meprobamate enhanced EC20 and saturating GABA currents, and directly activated these receptors. The barbiturate antagonist bemegride attenuated direct effects of meprobamate. Whereas pentobarbital directly gated homomeric β3 receptors, meprobamate did not, and instead blocked the spontaneously open current present in these receptors. In wild type homomeric ρ1 receptors, pentobarbital and meprobamate were ineffective in direct gating; a mutation known to confer sensitivity to pentobarbital did not confer sensitivity to meprobamate. Our results provide insight into the actions of meprobamate and parent therapeutic agents such as carisoprodol. Whereas in general actions of meprobamate were comparable to those of carisoprodol, differential effects of meprobamate at some receptor subtypes suggest potential advantages of meprobamate may be exploited. A re-assessment of previously synthesized meprobamate-related carbamate molecules for myorelaxant and other therapeutic indications is warranted. PMID:26872987

  20. Novel positive allosteric modulators of the human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Hugo R; Gu, Ruo-Xu; Feuerbach, Dominik; Guo, Bao-Bao; Ye, Yong; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2011-06-14

    The pharmacological activity of a series of novel amide derivatives was characterized on several nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Ca(2+) influx results indicate that these compounds are not agonists of the human (h) α4β2, α3β4, α7, and α1β1γδ AChRs; compounds 2-4 are specific positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of hα7 AChRs, whereas compounds 1-4, 7, and 12 are noncompetitive antagonists of the other AChRs. Radioligand binding results indicate that PAMs do not inhibit binding of [(3)H]methyllycaconitine but enhance binding of [(3)H]epibatidine to hα7 AChRs, indicating that these compounds do not directly, but allosterically, interact with the hα7 agonist sites. Additional competition binding results indicate that the antagonistic action mediated by these compounds is produced by direct interaction with neither the phencyclidine site in the Torpedo AChR ion channel nor the imipramine and the agonist sites in the hα4β2 and hα3β4 AChRs. Molecular dynamics and docking results suggest that the binding site for compounds 2-4 is mainly located in the inner β-sheet of the hα7-α7 interface, ∼12 Å from the agonist locus. Hydrogen bond interactions between the amide group of the PAMs and the hα7 AChR binding site are found to be critical for their activity. The dual PAM and antagonistic activities elicited by compounds 2-4 might be therapeutically important. PMID:21510634

  1. Dual-cavity basket promotes encapsulation in water in an allosteric fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shigui; Yamasaki, Makoto; Polen, Shane; Gallucci, Judith; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2015-09-30

    We prepared dual-cavity basket 1 to carry six (S)-alanine residues at the entrance of its two juxtaposed cavities (289 Å(3)). With the assistance of (1)H NMR spectroscopy and calorimetry, we found that 1 could trap a single molecule of 4 (K1 = 1.45 ± 0.40 × 10(4) M(-1), ITC), akin in size (241 Å(3)) and polar characteristics to nerve agent VX (289 Å(3)). The results of density functional theory calculations (DFT, M06-2X/6-31G*) and experiments ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) suggest that the negative homotropic allosterism arises from the guest forming C-H···π contacts with all three of the aromatic walls of the occupied basket's cavity. In response, the other cavity increases its size and turns rigid to prevent the formation of the ternary complex. A smaller guest 6 (180 Å(3)), akin in size and polar characteristics to soman (186 Å(3)), was also found to bind to dual-cavity 1, although giving both binary [1⊂6] and ternary [1⊂62] complexes (K1 = 7910 M(-1) and K2 = 2374 M(-1), (1)H NMR spectroscopy). In this case, the computational and experimental ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) results suggest that only two aromatic walls of the occupied basket's cavity form C-H···π contacts with the guest to render the singly occupied host flexible enough to undergo additional structural changes necessary for receiving another guest molecule. The structural adaptivity of dual-cavity baskets of type 1 is unique and important for designing multivalent hosts capable of effectively sequestering targeted guests in an allosteric manner to give stable supramolecular polymers. PMID:26348904

  2. On the G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers and Their Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions in the Central Nervous System: Focus on Their Role in Pain Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kjell Fuxe; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Luigi F. Agnati; Alicia Rivera; Kathleen Van Craenenbroeck; Wilber Romero-Fernandez; Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2013-01-01

    The modulatory role of allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in the pain pathways of the Central Nervous System and the peripheral nociceptors has become of increasing interest. As integrators of nociceptive and antinociceptive wiring and volume transmission signals, with a major role for the opioid receptor heteromers, they likely have an important role in the pain circuits and may be involved in acupuncture. The delta opioid receptor (DOR) exerts an antagonistic allosteric influence on ...

  3. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  4. Allosteric inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase a by the potential antidiabetic drug 3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbo xylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomakos, N G; Tsitsanou, K E; Zographos, S E; Skamnaki, V T; Goldmann, S; Bischoff, H

    1999-10-01

    The effect of the potential antidiabetic drug (-)(S)-3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbox ylate (W1807) on the catalytic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase a has been studied. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is an allosteric enzyme whose activity is primarily controlled by reversible phosphorylation of Ser14 of the dephosphorylated enzyme (GPb, less active, predominantly T-state) to form the phosphorylated enzyme (GPa, more active, predominantly R-state). Upon conversion of GPb to GPa, the N-terminal tail (residues 5-22), which carries the Ser14(P), changes its conformation into a distorted 3(10) helix and its contacts from intrasubunit to intersubunit. This alteration causes a series of tertiary and quaternary conformational changes that lead to activation of the enzyme through opening access to the catalytic site. As part of a screening process to identify compounds that might contribute to the regulation of glycogen metabolism in the noninsulin dependent diabetes diseased state, W1807 has been found as the most potent inhibitor of GPb (Ki = 1.6 nM) that binds at the allosteric site of T-state GPb and produces further conformational changes, characteristic of a T'-like state. Kinetics show W1807 is a potent competitive inhibitor of GPa (-AMP) (Ki = 10.8 nM) and of GPa (+1 mM AMP) (Ki = 19.4 microM) with respect to glucose 1-phosphate and acts in synergism with glucose. To elucidate the structural features that contribute to the binding, the structures of GPa in the T-state conformation in complex with glucose and in complex with both glucose and W1807 have been determined at 100 K to 2.0 A and 2.1 A resolution, and refined to crystallographic R-values of 0.179 (R(free) = 0.230) and 0.189 (R(free) = 0.263), respectively. W1807 binds tightly at the allosteric site and induces substantial conformational changes both in the vicinity of the allosteric site and the subunit interface. A disordering of the N

  5. Allosteric modulation of the effect of escitalopram, paroxetine and fluoxetine: in-vitro and in-vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansari, Mostafa El; Wiborg, Ove; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame;

    2006-01-01

    escitalopram. This effect was suggested to occur via an allosteric modulation at the level of the 5-HT transporter. Using in-vitro binding assays at membranes from COS-1 cells expressing the human 5-HT transporter (hSERT) and in-vivo electrophysiological and microdialysis techniques in rats, the present study...... was directed at determining whether R-citalopram modifies the action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) known to act on allosteric sites namely escitalopram, and to a lesser extent paroxetine, compared to fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites. In-vitro binding studies...... showed that R-citalopram attenuated the association rates of escitalopram and paroxetine to the 5-HT transporter, but had no effect on the association rates of fluoxetine, venlafaxine or sertraline. In the rat dorsal raphe nucleus, R-citalopram (250 microg/kg i.v.) blocked the suppressant effect on...

  6. Identification of an allosteric pocket on human hsp70 reveals a mode of inhibition of this therapeutically important protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodina, Anna; Patel, Pallav D; Kang, Yanlong; Patel, Yogita; Baaklini, Imad; Wong, Michael J H; Taldone, Tony; Yan, Pengrong; Yang, Chenghua; Maharaj, Ronnie; Gozman, Alexander; Patel, Maulik R; Patel, Hardik J; Chirico, William; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Talele, Tanaji T; Young, Jason C; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2013-12-19

    Hsp70s are important cancer chaperones that act upstream of Hsp90 and exhibit independent anti-apoptotic activities. To develop chemical tools for the study of human Hsp70, we developed a homology model that unveils a previously unknown allosteric site located in the nucleotide binding domain of Hsp70. Combining structure-based design and phenotypic testing, we discovered a previously unknown inhibitor of this site, YK5. In cancer cells, this compound is a potent and selective binder of the cytosolic but not the organellar human Hsp70s and has biological activity partly by interfering with the formation of active oncogenic Hsp70/Hsp90/client protein complexes. YK5 is a small molecule inhibitor rationally designed to interact with an allosteric pocket of Hsp70 and represents a previously unknown chemical tool to investigate cellular mechanisms associated with Hsp70. PMID:24239008

  7. Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Study of Potential Negative Allosteric Modulators of mGluR1 from Chinese Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludi Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The metabotropic glutamate subtype 1 (mGluR1, a member of the metabotropic glutamate receptors, is a therapeutic target for neurological disorders. However, due to the lower subtype selectivity of mGluR1 orthosteric compounds, a new targeted strategy, known as allosteric modulators research, is needed for the treatment of mGluR1-related diseases. Recently, the structure of the seven-transmembrane domain (7TMD of mGluR1 has been solved, which reveals the binding site of allosteric modulators and provides an opportunity for future subtype-selectivity drug design. In this study, a series of computer-aided drug design methods were utilized to discover potential mGluR1 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs. Pharmacophore models were constructed based on three different structure types of mGluR1 NAMs. After validation using the built-in parameters and test set, the optimal pharmacophore model of each structure type was selected and utilized as a query to screen the Traditional Chinese Medicine Database (TCMD. Then, three different hit lists of compounds were obtained. Molecular docking was used based on the latest crystal structure of mGluR1-7TMD to further filter these hits. As a compound with high QFIT and LibDock Score was preferred, a total of 30 compounds were retained. MD simulation was utilized to confirm the stability of potential compounds binding. From the computational results, thesinine-4ʹ-O-β-d-glucoside, nigrolineaxanthone-P and nodakenin might exhibit negative allosteric moderating effects on mGluR1. This paper indicates the applicability of molecular simulation technologies for discovering potential natural mGluR1 NAMs from Chinese herbs.

  8. Synthesis of a Series of Novel 3,9-Disubstituted Phenanthrenes as Analogues of Known NMDA Receptor Allosteric Modulators

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, Mark W.; Fang, Guangyu; Eaves, Richard; Mayo-Martin, Maria B.; Burnell, Erica S.; Costa, Blaise M.; Culley, Georgia R.; Volianskis, Arturas; Collingridge, Graham L; Monaghan, Daniel T.; Jane, David E.

    2015-01-01

    9-Substituted phenanthrene-3-carboxylic acids have been reported to have allosteric modulatory activity at the NMDA receptor. This receptor is activated by the excitatory neurotransmitter L-glutamate and has been implicated in a range of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, epilepsy and chronic pain and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Herein, the convenient synthesis of a wide range of novel 3,9-disubstituted phenanthrene derivatives starting from a few commo...

  9. An allosteric modulator of HIV-1 protease shows equipotent inhibition of wild-type and drug-resistant proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Peter M-U; Dunbar, James B; Gestwicki, Jason E; Carlson, Heather A

    2014-08-14

    NMR and MD simulations have demonstrated that the flaps of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1p) adopt a range of conformations that are coupled with its enzymatic activity. Previously, a model was created for an allosteric site located between the flap and the core of HIV-1p, called the Eye site (Biopolymers 2008, 89, 643-652). Here, results from our first study were combined with a ligand-based, lead-hopping method to identify a novel compound (NIT). NIT inhibits HIV-1p, independent of the presence of an active-site inhibitor such as pepstatin A. Assays showed that NIT acts on an allosteric site other than the dimerization interface. MD simulations of the ligand-protein complex show that NIT stably binds in the Eye site and restricts the flaps. That bound state of NIT is consistent with a crystal structure of similar fragments bound in the Eye site (Chem. Biol. Drug Des. 2010, 75, 257-268). Most importantly, NIT is equally potent against wild-type and a multidrug-resistant mutant of HIV-1p, which highlights the promise of allosteric inhibitors circumventing existing clinical resistance. PMID:25062388

  10. Positive allosteric modulation of TRPV1 as a novel analgesic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebovitz Evan E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of long-term opiate use in treating chronic non-cancer pain is increasing, and prescription opioid abuse and dependence are a major public health concern. To explore alternatives to opioid-based analgesia, the present study investigates a novel allosteric pharmacological approach operating through the cation channel TRPV1. This channel is highly expressed in subpopulations of primary afferent unmyelinated C- and lightly-myelinated Aδ-fibers that detect low and high rates of noxious heating, respectively, and it is also activated by vanilloid agonists and low pH. Sufficient doses of exogenous vanilloid agonists, such as capsaicin or resiniferatoxin, can inactivate/deactivate primary afferent endings due to calcium overload, and we hypothesized that positive allosteric modulation of agonist-activated TRPV1 could produce a selective, temporary inactivation of nociceptive nerve terminals in vivo. We previously identified MRS1477, a 1,4-dihydropyridine that potentiates vanilloid and pH activation of TRPV1 in vitro, but displays no detectable intrinsic agonist activity of its own. To study the in vivo effects of MRS1477, we injected the hind paws of rats with a non-deactivating dose of capsaicin, MRS1477, or the combination. An infrared diode laser was used to stimulate TRPV1-expressing nerve terminals and the latency and intensity of paw withdrawal responses were recorded. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed on dorsal root ganglia to examine changes in gene expression and the cellular specificity of such changes following treatment. Results Withdrawal responses of the capsaicin-only or MRS1477-only treated paws were not significantly different from the untreated, contralateral paws. However, rats treated with the combination of capsaicin and MRS1477 exhibited increased withdrawal latency and decreased response intensity consistent with agonist potentiation and inactivation or lesion of TRPV1-containing

  11. Ultrasensitivity and heavy-metal selectivity of the allosterically modulated MerR transcription complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MerR metalloregulatory protein is a heavy-metal receptor that functions as the repressor and Hg(II)-responsive transcription activator of the prokaryotic mercury-resistance (mer) genes. The authors demonstrate that this allosterically modulated regulatory protein is sensitive to HgCl2 concentrations of 1.0 ± 0.3 x 10-8 M in the presence of 1.0 x 10-3 M dithiothreitol for half-maximal induction of transcription of the mer promoter by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in vitro. Transcription mediated by MerR increases from 10% to 90% of maximum in response to a 7-fold change in concentration of HgCl2, consistent with a threshold phenomenon known as ultrasensitivity. In addition, MerR exhibits a high degree of selectivity. Cd(II), Zn(II), Ag(I), Au(I), and Au(III) have been found to partially stimulate transcription in the presence of MerR, but concentrations at least two to three orders of magnitude greater than for Hg(II) are required. The molecular basis of the ultrasensitivity and selectivity phenomena are postulated to arise from the unusual topology of the transcription complex and a rare trigonal mercuric ion coordination environment, respectively. This mercuric ion-induced switch is to our knowledge the only known example of ultrasensitivity in a signal-responsive transcription mechanism

  12. Comparison of crystal and solution hemoglobin binding of selected antigelling agents and allosteric modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper details comprehensive binding studies (solution and X-ray) of human hemoglobin A with a group of halogenated carboxylic acids that were investigated as potential antisickling agents. It is, to our knowledge, the first study to compare solution and crystal binding for a series of compounds under similar high-salt conditions used for cocrystallization. The compounds include [(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxy]acetic acid, [(p-bromobenzyl)oxy]acetic acid, clofibric acid, and bezafibrate. The location and stereochemistry of binding sites have been established by X-ray crystallography, while the number of binding sites and affinity constants were measured by using equilibrium dialysis. The observed crystal structures are consistent with the binding observed in solution and that the number of binding sites is independent of salt concentration, while the binding constant increases with increasing salt concentration. The studies also reveal that relatively small changes in the chemical structure of a drug molecule can result in entirely different binding sites on the protein. Moreover, the X-ray studies provide a possible explanation for the multiplicity in function exhibited by these compounds as allosteric modulators and/or antisickling agents. Finally, the studies indicate that these compounds bind differently to the R and T states of hemoglobin, and observation of special significance to the original design of these agents

  13. Allosteric effects in binuclear homo- and heterometallic triple-stranded lanthanide podates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick E; Canard, Gabriel; Koeller, Sylvain; Bocquet, Bernard; Piguet, Claude

    2012-09-17

    This work illustrates a simple approach for deciphering and exploiting the various free energy contributions to the global complexation process leading to the binuclear triple-stranded podates [Ln(2)(L9)](6+) (Ln is a trivalent lanthanide). Despite the larger microscopic affinities exhibited by the binding sites for small Ln(3+), the stability constants measured for [Ln(2)(L9)](6+) decrease along the lanthanide series; a phenomenon which can be ascribed to the severe enthalpic penalty accompanying the intramolecular cyclization around small Ln(III), combined with increasing anticooperative allosteric interligand interactions. Altogether, the microscopic thermodynamic characteristics predict β(1,1,1)(La,Lu,L9)/β(1,1,1)(Lu,La,L9) = 145 for the ratio of the formation constants of the target heterobimetallic [LaLu(L9)](6+) and [LuLa(L9)](6+) microspecies, a value in line with the quantitative preparation (>90%) of [LaLu(L9)](6+) at millimolar concentrations. Preliminary NMR titrations indeed confirm the rare thermodynamic programming of a pure heterometallic f-f' complex. PMID:22946598

  14. GABAB receptor as therapeutic target for drug addiction: from baclofen to positive allosteric modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Agabio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper summarizes experimental and clinical data indicating the therapeutic potential of the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, in the treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD and substance use disorder (SUD. Multiple preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of baclofen to suppress alcohol drinking (including binge- and relapse-like drinking, oral alcohol self-administration, and intravenous self-administration of cocaine, nicotine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, morphine, and heroin in rodents. Some randomized, controlled trials (RCTs and case reports support the efficacy of baclofen in suppressing alcohol consumption, craving for alcohol, and alcohol withdrawal symptomatology in alcohol-dependent patients. Data from RCTs and open studies investigating baclofen efficacy on SUD are currently less conclusive. Interest in testing high doses of baclofen in AUD and SUD treatment has recently emerged. Preclinical research has extended the anti-addictive properties of baclofen to positive allosteric modulators of the GABAB receptor (GABAB PAMs. In light of their more favourable side effect profile (compared to baclofen, GABAB PAMs may represent a major step forward in a GABAB receptor-based pharmacotherapy of AUD and SUD.

  15. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity. (perspective)

  16. Comparison of crystal and solution hemoglobin binding of selected antigelling agents and allosteric modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehanna, A.S.; Abraham, D.J. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (USA))

    1990-04-24

    This paper details comprehensive binding studies (solution and X-ray) of human hemoglobin A with a group of halogenated carboxylic acids that were investigated as potential antisickling agents. It is, to our knowledge, the first study to compare solution and crystal binding for a series of compounds under similar high-salt conditions used for cocrystallization. The compounds include ((3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxy)acetic acid, ((p-bromobenzyl)oxy)acetic acid, clofibric acid, and bezafibrate. The location and stereochemistry of binding sites have been established by X-ray crystallography, while the number of binding sites and affinity constants were measured by using equilibrium dialysis. The observed crystal structures are consistent with the binding observed in solution and that the number of binding sites is independent of salt concentration, while the binding constant increases with increasing salt concentration. The studies also reveal that relatively small changes in the chemical structure of a drug molecule can result in entirely different binding sites on the protein. Moreover, the X-ray studies provide a possible explanation for the multiplicity in function exhibited by these compounds as allosteric modulators and/or antisickling agents. Finally, the studies indicate that these compounds bind differently to the R and T states of hemoglobin, and observation of special significance to the original design of these agents.

  17. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4 Positive Allosteric Modulator ADX88178 Inhibits Inflammatory Responses in Primary Microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnazhagan, Ranjani; Harms, Ashley S; Thome, Aaron D; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Gogliotti, Rocco; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Standaert, David G

    2016-06-01

    While the specific trigger of Parkinson Disease (PD) in most patients is unknown, considerable evidence suggests that the neuroinflammatory response makes an essential contribution to the neurodegenerative process. Drugs targeting metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu receptors), 7 Transmembrane (7TM) spanning/G protein coupled receptors that bind glutamate, are emerging as therapeutic targets for PD and may have anti-inflammatory properties. ADX88178 is novel potent, selective, and brain-penetrant positive allosteric modulator of the mGlu4 which is under evaluation for treatment of PD and other neurological disorders. We used microglia cultured from mouse brain to determine if ADX88178 had direct effects on the inflammatory responses of these cells. We studied both microglia from wild type and Grm4 knock out mice. We found that activation of mGlu4 with ADX88178 attenuated LPS-induced inflammation in primary microglia, leading to a decrease in the expression of TNFα, MHCII, and iNOS, markers of pro-inflammatory responses. These effects were absent in microglia from mice lacking mGlu4. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous anti-inflammatory effect of ADX88178 mediated mGlu4 activation on microglia, and suggest that this drug or similar activators or potentiators of mGlu4 may have disease-modifying as well as symptomatic effects in PD and other brain disorders with an inflammatory component. PMID:26872456

  18. Comparing allosteric transitions in the domains of calmodulin through coarse-grained simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous calcium binding protein consisting of two structurally similar domains with distinct stabilities, binding affinities, and flexibilities. We present coarse grained simulations that suggest the mechanism for the domain's allosteric transitions between the open and closed conformations depend on subtle differences in the folded state topology of the two domains. Throughout a wide temperature range, the simulated transition mechanism of the N-terminal domain (nCaM) follows a two-state transition mechanism while domain opening in the C-terminal domain (cCaM) involves unfolding and refolding of the tertiary structure. The appearance of the unfolded intermediate occurs at a higher temperature in nCaM than it does in cCaM. That is, we find that cCaM unfolds more readily along the transition route than nCaM. Furthermore, unfolding and refolding of the domain significantly slows the domain opening and closing rates of cCaM, a distinct scenario which can potentially influence the mechani...

  19. Optimization of allosteric MEK inhibitors. Part 2: Taming the sulfamide group balances compound distribution properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Ingo V; Hammer, Stefanie; Hitchcock, Marion; Neuhaus, Roland; Scholz, Arne; Siemeister, Gerhard; Bohlmann, Rolf; Hillig, Roman C; Pühler, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we had identified an unexplored pocket adjacent to the known binding site of allosteric MEK inhibitors which allowed us to design highly potent and in vivo efficacious novel inhibitors. We now report that our initial preclinical candidate, featuring a phenoxy side chain with a sulfamide capping group, displayed human carbonic anhydrase off-target activity and species-dependent blood cell accumulation, which prevented us from advancing this candidate further. Since this sulfamide MEK inhibitor displayed an exceptionally favorable PK profile with low brain penetration potential despite being highly oral bioavailable, we elected to keep the sulfamide capping group intact while taming its unwanted off-target activity by optimizing the structural surroundings. Introduction of a neighboring fluorine atom or installation of a methylene linker reduced hCA potency sufficiently, at the cost of MEK target potency. Switching to a higher fluorinated central core reinstated high MEK potency, leading to two new preclinical candidates with long half-lives, high bioavailabilities, low brain penetration potential and convincing efficacy in a K-Ras-mutated A549 xenograft model. PMID:26611920

  20. Spin exchange monitoring of the strong positive homotropic allosteric binding of a tetraradical by a synthetic receptor in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardelang, David; Casano, Gilles; Poulhès, Florent; Karoui, Hakim; Filippini, Jessica; Rockenbauer, Antal; Rosas, Roselyne; Monnier, Valérie; Siri, Didier; Gaudel-Siri, Anouk; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul

    2014-12-17

    The flexible tetranitroxide 4T has been prepared and was shown to exhibit a nine line EPR spectrum in water, characteristic of significant through space spin exchange (J(ij)) between four electron spins interacting with four nitrogen nuclei (J(ij) ≫ a(N)). Addition of CB[8] to 4T decreases dramatically all the Jij couplings, and the nine line spectrum is replaced by the characteristic three line spectrum of a mononitroxide. The supramolecular association between 4T and CB[8] involves a highly cooperative asymmetric complexation by two CB[8] (K1 = 4027 M(-1); K2 = 202,800 M(-1); α = 201) leading to a rigid complex with remote nitroxide moieties. The remarkable enhancement for the affinity of the second CB[8] corresponds to an allosteric interaction energy of ≈13 kJ mol(-1), which is comparable to that of the binding of oxygen by hemoglobin. These results are confirmed by competition and reduction experiments, DFT and molecular dynamics calculations, mass spectrometry, and liquid state NMR of the corresponding reduced complex bearing hydroxylamine moieties. This study shows that suitably designed molecules can generate allosteric complexation with CB[8]. The molecule must (i) carry several recognizable groups for CB[8] and (ii) be folded so that the first binding event reorganizes the molecule (unfold) for a better subsequent recognition. The presence of accessible protonable amines and H-bond donors to fit with the second point are also further stabilizing groups of CB[8] complexation. In these conditions, the spin exchange coupling between four radicals has been efficiently and finely tuned and the resulting allosteric complexation induced a dramatic stabilization enhancement of the included paramagnetic moieties in highly reducing conditions through the formation of the supramolecular 4T@CB[8]2 complex. PMID:25418528

  1. Positive allosteric modulation of mGluR5 accelerates extinction learning but not relearning following methamphetamine self-administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Kufahl

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have implicated glutamate neurotransmission as an important substrate for the extinction of conditioned behaviors, including responding for drug reinforcement. Positive allosteric modulation of the type-5 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR5 in particular has emerged as a treatment strategy for the enhancement of extinction of drug-motivated behaviors. Here, we investigated the effects of the mGluR5 positive allosteric modulator CDPPB, a compound known for its cognitive enhancing effects in rodents, on extinction learning in rats with different histories of methamphetamine (METH training. Rats were trained to self-administer METH under two conditions: 16 daily sessions of short access (90 min/day, ShA, or 8 daily sessions of short access followed by 8 sessions of long access (6 hr/day, LgA. Control rats self-administered sucrose pellets in daily 30 min sessions. Next, rats were administered vehicle or 30 mg/kg CDPPB prior to 7 consecutive daily extinction sessions, subjected to additional extinction sessions to re-establish a post-treatment baseline, and then tested for reinstatement of behavior in the presence of METH- or sucrose-paired cues. Rats were then subjected to a second series of extinction sessions, preceded by vehicle or 30 mg/kg CDPPB, and an additional test for cue-triggered reinstatement. CDPPB treatment resulted in a more rapid extinction of responding on the active lever, especially in the early sessions of the first extinction sequence. However, treatment effects were minimal during subsequent cue reinstatement tests and nonexistent during the second series of extinction sessions. Rats with histories of ShA, LgA and sucrose training expressed similar behavioral sensitivities to CDPPB, with LgA rats demonstrating a modestly higher treatment effect. Positive allosteric modulation of mGluR5 may therefore have some beneficial effects on efforts to facilitate extinction learning and reduce methamphetamine seeking.

  2. Positive Allosteric Modulator of GABA Lowers BOLD Responses in the Cingulate Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna A Walter

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the neural underpinnings of the negative blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is still limited. We hypothesized that pharmacological GABAergic modulation attenuates BOLD responses, and that blood concentrations of a positive allosteric modulator of GABA correlate inversely with BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex. We investigated whether or not pure task-related negative BOLD responses were co-localized with pharmacologically modulated BOLD responses. Twenty healthy adults received either 5 mg diazepam or placebo in a double blind, randomized design. During fMRI the subjects performed a working memory task. Results showed that BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex were inversely correlated with diazepam blood concentrations; that is, the higher the blood diazepam concentration, the lower the BOLD response. This inverse correlation was most pronounced in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior mid-cingulate cortex. For subjects with diazepam plasma concentration > 0.1 mg/L we observed negative BOLD responses with respect to fixation baseline. There was minor overlap between cingulate regions with task-related negative BOLD responses and regions where the BOLD responses were inversely correlated with diazepam concentration. We interpret that the inverse correlation between the BOLD response and diazepam was caused by GABA-related neural inhibition. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that GABA attenuates BOLD responses in fMRI. The minimal overlap between task-related negative BOLD responses and responses attenuated by diazepam suggests that these responses might be caused by different mechanisms.

  3. Presence of a putative steroidal allosteric site on glycoprotein hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mario; Dimida, Antonio; Ferrarini, Eleonora; Silvano, Elena; De Marco, Giuseppina; Agretti, Patrizia; Aloisi, Gabriella; Simoncini, Tommaso; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Tonacchera, Massimo; Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto

    2009-11-25

    In a previous work we found that the insecticide 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), inhibits the accumulation of cAMP as induced by the bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) in cells transfected with the TSH receptor. In this work, we demonstrate that the DDT molecular analogues, diethylstilbestrol and quercetine, are more potent inhibitors of the TSH receptor activity than DDT itself. The notion that all these compounds interfere with nuclear estrogen receptors, as either agonists (DDT and diethylstilbestrol) or antagonists (quercetin), prompted us to test the ability of the steroid hormone 17-beta-estradiol to inhibit the TSH receptor activity. We found that estrogen exposure causes a modest but significant inhibition of the bTSH induced cAMP accumulation both in transfected CHO-TSH receptor and Fischer Rat Thyroid Low Serum 5% (FRTL-5) cells. When applied to CHO cells transfected with the luteinizing hormone receptor, 17-beta-estradiol proved capable of inhibiting the hCG induced cAMP accumulation at a concentration as low as 10nM, though the effect was not greater than 35%. The effect of 17-beta-estradiol was not estrogen receptors mediated, as co-transfection of the estrogen receptor alpha and beta subunits with LH receptor caused cAMP to increase above the level attained by the sole hCG stimulation, and not to decrease it as expected. These data suggest the presence of a steroidal-like allosteric binding site on glycoprotein hormone receptors. PMID:19766106

  4. Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Subtype 5 in Addiction: a Therapeutic Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abundant evidence at the anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular levels implicates metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) in addiction. Consistently, the effects of a wide range of doses of different mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) have been tested in various animal models of addiction. Here, these studies were subjected to a systematic review to find out if mGluR5 NAMs have a therapeutic potential that can be translated to the clinic. Methods: Literature on consumption/self-administration and reinstatement of drug seeking as outcomes of interest published up to April 2015 was retrieved via PubMed. The review focused on the effects of systemic (i.p., i.v., s.c.) administration of the mGluR5 NAMs 3-((2-Methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl)pyridine (MTEP) and 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) on paradigms with cocaine, ethanol, nicotine, and food in rats. Results: MTEP and MPEP were found to reduce self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine at doses ≥1mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg, respectively. Dose-response relationship resembled a sigmoidal curve, with low doses not reaching statistical significance and high doses reliably inhibiting self-administration of drugs of abuse. Importantly, self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine, but not food, was reduced by MTEP and MPEP in the dose range of 1 to 2mg/kg and 2.5 to 3.2mg/kg, respectively. This dose range corresponds to approximately 50% to 80% mGluR5 occupancy. Interestingly, the limited data found in mice and monkeys showed a similar therapeutic window. Conclusion: Altogether, this review suggests a therapeutic window for mGluR5 NAMs that can be translated to the treatment of substance-related and addictive disorders. PMID:26802568

  5. Poly(A) RNA and Paip2 act as allosteric regulators of poly(A)-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Oh, Jungsic; Park, Jonghyun; Paek, Ki Young; Rho, Sangchul; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-02-01

    When bound to the 3' poly(A) tail of mRNA, poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) modulates mRNA translation and stability through its association with various proteins. By visualizing individual PABP molecules in real time, we found that PABP, containing four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), adopts a conformation on poly(A) binding in which RRM1 is in proximity to RRM4. This conformational change is due to the bending of the region between RRM2 and RRM3. PABP-interacting protein 2 actively disrupts the bent structure of PABP to the extended structure, resulting in the inhibition of PABP-poly(A) binding. These results suggest that the changes in the configuration of PABP induced by interactions with various effector molecules, such as poly(A) and PABP-interacting protein 2, play pivotal roles in its function. PMID:24293655

  6. Hemoglobin isoform differentiation and allosteric regulation of oxygen binding in the turtle, Trachemys scripta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Storz, Jay F.; Hoffmann, Federico G.;

    2013-01-01

    When freshwater turtles acclimatize to winter hibernation, there is a gradual transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, which may require adjustments of blood O2 transport before turtles become anoxic. Here, we report the effects of protons, anionic cofactors, and temperature on the O2......-binding properties of isolated hemoglobin (Hb) isoforms, HbA and HbD, in the turtle Trachemys scripta. We determined the primary structures of the constituent subunits of the two Hb isoforms, and we related the measured functional properties to differences in O2 affinity between untreated hemolysates from...... turtles that were acclimated to normoxia and anoxia. Our data show that HbD has a consistently higher O2 affinity compared with HbA, whereas Bohr and temperature effects, as well as thiol reactivity, are similar. Although sequence data show amino acid substitutions at two known β-chain ATP-binding site...

  7. Positive allosteric modulation of GABA-A receptors reduces capsaicin-induced primary and secondary hypersensitivity in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Rie; Erichsen, Helle K; Brown, David T;

    2012-01-01

    GABA-A receptor positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) mediate robust analgesia in animal models of pathological pain, in part via enhancing injury-induced loss of GABA-A-α2 and -α3 receptor function within the spinal cord. As yet, a lack of clinically suitable tool compounds has prevented this...... concept being tested in humans. Prior to assessing the efficacy of GABA-A receptor PAMs in a human volunteer pain model we have compared compounds capable of variously modulating GABA-A receptor function in comparable rat models of capsaicin-induced acute nocifensive flinching behaviour and secondary...

  8. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  9. Identification of an Allosteric Pocket on Human Hsp70 Reveals a Mode of Inhibition of This Therapeutically Important Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Rodina, Anna; Patel, Pallav D.; Kang, Yanlong; Patel, Yogita; Baaklini, Imad; Wong, Michael J. H.; Taldone, Tony; Yan, Pengrong; Yang, Chenghua; Maharaj, Ronnie; Gozman, Alexander; Patel, Maulik R.; Patel, Hardik J.; Chirico, William; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye

    2013-01-01

    Hsp70s are important cancer chaperones that act upstream of Hsp90 and exhibit independent anti-apoptotic activities. To develop chemical tools for the study of human Hsp70, we developed a homology model that unveils a previously unknown allosteric site located in the nucleotide binding domain of Hsp70. Combining structure-based design and phenotypic testing, we discovered a previously unknown inhibitor of this site, YK5. In cancer cells, this compound is a potent and selective binder of the c...

  10. Multiple Transmembrane Binding Sites for p-Trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a Photoreactive Torpedo Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Allosteric Inhibitor*

    OpenAIRE

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Husain, S. Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [3H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[3H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our unders...

  11. A novel strategy for selection of allosteric ribozymes yields RiboReporter™ sensors for caffeine and aspartame

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Alicia; Boomer, Ryan M.; Kurz, Markus; Keene, Sara C.; Diener, John L.; Keefe, Anthony D.; Wilson, Charles; Cload, Sharon T.

    2004-01-01

    We have utilized in vitro selection technology to develop allosteric ribozyme sensors that are specific for the small molecule analytes caffeine or aspartame. Caffeine- or aspartame-responsive ribozymes were converted into fluorescence-based RiboReporter™ sensor systems that were able to detect caffeine or aspartame in solution over a concentration range from 0.5 to 5 mM. With read-times as short as 5 min, these caffeine- or aspartame-dependent ribozymes function as highly specific and facile...

  12. Benzothiazole Derivative as a Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis Shikimate Kinase Inhibitor: Identification and Elucidation of Its Allosteric Mode of Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Rukmankesh; Rajput, Vikrant Singh; Gupta, Monika; Chib, Reena; Kumar, Amit; Wazir, Priya; Khan, Inshad Ali; Nargotra, Amit

    2016-05-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase (Mtb-SK) is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids through the shikimate pathway. Since it is proven to be essential for the survival of the microbe and is absent from mammals, it is a promising target for anti-TB drug discovery. In this study, a combined approach of in silico similarity search and pharmacophore building using already reported inhibitors was used to screen a procured library of 20,000 compounds of the commercially available ChemBridge database. From the in silico screening, 15 hits were identified, and these hits were evaluated in vitro for Mtb-SK enzyme inhibition. Two compounds presented significant enzyme inhibition with IC50 values of 10.69 ± 0.9 and 46.22 ± 1.2 μM. The best hit was then evaluated for the in vitro mode of inhibition where it came out to be an uncompetitive and noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to shikimate (SKM) and ATP, respectively, suggesting its binding at an allosteric site. Potential binding sites of Mtb-SK were identified which confirmed the presence of an allosteric binding pocket apart from the ATP and SKM binding sites. The docking simulations were performed at this pocket in order to find the mode of binding of the best hit in the presence of substrates and the products of the enzymatic reaction. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidated the probability of inhibitor binding at the allosteric site in the presence of ADP and shikimate-3-phosphate (S-3-P), that is, after the formation of products of the reaction. The inhibitor binding may prevent the release of the product from Mtb-SK, thereby inhibiting its activity. The binding stability and the key residue interactions of the inhibitor to this product complex were also revealed by the MD simulations. Residues ARG43, ILE45, and PHE57 were identified as crucial that were involved in interactions with the best hit. This is the first report of an allosteric binding site of Mtb-SK, which

  13. Possible regulation of the Salmonella typhimurium histidine operon by adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase: large metabolic effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Goitein, R K; Parsons, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    An effort to find growth conditions leading to conditional regulation of the histidine operon of Salmonella typhimurium by the allosteric first enzyme of the pathway, adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.17), is reported. A strain deleting the enzyme, TR3343, behaved simply and predictably under all growth conditions, whereas histidine auxotrophs containing active enzyme behaved in complicated ways dependent upon the location of the histidine pathway lesion. hisE strains...

  14. Mapping Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Allosteric Site(s): Critical Molecular Determinant and Signaling Profile of GAT100, a Novel, Potent, and Irreversibly Binding Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprairie, Robert B; Kulkarni, Abhijit R; Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Hurst, Dow P; Lynch, Diane; Reggio, Patricia H; Janero, David R; Pertwee, Roger G; Stevenson, Lesley A; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Thakur, Ganesh A

    2016-06-15

    One of the most abundant G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in brain, the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R), is a tractable therapeutic target for treating diverse psychobehavioral and somatic disorders. Adverse on-target effects associated with small-molecule CB1R orthosteric agonists and inverse agonists/antagonists have plagued their translational potential. Allosteric CB1R modulators offer a potentially safer modality through which CB1R signaling may be directed for therapeutic benefit. Rational design of candidate, druglike CB1R allosteric modulators requires greater understanding of the architecture of the CB1R allosteric endodomain(s) and the capacity of CB1R allosteric ligands to tune the receptor's information output. We have recently reported the synthesis of a focused library of rationally designed, covalent analogues of Org27569 and PSNCBAM-1, two prototypic CB1R negative allosteric modulators (NAMs). Among the novel, pharmacologically active CB1R NAMs reported, the isothiocyanate GAT100 emerged as the lead by virtue of its exceptional potency in the [(35)S]GTPγS and β-arrestin signaling assays and its ability to label CB1R as a covalent allosteric probe with significantly reduced inverse agonism in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay as compared to Org27569. We report here a comprehensive functional profiling of GAT100 across an array of important downstream cell-signaling pathways and analysis of its potential orthosteric probe-dependence and signaling bias. The results demonstrate that GAT100 is a NAM of the orthosteric CB1R agonist CP55,940 and the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide for β-arrestin1 recruitment, PLCβ3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, cAMP accumulation, and CB1R internalization in HEK293A cells overexpressing CB1R and in Neuro2a and STHdh(Q7/Q7) cells endogenously expressing CB1R. Distinctively, GAT100 was a more potent and efficacious CB1R NAM than Org27569 and PSNCBAM-1 in all signaling assays and did not exhibit the inverse

  15. Pharmacological characterization and modeling of the binding sites of novel 1,3-bis(pyridinylethynyl)benzenes as metabotropic glutamate receptor 5-selective negative allosteric modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølck, Christina; Harpsøe, Kasper; Gloriam, David E;

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) is a potential drug target in neurological and psychiatric disorders, and subtype-selective allosteric modulators have attracted much attention as potential drug candidates. In this study, the binding sites of three novel 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl......)pyridine (MPEP)-derived negative allosteric modulators, 2-, 3-, and 4-BisPEB, have been characterized. 2-, 3-, and 4-BisPEB are 1,3-bis(pyridinylethynyl)-benzenes and differ only by the position of the nitrogen atoms in the pyridine rings. Despite their high structural similarity, 2-BisPEB [1,3-bis(pyridin-2...

  16. Targeting AKT with the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK-2206 in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired resistance to cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Campbell, David A; Starr, Megan M; Luthar, Neha; Traynor, Anne M; Wheeler, Deric L

    2013-06-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody that has been approved for use in oncology. Despite clinical success the majority of patients do not respond to cetuximab and those who initially respond frequently acquire resistance. To understand how tumor cells acquire resistance to cetuximab we developed a model of resistance using the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. We found that cetuximab-resistant (Ctx (R) ) clones manifested strong activation of EGFR, PI3K/AKT and MAPK. To investigate the role of AKT signaling in cetuximab resistance we analyzed the activation of the AKT pathway effector molecules using a human AKT phospho-antibody array. Strong activation was observed in Ctx (R) clones for several key AKT substrates including c-jun, GSK3β, eIF4E, rpS6, IKKα, IRS-1 and Raf1. Inhibition of AKT signaling by siAKT1/2 or by the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK-2206 resulted in robust inhibition of cell proliferation in all Ctx (R) clones. Moreover, the combinational treatment of cetuximab and MK-2206 resulted in further decreases in proliferation than either drug alone. This combinatorial treatment resulted in decreased activity of both AKT and MAPK thus highlighting the importance of simultaneous pathway inhibition to maximally affect the growth of Ctx (R) cells. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that AKT activation is an important pathway in acquired resistance to cetuximab and suggests that combinatorial therapy directed at both the AKT and EGFR/MAPK pathways may be beneficial in this setting. PMID:23760490

  17. The N-terminal Peptide of Mammalian GTP Cyclohydrolase I Is an Autoinhibitory Control Element and Contributes to Binding the Allosteric Regulatory Protein GFRP*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Christina E.; Gross, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  18. The N-terminal peptide of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is an autoinhibitory control element and contributes to binding the allosteric regulatory protein GFRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Christina E; Gross, Steven S

    2011-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  19. Allosteric MEK1/2 Inhibitor Refametinib (BAY 86-9766 in Combination with Sorafenib Exhibits Antitumor Activity in Preclinical Murine and Rat Models of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Schmieder

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objectives of the study were to evaluate the allosteric mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK inhibitor BAY 86-9766 in monotherapy and in combination with sorafenib in orthotopic and subcutaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC models with different underlying etiologies in two species. DESIGN: Antiproliferative potential of BAY 86-9766 and synergistic effects with sorafenib were studied in several HCC cell lines. Relevant pathway signaling was studied in MH3924a cells. For in vivo testing, the HCC cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically. Survival and mode of action (MoA were analyzed. RESULTS: BAY 86-9766 exhibited potent antiproliferative activity in HCC cell lines with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values ranging from 33 to 762 nM. BAY 86-9766 was strongly synergistic with sorafenib in suppressing tumor cell proliferation and inhibiting phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK. BAY 86-9766 prolonged survival in Hep3B xenografts, murine Hepa129 allografts, and MH3924A rat allografts. Additionally, tumor growth, ascites formation, and serum alpha-fetoprotein levels were reduced. Synergistic effects in combination with sorafenib were shown in Huh-7, Hep3B xenografts, and MH3924A allografts. On the signaling pathway level, the combination of BAY 86-9766 and sorafenib led to inhibition of the upregulatory feedback loop toward MEK phosphorylation observed after BAY 86-9766 monotreatment. With regard to the underlying MoA, inhibition of ERK phosphorylation, tumor cell proliferation, and microvessel density was observed in vivo. CONCLUSION: BAY 86-9766 shows potent single-agent antitumor activity and acts synergistically in combination with sorafenib in preclinical HCC models. These results support the ongoing clinical development of BAY 86-9766 and sorafenib in advanced HCC.

  20. Campylobacter jejuni adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase is an active hexamer that is allosterically controlled by the twisting of a regulatory tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstädt, Gerd; Moggré, Gert-Jan; Panjikar, Santosh; Nazmi, Ali Reza; Parker, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (ATP-PRT) catalyzes the first committed step of the histidine biosynthesis in plants and microorganisms. Here, we present the functional and structural characterization of the ATP-PRT from the pathogenic ε-proteobacteria Campylobacter jejuni (CjeATP-PRT). This enzyme is a member of the long form (HisGL ) ATP-PRT and is allosterically inhibited by histidine, which binds to a remote regulatory domain, and competitively inhibited by AMP. In the crystalline form, CjeATP-PRT was found to adopt two distinctly different hexameric conformations, with an open homohexameric structure observed in the presence of substrate ATP, and a more compact closed form present when inhibitor histidine is bound. CjeATP-PRT was observed to adopt only a hexameric quaternary structure in solution, contradicting previous hypotheses favoring an allosteric mechanism driven by an oligomer equilibrium. Instead, this study supports the conclusion that the ATP-PRT long form hexamer is the active species; the tightening of this structure in response to remote histidine binding results in an inhibited enzyme. PMID:27191057

  1. 2.3 Å resolution cryo-EM structure of human p97 and mechanism of allosteric inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soojay; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Merk, Alan; Rao, Prashant; Bulfer, Stacie L; Yan, Yongzhao; Green, Neal; Mroczkowski, Barbara; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Wipf, Peter; Falconieri, Veronica; Deshaies, Raymond J; Milne, Jacqueline L S; Huryn, Donna; Arkin, Michelle; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2016-02-19

    p97 is a hexameric AAA+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) that is an attractive target for cancer drug development. We report cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures for adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound, full-length, hexameric wild-type p97 in the presence and absence of an allosteric inhibitor at resolutions of 2.3 and 2.4 angstroms, respectively. We also report cryo-EM structures (at resolutions of ~3.3, 3.2, and 3.3 angstroms, respectively) for three distinct, coexisting functional states of p97 with occupancies of zero, one, or two molecules of adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATPγS) per protomer. A large corkscrew-like change in molecular architecture, coupled with upward displacement of the N-terminal domain, is observed only when ATPγS is bound to both the D1 and D2 domains of the protomer. These cryo-EM structures establish the sequence of nucleotide-driven structural changes in p97 at atomic resolution. They also enable elucidation of the binding mode of an allosteric small-molecule inhibitor to p97 and illustrate how inhibitor binding at the interface between the D1 and D2 domains prevents propagation of the conformational changes necessary for p97 function. PMID:26822609

  2. An Autoregulatory Mechanism Imposes Allosteric Control on the V(DJ Recombinase by Histone H3 Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available V(DJ recombination is initiated by a specialized transposase consisting of the subunits RAG-1 and RAG-2. The susceptibility of gene segments to DNA cleavage by the V(DJ recombinase is correlated with epigenetic modifications characteristic of active chromatin, including trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me3. Engagement of H3K4me3 by a plant homeodomain (PHD in RAG-2 promotes recombination in vivo and stimulates DNA cleavage by RAG in vitro. We now show that H3K4me3 acts allosterically at the PHD finger to relieve autoinhibition imposed by a separate domain within RAG-2. Disruption of this autoinhibitory domain was associated with constitutive increases in recombination frequency, DNA cleavage activity, substrate binding affinity, and catalytic rate, thus mimicking the stimulatory effects of H3K4me3. Our observations support a model in which allosteric control of RAG is enforced by an autoinhibitory domain whose action is relieved by engagement of active chromatin.

  3. Lid L11 of the glutamine amidotransferase domain of CTP synthase mediates allosteric GTP activation of glutaminase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Mølgaard, Anne; Johansson, Eva;

    2005-01-01

    GTP is an allosteric activator of CTP synthase and acts to increase the k(cat) for the glutamine-dependent CTP synthesis reaction. GTP is suggested, in part, to optimally orient the oxy-anion hole for hydrolysis of glutamine that takes place in the glutamine amidotransferase class I (GATase) domain...... position depending on the presence or absence of glutamine in the glutamine binding site. Displacement or rearrangement of this loop may provide a means for the suggested role of allosteric activation by GTP to optimize the oxy-anion hole for glutamine hydrolysis. Arg359, Gly360 and Glu362 of the...... enzyme behaved like wild-type enzyme. Apart from the G360A enzyme, the results from kinetic analysis of the enzymes altered at position 359 and 360 showed a 10- to 50-fold decrease in GTP activation of glutamine dependent CTP synthesis and concomitant four- to 10-fold increases in K(A) for GTP. The R359M...

  4. The M1 Muscarinic Positive Allosteric Modulator PQCA Improves Performance on Translatable Tests of Memory and Attention in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Henry S; Cannon, Christopher E; Drott, Jason T; Kuduk, Scott D; Uslaner, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    Improved treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD) is a significant unmet medical need that is becoming even more critical given the rise in the number of patients and the substantial economic burden. The current standards of care, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), are hindered by gastrointestinal side effects owing to their nonselective activation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. Recently, the highly selective M1 positive allosteric modulator PQCA (1-((4-cyano-4-(pyridine-2-yl)piperidin-1-yl)methyl-4-oxo-4 H-quinolizine-3-carboxylic acid) has been demonstrated to improve cognition in a variety of rodent and nonhuman primate cognition models without producing significant gastrointestinal side effects. Here we describe the effect of PQCA and the AChEI donepezil on two clinically relevant and highly translatable touchscreen cognition tasks in nonhuman primates: paired-associates learning (PAL) and the continuous-performance task (CPT). Blockade of muscarinic signaling by scopolamine produced significant impairments in both PAL and CPT. PQCA and donepezil attenuated the scopolamine deficits in both tasks, and the action of these two compounds was similar in magnitude. In addition, the combination of subeffective doses of PQCA and donepezil enhanced PAL performance. These results further suggest that M1-positive allosteric modulators, either as monotherapy or as an add-on to current standards of care, have potential to reduce the cognitive deficits associated with AD. PMID:26446308

  5. Allosteric Activation of Ubiquitin-Specific Proteases by β-Propeller Proteins UAF1 and WDR20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Lim, Kah Suan; Kim, Hyungjin; Hinds, Thomas R; Jo, Ukhyun; Mao, Haibin; Weller, Caroline E; Sun, Ji; Chatterjee, Champak; D'Andrea, Alan D; Zheng, Ning

    2016-07-21

    Ubiquitin-specific proteases (USPs) constitute the largest family of deubiquitinating enzymes, whose catalytic competency is often modulated by their binding partners through unknown mechanisms. Here we report on a series of crystallographic and biochemical analyses of an evolutionarily conserved deubiquitinase, USP12, which is activated by two β-propeller proteins, UAF1 and WDR20. Our structures reveal that UAF1 and WDR20 interact with USP12 at two distinct sites far from its catalytic center. Without increasing the substrate affinity of USP12, the two β-propeller proteins potentiate the enzyme through different allosteric mechanisms. UAF1 docks at the distal end of the USP12 Fingers domain and induces a cascade of structural changes that reach a critical ubiquitin-contacting loop adjacent to the catalytic cleft. By contrast, WDR20 anchors at the base of this loop and remotely modulates the catalytic center of the enzyme. Our results provide a mechanistic example for allosteric activation of USPs by their regulatory partners. PMID:27373336

  6. Potent Allosteric Dengue Virus NS5 Polymerase Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Resistance Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Noble, Christian Guy; Seh, Cheah Chen; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; El Sahili, Abbas; Chan, Grace Kar Yarn; Lescar, Julien; Arora, Rishi; Benson, Timothy; Nilar, Shahul; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Wan, Kah Fei; Dong, Hongping; Xie, Xuping; Shi, Pei-Yong; Yokokawa, Fumiaki

    2016-08-01

    Flaviviruses comprise major emerging pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV) or Zika virus (ZIKV). The flavivirus RNA genome is replicated by the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of non-structural protein 5 (NS5). This essential enzymatic activity renders the RdRp attractive for antiviral therapy. NS5 synthesizes viral RNA via a "de novo" initiation mechanism. Crystal structures of the flavivirus RdRp revealed a "closed" conformation reminiscent of a pre-initiation state, with a well ordered priming loop that extrudes from the thumb subdomain into the dsRNA exit tunnel, close to the "GDD" active site. To-date, no allosteric pockets have been identified for the RdRp, and compound screening campaigns did not yield suitable drug candidates. Using fragment-based screening via X-ray crystallography, we found a fragment that bound to a pocket of the apo-DENV RdRp close to its active site (termed "N pocket"). Structure-guided improvements yielded DENV pan-serotype inhibitors of the RdRp de novo initiation activity with nano-molar potency that also impeded elongation activity at micro-molar concentrations. Inhibitors exhibited mixed inhibition kinetics with respect to competition with the RNA or GTP substrate. The best compounds have EC50 values of 1-2 μM against all four DENV serotypes in cell culture assays. Genome-sequencing of compound-resistant DENV replicons, identified amino acid changes that mapped to the N pocket. Since inhibitors bind at the thumb/palm interface of the RdRp, this class of compounds is proposed to hinder RdRp conformational changes during its transition from initiation to elongation. This is the first report of a class of pan-serotype and cell-active DENV RdRp inhibitors. Given the evolutionary conservation of residues lining the N pocket, these molecules offer insights to treat other serious conditions caused by flaviviruses. PMID:27500641

  7. Potent Allosteric Dengue Virus NS5 Polymerase Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Resistance Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Noble, Christian Guy; Seh, Cheah Chen; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; El Sahili, Abbas; Chan, Grace Kar Yarn; Lescar, Julien; Arora, Rishi; Benson, Timothy; Nilar, Shahul; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Wan, Kah Fei; Dong, Hongping; Xie, Xuping; Yokokawa, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise major emerging pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV) or Zika virus (ZIKV). The flavivirus RNA genome is replicated by the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of non-structural protein 5 (NS5). This essential enzymatic activity renders the RdRp attractive for antiviral therapy. NS5 synthesizes viral RNA via a “de novo” initiation mechanism. Crystal structures of the flavivirus RdRp revealed a “closed” conformation reminiscent of a pre-initiation state, with a well ordered priming loop that extrudes from the thumb subdomain into the dsRNA exit tunnel, close to the “GDD” active site. To-date, no allosteric pockets have been identified for the RdRp, and compound screening campaigns did not yield suitable drug candidates. Using fragment-based screening via X-ray crystallography, we found a fragment that bound to a pocket of the apo-DENV RdRp close to its active site (termed “N pocket”). Structure-guided improvements yielded DENV pan-serotype inhibitors of the RdRp de novo initiation activity with nano-molar potency that also impeded elongation activity at micro-molar concentrations. Inhibitors exhibited mixed inhibition kinetics with respect to competition with the RNA or GTP substrate. The best compounds have EC50 values of 1–2 μM against all four DENV serotypes in cell culture assays. Genome-sequencing of compound-resistant DENV replicons, identified amino acid changes that mapped to the N pocket. Since inhibitors bind at the thumb/palm interface of the RdRp, this class of compounds is proposed to hinder RdRp conformational changes during its transition from initiation to elongation. This is the first report of a class of pan-serotype and cell-active DENV RdRp inhibitors. Given the evolutionary conservation of residues lining the N pocket, these molecules offer insights to treat other serious conditions caused by flaviviruses. PMID:27500641

  8. A novel dualistic profile of an allosteric AMPA receptor modulator identified through studies on recombinant receptors, mouse hippocampal synapses and crystal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, G B; Harbak, Barbara; Hede, S E;

    2015-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors receive increasing interest as therapeutic drugs and have long served as important experimental tools in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamate-mediated neurotra...

  9. Changes of cooperativity between N-methylscopolamine and allosteric modulators alcuronium and gallamine induced by mutations of external loops of muscarinic M(3) receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Alena; Tuček, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2001), s. 761-767. ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulators Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.297, year: 2001

  10. The tertiary origin of the allosteric activation of E. coli glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase studied by sol-gel nanoencapsulation of its T conformer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Zonszein

    Full Text Available The role of tertiary conformational changes associated to ligand binding was explored using the allosteric enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P deaminase from Escherichia coli (EcGNPDA as an experimental model. This is an enzyme of amino sugar catabolism that deaminates GlcN6P, giving fructose 6-phosphate and ammonia, and is allosterically activated by N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate (GlcNAc6P. We resorted to the nanoencapsulation of this enzyme in wet silica sol-gels for studying the role of intrasubunit local mobility in its allosteric activation under the suppression of quaternary transition. The gel-trapped enzyme lost its characteristic homotropic cooperativity while keeping its catalytic properties and the allosteric activation by GlcNAc6P. The nanoencapsulation keeps the enzyme in the T quaternary conformation, making possible the study of its allosteric activation under a condition that is not possible to attain in a soluble phase. The involved local transition was slowed down by nanoencapsulation, thus easing the fluorometric analysis of its relaxation kinetics, which revealed an induced-fit mechanism. The absence of cooperativity produced allosterically activated transitory states displaying velocity against substrate concentration curves with apparent negative cooperativity, due to the simultaneous presence of subunits with different substrate affinities. Reaction kinetics experiments performed at different tertiary conformational relaxation times also reveal the sequential nature of the allosteric activation. We assumed as a minimal model the existence of two tertiary states, t and r, of low and high affinity, respectively, for the substrate and the activator. By fitting the velocity-substrate curves as a linear combination of two hyperbolic functions with Kt and Kr as KM values, we obtained comparable values to those reported for the quaternary conformers in solution fitted to MWC model. These results are discussed in the

  11. Allosterism in human complement component 5a ((h)C5a): a damper of C5a receptor (C5aR) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The phenomena of allosterism continues to advance the field of drug discovery, by illuminating gainful insights for many key processes, related to the structure-function relationships in proteins and enzymes, including the transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), both in normal as well as in the disease states. However, allosterism is completely unexplored in the native protein ligands, especially when a small covalent change significantly modulates the pharmacology of the protein ligands toward the signaling axes of the GPCRs. One such example is the human C5a ((h)C5a), the potent cationic anaphylatoxin that engages C5aR and C5L2 to elicit numerous immunological and non-immunological responses in humans. From the recently available structure-function data, it is clear that unlike the mouse C5a ((m)C5a), the (h)C5a displays conformational heterogeneity. However, the molecular basis of such conformational heterogeneity, otherwise allosterism in (h)C5a and its precise contribution toward the overall C5aR signaling is not known. This study attempts to decipher the functional role of allosterism in (h)C5a, by exploring the inherent conformational dynamics in (m)C5a, (h)C5a and in its point mutants, including the proteolytic mutant des-Arg(74)-(h)C5a. Prima facie, the comparative molecular dynamics study, over total 500 ns, identifies Arg(74)-Tyr(23) and Arg(37)-Phe(51) "cation-π" pairs as the molecular "allosteric switches" on (h)C5a that potentially functions as a damper of C5aR signaling. PMID:26212097

  12. Changes in dynamics upon oligomerization regulate substrate binding and allostery in amino acid kinase family members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Marcos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization is a functional requirement for many proteins. The interfacial interactions and the overall packing geometry of the individual monomers are viewed as important determinants of the thermodynamic stability and allosteric regulation of oligomers. The present study focuses on the role of the interfacial interactions and overall contact topology in the dynamic features acquired in the oligomeric state. To this aim, the collective dynamics of enzymes belonging to the amino acid kinase family both in dimeric and hexameric forms are examined by means of an elastic network model, and the softest collective motions (i.e., lowest frequency or global modes of motions favored by the overall architecture are analyzed. Notably, the lowest-frequency modes accessible to the individual subunits in the absence of multimerization are conserved to a large extent in the oligomer, suggesting that the oligomer takes advantage of the intrinsic dynamics of the individual monomers. At the same time, oligomerization stiffens the interfacial regions of the monomers and confers new cooperative modes that exploit the rigid-body translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the intact monomers. The present study sheds light on the mechanism of cooperative inhibition of hexameric N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase by arginine and on the allosteric regulation of UMP kinases. It also highlights the significance of the particular quaternary design in selectively determining the oligomer dynamics congruent with required ligand-binding and allosteric activities.

  13. Inversion of allosteric effect of arginine on N-acetylglutamate synthase, a molecular marker for evolution of tetrapods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera-Luque Juan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficient conversion of ammonia, a potent neurotoxin, into non-toxic metabolites was an essential adaptation that allowed animals to move from the aquatic to terrestrial biosphere. The urea cycle converts ammonia into urea in mammals, amphibians, turtles, snails, worms and many aquatic animals and requires N-acetylglutamate (NAG, an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI in mammals and amphibians, and carbamylphosphate synthetase III (CPSIII in fish and invertebrates. NAG-dependent CPSI and CPSIII catalyze the formation of carbamylphosphate in the first and rate limiting step of ureagenesis. NAG is produced enzymatically by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS, which is also found in bacteria and plants as the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of microbial and plant NAGS, and allosteric activator of mammalian NAGS. Results Information from mutagenesis studies of E. coli and P. aeruginosa NAGS was combined with structural information from the related bacterial N-acetylglutamate kinases to identify four residues in mammalian NAGS that interact with arginine. Substitutions of these four residues were engineered in mouse NAGS and into the vertebrate-like N-acetylglutamate synthase-kinase (NAGS-K of Xanthomonas campestris, which is inhibited by arginine. All mutations resulted in arginine losing the ability to activate mouse NAGS, and inhibit X. campestris NAGS-K. To examine at what point in evolution inversion of arginine effect on NAGS occur, we cloned NAGS from fish and frogs and examined the arginine response of their corresponding proteins. Fish NAGS were partially inhibited by arginine and frog NAGS were activated by arginine. Conclusion Difference in arginine effect on bacterial and mammalian NAGS most likely stems from the difference in the type of conformational change triggered by arginine binding to these proteins. The change from arginine

  14. Multiple transmembrane binding sites for p-trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a photoreactive Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor allosteric inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Stewart, Deirdre S; Husain, S Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2011-06-10

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[(3)H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our understanding of the locations of allosteric modulator binding sites in the nAChR, we now characterize the interactions of a second aryl diazirine etomidate derivative, TFD-etomidate (ethyl-1-(1-(4-(3-trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl)phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate). TFD-etomidate inhibited acetylcholine-induced currents with an IC(50) = 4 μM, whereas it inhibited the binding of [(3)H]phencyclidine to the Torpedo nAChR ion channel in the resting and desensitized states with IC(50) values of 2.5 and 0.7 mm, respectively. Similar to [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate bound to a site at the γ-α subunit interface, photolabeling αM2-10 (αSer-252) and γMet-295 and γMet-299 within γM3, and to a site in the ion channel, photolabeling amino acids within each subunit M2 helix that line the lumen of the ion channel. In addition, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate photolabeled in an agonist-dependent manner amino acids within the δ subunit M2-M3 loop (δIle-288) and the δ subunit transmembrane helix bundle (δPhe-232 and δCys-236 within δM1). The fact that TFD-etomidate does not compete with ion channel blockers at concentrations that inhibit acetylcholine responses indicates that binding to sites at the γ-α subunit interface and/or within δ subunit helix bundle mediates the TFD-etomidate inhibitory effect. These results also suggest that the γ-α subunit interface is a binding site for Torpedo nAChR negative allosteric modulators (TFD-etomidate) and for positive

  15. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzyma...

  16. Thermodynamic Characterization of New Positive Allosteric Modulators Binding to the Glutamate Receptor A2 Ligand-Binding Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Francotte, Pierre; Goffin, Eric; Botez, Iuliana; Danober, Laurence; Lestage, Pierre; Pirotte, Bernard; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen; Olsen, Lars; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-01

    5a (5-F) and 5b (6-F) are entropy driven. For 5d (8-F), both quantities were equal in size. Thermodynamic integration (TI) and one-step perturbation (OSP) were used to calculate the relative binding affinity of the modulators. The OSP calculations had a higher predictive power than those from TI......Positive allosteric modulation of the ionotropic glutamate receptor GluA2 presents a potential treatment of cognitive disorders, for example, Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we describe the synthesis, pharmacology, and thermodynamic studies of a series of monofluoro-substituted 3......,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxides. Measurements of ligand binding by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed similar binding affinities for the modulator series at the GluA2 LBD but differences in the thermodynamic driving forces. Binding of 5c (7-F) and 6 (no-F) is enthalpy driven, and...

  17. Docking of noncompetitive inhibitors into dengue virus type 2 protease: understanding the interactions with allosteric binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Rozana; Kiat, Tan Siew; Khalid, Norzulaani; Yusof, Rohana; Newhouse, E Irene; Newhouse, James S; Alam, Masqudul; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul

    2008-08-01

    A group of flavanones and their chalcones, isolated from Boesenbergia rotunda L., were previously reported to show varying degrees of noncompetitive inhibitory activities toward Dengue virus type 2 (Den2) protease. Results obtained from automated docking studies are in agreement with experimental data in which the ligands were shown to bind to sites other than the active site of the protease. The calculated K(i) values are very small, indicating that the ligands bind quite well to the allosteric binding site. Greater inhibition by pinostrobin, compared to the other compounds, can be explained by H-bonding interaction with the backbone carbonyl of Lys74, which is bonded to Asp75 (one of the catalytic triad residues). In addition, structure-activity relationship analysis yields structural information that may be useful for designing more effective therapeutic drugs against dengue virus infections. PMID:18656912

  18. In vitro and in vivo characterization of a novel negative allosteric modulator of neuronal nAChRs

    OpenAIRE

    Abdrakhmanova, Galya R.; Blough, Bruce E.; Nesloney, Carey; Navarro, Hernán A.; Damaj, M. Imad; Carroll, F. Ivy

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compared the in vitro and in vivo neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) properties of 1,2,3,3a,4,8b-hexahydro-2-benzyl-6-N,N-dimethylamino-1-methylindeno[1,2,-b]pyrrole (HDMP, 4) to that of negative allosteric modulator (NAM), PCP. Patch-clamp experiments showed that HDMP exhibited an inhibitory functional activity at α7 nAChRs with an IC50 of 0.07 μM, and was 357- and 414-fold less potent at α4β2 and α3β4 nAChRs, with IC50s of 25.1 and 29.0 μM, respectively. Con...

  19. The Ascaris suum nicotinic receptor, ACR-16, as a drug target: Four novel negative allosteric modulators from virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fudan; Robertson, Alan P; Abongwa, Melanie; Yu, Edward W; Martin, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections in humans and livestock cause significant debility, reduced productivity and economic losses globally. There are a limited number of effective anthelmintic drugs available for treating helminths infections, and their frequent use has led to the development of resistance in many parasite species. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic drugs for treating these parasites. We have chosen the ACR-16 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Ascaris suum (Asu-ACR-16), as a drug target and have developed three-dimensional models of this transmembrane protein receptor to facilitate the search for new bioactive compounds. Using the human α7 nAChR chimeras and Torpedo marmorata nAChR for homology modeling, we defined orthosteric and allosteric binding sites on the Asu-ACR-16 receptor for virtual screening. We identified four ligands that bind to sites on Asu-ACR-16 and tested their activity using electrophysiological recording from Asu-ACR-16 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The four ligands were acetylcholine inhibitors (SB-277011-A, IC50, 3.12 ± 1.29 μM; (+)-butaclamol Cl, IC50, 9.85 ± 2.37 μM; fmoc-1, IC50, 10.00 ± 1.38 μM; fmoc-2, IC50, 16.67 ± 1.95 μM) that behaved like negative allosteric modulators. Our work illustrates a structure-based in silico screening method for seeking anthelmintic hits, which can then be tested electrophysiologically for further characterization. PMID:27054065

  20. VU0477573: Partial Negative Allosteric Modulator of the Subtype 5 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor with In Vivo Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Yuh, Joannes P; Gregory, Karen J; Morrison, Ryan D; Bates, Brittney S; Stauffer, Shaun R; Emmitte, Kyle A; Bubser, Michael; Peng, Weimin; Nedelcovych, Michael T; Thompson, Analisa; Lv, Xiaohui; Xiang, Zixiu; Daniels, J Scott; Niswender, Colleen M; Lindsley, Craig W; Jones, Carrie K; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) have potential applications in the treatment of fragile X syndrome, levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, addiction, and anxiety; however, clinical and preclinical studies raise concerns that complete blockade of mGlu5 and inverse agonist activity of current mGlu5 NAMs contribute to adverse effects that limit the therapeutic use of these compounds. We report the discovery and characterization of a novel mGlu5 NAM, N,N-diethyl-5-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)picolinamide (VU0477573) that binds to the same allosteric site as the prototypical mGlu5 NAM MPEP but displays weak negative cooperativity. Because of this weak cooperativity, VU0477573 acts as a "partial NAM" so that full occupancy of the MPEP site does not completely inhibit maximal effects of mGlu5 agonists on intracellular calcium mobilization, inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation, or inhibition of synaptic transmission at the hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse. Unlike previous mGlu5 NAMs, VU0477573 displays no inverse agonist activity assessed using measures of effects on basal [(3)H]inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation. VU0477573 acts as a full NAM when measuring effects on mGlu5-mediated extracellular signal-related kinases 1/2 phosphorylation, which may indicate functional bias. VU0477573 exhibits an excellent pharmacokinetic profile and good brain penetration in rodents and provides dose-dependent full mGlu5 occupancy in the central nervous system (CNS) with systemic administration. Interestingly, VU0477573 shows robust efficacy, comparable to the mGlu5 NAM MTEP, in models of anxiolytic activity at doses that provide full CNS occupancy of mGlu5 and demonstrate an excellent CNS occupancy-efficacy relationship. VU0477573 provides an exciting new tool to investigate the efficacy of partial NAMs in animal models. PMID:26503377

  1. Aspects of Ribonucleotide Reductase Regulation and Genome Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Berner Nedergaard

    In all living cells, synthesis of the DNA building blocks, deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), is tightly regulated to ensure a precise DNA replication to maintain genomic stability. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is the enzyme responsible for reducing ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms....... RNR consists of two subunits: R1 and R2, both of which are essential. The activity of RNR is strictly regulated to control the dNTP pool, both by allosteric feedback control and transcriptional and translational controls. Four inhibitory proteins of RNR have been identified in yeast: Spd1 in fission...... yeast, and Sml1, Hug1, and Dif1 in budding yeast. An elevated, as well as a reduced dNTP pool is shown to lead to an increase in spontaneous mutation rates, hence regulation of RNR is very important in order to maintain genomic stability. No human inhibitory proteins have yet been identified to regulate...

  2. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1 Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina N Lyukmanova

    Full Text Available SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and controls inflammation and malignant cell transformation. The majority of previous studies of SLURP-1 have been made using fusion constructs containing, in addition to the native protein, extra polypeptide sequences. Here we describe the activity and pharmacological profile of a recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1 differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells. Application of mecamylamine and atropine,--non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-nAChRs. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7-nAChRs to rSLURP-1 caused a significant non-competitive inhibition of the response to acetylcholine (up to ~ 70%, IC50 ~ 1 μM. It was shown that rSLURP-1 binds to α7-nAChRs overexpressed in GH4Cl cells, but does not compete with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the receptor. These findings imply an allosteric antagonist-like mode of SLURP-1 interaction with α7-nAChRs outside the classical ligand-binding site. Contrary to rSLURP-1, other inhibitors of α7-nAChRs (mecamylamine, α-bungarotoxin and Lynx1 did not suppress the proliferation of keratinocytes. Moreover, the co-application of α-bungarotoxin with rSLURP-1 did not influence antiproliferative activity of the latter. This supports the

  3. A combination of temsirolimus, an allosteric mTOR inhibitor, with clofarabine as a new therapeutic option for patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Chiarini, Francesca; Lonetti, Annalisa; Teti, Gabriella; Orsini, Ester; Bressanin, Daniela; Cappellini, Alessandra; Ricci, Francesca; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Ognibene, Andrea; Falconi, Mirella; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Martinelli, Giovanni; Amadori, Sergio; McCubrey, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream effectors, Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), is aberrantly activated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, where it contributes to leukemic cell proliferation, survival, and drug-resistance. Thus, inhibiting mTOR signaling in AML blasts could enhance their sensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Preclinical data also suggest that allosteric mTOR inhibition with rapamycin impaired leukemia initiati...

  4. The Nature of Allosteric Inhibition in Glutamate Racemase: discovery and characterization of a cryptic inhibitory pocket using atomistic MD simulations and pKa calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Whalen, Katie L.; Tussey, Kenneth B.; Blanke, Steven R.; Spies, M. Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme inhibition via allostery, in which the ligand binds remotely from the active site, is a poorly understood phenomenon, and represents a significant challenge to structure-based drug design. Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major component of Bacillus spores, is shown to inhibit glutamate racemase from Bacillus anthracis, a monosubstrate/monoproduct enzyme, in a novel allosteric fashion. Glutamate racemase has long been considered an important drug target for its integral role in bacterial cell...

  5. Allosteric inhibition enhances the efficacy of ABL kinase inhibitors to target unmutated BCR-ABL and BCR-ABL-T315I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Afsar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+ acute lymphatic leukemia (Ph + ALL are caused by the t(9;22, which fuses BCR to ABL resulting in deregulated ABL-tyrosine kinase activity. The constitutively activated BCR/ABL-kinase “escapes” the auto-inhibition mechanisms of c-ABL, such as allosteric inhibition. The ABL-kinase inhibitors (AKIs Imatinib, Nilotinib or Dasatinib, which target the ATP-binding site, are effective in Ph + leukemia. Another molecular therapy approach targeting BCR/ABL restores allosteric inhibition. Given the fact that all AKIs fail to inhibit BCR/ABL harboring the ‘gatekeeper’ mutation T315I, we investigated the effects of AKIs in combination with the allosteric inhibitor GNF2 in Ph + leukemia. Methods The efficacy of this approach on the leukemogenic potential of BCR/ABL was studied in Ba/F3 cells, primary murine bone marrow cells, and untransformed Rat-1 fibroblasts expressing BCR/ABL or BCR/ABL-T315I as well as in patient-derived long-term cultures (PDLTC from Ph + ALL-patients. Results Here, we show that GNF-2 increased the effects of AKIs on unmutated BCR/ABL. Interestingly, the combination of Dasatinib and GNF-2 overcame resistance of BCR/ABL-T315I in all models used in a synergistic manner. Conclusions Our observations establish a new approach for the molecular targeting of BCR/ABL and its resistant mutants using a combination of AKIs and allosteric inhibitors.

  6. Detailed kinetics and regulation of mammalian 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Ranjan K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC, a key regulatory point of tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, plays vital roles in multiple pathways of energy metabolism and biosynthesis. The catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of this large enzyme complex are not fully understood. Here computer simulation is used to test possible catalytic mechanisms and mechanisms of allosteric regulation of the enzyme by nucleotides (ATP, ADP, pH, and metal ion cofactors (Ca2+ and Mg2+. Results A model was developed based on an ordered ter-ter enzyme kinetic mechanism combined with con-formational changes that involve rotation of one lipoic acid between three catalytic sites inside the enzyme complex. The model was parameterized using a large number of kinetic data sets on the activity of OGDHC, and validated by comparison of model predictions to independent data. Conclusions The developed model suggests a hybrid rapid-equilibrium ping-pong random mechanism for the kinetics of OGDHC, consistent with previously reported mechanisms, and accurately describes the experimentally observed regulatory effects of cofactors on the OGDHC activity. This analysis provides a single consistent theoretical explanation for a number of apparently contradictory results on the roles of phosphorylation potential, NAD (H oxidation-reduction state ratio, as well as the regulatory effects of metal ions on ODGHC function.

  7. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Kinetics Demonstrate Long Range Allosteric Effects of Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deredge, Daniel; Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A; Wintrode, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    New nonnucleoside analogs are being developed as part of a multi-drug regimen to treat hepatitis C viral infections. Particularly promising are inhibitors that bind to the surface of the thumb domain of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B). Numerous crystal structures have been solved showing small molecule non-nucleoside inhibitors bound to the hepatitis C viral polymerase, but these structures alone do not define the mechanism of inhibition. Our prior kinetic analysis showed that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) do not block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from the initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex. Here we have mapped the effect of three NNI2 inhibitors on the conformational dynamics of the enzyme using hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. All three inhibitors rigidify an extensive allosteric network extending >40 Å from the binding site, thus providing a structural rationale for the observed disruption of the transition from distributive initiation to processive elongation. The two more potent inhibitors also suppress slow cooperative unfolding in the fingers extension-thumb interface and primer grip, which may contribute their stronger inhibition. These results establish that NNI2 inhibitors act through long range allosteric effects, reveal important conformational changes underlying normal polymerase function, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:27006396

  8. Insecticidal 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides specifically bind with high affinity to a novel allosteric site in housefly GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Nakao, Toshifumi; Sato, Kazuyuki; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs) are an important target for existing insecticides such as fiproles. These insecticides act as noncompetitive antagonists (channel blockers) for insect GABARs by binding to a site within the intrinsic channel of the GABAR. Recently, a novel class of insecticides, 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides (BPBs), was shown to inhibit GABARs by binding to a site distinct from the site for fiproles. We examined the binding site of BPBs in the adult housefly by means of radioligand-binding and electrophysiological experiments. 3-Benzamido-N-(2,6-dimethyl-4-perfluoroisopropylphenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (BPB 1) (the N-demethyl BPB) was a partial, but potent, inhibitor of [(3)H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (GABA channel blocker) binding to housefly head membranes, whereas the 3-(N-methyl)benzamido congener (the N-methyl BPB) had low or little activity. A total of 15 BPB analogs were tested for their abilities to inhibit [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to the head membranes. The N-demethyl analogs, known to be highly effective insecticides, potently inhibited the [(3)H]BPB 1 binding, but the N-methyl analogs did not even though they, too, are considered highly effective. [(3)H]BPB 1 equally bound to the head membranes from wild-type and dieldrin-resistant (rdl mutant) houseflies. GABA allosterically inhibited [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. By contrast, channel blocker-type antagonists enhanced [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to housefly head membranes by increasing the affinity of BPB 1. Antiparasitic macrolides, such as ivermectin B1a, were potent inhibitors of [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. BPB 1 inhibited GABA-induced currents in housefly GABARs expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it failed to inhibit l-glutamate-induced currents in inhibitory l-glutamate receptors. Overall, these findings indicate that BPBs act at a novel allosteric site that is different from the site for channel blocker-type antagonists and that is probably overlapped with the site for macrolides

  9. Regulation of mammalian nucleotide metabolism and biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew N; Fan, Teresa W-M

    2015-02-27

    Nucleotides are required for a wide variety of biological processes and are constantly synthesized de novo in all cells. When cells proliferate, increased nucleotide synthesis is necessary for DNA replication and for RNA production to support protein synthesis at different stages of the cell cycle, during which these events are regulated at multiple levels. Therefore the synthesis of the precursor nucleotides is also strongly regulated at multiple levels. Nucleotide synthesis is an energy intensive process that uses multiple metabolic pathways across different cell compartments and several sources of carbon and nitrogen. The processes are regulated at the transcription level by a set of master transcription factors but also at the enzyme level by allosteric regulation and feedback inhibition. Here we review the cellular demands of nucleotide biosynthesis, their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of regulation during the cell cycle. The use of stable isotope tracers for delineating the biosynthetic routes of the multiple intersecting pathways and how these are quantitatively controlled under different conditions is also highlighted. Moreover, the importance of nucleotide synthesis for cell viability is discussed and how this may lead to potential new approaches to drug development in diseases such as cancer. PMID:25628363

  10. The Structural Basis for Allosteric Inhibition of a Threonine-sensitive Aspartokinase*

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xuying; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Ronald E. Viola

    2008-01-01

    The commitment step to the aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is the phosphorylation of aspartic acid catalyzed by aspartokinase (AK). Most microorganisms and plants have multiple forms of this enzyme, and many of these isofunctional enzymes are subject to feedback regulation by the end products of the pathway. However, the archeal species Methanococcus jannaschii has only a single, monofunctional form of AK. The substrate l-aspartate binds to this recombinant enzy...

  11. Negative Allosteric Modulators Selective for The NR2B Subtype of The NMDA Receptor Impair Cognition in Multiple Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Michael R; Bookbinder, Mark; Polino, Joseph; Keavy, Deborah; Cardinal, Rudolf N; Simmermacher-Mayer, Jean; Cometa, Fu-ni L; King, Dalton; Thangathirupathy, Srinivasan; Macor, John E; Bristow, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressant activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) has led to increased investigation of their behavioral pharmacology. NMDA antagonists, such as ketamine, impair cognition in multiple species and in multiple cognitive domains. However, studies with NR2B subtype-selective NAMs have reported mixed results in rodents including increased impulsivity, no effect on cognition, impairment or even improvement of some cognitive tasks. To date, the effects of NR2B-selective NAMs on cognitive tests have not been reported in nonhuman primates. The current study evaluated two selective NR2B NAMs, CP101,606 and BMT-108908, along with the nonselective NMDA antagonists, ketamine and AZD6765, in the nonhuman primate Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) list-based delayed match to sample (list-DMS) task. Ketamine and the two NMDA NR2B NAMs produced selective impairments in memory in the list-DMS task. AZD6765 impaired performance in a non-specific manner. In a separate cohort, CP101,606 impaired performance of the nonhuman primate CANTAB visuo-spatial Paired Associates Learning (vsPAL) task with a selective impairment at more difficult conditions. The results of these studies clearly show that systemic administration of a selective NR2B NAM can cause transient cognitive impairment in multiple cognitive domains. PMID:26105137

  12. The Central domain of RyR1 is the transducer for long-range allosteric gating of channel opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiao-Chen; Yan, Zhen; Wu, Jianping; Li, Zhangqiang; Yan, Nieng

    2016-09-01

    The ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are intracellular calcium channels responsible for rapid release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) to the cytoplasm, which is essential for the excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling of cardiac and skeletal muscles. The near-atomic resolution structure of closed RyR1 revealed the molecular details of this colossal channel, while the long-range allosteric gating mechanism awaits elucidation. Here, we report the cryo-EM structures of rabbit RyR1 in three closed conformations at about 4 Å resolution and an open state at 5.7 Å. Comparison of the closed RyR1 structures shows a breathing motion of the cytoplasmic platform, while the channel domain and its contiguous Central domain remain nearly unchanged. Comparison of the open and closed structures shows a dilation of the S6 tetrahelical bundle at the cytoplasmic gate that leads to channel opening. During the pore opening, the cytoplasmic "O-ring" motif of the channel domain and the U-motif of the Central domain exhibit coupled motion, while the Central domain undergoes domain-wise displacement. These structural analyses provide important insight into the E-C coupling in skeletal muscles and identify the Central domain as the transducer that couples the conformational changes of the cytoplasmic platform to the gating of the central pore. PMID:27468892

  13. An Integrated Approach for Screening and Identification of Positive Allosteric Modulators of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, Enrique; Cerne, Rok; Smith, Emery; Scampavia, Louis; Cuadrado, Maria; Findlay, Jeremy; Krambis, Michael J; Wakulchik, Mark; Chase, Peter; Brunavs, Michael; Burris, Kevin D; Gallagher, Peter; Spicer, Timothy P; Ursu, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors that play an important role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory formation. Malfunctioning of NMDARs, in particular the reduction in NMDAR activity, is thought to be implicated in major neurological disorders. NMDAR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) represent potential therapeutic interventions for restoring normal NMDAR function. We report a novel screening approach for identification and characterization of NMDAR-PAMs. The approach combines high-throughput fluorescence imaging with automated electrophysiological recording of glutamate-evoked responses in HEK-293 cells expressing NR1/NR2A NMDAR subunits. Initial high-throughput screening (HTS) of a chemical library containing >810,000 compounds using a calcium flux assay in 1536-well plate format identified a total of 864 NMDAR-PAMs. Concentration response determination in both calcium flux and automated electrophysiological assays found several novel chemical series with EC50 values between 0.49 and 10 µM. A small subset (six series) was selected and analyzed for pharmacological properties, subtype selectivity, mode of action, and activity at native NMDARs. Our approach demonstrates the successful application of HTS functional assays that led to identification of NMDAR-PAMs providing the foundation for further medicinal chemistry work that may lead to novel therapies for treatment of cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. PMID:26838761

  14. Nonlinear excitations match correlated motions unveiled by NMR in proteins: a new perspective on allosteric cross-talk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we propose a novel theoretical framework for interpreting long-range dynamical correlations unveiled in proteins through NMR measurements. The theoretical rationale relies on the hypothesis that correlated motions in proteins may be reconstructed as large-scale, collective modes sustained by long-lived nonlinear vibrations known as discrete breathers (DB) localized at key, hot-spot sites. DBs are spatially localized modes, whose nonlinear nature hinders resonant coupling with the normal modes, thus conferring them long lifetimes as compared to normal modes. DBs have been predicted to exist in proteins, localized at few hot-spot residues typically within the stiffest portions of the structure. We compute DB modes analytically in the framework of the nonlinear network model, showing that the displacement patterns of many DBs localized at key sites match to a remarkable extent the experimentally uncovered correlation blueprint. The computed dispersion relations prove that it is physically possible for some of these DBs to be excited out of thermal fluctuations at room temperature. Based on our calculations, we speculate that transient energy redistribution among the vibrational modes in a protein might favor the emergence of DB-like bursts of long-lived energy at hot-spot sites with lifetimes in the ns range, able to sustain critical, function-encoding correlated motions. More generally, our calculations provide a novel quantitative tool to predict fold-spanning dynamical pathways of correlated residues that may be central to allosteric cross-talk in proteins. (paper)

  15. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Paer; Jansson, Anna; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower). Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM) and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD). PMID:27253209

  16. Insights into protein -- DNA interactions, stability and allosteric communications: A computational study of MutS-DNA recognition complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Salsbury, Freddie

    2012-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair proteins (MMR) maintain genetic stability by recognizing and repairing mismatched bases and insertion/deletion loops mistakenly incorporated during DNA replication, and initiate cellular response to certain types of DNA damage. The most abundant MMR mismatch-binding factor in eukaryotes, MutS, recognizes and initiates the repair of base-base mismatches and small insertion/deletions. We performed molecular dynamics simulations on mismatched and damaged MutS-DNA complexes. A comprehensive DNA binding site analysis of relevant conformations shows that MutS proteins recognize the mismatched and platinum cross-linked DNA substrates in significantly different modes. Distinctive conformational changes associated with MutS binding to mismatched and damaged DNA have been identified and they provide insight into the involvement of MMR proteins in DNA-repair and DNA-damage pathways. Stability and allosteric interactions at the heterodimer interface associated with the mismatch and damage recognition step allow for prediction of key residues in MMR cancer-causing mutations. A rigorous hydrogen bonding analysis for ADP molecules at the ATPase binding sites is also presented. A large number of known MMR cancer causing mutations among the residues were found.

  17. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chandramohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower. Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD.

  18. Effects of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-07-15

    Evidence indicates that microglial activation contributes to the pathophysiology and maintenance of neuroinflammatory pain involving central nervous system alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of 3a,4,5,9b-Tetrahydro-4-(1-naphthalenyl)-3H-cyclopentan[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide (TQS), an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in hippocampus, a neuroinflammatory pain model in mice. In addition, we examined the effects of TQS on microglial activation marker, an ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), in the hippocampus may be associated with neuroinflammatory pain. Pretreatment of TQS (4mg/kg) significantly reduced LPS (1mg/kg)-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, pretreatment of methyllycaconitine (3mg/kg) significantly reversed TQS-induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic responses indicating the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pretreatment of TQS significantly decreased LPS-induced increased in hippocampal Iba-1 expression. Overall, these results suggest that TQS reduces LPS-induced neuroinflammatory pain like symptoms via modulating microglial activation likely in the hippocampus and/or other brain region by targeting alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Therefore, alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PAM such as TQS could be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammatory pain. PMID:27154173

  19. From Conformational Spread to Allosteric and Cooperative models of E. coli flagellar motor

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzotta, Alberto; Celani, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli swims using flagella activated by rotary motors. The direction of rotation of the motors is indirectly regulated by the binding of a single messenger protein. The conformational spread model has been shown to accurately describe the equilibrium properties as well as the dynamics of the flagellar motor. In this paper we study this model from an analytic point of view. By exploiting the separation of timescales observed in experiments, we show how to reduce the conformational spread model to a coarse-grained, cooperative binding model. We show that this simplified model reproduces very well the dynamics of the motor switch.

  20. Development of a high throughput screen for allosteric modulators of melanocortin-4 receptor signaling using a real time cAMP assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantel, Jacques; Williams, Savannah Y; Mi, Dehui; Sebag, Julien; Corbin, Jackie D; Weaver, C David; Cone, Roger D

    2011-06-11

    The melanocortin MC(4) receptor is a potential target for the development of drugs for both obesity and cachexia. Melanocortin MC(4) receptor ligands known thus far are orthosteric agonists or antagonists, however the agonists, in particular, have generally exhibited unwanted side effects. For some receptors, allosteric modulators are expected to reduce side-effect profiles. To identify allosteric modulators of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor, we created HEK293 cell lines coexpressing the human melanocortin MC(4) receptor and a modified luciferase-based cAMP sensor. Monitoring luminescence as a readout of real-time intracellular cAMP concentration, we demonstrate that this cell line is able to report melanocortin agonist responses, as well as inverse agonist response to the physiological AgRP peptide. Based on the MC4R-GLO cell line, we developed an assay that was shown to meet HTS standards (Z'=0.50). A pilot screen run on the Microsource Spectrum compound library (n=2000) successfully identified 62 positive modulators. This screen identified predicted families of compounds: β(2)AR agonists - the β(2)AR being endogenously expressed in HEK293 cells, an adenylyl cyclase activator and finally a distribution of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors well characterized or recently identified. In this last category, we identified a structural family of coumarin-derived compounds (imperatorin, osthol and prenyletin), along with deracoxib, a drug in veterinary use for its COX2 inhibitory properties. This latter finding unveiled a new off-target mechanism of action for deracoxib as a PDE inhibitor. Overall, these data are the first report of a HTS for allosteric modulators for a Gs protein coupled receptor. PMID:21296065

  1. DF2755A, a novel non-competitive allosteric inhibitor of CXCR1/2, reduces inflammatory and post-operative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Alexandre H; Brandolini, Laura; Aramini, Andrea; Bianchini, Gianluca; Silva, Rangel L; Zaperlon, Ana C; Verri, Waldiceu A; Alves-Filho, José C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Teixeira, Mauro M; Allegretti, Marcello; Cunha, Thiago M

    2016-01-01

    The activation of CXCR1/2 has been implicated in the genesis of inflammatory and postoperative pain. Here, we investigated a novel orally acting allosteric inhibitor of CXCR1/2 (DF2755A) and evaluated its antinociceptive effect in several models of inflammatory and post-operatory pain. DF2755A was tested in vitro for efficacy in the chemotaxis assay, selectivity and toxicity. In vivo, C57Bl/6 mice were treated orally with DF2755A and the following experiments were performed: pharmacokinetic profile; inflammatory hyperalgesia models using electronic pressure meter test; neutrophil migration assay assessed by myeloperoxidase assay. DF2755A selectively inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis induced by CXCR1/2 ligands without effect on CXCL8 binding to neutrophils. A single mutation of the allosteric site at CXCR1 abrogated the inhibitory effect of DF2755A on CXCL8-induced chemotaxis. DF2755A given orally was well absorbed (88.2%), and it was able to reduce, in a dose (3-30mg/kg)-dependent manner, inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan, LPS and CXCL1/KC as well as neutrophil recruitment and IL-1β production. In addition, DF2755A was able to reduce post-incisional nociception. Therapeutic treatment with DF2755A reduced CFA-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia even when injected intrathecally. The present results indicate that DF2755A is a novel selective allosteric inhibitor of CXCR1/2 with a favorable oral pharmacokinetic profile. Furthermore, the results might suggest that DF2755A might be a candidate of a novel therapeutic option to control inflammatory and post-operative pain. PMID:26592483

  2. Yellow fluorescent protein-based assay to measure GABA(A channel activation and allosteric modulation in CHO-K1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teres Johansson

    Full Text Available The γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A ion channels are important drug targets for treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Finding GABA(A channel subtype selective allosteric modulators could lead to new improved treatments. However, the progress in this area has been obstructed by the challenging task of developing functional assays to support screening efforts and the generation of cells expressing functional GABA(A ion channels with the desired subtype composition. To address these challenges, we developed a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-based assay to be able to study allosteric modulation of the GABA(A ion channel using cryopreserved, transiently transfected, assay-ready cells. We show for the first time how the MaxCyte STX electroporation instrument can be used to generate CHO-K1 cells expressing functional GABA(A α2β3γ2 along with a halide sensing YFP-H148Q/I152L (YFP-GABA(A2 cells. As a basis for a cell-based assay capable of detecting allosteric modulators, experiments with antagonist, ion channel blocker and modulators were used to verify GABA(A subunit composition and functionality. We found that the I(- concentration used in the YFP assay affected both basal quench of YFP and potency of GABA. For the first time the assay was used to study modulation of GABA with 7 known modulators where statistical analysis showed that the assay can distinguish modulatory pEC50 differences of 0.15. In conclusion, the YFP assay proved to be a robust, reproducible and inexpensive assay. These data provide evidence that the assay is suitable for high throughput screening (HTS and could be used to discover novel modulators acting on GABA(A ion channels.

  3. Selective Allosteric Inhibition of MMP9 Is Efficacious in Preclinical Models of Ulcerative Colitis and Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek C Marshall

    Full Text Available Expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9 is elevated in a variety of inflammatory and oncology indications, including ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer. MMP9 is a downstream effector and an upstream mediator of pathways involved in growth and inflammation, and has long been viewed as a promising therapeutic target. However, previous efforts to target matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, including MMP9, have utilized broad-spectrum or semi-selective inhibitors. While some of these drugs showed signs of efficacy in patients, all MMP-targeted inhibitors have been hampered by dose-limiting toxicity or insufficient clinical benefit, likely due to their lack of specificity. Here, we show that selective inhibition of MMP9 did not induce musculoskeletal syndrome (a characteristic toxicity of pan-MMP inhibitors in a rat model, but did reduce disease severity in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced mouse model of ulcerative colitis. We also found that MMP9 inhibition decreased tumor growth and metastases incidence in a surgical orthotopic xenograft model of colorectal carcinoma, and that inhibition of either tumor- or stroma-derived MMP9 was sufficient to reduce primary tumor growth. Collectively, these data suggest that selective MMP9 inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and oncology indications in which MMP9 is upregulated and is associated with disease pathology, such as ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer. In addition, we report the development of a potent and highly selective allosteric MMP9 inhibitor, the humanized monoclonal antibody GS-5745, which can be used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of MMP9 inhibition in patients.

  4. A Monoclonal Antibody (MCPR3-7) Interfering with the Activity of Proteinase 3 by an Allosteric Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkofer, Lisa C.; Seidel, Susanne A. I.; Korkmaz, Brice; Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M.; Braun, Dieter; Jenne, Dieter E.; Specks, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is an abundant serine protease of neutrophil granules and a major target of autoantibodies (PR3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Some of the PR3 synthesized by promyelocytes in the bone marrow escapes the targeting to granules and occurs on the plasma membrane of naive and primed neutrophils. This membrane-associated PR3 antigen may represent pro-PR3, mature PR3, or both forms. To discriminate between mature PR3 and its inactive zymogen, which have different conformations, we generated and identified a monoclonal antibody called MCPR3-7. It bound much better to pro-PR3 than to mature PR3. This monoclonal antibody greatly reduced the catalytic activity of mature PR3 toward extended peptide substrates. Using diverse techniques and multiple recombinant PR3 variants, we characterized its binding properties and found that MCPR3-7 preferentially bound to the so-called activation domain of the zymogen and changed the conformation of mature PR3, resulting in impaired catalysis and inactivation by α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-antitrypsin). Noncovalent as well as covalent complexation between PR3 and α1-proteinase inhibitor was delayed in the presence of MCPR3-7, but cleavage of certain thioester and paranitroanilide substrates with small residues in the P1 position was not inhibited. We conclude that MCPR3-7 reduces PR3 activity by an allosteric mechanism affecting the S1′ pocket and further prime side interactions with substrates. In addition, MCPR3-7 prevents binding of PR3 to cellular membranes. Inhibitory antibodies targeting the activation domain of PR3 could be exploited as highly selective inhibitors of PR3, scavengers, and clearers of the PR3 autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23902773

  5. Structural basis for allosteric cross-talk between the asymmetric nucleotide binding sites of a heterodimeric ABC exporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Michael; Hürlimann, Lea M; Böhm, Simon; Schöppe, Jendrik; Grütter, Markus G; Bordignon, Enrica; Seeger, Markus A

    2014-07-29

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate vital transport processes in every living cell. ATP hydrolysis, which fuels transport, displays positive cooperativity in numerous ABC transporters. In particular, heterodimeric ABC exporters exhibit pronounced allosteric coupling between a catalytically impaired degenerate site, where nucleotides bind tightly, and a consensus site, at which ATP is hydrolyzed in every transport cycle. Whereas the functional phenomenon of cooperativity is well described, its structural basis remains poorly understood. Here, we present the apo structure of the heterodimeric ABC exporter TM287/288 and compare it to the previously solved structure with adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) bound at the degenerate site. In contrast to other ABC exporter structures, the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of TM287/288 remain in molecular contact even in the absence of nucleotides, and the arrangement of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) is not influenced by AMP-PNP binding, a notion confirmed by double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements. Nucleotide binding at the degenerate site results in structural rearrangements, which are transmitted to the consensus site via two D-loops located at the NBD interface. These loops owe their name from a highly conserved aspartate and are directly connected to the catalytically important Walker B motif. The D-loop at the degenerate site ties the NBDs together even in the absence of nucleotides and substitution of its aspartate by alanine is well-tolerated. By contrast, the D-loop of the consensus site is flexible and the aspartate to alanine mutation and conformational restriction by cross-linking strongly reduces ATP hydrolysis and substrate transport. PMID:25030449

  6. Hydrogen-exchange labeling study of the allosteric R-state to T-state equilibrium in methemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnie, R. E.; Englander, J. J.; Englander, S. W.

    1991-12-01

    Hydrogen-exchange labeling methods can be used to identify functionally important changes at positions all through a protein structure, can monitor the effect at these positions of structure changes anywhere in the protein, and can quantify these effects in terms of change in structural-stabilization free energy. These methods were used to study effects at two widely separated positions in human methemoglobin (metHb). The results show that the observed changes in hydrogen-exchange behavior reflect changes in the global R-state to T-state equilibrium, and specifically that stabilizing salt links at the α-chain N-terminus and the β-chain C-terminus are reformed in the R-T transition. The strong allosteric effector, inositol hexaphosphate (IHP), switches R-state methemoglobin to the T-state, but achieves a T/R equilibrium constant of only ≈ 3 (at pH=6.5, 0°C). Addition of the weaker effector, bezafibrate (Bzf), promotes this transition by an additional 0.7 kcal (T/R shifts to ≈ 12). Bzf alone is insufficient to cause the transition, indicating that R/T is 10 or more in stripped metHb under these conditions. However, R/T is small enough, not more than 103, to be reversed by the differential (T versus R) binding energy of IHP. The R-T transition caused by IHP and Bzf acting together can be reversed by some covalent modifications that sever the stabilizing salt links at the chain termini and thus favor transition back to the R-state.

  7. Selective Allosteric Antagonists for the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPRC6A Based on the 2-Phenylindole Privileged Structure Scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Henrik; Boesgaard, Michael Worch; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Larsen, Inna; Kuhne, Sebastiaan; Gloriam, David E; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a biological target class of fundamental importance in drug therapy. The GPRC6A receptor is a newly deorphanized class C GPCR that we recently reported for the first allosteric antagonists based on the 2-arylindole privileged structure scaffold (e.g., 1......, and 34b as antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor in the low micromolar range and show that 7 and 34b display >9-fold selectivity for the GPRC6A receptor over related GPCRs, making 7 and 34b the most potent and selective antagonists for the GPRC6A receptor reported to date....

  8. Allosteric-Site and Catalytic-Site Ligand Effects on PDE5 Functions are Associated with Distinct Changes in Physical Form of the Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Corbin, Jackie D.; Zoraghi, Roya; Francis, Sharron H.

    2009-01-01

    Native phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) homodimer contains distinct non-catalytic cGMP allosteric sites and catalytic sites for cGMP hydrolysis. Purified recombinant PDE5 was activated by pre-incubation with cGMP. Relatively low concentrations of cGMP produced a Native PAGE gel-shift of PDE5 from a single band position (lower band) to a band with decreased mobility (upper band); higher concentrations of cGMP produced a band of intermediate mobility (middle band) in addition to the upper band. Two p...

  9. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W. (SVIMR-A); (Avea); (Monash IPS)

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  10. An Allosteric Interaction Links USP7 to Deubiquitination and Chromatin Targeting of UHRF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Min Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The protein stability and chromatin functions of UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains, 1 are regulated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. We report a structural characterization of the complex between UHRF1 and the deubiquitinase USP7. The first two UBL domains of USP7 bind to the polybasic region (PBR of UHRF1, and this interaction is required for the USP7-mediated deubiquitination of UHRF1. Importantly, we find that the USP7-binding site of the UHRF1 PBR overlaps with the region engaging in an intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal tandem Tudor domain (TTD. We show that the USP7-UHRF1 interaction perturbs the TTD-PBR interaction of UHRF1, thereby shifting the conformation of UHRF1 from a TTD-“occluded” state to a state open for multivalent histone binding. Consistently, introduction of a USP7-interaction-defective mutation to UHRF1 significantly reduces its chromatin association. Together, these results link USP7 interaction to the dynamic deubiquitination and chromatin association of UHRF1.

  11. The insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) induces angiogenesis via allosteric modulation of the M3 muscarinic receptor in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeay, Samuel; Clere, Nicolas; Hilairet, Grégory; Do, Quoc-Tuan; Bernard, Philippe; Quignard, Jean-François; Apaire-Marchais, Véronique; Lapied, Bruno; Faure, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) has been reported to inhibit AChE (acetylcholinesterase) and to possess potential carcinogenic properties with excessive vascularization. In the present paper, we demonstrate that DEET specifically stimulates endothelial cells that promote angiogenesis which increases tumor growth. DEET activates cellular processes that lead to angiogenesis including proliferation, migration and adhesion. This is associated with an enhancement of NO production and VEGF expression in endothelial cells. M3 silencing or the use of a pharmacological M3 inhibitor abrogates all of these effects which reveals that DEET-induced angiogenesis is M3 sensitive. The experiments involving calcium signals in both endothelial and HEK cells overexpressing M3 receptors, as well as binding and docking studies demonstrate that DEET acts as an allosteric modulator of the M3 receptor. In addition, DEET inhibited AChE which increased acetylcholine bioavailability and binding to M3 receptors and also strengthened proangiogenic effects by an allosteric modulation. PMID:27345502

  12. Positive Allosteric Modulators of Type 5 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors (mGluR5 and Their Therapeutic Potential for the Treatment of CNS Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Cleva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies utilizing selective pharmacological antagonists or targeted gene deletion have demonstrated thattype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5 are critical mediators and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of numerous disorders of the central nervous system (CNS, including depression, anxiety, drug addiction, chronic pain, Fragile X syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, in recent years, the development of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs of the mGluR5 receptor have revealed that allosteric activation of this receptor may also be of potential therapeutic benefit for the treatment of other CNS disorders, including schizophrenia, cognitive deficits associated with chronic drug use, and deficits in extinction learning. Here we summarize the discovery and characterization of various mGluR5 PAMs, with an emphasis on those that are systemically active. We will also review animal studies showing that these molecules have potential efficacy as novel antipsychotic agents. Finally, we will summarize findings that suggest that mGluR5 PAMs have pro-cognitive effects such as the ability toenhance synaptic plasticity, improve performance in various learning and memory tasks, including extinction of drug-seeking behavior, and reverse cognitive deficits produced by chronic drug use.

  13. Molecular Motions as a Drug Target: Mechanistic Simulations of Anthrax Toxin Edema Factor Function Led to the Discovery of Novel Allosteric Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Blondel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Edema Factor (EF is a component of Bacillus anthracis toxin essential for virulence. Its adenylyl cyclase activity is induced by complexation with the ubiquitous eukaryotic cellular protein, calmodulin (CaM. EF and its complexes with CaM, nucleotides and/or ions, have been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography. Those structural data allowed molecular simulations analysis of various aspects of EF action mechanism, including the delineation of EF and CaM domains through their association energetics, the impact of calcium binding on CaM, and the role of catalytic site ions. Furthermore, a transition path connecting the free inactive form to the CaM-complexed active form of EF was built to model the activation mechanism in an attempt to define an inhibition strategy. The cavities at the surface of EF were determined for each path intermediate to identify potential sites where the binding of a ligand could block activation. A non-catalytic cavity (allosteric was found to shrink rapidly at early stages of the path and was chosen to perform virtual screening. Amongst 18 compounds selected in silico and tested in an enzymatic assay, 6 thiophen ureidoacid derivatives formed a new family of EF allosteric inhibitors with IC50 as low as 2 micromolars.

  14. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  15. Market, Regulation, Market, Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Galland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the European Regulatory system which was settled both for opening the Single Market for products and ensuring the consumers' safety. It claims that the New Approach and Standardization, and the Global Approach to conformity assessment, which suppressed the last technical...... barriers to trade in Europe, realized the free movement of products by organizing progressively several orders of markets and regulation. Based on historical and institutional documents, on technical publications, and on interviews, this article relates how the European Commission and the Member States had...... alternatively recourse to markets and to regulations, at the three main levels of the New Approach Directives implementation. The article focuses also more specifically on the Medical Devices sector, not only because this New Approach sector has long been controversial in Europe, and has recently been concerned...

  16. 3-(Imidazolyl methyl)-3-aza-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-6-yl)methyl ethers: a novel series of mGluR2 positive allosteric modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Rogers, Bruce N; Duplantier, Allen J; McHardy, Stanley F; Efremov, Ivan; Berke, Helen; Qian, Weimin; Zhang, Andy Q; Maklad, Noha; Candler, John; Doran, Angela C; Lazzaro, John T; Ganong, Alan H

    2008-10-15

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a novel series of 3-(imidazolyl methyl)-3-aza-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-6-yl)methyl ethers, derived from a high throughput screening (HTS), are described. Subsequent optimization led to identification of potent, metabolically stable and orally available mGluR2 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). PMID:18812259

  17. Steady-state kinetics and analysis of pH dependence on wild-type and a modified allosteric Pseudomonas aeruginosa ornithine carbamoyltransferase containing the replacement of glutamate 105 by alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, C; Nguyen, V T; Stalon, V

    1993-08-01

    The substitution of alanine for glutamate at position 105 (E105A) of the allosteric ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTCase) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa abolishes the carbamoylphosphate (CP) cooperativity observed in the wild-type enzyme. A kinetic analysis of [E105A]OTCase was performed in order to determine the mechanism of the reaction. The results of initial velocity and inhibition studies are consistent with an ordered mechanism with CP as the first substrate to add to the enzyme. In addition, similar studies have been made using the wild-type enzyme in the presence of the activator, phosphate. The results are similar to those obtained with [E105A]OTCase indicating that the residue E105 is critical for the allosteric transition of the wild-type enzyme. The activities of the wild-type allosteric OTCase and of [E105A]OTCase have been studied in the pH range 5.8-8.2 in the absence and in the presence of positive and negative effectors. The sigmoid saturation of OTCases by CP has been analyzed according to the Hill equation. At low pH values, CP cooperativity is low in the wild-type enzyme but cooperativity and [S]CP0.5 values increase markedly with pH. For [E105A]OTCase, the saturation by CP is hyperbolic at all pH values; in this modified enzyme, the presence of spermidine, an allosteric inhibitor of the wild-type enzyme, results in an inhibition which induces CP cooperativity. Thus, the ionization of the residue E105 apparently results in a conformational change in the wild-type enzyme which modifies the catalytic site. Since the [E105A] enzyme retains the heterotropic effects of the wild-type enzyme, other structural features are required for the allosteric transition in the wild-type catabolic OTCase. PMID:8102605

  18. Structure, inhibition and regulation of two-pore channel TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintzer, Alexander F; Stroud, Robert M

    2016-03-10

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) comprise a subfamily (TPC1-3) of eukaryotic voltage- and ligand-gated cation channels with two non-equivalent tandem pore-forming subunits that dimerize to form quasi-tetramers. Found in vacuolar or endolysosomal membranes, they regulate the conductance of sodium and calcium ions, intravesicular pH, trafficking and excitability. TPCs are activated by a decrease in transmembrane potential and an increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations, are inhibited by low luminal pH and calcium, and are regulated by phosphorylation. Here we report the crystal structure of TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana at 2.87 Å resolution as a basis for understanding ion permeation, channel activation, the location of voltage-sensing domains and regulatory ion-binding sites. We determined sites of phosphorylation in the amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal domains that are positioned to allosterically modulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) activation. One of the two voltage-sensing domains (VSD2) encodes voltage sensitivity and inhibition by luminal Ca(2+) and adopts a conformation distinct from the activated state observed in structures of other voltage-gated ion channels. The structure shows that potent pharmacophore trans-Ned-19 (ref. 17) acts allosterically by clamping the pore domains to VSD2. In animals, Ned-19 prevents infection by Ebola virus and other filoviruses, presumably by altering their fusion with the endolysosome and delivery of their contents into the cytoplasm. PMID:26961658

  19. mGlu2 Receptor Agonism, but Not Positive Allosteric Modulation, Elicits Rapid Tolerance towards Their Primary Efficacy on Sleep Measures in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Ahnaou

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR agonists are known to induce both cellular adaptations resulting in tolerance to therapeutic effects and withdrawal symptoms upon treatment discontinuation. Glutamate neurotransmission is an integral part of sleep-wake mechanisms, which processes have translational relevance for central activity and target engagement. Here, we investigated the efficacy and tolerance potential of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3 agonist LY354740 versus mGluR2 positive allosteric modulator (PAM JNJ-42153605 on sleep-wake organisation in rats. In vitro, the selectivity and potency of JNJ-42153605 were characterized. In vivo, effects on sleep measures were investigated in rats after once daily oral repeated treatment for 7 days, withdrawal and consecutive re-administration of LY354740 (1-10 mg/kg and JNJ-42153605 (3-30 mg/kg. JNJ-42153605 showed high affinity, potency and selectivity at mGluR2. Binding site analyses and knowledge-based docking confirmed the specificity of JNJ-42153605 at the mGluR2 allosteric binding site. Acute LY354740 and JNJ-42153605 dose-dependently decreased rapid eye movement (REM sleep time and prolonged its onset latency. Sub chronic effects of LY354740 on REM sleep measures disappeared from day 3 onwards, whereas those of JNJ-42153605 were maintained after repeated exposure. LY354740 attenuated REM sleep homeostatic recovery, while this was preserved after JNJ-42153605 administration. JNJ-42153605 enhanced sleep continuity and efficiency, suggesting its potential as an add-on medication for impaired sleep quality during early stages of treatment. Abrupt cessation of JNJ-42153605 did not induce withdrawal phenomena and sleep disturbances, while the initial drug effect was fully reinstated after re-administration. Collectively, long-term treatment with JNJ-42153605 did not induce tolerance phenomena to its primary functional effects on sleep measures, nor adverse effects at withdrawal, while it

  20. Modeling the Contribution of Allosteric Regulation for Flux Control in the Central Carbon Metabolism of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Daniel; Herrgard, Markus; Rocha, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cellular metabolism is fundamental for many biotechnological applications, including drug discovery and rational cell factory design. Central carbon metabolism (CCM) is particularly important as it provides the energy and precursors for other biological processes. However, the complex...

  1. Allosteric regulation of the GTP activated and CTP inhibited uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Arent, Susan; Larsen, Sine;

    2005-01-01

    The upp gene, encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It behaved as a tetramer in solution and showed optimal activity at pH 5.5 when...... assayed at 60 °C. Enzyme activity was strongly stimulated by GTP and inhibited by CTP. GTP caused an approximately 20-fold increase in the turnover number kcat and raised the Km values for 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) and uracil by two- and >10-fold, respectively. The inhibition by CTP was...

  2. The reciprocal regulation of stress hormones and GABAA receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan eMody

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-derived steroid hormones regulate the expression and function of GABAA receptors (GABAARs. Changes in GABAAR subunit expression have been demonstrated under conditions of altered steroid hormone levels, such as stress, as well as following exogenous steroid hormone administration. In addition to the effects of stress-derived steroid hormones on GABAAR subunit expression, stress hormones can also be metabolized to neuroactive derivatives which can alter the function of GABAARs. Neurosteroids allosterically modulate GABAARs at concentrations comparable to those during stress. In addition to the actions of stress-derived steroid hormones on GABAARs, GABAARs reciprocally regulate the production of stress hormones. The stress response is mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, the activity of which is governed by corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH neurons. The activity of CRH neurons is largely controlled by robust GABAergic inhibition. Recently, it has been demonstrated that CRH neurons are regulated by neurosteroid-sensitive, GABAAR δ subunit-containing receptors representing a novel feedback mechanism onto the HPA axis. Further, it has been demonstrated that neurosteroidogenesis and neurosteroid actions on GABAAR δ subunit-containing receptors on CRH neurons are necessary to mount the physiological response to stress. Here we review the literature describing the effects of steroid hormones on GABAARs as well as the importance of GABAARs in regulating the production of steroid hormones. This review incorporates what we currently know about changes in GABAARs following stress and the role in HPA axis regulation.

  3. Allosteric effects of R- and S-citalopram on the human 5-HT transporter: evidence for distinct high- and low-affinity binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Gether, Ulrik; Rasmussen, Søren G

    2007-01-01

    cells, and their 5-HT uptake and uptake inhibitor-binding abilities were studied. The hSERT mutations did not alter affinities for 5-HT or paroxetine, but high-affinity binding of S-citalopram was severely affected, particularly by the I172M, and Y95F/I172M mutations - K(i) respectively 4 nM (wild......-type), 35 nM, 1000 nM, and 17.100 nM (mutants). The allosteric site however, in wild-type hSERT and the three mutants was unaffected by the mutations as attenuation of the dissociation rate of the [(3)H]-paroxetine:hSERT complex in the presence of S-citalopram or paroxetine was the same for wild-type h...

  4. Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Allosterically Block the Transition from Initiation to Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2016-05-01

    Replication of the hepatitis C viral genome is catalyzed by the NS5B (nonstructural protein 5B) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, which is a major target of antiviral drugs currently in the clinic. Prior studies established that initiation of RNA replication could be facilitated by starting with a dinucleotide (pGG). Here we establish conditions for efficient initiation from GTP to form the dinucleotide and subsequent intermediates leading to highly processive elongation, and we examined the effects of four classes of nonnucleoside inhibitors on each step of the reaction. We show that palm site inhibitors block initiation starting from GTP but not when starting from pGG. In addition we show that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) lead to the accumulation of abortive intermediates three-five nucleotides in length. Our kinetic analysis shows that NNI2 do not significantly block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex including displacement of the β-loop from the active site. Direct measurement in single turnover kinetic studies show that pyrophosphate release is faster than the chemistry step, which appears to be rate-limiting during processive synthesis. These results reveal important new details to define the steps involved in initiation and elongation during viral RNA replication, establish the allosteric mechanisms by which NNI2 inhibitors act, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:26851276

  5. An mGlu5-Positive Allosteric Modulator Rescues the Neuroplasticity Deficits in a Genetic Model of NMDA Receptor Hypofunction in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Darrick T; Li, Yan; Takagi, Shunsuke; Presti, Kendall Taylor; Ramikie, Teniel S; Rook, Jerri M; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Bolshakov, Vadim Y; Coyle, Joseph T

    2016-07-01

    There is substantial evidence that NMDA receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction contributes to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). A recent large-scale genome-wide association study identified serine racemase (SR), the enzyme that produces the NMDAR co-agonist D-serine, as a risk gene for SCZ. Serine racemase knockout (SR-/-) mice, which lack D-serine, exhibit many of the neurochemical and behavioral abnormalities observed in SCZ. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5)-positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) are currently being developed to treat cognitive dysfunction. We used in vitro electrophysiology to determine whether the mGlu5 PAM VU0409551 directly enhances NMDAR function in hippocampal slices from adult male SR-/- mice. We administered VU0409551 systemically for 5 days to adult male wild-type C57BL/6 animals to determine the optimal dose to test in SR-/- mice. We used western blot analyses and trace-fear conditioning to determine whether 5 days of VU0409551 treatment could reverse the neuroplasticity and learning deficits, respectively, in SR-/- mice. We show that VU0409551 enhances NMDAR function and rescues long-term potentiation in hippocampal slices obtained from SR-/- mice. Systemic treatment with VU0409551 (10 and 30 mg/kg) to wild-type mice causes a dose-dependent increase in the Akt/GS3Kα/β signaling pathway, which is reduced in SR-/- mice and in SCZ. Furthermore, the administration of VU0409551 to SR-/- mice reverses their deficits in several neuroplasticity signaling pathways and improves their contextual fear memory. These results support positive allosteric modulation of mGlu5, particularly with VU0409551, as a viable mechanism to reverse the deficits in NMDAR function, synaptic plasticity, and memory that are known to be impaired in SCZ. PMID:26741285

  6. The use of isomeric testosterone dimers to explore allosteric effects in substrate binding to cytochrome P450 CYP3A4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Ilia G; Mak, Piotr J; Grinkova, Yelena V; Bastien, Dominic; Bérubé, Gervais; Sligar, Stephen G; Kincaid, James R

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 is the main drug-metabolizing enzyme in the human liver, being responsible for oxidation of 50% of all pharmaceuticals metabolized by human P450 enzymes. Possessing a large substrate binding pocket, it can simultaneously bind several substrate molecules and often exhibits a complex pattern of drug-drug interactions. In order to better understand structural and functional aspects of binding of multiple substrate molecules to CYP3A4 we used resonance Raman and UV-VIS spectroscopy to document the effects of binding of synthetic testosterone dimers of different configurations, cis-TST2 and trans-TST2. We directly demonstrate that the binding of two steroid molecules, which can assume multiple possible configurations inside the substrate binding pocket of monomeric CYP3A4, can lead to active site structural changes that affect functional properties. Using resonance Raman spectroscopy, we have documented perturbations in the ferric and Fe-CO states by these substrates, and compared these results with effects caused by binding of monomeric TST. While the binding of trans-TST2 yields results similar to those obtained with monomeric TST, the binding of cis-TST2 is much tighter and results in significantly more pronounced conformational changes of the porphyrin side chains and Fe-CO unit. In addition, binding of an additional monomeric TST molecule in the remote allosteric site significantly improves binding affinity and the overall spin shift for CYP3A4 with trans-TST2 dimer bound inside the substrate binding pocket. This result provides the first direct evidence for an allosteric effect of the peripheral binding site at the protein-membrane interface on the functional properties of CYP3A4. PMID:26774838

  7. Steric and allosteric effects of fatty acids on the binding of warfarin to human serum albumin revealed by molecular dynamics and free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Shin-Ichi; Amisaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) binds with drugs and fatty acids (FAs). This study was initiated to elucidate the relationship between the warfarin binding affinity of HSA and the positions of bound FA molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations of 11 HSA-warfarin-myristate complexes were performed. HSA-warfarin binding free energy was then calculated for each of the complexes by the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The results indicated that the magnitude of the binding free energy was smaller in HSA-warfarin complexes that had 4 or more myristate molecules than in complexes with no myristate molecules. The unfavorable effect on the HSA-warfarin binding affinity was caused sterically by the binding of a myristate molecule to the FA binding site closest to the warfarin binding site. On the other hand, the magnitude of HSA-warfarin binding free energy was largest when 3 myristate molecules were bound to the high-affinity sites. The strongest HSA-warfarin binding was attributable to favorable entropic contribution related to larger atomic fluctuations of the amino acid residues at the warfarin binding site. In the binding of 2 myristate molecules to the sites with the highest and second-highest affinities, allosteric modulation that enhanced electrostatic interactions between warfarin and some of the amino acid residues around the warfarin binding site was observed. This study clarified the structural and energetic properties of steric/allosteric effects of FAs on the HSA-warfarin binding affinity and illustrated the approach to analyze protein-ligand interactions in situations such that multiple ligands bind to the other sites of the protein. PMID:21720037

  8. Domain structure of the large subunit of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. Location of the binding site for the allosteric inhibitor UMP in the COOH-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large subunit of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase is responsible for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis from NH3 and for the binding of the allosteric activators ornithine and IMP and of the inhibitor UMP. Elastase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin inactivate the enzyme and cleave the large subunit at a site approximately 15 kDa from the COOH terminus UMP, IMP, and ornithine prevent this cleavage and the inactivation. Upon irradiation with ultraviolet light in the presence of [14C]UMP, the large subunit is labeled selectively and specifically. The labeling is inhibited by ornithine and IMP. Cleavage of the 15-kDa COOH-terminal region by prior treatment of the enzyme with trypsin prevents the labeling on subsequent irradation with [14C]UMP. The [14C]UMP-labeled large subunit is resistant to proteolytic cleavage, but if it is treated with SDS the resistance is lost, indicating that UMP is cross-linked to its binding site and that the protection is due to conformational factors. Since the binding sites for IMP and UMP overlap, most probably IMP also binds in this domain. The protection from proteolysis by ornithine suggests that ornithine binds in the same domain. To account for the effects of the allosteric effectors on the binding of ATP, the authors propose a scheme where the two halves of the large subunit form a pseudohomodimer by complementary isologous association, thus placing the NH2 half, which is involved in the binding of the molecule of ATP that yields Pi, close to the regulatory domain

  9. Regulation of Bacterial Peptidoglycan Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Michel

    2016-07-01

    How bacterial cells control the activity of peptidoglycan polymerases has remained mysterious. Biochemical characterization of derivatives of penicillin-binding protein PBP1b that are functional in the absence of lipoprotein LpoB provides evidence for allosteric control of PBP1b glycosyltransferase activity via binding of LpoB to the PBP1b UBH1 domain. PMID:27236859

  10. Pyruvate Kinase M2: A Potential Target for Regulating Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Filho, Jose C.; Pålsson-McDermott, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) is the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the last step of glycolysis. Of the four PK isoforms expressed in mammalian cells, PKM2 has generated the most interest due to its impact on changes in cellular metabolism observed in cancer as well as in activated immune cells. As our understanding of dysregulated metabolism in cancer develops, and in light of the growing field of immunometabolism, intense efforts are in place to define the mechanism by which PKM2 regulates the metabolic profile of cancer as well as of immune cells. The enzymatic activity of PKM2 is heavily regulated by endogenous allosteric effectors as well as by intracellular signaling pathways, affecting both the enzymatic activity of PKM2 as a PK and the regulation of the recently described non-canonical nuclear functions of PKM2. We here review the current literature on PKM2 and its regulation, and discuss the potential for this protein as a therapeutic target in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27148264

  11. Telomerase Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Cifuentes-Rojas, Catherine; Dorothy E Shippen

    2011-01-01

    The intimate connection between telomerase regulation and human disease is now well established. The molecular basis for telomerase regulation is highly complex and entails multiple layers of control. While the major target of enzyme regulation is the catalytic subunit TERT, the RNA subunit of telomerase is also implicated in telomerase control. In addition, alterations in gene dosage and alternative isoforms of core telomerase components have been described. Finally, telomerase localization,...

  12. Radiation regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The five main areas of radiation regulation considered are radiation exposure in the mining of uranium and other minerals, exposure in the use of uranium in nuclear reactors, risks in the transport of radioactive materials and hazards associated with the disposal of used materials. In Australia these problems are regulated by mines departments, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and radiation control branches in state health departments. Each of these instutional areas of regulation is examined

  13. Allosteric inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase a by the potential antidiabetic drug 3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbo xylate.

    OpenAIRE

    Oikonomakos, N. G.; Tsitsanou, K. E.; Zographos, S. E.; Skamnaki, V. T.; Goldmann, S.; Bischoff, H

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the potential antidiabetic drug (-)(S)-3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbox ylate (W1807) on the catalytic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase a has been studied. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is an allosteric enzyme whose activity is primarily controlled by reversible phosphorylation of Ser14 of the dephosphorylated enzyme (GPb, less active, predominantly T-state) to form the phosphorylated enzyme (GPa, more active, ...

  14. A novel role for central ACBP/DBI as a regulator of long-chain fatty acid metabolism in astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouyakdan, Khalil; Taïb, Bouchra; Budry, Lionel;

    2015-01-01

    Diazepam-Binding Inhibitor, a secreted peptide acting as an allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor. However, its role in central LCFA metabolism remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated ACBP cellular expression, ACBP regulation of LCFA intracellular metabolism, FA profile, and FA......Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that binds intracellular acyl-CoA esters. Several studies have suggested that ACBP acts as an acyl-CoA pool former and regulates long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) metabolism in peripheral tissues. In the brain, ACBP is known as...... response to palmitate in hypothalamic astrocytes. Collectively, these findings reveal for the first time that central ACBP acts as a regulator of LCFA intracellular metabolism in astrocytes. Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) or diazepam-binding inhibitor is a secreted peptide acting centrally as a GABAA...

  15. An allosteric enhancer of M4muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar;

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M4 acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M4 receptors could be...

  16. Cocaine self-administration differentially affects allosteric A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interactions in the striatum. Relevance for cocaine use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintsuk, Julia; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Pomierny, Bartosz; Wydra, Karolina; Zaniewska, Magdalena; Filip, Malgorzata; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-05-01

    In the current study behavioral and biochemical experiments were performed to study changes in the allosteric A2AR-D2R interactions in the ventral and dorsal striatum after cocaine self-administration versus corresponding yoked saline control. By using ex vivo [(3)H]-raclopride/quinpirole competition experiments, the effects of the A2AR agonist CGS 21680 (100nM) on the KiH and KiL values of the D2-like receptor (D2-likeR) were determined. One major result was a significant reduction in the D2-likeR agonist high affinity state observed with CGS 21680 after cocaine self-administration in the ventral striatum compared with the yoked saline group. The results therefore support the hypothesis that A2AR agonists can at least in part counteract the motivational actions of cocaine. This action is mediated via the D2-likeR by targeting the A2AR protomer of A2AR-D2-likeR heteroreceptor complexes in the ventral striatum, which leads to the reduction of D2-likeR protomer recognition through the allosteric receptor-receptor interaction. In contrast, in the dorsal striatum the CGS 21680-induced antagonistic modulation in the D2-likeR agonist high affinity state was abolished after cocaine self-administration versus the yoked saline group probably due to a local dysfunction/disruption of the A2AR-D2-likeR heteroreceptor complexes. Such a change in the dorsal striatum in cocaine self-administration can contribute to the development of either locomotor sensitization, habit-forming learning and/or the compulsive drug seeking by enhanced D2-likeR protomer signaling. Potential differences in the composition and stoichiometry of the A2AR-D2R heteroreceptor complexes, including differential recruitment of sigma 1 receptor, in the ventral and dorsal striatum may explain the differential regional changes observed in the A2A-D2-likeR interactions after cocaine self-administration. PMID:26987369

  17. Development of a highly selective allosteric antagonist radioligand for the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor and elucidation of its molecular basis of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maoqing; Vattelana, Ashton M; Lam, Polo C-H; Orry, Andrew J; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Haines, David R; Miller, Laurence J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of ligand binding to receptors provides insights useful for rational drug design. This work describes development of a new antagonist radioligand of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R), (2-fluorophenyl)-2,3-dihydro-3-[(3-isoquinolinylcarbonyl)amino]-6-methoxy-2-oxo-l-H-indole-3-propanoate (T-0632), and exploration of the molecular basis of its binding. This radioligand bound specifically with high affinity within an allosteric pocket of CCK1R. T-0632 fully inhibited binding and action of CCK at this receptor, while exhibiting no saturable binding to the closely related type 2 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK2R). Chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs were used to explore the molecular basis of T-0632 binding. Exchanging exonic regions revealed the functional importance of CCK1R exon 3, extending from the bottom of transmembrane segment (TM) 3 to the top of TM5, including portions of the intramembranous pocket as well as the second extracellular loop region (ECL2). However, CCK1R mutants in which each residue facing the pocket was changed to that present in CCK2R had no negative impact on T-0632 binding. Extending the chimeric approach to ECL2 established the importance of its C-terminal region, and site-directed mutagenesis of each nonconserved residue in this region revealed the importance of Ser(208) at the top of TM5. A molecular model of T-0632-occupied CCK1R was consistent with these experimental determinants, also identifying Met(121) in TM3 and Arg(336) in TM6 as important. Although these residues are conserved in CCK2R, mutating them had a distinct impact on the two closely related receptors, suggesting differential orientation. This establishes the molecular basis of binding of a highly selective nonpeptidyl allosteric antagonist of CCK1R, illustrating differences in docking that extend beyond determinants attributable to distinct residues lining the intramembranous pocket in the two receptor subtypes. PMID:25319540

  18. Computational fragment-based drug design to explore the hydrophobic sub-pocket of the mitotic kinesin Eg5 allosteric binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguievetskaia, Ksenia; Martin-Chanas, Laetitia; Vorotyntsev, Artem; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Brotel, Xavier; Adcock, Stewart A; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Delfaud, Francois; Moriaud, Fabrice

    2009-08-01

    Eg5, a mitotic kinesin exclusively involved in the formation and function of the mitotic spindle has attracted interest as an anticancer drug target. Eg5 is co-crystallized with several inhibitors bound to its allosteric binding pocket. Each of these occupies a pocket formed by loop 5/helix alpha2 (L5/alpha2). Recently designed inhibitors additionally occupy a hydrophobic pocket of this site. The goal of the present study was to explore this hydrophobic pocket with our MED-SuMo fragment-based protocol, and thus discover novel chemical structures that might bind as inhibitors. The MED-SuMo software is able to compare and superimpose similar interaction surfaces upon the whole protein data bank (PDB). In a fragment-based protocol, MED-SuMo retrieves MED-Portions that encode protein-fragment binding sites and are derived from cross-mining protein-ligand structures with libraries of small molecules. Furthermore we have excluded intra-family MED-Portions derived from Eg5 ligands that occupy the hydrophobic pocket and predicted new potential ligands by hybridization that would fill simultaneously both pockets. Some of the latter having original scaffolds and substituents in the hydrophobic pocket are identified in libraries of synthetically accessible molecules by the MED-Search software. PMID:19533373

  19. Interplay between Structure and Charge as a Key to Allosteric Modulation of Human 20S Proteasome by the Basic Fragment of HIV-1 Tat Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Karpowicz

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a giant protease responsible for degradation of the majority of cytosolic proteins. Competitive inhibitors of the proteasome are used against aggressive blood cancers. However, broadening the use of proteasome-targeting drugs requires new mechanistic approaches to the enzyme's inhibition. In our previous studies we described Tat1 peptide, an allosteric inhibitor of the proteasome derived from a fragment of the basic domain of HIV-Tat1 protein. Here, we attempted to dissect the structural determinants of the proteasome inhibition by Tat1. Single- and multiple- alanine walking scans were performed. Tat1 analogs with stabilized beta-turn conformation at positions 4-5 and 8-9, pointed out by the molecular dynamics modeling and the alanine scan, were synthesized. Structure of Tat1 analogs were analyzed by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies, supplemented by molecular dynamics simulations. Biological activity tests and structural studies revealed that high flexibility and exposed positive charge are hallmarks of Tat1 peptide. Interestingly, stabilization of a beta-turn at the 8-9 position was necessary to significantly improve the inhibitory potency.

  20. Direct and allosteric inhibition of the FGF2/HSPGs/FGFR1 ternary complex formation by an antiangiogenic, thrombospondin-1-mimic small molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiuscia Pagano

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs are recognized targets for the development of therapies against angiogenesis-driven diseases, including cancer. The formation of a ternary complex with the transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs, and heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs is required for FGF2 pro-angiogenic activity. Here by using a combination of techniques including Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Molecular Dynamics, Surface Plasmon Resonance and cell-based binding assays we clarify the molecular mechanism of inhibition of an angiostatic small molecule, sm27, mimicking the endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis, thrombospondin-1. NMR and MD data demonstrate that sm27 engages the heparin-binding site of FGF2 and induces long-range dynamics perturbations along FGF2/FGFR1 interface regions. The functional consequence of the inhibitor binding is an impaired FGF2 interaction with both its receptors, as demonstrated by SPR and cell-based binding assays. We propose that sm27 antiangiogenic activity is based on a twofold-direct and allosteric-mechanism, inhibiting FGF2 binding to both its receptors.

  1. The S-enantiomer of R,S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism. Comparison with other serotonin transporter inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads Breum; Sánchez, Connie;

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  2. The S-enantiomer of R, S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads; Sanchez, Connie;

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  3. Effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 positive allosteric modulator CDPPB on rats tested with the paired associates learning task in touchscreen-equipped operant conditioning chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Brittney R; Howland, John G

    2016-03-15

    Effective treatments for the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia are critically needed. Positive allosteric modulation (PAM) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) is one strategy currently under investigation to improve these symptoms. Examining cognition using touchscreen-equipped operant chambers may increase translation between preclinical and clinical research through analogous behavioral testing paradigms in rodents and humans. We used acute CDPPB (1-30mg/kg) treatment to examine the effects of mGluR5 PAM in the touchscreen paired associates learning (PAL) task using well-trained rats with and without co-administration of acute MK-801 (0.15mg/kg). CDPPB had no consistent effects on task performance when administered alone and failed to reverse the MK-801 induced impairments at any of the examined doses. Overall, the disruptive effects of MK-801 on PAL were consistent with previous research but increasing mGluR5 signaling is not beneficial in the PAL task. Future research should test whether administration of CDPPB during PAL acquisition increases performance. PMID:26721467

  4. NMR Mapping of the IFNAR1-EC binding site on IFNα2 reveals allosteric changes in the IFNAR2-EC binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akabayov, Sabine Ruth; Biron, Zohar; Lamken, Peter; Piehler, Jacob; Anglister, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    All type I interferons (IFNs) bind to a common cell-surface receptor consisting of two subunits. IFNs initiate intracellular signal transduction cascades by simultaneous interaction with the extracellular domains of its receptor subunits IFNAR1 and IFNAR2. In this study we mapped the surface of IFNα2 interacting with the extracellular domain of IFNAR1 (IFNAR1-EC) by following changes in or the disappearance of the [1H,15N]-TROSY-HSQC cross peaks of IFNα2 caused by the binding of the extracellular domain of IFNAR1 (IFNAR1-EC) to the binary complex of IFNα2 with IFNAR2-EC. The NMR study on the 89 kDa complex was conducted at pH 8 and 308 K using an 800 MHz spectrometer. IFNAR1 binding affected a total of 47 out of 165 IFNα2 residues contained in two large patches on the face of the protein opposing the binding site for IFNAR2 and in a third patch located on the face containing the IFNAR2 binding site. The first two patches form the IFNAR1 binding site and one of these matches the IFNAR1 binding site previously identified by site-directed mutagenesis. The third patch partially matches the IFNα2 binding site for IFNAR2-EC indicating allosteric communication between the binding sites for the two receptor subunits. PMID:20047337

  5. NOISE REGULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Voican; Constantin Stanescu

    2012-01-01

    Noise regulation includes statutes or guidelines relating to sound transmission established by national, state or provincial and municipal levels of government. After the watershed passage of the United States Noise Control Act of 1972, other local and state governments passed further regulations. Although the UK and Japan enacted national laws in 1960 and 1967 respectively, these laws were not at all comprehensive or fully enforceable as to address generally rising ambient noise, enforceable...

  6. NORM regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  7. AlloRep: A Repository of Sequence, Structural and Mutagenesis Data for the LacI/GalR Transcription Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Filipa L; Parente, Daniel J; Shis, David L; Hessman, Jacob A; Chazelle, Allen; Bennett, Matthew R; Teichmann, Sarah A; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2016-02-22

    Protein families evolve functional variation by accumulating point mutations at functionally important amino acid positions. Homologs in the LacI/GalR family of transcription regulators have evolved to bind diverse DNA sequences and allosteric regulatory molecules. In addition to playing key roles in bacterial metabolism, these proteins have been widely used as a model family for benchmarking structural and functional prediction algorithms. We have collected manually curated sequence alignments for >3000 sequences, in vivo phenotypic and biochemical data for >5750 LacI/GalR mutational variants, and noncovalent residue contact networks for 65 LacI/GalR homolog structures. Using this rich data resource, we compared the noncovalent residue contact networks of the LacI/GalR subfamilies to design and experimentally validate an allosteric mutant of a synthetic LacI/GalR repressor for use in biotechnology. The AlloRep database (freely available at www.AlloRep.org) is a key resource for future evolutionary studies of LacI/GalR homologs and for benchmarking computational predictions of functional change. PMID:26410588

  8. Differential effects of CSF-1R D802V and KIT D816V homologous mutations on receptor tertiary structure and allosteric communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes

    Full Text Available The colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R and the stem cell factor receptor KIT, type III receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, are important mediators of signal transduction. The normal functions of these receptors can be compromised by gain-of-function mutations associated with different physiopatological impacts. Whereas KIT D816V/H mutation is a well-characterized oncogenic event and principal cause of systemic mastocytosis, the homologous CSF-1R D802V has not been identified in human cancers. The KIT D816V oncogenic mutation triggers resistance to the RTK inhibitor Imatinib used as first line treatment against chronic myeloid leukemia and gastrointestinal tumors. CSF-1R is also sensitive to Imatinib and this sensitivity is altered by mutation D802V. Previous in silico characterization of the D816V mutation in KIT evidenced that the mutation caused a structure reorganization of the juxtamembrane region (JMR and facilitated its departure from the kinase domain (KD. In this study, we showed that the equivalent CSF-1R D802V mutation does not promote such structural effects on the JMR despite of a reduction on some key H-bonds interactions controlling the JMR binding to the KD. In addition, this mutation disrupts the allosteric communication between two essential regulatory fragments of the receptors, the JMR and the A-loop. Nevertheless, the mutation-induced shift towards an active conformation observed in KIT D816V is not observed in CSF-1R D802V. The distinct impact of equivalent mutation in two homologous RTKs could be associated with the sequence difference between both receptors in the native form, particularly in the JMR region. A local mutation-induced perturbation on the A-loop structure observed in both receptors indicates the stabilization of an inactive non-inhibited form, which Imatinib cannot bind.

  9. The qEEG Signature of Selective NMDA NR2B Negative Allosteric Modulators; A Potential Translational Biomarker for Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keavy, Deborah; Bristow, Linda J; Sivarao, Digavalli V; Batchelder, Margaret; King, Dalton; Thangathirupathy, Srinivasan; Macor, John E; Weed, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The antidepressant activity of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel blocker, ketamine, has led to the investigation of negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) selective for the NR2B receptor subtype. The clinical development of NR2B NAMs would benefit from a translational pharmacodynamic biomarker that demonstrates brain penetration and functional inhibition of NR2B receptors in preclinical species and humans. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) is a translational measure that can be used to demonstrate pharmacodynamic effects across species. NMDA receptor channel blockers, such as ketamine and phencyclidine, increase the EEG gamma power band, which has been used as a pharmacodynamic biomarker in the development of NMDA receptor antagonists. However, detailed qEEG studies with ketamine or NR2B NAMs are lacking in nonhuman primates. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects on the qEEG power spectra of the NR2B NAMs traxoprodil (CP-101,606) and BMT-108908 in nonhuman primates, and to compare them to the NMDA receptor channel blockers, ketamine and lanicemine. Cynomolgus monkeys were surgically implanted with EEG radio-telemetry transmitters, and qEEG was measured after vehicle or drug administration. The relative power for a number of frequency bands was determined. Ketamine and lanicemine increased relative gamma power, whereas the NR2B NAMs traxoprodil and BMT-108908 had no effect. Robust decreases in beta power were elicited by ketamine, traxoprodil and BMT-108908; and these agents also produced decreases in alpha power and increases in delta power at the doses tested. These results suggest that measurement of power spectra in the beta and delta bands may represent a translational pharmacodynamic biomarker to demonstrate functional effects of NR2B NAMs. The results of these studies may help guide the selection of qEEG measures that can be incorporated into early clinical evaluation of NR2B NAMs in healthy humans. PMID:27035340

  10. Negative Allosteric Modulation of the mGluR5 Receptor Reduces Repetitive Behaviors and Rescues Social Deficits in Mouse Models of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jill L.; Smith, Daniel G.; Sukoff Rizzo, Stacey J.; Karras, Michael N.; Turner, Sarah M.; Tolu, Seda S.; Bryce, Dianne K.; Smith, Deborah L.; Fonseca, Kari; Ring, Robert H.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and fragile X syndrome were long thought to be medically untreatable, on the assumption that brain dysfunctions were immutably hardwired before diagnosis. Recent revelations that many cases of autism are caused by mutations in genes that control the ongoing formation and maturation of synapses have challenged this dogma. Antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5), which modulate excitatory neurotransmission, are in clinical trials for fragile X syndrome, a major genetic cause of intellectual disabilities. About 30% of patients with fragile X syndrome meet the diagnostic criteria for autism. Reasoning by analogy, we considered the mGluR5 receptor as a potential target for intervention in autism. We used BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) mice, an established model with robust behavioral phenotypes relevant to the three diagnostic behavioral symptoms of autism—unusual social interactions, impaired communication, and repetitive behaviors—to probe the efficacy of a selective negative allosteric modulator of the mGluR5 receptor, GRN-529. GRN-529 reduced repetitive behaviors in three cohorts of BTBR mice at doses that did not induce sedation in control assays of open field locomotion. In addition, the same nonsedating doses reduced the spontaneous stereotyped jumping that characterizes a second inbred strain of mice, C58/J. Further, GRN-529 partially reversed the striking lack of sociability in BTBR mice on some parameters of social approach and reciprocal social interactions. These findings raise the possibility that a single targeted pharmacological intervention may alleviate multiple diagnostic behavioral symptoms of autism. PMID:22539775

  11. Efficacy and safety of an adjunctive mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulator to a SSRI/SNRI in anxious depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Justine M; Daly, Ella; Kezic, Iva; Lane, Rosanne; Lim, Pilar; De Smedt, Heidi; De Boer, Peter; Van Nueten, Luc; Drevets, Wayne C; Ceusters, Marc

    2016-06-01

    This phase 2a, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, proof-of-concept study was designed to evaluate, efficacy, safety and tolerability of JNJ-40411813/ADX71149, a novel metabotropic glutamate 2 receptor positive allosteric modulator as an adjunctive treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) with significant anxiety symptoms. Eligible patients (18-64years) had a DSM-IV diagnosis of MDD, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HDRS17) score of ≥18, HDRS17 anxiety/somatization factor score of ≥7, and an insufficient response to current treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. The doubly-randomized, 8-week double-blind treatment phase was comprised of two 4-week periods, from which a combined test statistic was generated, with pre-determined weights assigned to each of the 2 treatment periods. Period 1: patients (n=121) were randomly assigned (1:1) to JNJ-40411813 (n=62; 50mg to 150mg b.i.d, flexibly dosed) or placebo (n=59); Period 2: placebo-treated patients (n=22) who continued to meet entry severity criteria were re-randomized (1:1) to JNJ-40411813 or placebo, while other patients underwent sham re-randomization and continued on their same treatment. Of 121 randomized patients, 100 patients (82.6%) were completers. No efficacy signal was detected on the primary endpoint, the 6-item Hamilton Anxiety Subscale (HAM-A6, p=0.51). Efficacy signals (based on prespecified 1-sided pIDS-C30]) and anxiety (HDRS17 anxiety/somatization factor, IDS-C30 anxiety subscale). Although well-tolerated, the results do not suggest efficacy for JNJ-40411813 as an adjunctive treatment for patients with MDD with significant anxious symptoms in the dose range studied. PMID:26804646

  12. Antidepressant activity in mice elicited by 3-furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide, a positive allosteric modulator of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Feuerbach, Dominik; Biala, Grazyna; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Arias, Hugo R

    2014-05-21

    The objective of the current study is to determine whether 3-furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide (PAM-2), a positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic receptors (AChRs), produces antidepressant-like behavior in mice, and reactivates desensitized α7 AChRs expressed in CH3-α7 cells. Mice from both sexes were injected (i.p.) with PAM-2 (1.0mg/kg) on a daily basis for three weeks. Forced swim tests (FSTs) were performed on Day 1 and Day 7 to determine the acute and subchronic effects of PAM-2, respectively, and on Days 14 and 21 to determine its chronic activity. To examine the residual effects after drug treatment, a withdrawal period of two more weeks was continued with FSTs performed on Day 28 and 35. Our results indicate that: (1) PAM-2 does not induce acute antidepressant effects in male or female mice, (2) PAM-2 induces antidepressant effects in mice from both sexes after one (subchronic) and two (chronic) weeks, whereas at the third week (chronic), the antidepressant effect is decreased in male and increased in female mice. Since PAM-2 does not influence the locomotor activity of mice, the observed antidepressant activity is not driven by nonspecific motor-stimulant actions, (3) the residual antidepressant effect mediated by PAM-2 after one week of treatment cessation is observed only in female mice, and finally the Ca(2+) influx results indicate that (4) PAM-2 can reactivate desensitized α7 AChRs. Our results clearly indicate that PAM-2 elicits antidepressant activity, probably by enhancing the activity of the endogenous neurotransmitter acetylcholine on α7 AChRs, without inducing receptor desensitization, and that this activity is gender-dependent. This is the first time that an antidepressant activity is described for an α7 PAM, supporting further studies as potential therapeutic medications for depressive states. PMID:24708923

  13. Escherichia coli DnaB Helicase–DnaC Protein Complex: Allosteric Effects of the Nucleotides on the Nucleic Acid Binding and the Kinetic Mechanism of NTP Hydrolysis. 3†

    OpenAIRE

    Roychowdhury, Anasuya; Szymanski, Michal R.; Jezewska, Maria J.; Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz

    2009-01-01

    Allosteric interactions between the DNA- and NTP-binding sites of the Escherichia coli DnaB helicase engaged in the DnaB–DnaC complex and the mechanism of NTP hydrolysis by the complex have been examined using the fluorescence titration, analytical ultracentrifugation, and rapid quench-flow technique. Surprisingly, the ssDNA affinity of the DnaB–DnaC complex is independent of the structure of the phosphate group of the cofactor bound to the helicase. Thus, the DnaC protein eliminates the anta...

  14. The mGluR2 Positive Allosteric Modulator BINA Decreases Cocaine Self-Administration and Cue-Induced Cocaine-Seeking and Counteracts Cocaine-Induced Enhancement of Brain Reward Function in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xinchun; Semenova, Svetlana; Yang, Li; Ardecky, Robert; Sheffler, Douglas J.; Dahl, Russell; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Cosford, Nicholas DP; Markou, Athina

    2010-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 (mGluR2/3) agonists were shown previously to nonselectively decrease both cocaine- and food-maintained responding in rats. mGluR2 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) may represent improved therapeutic compounds because of their modulatory properties and higher selectivity for mGluR2. We analyzed the effects of the selective, brain penetrant, and systemically active mGluR2 PAM potassium 3′-([(2-cyclopentyl-6-7-dimethyl-1-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-5-yl)oxy]m...

  15. Crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum Aspartate kinase (CaAK): An important allosteric enzyme for amino acids production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Chance, Mark R; Burley, Stephen K; Panjikar, Santosh; Almo, Steven C

    2014-09-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK) is an enzyme which is tightly regulated through feedback control and responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate. This intermediate step is at an important branch point where one path leads to the synthesis of lysine and the other to threonine, methionine and isoleucine. Concerted feedback inhibition of AK is mediated by threonine and lysine and varies between the species. The crystal structure of biotechnologically important Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAK; E.C. 2.7.2.4; Mw=48,030Da; 437aa; SwissProt: Q97MC0) has been determined to 3Å resolution. CaAK acquires a protein fold similar to the other known structures of AKs despite the low sequence identity (Clostridium tetani (64% sequence identity) suggesting the potential of the structure solved here to be applied for modeling drug interactions. CaAK structure may serve as a guide to better understand and engineer lysine biosynthesis for the biotechnology industry. PMID:25170437

  16. Crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAk: An important allosteric enzyme for amino acids production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu A. Manjasetty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspartate kinase (AK is an enzyme which is tightly regulated through feedback control and responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-l-aspartate from l-aspartate. This intermediate step is at an important branch point where one path leads to the synthesis of lysine and the other to threonine, methionine and isoleucine. Concerted feedback inhibition of AK is mediated by threonine and lysine and varies between the species. The crystal structure of biotechnologically important Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAK; E.C. 2.7.2.4; Mw = 48,030 Da; 437aa; SwissProt: Q97MC0 has been determined to 3 Å resolution. CaAK acquires a protein fold similar to the other known structures of AKs despite the low sequence identity (<30%. It is composed of two domains: an N-terminal catalytic domain (kinase domain and a C-terminal regulatory domain further comprised of two small domains belonging to the ACT domain family. Pairwise comparison of 12 molecules in the asymmetric unit helped to identify the bending regions which are in the vicinity of ATP binding site involved in domain movements between the catalytic and regulatory domains. All 12 CaAK molecules adopt fully open T-state conformation leading to the formation of three tetramers unique among other similar AK structures. On the basis of comparative structural analysis, we discuss tetramer formation based on the large conformational changes in the catalytic domain associated with the lysine binding at the regulatory domains. The structure described herein is homologous to a target in wide-spread pathogenic (toxin producing bacteria such as Clostridium tetani (64% sequence identity suggesting the potential of the structure solved here to be applied for modeling drug interactions. CaAK structure may serve as a guide to better understand and engineer lysine biosynthesis for the biotechnology industry.

  17. RegulatING chromatin regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satpathy, Shankha; Nabbi, Arash; Riabowol, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The five human ING genes encode at least 15 splicing isoforms, most of which affect cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis through their ability to alter gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms. Since their discovery in 1996, ING proteins have been classified as type II tumour suppressors on...... the basis of reports describing their down-regulation and mislocalization in a variety of cancer types. In addition to their regulation by transcriptional mechanisms, understanding the range of PTMs (post-translational modifications) of INGs is important in understanding how ING functions are fine...... stresses. We also describe the ING PTMs that have been identified by several unbiased MS-based PTM enrichment techniques and subsequent proteomic analysis. Among the ING PTMs identified to date, a subset has been characterized for their biological significance and have been shown to affect processes...

  18. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Fischer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077: IC50 = 134 nM whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135: LLE = 2.91.

  19. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91). PMID:26938528

  20. Discovery of 3-benzyl-1,3-benzoxazine-2,4-dione analogues as allosteric mitogen-activated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitors and anti-enterovirus 71 (EV71) agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Niu, Yan; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hao; Xie, Bingyu; Xu, Fengrong; Jin, Hongwei; Peng, Yihong; Liang, Lei; Xu, Ping

    2016-08-15

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a kind of RNA virus and one of the two causes of Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Inhibitors that target key components of Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in host cells could impair replication of EV71. A series of 3-benzyl-1,3-benzoxazine-2,4-diones were designed from a specific MEK inhibitor G8935, by replacing the double bond between C3 and C4 within the coumarin scaffold with amide bond. One compound (9f) showed submicromolar inhibitory activity among the 12 derivatives. Further optimization on 9f led to two active compounds (9k and 9m) with nanomolar bioactivities (55nM and 60nM). The results of enzymatic assays also demonstrated that this series of compounds were allosteric inhibitors of unphosphorylated MEK1. The binding mode of compound 9k was predicted by molecular dynamic simulation and the key interactions were same as published MEK1/2 allosteric inhibitors. In the cell-based assays, compounds 9k and 9m could effectively suppress the ERK1/2 pathway, expression of EV71 VP1, and EV71 induced cytopathic effect (CPE) in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells. PMID:27288186

  1. Nuclear regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, 112 nuclear power plants, 22 facilities that support these plants, 54 reactors used in research, and approximately 23,000 organizations hold licenses from either the Nuclear Regulator Commission or various states to use radioactive material; other facilities are operated by various government agencies. Eventually most of these facilities will be decommissioned, which involves removing the radioactive material and terminating the license. NRC needs to ensure that licensees appropriately decontaminate their facilities because, under current regulations, NRC cannot specifically require additional cleanup once it terminates a license. This paper presents a GAO report on NRC's decommissioning procedures. In two of eight cases GAO reviewed, NRC fully or partially released sites for unrestricted use where radioactive contamination was higher than its guidelines allowed; in the other cases, NRC's information was inadequate or incomplete. Further, NRC lacks information on the types and amounts of radioactive waste buried on-site. At five sites reviewed by GAO, groundwater has been found to be contaminated by radioactive waste

  2. A Novel α2/α4 Subtype-selective Positive Allosteric Modulator of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Acting from the C-tail of an α Subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Jin, Zhuang; Norleans, Jack; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-11-27

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are important therapeutic candidates as well as valuable research tools. We identified a novel type II PAM, (R)-7-bromo-N-(piperidin-3-yl)benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamide (Br-PBTC), which both increases activation and reactivates desensitized nAChRs. This compound increases acetylcholine-evoked responses of α2* and α4* nAChRs but is without effect on α3* or α6* nAChRs (* indicates the presence of other nAChR subunits). Br-BPTC acts from the C-terminal extracellular sequences of α4 subunits, which is also a PAM site for steroid hormone estrogens such as 17β-estradiol. Br-PBTC is much more potent than estrogens. Like 17β-estradiol, the non-steroid Br-PBTC only requires one α4 subunit to potentiate nAChR function, and its potentiation is stronger with more α4 subunits. This feature enables Br-BPTC to potentiate activation of (α4β2)(α6β2)β3 but not (α6β2)2β3 nAChRs. Therefore, this compound is potentially useful in vivo for determining functions of different α6* nAChR subtypes. Besides activation, Br-BPTC affects desensitization of nAChRs induced by sustained exposure to agonists. After minutes of exposure to agonists, Br-PBTC reactivated short term desensitized nAChRs that have at least two α4 subunits but not those with only one. Three α4 subunits were required for Br-BPTC to reactivate long term desensitized nAChRs. These data suggest that higher PAM occupancy promotes channel opening more efficiently and overcomes short and long term desensitization. This C-terminal extracellular domain could be a target for developing subtype or state-selective drugs for nAChRs. PMID:26432642

  3. An acetylcholine alpha7 positive allosteric modulator rescues a schizophrenia-associated brain endophenotype in the 15q13.3 microdeletion, encompassing CHRNA7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Natalia; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Sartorius, Alexander; Becker, Robert; Didriksen, Michael; Stensbøl, Tine Bryan; Bastlund, Jesper Frank; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Schwarz, Adam J

    2016-07-01

    The 15q13.3 microdeletion copy number variation is strongly associated with schizophrenia and epilepsy. The CHRNA7 gene, encoding nicotinic acetylcholine alpha 7 receptors (nAChA7Rs), is hypothesized to be one of the main genes in this deletion causing the neuropsychiatric phenotype. Here we used a recently developed 15q13.3 microdeletion mouse model to explore whether an established schizophrenia-associated connectivity phenotype is replicated in a murine model, and whether positive modulation of nAChA7 receptor might pharmacologically normalize the connectivity patterns. Resting-state fMRI data were acquired from male mice carrying a hemizygous 15q13.3 microdeletion (N=9) and from wild-type mice (N=9). To study the connectivity profile of 15q13.3 mice and test the effect of nAChA7 positive allosteric modulation, the 15q13.3 mice underwent two imaging sessions, one week apart, receiving a single intraperitoneal injection of either 15mg/kg Lu AF58801 or saline. The control group comprised wild-type mice treated with saline. We performed seed-based functional connectivity analysis to delineate aberrant connectivity patterns associated with the deletion (15q13.3 mice (saline treatment) versus wild-type mice (saline treatment)) and their modulation by Lu AF58801 (15q13.3 mice (Lu AF58801 treatment) versus 15q13.3 mice (saline treatment)). Compared to wild-type mice, 15q13.3 mice evidenced a predominant hyperconnectivity pattern. The main effect of Lu AF58801 was a normalization of elevated functional connectivity between prefrontal and frontal, hippocampal, striatal, thalamic and auditory regions. The strongest effects were observed in brain regions expressing nAChA7Rs, namely hippocampus, cerebral cortex and thalamus. These effects may underlie the antiepileptic, pro-cognitive and auditory gating deficit-reversal effects of nAChA7R stimulation. PMID:27061851

  4. Apo-ghrelin receptor (apo-GHSR1a Regulates Dopamine Signaling in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras eKern

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The orexigenic peptide hormone ghrelin is synthesized in the stomach and its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a is expressed mainly in the central nervous system (CNS. In this review we confine our discussion to the physiological role of GHSR1a in the brain. Paradoxically, despite broad expression of GHSR1a in the CNS, other than trace amounts in the hypothalamus, ghrelin is undetectable in the brain. In our efforts to elucidate the function of the ligand-free ghrelin receptor (apo-GHSR1a we identified subsets of neurons that co-express GHSR1a and dopamine receptors. In this review we focus on interactions between apo-GHSR1a and dopamine-2 receptor (DRD2 and formation of GHSR1a:DRD2 heteromers in hypothalamic neurons that regulate appetite, and discuss implications for the treatment of Prader-Willi syndrome. GHSR1a antagonists of distinct chemical structures, a quinazolinone and a triazole, respectively enhance and inhibit dopamine signaling through GHSR1a:DRD2 heteromers by an allosteric mechanism. This finding illustrates a potential strategy for designing the next generation of drugs for treating eating disorders as well as psychiatric disorders caused by abnormal dopamine signaling. Treatment with a GHSR1a antagonist that enhances dopamine/DRD2 activity in GHSR1a:DRD2 expressing hypothalamic neurons has the potential to inhibit the uncontrollable hyperphagia associated with Prader-Willi syndrome. DRD2 antagonists are prescribed for treating schizophrenia, but these block dopamine signaling in all DRD2 expressing neurons and are associated with adverse side effects, including enhanced appetite and excessive weight gain. A GHSR1a antagonist of structural class that allosterically blocks dopamine/DRD2 action in GHSR1a:DRD2 expressing neurons would have no effect on neurons expressing DRD2 alone; therefore, the side effects of DRD2 antagonists would potentially be reduced thereby enhancing patient compliance.

  5. Regulation of Differentiation by Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Normal and Tumoral Developing Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; García, Marta; Rodríguez-Hernández, Carlos J.; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    During normal development of the nervous system (NS), neural progenitor cells (NPCs) produce specialized populations of neurons and glial cells upon cell fate restriction and terminal differentiation. These sequential processes require the dynamic regulation of thousands of genes. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is temporally and spatially regulated in both neurons and glial cells during development of the NS. In particular, CaSR expression and function have been shown to play a significant role during differentiation of NPCs toward the oligodendrocyte lineage and also in maturation of cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs). Moreover, CaSR regulates axonal and dendritic growth in both central and peripheral nervous systems (PNSs), a process necessary for proper construction of mature neuronal networks. On the other hand, several lines of evidence support a role for CaSR in promotion of cell differentiation and inhibition of proliferation in neuroblastoma, a tumor arising from precursor cells of developing PNS. Thus, among the variety of NS functions in which the CaSR participates, this mini-review focuses on its role in differentiation of normal and tumoral cells. Current knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for CaSR regulation and function in these contexts is also discussed, together with the therapeutic opportunities provided by CaSR allosteric modulators.

  6. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  7. Role of Ser102 and Ser104 as Regulators of cGMP Hydrolysis by PDE5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carøe Nordgaard, Julie; Kruse, Lars Schack; Gammeltoft, Steen; Kruuse, Christina

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) cleave phosphodiester bonds in cyclic nucleotides and play diverse roles in cell biology. PDE5A is a cytoplasmic phosphodiesterase which specifically degrades cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a cell signaling molecule that plays important roles in...... quantified in cell extracts by standard in vitro assay using [3H] cGMP. RESULTS: The intracellular distribution of wild-type, single and double mutant PDE5A was similar and was not altered by exposure to sildenafil, cilostazol, glyceryl trinitrate, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or sumatriptan. PDE5...... doublet. INTERPRETATION: Ser102 and Ser104 may influence the conformational flexibility of PDE5A, which may in turn influence phosphorylation status, allosteric regulation by cGMP or other as yet unknown regulatory mechanisms for PDE5A. PDE5A activation could be important in reversal of migraine...

  8. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Bilal; Dağliyan, Onur; Dağyildiz, Ezgi; Bariş, İbrahim; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Kizilel, Seda; Türkay, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is an allosteric Zn+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. Conclusion/Significance This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible. PMID:22355395

  9. Structure based discovery of small molecules to regulate the activity of human insulin degrading enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Çakir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is an allosteric Zn(+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible.

  10. Genes, enzymes and regulation of arginine biosynthesis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Robert D

    2005-08-01

    Arabidopsis genes encoding enzymes for each of the eight steps in L-arginine (Arg) synthesis were identified, based upon sequence homologies with orthologs from other organisms. Except for N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS; EC 2.3.1.1), which is encoded by two genes, all remaining enzymes are encoded by single genes. Targeting predictions for these enzymes, based upon their deduced sequences, and subcellular fractionation studies, suggest that most enzymes of Arg synthesis reside within the plastid. Synthesis of the L-ornthine (Orn) intermediate in this pathway from L-glutamate occurs as a series of acetylated intermediates, as in most other organisms. An N-acetylornithine:glutamate acetyltransferase (NAOGAcT; EC 2.3.1.35) facilitates recycling of the acetyl moiety during Orn formation (cyclic pathway). A putative N-acetylornithine deacetylase (NAOD; EC 3.5.1.16), which participates in the "linear" pathway for Orn synthesis in some organisms, was also identified. Previous biochemical studies have indicated that allosteric regulation of the first and, especially, the second steps in Orn synthesis (NAGS; N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK), EC 2.7.2.8) by the Arg end-product are the major sites of metabolic control of the pathway in organisms using the cyclic pathway. Gene expression profiling for pathway enzymes further suggests that NAGS, NAGK, NAOGAcT and NAOD are coordinately regulated in response to changes in Arg demand during plant growth and development. Synthesis of Arg from Orn is further coordinated with pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis, at the level of allocation of the common carbamoyl-P intermediate. PMID:16122935

  11. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  12. Cancer metabolism meets systems biology: Pyruvate kinase isoform PKM2 is a metabolic master regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian V Filipp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase activity is controlled by a tightly woven regulatory network. The oncofetal isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2 is a master regulator of cancer metabolism. PKM2 engages in parallel, feed-forward, positive and negative feedback control contributing to cancer progression. Besides its metabolic role, non-metabolic functions of PKM2 as protein kinase and transcriptional coactivator for c-MYC and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha are essential for epidermal growth factor receptor activation-induced tumorigenesis. These biochemical activities are controlled by a shift in the oligomeric state of PKM2 that includes acetylation, oxidation, phosphorylation, prolyl hydroxylation and sumoylation. Metabolically active PKM2 tetramer is allosterically regulated and responds to nutritional and stress signals. Metabolically inactive PKM2 dimer is imported into the nucleus and can function as protein kinase stimulating transcription. A systems biology approach to PKM2 at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome level reveals how differences in biomolecular structure translate into a global rewiring of cancer metabolism. Cancer systems biology takes us beyond the Warburg effect, opening unprecedented therapeutic opportunities.

  13. Regulations and instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulations and instructions for operating the RA reactor consist of the following chapters: general regulations with the fundamental RA reactor characteristics, operating regulations and instructions for the personnel on duty, regulations for accidental conditions, training program for the staff of the Laboratory for reactor operation

  14. Labeling by [3H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine of two high affinity binding sites in guinea pig brain: Evidence for allosteric regulation by calcium channel antagonists and pseudoallosteric modulation by sigma ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium binding studies with the sigma receptor ligand [3H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([3H]DTG) demonstrated two high affinity binding sites in membranes prepared from guinea pig brain. The apparent Kd values of DTG for sites 1 and 2 were 11.9 and 37.6 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 1045 and 1423 fmol/mg of protein. Site 1 had high affinity for (+)-pentazocine, haloperidol, (R)-(+)-PPP, carbepentane, and other sigma ligands, suggesting a similarity with the dextromethorphan/sigma 1 binding site described by Musacchio et al. [Life Sci. 45:1721-1732 (1989)]. Site 2 had high affinity for DTG and haloperidol (Ki = 36.1 nM) and low affinity for most other sigma ligands. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that [3H]DTG dissociated in a biphasic manner from both site 1 and site 2. DTG and haloperidol increased the dissociation rate of [3H]DTG from site 1 and site 2, demonstrating the presence of pseudoallosteric interactions. Inorganic calcium channel blockers such as Cd2+ selectively increased the dissociation rate of [3H]DTG from site 2, suggesting an association of this binding site with calcium channels

  15. Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulation of an α1β3γ2 γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor by Binding to a Site in the Transmembrane Domain at the γ+-β- Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, Selwyn S; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Savechenkov, Pavel Y; Chiara, David C; Desai, Rooma; Bruzik, Karol S; Miller, Keith W; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2015-09-18

    In the process of developing safer general anesthetics, isomers of anesthetic ethers and barbiturates have been discovered that act as convulsants and inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) rather than potentiators. It is unknown whether these convulsants act as negative allosteric modulators by binding to the intersubunit anesthetic-binding sites in the GABAAR transmembrane domain (Chiara, D. C., Jayakar, S. S., Zhou, X., Zhang, X., Savechenkov, P. Y., Bruzik, K. S., Miller, K. W., and Cohen, J. B. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 19343-19357) or to known convulsant sites in the ion channel or extracellular domains. Here, we show that S-1-methyl-5-propyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl) barbituric acid (S-mTFD-MPPB), a photoreactive analog of the convulsant barbiturate S-MPPB, inhibits α1β3γ2 but potentiates α1β3 GABAAR responses. In the α1β3γ2 GABAAR, S-mTFD-MPPB binds in the transmembrane domain with high affinity to the γ(+)-β(-) subunit interface site with negative energetic coupling to GABA binding in the extracellular domain at the β(+)-α(-) subunit interfaces. GABA inhibits S-[(3)H]mTFD-MPPB photolabeling of γ2Ser-280 (γM2-15') in this site. In contrast, within the same site GABA enhances photolabeling of β3Met-227 in βM1 by an anesthetic barbiturate, R-[(3)H]methyl-5-allyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (mTFD-MPAB), which differs from S-mTFD-MPPB in structure only by chirality and two hydrogens (propyl versus allyl). S-mTFD-MPPB and R-mTFD-MPAB are predicted to bind in different orientations at the γ(+)-β(-) site, based upon the distance in GABAAR homology models between γ2Ser-280 and β3Met-227. These results provide an explanation for S-mTFD-MPPB inhibition of α1β3γ2 GABAAR function and provide a first demonstration that an intersubunit-binding site in the GABAAR transmembrane domain binds negative and positive allosteric modulators. PMID:26229099

  16. Positive allosteric modulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid glutamate receptors differentially modulates the behavioural effects of citalopram in mouse models of antidepressant and anxiolytic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Ciarán M; Larsen, Maria; Madsen, Louise H; Caballero-Puntiverio, Maitane; Pickering, Darryl S; Clausen, Rasmus P; Andreasen, Jesper T

    2016-09-01

    Drugs that increase monoamine neurotransmission are effective in both anxiety and depression. The therapeutic effects of monoamine-based antidepressant drugs may involve indirect effects on neurotransmission through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid glutamate receptors (AMPAR). Thus, chronic antidepressant treatment increases AMPAR-mediated neurotransmission and AMPAR-positive allosteric modulators have shown antidepressant-like efficacy in rodents. Here, the effect of enhanced AMPAR neurotransmission on the antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like actions of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram (0-10 mg/kg) was investigated in mice using the AMPAR-positive allosteric modulator LY451646 (0-3 mg/kg). Antidepressant-like effects were assessed using the forced-swim test (FST), whereas anxiolytic-like effects were tested using the elevated zero maze (EZM) and the marble burying test. LY451646 (3 mg/kg) increased swim distance in the FST and a subactive dose of LY451646 (1 mg/kg) enhanced the effect of citalopram in the FST. In the EZM, LY451646 (3 mg/kg) did not show anxiogenic effects alone, but blocked the anxiolytic-like action of citalopram in the EZM, as reflected by an increase in the latency to enter the open areas and a decrease in the number of entries and time spent in the open areas in citalopram-treated mice. In the marble burying test, LY451646 (3 mg/kg) showed no effect alone, but significantly attenuated the anxiolytic-like effect of citalopram (1.25-2.5 mg/kg) by increasing the number of marbles buried in citalopram-treated mice. These results suggest that AMPAR neurotransmission plays opposite roles in anxiety and depression as AMPAR potentiation facilitated the antidepressant-like effects of citalopram while attenuating its anxiolytic-like effect. These findings have ramifications in the search for AMPAR-based novel anxiolytic and antidepressant treatments. PMID:27341500

  17. Regulating Rho GTPases and their regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Richard G; Ridley, Anne J

    2016-08-01

    Rho GTPases regulate cytoskeletal and cell adhesion dynamics and thereby coordinate a wide range of cellular processes, including cell migration, cell polarity and cell cycle progression. Most Rho GTPases cycle between a GTP-bound active conformation and a GDP-bound inactive conformation to regulate their ability to activate effector proteins and to elicit cellular responses. However, it has become apparent that Rho GTPases are regulated by post-translational modifications and the formation of specific protein complexes, in addition to GTP-GDP cycling. The canonical regulators of Rho GTPases - guanine nucleotide exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins and guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors - are regulated similarly, creating a complex network of interactions to determine the precise spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPases. PMID:27301673

  18. Domain organization, catalysis and regulation of eukaryotic cystathionine beta-synthases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Majtan

    Full Text Available Cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS is a key regulator of sulfur amino acid metabolism diverting homocysteine, a toxic intermediate of the methionine cycle, via the transsulfuration pathway to the biosynthesis of cysteine. Although the pathway itself is well conserved among eukaryotes, properties of eukaryotic CBS enzymes vary greatly. Here we present a side-by-side biochemical and biophysical comparison of human (hCBS, fruit fly (dCBS and yeast (yCBS enzymes. Preparation and characterization of the full-length and truncated enzymes, lacking the regulatory domains, suggested that eukaryotic CBS exists in one of at least two significantly different conformations impacting the enzyme's catalytic activity, oligomeric status and regulation. Truncation of hCBS and yCBS, but not dCBS, resulted in enzyme activation and formation of dimers compared to native tetramers. The dCBS and yCBS are not regulated by the allosteric activator of hCBS, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet; however, they have significantly higher specific activities in the canonical as well as alternative reactions compared to hCBS. Unlike yCBS, the heme-containing dCBS and hCBS showed increased thermal stability and retention of the enzyme's catalytic activity. The mass-spectrometry analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry showed clear presence and binding of AdoMet to yCBS and hCBS, but not dCBS. However, the role of AdoMet binding to yCBS remains unclear, unlike its role in hCBS. This study provides valuable information for understanding the complexity of the domain organization, catalytic specificity and regulation among eukaryotic CBS enzymes.

  19. Targeting α4β2 nAChRs in CNS disorders: Perspectives on positive allosteric modulation as a therapeutic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grupe, Morten; Grunnet, Morten; Bastlund, Jesper F.; Jensen, Anders A.

    2015-01-01

    characteristics, expression pattern and pharmacological profile. The focus of the present MiniReview is on the heteromeric α4β2 nAChR, as activity at this subtype contributes to cognitive functioning through interactions with multiple neurotransmitter systems and is implicated in various CNS disorders, for......The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels broadly involved in regulating neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS) by conducting cation currents through the membrane of neurons. Many different nAChR subtypes exist with each their functional...... clinical advantages and concerns of PAMs are discussed in the light of the role of α4β2 nAChRs as key regulators of fast synaptic transmission....

  20. Targeting AKT with the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK-2206 in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired resistance to cetuximab

    OpenAIRE

    Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Campbell, David A; Starr, Megan M.; Luthar, Neha; Traynor, Anne M.; Wheeler, Deric L

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody that has been approved for use in oncology. Despite clinical success the majority of patients do not respond to cetuximab and those who initially respond frequently acquire resistance. To understand how tumor cells acquire resistance to cetuximab we developed a model of resistance using the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. We found th...

  1. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N.; Mikhail A Shulepko; Denis Kudryavtsev; Bychkov, Maxim L.; Kulbatskii, Dmitrii S.; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Astapova, Maria V.; Feofanov, Alexey V; Thomsen, Morten S.; Jens D Mikkelsen; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Mikhail P Kirpichnikov

    2016-01-01

    SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and controls inflammation and malignant cell transformation. The majority of previous studies of SLURP-1 have been made using fusion constructs containing, in addition to the native ...

  2. Synthesis, pharmacological and structural characterization, and thermodynamic aspects of GluA2-positive allosteric modulators with a 3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxide scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Francotte, Pierre; Olsen, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors are potential compounds for treatment of cognitive disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease. The modulators bind within the dimer interface of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) and stabilize the agonist-bound conformation, thereby slowing...... receptor desensitization and/or deactivation. Here we describe the synthesis and pharmacological testing at GluA2 of a new generation of 3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxides. The most potent modulator 3 in complex with GluA2-LBD-L483Y-N754S was subjected to structural analysis by X......-ray crystallography, and the thermodynamics of binding was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry. Compound 3 binds to GluA2-LBD-L483Y-N754S with a Kd of 0.35 μM (ΔH = -7.5 kcal/mol and -TΔS = -1.3 kcal/mol). This is the first time that submicromolar binding affinity has been achieved for this type of positive...

  3. Substituted 1-Phenyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)urea negative allosteric modulators of mGlu5: discovery of a new tool compound VU0463841 with activity in rat models of cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Russell J; Felts, Andrew S; Rodriguez, Alice L; Venable, Daryl F; Morrison, Ryan D; Byers, Frank W; Daniels, J Scott; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W; Jones, Carrie K; Emmitte, Kyle A

    2013-08-21

    Cocaine is a powerful and highly addictive stimulant that disrupts the normal reward circuitry in the central nervous system (CNS), producing euphoric effects. Cocaine use can lead to acute and life threatening emergencies, and abuse is associated with increased risk for contracting infectious diseases. Though certain types of behavioral therapy have proven effective for treatment of cocaine addiction, relapse remains high, and there are currently no approved medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse. Evidence has continued to accumulate that indicates a critical role for the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) in the modulation of neural circuitry associated with the addictive properties of cocaine. While the small molecule mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator (NAM) field is relatively advanced, investigation into the potential of small molecule mGlu5 NAMs for the treatment of cocaine addiction remains an area of high interest. Herein we describe the discovery and characterization of a potent and selective compound 29 (VU0463841) with good CNS exposure in rats. The utility of 29 (VU0463841) was demonstrated by its ability to attenuate drug seeking behaviors in relevant rat models of cocaine addiction. PMID:23682684

  4. Recent advance in the discovery of allosteric inhibitors binding to the AMP site of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase%果糖-1,6-二磷酸酶AMP变构抑制剂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李占梅; 别建波; 宋宏锐; 徐柏玲

    2011-01-01

    果糖-1,6-二磷酸酶(fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase,FBPase)是肝葡萄糖异生路径中的一个限速酶,催化果糖-1,6-二磷酸水解为果糖-6-磷酸.抑制FBPase的活性,可减少内源性葡萄糖的生成,降低血糖水平,FBPase抑制剂是潜在的新型治疗Ⅱ型糖尿病的药物.本文综述了近年来FBPase一磷酸腺苷(adenosine monophosphate,AMP)变构抑制剂研究的最新进展.%Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the pathway of gluconeogenesis, can catalyze the hydrolysis of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate to fructose-6-phosphate. Upon inhibiting the activity of FBPase, the production of endogenous glucose can be decreased and the level of blood glucose lowered. Therefore, inhibitors of FBPase are expected to be novel potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes. Recent research efforts were reviewed in the field of developing allosteric inhibitors interacting with the AMP binding site of FBPase.

  5. Ocean Dumping Control Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These Regulations were made further to the Ocean Dumping Control Act which provides for restrictions in dumping operations. The Regulations contain model applications for permits to dump or load a series of materials. (NEA)

  6. Trout Stream Special Regulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer shows Minnesota trout streams that have a special regulation as described in the 2006 Minnesota Fishing Regulations. Road crossings were determined using...

  7. Regulation of Genetic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... advertised. The Commission has the authority to regulate advertising that delivers health-related information to consumers to ensure that it is not false or misleading. Top of page FDA Regulation and ...

  8. Activists versus Captured Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Daubanes, Julien; Rochet, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of activism in a regulated industry where the regulator has been captured by the industry. Unlike ordinary economic agents, activists are insensitive to monetary incentives. Moreover, they are less well informed than regulators and their actions generate dead-weight costs. Yet we find that activism may increase social welfare because it disciplines captured regulators and reduces the social cost of imperfect regulatory systems.

  9. Hepcidin: regulation of the master iron regulator

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Iron, an essential nutrient, is required for many diverse biological processes. The absence of a defined pathway to excrete excess iron makes it essential for the body to regulate the amount of iron absorbed; a deficiency could lead to iron deficiency and an excess to iron overload and associated disorders such as anaemia and haemochromatosis respectively. This regulation is mediated by the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin binds to the only known iron export protein, ferroportin (FP...

  10. Radiation Control Regulation 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Regulation (No. 434-1993) was made in pursuance of the Radiation Control Act 1990 and replaces the Active Substances Regulations 1959 repealed by the Act. It entered into force on 1 September 1993. The Regulation specifies that the technical radiation protection definitions have the same meaning as in the 1990 recommendations. The Regulation provides for the licensing of persons to use radioactive substances and radiation apparatus. It prescribes activities which may only be carried out by an accredited radiation expert and regulates the use of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances as well as the disposal and transport of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances. (NEA)

  11. Views of the regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In dealing with a challenging problem in occupational exposure the nuclear regulator in South Africa concluded that the involvement of stake holders was critical. Valuable lessons were learnt in the process. These related to co-operation amongst regulators, the involvement of regulators in addressing occupational exposure problems, the training of workers by the regulator and the need for technical training of the workers. In general, it was also learnt that regulators should establish mechanisms to measure and continuously improve the satisfaction of their stake holders. (author)

  12. Nuclear safety regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Safety Regulations for Nuclear Installations and Nuclear Safety Codes for Nuclear Pressure Retaining Components were issued by the NNSA in 1995. The Atomic Act and Regulations on the Safety Regulation for Transportation of Radioactive Materials have been finished and submitted to the State Council in 1995. At the same time the NNSA organized a revised collection of regulations on nuclear safety in both Chinese and English, titled 'The Collection of Regulations on Nuclear Safety of the People's Republic of China'. To enhance the implementation of newly issued nuclear safety regulations, the NNSA conducted seven times of propagating activities in relation to the regulations for nuclear pressure retaining components and research reactors design and operating in 1995

  13. Crystal Structures of the Reduced, Sulfenic Acid, and Mixed Disulfide Forms of SarZ, a Redox Active Global Regulator in Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poor, Catherine B.; Chen, Peng R.; Duguid, Erica; Rice, Phoebe A.; He, Chuan; (UC)

    2010-01-20

    SarZ is a global transcriptional regulator that uses a single cysteine residue, Cys{sup 13}, to sense peroxide stress and control metabolic switching and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. SarZ belongs to the single-cysteine class of OhrR-MgrA proteins that play key roles in oxidative resistance and virulence regulation in various bacteria. We present the crystal structures of the reduced form, sulfenic acid form, and mixed disulfide form of SarZ. Both the sulfenic acid and mixed disulfide forms are structurally characterized for the first time for this class of proteins. The Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid modification is stabilized through two hydrogen bonds with surrounding residues, and the overall DNA-binding conformation is retained. A further reaction of the Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid with an external thiol leads to formation of a mixed disulfide bond, which results in an allosteric change in the DNA-binding domains, disrupting DNA binding. Thus, the crystal structures of SarZ in three different states provide molecular level pictures delineating the mechanism by which this class of redox active regulators undergoes activation. These structures help to understand redox-mediated virulence regulation in S. aureus and activation of the MarR family proteins in general.

  14. Na+ pump in renal tubular cells is regulated by endogenous Na+-K+-ATPase inhibitor from hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovine hypothalamus contains a high affinity, specific, reversible inhibitor of mammalian Na+-K+-ATPase. Kinetic analysis using isolated membrane fractions showed binding and dissociation rates of the hypothalamic factor (HF) to be (like ouabain) relatively long (off rate = 60 min). To determine whether the kinetics of inhibition in intact cells might be more consistent with regulation of physiological processes in vivo, binding and dissociation reactions of HF in intact renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK1) were studied using 86Rb+ uptake and [3H]ouabain binding. As with membranes, a 60-min incubation with HF inhibited Na+-K+-ATPase in LLC-PK1 cells. In contrast to membrane studies, no prolonged incubation with LLC-PK1 was needed to observe inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase. HF caused a 33% inhibition of ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ influx within 10 min. Incubation of cells with HF followed by washout showed rapid reversal of pump inhibition and a doubling of pump activity. The dose-response curve for HF inhibition of LLC-PK186Rb+ uptake showed a sigmoidal shape consistent with an allosteric binding reaction. Thus HF is a potent regulator of Na+-K+-ATPase activity in intact renal cells, with binding and dissociation reactions consistent with relevant physiological processes

  15. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  16. The development of regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 2002, The Act on Protection Against Ionising Radiation and Nuclear Safety which regulates all aspects of protection against ionising radiation and nuclear safety entered into force in Slovenia. The Slovenian government and its responsible ministries shall issue several governmental and ministerial regulations to support the above - mentioned act. The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) which acts within the Ministry of the Environment, Spatial Planing and Energy takes an active part in drafting the regulations which are defined in the act. Due to a very comprehensive and pretentious task, that is to be completed in a relatively short period of time, taking into consideration the involvement of stakeholders and all competent ministries, the SNSA within the Quality Management System developed a special procedure that insures the systematic approach to the preparation of regulations. The article will briefly represent the process that: defines the preparation, development, harmonisation, review, approval and issue of regulations and uniforms the format of developed regulations. (author)

  17. Nuclear safety regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enactment of nuclear safety regulations in 1996 is mainly focused on the preparation of related regulations, and safety guides for nuclear materials control, the reprocessing installations of spent fuels, the treatment and disposal for radioactive waste. The NNSA also assists the departments concerned of the State Council for modification on the 'Atomic Energy Act' (draft) and the' Regulations on the Safety Supervision and Control of Radioactive Materials Transportation' (draft)

  18. Attention in emotion regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gelow, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The concept of emotion and how to regulate it is a central aspect of modern psychology. Within the process model of emotion regulation (Gross, 1998), one issue is how attentional deployment affects emotion regulation and how this can be measured. In task 1, pictures of positive or negative valence were showed in two conditions, either attend or decrease emotional reaction, while participants’ eye movements were followed with an eye tracker. Ratings of arousal and valence were significantly af...

  19. Accounting Regulation in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Hora, Michal; Chyzevska, Ludmila

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to evaluate the regulation and organization of accounting in Ukraine under the changes in the national economic system development and impact of IFRS implementation. The system of legal regulation of accounting in Ukraine is presented by five levels, each comprised of a number of corresponding subjects of regulation and documents. Typical Chart of Accounts is evidence of the continental accounting model in Ukraine. The accounting standards provide freedom of choice as ...

  20. Emotional regulation and friendship

    OpenAIRE

    Zaccagnini, J.L.; Ruiz-Aranda, D.

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has been shown that emotional regulation facilitates the establishment and maintenance of social relations (Dodge Garber, 1991; Saarni, 1999). The objective of the present study was to analyze the influence of emotional regulation (Gross y John, 2003) in positive friendship (Berscheid, 2003), specifically at the level of intimacy with friends. In addition, we examined the mediating role of positive emotions in the relationship between the emotional regulation and the leve...

  1. Benchmarking and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Agrell, Per Joakim; Bogetoft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publication...

  2. Better Regulation in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Wiener, Jonathan B.

    2006-01-01

    "Better Regulation" is afoot in Europe. After several transatlantic conflicts over regulatory topics such as the precautionary principle, genetically modified foods, and climate change, Europe and America now appear to be converging on the analytic basis for regulation. In a process of hybridization, European institutions are borrowing "Better Regulation" reforms from both the US approach to regulatory review using benefit-cost analysis and from European member states' initiatives on administ...

  3. Rescue of deficient amygdala tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic currents in the Fmr(-/y) mouse model of fragile X syndrome by a novel γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-positive allosteric modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brandon S; Martinez-Botella, Gabriel; Loya, Carlos M; Salituro, Francesco G; Robichaud, Albert J; Huntsman, Molly M; Ackley, Mike A; Doherty, James J; Corbin, Joshua G

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory transmission are emerging as a common component of many nervous system disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission provided by peri- and extrasynaptic GABA type A (GABAA ) receptors powerfully controls neuronal excitability and plasticity and, therefore, provides a rational therapeutic target for normalizing hyperexcitable networks across a variety of disorders, including ASDs. Our previous studies revealed tonic GABAergic deficits in principal excitatory neurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the Fmr1(-/y) knockout (KO) mouse model fragile X syndrome. To correct amygdala deficits in tonic GABAergic neurotransmission in Fmr1(-/y) KO mice, we developed a novel positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors, SGE-872, based on endogenously active neurosteroids. This study shows that SGE-872 is nearly as potent and twice as efficacious for positively modulating GABAA receptors as its parent molecule, allopregnanolone. Furthermore, at submicromolar concentrations (≤1 μM), SGE-872 is selective for tonic, extrasynaptic α4β3δ-containing GABAA receptors over typical synaptic α1β2γ2 receptors. We further find that SGE-872 strikingly rescues the tonic GABAergic transmission deficit in principal excitatory neurons in the Fmr1(-/y) KO BLA, a structure heavily implicated in the neuropathology of ASDs. Therefore, the potent and selective action of SGE-872 on tonic GABAA receptors containing α4 subunits may represent a novel and highly useful therapeutic avenue for ASDs and related disorders involving hyperexcitability of neuronal networks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26308557

  4. Positive Allosteric Modulators of 2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic Acid Receptors Belonging to 4-Cyclopropyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-pyridothiadiazine Dioxides and Diversely Chloro-Substituted 4-Cyclopropyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-Dioxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francotte, Pierre; Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Deva, Taru;

    2014-01-01

    Two 4-ethyl-substituted pyridothiadiazine dioxides belonging to α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor positive allosteric modulators were cocrystallized with the GluA2 ligand binding domain in order to decipher the impact of the position of the nitrogen atom on their......-brain barrier. In an in vivo object recognition test with CD1 mice, oral administration of 36c was found to significantly improve cognition performance at doses as low as 1 mg/kg....

  5. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Kudryavtsev, Denis;

    2016-01-01

    SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation...... recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1) differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM) of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells). Application of mecamylamine and atropine......,-non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively...

  6. Emotion-regulation choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheppes, Gal; Scheibe, Susanne; Suri, Gaurav; Gross, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite centuries of speculation about how to manage negative emotions, little is actually known about which emotion-regulation strategies people choose to use when confronted with negative situations of varying intensity. On the basis of a new process conception of emotion regulation, we hypothesiz

  7. Benchmarking and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    nchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The applica...

  8. Reconceptualizing Civil Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galang, Roberto Martin; Castello, Itziar

    2011-01-01

    This article re-conceptualizes the notion of civil regulation, through an analysis of 775 projects by firms located in 21 Asian countries, wherein we map the state of civil regulation initiatives in the region. We challenge two established assumptions in the Corporate Social Responsibility...... literature. First, contrary to what is commonly argued, we claim that strong states in Asia promote civil regulation in what we call the “paradox of the weak state”. Second, we not only argue that civil regulation is mainly enforced by multinational enterprises willing to promote international social and...... environmental standards; but also that local, small and medium companies play a key role in the development of Asian civil regulation. We call this second finding the “CSR importation trap”. Our findings are supported by evidence on the limitations in the interchangeable properties of business and governments...

  9. Regulation of megakaryocytopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caen, J P; Han, Z C; Bellucci, S; Alemany, M

    1999-09-01

    After 35 years of research, a physiological regulator of platelet production has been identified and the recombinant protein is available. With the discovery of thrombopoietin (TPO), its potential use in a wide variety of clinical megakaryocytic and platelet disorders has been expected and clinical trials have been undertaken. To date, the reported encouraging pre-clinical studies indicate that, as with erythropoietin or G-CSF, minimal toxicity can be expected. A potential limiting side-effect of TPO could be the induction of thrombosis. Nevertheless, it is too early to know whether this cytokine will be of major therapeutic importance for patients with life-threatening thrombocytopenia, such as patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation or subjected to a high dose of chemotherapy. Several experimental and clinical studies are still needed to determine the efficacy of TPO in the prevention or the amelioration of bleeding, which is the ultimate goal for the appropriate use of cytokines with haemostatic benefit. Basic and clinical studies on regulators of megakaryocytopoiesis have rapidly progressed. Now, there is no doubt that some of these regulators are effective in correcting haematopoietic disorders of various aetiologies. Studies on negative regulators not only are important to understand the regulation of megakaryocytopoiesis in normal and pathological states but also have a potential clinical application. Some of these regulators have been shown to be effective in the treatment of essential thrombocythaemia and other myeloproliferative disorders. Platelet factor 4 (PF4) and some other chemokines are also capable of protecting progenitor cells from the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs. However, detailed investigations are still required to determine the precise mechanism(s) of action of these regulators and to establish the optimal clinical protocols of negative regulators alone or in association with positive regulators for the treatment of various

  10. Electrical installations and regulations

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, J F

    1966-01-01

    Electrical Installations and Regulations focuses on the regulations that apply to electrical installations and the reasons for them. Topics covered range from electrical science to alternating and direct current supplies, as well as equipment for providing protection against excess current. Cables, wiring systems, and final subcircuits are also considered, along with earthing, discharge lighting, and testing and inspection.Comprised of 12 chapters, this book begins with an overview of electrical installation work, traits of a good electrician, and the regulations governing installations. The r

  11. The power of regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slides accompanying a presentation at The Power of Change Conference in Vancouver, BC in April 1995 about regulations affecting the power industry were presented. Issues addressed included customer choice, incentive regulation changes (price-caps, revenue sharing and pricing flexibility), the reactions of Canadian industry to regulatory changes, and anticipated reactions of the financial markets to changes in regulations. The potential effects of competition and changes that will create competition were discussed. The level of readiness of Canadian financial, ownership and regulatory bodies was discussed. The needs and expectations of investors from a new regulatory regime were quesstimated. Possible alternatives to the present regulatory framework were suggested

  12. Sport Fishing Regulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The regulations for sport fishing on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge are outlined in this document. Fishing is only permitted from sunrise to sunset, and only...

  13. Legislation and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 3 of the document contains some details about the Brazilian legislation and regulation, the nuclear and environmental licensing, and emergency preparedness legislation

  14. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    - serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...... of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume......, controlled cell death and cellular migration. Volume regulatory mechanisms has long been in focus for regulating cellular proliferation and my thesis work have been focusing on the role of Cl- channels in proliferation with specific emphasis on ICl, swell. Pharmacological blockage of the ubiquitously...

  15. Optimal Regulation of Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    Pagano, Marco; Immordino, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    We study regulation of the auditing profession in a model where audit quality is unobservable and enforcing regulation is costly. The optimal audit standard falls short of the first-best audit quality, and is increasing in the riskiness of firms and in the amount of funding they seek. The model can encompass collusion between clients and auditors, arising from the joint provision of auditing and consulting services: deflecting collusion requires less ambitious standards. Finally, banning the ...

  16. Restructuring nuclear regulations.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossman, Kenneth L.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear regulations are a subset of social regulations (laws to control activities that may negatively impact the environment, health, and safety) that concern control of ionizing radiation from radiation-producing equipment and from radioactive materials. The impressive safety record among nuclear technologies is due, in no small part, to the work of radiation safety professionals and to a protection system that has kept pace with the rapid technologic advancements in electric power generati...

  17. Rethinking financial regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas M. Hoenig

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, revolutionary changes in financial markets, combined with incidents such as Barings and Daiwa, have revived concerns about the adequacy of financial regulation. Historically, financial regulatory policy has been driven by the view that to maintain the health of the financial system you must maintain the health of individual institutions.> In light of ongoing changes in financial markets, however, extending the traditional approach to financial market regulation may not work. ...

  18. Supermarkets and Planning Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, Rachel; Harmgart, Heike

    2008-01-01

    We are interested in evaluating the impact of restrictive planning regulation on entry into the UK grocery retail industry. We estimate a model similar to Bresnahan and Reiss (1991) where we allow for multiple store formats. We find that more restrictive planning regulation reduces the number of large format supermarkets in equilibrium. However, the impact is overstated if variation in demographic characteristics across markets is not also controlled for. Our estimates suggest that restrictiv...

  19. Regulating deregulated energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The North American gas and electricity markets are fast evolving, and regulators are currently faced with a host of issues such as market-based rates, unbundling, stranded costs, open access, and incentive regulation are surfacing as a result of deregulation. The regulatory environment in Ontario was reviewed by the author. Deregulated markets rule, from commodities to gas and electricity. Additionally, there is an evolution of traditional utility regulation. A look at deregulated markets revealed that there are regulations on boundary conditions on the deregulated market. Under the Ontario Energy Board (OEB), all generators, transmitters, distributors, and retailers of electricity must be licensed. The standard supply service (SSS) offered by electricity distributors and system gas which is still being sold by natural gas distributors continues to be regulated by OEB. One issue that was addressed was separation for revenues and costs of the utility's purchase and sale of gas business, at least for accounting purposes. The next issue discussed was cost of system gas and SSS, followed by timely signals and prudent incurred costs. Historical benefits were reviewed, such as historical commitments to low-cost electricity. Pooling transportation costs, transmission pricing continued, market-based rates, unbundling, stranded costs, open access, incentive regulation/ performance based regulation (PBR) were all discussed. Price cap on PBR, both partial and comprehensive were looked at. A requirement to review guidelines on cost of capital and an application to extend blanket approval provisions for gas storage were discussed, as they are amongst some of the challenges of the future. Other challenges include revised rules and practice and procedure; practice directions for cost awards, appeals, and other functions; confidentiality guidelines; and refinements to the role of and approaches to alternative dispute resolution. The future role of regulators was examined in light

  20. Summary of the regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) prescribes regulations for the international movement of all radioactive materials among member nations. The U.S. governmental agencies regulating the transportation of radioactive materals include the Department of Transportation (DOT), which is responsible for safety in packaging, shipping, carriage, stowage, storage, and handling of all radioactive materials; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which is responsible for (1) safety and safeguards in receipt, possession, use, transfer of by-product, source, and special nuclear materials and (2) safety in packaging of fissile and radioactive materials in quantities exceeding Type A limits, defined in the Code of Federal Regulations; the Energy Research and Development Administration, which is responsible for safety in all aspects of radioactive material transport by its license-exempt contractors; and the Postal Service, which is responsible for safety in shipment by mail. Current regulatory actions involving NRC that may influence the transportation of radioactive materials include the examination of the regulations, legal contests, and the adoption of new regulations. The NRC published a draft of an environmental impact statement on transportation in March 1976 and will conduct a rulemaking proceeding after the final version of the statement is published in the fall. Of the new regulations, the most recent innovations in the IAEA regulations and a quality assurance program of increased rigor are foremost. The two most prominent ideas of the reguations IAEA regulations are the assignment of radiotoxicity values to each radionuclide rather than to grups of radionuclides, providing for increased flexibility in package limits for most radionuclides, and the allowance of small releases from Type B packages under hypothetical accident conditions. The DOT and NRC are in the process of adopting these IAEA revisions

  1. Financial Regulation Going Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin Allen; Elena Carletti

    2010-01-01

    The financial sector is heavily regulated in order to prevent financial crises. The recent crisis showed how ineffective this regulation and other types of government intervention were in achieving this aim. We argue that the crisis was primarily caused by housing price bubbles. These occurred because of too loose monetary policies and the easy availability of credit resulting from the build up of large foreign exchange reserves by Asian central banks. A number of regulatory reforms are sugge...

  2. On Globalisation of Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Wessels

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article the opinion that financial regulation should be dealt with on a national, and not on a global scale is criticised. The objections against global regulation are discussed and dismissed. The greater good of a solid global system is inconsistent with maintaining the full force of national social or economic policies. Bob Wessels submits that the best way forward is to look for (a combination of the best methods of regulation on the basis of geography, the nature of regulation itself (hard law, best practices, guidelines, the function of certain rules in relation to the goals or the expectations they aim to address and the character of these rules. A parallel is drawn with the way in which cross-border insolvencies are regulated, including solutions from practitioners in the global insolvency of Lehman Brothers Group of Companies. Given the essential role courts play the presence of new rules of the international insolvency should be supported by more robust rules for the cross-border judicial coordination of cross-border cases, such as a convention. The body of financial regulation should be guided by international accepted principles and guidelines and international regulation and national implementation should reflect a balance between what is necessary in the light of the past events, while still leaving room for fair national demands and policies. The allocation of clear responsibility and authority to regulating bodies should warrant an efficient and effective answer for what, at the core, is a global problem, related to international financial markets.

  3. Corruption, Institutions and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Breen, Michael; Gillanders, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the effects of corruption and institutional quality on the quality of business regulation. Our key findings indicate that corruption negatively affects the quality of regulation and that general institutional quality is insignificant once corruption is con- trolled for. These findings hold over a number of specifications which include additional exogenous historical and geographic controls. The findings imply that policy-makers should focus on curbing corruption to improve regulati...

  4. The regulator's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The speaker recalls the task of regulators in establishing criteria and standards and assessing and controlling their fulfillment, as well as the fact that there are many types of radiological regulators, depending on their targets, structures, level of independence, and others. She also stresses that regulators take the environment presently into account to protect people as far as ionising radiation is concerned, that is, environmental protection is provided by present regulations, although implicitly based on an anthropocentric focus. In this sense, there is a clear need to develop a framework for the protection of environment, on the basis of the evolution of the present system. There is a preference for a unique, coherent, timely, integrated and manageable radiological human and environment protection system, which has to be developed internationally. Such an enhanced environmental protection framework needs of clearly defined specific 'bricks' (principles/criteria/tools). Regulators will face important challenges in adapting to an integrated man/environment protection framework, and need to act nationally in the meantime to fulfill obligations, as well as actively encourage international initiatives. A proposal on a radiological environmental framework is laid down, and finally she states the overall regulators viewpoint on this process: 'The path towards pragmatism and credibility'. (author)

  5. Regulating energy industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of sector-based regulation takes on significant importance in the context of market liberalization. The overall aim is to conciliate, in the considered sector, fair competition with the achievement of public service missions. However, the nature of the authority in charge of this regulation is not prone to harmonized clauses, even in Europe. For electricity for example, the 96/92/CE directive of 19 December 1996 concerning common rules for the inner electricity market, does not state this and Germany, which has not designed any sector-based regulator, applies the general procedure of litigation settlement by the equivalent of the competition Council. In France, the law Nr 2000-108 of 10 February 2000 defines the CRE (Electricity Regulation Commission) is article 28 as including six members, three of which are appointed by Government and the three others respectively by each of the presidents of the parliamentary assemblies. Many other countries have made the same choice. However, the scope of the missions given to these specialized authorities varies considerably according to the country. At European level, what are the different models of organisation of sector-based regulation in the energy field? How are the new regulators organised in relation with the competition authorities? Will the new models converge on the medium term or on the long term? Must we anticipate the creation of European regulation authorities to rule the problems concerning several national markets? What can we learn from the recent electricity crisis in California? To try and answer these questions, Mr Michel Matheu presented a European comparative study and before the debate started, Mr Pierre Couveinhes suggested a reflection on the practical implications of the analyses carried out. (authors)

  6. Nuclear regulation in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current state of nuclear regulations in the USA is examined. Since Three Mile Island the regulation of the nuclear power industry has been undergoing a noticeable transition. It will be argued here that the transition is characterized by two indicia. First, the primary focus of state and federal regulators has been on the financial aspects of the industry: this is best seen in the context of decisions allocating the costs of nuclear plant cancellations. Second, decisionmaking power has been decentralized: although the regulatory history of nuclear power demonstrates the tradition of centralized decisionmaking power (i.e., formerly the primary decisionmaking body was the Atomic Energy Commission), now States share decisionmaking power with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In Section 1 a brief legislative history of nuclear regulation is presented to establish the assertion that nuclear regulation, both de jure and de facto, was centralized. Next, Section 2 canvasses recent United States Supreme Court opinions regarding nuclear regulation. The Court frequently acts as policymaker through the consequences of its opinions, if not by its intent. In the area of nuclear policymaking, the Court has paid allegiance recently both to the tradition of centralization and to the movement toward decentralization. This dualism is reflected in other federal court decisions as well which will be briefly mentioned. Continuing the analysis of Federal regulation, Section 3 examines the current reform efforts of the NRC. Section 4 presents an examination of State responses to nuclear plant cancellations. In this section, State administrative agency and court decisions will be examined and recent State legislation will be discussed. (author)

  7. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  8. Probiotics and Appetite Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Anne Toksvig

    resistance and blood lipid profile among others. Probiotics which are health promoting bacteria can potentially be used to affect the GM and thereby change metabolic outcomes of the host. Animal studies have shown associations between intake of probiotics and appetite regulation, but currently no human...... intestine, in an animal study and in two human studies the effect of the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8 (W8) on appetite regulation, blood lipids and blood fatty acids. In addition, it was investigated if W8 had an effect on the fecal microbiota of the human...... (GCG) gene encoding GLP-1 and GLP-2 and expression of the gene SCD1 encoding stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1); which is involved in the formation of triacylglycerol (TAG); was studied in piglets supplemented with W8 for two weeks. To study the acute effect of W8 on appetite regulation, glycemic...

  9. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  10. ANTICIPATING AND REGULATING BIOSYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Iorga Siman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Regulating biosystems closely related to human beings are structures still difficult to understand.Numerous intimate processes taking place in these systems, even their actual constitution, are insufficiently decoded, and that they have populated the world long before man invented the first regulator, appears not to have contributed much to their knowledge. This work is intended to highlight what regulating biosystems are.There is no secret that somatic muscles perform control operations which no act of moving would be possible without. All actions are the result of dynamic controlled processes adjusted to strict control laws. By treating them very seriously may lead to knowledge of processes occurring in complex systems

  11. Environmentally regulated aerospace coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Virginia L.

    1995-01-01

    Aerospace coatings represent a complex technology which must meet stringent performance requirements in the protection of aerospace vehicles. Topcoats and primers are used, primarily, to protect the structural elements of the air vehicle from exposure to and subsequent degradation by environmental elements. There are also many coatings which perform special functions, i.e., chafing resistance, rain erosion resistance, radiation and electric effects, fuel tank coatings, maskants, wire and fastener coatings. The scheduled promulgation of federal environmental regulations for aerospace manufacture and rework materials and processes will regulate the emissions of photochemically reactive precursors to smog and air toxics. Aerospace organizations will be required to identify, qualify and implement less polluting materials. The elimination of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC's) and implementation of pollution prevention requirements are added constraints which must be addressed concurrently. The broad categories of operations affected are the manufacture, operation, maintenance, and repair of military, commercial, general aviation, and space vehicles. The federal aerospace regulations were developed around the precept that technology had to be available to support the reduction of organic and air toxic emissions, i.e., the regulations cannot be technology forcing. In many cases, the regulations which are currently in effect in the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), located in Southern California, were used as the baseline for the federal regulations. This paper addresses strategies used by Southern California aerospace organizations to cope with these regulatory impacts on aerospace productions programs. All of these regulatory changes are scheduled for implementation in 1993 and 1994, with varying compliance dates established.

  12. Regulation as Rhetoric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen; Györy, Csaba

    This paper analyses the way regulatory agencies strategically use public ‘rhetoric’ and ‘management of appearance’ to strengthen their regulation. It reports a comparative study of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) which is the US federal securities regulator and the Danish Tax and...... environment, these two agencies apply strategies that appear to be strikingly similar, and these similarities are worth investigating not despite, but exactly because of the differing political and social environment. We track recent shifts in organizational practice at these two agencies and argue that both...

  13. Nuclear regulation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed

  14. Nuclear regulations and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an historical overview of the nuclear regulation system in Argentina a description is made of the country's Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) and of its regulation and control functions. Its organic structure is also outlined. A detailed report is given of the environmental monitoring activities in the sites of the operating Argentine nuclear power plants as well as those of the nuclear research centres. A special reference is made of the monitoring of the relevant uranium mining districts in Argentina. The radon determination in houses of several regions of the country is also mentioned

  15. Regulated underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. [40 CFR 280]. The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a ''roadmap'' for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation

  16. Regulation, Competition, and Information

    OpenAIRE

    Mian Muhammad Javed

    2002-01-01

    You know it is very hard after the Governor, State Bank, to make a presentation but I will try to do it in a very mundane way. You know the Regulatory Bodies specially in the Economic Sector in recent times. There has been a sort of resurgence, leaving aside the regulation of the financial sector, which has been doing very well. Our old memory of regulation is not so pleasant. Long ago, there used to be a transport Authority which used to dole out “Route Permits” as political favours, and the...

  17. Cyberplagiarism in University Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Cavanillas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the legal framework for plagiarism, and its twofold nature of illicit appropriation (from the author of the plagiarized work and fraud (with regard to the target audience of the plagiarism. Based on these premises, academic cyberplagiarism is analysed as a form of plagiarism carried out using electronic tools in the university setting. The question of responsibility (who can regulate the legal consequences of plagiarism? before and after the Ley Orgánica de Universidades (organic law on universities, LOU is studied, as is the disciplinary handling of cyberplagiarism with the limited regulations currently in place at universities.

  18. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  19. Global identification of genes and pathways regulated by Akt during activation of T helper cells [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/107

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cheng

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that Akt differentially modulated a subset of NF-kB target genes during T cell activation. In the current study, we further explored the broader effects of Akt inhibition on T cell gene induction. Global microarray analysis was used to characterize T helper cell transcriptional responses following antigen receptor stimulation in the absence or presence of Akti1/2 (an allosteric inhibitor which targets Akt1 and Akt2, to identify novel targets dependent upon Akt and obtain a more comprehensive view of Akt-sensitive genes in T helper cells. Pathway analysis of microarray data from a CD4+ T cell line revealed effects on gene networks involving ribosomal and T cell receptor signaling pathways associated with Akti1/2 treatment. Using real-time PCR analysis, we validated differential regulation of several genes in these pathways, including Ier3, Il13, Klf6, Egr1, Ccl1 and Ccl4, among others. Additionally, transcription factor target gene (TFactS analysis revealed that NF-kB and Myc were the most significantly enriched transcription factors among Akt-dependent genes after T cell receptor and CD28 stimulation. Akt activation elicited increases in the enrichment of NF-kB- and Myc-targeted genes. The present study has identified a diverse set of genes, and possible mechanisms for their regulation, that are dependent on Akt during T cell activation.

  20. Nuclear safety regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Departmental Rules and The Safety Guides were issued by the NNSA in 1998. The NNSA performed the activities of propagation and implementation of nuclear safety regulations at QTNPP in order to improve the nuclear safety culture of operating organization and construct and contract organizations

  1. Emotion regulation during isolation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poláčková Šolcová, Iva; Šolcová, Iva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, Suppl. 1 (2012). ISSN 0020-7594. [International Congress of Psychology /30./. 22.07.2012-27.07.2012, Cape Town] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP407/11/2226 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : emotion regulation * isolation * Mars500 Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  2. International telecommunications market regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Productivity Commission

    2001-01-01

    On 23 February 1999 the Assistant Treasurer referred international telecommunic-ations market regulation for inquiry and report within six months. The report focused on the reform of international telecommunications markets, in particular on the payment arrangements between providers of international telecommunications services.

  3. Regulation after Bush

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn Robert; Passell Peter

    2008-01-01

    Barack Obama and John McCain have staked out very different positions on serious questions involving economic regulation everything from housing finance to alternative energy mandates but practical considerations will dissolve many of these differences, according to Robert Hahn and Peter Passell.

  4. Vehicle recycling regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smink, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The number of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) in the EU is increasing continously. Around 75 percent of an ELV are recyclable metals. The forecast growth in the number of ELVs calls for regulation that aims to minimise the environmental impact of a car. Using Denmark as an example, this article...

  5. Jordan Corporate Governance Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan Institute of Directors

    2013-01-01

    As the importance of Corporate Governance increases, an awareness and understanding of the different relevant regulations becomes of paramount value. The importance and value of Corporate Governance is not the core of this publication. The publication is built around the premise that Corporate Governance is important and increasingly becoming of significant importance for growth, continued...

  6. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wulp, Mariette Y. M.; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Groen, Albert K.

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-codin

  7. Legislation and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 3 of the document contains some details about the Brazilian legislation and regulation, the legislative and regulatory framework, regulatory body and responsibility of the license holder

  8. Regulating the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Byron

    2007-01-01

    The Internet's breakthrough to primetime usage beginning in the mid-1990s evolved in an era of openness. Unfettered access seemed key to Internet development. An important foundation for the 1996 Telecommunications Act was the theory that the telecom industry would work best if it were free of government regulation, a guiding principle that has…

  9. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  10. Regulating emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The presentation is designed for individuals who are involved in therapeutic administration of radioactive material and the implementation of the radiation safety programme. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has regulatory authority over the medical use of by-product material and the radiation from by-product material. The presentation will address how the NRC regulates new medical uses (i.e. emerging technologies) used in radiation oncology that are too new to be covered in the current regulations. NRC's process that allows licensees to get approved for these emerging technologies until regulations are promulgated for the new modalities will be described. The presentation will also cover NRC's reporting requirements for medical events and other radiation safety-related incidents. Some examples of errors that have occurred for these new NRC-regulated activities will be provided. The root causes in these events will be identified to prevent similar additional incidents from occurring in other facilities performing the same type of therapy. (author)

  11. Regulation of Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, George A.

    1985-01-01

    Explains relationships between energy intake and expenditure focusing on the cellular, chemical and neural mechanisms involved in regulation of energy balance. Information is referenced specifically to conditions of obesity. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  12. Regulating nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Parliament passed the Atomic Energy Control Act in 1946, it erected the framework for nuclear safety in Canada. Under the Act, the government created the Atomic Energy Control Board and gave it the authority to make and enforce regulations governing every aspect of nuclear power production and use in this country. The Act gives the Control Board the flexibility to amend its regulations to adapt to changes in technology, health and safety standards, co-operative agreements with provincial agencies and policy regarding trade in nuclear materials. This flexibility has allowed the Control Board to successfully regulate the nuclear industry for more than 40 years. Its mission statement 'to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment' concisely states the Control Board's primary objective. The Atomic Energy Control Board regulates all aspects of nuclear energy in Canada to ensure there is no undue risk to health, safety, security or the environment. It does this through a multi-stage licensing process

  13. Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator (LYST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaojie; Chang, Bo; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of vesicle trafficking to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) as well as regulation of the size of these organelles are critical to maintain their functions. Disruption of the lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) results in Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, prolonged bleeding, severe immunodeficiency, recurrent bacterial infection, neurologic dysfunction and hemophagocytic lympohistiocytosis (HLH). The classic diagnostic feature of the syndrome is enlarged LROs in all cell types, including lysosomes, melanosomes, cytolytic granules and platelet dense bodies. The most striking CHS ocular pathology observed is an enlargement of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which leads to aberrant distribution of eye pigmentation, and results in photophobia and decreased visual acuity. Understanding the molecular function of LYST and identification of its interacting partners may provide therapeutic targets for CHS and other diseases associated with the regulation of LRO size and/or vesicle trafficking, such as asthma, urticaria and Leishmania amazonensis infections. PMID:26427484

  14. Inconsistent Regulators: Evidence From Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Sumit Agarwal; David Lucca; Amit Seru; Francesco Trebbi

    2012-01-01

    US state chartered commercial banks are supervised alternately by state and federal regulators. Each regulator supervises a given bank for a fixed time period according to a predetermined rotation schedule. We use unique data to examine differences between federal and state regulators for these banks. Federal regulators are significantly less lenient, downgrading supervisory ratings about twice as frequently as state supervisors. Under federal regulators, banks report higher nonperforming loa...

  15. Regulating the private security industry

    CERN Document Server

    Percy, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    The under-regulation of the private security industry has increasingly become a topic of media and academic interest. This Adelphi Paper enters the debate by explaining why the industry requires further regulation, and what is wrong with the current system. It begins by briefly defining the industry and explaining the need for more effective regulation, before analysing three types of regulation: domestic, international and informal (including self-regulation).

  16. Leadership and the Independent Regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Jamison, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Being a utility regulator has perils because the independence of the regulator necessarily removes power from politicians, operators, and others. Furthermore, regulators are sometimes scapegoats for unpopular policies and unavoidably become involved in shaping the policies that they are supposed to implement. As a result of such frictions, regulators are sometimes removed from office or marginalized in some way. How can regulators not only survive in such an environment, but also thrive? Jami...

  17. Chemogenomics of allosteric binding sites in GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemogenomic techniques connect the chemical and biological domains to establish ligand and target relationships not evident from the individual disciplines. Chemogenomics has been applied in lead generation, target classification, focused library design as well as selectivity and polypharmacology...

  18. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter; Meens, Merlijn J P M T

    2011-01-01

    The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects. In resista...... that discriminate between ET(A)-mediated effects of the endogenous isopeptides ET1, ET2 and ET3 and that become more effective when the activity of the endogenous endothelin system is elevated....

  19. RSR13 e modificação alostérica da afinidade hemoglobina-oxigênio: abuso entre atletas RSR13 and allosteric change in the hemoglobin-oxygen afinity: abuse among athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Claudio Lucas da Nóbrega

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available O ácido metilpropiônico (RSR13 é um modificador alostérico da hemoglobina, com a qual se liga de forma não-covalente, diminuindo sua afinidade pelo oxigênio de modo dose-dependente e, conseqüentemente, aumentando a oxigenação periférica. O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar brevemente as evidências científicas acerca das características farmacológicas e funcionais, indicações médicas e efeitos adversos do uso do RSR13 por atletas, a mais recente alternativa de aumento artificial do desempenho. Estudos experimentais preliminares verificaram algum efeito positivo do RSR13 sobre a recuperação do miocárdio isquêmico e sobre a extensão da isquemia cerebral, mas as principais indicações estudadas atualmente são a cirurgia com hipotermia e cardioplegia durante circulação extracorpórea e o uso como agente coadjuvante potenciador da radioterapia para certos tumores sólidos. Somente um estudo em modelo canino mostrou aumento do consumo máximo de oxigênio em músculo isolado, não existindo evidências de que o RSR13 possa efetivamente melhorar o desempenho em humanos. Em realidade, já foram descritos efeitos adversos, como diminuição da perfusão sanguínea, elevação da pressão arterial e diminuição da função renal. Antecipando o potencial aumento da utilização do RSR13 por atletas, métodos já foram desenvolvidos para sua detecção em amostras de urina humana.Methylpropionic acid (RSR13 is an allosteric hemoglobin modifier to which it binds in a non-covalent manner, reducing its affinity to oxygen in a dose-dependent fashion, and consequently, increasing peripheral oxygenation. The purpose of this article is to briefly present scientific evidence concerning pharmacological and functional characteristics, medical indications, and adverse effects of RSR13 use by athletes, the most recent alternative to enhance performance artificially. Preliminary experimental studies have verified some positive effect of RSR13

  20. Markets, religion, regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    of regulation, certification and standardization on a global scale. Building on research on global kosher (a Hebrew term meaning “fit” or “proper”), halal (an Arabic word that literally means “permissible” or “lawful”) and Hindu vegetarianism this paper argues that these economies or markets to a...... large extent are conditioned by and themselves condition forms of transnational governmentality, that is, new and often overlapping practices of government and grassroots politics. I explore religious economies and markets at three interrelated levels of the social scale: state and non-state regulation......Most recent scholarship on moral economies or religious markets argues for the compatibility of economies/markets and religious practices in particular national or regional contexts. However, over the last couple of decades or so religious markets have entered a new phase characterized by new forms...

  1. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  2. Volume Regulation in Epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    We review studies on regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and regulatory volume increase (RVI) of major ion and water transporting vertebrate epithelia. The rate of RVD and RVI is faster in cells of high osmotic permeability like amphibian gallbladder and mammalian proximal tubule as compared to...... amphibian skin and mammalian cortical collecting tubule of low and intermediate osmotic permeability. Crosstalk between entrance and exit mechanisms interferes with volume regulation both at aniso-osmotic and iso-osmotic volume perturbations. It has been proposed that cell volume regulation is an intrinsic...... function of iso-osmotic fluid transport that depends on Na+ recirculation. The causative relationship is discussed for a fluid-absorbing and a fluid-secreting epithelium of which the Na+ recirculation mechanisms have been identified. A large number of transporters and ion channels involved in cell volume...

  3. Auditing and Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Pettinicchio, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Effective financial reporting has become of critical importance in our economic markets and the international accounting scandals of the last decades have accentuated the role of auditing in protecting stakeholders' interests and contributing to an efficient functioning of financial markets. Auditing regulation has been at the centre of recent international debates (e.g. EU Green paper; 2010) and different regulatory interventions have been put in place in different countries and in different...

  4. POTENT REGULATORS OF METABOLISM

    OpenAIRE

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Yang, Kryscilla Jian Zhang; Lee, Seung-Ah; Yuen, Jason J.; Blaner, William S.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its analogs) are highly potent regulators of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Because of these activities, retinoids have been most extensively studied in the contexts of embryonic development and of proliferative diseases, especially cancer and skin disease. Recently, there has been considerable new research interest focused on gaining understanding of the roles that retinoids and/or retinoid-related proteins may have in the development of met...

  5. Human telomerase activity regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wojtyla, Aneta; Gladych, Marta; Rubis, Blazej

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase has been recognized as a relevant factor distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells. Thus, it has become a very promising target for anticancer therapy. The cell proliferative potential can be limited by replication end problem, due to telomeres shortening, which is overcome in cancer cells by telomerase activity or by alternative telomeres lengthening (ALT) mechanism. However, this multisubunit enzymatic complex can be regulated at various levels, including expression control b...

  6. Regulating hate speech online

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, James

    2010-01-01

    The exponential growth in the Internet as a means of communication has been emulated by an increase in far-right and extremist web sites and hate based activity in cyberspace. The anonymity and mobility afforded by the Internet has made harassment and expressions of hate effortless in a landscape that is abstract and beyond the realms of traditional law enforcement. This paper examines the complexities of regulating hate speech on the Internet through legal and technological frameworks. It ex...

  7. Iron regulation by hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ningning; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin is a key hormone that is involved in the control of iron homeostasis in the body. Physiologically, hepcidin is controlled by iron stores, inflammation, hypoxia, and erythropoiesis. The regulation of hepcidin expression by iron is a complex process that requires the coordination of multiple proteins, including hemojuvelin, bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), hereditary hemochromatosis protein, transferrin receptor 2, matriptase-2, neogenin, BMP receptors, and transferrin. Misregulati...

  8. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably cons...

  9. The regulation of hunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildtrup, Jens; Jensen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a tax/subsidy on hunters based on game population. The tax/subsidy is the difference between actual and optimal population multiplied by an individual, variable tax rate. The tax rate is, among other things, based on the difference between the marginal value of the game...... population to the hunter and the regulator and differences in user costs of the population. The paper shows that the population tax/subsidy secures a first-best optimum....

  10. Cyberplagiarism in University Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago Cavanillas

    2008-01-01

    The article examines the legal framework for plagiarism, and its twofold nature of illicit appropriation (from the author of the plagiarized work) and fraud (with regard to the target audience of the plagiarism). Based on these premises, academic cyberplagiarism is analysed as a form of plagiarism carried out using electronic tools in the university setting. The question of responsibility (who can regulate the legal consequences of plagiarism?) before and after the Ley Orgánica de Universidad...

  11. Fibronectin Mechanobiology Regulates Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Karin; Seo, Bo Ri; Fischbach, Claudia; Gourdon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is an essential extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein involved in both physiological and pathological processes. The structure–function relationship of Fn has been and is still being studied, as changes in its molecular structure are integral in regulating (or dysregulating) its biological activities via its cell, matrix component, and growth factor binding sites. Fn comprises three types of repeating modules; among them, FnIII modules are mechanically unstable domains that...

  12. Beyond State Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Madanat, Philip; Pies, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Holding the news media accountable has traditionally been a task of the state in Jordan. Media laws and regulations are numerous and do not leave too much space for self-regulatory practices on a national basis. The Jordan Press Association (JPA) is the core of so-called established media accountability institutions. It conducted a law-like code of ethics in 2003 and runs ombuds committees (currently three) dealing with mishaps of the media to prevent journalists from legal liability. Thou...

  13. Improving CS regulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesse, R.J.; Scheer, R.M.; Marasco, A.L.; Furey, R.

    1980-10-01

    President Carter issued Executive Order 12044 (3/28/78) that required all Federal agencies to distinguish between significant and insignificant regulations, and to determine whether a regulation will result in major impacts. This study gathered information on the impact of the order and the guidelines on the Office of Conservation and Solar Energy (CS) regulatory practices, investigated problems encountered by the CS staff when implementing the order and guidelines, and recommended solutions to resolve these problems. Major tasks accomplished and discussed are: (1) legislation, Executive Orders, and DOE Memoranda concerning Federal administrative procedures relevant to the development and analysis of regulations within CS reviewed; (2) relevant DOE Orders and Memoranda analyzed and key DOE and CS staff interviewed in order to accurately describe the current CS regulatory process; (3) DOE staff from the Office of the General Counsel, the Office of Policy and Evaluation, the Office of the Environment, and the Office of the Secretary interviewed to explore issues and problems encountered with current CS regulatory practices; (4) the regulatory processes at five other Federal agencies reviewed in order to see how other agencies have approached the regulatory process, dealt with specific regulatory problems, and responded to the Executive Order; and (5) based on the results of the preceding four tasks, recommendations for potential solutions to the CS regulatory problems developed. (MCW)

  14. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  15. Taiwan Regulation of Biobanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chien-Te; Hung, Tzu-Hsun; Yeh, Chan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces legal framework and governance structure in relation to the management and development of biobanks in Taiwan. At first, we briefly describe Taiwan's population, political system and health care system. Secondly, this research introduces biobanking framework of Taiwan including 25 biobanks established with the approval of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. In those biobanks, "Taiwan Biobank" is the first and the largest government-supported biobank which comprises population-based cohort study and disease- oriented study. Since the collection of information, data, and biological specimen of biobanks often involve highly sensitive personal information, in the legal framework of Taiwan, there is a specific regulation, "Human Biobank Management Act" (HBMA), which plays an important role in regulating biobanks in Taiwan. HBMA, the Personal Information Act and other regulations constitute a comprehensive legal and regulatory privacy framework of biobanks. Through the introduction and analysis of the current legal framework applicable to biobanks, we found that there are several challenges that need to be solved appropriately that involve duplicate review systems, the obstacles in the international collaboration, and data sharing between biobanks in Taiwan. PMID:26711420

  16. Whither tobacco product regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Ann; Hammond, David; Gartner, Coral

    2012-03-01

    Despite decades of industry innovation and regulatory efforts, the harmfulness of conventional cigarettes has not changed. There are several pitfalls in this area, including the long time lag before health impacts of product regulatory changes become apparent, the danger of consumers deriving false reassurance of lesser harm in the interim period, the lack of relevant expertise and the lack of an internationally agreed and evidence-based strategic approach. Articles 9 and 10 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provide the potential for such a global strategy, and knowledge and research has increased significantly over recent years. However, there are huge opportunity costs in implementing product disclosure and regulatory strategies: most national regulators have very limited human and financial resources, which should be focused on other evidence-based tobacco control interventions. We believe therefore that it is now time to abandon the notion of safe or safer cigarettes while moving consumers towards cleaner nicotine products as soon as possible. In parallel to this, we recommend a number of other strategies be implemented including: reducing the appeal of all tobacco products, forbidding new tobacco products or brand variants being marketed without evidence of reduced harm, appeal or addictiveness, and developing a tobacco industry resourced, but industry independent, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control global repository to assist national regulators in understanding and regulating the products on their markets. PMID:22345253

  17. The international radioactive transportation regulations: A model for national regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Series No. 6 (herein after denoted as the ''International Regulations'') serve as the model for the regulations for individual countries and international modal organizations controlling the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to outline the background and history of the International Regulations, the general principles behind the requirements of the International Regulations, the structure and general contents of the latest edition of the International Regulations, and the roles of various international bodies in the development and implementation of the International Regulations and the current status of regulatory and supportive document development at both the international and domestic level. This review will provide a basis for users and potential users to better understand the source and application of the International Regulations. 1 tab

  18. Co-conserved features associated with cis regulation of ErbB tyrosine kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Mirza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidermal growth factor receptor kinases, or ErbB kinases, belong to a large sub-group of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, which share a conserved catalytic core. The catalytic core of ErbB kinases have functionally diverged from other RTKs in that they are activated by a unique allosteric mechanism that involves specific interactions between the kinase core and the flanking Juxtamembrane (JM and COOH-terminal tail (C-terminal tail. Although extensive studies on ErbB and related tyrosine kinases have provided important insights into the structural basis for ErbB kinase functional divergence, the sequence features that contribute to the unique regulation of ErbB kinases have not been systematically explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we use a Bayesian approach to identify the selective sequence constraints that most distinguish ErbB kinases from other receptor tyrosine kinases. We find that strong ErbB kinase-specific constraints are imposed on residues that tether the JM and C-terminal tail to key functional regions of the kinase core. A conserved RIxKExE motif in the JM-kinase linker region and a glutamine in the inter-lobe linker are identified as two of the most distinguishing features of the ErbB family. While the RIxKExE motif tethers the C-terminal tail to the N-lobe of the kinase domain, the glutamine tethers the C-terminal tail to hinge regions critical for inter-lobe movement. Comparison of the active and inactive crystal structures of ErbB kinases indicates that the identified residues are conformationally malleable and can potentially contribute to the cis regulation of the kinase core by the JM and C-terminal tail. ErbB3, and EGFR orthologs in sponges and parasitic worms, diverge from some of the canonical ErbB features, providing insights into sub-family and lineage-specific functional specialization. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis pinpoints key residues for mutational analysis, and

  19. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism integrates nutrient and hormonal feedback to regulate energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-15

    The maintenance of energy homeostasis requires the hypothalamic integration of nutrient feedback cues, such as glucose, fatty acids, amino acids, and metabolic hormones such as insulin, leptin and ghrelin. Although hypothalamic neurons are critical to maintain energy homeostasis research efforts have focused on feedback mechanisms in isolation, such as glucose alone, fatty acids alone or single hormones. However this seems rather too simplistic considering the range of nutrient and endocrine changes associated with different metabolic states, such as starvation (negative energy balance) or diet-induced obesity (positive energy balance). In order to understand how neurons integrate multiple nutrient or hormonal signals, we need to identify and examine potential intracellular convergence points or common molecular targets that have the ability to sense glucose, fatty acids, amino acids and hormones. In this review, we focus on the role of carnitine metabolism in neurons regulating energy homeostasis. Hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a novel means for neurons to facilitate and control both nutrient and hormonal feedback. In terms of nutrient regulation, carnitine metabolism regulates hypothalamic fatty acid sensing through the actions of CPT1 and has an underappreciated role in glucose sensing since carnitine metabolism also buffers mitochondrial matrix levels of acetyl-CoA, an allosteric inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and hence glucose metabolism. Studies also show that hypothalamic CPT1 activity also controls hormonal feedback. We hypothesis that hypothalamic carnitine metabolism represents a key molecular target that can concurrently integrate nutrient and hormonal information, which is critical to maintain energy homeostasis. We also suggest this is relevant to broader neuroendocrine research as it predicts that hormonal signaling in the brain varies depending on current nutrient status. Indeed, the metabolic action of ghrelin, leptin or insulin

  20. Nuclear regulation in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key prerequisite to the development of a nuclear program to provide a country's electricity is that governments and the public are confident that a nuclear accident 'will not occur' over the whole life of the program. This can only be achieved by three elements being equally strong: an excellent design, a highly competent and safety conscious operator, and a strong competent regulator with appropriate legal powers. This paper will outline what is necessary to achieve the third of these prerequisites. It will outline the principles by which a Regulatory Agency ensures that licensees meet their responsibility for the safety of their nuclear plant, based on both internationally accepted ideas, the Nuclear Safety Convention, and Canadian practice. The paper will cover legislative principles -- what to include in legislation, what to include in regulations, and what to include in standards and guides. The problem of 'prescriptive requirements' versus 'general performance statements' in regulations will be addressed, and the implications of this problem on ensuring licensees retain responsibility for safety, and on licensees' desire for a high degree of certainty in what is expected of them, both to get a licence and to keep it, in today's economic climate. The paper will also address compliance and the differences between the lawyers' definition of compliance (meeting specific requirements defined by law) and the nuclear safety engineers' view of compliance, (meeting commitments made at the time a licence was given), and how these views can be reconciled. The paper will discuss how Canada's new Nuclear Safety and Control Act has addressed some of these issues, and how the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission is implementing the new Act. The issue of transfer of regulatory programs and technology to the regulatory agencies of countries buying a nuclear plant from Canadian companies will be discussed, and examples given of how this has been accomplished to the benefit of

  1. Situated bio-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prainsack, Barbara; Wahlberg, Ayo

    2013-01-01

    Several years ago, both authors engaged in research into bioscience and biomedical regulation in Asian countries. One of us (BP) explored why the regulatory and discursive embedding of human embryonic stem cell in Israel was much more permissive than elsewhere. The other author (AW) sought to und...... case studies meant bringing what we call ‘ethnographic sensibility’ to our research. This paper discusses the implications of this approach, which often entails rendering visible the contradictions and ‘disorders’ in what seems coherent and orderly....

  2. Regulering og simulering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen-Thøde, Mogens

    Dette notat er primært udarbejdet til brug i undervisningen i kurset Energisystemer og Regulering pa civilingeniørlinien lndeklima og Energiøkonomi på Aalborg Universitet, hvilket naturligvis sætter sit spor bade i omfang og udvælgelse af emner. Hensigten er at give en introduktion til det teoret...... teoretiske grundlag for reguleringsteknikken samtidig med en indføring i simulering af dynamiske systemer, således at læseren får en rimelig forståelse af dynamiske systemers virkemåde og karakteristika....

  3. Ionising radiations regulations 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (UK) Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 come into force on 1.1.86 with supporting Approved Code of Practice. They are discussed under the headings: introduction; notifications to start work with ionising radiations; dose limitation (ALARP -as low as reasonably practicable); designation of controlled and supervised areas; Radiation Protection Advisers to be appointed by employers; Local Rules; Radiation Protection Supervisors to be appointed by employers from among employees; instruction and training; dosimetry and medical surveillance; control of radioactive substances; radiation monitoring; assessment of hazards; articles and equipment. (U.K.)

  4. FACTORS REGULATING LIBERAL TRANSLATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚海红

    2012-01-01

    Literal translation and liberal translation are two important methods and both play key roles in translation.However,some textbooks say that most translations are literal translations while others maintain most are liberal ones,besides,some others suggest a combination of the two.This paper focuses on the facts that regulate liberal translation.Because of the differences in culture,society,history,geography,and so on,there exists a great difference between Chinese language and English language,which does naturally lead to the liberal translation.

  5. The regulation of hunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildtrup, Jens; Jensen, Frank

    multiplied by an individual, variable tax rate. The variable tax rate is, among other things, based on the difference in marginal value of the population between the hunter and the regulator. The paper shows that the population tax/subsidy secures a first-best optimum. Thus, the population tax is a good...... of the individual harvest. However, information about the individual harvest may be costly to obtain. Thus, we may have to look for alternatives to the existing system. This paper proposes a population tax/subsidy as an alternative which is the difference between the actual and optimal population...

  6. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes accomplishments over the past year on understanding of terpene synthesis in mint plants and sage. Specifically reported are the fractionation of 4-S-limonene synthetase, the enzyme responsible for the first committed step to monoterpene synthesis, along with isolation of the corresponding RNA and DNA cloning of its gene; the localization of the enzyme within the oil glands, regulation of transcription and translation of the synthetase, the pathway to camphor biosynthesis,a nd studies on the early stages and branch points of the isoprenoid pathway.

  7. Wiring regulations in brief

    CERN Document Server

    Tricker, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Tired of trawling through the Wiring Regs?Perplexed by Part P?Confused by cables, conductors and circuits?Then look no further! This handy guide provides an on-the-job reference source for Electricians, Designers, Service Engineers, Inspectors, Builders, Students, DIY enthusiastsTopic-based chapters link areas of working practice - such as cables, installations, testing and inspection, special locations - with the specifics of the Regulations themselves. This allows quick and easy identification of the official requirements relating to the situati

  8. REGULATION OF VASCULOGENESIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.B.D. AbbottReproductive Toxicology Division, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by a complex, interactive family of receptors and lig...

  9. Self-Regulation in School

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Ulrike Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Successful self-regulation depends on the ability to regulate the self both motivationally and emotionally in order to protect the self and the learning process against competing personal needs as well as situational distractions. Successful self-regulation further requires students to adequately use metacognitive and cognitive learning strategies to organize the learning process efficiently. The studies presented in this dissertation focus on students' strategies for regulating themselves in...

  10. Mergers in Regulated Industries: Electricity

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis W. Carlton

    2007-01-01

    Mergers in any industry can raise complicated questions about the elimination of competition and the achievement of efficiencies. Mergers in regulated industries such as electricity raise even more complicated issues as the analyst needs to grapple with the constraining effects of regulation, multiple levels of regulation, the ability to evade regulation, and the desire for efficiency. This paper discusses the electricity industry in general and one particular electricity merger that the U.S....

  11. Strategic Behaviour under Regulation Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Nillesen, Paul; Michael G. Pollitt

    2003-01-01

    Liberalisation of generation and supply activities in the electricity sectors is often followed by regulatory reform of distribution networks. In order to improve the efficiency of distribution utilities, some regulators have adopted incentive regulation schemes that rely on performance benchmarking. Although regulation benchmarking can influence the ?regulation game?, the subject has received limited attention. This paper discusses how strategic behaviour can result in inefficient behav...

  12. Nuclear regulation - the Canadian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the Atomic Energy Control Board was established 35 years ago the basic philosophy of nuclear regulation in Canada and the underlying principles of the regulatory process remain essentially unchanged. This paper outlines the Canadian approach to nuclear regulation and explains in practical terms how the principles of regulation are applied. (author)

  13. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

  14. Regulation of ATM induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: ATM, the tumour suppressor protein mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia, is of pivotal importance in controlling the cells primary response to ionising radiation (IR) induced DNA damage. Mutations in ATM which reduce the level of the ATM protein and/or compromise ATM functions are known to give rise to radiosensitivity and defective cell cycle checkpoint control. In response to DNA damage ATM kinase is rapidly activated and initiates downstream signalling to cell cycle control molecules including p53. To investigate additional mechanisms of ATM control we have employed ATM antisense expression in cultured cells, western analyses and immunohistochemistry in situ. We report that ATM can be up-regulated up to 10-fold following exposure to low levels of ionising radiation. ATM radiation-induction was radiation dose dependent while the rapidity of the response indicates a post translational pathway. The concurrent time frames for the radiation-induction of ATM levels and the activation of ATM kinase activity appear to be complimentary in boosting ATM's protective response to IR induced DNA damage, especially in ATM 'low expressing' systems. We also provide the first report of ATM misregulation in 2 cancer patients, indicating that ATM is not only radio-protective but has possible implications in cancer, particularly breast cancer. These results have particular importance in defining the regulation of the ATM protein as an: adaptive radio-response; radio-prognostic market in tumours and normal tissue, and breast cancer marker

  15. Regulation as delegation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Bar-Gill

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to consider the conception of reverse delegation when the government acts a principal and an individual ndash an agent from the point of view of behavioral PrincipalAgent Theory. Methods statistical method sociological polling. Results In diverse areas ndash from retirement savings to consumer credit to prescription drug use to fuel economy and energy efficiency rules to tobacco consumption to food and beverage consumption ndash government makes decisions for us or endeavors to help us make better decisions thus serving as our agent. From the point of view of PrincipalAgent Theory and behavioral PrincipalAgent Theory a great deal of modern regulation can be helpfully evaluated as a hypothetical delegation. Shifting from personal decisions to public goods problems the authors view the idea of reverse delegation with the government as principal and the individuals as agents. They show that the essence of delegation changes depending on the context. The article describes conditions under which various approaches will make sense. Scientific novelty the paper is devoted to the foreign experience of regulation through delegation by the example of a country with developed market economy the USA. It shows the prospects of such approach in solving both the public and the private tasks. Application of PrincipalAgent Theory and behavioral PrincipalAgent Theory is viewed to distinguish between such types of hypothetical delegation as information default rules incentives precommitments mandates and prohibitions. The article considers the benefits and costs of delegation and circumstances in which one or another approach makes sense. Practical significance PrincipalAgent Theory is widely used in economics and political science and can serve as a convenient tool to consider the optimal scale and essence of the assistance rendered to us by the government as our agent. The paper is of interest for the Russian legal science as the institution of

  16. Mechanistic Scrutiny Identifies a Kinetic Role for Cytochrome b5 Regulation of Human Cytochrome P450c17 (CYP17A1, P450 17A1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr N Simonov

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450c17 (P450 17A1, CYP17A1 is a critical enzyme in the synthesis of androgens and is now a target enzyme for the treatment of prostate cancer. Cytochrome P450c17 can exhibit either one or two physiological enzymatic activities differentially regulated by cytochrome b5. How this is achieved remains unknown. Here, comprehensive in silico, in vivo and in vitro analyses were undertaken. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer analysis showed close interactions within living cells between cytochrome P450c17 and cytochrome b5. In silico modeling identified the sites of interaction and confirmed that E48 and E49 residues in cytochrome b5 are essential for activity. Quartz crystal microbalance studies identified specific protein-protein interactions in a lipid membrane. Voltammetric analysis revealed that the wild type cytochrome b5, but not a mutated, E48G/E49G cyt b5, altered the kinetics of electron transfer between the electrode and the P450c17. We conclude that cytochrome b5 can influence the electronic conductivity of cytochrome P450c17 via allosteric, protein-protein interactions.

  17. An autism-associated mutation in CaV1.3 channels has opposing effects on voltage- and Ca2+-dependent regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpitikul, Worawan B.; Dick, Ivy E.; Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    CaV1.3 channels are a major class of L-type Ca2+ channels which contribute to the rhythmicity of the heart and brain. In the brain, these channels are vital for excitation-transcription coupling, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal firing. Moreover, disruption of CaV1.3 function has been associated with several neurological disorders. Here, we focus on the de novo missense mutation A760G which has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To explore the role of this mutation in ASD pathogenesis, we examined the effects of A760G on CaV1.3 channel gating and regulation. Introduction of the mutation severely diminished the Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of CaV1.3 channels, an important feedback system required for Ca2+ homeostasis. This reduction in CDI was observed in two major channel splice variants, though to different extents. Using an allosteric model of channel gating, we found that the underlying mechanism of CDI reduction is likely due to enhanced channel opening within the Ca2+-inactivated mode. Remarkably, the A760G mutation also caused an opposite increase in voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), resulting in a multifaceted mechanism underlying ASD. When combined, these regulatory deficits appear to increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, thus potentially disrupting neuronal development and synapse formation, ultimately leading to ASD. PMID:27255217

  18. An autism-associated mutation in CaV1.3 channels has opposing effects on voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpitikul, Worawan B; Dick, Ivy E; Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, David T

    2016-01-01

    CaV1.3 channels are a major class of L-type Ca(2+) channels which contribute to the rhythmicity of the heart and brain. In the brain, these channels are vital for excitation-transcription coupling, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal firing. Moreover, disruption of CaV1.3 function has been associated with several neurological disorders. Here, we focus on the de novo missense mutation A760G which has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To explore the role of this mutation in ASD pathogenesis, we examined the effects of A760G on CaV1.3 channel gating and regulation. Introduction of the mutation severely diminished the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) of CaV1.3 channels, an important feedback system required for Ca(2+) homeostasis. This reduction in CDI was observed in two major channel splice variants, though to different extents. Using an allosteric model of channel gating, we found that the underlying mechanism of CDI reduction is likely due to enhanced channel opening within the Ca(2+)-inactivated mode. Remarkably, the A760G mutation also caused an opposite increase in voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), resulting in a multifaceted mechanism underlying ASD. When combined, these regulatory deficits appear to increase the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, thus potentially disrupting neuronal development and synapse formation, ultimately leading to ASD. PMID:27255217

  19. A pressure regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device for regulating the pressure of a gas in a glove box comprises a resiliently biassed pressure sensitive diaphragm and a spool valve operable by deflection of the diaphragm. The diaphragm is arranged to be exposed on one side to atmospheric pressure and on the other side to the pressure of the gas in the glove box, and the spool valve is used to control simultaneously the rates at which gas is pumped in and out of the glove box. The valve spool has two axially spaced circumferential grooves A, B which provide communication between conduits C, D and E, F respectively, the flow control along each path being effected by means of apertures in a sleeve within which the spool slides. (author)

  20. NCAM regulates cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna;

    2002-01-01

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells...... independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment to a...... fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine...