WorldWideScience

Sample records for allosteric binding sites

  1. Towards the identification of the allosteric Phe-binding site in phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carluccio, Carla; Fraternali, Franca; Salvatore, Francesco; Fornili, Arianna; Zagari, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is defective in the inherited disorder phenylketonuria. PAH, a tetrameric enzyme, is highly regulated and displays positive cooperativity for its substrate, Phe. Whether Phe binds to an allosteric site is a matter of debate, despite several studies worldwide. To address this issue, we generated a dimeric model for Phe-PAH interactions, by performing molecular docking combined with molecular dynamics simulations on human and rat wild-type sequences and also on a human G46S mutant. Our results suggest that the allosteric Phe-binding site lies at the dimeric interface between the regulatory and the catalytic domains of two adjacent subunits. The structural and dynamical features of the site were characterized in depth and described. Interestingly, our findings provide evidence for lower allosteric Phe-binding ability of the G46S mutant than the human wild-type enzyme. This also explains the disease-causing nature of this mutant.

  2. Evolution of allosteric citrate binding sites on 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Usenik

    Full Text Available As an important part of metabolism, metabolic flux through the glycolytic pathway is tightly regulated. The most complex control is exerted on 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK1 level; this control overrules the regulatory role of other allosteric enzymes. Among other effectors, citrate has been reported to play a vital role in the suppression of this enzyme's activity. In eukaryotes, amino acid residues forming the allosteric binding site for citrate are found both on the N- and the C-terminal region of the enzyme. These site has evolved from the phosphoenolpyruvate/ADP binding site of bacterial PFK1 due to the processes of duplication and tandem fusion of prokaryotic ancestor gene followed by the divergence of the catalytic and effector binding sites. Stricter inhibition of the PFK1 enzyme was needed during the evolution of multi-cellular organisms, and the most stringent control of PFK1 by citrate occurs in vertebrates. By substituting a single amino acid (K557R or K617A as a component of the allosteric binding site in the C-terminal region of human muscle type PFK-M with a residue found in the corresponding site of a fungal enzyme, the inhibitory effect of citrate was attenuated. Moreover, the proteins carrying these single mutations enabled growth of E. coli transformants encoding mutated human PFK-M in a glucose-containing medium that did not support the growth of E. coli transformed with native human PFK-M. Substitution of another residue at the citrate-binding site (D591V of human PFK-M resulted in the complete loss of activity. Detailed analyses revealed that the mutated PFK-M subunits formed dimers but were unable to associate into the active tetrameric holoenzyme. These results suggest that stricter control over glycolytic flux developed in metazoans, whose somatic cells are largely characterized by slow proliferation.

  3. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-05-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5-inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented.

  4. γ-Secretase modulator (GSM) photoaffinity probes reveal distinct allosteric binding sites on presenilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakov, Nikolay; Murrey, Heather E; Crump, Christina J; Pettersson, Martin; Ballard, T Eric; Am Ende, Christopher W; Ahn, Kwangwook; Li, Yue-Ming; Bales, Kelly R; Johnson, Douglas S

    2013-04-05

    γ-Secretase is an intramembrane aspartyl protease that cleaves the amyloid precursor protein to produce neurotoxic β-amyloid peptides (i.e. Aβ42) that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Small molecule γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) have emerged as potential disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer disease because they reduce the formation of Aβ42 while not blocking the processing of γ-secretase substrates. We developed clickable GSM photoaffinity probes with the goal of identifying the target of various classes of GSMs and to better understand their mechanism of action. Here, we demonstrate that the photoaffinity probe E2012-BPyne specifically labels the N-terminal fragment of presenilin-1 (PS1-NTF) in cell membranes as well as in live cells and primary neuronal cultures. The labeling is competed in the presence of the parent imidazole GSM E2012, but not with acid GSM-1, allosteric GSI BMS-708163, or substrate docking site peptide inhibitor pep11, providing evidence that these compounds have distinct binding sites. Surprisingly, we found that the cross-linking of E2012-BPyne to PS1-NTF is significantly enhanced in the presence of the active site-directed GSI L-685,458 (L458). In contrast, L458 does not affect the labeling of the acid GSM photoprobe GSM-5. We also observed that E2012-BPyne specifically labels PS1-NTF (active γ-secretase) but not full-length PS1 (inactive γ-secretase) in ANP.24 cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that multiple binding sites within the γ-secretase complex exist, each of which may contribute to different modes of modulatory action. Furthermore, the enhancement of PS1-NTF labeling by E2012-BPyne in the presence of L458 suggests a degree of cooperativity between the active site of γ-secretase and the modulatory binding site of certain GSMs.

  5. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  6. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eghorn, Laura Friis; Høstgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann

    2014-01-01

    conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed......γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate...... whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive...

  7. Development of a radioligand, [(3)H]LY2119620, to probe the human M(2) and M(4) muscarinic receptor allosteric binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Douglas A; Croy, Carrie H; Xiao, Hongling; Christopoulos, Arthur; Felder, Christian C

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we characterized a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) potentiator, LY2119620 (3-amino-5-chloro-N-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-6-[2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-oxoethoxy]thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide) as a novel probe of the human M2 and M4 allosteric binding sites. Since the discovery of allosteric binding sites on G protein-coupled receptors, compounds targeting these novel sites have been starting to emerge. For example, LY2033298 (3-amino-5-chloro-6-methoxy-4-methyl-thieno(2,3-b)pyridine-2-carboxylic acid cyclopropylamid) and a derivative of this chemical scaffold, VU152100 (3-amino-N-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4,6-dim​ethylthieno[2,3-b]pyridine carboxamide), bind to the human M4 mAChR allosteric pocket. In the current study, we characterized LY2119620, a compound similar in structure to LY2033298 and binds to the same allosteric site on the human M4 mAChRs. However, LY2119620 also binds to an allosteric site on the human M2 subtype. [(3)H]NMS ([(3)H]N-methylscopolamine) binding experiments confirm that LY2119620 does not compete for the orthosteric binding pocket at any of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. Dissociation kinetic studies using [(3)H]NMS further support that LY2119620 binds allosterically to the M2 and M4 mAChRs and was positively cooperative with muscarinic orthosteric agonists. To probe directly the allosteric sites on M2 and M4, we radiolabeled LY2119620. Cooperativity binding of [(3)H]LY2119620 with mAChR orthosteric agonists detects significant changes in Bmax values with little change in Kd, suggesting a G protein-dependent process. Furthermore, [(3)H]LY2119620 was displaced by compounds of similar chemical structure but not by previously described mAChR allosteric compounds such as gallamine or WIN 62,577 (17-β-hydroxy-17-α-ethynyl-δ-4-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole). Our results therefore demonstrate the development of a radioligand, [(3)H]LY2119620 to probe specifically the human M2 and M4 muscarinic

  8. Insecticidal 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides specifically bind with high affinity to a novel allosteric site in housefly GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Nakao, Toshifumi; Sato, Kazuyuki; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs) are an important target for existing insecticides such as fiproles. These insecticides act as noncompetitive antagonists (channel blockers) for insect GABARs by binding to a site within the intrinsic channel of the GABAR. Recently, a novel class of insecticides, 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides (BPBs), was shown to inhibit GABARs by binding to a site distinct from the site for fiproles. We examined the binding site of BPBs in the adult housefly by means of radioligand-binding and electrophysiological experiments. 3-Benzamido-N-(2,6-dimethyl-4-perfluoroisopropylphenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (BPB 1) (the N-demethyl BPB) was a partial, but potent, inhibitor of [(3)H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (GABA channel blocker) binding to housefly head membranes, whereas the 3-(N-methyl)benzamido congener (the N-methyl BPB) had low or little activity. A total of 15 BPB analogs were tested for their abilities to inhibit [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to the head membranes. The N-demethyl analogs, known to be highly effective insecticides, potently inhibited the [(3)H]BPB 1 binding, but the N-methyl analogs did not even though they, too, are considered highly effective. [(3)H]BPB 1 equally bound to the head membranes from wild-type and dieldrin-resistant (rdl mutant) houseflies. GABA allosterically inhibited [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. By contrast, channel blocker-type antagonists enhanced [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to housefly head membranes by increasing the affinity of BPB 1. Antiparasitic macrolides, such as ivermectin B1a, were potent inhibitors of [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. BPB 1 inhibited GABA-induced currents in housefly GABARs expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it failed to inhibit l-glutamate-induced currents in inhibitory l-glutamate receptors. Overall, these findings indicate that BPBs act at a novel allosteric site that is different from the site for channel blocker-type antagonists and that is probably overlapped with the site for macrolides

  9. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura (Pfizer)

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  10. Piracetam defines a new binding site for allosteric modulators of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ahmed H; Oswald, Robert E

    2010-03-11

    Glutamate receptors are the most prevalent excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the vertebrate central nervous system and are important potential drug targets for cognitive enhancement and the treatment of schizophrenia. Allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors promote dimerization by binding to a dimer interface and reducing desensitization and deactivation. The pyrrolidine allosteric modulators, piracetam and aniracetam, were among the first of this class of drugs to be discovered. We have determined the structure of the ligand binding domain of the AMPA receptor subtypes GluA2 and GluA3 with piracetam and a corresponding structure of GluA3 with aniracetam. Both drugs bind to GluA2 and GluA3 in a very similar manner, suggesting little subunit specificity. However, the binding sites for piracetam and aniracetam differ considerably. Aniracetam binds to a symmetrical site at the center of the dimer interface. Piracetam binds to multiple sites along the dimer interface with low occupation, one of which is a unique binding site for potential allosteric modulators. This new site may be of importance in the design of new allosteric regulators.

  11. Allosteric enhancers, allosteric agonists and ago-allosteric modulators: where do they bind and how do they act?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Birgitte

    2007-01-01

    Many small-molecule agonists also display allosteric properties. Such ago-allosteric modulators act as co-agonists, providing additive efficacy--instead of partial antagonism--and they can affect--and often improve--the potency of the endogenous agonist. Surprisingly, the apparent binding sites...... different binding modes. In another, dimeric, receptor scenario, the endogenous agonist binds to one protomer while the ago-allosteric modulator binds to the other, 'allosteric' protomer. It is suggested that testing for ago-allosteric properties should be an integral part of the agonist drug discovery...... process because a compound that acts with--rather than against--the endogenous agonist could be an optimal agonist drug....

  12. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-05

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  13. Allosteric effects of R- and S-citalopram on the human 5-HT transporter: evidence for distinct high- and low-affinity binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Gether, Ulrik; Rasmussen, Søren G

    2007-01-01

    SERT and the three mutants. Further, R-citalopram previously thought of as an inactive enantiomer strongly attenuated dissociation of the wild-type [(3)H]-imipramine:hSERT complex, whereas S-citalopram had almost no effect on this complex. These results suggest that 1: The allosteric site on hSERT is distinct from...... the site to which S-citalopram binds with high affinity. 2: The allosteric effects of R-citalopram on the dissociation of [(3)H]-imipramine from hSERT indicate that R-citalopram introduces a conformational change in hSERT....

  14. An allosteric binding site at the human serotonin transporter mediates the inhibition of escitalopram by R-citalopram: kinetic binding studies with the ALI/VFL-SI/TT mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huailing; Hansen, Kasper B; Boyle, Noel J; Han, Kiho; Muske, Galina; Huang, Xinyan; Egebjerg, Jan; Sánchez, Connie

    2009-10-25

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) has primary and allosteric binding sites for escitalopram and R-citalopram. Previous studies have established that the interaction of these two compounds at a low affinity allosteric binding site of hSERT can affect the dissociation of [(3)H]escitalopram from hSERT. The allosteric binding site involves a series of residues in the 10th, 11th, and 12th trans-membrane domains of hSERT. The low affinity allosteric activities of escitalopram and R-citalopram are essentially eliminated in a mutant hSERT with changes in some of these residues, namely A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T, as measured in dissociation binding studies. We confirm that in association binding experiments, R-citalopram at clinically relevant concentrations reduces the association rate of [(3)H]escitalopram as a ligand to wild type hSERT. We demonstrate that the ability of R-citalopram to reduce the association rate of escitalopram is also abolished in the mutant hSERT (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T), along with the expected disruption the low affinity allosteric function on dissociation binding. This suggests that the allosteric binding site mediates both the low affinity and higher affinity interactions between R-citalopram, escitalopram, and hSERT. Our data add an additional structural basis for the different efficacies of escitalopram compared to racemic citalopram reported in animal studies and clinical trials, and substantiate the hypothesis that hSERT has complex allosteric mechanisms underlying the unexplained in vivo activities of its inhibitors.

  15. Identification of an Allosteric Binding Site on Human Lysosomal Alpha-Galactosidase Opens the Way to New Pharmacological Chaperones for Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    den-Haan, Helena; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Del Prete, Rosita; Liguori, Ludovica; Cimmaruta, Chiara; Lukas, Jan; Andreotti, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Personalized therapies are required for Fabry disease due to its large phenotypic spectrum and numerous different genotypes. In principle, missense mutations that do not affect the active site could be rescued with pharmacological chaperones. At present pharmacological chaperones for Fabry disease bind the active site and couple a stabilizing effect, which is required, to an inhibitory effect, which is deleterious. By in silico docking we identified an allosteric hot-spot for ligand binding where a drug-like compound, 2,6-dithiopurine, binds preferentially. 2,6-dithiopurine stabilizes lysosomal alpha-galactosidase in vitro and rescues a mutant that is not responsive to a mono-therapy with previously described pharmacological chaperones, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin and galactose in a cell based assay. PMID:27788225

  16. Study and reengineering of the binding sites and allosteric regulation of biosynthetic threonine deaminase by isoleucine and valine in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Zhen; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2013-04-01

    Biosynthetic threonine deaminase (TD) is a key enzyme for the synthesis of isoleucine which is allosterically inhibited and activated by Ile and Val, respectively. The binding sites of Ile and Val and the mechanism of their regulations in TD are not clear, but essential for a rational design of efficient productive strain(s) for Ile and related amino acids. In this study, structure-based computational approach and site-directed mutagenesis were combined to identify the potential binding sites of Ile and Val in Escherichia coli TD. Our results demonstrated that each regulatory domain of the TD monomer possesses two nonequivalent effector-binding sites. The residues R362, E442, G445, A446, Y369, I460, and S461 only interact with Ile while E347, G350, and F352 are involved not only in the Ile binding but also in the Val binding. By further considering enzyme kinetic data, we propose a concentration-dependent mechanism of the allosteric regulation of TD by Ile and Val. For the construction of Ile overproducing strain, a novel TD mutant with double mutation of F352A/R362F was also created, which showed both higher activity and much stronger resistance to Ile inhibition comparing to those of wild-type enzyme. Overexpression of this mutant TD in E. coli JW3591 significantly increased the production of ketobutyrate and Ile in comparison to the reference strains overexpressing wild-type TD or the catabolic threonine deaminase (TdcB). This work builds a solid basis for the reengineering of TD and related microorganisms for Ile production.

  17. An Allosteric Cross-Talk Between the Activation Loop and the ATP Binding Site Regulates the Activation of Src Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheta-Martínez, Encarna; Saladino, Giorgio; Morando, Maria Agnese; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Lelli, Moreno; Sutto, Ludovico; D'Amelio, Nicola; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation loop is a fundamental step in the activation of most protein kinases. In the case of the Src tyrosine kinase, a prototypical kinase due to its role in cancer and its historic importance, phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 in the activation loop is known to rigidify the structure and contribute to the switch from the inactive to a fully active form. However, whether or not phosphorylation is able per-se to induce a fully active conformation, that efficiently binds ATP and phosphorylates the substrate, is less clear. Here we employ a combination of solution NMR and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to fully map the effects of phosphorylation and ATP/ADP cofactor loading on the conformational landscape of Src tyrosine kinase. We find that both phosphorylation and cofactor binding are needed to induce a fully active conformation. What is more, we find a complex interplay between the A-loop and the hinge motion where the phosphorylation of the activation-loop has a significant allosteric effect on the dynamics of the C-lobe.

  18. LIBSA--a method for the determination of ligand-binding preference to allosteric sites on receptor ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocker, Harrison J; Rambahal, Nandini; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2014-02-24

    Incorporation of receptor flexibility into computational drug discovery through the relaxed complex scheme is well suited for screening against a single binding site. In the absence of a known pocket or if there are multiple potential binding sites, it may be necessary to do docking against the entire surface of the target (global docking). However no suitable and easy-to-use tool is currently available to rank global docking results based on the preference of a ligand for a given binding site. We have developed a protocol, termed LIBSA for LIgand Binding Specificity Analysis, that analyzes multiple docked poses against a single or ensemble of receptor conformations and returns a metric for the relative binding to a specific region of interest. By using novel filtering algorithms and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the relative ligand-binding frequency at different pockets can be calculated and compared quantitatively. Ligands can then be triaged by their tendency to bind to a site instead of ranking by affinity alone. The method thus facilitates screening libraries of ligand cores against a large library of receptor conformations without prior knowledge of specific pockets, which is especially useful to search for hits that selectively target a particular site. We demonstrate the utility of LIBSA by showing that it correctly identifies known ligand binding sites and predicts the relative preference of a set of related ligands for different pockets on the same receptor.

  19. Computational fragment-based drug design to explore the hydrophobic sub-pocket of the mitotic kinesin Eg5 allosteric binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguievetskaia, Ksenia; Martin-Chanas, Laetitia; Vorotyntsev, Artem; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Brotel, Xavier; Adcock, Stewart A.; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Delfaud, Francois; Moriaud, Fabrice

    2009-08-01

    Eg5, a mitotic kinesin exclusively involved in the formation and function of the mitotic spindle has attracted interest as an anticancer drug target. Eg5 is co-crystallized with several inhibitors bound to its allosteric binding pocket. Each of these occupies a pocket formed by loop 5/helix α2 (L5/α2). Recently designed inhibitors additionally occupy a hydrophobic pocket of this site. The goal of the present study was to explore this hydrophobic pocket with our MED-SuMo fragment-based protocol, and thus discover novel chemical structures that might bind as inhibitors. The MED-SuMo software is able to compare and superimpose similar interaction surfaces upon the whole protein data bank (PDB). In a fragment-based protocol, MED-SuMo retrieves MED-Portions that encode protein-fragment binding sites and are derived from cross-mining protein-ligand structures with libraries of small molecules. Furthermore we have excluded intra-family MED-Portions derived from Eg5 ligands that occupy the hydrophobic pocket and predicted new potential ligands by hybridization that would fill simultaneously both pockets. Some of the latter having original scaffolds and substituents in the hydrophobic pocket are identified in libraries of synthetically accessible molecules by the MED-Search software.

  20. Kinetic analysis of ligand binding to the Ehrlich cell nucleoside transporter: Pharmacological characterization of allosteric interactions with the sup 3 Hnitrobenzylthioinosine binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, J.R. (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1991-06-01

    Kinetic analysis of the binding of {sup 3}Hnitrobenzylthioinosine ({sup 3}H NBMPR) to Ehrlich ascites tumor cell plasma membranes was conducted in the presence and absence of a variety of nucleoside transport inhibitors and substrates. The association of {sup 3}H NBMPR with Ehrlich cell membranes occurred in two distinct phases, possibly reflecting functional conformation changes in the {sup 3}HNBMPR binding site/nucleoside transporter complex. Inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR, tested at submaximal inhibitory concentrations, generally decreased the rate of association of {sup 3}HNBMPR, but the magnitude of this effect varied significantly with the agent tested. Adenosine and diazepam had relatively minor effects on the association rate, whereas dipyridamole and mioflazine slowed the rate dramatically. Inhibitors of nucleoside transport also decreased the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR, with an order of potency significantly different from their relative potencies as inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR. Dilazep, dipyridamole, and mioflazine were effective inhibitors of both {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation and equilibrium binding. The lidoflazine analogue R75231, on the other hand, had no effect on the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR at concentrations below 300 microM, even though it was one of the most potent inhibitors of {sup 3}HNBMPR binding tested (Ki less than 100 nM). In contrast, a series of natural substrates for the nucleoside transport system enhanced the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR with an order of effectiveness that paralleled their relative affinities for the permeant site of the transporter. The most effective enhancers of {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation, however, were the benzodiazepines diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and triazolam.

  1. Change in allosteric network affects binding affinities of PDZ domains: analysis through perturbation response scanning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Nevin Gerek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The allosteric mechanism plays a key role in cellular functions of several PDZ domain proteins (PDZs and is directly linked to pharmaceutical applications; however, it is a challenge to elaborate the nature and extent of these allosteric interactions. One solution to this problem is to explore the dynamics of PDZs, which may provide insights about how intramolecular communication occurs within a single domain. Here, we develop an advancement of perturbation response scanning (PRS that couples elastic network models with linear response theory (LRT to predict key residues in allosteric transitions of the two most studied PDZs (PSD-95 PDZ3 domain and hPTP1E PDZ2 domain. With PRS, we first identify the residues that give the highest mean square fluctuation response upon perturbing the binding sites. Strikingly, we observe that the residues with the highest mean square fluctuation response agree with experimentally determined residues involved in allosteric transitions. Second, we construct the allosteric pathways by linking the residues giving the same directional response upon perturbation of the binding sites. The predicted intramolecular communication pathways reveal that PSD-95 and hPTP1E have different pathways through the dynamic coupling of different residue pairs. Moreover, our analysis provides a molecular understanding of experimentally observed hidden allostery of PSD-95. We show that removing the distal third alpha helix from the binding site alters the allosteric pathway and decreases the binding affinity. Overall, these results indicate that (i dynamics plays a key role in allosteric regulations of PDZs, (ii the local changes in the residue interactions can lead to significant changes in the dynamics of allosteric regulations, and (iii this might be the mechanism that each PDZ uses to tailor their binding specificities regulation.

  2. A Random Forest Model for Predicting Allosteric and Functional Sites on Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ava S-Y; Westwood, Nicholas J; Brear, Paul; Rogers, Graeme W; Mavridis, Lazaros; Mitchell, John B O

    2016-04-01

    We created a computational method to identify allosteric sites using a machine learning method trained and tested on protein structures containing bound ligand molecules. The Random Forest machine learning approach was adopted to build our three-way predictive model. Based on descriptors collated for each ligand and binding site, the classification model allows us to assign protein cavities as allosteric, regular or orthosteric, and hence to identify allosteric sites. 43 structural descriptors per complex were derived and were used to characterize individual protein-ligand binding sites belonging to the three classes, allosteric, regular and orthosteric. We carried out a separate validation on a further unseen set of protein structures containing the ligand 2-(N-cyclohexylamino) ethane sulfonic acid (CHES).

  3. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Zachariah H; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T; Shaw, David E; Seeliger, Markus A

    2015-01-20

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity.

  4. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  5. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  6. Transfer of noncovalent chiral information along an optically inactive helical peptide chain: allosteric control of asymmetry of the C-terminal site by external molecule that binds to the N-terminal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousaka, Naoki; Inai, Yoshihito

    2009-02-20

    This study aims at demonstrating end-to-end transfer of noncovalent chiral information along a peptide chain. The domino-type induction of helical sense is proven by using achiral peptides 1-m of bis-chromophoric sequence with different chain lengths: H-(Aib-Delta(Z)Phe)(m)-(Aib-Delta(Z)Bip)(2)-Aib-OCH(3) [m = 2, 4, and 6; Aib = alpha-aminoisobutyric acid; Delta(Z)Phe = (Z)-alpha,beta-didehydrophenylalanine; Delta(Z)Bip = (Z)-beta-(4,4'-biphenyl)-alpha,beta-didehydroalanine]. They all showed the tendency to adopt a 3(10)-helix. Whereas peptide 1-m originally shows no circular dichroism (CD) signals, marked CD signals were induced at around 270-320 nm based on both the beta-aryl didehydroresidues by chiral Boc-proline (Boc = tert-butoxycarbonyl). The observed CD spectra were interpreted on the basis of the exciton chirality method and theoretical CD simulation of several helical conformations that were energy-minimized. The experimental and theoretical CD analysis reveals that Boc-l-proline induces the preference for a right-handed helicity in the whole chain of 1-m. Such noncovalent chiral induction was not observed in the corresponding N-terminally protected 1-m. Obviously, helicity induction in 1-m originates from the binding of Boc-proline to the N-terminal site. In the 17-mer (1-6), the information of helix sense reaches the 16th residue from the N-terminus. We have monitored precise transfer of noncovalent chiral stimulus along a helical peptide chain. The present study also proposes a primitive allosteric model of a single protein-mimicking backbone. Here chiral molecule binding the N-terminal site of 1-6 controls the chiroptical signals and helical sense of the C-terminal site about 30 A away.

  7. Advances in the research of tageting DFG-out allosteric binding site of inactive kinases%靶向非活性激酶DFG-out变构结合位点的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭文; 张小猛; 张仓; 王芳; 尤启冬

    2012-01-01

    目前大多数激酶抑制剂是通过模拟ATP的结构,以识别激酶的活性构象来竞争性结合于ATP结合位点,从而抑制激酶的自磷酸化和下游的信号传导.然而,最近人们对已上市药物甲磺酸伊马替尼、尼罗替尼及对甲苯磺酸索拉非尼的晶体结构研究发现,在非活性激酶中ATP结合位点的相邻位置存在着第二个能与激酶抑制剂结合的位点——DFG-out变构结合位点.该位点的发现为以蛋白激酶为靶标的小分子激酶抑制剂的设计与开发指明了新的方向,成为抗肿瘤研究领域的新热点之一.因此,本文对非活性激酶的DFG-out变构结合位点的发现、非活性激酶与其抑制剂的结合方式及处于临床研究阶段的非活性激酶抑制剂进行了综述.%Up to nowadays, a majority of kinase inhibitors identify the activity conformation of protein ki-nase to integrate competitively with ATP binding site by simulating the structure of ATP. In this way, kinase inhibitors can inhibit kinase autophosphorylation and restrain signal transduction of downstream. However, the crystal structures of imatinib mesylate, nilotnib and sorafenib tosylate have revealed a secondary binding site adjacent to the ATP binding site, which is also bound by kinase inhibitors, known as the DFG-out allosteric binding site, in the inactive conformation of protein kinase. The discovery of the site has pointed out a new direction for the design and development of small molecule kinase inhibitors, which lakes protein kinase as a target. This becomes a new hotspot in antineoplastic research field. In this paper, we reviewed the discovery and inhibitors of the DFG-out allosteric binding site, and the binding mode between inactive kinases, as well as the inactive kinase inhibitors in clinical studies.

  8. Use of binding enthalpy to drive an allosteric transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick H; Beckett, Dorothy

    2005-03-01

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor is an allosteric DNA binding protein and is activated by the small molecule bio-5'-AMP. Binding of this small molecule promotes transcription repression complex assembly between the repressor and the biotin operator of the biotin biosynthetic operon. The ability of the adenylate to activate the assembly process reflects its effect on biotin repressor dimerization. Thus concomitant with small molecule binding the free energy of repressor dimerization becomes more favorable by approximately -4 kcal/mol. The structural, dynamic, and energetic changes in the repressor monomer that accompany allosteric activation are not known. In this work the thermodynamics of binding of four allosteric activators to the repressor have been characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry. While binding of two of the effectors results in relatively modest activation of the dimerization process, binding of the other two small molecules, including the physiological effector, leads to large changes in repressor dimerization energetics. Results of the calorimetric measurements indicate that strong effector binding is accompanied by an enthalpically costly transition in the protein. This transition is "paid for" by the enthalpy that would have otherwise been realized from the formation of noncovalent bonds between the ligand and repressor monomer.

  9. Reciprocal allosteric modulation of carbon monoxide and warfarin binding to ferrous human serum heme-albumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Bocedi

    Full Text Available Human serum albumin (HSA, the most abundant protein in human plasma, could be considered as a prototypic monomeric allosteric protein, since the ligand-dependent conformational adaptability of HSA spreads beyond the immediate proximity of the binding site(s. As a matter of fact, HSA is a major transport protein in the bloodstream and the regulation of the functional allosteric interrelationships between the different binding sites represents a fundamental information for the knowledge of its transport function. Here, kinetics and thermodynamics of the allosteric modulation: (i of carbon monoxide (CO binding to ferrous human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(II by warfarin (WF, and (ii of WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II by CO are reported. All data were obtained at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Kinetics of CO and WF binding to the FA1 and FA7 sites of HSA-heme-Fe(II, respectively, follows a multi-exponential behavior (with the same relative percentage for the two ligands. This can be accounted for by the existence of multiple conformations and/or heme-protein axial coordination forms of HSA-heme-Fe(II. The HSA-heme-Fe(II populations have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, indicating the coexistence of different species characterized by four-, five- and six-coordination of the heme-Fe atom. As a whole, these results suggest that: (i upon CO binding a conformational change of HSA-heme-Fe(II takes place (likely reflecting the displacement of an endogenous ligand by CO, and (ii CO and/or WF binding brings about a ligand-dependent variation of the HSA-heme-Fe(II population distribution of the various coordinating species. The detailed thermodynamic and kinetic analysis here reported allows a quantitative description of the mutual allosteric effect of CO and WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II.

  10. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  11. Identification of the Allosteric Site for Phenylalanine in Rat Phenylalanine Hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengnan; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2016-04-01

    Liver phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) is an allosteric enzyme that requires activation by phenylalanine for full activity. The location of the allosteric site for phenylalanine has not been established. NMR spectroscopy of the isolated regulatory domain (RDPheH(25-117) is the regulatory domain of PheH lacking residues 1-24) of the rat enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine is consistent with formation of a side-by-side ACT dimer. Six residues in RDPheH(25-117) were identified as being in the phenylalanine-binding site on the basis of intermolecular NOEs between unlabeled phenylalanine and isotopically labeled protein. The location of these residues is consistent with two allosteric sites per dimer, with each site containing residues from both monomers. Site-specific variants of five of the residues (E44Q, A47G, L48V, L62V, and H64N) decreased the affinity of RDPheH(25-117) for phenylalanine based on the ability to stabilize the dimer. Incorporation of the A47G, L48V, and H64N mutations into the intact protein increased the concentration of phenylalanine required for activation. The results identify the location of the allosteric site as the interface of the regulatory domain dimer formed in activated PheH.

  12. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, B. R. C.; Schaub, M. T.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2016-08-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites.

  13. Changes in BQCA Allosteric Modulation of [(3)H]NMS Binding to Human Cortex within Schizophrenia and by Divalent Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian; Hopper, Shaun; Conn, P Jeffrey; Scarr, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Stimulation of the cortical muscarinic M1 receptor (CHRM1) is proposed as a treatment for schizophrenia, a hypothesis testable using CHRM1 allosteric modulators. Allosteric modulators have been shown to change the activity of CHRMs using cloned human CHRMs and CHRM knockout mice but not human CNS, a prerequisite for them working in humans. Here we show in vitro that BQCA, a positive allosteric CHRM1 modulator, brings about the expected change in affinity of the CHRM1 orthosteric site for acetylcholine in human cortex. Moreover, this effect of BQCA is reduced in the cortex of a subset of subjects with schizophrenia, separated into a discrete population because of a profound loss of cortical [(3)H]pirenzepine binding. Surprisingly, there was no change in [(3)H]NMS binding to the cortex from this subset or those with schizophrenia but without a marked loss of cortical CHRM1. Hence, we explored the nature of [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding to human cortex and showed total [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding was reduced by Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]NMS binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]pirenzepine was reduced by Mg(2+) and enhanced by Zn(2+), whereas BQCA effects on [(3)H]NMS, but not [(3)H]pirenzepine, binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+). These data suggest the orthosteric and allosteric sites on CHRMs respond differently to divalent cations and the effects of allosteric modulation of the cortical CHRM1 is reduced in a subset of people with schizophrenia, a finding that may have ramifications for the use of CHRM1 allosteric modulators in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  14. Identification of the allosteric regulatory site of insulysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Noinaj

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  15. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.; Gerrard, Juliet Ann

    2011-06-24

    Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. Principal Findings The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  16. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W. (U. Sao Paulo); (Kentucky)

    2012-05-25

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the A{beta} peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  17. Intrasteric control of AMPK via the gamma1 subunit AMP allosteric regulatory site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julian; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Van Denderen, Bryce J W; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W; Witters, Lee A; Stapleton, David; Kemp, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a alphabetagamma heterotrimer that is activated in response to both hormones and intracellular metabolic stress signals. AMPK is regulated by phosphorylation on the alpha subunit and by AMP allosteric control previously thought to be mediated by both alpha and gamma subunits. Here we present evidence that adjacent gamma subunit pairs of CBS repeat sequences (after Cystathionine Beta Synthase) form an AMP binding site related to, but distinct from the classical AMP binding site in phosphorylase, that can also bind ATP. The AMP binding site of the gamma(1) CBS1/CBS2 pair, modeled on the structures of the CBS sequences present in the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase crystal structure, contains three arginine residues 70, 152, and 171 and His151. The yeast gamma homolog, snf4 contains a His151Gly substitution, and when this is introduced into gamma(1), AMP allosteric control is substantially lost and explains why the yeast snf1p/snf4p complex is insensitive to AMP. Arg70 in gamma(1) corresponds to the site of mutation in human gamma(2) and pig gamma(3) genes previously identified to cause an unusual cardiac phenotype and glycogen storage disease, respectively. Mutation of any of AMP binding site Arg residues to Gln substantially abolishes AMP allosteric control in expressed AMPK holoenzyme. The Arg/Gln mutations also suppress the previously described inhibitory properties of ATP and render the enzyme constitutively active. We propose that ATP acts as an intrasteric inhibitor by bridging the alpha and gamma subunits and that AMP functions to derepress AMPK activity.

  18. Mapping of the Allosteric Site in Cholesterol Hydroxylase CYP46A1 for Efavirenz, a Drug That Stimulates Enzyme Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kyle W; Mast, Natalia; Hudgens, Jeffrey W; Lin, Joseph B; Turko, Illarion V; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-05-27

    Cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is a microsomal enzyme and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase that controls cholesterol elimination from the brain. This P450 is also a potential target for Alzheimer disease because it can be activated pharmacologically by some marketed drugs, as exemplified by efavirenz, the anti-HIV medication. Previously, we suggested that pharmaceuticals activate CYP46A1 allosterically through binding to a site on the cytosolic protein surface, which is different from the enzyme active site facing the membrane. Here we identified this allosteric site for efavirenz on CYP46A1 by using a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to MS, computational modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and analysis of the CYP46A1 crystal structure. We also mapped the binding region for the CYP46A1 redox partner oxidoreductase and found that the allosteric and redox partner binding sites share a common border. On the basis of the data obtained, we propose the mechanism of CYP46A1 allostery and the pathway for the signal transmission from the P450 allosteric site to the active site.

  19. How allosteric effectors can bind to the same protein residue and produce opposite shifts in the allosteric equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, D J; Safo, M K; Boyiri, T; Danso-Danquah, R E; Kister, J; Poyart, C

    1995-11-21

    Monoaldehyde allosteric effectors of hemoglobin were designed, using molecular modeling software (GRID), to form a Schiff base adduct with the Val 1 alpha N-terminal nitrogens and interact via a salt bridge with Arg 141 alpha of the opposite subunit. The designed molecules were synthesized if not available. It was envisioned that the molecules, which are aldehyde acids, would produce a high-affinity hemoglobin with potential interest as antisickling agents similar to other aldehyde acids reported earlier. X-ray crystallographic analysis indicated that the aldehyde acids did bind as modeled de novo in symmetry-related pairs to the alpha subunit N-terminal nitrogens. However, oxygen equilibrium curves run on solutions obtained from T- (tense) state hemoglobin crystals of reacted effector molecules produced low-affinity hemoglobins. The shift in the allosteric equilibrium was opposite to that expected. We conclude that the observed shift in allosteric equilibrium was due to the acid group on the monoaldehyde aromatic ring that forms a salt bridge with the guanidinium ion of Arg 141 alpha on the opposite subunit. This added constraint to the T-state structure that ties two subunits across the molecular symmetry axis shifts the equilibrium further toward the T-state. We tested this idea by comparing aldehydes that form Schiff base interactions with the same Val 1 alpha residues but do not interact across the dimer subunit symmetry axis (a new one in this study with no acid group and others that have had determined crystal structures). The latter aldehydes shift the allosteric equilibrium toward the R-state. A hypothesis to predict the direction in shift of the allosteric equilibrium is made and indicates that it is not exclusively where the molecule binds but how it interacts with the protein to stabilize or destabilize the T- (tense) allosteric state.

  20. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    CERN Document Server

    Amor, Benjamin R C; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric regulation is central to many biochemical processes. Allosteric sites provide a target to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methods to predict them. Here, we present an efficient graph-theoretical approach for identifying allosteric sites and the mediating interactions that connect them to the active site. Using an atomistic graph with edges weighted by covalent and non-covalent bond energies, we obtain a bond-to-bond propensity that quantifies the effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. We use this propensity to detect the sites and communication pathways most strongly linked to the active site, assessing their significance through quantile regression and comparison against a reference set of 100 generic proteins. We exemplify our method in detail with three well-studied allosteric proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting the location of the allosteric site and identifying key allosteric interactions. Consistent prediction of...

  1. Structural insight to mutation effects uncover a common allosteric site in class C GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Boesgaard, Michael W; Munk, Christian;

    2017-01-01

    . Combining pharmacological site-directed mutagenesis data with the recent class C GPCR experimental structures will provide a foundation for rational design of new therapeutics. RESULTS: We uncover one common site for both positive and negative modulators with different amino acid layouts that can......MOTIVATION: Class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate important physiological functions and allosteric modulators binding to the transmembrane domain constitute an attractive and, due to a lack of structural insight, a virtually unexplored potential for therapeutics and the food industry...

  2. Allosteric modulation of neurotoxin binding to voltage-sensitive sodium channels by Ptychodiscus brevis toxin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, R G; Jover, E; Couraud, F; Baden, D G; Catterall, W A

    1987-03-01

    The effects of Ptychodiscus brevis toxin 2 (PbTx-2) on the binding of neurotoxins at four different neurotoxin receptor sites on voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes were examined. Binding of saxitoxin at neurotoxin receptor site 1 and Leiurus quinquestriatus alpha-scorpion toxin (LqTx) at neurotoxin receptor site 3 was unaffected. PbTx-2 enhanced binding of batrachotoxinin A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B) to neurotoxin receptor site 2 and Centruroides suffusus suffusus beta-scorpion toxin (CsTx II) to site 4 on sodium channels. These results support the proposal that PbTx-2 and related toxins act at a new receptor site (site 5) that has not been previously analyzed in binding experiments. Half-maximal effects of PbTx-2 were observed in the range of 20-50 nM PbTx-2. The enhancement of BTX-B binding was reduced by depolarization. Saturating concentrations of PbTx-2 reduced KD values for binding of BTX-B and CsTx-II 2.9-fold and 2.6-fold, respectively. The effects of PbTx-2 and LqTx in enhancing BTX-B binding were synergistic. A model involving both preferential binding of BTX-B, PbTx-2, LqTx, and CsTx II to active states of sodium channels and allosteric interactions among the four receptor sites at which these toxins act accommodates these and previous results.

  3. Targeting the Akt1 allosteric site to identify novel scaffolds through virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Oya Gursoy; Olmez, Elif Ozkirimli; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2014-02-01

    Preclinical data and tumor specimen studies report that AKT kinases are related to many human cancers. Therefore, identification and development of small molecule inhibitors targeting AKT and its signaling pathway can be therapeutic in treatment of cancer. Numerous studies report inhibitors that target the ATP-binding pocket in the kinase domains, but the similarity of this site, within the kinase family makes selectivity a major problem. The sequence identity amongst PH domains is significantly lower than that in kinase domains and developing more selective inhibitors is possible if PH domain is targeted. This in silico screening study is the first time report toward the identification of potential allosteric inhibitors expected to bind the cavity between kinase and PH domains of Akt1. Structural information of Akt1 was used to develop structure-based pharmacophore models comprising hydrophobic, acceptor, donor and ring features. The 3D structural information of previously identified allosteric Akt inhibitors obtained from literature was employed to develop a ligand-based pharmacophore model. Database was generated with drug like subset of ZINC and screening was performed based on 3D similarity to the selected pharmacophore hypotheses. Binding modes and affinities of the ligands were predicted by Glide software. Top scoring hits were further analyzed considering 2D similarity between the compounds, interactions with Akt1, fitness to pharmacophore models, ADME, druglikeness criteria and Induced-Fit docking. Using virtual screening methodologies, derivatives of 3-methyl-xanthine, quinoline-4-carboxamide and 2-[4-(cyclohexa-1,3-dien-1-yl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]phenol were proposed as potential leads for allosteric inhibition of Akt1.

  4. Multiple allosteric effectors control the affinity of DasR for its target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenconi, Elodie; Urem, Mia; Świątek-Połatyńska, Magdalena A; Titgemeyer, Fritz; Muller, Yves A; van Wezel, Gilles P; Rigali, Sébastien

    2015-08-14

    The global transcriptional regulator DasR connects N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) utilization to the onset of morphological and chemical differentiation in the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor. Previous work revealed that glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P) acts as an allosteric effector which disables binding by DasR to its operator sites (called dre, for DasR responsive element) and allows derepression of DasR-controlled/GlcNAc-dependent genes. To unveil the mechanism by which DasR controls S. coelicolor development, we performed a series of electromobility shift assays with histidine-tagged DasR protein, which suggested that N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6P) could also inhibit the formation of DasR-dre complexes and perhaps even more efficiently than GlcN-6P. The possibility that GlcNAc-6P is indeed an efficient allosteric effector of DasR was further confirmed by the high and constitutive activity of the DasR-repressed nagKA promoter in the nagA mutant, which lacks GlcNAc-6P deaminase activity and therefore accumulates GlcNAc-6P. In addition, we also observed that high concentrations of organic or inorganic phosphate enhanced binding of DasR to its recognition site, suggesting that the metabolic status of the cell could determine the selectivity of DasR in vivo, and hence its effect on the expression of its regulon.

  5. Identification of potential small molecule allosteric modulator sites on IL-1R1 ectodomain using accelerated conformational sampling method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yie Yang

    Full Text Available The interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R is the founding member of the interleukin 1 receptor family which activates innate immune response by its binding to cytokines. Reports showed dysregulation of cytokine production leads to aberrant immune cells activation which contributes to auto-inflammatory disorders and diseases. Current therapeutic strategies focus on utilizing antibodies or chimeric cytokine biologics. The large protein-protein interaction interface between cytokine receptor and cytokine poses a challenge in identifying binding sites for small molecule inhibitor development. Based on the significant conformational change of IL-1R type 1 (IL-1R1 ectodomain upon binding to different ligands observed in crystal structures, we hypothesized that transient small molecule binding sites may exist when IL-1R1 undergoes conformational transition and thus suitable for inhibitor development. Here, we employed accelerated molecular dynamics (MD simulation to efficiently sample conformational space of IL-1R1 ectodomain. Representative IL-1R1 ectodomain conformations determined from the hierarchy cluster analysis were analyzed by the SiteMap program which leads to identify small molecule binding sites at the protein-protein interaction interface and allosteric modulator locations. The cosolvent mapping analysis using phenol as the probe molecule further confirms the allosteric modulator site as a binding hotspot. Eight highest ranked fragment molecules identified from in silico screening at the modulator site were evaluated by MD simulations. Four of them restricted the IL-1R1 dynamical motion to inactive conformational space. The strategy from this study, subject to in vitro experimental validation, can be useful to identify small molecule compounds targeting the allosteric modulator sites of IL-1R and prevent IL-1R from binding to cytokine by trapping IL-1R in inactive conformations.

  6. Controlling allosteric networks in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokholyan, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel methodology based on graph theory and discrete molecular dynamics simulations for delineating allosteric pathways in proteins. We use this methodology to uncover the structural mechanisms responsible for coupling of distal sites on proteins and utilize it for allosteric modulation of proteins. We will present examples where inference of allosteric networks and its rewiring allows us to ``rescue'' cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a protein associated with fatal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. We also use our methodology to control protein function allosterically. We design a novel protein domain that can be inserted into identified allosteric site of target protein. Using a drug that binds to our domain, we alter the function of the target protein. We successfully tested this methodology in vitro, in living cells and in zebrafish. We further demonstrate transferability of our allosteric modulation methodology to other systems and extend it to become ligh-activatable.

  7. Assessing the structural conservation of protein pockets to study functional and allosteric sites: implications for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daura Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the classical, active-site oriented drug-development approach reaching its limits, protein ligand-binding sites in general and allosteric sites in particular are increasingly attracting the interest of medicinal chemists in the search for new types of targets and strategies to drug development. Given that allostery represents one of the most common and powerful means to regulate protein function, the traditional drug discovery approach of targeting active sites can be extended by targeting allosteric or regulatory protein pockets that may allow the discovery of not only novel drug-like inhibitors, but activators as well. The wealth of available protein structural data can be exploited to further increase our understanding of allosterism, which in turn may have therapeutic applications. A first step in this direction is to identify and characterize putative effector sites that may be present in already available structural data. Results We performed a large-scale study of protein cavities as potential allosteric and functional sites, by integrating publicly available information on protein sequences, structures and active sites for more than a thousand protein families. By identifying common pockets across different structures of the same protein family we developed a method to measure the pocket's structural conservation. The method was first parameterized using known active sites. We characterized the predicted pockets in terms of sequence and structural conservation, backbone flexibility and electrostatic potential. Although these different measures do not tend to correlate, their combination is useful in selecting functional and regulatory sites, as a detailed analysis of a handful of protein families shows. We finally estimated the numbers of potential allosteric or regulatory pockets that may be present in the data set, finding that pockets with putative functional and effector characteristics are widespread across

  8. An Allosteric Pathway Revealed in the Ribosome Binding Stress Factor BipA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makanji, H.; deLivron, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions as a master regulator of stress and virulence processes in bacteria. It is a member of the translational factor family of GTPases along with EF-G, IF-2 and LepA. Structural and biochemical data suggest that ribosome binding specificity for each member of this family lies in an effector domain. As with other bacterial GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of this protein are tightly coupled. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is still unknown. A series of experiments have been designed to probe structural features of the protein to see if we can pinpoint specific areas of BipA, perhaps even individual residues, which are important to its association with the ribosome. Included in the list are the C-terminal effector domain of the protein, which is distinct to the BipA family of proteins, and amino acid residues in the switch I and II regions of the G domain. Using sucrose density gradients, we have shown that the C-terminal domain is required in order for BipA to bind to the ribosome. Moreover, deletion of this domain increases the GTP hydrolysis rates of the protein, likely through relief of inhibitory contacts. Additional evidence has revealed an allosteric connection between the conformationally flexible switch II region and the C-terminal domain of BipA. Site directed mutagenesis, sucrose gradients and malachite green assays are being used to elucidate the details of this coupling.

  9. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Paer; Jansson, Anna; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower). Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM) and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD). PMID:27253209

  10. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chandramohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower. Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD.

  11. Rational design of allosteric-inhibition sites in classical protein tyrosine phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Cynthia M.; Yu, Xiaoling; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine in protein substrates, are critical regulators of metazoan cell signaling and have emerged as potential drug targets for a range of human diseases. Strategies for chemically targeting the function of individual PTPs selectively could serve to elucidate the signaling roles of these enzymes and would potentially expedite validation of the therapeutic promise of PTP inhibitors. Here we report a novel strategy for the design of non-natural allosteric-inhibition sites in PTPs; these sites, which can be introduced into target PTPs through protein engineering, serve to sensitize target PTPs to potent and selective inhibition by a biarsenical small molecule. Building on the recent discovery of a naturally occurring cryptic allosteric site in wild-type Src-homology-2 domain containing PTP (Shp2) that can be targeted by biarsenical compounds, we hypothesized that Shp2’s unusual sensitivity to biarsenicals could be strengthened through rational design and that the Shp2-specific site could serve as a blueprint for the introduction of non-natural inhibitor sensitivity in other PTPs. Indeed, we show here that the strategic introduction of a cysteine residue at a position removed from the Shp2 active site can serve to increase the potency and selectivity of the interaction between Shp2’s allosteric site and the biarsenical inhibitor. Moreover, we find that “Shp2-like” allosteric sites can be installed de novo in PTP enzymes that do not possess naturally occurring sensitivity to biarsenical compounds. Using primary-sequence alignments to guide our enzyme engineering, we have successfully introduced allosteric-inhibition sites in four classical PTPs—PTP1B, PTPH-1, FAP-1, and HePTP—from four different PTP subfamilies, suggesting that our sensitization approach can likely be applied widely across the classical PTP family to generate biarsenical-responsive PTPs. PMID:25828055

  12. Elucidation of a four-site allosteric network in fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaibin; Marsiglia, William M; Cho, Min-Kyu; Huang, Zhifeng; Deng, Jingjing; Blais, Steven P; Gai, Weiming; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Neubert, Thomas A; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2017-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is tightly regulated by protein allostery within the intracellular tyrosine kinase domains. Yet the molecular determinants of allosteric connectivity in tyrosine kinase domain are incompletely understood. By means of structural (X-ray and NMR) and functional characterization of pathogenic gain-of-function mutations affecting the FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase domain, we elucidated a long-distance allosteric network composed of four interconnected sites termed the ‘molecular brake’, ‘DFG latch’, ‘A-loop plug’, and ‘αC tether’. The first three sites repress the kinase from adopting an active conformation, whereas the αC tether promotes the active conformation. The skewed design of this four-site allosteric network imposes tight autoinhibition and accounts for the incomplete mimicry of the activated conformation by pathogenic mutations targeting a single site. Based on the structural similarity shared among RTKs, we propose that this allosteric model for FGFR kinases is applicable to other RTKs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21137.001 PMID:28166054

  13. Elucidation of the ATP7B N-domain Mg2+-ATP coordination site and its allosteric regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Hercend

    Full Text Available The diagnostic of orphan genetic disease is often a puzzling task as less attention is paid to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of these rare disorders at the molecular level. We present here a multidisciplinary approach using molecular modeling tools and surface plasmonic resonance to study the function of the ATP7B protein, which is impaired in the Wilson disease. Experimentally validated in silico models allow the elucidation in the Nucleotide binding domain (N-domain of the Mg(2+-ATP coordination site and answer to the controversial role of the Mg(2+ ion in the nucleotide binding process. The analysis of protein motions revealed a substantial effect on a long flexible loop branched to the N-domain protein core. We demonstrated the capacity of the loop to disrupt the interaction between Mg(2+-ATP complex and the N-domain and propose a role for this loop in the allosteric regulation of the nucleotide binding process.

  14. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  15. In vitro binding of a radio-labeled positive allosteric modulator for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysk, John R; Spear, Nathan; Fieles, William; Stein, Mark M; Sygowski, Linda S; King, Megan M; Hoesch, Valerie; Hastings, Richard; Brockel, Becky; Do, Mylinh; Ström, Peter; Gadient, Reto; Chhajlani, Vijay; Elmore, Charles S; Maier, Donna L

    2013-03-01

    The positive allosteric modulator (PAM) binding site for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu(5)) lacks a readily available radio-labeled tracer fordetailed structure-activity studies. This communication describes a selective mGlu(5) compound, 7-methyl-2-(4-(pyridin-2-yloxy)benzyl)-5-(pyridin-3-yl)isoindolin-1-one (PBPyl) that binds with high affinity to human mGlu(5) and exhibits functional PAM activity. Analysis of PBPyl by FLIPR revealed an EC(50) of 87 nM with an 89% effect in transfected HEK293 cells and an EC(50) of 81 nM with a 42% effect in rat primary neurons. PBPyl exhibited 5-fold higher functional selectivity for mGlu(5) in a full mGlu receptor panel. Unlabeled PBPyl was tested for specific binding using a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS)-based filtration binding assay and exhibited 40% specific binding in recombinant membranes, a value higher than any candidate compound tested. In competition binding studies with [(3)H]MPEP, the mGlu(5) receptor negative allosteric modulator (NAM), PBPyl exhibited a k(i) value of 34 nM. PBPyl also displaced [(3)H]ABP688, a mGluR(5) receptor NAM, in tissue sections from mouse and rat brain using autoradiography. Areas of specific binding included the frontal cortex, striatum and nucleus accumbens. PBPyl was radiolabeled to a specific activity of 15 Ci/mmol and tested for specific binding in a filter plate format. In recombinant mGlu(5b) membranes, [(3)H] PBPyl exhibited saturable binding with a K(d) value of 18.6 nM. In competition binding experiments, [(3)H] PBPyl was displaced by high affinity mGlu(5) positive and negative modulators. Further tests showed that PBPyl displays less than optimal characteristics as an in vivo tool, including a high volume of distribution and ClogP, making it more suitable as an in vitro compound. However, as a first report of direct binding of an mGlu(5) receptor PAM, this study offers value toward the development of novel PET imaging agents for this important

  16. Anti-tumor agent calixarene 0118 targets human galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of carbohydrate binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dings, Ruud P.M.; Miller, Michelle C.; Nesmelova, Irina; Astorgues-Xerri, Lucile; Kumar, Nigam; Serova, Maria; Chen, Xuimei; Raymond, Eric; Hoye, Thomas R.; Mayo, Kevin H.

    2012-01-01

    Calix[4]arene compound 0118 is an angiostatic agent that inhibits tumor growth in mice. Although 0118 is a topomimetic of galectin-1-targeting angiostatic amphipathic peptide anginex, we had yet to prove that 0118 targets galectin-1. Galectin-1 is involved in pathological disorders like tumor endothelial cell adhesion and migration and therefore presents a relevant target for therapeutic intervention against cancer. Here, 15N-1H HSQC NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that 0118 indeed targets galectin-1 at a site away from the lectin’s carbohydrate binding site, and thereby attenuates lactose binding to the lectin. Flow cytometry and agglutination assays show that 0118 attenuates binding of galectin-1 to cell surface glycans, and the inhibition of cell proliferation by 0118 is found to be correlated with the cellular expression of the lectin. In general, our data indicate that 0118 targets galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of glycan/carbohydrate binding. This work contributes to the clinical development of anti-tumor calixarene compound 0118. PMID:22575017

  17. Allosteric role of the large-scale domain opening in biological catch-binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2009-05-01

    The proposed model demonstrates the allosteric role of the two-domain region of the receptor protein in the increased lifetimes of biological receptor/ligand bonds subjected to an external force. The interaction between the domains is represented by a bounded potential, containing two minima corresponding to the attached and separated conformations of the two protein domains. The dissociative potential with a single minimum describing receptor/ligand binding fluctuates between deep and shallow states, depending on whether the domains are attached or separated. A number of valuable analytic expressions are derived and are used to interpret experimental data for two catch bonds. The P-selectin/P-selectin-glycoprotein-ligand-1 (PSGL-1) bond is controlled by the interface between the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and lectin domains of P-selectin, and the type 1 fimbrial adhesive protein (FimH)/mannose bond is governed by the interface between the lectin and pilin domains of FimH. Catch-binding occurs in these systems when the external force stretches the receptor proteins and increases the interdomain distance. The allosteric effect is supported by independent measurements, in which the domains are kept separated by attachment of another ligand. The proposed model accurately describes the experimentally observed anomalous behavior of the lifetimes of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 and FimH/mannose complexes as a function of applied force and provides valuable insights into the mechanism of catch-binding.

  18. Ago-allosteric modulation and other types of allostery in dimeric 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Birgitte

    2006-01-01

    Conventionally, an allosteric modulator is neutral in respect of efficacy and binds to a receptor site distant from the orthosteric site of the endogenous agonist. However, recently compounds being ago-allosteric modulators have been described i.e., compounds acting both as agonists on their own...... influence the potency of the endogenous agonist. It is of interest that at least some endogenous agonists can only occupy one protomer of a dimeric 7TM receptor complex at a time and thereby they leave the orthosteric binding site in the allosteric protomer free, potentially for binding of exogenous......, allosteric modulators. If the allosteric modulator is an agonist, it is an ago-allosteric modulator; if it is neutral, it is a classical enhancer. Molecular mapping in hetero-dimeric class-C receptors, where the endogenous agonist clearly binds only in one protomer, supports the notion that allosteric...

  19. Molecular sites for the positive allosteric modulation of glycine receptors by endocannabinoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo E Yévenes

    Full Text Available Glycine receptors (GlyRs are transmitter-gated anion channels of the Cys-loop superfamily which mediate synaptic inhibition at spinal and selected supraspinal sites. Although they serve pivotal functions in motor control and sensory processing, they have yet to be exploited as drug targets partly because of hitherto limited possibilities for allosteric control. Endocannabinoids (ECs have recently been characterized as direct allosteric GlyR modulators, but the underlying molecular sites have remained unknown. Here, we show that chemically neutral ECs (e.g. anandamide, AEA are positive modulators of α(1, α(2 and α(3 GlyRs, whereas acidic ECs (e.g. N-arachidonoyl-glycine; NA-Gly potentiate α(1 GlyRs but inhibit α(2 and α(3. This subunit-specificity allowed us to identify the underlying molecular sites through analysis of chimeric and mutant receptors. We found that alanine 52 in extracellular loop 2, glycine 254 in transmembrane (TM region 2 and intracellular lysine 385 determine the positive modulation of α(1 GlyRs by NA-Gly. Successive substitution of non-conserved extracellular and TM residues in α(2 converted NA-Gly-mediated inhibition into potentiation. Conversely, mutation of the conserved lysine within the intracellular loop between TM3 and TM4 attenuated NA-Gly-mediated potentiation of α(1 GlyRs, without affecting inhibition of α(2 and α(3. Notably, this mutation reduced modulation by AEA of all three GlyRs. These results define molecular sites for allosteric control of GlyRs by ECs and reveal an unrecognized function for the TM3-4 intracellular loop in the allosteric modulation of Cys-loop ion channels. The identification of these sites may help to understand the physiological role of this modulation and facilitate the development of novel therapeutic approaches to diseases such as spasticity, startle disease and possibly chronic pain.

  20. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein-Seetharaman Judith

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%, the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%, the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86% and 8/9 (89% for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71% and 7/9 (78% for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by

  1. Semisynthetic analogues of toxiferine I and their pharmacological properties at α7 nAChRs, muscle-type nAChRs, and the allosteric binding site of muscarinic M2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlotos, D.P.; Tränkle, C; Holzgrabe, U;

    2014-01-01

    , saturation of the exocyclic double bonds, and various N-substituents (methyl, allyl, 4-nitrobenzyl). At the muscle-type nAChRs, most ligands showed similar binding to the muscle relaxant alcuronium, indicating neuromuscular blocking activity, with the nonhydroxylated analogues 3b (Ki = 75 nM) and 3c (Ki = 82...

  2. Allosteric Regulation of Serine Protease HtrA2 through Novel Non-Canonical Substrate Binding Pocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nitu; Gadewal, Nikhil; Chaganti, Lalith K.; Sastry, G. Madhavi; Bose, Kakoli

    2013-01-01

    HtrA2, a trimeric proapoptotic serine protease is involved in several diseases including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Its unique ability to mediate apoptosis via multiple pathways makes it an important therapeutic target. In HtrA2, C-terminal PDZ domain upon substrate binding regulates its functions through coordinated conformational changes the mechanism of which is yet to be elucidated. Although allostery has been found in some of its homologs, it has not been characterized in HtrA2 so far. Here, with an in silico and biochemical approach we have shown that allostery does regulate HtrA2 activity. Our studies identified a novel non-canonical selective binding pocket in HtrA2 which initiates signal propagation to the distal active site through a complex allosteric mechanism. This non-classical binding pocket is unique among HtrA family proteins and thus unfolds a novel mechanism of regulation of HtrA2 activity and hence apoptosis. PMID:23457469

  3. Allosteric regulation of serine protease HtrA2 through novel non-canonical substrate binding pocket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruthvi Raj Bejugam

    Full Text Available HtrA2, a trimeric proapoptotic serine protease is involved in several diseases including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Its unique ability to mediate apoptosis via multiple pathways makes it an important therapeutic target. In HtrA2, C-terminal PDZ domain upon substrate binding regulates its functions through coordinated conformational changes the mechanism of which is yet to be elucidated. Although allostery has been found in some of its homologs, it has not been characterized in HtrA2 so far. Here, with an in silico and biochemical approach we have shown that allostery does regulate HtrA2 activity. Our studies identified a novel non-canonical selective binding pocket in HtrA2 which initiates signal propagation to the distal active site through a complex allosteric mechanism. This non-classical binding pocket is unique among HtrA family proteins and thus unfolds a novel mechanism of regulation of HtrA2 activity and hence apoptosis.

  4. The rational design of specific peptide inhibitor against p38α MAPK at allosteric-site: a therapeutic modality for HNSCC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeep Gill

    Full Text Available p38α is a significant target for drug designing against cancer. The overproduction of p38α MAPK promotes tumorigenesis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. The ATP binding and an allosteric site referred as DFG are the key sites of the p38α mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK exploited for the design of inhibitors. This study demonstrated design of peptide inhibitor on the basis of allosteric site using Glide molecular docking software and the biochemical analysis of the best modeled peptide. The best fitted tetrapeptide (FWCS in the allosteric site inhibited the pure recombinant and serum p38α of HNSCC patients by 74 and 72%, respectively. The potency of the peptide was demonstrated by its IC50 (4.6 nM and KD (3.41×10-10 M values, determined by ELISA and by surface plasmon resonance (SPR technology, respectively. The cell viability of oral cancer i.e. KB cell line was reduced in dose dependent manner by 60 and 97% by the treatment of peptide and the IC50 was 600 and 210 µM after 24 and 72 h incubation, respectively. Our result provides an insight for the development of a proficient small peptide as a promising anticancer agent targeting DFG site of p38α kinase.

  5. An additional substrate binding site in a bacterial phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronau, Judith A; Paul, Lake N; Fuchs, Julian E; Corn, Isaac R; Wagner, Kyle T; Liedl, Klaus R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Das, Chittaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of phenylalanine to tyrosine, a reaction that must be kept under tight regulatory control. Mammalian PAH has a regulatory domain in which binding of the substrate leads to allosteric activation of the enzyme. However, the existence of PAH regulation in evolutionarily distant organisms, for example some bacteria in which it occurs, has so far been underappreciated. In an attempt to crystallographically characterize substrate binding by PAH from Chromobacterium violaceum, a single-domain monomeric enzyme, electron density for phenylalanine was observed at a distal site 15.7 Å from the active site. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed a dissociation constant of 24 ± 1.1 μM for phenylalanine. Under the same conditions, ITC revealed no detectable binding for alanine, tyrosine, or isoleucine, indicating the distal site may be selective for phenylalanine. Point mutations of amino acid residues in the distal site that contact phenylalanine (F258A, Y155A, T254A) led to impaired binding, consistent with the presence of distal site binding in solution. Although kinetic analysis revealed that the distal site mutants suffer discernible loss of their catalytic activity, X-ray crystallographic analysis of Y155A and F258A, the two mutants with the most noticeable decrease in activity, revealed no discernible change in the structure of their active sites, suggesting that the effect of distal binding may result from protein dynamics in solution.

  6. Mutations within the putative active site of heterodimeric deoxyguanosine kinase block the allosteric activation of the deoxyadenosine kinase subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Inshik; Ives, David H

    2002-03-31

    Replacement of the Asp-84 residue of the deoxyguanosine kinase subunit of the tandem deoxyadenosine kinase/ deoxyguanosine kinase (dAK/dGK) from Lactobacillus acidophilus R-26 by Ala, Asn, or Glu produced increased Km values for deoxyguanosine on dGK. However, it did not seem to affect the binding of Mg-ATP. The Asp-84 dGK replacements had no apparent effect on the binding of deoxyadenosine by dAK. However, the mutant dGKs were no longer inhibited by dGTP, normally a potent distal endproduct inhibitor of dGK. Moreover, the allosteric activation of dAK activity by dGTP or dGuo was lost in the modified heterodimeric dAK/dGK enzyme. Therefore, it seems very likely that Asp-84 participates in dGuo binding at the active site of the dGK subunit of dAK/dGK from Lactobacillus acidophilus R-26.

  7. An intracellular allosteric site for a specific class of antagonists of the CC chemokine G protein-coupled receptors CCR4 and CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Glen; Jones, Carolyn; Wreggett, Keith A

    2008-03-01

    A novel mechanism for antagonism of the human chemokine receptors CCR4 and CCR5 has been discovered with a series of small-molecule compounds that seems to interact with an allosteric, intracellular site on the receptor. The existence of this site is supported by a series of observations: 1) intracellular access of these antagonists is required for their activity; 2) specific, saturable binding of a radiolabeled antagonist requires the presence of CCR4; and 3) through engineering receptor chimeras by reciprocal transfer of C-terminal domains between CCR4 and CCR5, compound binding and the selective structure-activity relationships for antagonism of these receptors seem to be associated with the integrity of that intracellular region. Published antagonists from other chemical series do not seem to bind to the novel site, and their interaction with either CCR4 or CCR5 is not affected by alteration of the C-terminal domain. The precise location of the proposed binding site remains to be determined, but the known close association of the C-terminal domain, including helix 8, as a proposed intracellular region that interacts with transduction proteins (e.g., G proteins and beta-arrestin) suggests that this could be a generic allosteric site for chemokine receptors and perhaps more broadly for class A G protein-coupled receptors. The existence of such a site that can be targeted for drug discovery has implications for screening assays for receptor antagonists, which would need, therefore, to consider compound properties for access to this intracellular site.

  8. Allosteric Regulation in the Ligand Binding Domain of Retinoic Acid Receptorγ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, Ismail; Lutzing, Régis; Stote, Roland H.; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Rochel, Natacha; Dejaegere, Annick

    2017-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays key roles in cell differentiation and growth arrest through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), which are ligand-dependent transcription factors. While the main trigger of RAR activation is the binding of RA, phosphorylation of the receptors has also emerged as an important regulatory signal. Phosphorylation of the RARγ N-terminal domain (NTD) is known to play a functional role in neuronal differentiation. In this work, we investigated the phosphorylation of RARγ ligand binding domain (LBD), and present evidence that the phosphorylation status of the LBD affects the phosphorylation of the NTD region. We solved the X-ray structure of a phospho-mimetic mutant of the LBD (RARγ S371E), which we used in molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the consequences of the S371E mutation on the RARγ structural dynamics. Combined with simulations of the wild-type LBD, we show that the conformational equilibria of LBD salt bridges (notably R387-D340) are affected by the S371E mutation, which likely affects the recruitment of the kinase complex that phosphorylates the NTD. The molecular dynamics simulations also showed that a conservative mutation in this salt bridge (R387K) affects the dynamics of the LBD without inducing large conformational changes. Finally, cellular assays showed that the phosphorylation of the NTD of RARγ is differentially regulated by retinoic acid in RARγWT and in the S371N, S371E and R387K mutants. This multidisciplinary work highlights an allosteric coupling between phosphorylations of the LBD and the NTD of RARγ and supports the importance of structural dynamics involving electrostatic interactions in the regulation of RARs activity. PMID:28125680

  9. Impact of disruption of secondary binding site S2 on dopamine transporter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E A

    2016-09-01

    The structures of the leucine transporter, drosophila dopamine transporter, and human serotonin transporter show a secondary binding site (designated S2 ) for drugs and substrate in the extracellular vestibule toward the membrane exterior in relation to the primary substrate recognition site (S1 ). The present experiments are aimed at disrupting S2 by mutating Asp476 and Ile159 to Ala. Both mutants displayed a profound decrease in [(3) H]DA uptake compared with wild-type associated with a reduced turnover rate kcat . This was not caused by a conformational bias as the mutants responded to Zn(2+) (10 μM) similarly as WT. The dopamine transporters with either the D476A or I159A mutation both displayed a higher Ki for dopamine for the inhibition of [3H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding than did the WT transporter, in accordance with an allosteric interaction between the S1 and S2 sites. The results provide evidence in favor of a general applicability of the two-site allosteric model of the Javitch/Weinstein group from LeuT to dopamine transporter and possibly other monoamine transporters. X-ray structures of transporters closely related to the dopamine (DA) transporter show a secondary binding site S2 in the extracellular vestibule proximal to the primary binding site S1 which is closely linked to one of the Na(+) binding sites. This work examines the relationship between S2 and S1 sites. We found that S2 site impairment severely reduced DA transport and allosterically reduced S1 site affinity for the cocaine analog [(3) H]CFT. Our results are the first to lend direct support for the application of the two-site allosteric model, advanced for bacterial LeuT, to the human DA transporter. The model states that, after binding of the first DA molecule (DA1 ) to the primary S1 site (along with Na(+) ), binding of a second DA (DA2 ) to the S2 site triggers, through an allosteric interaction, the release of DA1 and Na(+) into the cytoplasm.

  10. Selective inhibition of mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) via disruption of a metal binding network by an allosteric small molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gejing; Shen, Junqing; Yin, Ming; McManus, Jessica; Mathieu, Magali; Gee, Patricia; He, Timothy; Shi, Chaomei; Bedel, Olivier; McLean, Larry R; Le-Strat, Frank; Zhang, Ying; Marquette, Jean-Pierre; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Bailin; Rak, Alexey; Hoffmann, Dietmar; Rooney, Eamonn; Vassort, Aurelie; Englaro, Walter; Li, Yi; Patel, Vinod; Adrian, Francisco; Gross, Stefan; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Cheng, Hong; Licht, Stuart

    2015-01-09

    Cancer-associated point mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) confer a neomorphic enzymatic activity: the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid, which is proposed to act as an oncogenic metabolite by inducing hypermethylation of histones and DNA. Although selective inhibitors of mutant IDH1 and IDH2 have been identified and are currently under investigation as potential cancer therapeutics, the mechanistic basis for their selectivity is not yet well understood. A high throughput screen for selective inhibitors of IDH1 bearing the oncogenic mutation R132H identified compound 1, a bis-imidazole phenol that inhibits d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid production in cells. We investigated the mode of inhibition of compound 1 and a previously published IDH1 mutant inhibitor with a different chemical scaffold. Steady-state kinetics and biophysical studies show that both of these compounds selectively inhibit mutant IDH1 by binding to an allosteric site and that inhibition is competitive with respect to Mg(2+). A crystal structure of compound 1 complexed with R132H IDH1 indicates that the inhibitor binds at the dimer interface and makes direct contact with a residue involved in binding of the catalytically essential divalent cation. These results show that targeting a divalent cation binding residue can enable selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 and suggest that differences in magnesium binding between wild-type and mutant enzymes may contribute to the inhibitors' selectivity for the mutant enzyme.

  11. Calculated pKa Variations Expose Dynamic Allosteric Communication Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Eric J M; Heyes, Logan C; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Parker, Emily J

    2016-02-17

    Allosteric regulation of protein function, the process by which binding of an effector molecule provokes a functional response from a distal site, is critical for metabolic pathways. Yet, the way the allosteric signal is communicated remains elusive, especially in dynamic, entropically driven regulation mechanisms for which no major conformational changes are observed. To identify these dynamic allosteric communication networks, we have developed an approach that monitors the pKa variations of ionizable residues over the course of molecular dynamics simulations performed in the presence and absence of an allosteric regulator. As the pKa of ionizable residues depends on their environment, it represents a simple metric to monitor changes in several complex factors induced by binding an allosteric effector. These factors include Coulombic interactions, hydrogen bonding, and solvation, as well as backbone motions and side chain fluctuations. The predictions that can be made with this method concerning the roles of ionizable residues for allosteric communication can then be easily tested experimentally by changing the working pH of the protein or performing single point mutations. To demonstrate the method's validity, we have applied this approach to the subtle dynamic regulation mechanism observed for Neisseria meningitidis 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase, the first enzyme of aromatic biosynthesis. We were able to identify key communication pathways linking the allosteric binding site to the active site of the enzyme and to validate these findings experimentally by reestablishing the catalytic activity of allosterically inhibited enzyme via modulation of the working pH, without compromising the binding affinity of the allosteric regulator.

  12. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla (NCSU); (MCW); (BU)

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  13. Allosteric and orthosteric sites in CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), a chimeric receptor approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Steen, Anne; Jensen, Pia C;

    2011-01-01

    molecules often act more deeply in an allosteric mode. However, opposed to the well described molecular interaction of allosteric modulators in class C 7-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors, the interaction in class A, to which the chemokine receptors belong, is more sparsely described. Using the CCR5...... chemokine receptor as a model system, we studied the molecular interaction and conformational interchange required for proper action of various orthosteric chemokines and allosteric small molecules, including the well known CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, SCH-C, and aplaviroc, and four novel CCR5 ago......-allosteric molecules. A chimera was successfully constructed between CCR5 and the closely related CCR2 by transferring all extracellular regions of CCR2 to CCR5, i.e. a Trojan horse that resembles CCR2 extracellularly but signals through a CCR5 transmembrane unit. The chimera bound CCR2 (CCL2 and CCL7), but not CCR5...

  14. Identification of a negative allosteric site on human α4β2 and α3β4 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan E Pavlovicz

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine-based neurotransmission is regulated by cationic, ligand-gated ion channels called nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. These receptors have been linked to numerous neurological diseases and disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and nicotine addiction. Recently, a class of compounds has been discovered that antagonize nAChR function in an allosteric fashion. Models of human α4β2 and α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR extracellular domains have been developed to computationally explore the binding of these compounds, including the dynamics and free energy changes associated with ligand binding. Through a blind docking study to multiple receptor conformations, the models were used to determine a putative binding mode for the negative allosteric modulators. This mode, in close proximity to the agonist binding site, is presented in addition to a hypothetical mode of antagonism that involves obstruction of C loop closure. Molecular dynamics simulations and MM-PBSA free energy of binding calculations were used as computational validation of the predicted binding mode, while functional assays on wild-type and mutated receptors provided experimental support. Based on the proposed binding mode, two residues on the β2 subunit were independently mutated to the corresponding residues found on the β4 subunit. The T58K mutation resulted in an eight-fold decrease in the potency of KAB-18, a compound that exhibits preferential antagonism for human α4β2 over α3β4 nAChRs, while the F118L mutation resulted in a loss of inhibitory activity for KAB-18 at concentrations up to 100 µM. These results demonstrate the selectivity of KAB-18 for human α4β2 nAChRs and validate the methods used for identifying the nAChR modulator binding site. Exploitation of this site may lead to the development of more potent and subtype-selective nAChR antagonists which may be used in the treatment of a number of neurological

  15. Amiloride and GMQ Allosteric Modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 Receptor: Influences of the Intersubunit Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride, a diuretic used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure, and 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ) are guanidine compounds that modulate acid-sensing ion channels. Both compounds have demonstrated affinity for a variety of membrane proteins, including members of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels, such as the heteromeric GABA-A αβγ receptors. The actions of these guanidine compounds on the homomeric GABA-A ρ1 receptor remains unclear, especially in light of how many GABA-A αβγ receptor modulators have different effects in the GABA-A ρ1 receptors. We sought to characterize the influence of amiloride and GMQ on the human GABA-A ρ1 receptors using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. The diuretic amiloride potentiated the human GABA-A ρ1 GABA-mediated current, whereas GMQ antagonized the receptor. Furthermore, a GABA-A second transmembrane domain site, the intersubunit site, responsible for allosteric modulation in the heteromeric GABA-A receptors mediated amiloride’s positive allosteric actions. In contrast, the mutation did not remove GMQ antagonism but only changed the guanidine compound’s potency within the human GABA-A ρ1 receptor. Through modeling and introduction of point mutations, we propose that the GABA-A ρ1 intersubunit site plays a role in mediating the allosteric effects of amiloride and GMQ. PMID:25829529

  16. The putative effector-binding site of Leishmania mexicana pyruvate kinase studied by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaert, Véronique; Yernaux, Cédric; Rigden, Daniel J; Fothergill-Gilmore, Linda A; Opperdoes, Fred R; Michels, Paul A M

    2002-03-13

    The activity of pyruvate kinase of Leishmania mexicana is allosterically regulated by fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (F-2,6-P(2)), contrary to the pyruvate kinases from other eukaryotes that are usually stimulated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)). Based on the comparison of the three-dimensional structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae pyruvate kinase crystallized with F-1,6-P(2) present at the effector site (R-state) and the L. mexicana enzyme crystallized in the T-state, two residues (Lys453 and His480) were proposed to bind the 2-phospho group of the effector. This hypothesis was tested by site-directed mutagenesis. The allosteric activation by F-2,6-P(2) appeared to be entirely abrogated in the mutated enzymes confirming our predictions.

  17. Isocitrate binding at two functionally distinct sites in yeast NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, An-Ping; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2002-06-21

    Yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an octamer containing two types of homologous subunits. Ligand-binding analyses were conducted to examine effects of residue changes in putative catalytic and regulatory isocitrate-binding sites respectively contained in IDH2 and IDH1 subunits. Replacement of homologous serine residues in either subunit site, S98A in IDH2 or S92A in IDH1, was found to reduce by half the total number of holoenzyme isocitrate-binding sites, confirming a correlation between detrimental effects on isocitrate binding and respective kinetic defects in catalysis and allosteric activation by AMP. Replacement of both serine residues eliminates isocitrate binding and measurable catalytic activity. The putative isocitrate-binding sites of IDH1 and IDH2 contain five identical and four nonidentical residues. Reciprocal replacement of the four nonidentical residues in either or both subunits (A108R, F136Y, T241D, and N245D in IDH1 and/or R114A, Y142F, D248T, and D252N in IDH2) was found to be permissive for isocitrate binding. This provides further evidence for two types of binding sites in IDH, although the authentic residues have been shown to be necessary for normal kinetic contributions. Finally, the mutant enzymes with residue replacements in the IDH1 site were found to be unable to bind AMP, suggesting that allosteric activation is dependent both upon binding of isocitrate at the IDH1 site and upon the changes in the enzyme normally elicited by this binding.

  18. Allosteric Regulation of Fibronectin/α5β1 Interaction by Fibronectin-Binding MSCRAMMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaowen; Garcia, Brandon L.; Visai, Livia; Prabhakaran, Sabitha; Meenan, Nicola A. G.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Humphries, Martin J.; Höök, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Adherence of microbes to host tissues is a hallmark of infectious disease and is often mediated by a class of adhesins termed MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules). Numerous pathogens express MSCRAMMs that specifically bind the heterodimeric human glycoprotein fibronectin (Fn). In addition to roles in adhesion, Fn-binding MSCRAMMs exploit physiological Fn functions. For example, several pathogens can invade host cells by a mechanism whereby MSCRAMM-bound Fn bridges interaction with α5β1 integrin. Here, we investigate two Fn-binding MSCRAMMs, FnBPA (Staphylococcus aureus) and BBK32 (Borrelia burgdorferi) to probe structure-activity relationships of MSCRAMM-induced Fn/α5β1integrin activation. Circular dichroism, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and dynamic light scattering techniques uncover a conformational rearrangement of Fn involving domains distant from the MSCRAMM binding site. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrate a significant enhancement of Fn/α5β1 integrin affinity in the presence of FnBPA or BBK32. Detailed kinetic analysis of these interactions reveal that this change in affinity can be attributed solely to an increase in the initial Fn/α5β1 on-rate and that this rate-enhancement is dependent on high-affinity Fn-binding by MSCRAMMs. These data implicate MSCRAMM-induced perturbation of specific intramolecular contacts within the Fn heterodimer resulting in activation by exposing previously cryptic α5β1 interaction motifs. By correlating structural changes in Fn to a direct measurement of increased Fn/α5β1 affinity, this work significantly advances our understanding of the structural basis for the modulation of integrin function by Fn-binding MSCRAMMs. PMID:27434228

  19. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo;

    2014-01-01

    be divided into two groups with most likely two topographically distinct binding sites. The aim of the current study was to identify the binding site of one such group of ligands, exemplified by three allosteric antagonists, CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. We first used a chimeric CCR2/CCR5 receptor......The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly...

  20. Hemoglobin isoform differentiation and allosteric regulation of oxygen binding in the turtle, Trachemys scripta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Storz, Jay F.; Hoffmann, Federico G.;

    2013-01-01

    When freshwater turtles acclimatize to winter hibernation, there is a gradual transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, which may require adjustments of blood O2 transport before turtles become anoxic. Here, we report the effects of protons, anionic cofactors, and temperature on the O2......-binding properties of isolated hemoglobin (Hb) isoforms, HbA and HbD, in the turtle Trachemys scripta. We determined the primary structures of the constituent subunits of the two Hb isoforms, and we related the measured functional properties to differences in O2 affinity between untreated hemolysates from...... turtles that were acclimated to normoxia and anoxia. Our data show that HbD has a consistently higher O2 affinity compared with HbA, whereas Bohr and temperature effects, as well as thiol reactivity, are similar. Although sequence data show amino acid substitutions at two known β-chain ATP-binding site...

  1. Allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments drives mutually exclusive binding with cofilin and myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Kien Xuan; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Kijima, Saku T; Kodera, Noriyuki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Furutani-Umezu, Nozomi; Nakajima, Jun; Noguchi, Taro Q P; Nagasaki, Akira; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2016-10-20

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) of myosin II and cofilin each binds to actin filaments cooperatively and forms clusters along the filaments, but it is unknown whether the two cooperative bindings are correlated and what physiological roles they have. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that HMM-GFP and cofilin-mCherry each bound cooperatively to different parts of actin filaments when they were added simultaneously in 0.2 μM ATP, indicating that the two cooperative bindings are mutually exclusive. In 0.1 mM ATP, the motor domain of myosin (S1) strongly inhibited the formation of cofilin clusters along actin filaments. Under this condition, most actin protomers were unoccupied by S1 at any given moment, suggesting that transiently bound S1 alters the structure of actin filaments cooperatively and/or persistently to inhibit cofilin binding. Consistently, cosedimentation experiments using copolymers of actin and actin-S1 fusion protein demonstrated that the fusion protein affects the neighboring actin protomers, reducing their affinity for cofilin. In reciprocal experiments, cofilin-actin fusion protein reduced the affinity of neighboring actin protomers for S1. Thus, allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments contributes to mutually exclusive cooperative binding of myosin II and cofilin to actin filaments, and presumably to the differential localization of both proteins in cells.

  2. The S-enantiomer of R, S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads; Sanchez, Connie

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  3. The S-enantiomer of R,S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism. Comparison with other serotonin transporter inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads Breum; Sánchez, Connie

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  4. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  5. Statistics for Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a key role in gene regulation. They interact with specific binding sites or motifs on the DNA sequence and regulate expression of genes downstream of these binding sites. In silico prediction of potential binding of a TF to a binding site is an important task in computational biology. From a statistical point of view, the DNA sequence is a long text consisting of four different letters ('A','C','G', and 'T'). The binding of a TF to the sequence corresponds to ...

  6. Computational study on the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism in hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HCV NS3/4A protein is an attractive therapeutic target responsible for harboring serine protease and RNA helicase activities during the viral replication. Small molecules binding at the interface between the protease and helicase domains can stabilize the closed conformation of the protein and thus block the catalytic function of HCV NS3/4A protein via an allosteric regulation mechanism. But the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, we aimed to provide some insight into the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein by using computational methods. Four simulation systems were investigated. They include: apo state of HCV NS3/4A protein, HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with an allosteric inhibitor and the truncated form of the above two systems. The molecular dynamics simulation results indicate HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 4VA adopts a closed conformation (inactive state, while the truncated apo protein adopts an open conformation (active state. Further residue interaction network analysis suggests the communication of the domain-domain interface play an important role in the transition from closed to open conformation of HCV NS3/4A protein. However, the inhibitor stabilizes the closed conformation through interaction with several key residues from both the protease and helicase domains, including His57, Asp79, Asp81, Asp168, Met485, Cys525 and Asp527, which blocks the information communication between the functional domains interface. Finally, a dynamic model about the allosteric regulation and conformational changes of HCV NS3/4A protein was proposed and could provide fundamental insights into the allosteric mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein function regulation and design of new potent inhibitors.

  7. Virtual Screening for Potential Allosteric Inhibitors of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Lu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2, a member of Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs, plays an important role in cell division and DNA replication. It is regarded as a desired target to treat cancer and tumor by interrupting aberrant cell proliferation. Compared to lower subtype selectivity of CDK2 ATP-competitive inhibitors, CDK2 allosteric inhibitor with higher subtype selectivity has been used to treat CDK2-related diseases. Recently, the first crystal structure of CDK2 with allosteric inhibitor has been reported, which provides new opportunities to design pure allosteric inhibitors of CDK2. The binding site of the ATP-competition inhibitors and the allosteric inhibitors are partially overlapped in space position, so the same compound might interact with the two binding sites. Thus a novel screening strategy was essential for the discovery of pure CDK2 allosteric inhibitors. In this study, pharmacophore and molecular docking were used to screen potential CDK2 allosteric inhibitors and ATP-competition inhibitors from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM. In the docking result of the allosteric site, the compounds which can act with the CDK2 ATP site were discarded, and the remaining compounds were regarded as the potential pure allosteric inhibitors. Among the results, prostaglandin E1 and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA were available and their growth inhibitory effect on human HepG2 cell lines was determined by MTT assay. The two compounds could substantially inhibit the growth of HepG2 cell lines with an estimated IC50 of 41.223 μmol/L and 45.646 μmol/L. This study provides virtual screening strategy of allosteric compounds and a reliable method to discover potential pure CDK2 allosteric inhibitors from TCM. Prostaglandin E1 and NDGA could be regarded as promising candidates for CDK2 allosteric inhibitors.

  8. ASBench: benchmarking sets for allosteric discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenkang; Wang, Guanqiao; Shen, Qiancheng; Liu, Xinyi; Lu, Shaoyong; Geng, Lv; Huang, Zhimin; Zhang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Allostery allows for the fine-tuning of protein function. Targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a novel strategy in drug design. The key challenge in the discovery of allosteric sites has strongly motivated the development of computational methods and thus high-quality, publicly accessible standard data have become indispensable. Here, we report benchmarking data for experimentally determined allosteric sites through a complex process, including a 'Core set' with 235 unique allosteric sites and a 'Core-Diversity set' with 147 structurally diverse allosteric sites. These benchmarking sets can be exploited to develop efficient computational methods to predict unknown allosteric sites in proteins and reveal unique allosteric ligand-protein interactions to guide allosteric drug design.

  9. Basis for half-site ligand binding in yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, An-Ping; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2011-09-27

    Yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase is an allosterically regulated octameric enzyme composed of four heterodimers of a catalytic IDH2 subunit and a regulatory IDH1 subunit. Despite structural predictions that the enzyme would contain eight isocitrate binding sites, four NAD(+) binding sites, and four AMP binding sites, only half of the sites for each ligand can be measured in binding assays. On the basis of a potential interaction between side chains of Cys-150 residues in IDH2 subunits in each tetramer of the enzyme, ligand binding assays of wild-type (IDH1/IDH2) and IDH1/IDH2(C150S) octameric enzymes were conducted in the presence of dithiothreitol. These assays demonstrated the presence of eight isocitrate and four AMP binding sites for the wild-type enzyme in the presence of dithiothreitol and for the IDH1/IDH2(C150S) enzyme in the absence or presence of this reagent, suggesting that interactions between sulfhydryl side chains of IDH2 Cys-150 residues limit access to these sites. However, only two NAD(+) sites could be measured for either enzyme. A tetrameric form of IDH (an IDH1(G15D)/IDH2 mutant enzyme) demonstrated half-site binding for isocitrate (two sites) in the absence of dithiothreitol and full-site binding (four sites) in the presence of dithiothreitol. Only one NAD(+) site could be measured for the tetramer under both conditions. In the context of the structure of the enzyme, these results suggest that an observed asymmetry between heterotetramers in the holoenzyme contributes to interactions between IDH2 Cys-150 residues and to half-site binding of isocitrate, but that a form of negative cooperativity may limit access to apparently equivalent NAD(+) binding sites.

  10. Allosteric modulators of the hERG K{sup +} channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhiyi, E-mail: z.yu@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl; Klaasse, Elisabeth, E-mail: elisabethklaasse@hotmail.com; Heitman, Laura H., E-mail: l.h.heitman@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl; IJzerman, Adriaan P., E-mail: ijzerman@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that block the cardiac K{sup +} channel encoded by the human ether-à-go-go gene (hERG) have been associated with QT interval prolongation leading to proarrhythmia, and in some cases, sudden cardiac death. Because of special structural features of the hERG K{sup +} channel, it has become a promiscuous target that interacts with pharmaceuticals of widely varying chemical structures and a reason for concern in the pharmaceutical industry. The structural diversity suggests that multiple binding sites are available on the channel with possible allosteric interactions between them. In the present study, three reference compounds and nine compounds of a previously disclosed series were evaluated for their allosteric effects on the binding of [{sup 3}H]astemizole and [{sup 3}H]dofetilide to the hERG K{sup +} channel. LUF6200 was identified as an allosteric inhibitor in dissociation assays with both radioligands, yielding similar EC{sub 50} values in the low micromolar range. However, potassium ions increased the binding of the two radioligands in a concentration-dependent manner, and their EC{sub 50} values were not significantly different, indicating that potassium ions behaved as allosteric enhancers. Furthermore, addition of potassium ions resulted in a concentration-dependent leftward shift of the LUF6200 response curve, suggesting positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them. In conclusion, our investigations provide evidence for allosteric modulation of the hERG K{sup +} channel, which is discussed in the light of findings on other ion channels. - Highlights: • Allosteric modulators on the hERG K{sup +} channel were evaluated in binding assays. • LUF6200 was identified as a potent allosteric inhibitor. • Potassium ions were found to behave as allosteric enhancers. • Positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them were proposed.

  11. Broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121 allosterically modulates CD4 binding via recognition of the HIV-1 gp120 V3 base and multiple surrounding glycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Julien

    Full Text Available New broad and potent neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies have recently been described that are largely dependent on the gp120 N332 glycan for Env recognition. Members of the PGT121 family of antibodies, isolated from an African donor, neutralize ∼70% of circulating isolates with a median IC50 less than 0.05 µg ml(-1. Here, we show that three family members, PGT121, PGT122 and PGT123, have very similar crystal structures. A long 24-residue HCDR3 divides the antibody binding site into two functional surfaces, consisting of an open face, formed by the heavy chain CDRs, and an elongated face, formed by LCDR1, LCDR3 and the tip of the HCDR3. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the antibody paratope reveals a crucial role in neutralization for residues on the elongated face, whereas the open face, which accommodates a complex biantennary glycan in the PGT121 structure, appears to play a more secondary role. Negative-stain EM reconstructions of an engineered recombinant Env gp140 trimer (SOSIP.664 reveal that PGT122 interacts with the gp120 outer domain at a more vertical angle with respect to the top surface of the spike than the previously characterized antibody PGT128, which is also dependent on the N332 glycan. We then used ITC and FACS to demonstrate that the PGT121 antibodies inhibit CD4 binding to gp120 despite the epitope being distal from the CD4 binding site. Together, these structural, functional and biophysical results suggest that the PGT121 antibodies may interfere with Env receptor engagement by an allosteric mechanism in which key structural elements, such as the V3 base, the N332 oligomannose glycan and surrounding glycans, including a putative V1/V2 complex biantennary glycan, are conformationally constrained.

  12. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  13. An allosteric model of the inositol trisphosphate receptor with nonequilibrium binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chen; Jiang, Daquan; Qian, Minping

    2014-10-01

    The inositol trisphosphate receptor (IPR) is a crucial ion channel that regulates the Ca2+ influx from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cytoplasm. A thorough study of the IPR channel contributes to a better understanding of calcium oscillations and waves. It has long been observed that the IPR channel is a typical biological system which performs adaptation. However, recent advances on the physical essence of adaptation show that adaptation systems with a negative feedback mechanism, such as the IPR channel, must break detailed balance and always operate out of equilibrium with energy dissipation. Almost all previous IPR models are equilibrium models assuming detailed balance and thus violate the dissipative nature of adaptation. In this article, we constructed a nonequilibrium allosteric model of single IPR channels based on the patch-clamp experimental data obtained from the IPR in the outer membranes of isolated nuclei of the Xenopus oocyte. It turns out that our model reproduces the patch-clamp experimental data reasonably well and produces both the correct steady-state and dynamic properties of the channel. Particularly, our model successfully describes the complicated bimodal [Ca2+] dependence of the mean open duration at high [IP3], a steady-state behavior which fails to be correctly described in previous IPR models. Finally, we used the patch-clamp experimental data to validate that the IPR channel indeed breaks detailed balance and thus is a nonequilibrium system which consumes energy.

  14. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91).

  15. Improved glucose metabolism in vitro and in vivo by an allosteric monoclonal antibody that increases insulin receptor binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Corbin

    Full Text Available Previously we reported studies of XMetA, an agonist antibody to the insulin receptor (INSR. We have now utilized phage display to identify XMetS, a novel monoclonal antibody to the INSR. Biophysical studies demonstrated that XMetS bound to the human and mouse INSR with picomolar affinity. Unlike monoclonal antibody XMetA, XMetS alone had little or no agonist effect on the INSR. However, XMetS was a strong positive allosteric modulator of the INSR that increased the binding affinity for insulin nearly 20-fold. XMetS potentiated insulin-stimulated INSR signaling ∼15-fold or greater including; autophosphorylation of the INSR, phosphorylation of Akt, a major enzyme in the metabolic pathway, and phosphorylation of Erk, a major enzyme in the growth pathway. The enhanced signaling effects of XMetS were more pronounced with Akt than with Erk. In cultured cells, XMetS also enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose transport. In contrast to its effects on the INSR, XMetS did not potentiate IGF-1 activation of the IGF-1 receptor. We studied the effect of XMetS treatment in two mouse models of insulin resistance and diabetes. The first was the diet induced obesity mouse, a hyperinsulinemic, insulin resistant animal, and the second was the multi-low dose streptozotocin/high-fat diet mouse, an insulinopenic, insulin resistant animal. In both models, XMetS normalized fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance. In concert with its ability to potentiate insulin action at the INSR, XMetS reduced insulin and C-peptide levels in both mouse models. XMetS improved the response to exogenous insulin without causing hypoglycemia. These data indicate that an allosteric monoclonal antibody can be generated that markedly enhances the binding affinity of insulin to the INSR. These data also suggest that an INSR monoclonal antibody with these characteristics may have the potential to both improve glucose metabolism in insulinopenic type 2 diabetes mellitus and correct

  16. The magic spot: a ppGpp binding site on E. coli RNA polymerase responsible for regulation of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Wilma; Vrentas, Catherine E; Sanchez-Vazquez, Patricia; Gaal, Tamas; Gourse, Richard L

    2013-05-01

    The global regulatory nucleotide ppGpp ("magic spot") regulates transcription from a large subset of Escherichia coli promoters, illustrating how small molecules can control gene expression promoter-specifically by interacting with RNA polymerase (RNAP) without binding to DNA. However, ppGpp's target site on RNAP, and therefore its mechanism of action, has remained unclear. We report here a binding site for ppGpp on E. coli RNAP, identified by crosslinking, protease mapping, and analysis of mutant RNAPs that fail to respond to ppGpp. A strain with a mutant ppGpp binding site displays properties characteristic of cells defective for ppGpp synthesis. The binding site is at an interface of two RNAP subunits, ω and β', and its position suggests an allosteric mechanism of action involving restriction of motion between two mobile RNAP modules. Identification of the binding site allows prediction of bacterial species in which ppGpp exerts its effects by targeting RNAP.

  17. The therapeutic potential of allosteric ligands for free fatty acid sensitive GPCRs

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Brian D.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most historically successful therapeutic targets. Despite this success there are many important aspects of GPCR pharmacology and function that have yet to be exploited to their full therapeutic potential. One in particular that has been gaining attention in recent times is that of GPCR ligands that bind to allosteric sites on the receptor distinct from the orthosteric site of the endogenous ligand. As therapeutics, allosteric ligands possess many th...

  18. Computation of conformational coupling in allosteric proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A Kidd

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In allosteric regulation, an effector molecule binding a protein at one site induces conformational changes, which alter structure and function at a distant active site. Two key challenges in the computational modeling of allostery are the prediction of the structure of one allosteric state starting from the structure of the other, and elucidating the mechanisms underlying the conformational coupling of the effector and active sites. Here we approach these two challenges using the Rosetta high-resolution structure prediction methodology. We find that the method can recapitulate the relaxation of effector-bound forms of single domain allosteric proteins into the corresponding ligand-free states, particularly when sampling is focused on regions known to change conformation most significantly. Analysis of the coupling between contacting pairs of residues in large ensembles of conformations spread throughout the landscape between and around the two allosteric states suggests that the transitions are built up from blocks of tightly coupled interacting sets of residues that are more loosely coupled to one another.

  19. Allosteric inactivation of a trypsin-like serine protease by an antibody binding to the 37- and 70-loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Lund, Ida K; Liu, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Serine protease catalytic activity is in many cases regulated by conformational changes initiated by binding of physiological modulators to exosites located distantly from the active site. Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies binding to such exosites are potential therapeutics and offer opportunities...... criteria similar to the E* conformation described for other serine proteases. Hence, agents targeting serine protease conformation through binding to exosites in the 37- and 70-loops represent a new class of potential therapeutics....

  20. Extracellular Loop 2 of the Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 Mediates Allosterism of a Phenylacetamide Ago-Allosteric ModulatorS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicola J.; Ward, Richard J.; Stoddart, Leigh A.; Hudson, Brian D.; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Morris, Joanne C.; Tränkle, Christian; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Adams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Allosteric agonists are powerful tools for exploring the pharmacology of closely related G protein-coupled receptors that have nonselective endogenous ligands, such as the short chain fatty acids at free fatty acid receptors 2 and 3 (FFA2/GPR43 and FFA3/GPR41, respectively). We explored the molecular mechanisms mediating the activity of 4-chloro-α-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolylbenzeneacetamide (4-CMTB), a recently described phenylacetamide allosteric agonist and allosteric modulator of endogenous ligand function at human FFA2, by combining our previous knowledge of the orthosteric binding site with targeted examination of 4-CMTB structure-activity relationships and mutagenesis and chimeric receptor generation. Here we show that 4-CMTB is a selective agonist for FFA2 that binds to a site distinct from the orthosteric site of the receptor. Ligand structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the N-thiazolyl amide is likely to provide hydrogen bond donor/acceptor interactions with the receptor. Substitution at Leu173 or the exchange of the entire extracellular loop 2 of FFA2 with that of FFA3 was sufficient to reduce or ablate, respectively, allosteric communication between the endogenous and allosteric agonists. Thus, we conclude that extracellular loop 2 of human FFA2 is required for transduction of cooperative signaling between the orthosteric and an as-yet-undefined allosteric binding site of the FFA2 receptor that is occupied by 4-CMTB. PMID:21498659

  1. Structural and regulatory elements of HCV NS5B polymerase--β-loop and C-terminal tail--are required for activity of allosteric thumb site II inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Boyce

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the mechanism of action of the HCV NS5B polymerase thumb site II inhibitors has presented a challenge. Current opinion holds that these allosteric inhibitors stabilize the closed, inactive enzyme conformation, but how this inhibition is accomplished mechanistically is not well understood. Here, using a panel of NS5B proteins with mutations in key regulatory motifs of NS5B--the C-terminal tail and β-loop--in conjunction with a diverse set of NS5B allosteric inhibitors, we show that thumb site II inhibitors possess a distinct mechanism of action. A combination of enzyme activity studies and direct binding assays reveals that these inhibitors require both regulatory elements to maintain the polymerase inhibitory activity. Removal of either element has little impact on the binding affinity of thumb site II inhibitors, but significantly reduces their potency. NS5B in complex with a thumb site II inhibitor displays a characteristic melting profile that suggests stabilization not only of the thumb domain but also the whole polymerase. Successive truncations of the C-terminal tail and/or removal of the β-loop lead to progressive destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, the thermal unfolding transitions characteristic for thumb site II inhibitor-NS5B complex are absent in the inhibitor-bound constructs in which interactions between C-terminal tail and β-loop are abolished, pointing to the pivotal role of both regulatory elements in communication between domains. Taken together, a comprehensive picture of inhibition by compounds binding to thumb site II emerges: inhibitor binding provides stabilization of the entire polymerase in an inactive, closed conformation, propagated via coupled interactions between the C-terminal tail and β-loop.

  2. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  3. The binding site for neohesperidin dihydrochalcone at the human sweet taste receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratochwil Nicole A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in sweet taste perception among species depend on structural variations of the sweet taste receptor. The commercially used isovanillyl sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone activates the human but not the rat sweet receptor TAS1R2+TAS1R3. Analysis of interspecies combinations and chimeras of rat and human TAS1R2+TAS1R3 suggested that the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 is crucial for the activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Results By mutational analysis combined with functional studies and molecular modeling we identified a set of different amino acid residues within the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 that forms the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding pocket. Sixteen amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains 2 to 7 and one in the extracellular loop 2 of hTAS1R3 influenced the receptor's response to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Some of these seventeen residues are also part of the binding sites for the sweetener cyclamate or the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. In line with this observation, lactisole inhibited activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate competitively, whereas receptor activation by aspartame, a sweetener known to bind to the N-terminal domain of TAS1R2, was allosterically inhibited. Seven of the amino acid positions crucial for activation of hTAS1R2+hTAS1R3 by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are thought to play a role in the binding of allosteric modulators of other class C GPCRs, further supporting our model of the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone pharmacophore. Conclusion From our data we conclude that we identified the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding site at the human sweet taste receptor, which overlaps with those for the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. This readily delivers a molecular explanation of our finding that lactisole is a competitive inhibitor of the receptor

  4. Inhibitory Mechanism of an Allosteric Antibody Targeting the Glucagon Receptor*

    OpenAIRE

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J.; Madjidi, Azadeh; Jacob E Corn; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M.; Allan, Bernard B.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the ext...

  5. A Unified Model of the GABA(A) Receptor Comprising Agonist and Benzodiazepine Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning; Bergmann, Rikke; Sørensen, Pernille Louise

    2013-01-01

    We present a full-length a1b2c2 GABA receptor model optimized for agonists and benzodiazepine (BZD) allosteric modulators. We propose binding hypotheses for the agonists GABA, muscimol and THIP and for the allosteric modulator diazepam (DZP). The receptor model is primarily based on the glutamate...

  6. Steady state kinetic model for the binding of substrates and allosteric effectors to Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Larsen, Sine

    2000-01-01

    saturation with ribose 5-phosphate leads to the binding of Mg2+ and substrates via a slow pathway where Pi binds to the enzyme last. The random mechanism for Pi binding was further supported by studies with competitive inhibitors of Mg2+, MgATP, and ribose 5-phosphate that all appeared noncompetitive when...... varying Pi at either saturating or unsaturating ribose 5-phosphate concentrations. Furthermore, none of the inhibitors induced inhibition at increasing Pi concentrations. Results from ADP inhibition of Pi activation suggest that these effectors compete for binding to a common regulatory site....

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Action for Allosteric Modulators and Agonists in CC-chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlshøj, Stefanie; Amarandi, Roxana Maria; Larsen, Olav;

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule metal ion chelators bipyridine and terpyridine complexed with Zn(2+) (ZnBip and ZnTerp) act as CCR5 agonists and strong positive allosteric modulators of CCL3 binding to CCR5, weak modulators of CCL4 binding, and competitors for CCL5 binding. Here we describe their binding site...

  8. Ligand binding and thermostability of different allosteric states of the insulin zinc-hexamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B;

    2006-01-01

    The influence of ligand binding and conformation state on the thermostability of hexameric zinc-insulin was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The insulin hexamer exists in equilibrium between the forms T6, T3R3, and R6. Phenolic ligands induce and stabilize the T3R3- and R6-stat...

  9. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. (BioMega, Inc., Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  10. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  11. GTP is an allosteric modulator of the interaction between the guanylate-binding protein 1 and the prosurvival kinase PIM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Marco; Petrella, Lella; Orteca, Nausicaa; Di Dato, Antonio; Mariani, Marisa; Andreoli, Mirko; De Donato, Marta; Scambia, Giovanni; Novellino, Ettore; Ferlini, Cristiano; Fattorusso, Caterina

    2015-02-16

    GBP1 and PIM1 are known to interact with a molar ratio 1:1. GBP1:PIM1 binding initiates a signaling pathway that induces resistance to common chemotherapeutics such as paclitaxel. Since GBP1 is a large GTPase which undergoes conformational changes in a nucleotide-dependent manner, we investigated the effect of GTP/GDP binding on GBP1:PIM1 interaction by using computational and biological studies. It resulted that only GTP decreases the formation of the GBP1:PIM1 complex through an allosteric mechanism, putting the bases for the identification of new compounds potentially able to revert resistance to paclitaxel.

  12. To be, or not to be two sites: that is the question about LeuT substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicolas; Tavoulari, Sotiria

    2011-10-01

    Transport proteins of the neurotransmitter sodium symporter (NSS) family regulate the extracellular concentration of several neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The only member of this family for which atomic-resolution structural data are available is the prokaryotic homologue LeuT. This protein has been used as a model system to study the molecular mechanism of transport of the NSS family. In this Journal Club, we discuss two strikingly different LeuT transport mechanisms: one involving a single high-affinity substrate binding site and one recently proposed alternative involving two high-affinity substrate binding sites that are allosterically coupled.

  13. Predicted metal binding sites for phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashok; Roy, Sudeep; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Roy, Pratibha; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha

    2009-09-05

    Metal ion binding domains are found in proteins that mediate transport, buffering or detoxification of metal ions. The objective of the study is to design and analyze metal binding motifs against the genes involved in phytoremediation. This is being done on the basis of certain pre-requisite amino-acid residues known to bind metal ions/metal complexes in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP's). Earlier work on MAP's have shown that heavy metals accumulated by aromatic and medicinal plants do not appear in the essential oil and that some of these species are able to grow in metal contaminated sites. A pattern search against the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL databases yielded true positives in each case showing the high specificity of the motifs designed for the ions of nickel, lead, molybdenum, manganese, cadmium, zinc, iron, cobalt and xenobiotic compounds. Motifs were also studied against PDB structures. Results of the study suggested the presence of binding sites on the surface of protein molecules involved. PDB structures of proteins were finally predicted for the binding sites functionality in their respective phytoremediation usage. This was further validated through CASTp server to study its physico-chemical properties. Bioinformatics implications would help in designing strategy for developing transgenic plants with increased metal binding capacity. These metal binding factors can be used to restrict metal update by plants. This helps in reducing the possibility of metal movement into the food chain.

  14. An allosteric conduit facilitates dynamic multisite substrate recognition by the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizmok, Veronika; Orlicky, Stephen; Cheng, Jing; Song, Jianhui; Bah, Alaji; Delgoshaie, Neda; Lin, Hong; Mittag, Tanja; Sicheri, Frank; Chan, Hue Sun; Tyers, Mike; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4 mediates phosphorylation-dependent elimination of numerous substrates by binding one or more Cdc4 phosphodegrons (CPDs). Methyl-based NMR analysis of the Cdc4 WD40 domain demonstrates that Cyclin E, Sic1 and Ash1 degrons have variable effects on the primary Cdc4WD40 binding pocket. Unexpectedly, a Sic1-derived multi-CPD substrate (pSic1) perturbs methyls around a previously documented allosteric binding site for the chemical inhibitor SCF-I2. NMR cross-saturation experiments confirm direct contact between pSic1 and the allosteric pocket. Phosphopeptide affinity measurements reveal negative allosteric communication between the primary CPD and allosteric pockets. Mathematical modelling indicates that the allosteric pocket may enhance ultrasensitivity by tethering pSic1 to Cdc4. These results suggest negative allosteric interaction between two distinct binding pockets on the Cdc4WD40 domain may facilitate dynamic exchange of multiple CPD sites to confer ultrasensitive dependence on substrate phosphorylation.

  15. Pharmacophore screening of the protein data bank for specific binding site chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Zhao, Yong; Schapira, Matthieu

    2010-03-22

    A simple computational approach was developed to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for putative pockets possessing a specific binding site chemistry and geometry. The method employs two commonly used 3D screening technologies, namely identification of cavities in protein structures and pharmacophore screening of chemical libraries. For each protein structure, a pocket finding algorithm is used to extract potential binding sites containing the correct types of residues, which are then stored in a large SDF-formatted virtual library; pharmacophore filters describing the desired binding site chemistry and geometry are then applied to screen this virtual library and identify pockets matching the specified structural chemistry. As an example, this approach was used to screen all human protein structures in the PDB and identify sites having chemistry similar to that of known methyl-lysine binding domains that recognize chromatin methylation marks. The selected genes include known readers of the histone code as well as novel binding pockets that may be involved in epigenetic signaling. Putative allosteric sites were identified on the structures of TP53BP1, L3MBTL3, CHEK1, KDM4A, and CREBBP.

  16. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors.

  17. Steric hindrance mutagenesis in the conserved extracellular vestibule impedes allosteric binding of antidepressants to the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Shi, Lei; Beuming, Thijs;

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) controls synaptic serotonin levels and is the primary target for antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (e.g. (S)-citalopram) and tricyclic antidepressants (e.g. clomipramine). In addition to a high affinity binding site, SERT possesses...

  18. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  19. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  20. Partial chemical characterization of cyclopyrrolones ((/sup 3/H) suriclone) and benzodiazepines ((/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam) binding site: Differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zundel, J.L.; Blanchard, J.C.; Julou, L.

    1985-06-10

    Rat hippocampus membranes were treated with several protein modifying reagents (iodoacetamide, N-ethylmaleimide, tetranitromethane and N-acetylimidazole). The effects of these treatments on the binding sites of cyclopyrrolones ((/sup 3/H) suriclone), a new chemical family of minor tranquilizers, and benzodiazepines ((/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam) were investigated. Here the authors show that both ligands are similarly sensitive to cysteine alkylation: (/sup 3/H) suriclone and (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam binding are reduced by iodoacetamide and slightly increased by N-ethylmaleimide. On the contrary they are clearly differentiated by tyrosine modification: (/sup 3/H) suriclone binding is not changed whereas (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam binding is increased by tetranitromethane and decreased by N-acetylimidazole. The present findings and published evidence suggest cyclopyrrolones and benzodiazepines bind to distinct sites or to different allosteric forms of the benzodiazepine receptor. 28 references, 6 figures.

  1. The allosteric regulation of pyruvate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, G; Chiarelli, L; Fortin, R; Speranza, M L; Galizzi, A; Mattevi, A

    2000-06-16

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) is critical for the regulation of the glycolytic pathway. The regulatory properties of Escherichia coli were investigated by mutating six charged residues involved in interdomain salt bridges (Arg(271), Arg(292), Asp(297), and Lys(413)) and in the binding of the allosteric activator (Lys(382) and Arg(431)). Arg(271) and Lys(413) are located at the interface between A and C domains within one subunit. The R271L and K413Q mutant enzymes exhibit altered kinetic properties. In K413Q, there is partial enzyme activation, whereas R271L is characterized by a bias toward the T-state in the allosteric equilibrium. In the T-state, Arg(292) and Asp(297) form an intersubunit salt bridge. The mutants R292D and D297R are totally inactive. The crystal structure of R292D reveals that the mutant enzyme retains the T-state quaternary structure. However, the mutation induces a reorganization of the interface with the creation of a network of interactions similar to that observed in the crystal structures of R-state yeast and M1 PK proteins. Furthermore, in the R292D structure, two loops that are part of the active site are disordered. The K382Q and R431E mutations were designed to probe the binding site for fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate, the allosteric activator. R431E exhibits only slight changes in the regulatory properties. Conversely, K382Q displays a highly altered responsiveness to the activator, suggesting that Lys(382) is involved in both activator binding and allosteric transition mechanism. Taken together, these results support the notion that domain interfaces are critical for the allosteric transition. They couple changes in the tertiary and quaternary structures to alterations in the geometry of the fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate and substrate binding sites. These site-directed mutagenesis data are discussed in the light of the molecular basis for the hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, which is caused by mutations in human erythrocyte PK gene.

  2. The ryanodine receptor pore blocker neomycin also inhibits channel activity via a previously undescribed high-affinity Ca(2+) binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Derek R; Hamada, Tomoyo; Fessenden, James D; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we present evidence for the mechanism of neomycin inhibition of skeletal ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In single-channel recordings, neomycin produced monophasic inhibition of RyR open probability and biphasic inhibition of [(3)H]ryanodine binding. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) for channel blockade by neomycin was dependent on membrane potential and cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)], suggesting that neomycin acts both as a pore plug and as a competitive antagonist at a cytoplasmic Ca(2+) binding site that causes allosteric inhibition. This novel Ca(2+)/neomycin binding site had a neomycin affinity of 100 nM: and a Ca(2+) affinity of 35 nM,: which is 30-fold higher than that of the well-described cytoplasmic Ca(2+) activation site. Therefore, a new high-affinity class of Ca(2+) binding site(s) on the RyR exists that mediates neomycin inhibition. Neomycin plugging of the channel pore induced brief (1-2 ms) conductance substates at 30% of the fully open conductance, whereas allosteric inhibition caused complete channel closure with durations that depended on the neomycin concentration. We quantitatively account for these results using a dual inhibition model for neomycin that incorporates voltage-dependent pore plugging and Ca(2+)-dependent allosteric inhibition.

  3. Inhibitory mechanism of an allosteric antibody targeting the glucagon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J; Madjidi, Azadeh; Corn, Jacob E; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M; Allan, Bernard B

    2013-12-13

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the extracellular domain (ECD) opposite the ligand-binding cleft, whereas the second binding site consists of residues in the αA helix of the ECD. A docking model suggests that the antibody does not occlude the ligand-binding cleft. We solved the crystal structure of GCGR ECD containing a naturally occurring G40S mutation and found a shift in the register of the αA helix that prevents antibody binding. We also found that alterations in the αA helix impact the normal function of GCGR. We present a model for the allosteric inhibition of GCGR by a monoclonal antibody that may form the basis for the development of allosteric modulators for the treatment of diabetes and other class B GPCR-related diseases.

  4. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  5. Computational identification of uncharacterized cruzain binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D Durrant

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, claims 50,000 lives annually and is the leading cause of infectious myocarditis in the world. As current antichagastic therapies like nifurtimox and benznidazole are highly toxic, ineffective at parasite eradication, and subject to increasing resistance, novel therapeutics are urgently needed. Cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi, is one attractive drug target. In the current work, molecular dynamics simulations and a sequence alignment of a non-redundant, unbiased set of peptidase C1 family members are used to identify uncharacterized cruzain binding sites. The two sites identified may serve as targets for future pharmacological intervention.

  6. Allosteric Modulation: An Alternate Approach Targeting the Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy; Li, Jun-Xu; Thomas, Brian F; Wiley, Jenny L; Kenakin, Terry P; Zhang, Yanan

    2016-11-23

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor is a G protein coupled receptor and plays an important role in many biological processes and physiological functions. A variety of CB1 receptor agonists and antagonists, including endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and synthetic cannabinoids, have been discovered or developed over the past 20 years. In 2005, it was discovered that the CB1 receptor contains allosteric site(s) that can be recognized by small molecules or allosteric modulators. A number of CB1 receptor allosteric modulators, both positive and negative, have since been reported and importantly, they display pharmacological characteristics that are distinct from those of orthosteric agonists and antagonists. Given the psychoactive effects commonly associated with CB1 receptor agonists and antagonists/inverse agonists, allosteric modulation may offer an alternate approach to attain potential therapeutic benefits while avoiding inherent side effects of orthosteric ligands. This review details the complex pharmacological profiles of these allosteric modulators, their structure-activity relationships, and efforts in elucidating binding modes and mechanisms of actions of reported CB1 allosteric modulators. The ultimate development of CB1 receptor allosteric ligands could potentially lead to improved therapies for CB1-mediated neurological disorders.

  7. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin signature motif: a critical element in the allosteric pathway that couples membrane binding to pore assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley J Dowd

    Full Text Available The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs constitute a family of pore-forming toxins that contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens.The most highly conserved region in the primary structure of the CDCs is the signature undecapeptide sequence (ECTGLAWEWWR. The CDC pore forming mechanism is highly sensitive to changes in its structure, yet its contribution to the molecular mechanism of the CDCs has remained enigmatic. Using a combination of fluorescence spectroscopic methods we provide evidence that shows the undecapeptide motif of the archetype CDC, perfringolysin O (PFO, is a key structural element in the allosteric coupling of the cholesterol-mediated membrane binding in domain 4 (D4 to distal structural changes in domain 3 (D3 that are required for the formation of the oligomeric pore complex. Loss of the undecapeptide function prevents all measurable D3 structural transitions, the intermolecular interaction of membrane bound monomers and the assembly of the oligomeric pore complex. We further show that this pathway does not exist in intermedilysin (ILY, a CDC that exhibits a divergent undecapeptide and that has evolved to use human CD59 rather than cholesterol as its receptor. These studies show for the first time that the undecapeptide of the cholesterol-binding CDCs forms a critical element of the allosteric pathway that controls the assembly of the pore complex.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of indole-2-carboxamides bearing photoactivatable functionalities as novel allosteric modulators for the cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Chang-Jiang; Ali, Hamed I; Ahn, Kwang H; Kolluru, Srikanth; Kendall, Debra A; Lu, Dai

    2016-10-04

    5-Chloro-3-ethyl-N-(4-(piperidin-1-yl)phenethyl)-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (ORG27569, 1) is a prototypical allosteric modulator for the cannabinoid CB1 receptor. Based on this indole-2-carboxamide scaffold, we designed and synthesized novel CB1 allosteric modulators that possess photoactivatable functionalities, which include benzophenone, phenyl azide, aliphatic azide and phenyltrifluoromethyldiazrine. To assess their allosteric effects, the dissociation constant (KB) and allosteric binding cooperativity factor (α) were determined and compared to their parent compounds. Within this series, benzophenone-containing compounds 26 and 27, phenylazide-containing compound 28, and the aliphatic azide containing compound 36b showed allosteric binding parameters (KB and α) comparable to their parent compound 1, 7, 8, and 9, respectively. We further assessed these modulators for their impact on G-protein coupling activity. Interestingly, these compounds exhibited negative allosteric modulator properties in a manner similar to their parent compounds, which antagonize agonist-induced G-protein coupling. These novel CB1 allosteric modulators, possessing photoactivatable functionalities, provide valuable tools for future photo-affinity labeling and mapping the CB1 allosteric binding site(s).

  9. Binding site of ribosomal proteins on prokaryotic 5S ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1982-01-01

    ., & Garrett, R. A. (1981) Biochemistry 20, 7301--7307], reveal an extensive interaction site for protein L18 and a more localized one for L25. Generally comparable results, with a few important differences, were obtained in a study of the binding sites of the two E. coli proteins on Bacillus...... experiments were performed for both RNAs. The effects of the bound proteins on the ribonuclease digestion of the RNAs could generally be correlated with the results obtained with the E. coli proteins L18 and L25, although there was evidence for an additional protein-induced conformational change in the B...... stearothermophilus 5S RNA. Several protein-induced changes in the RNA structures were identified; some are possibly allosteric in nature. The two prokaryotic 5S RNAs were also incubated with total 50S subunit proteins from E. coli and B. stearothermophilus ribosomes. Homologous and heterologous reconstitution...

  10. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  11. Auto-FACE: an NMR based binding site mapping program for fast chemical exchange protein-ligand systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janarthanan Krishnamoorthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy offers a variety of experiments to study protein-ligand interactions at atomic resolution. Among these experiments, 15N Heteronuclear Single Quantum Correlation (HSQCexperiment is simple, less time consuming and highly informative in mapping the binding site of the ligand. The interpretation of 15N HSQC becomes ambiguous when the chemical shift perturbations are caused by non-specific interactions like allosteric changes and local structural rearrangement. Under such cases, detailed chemical exchange analysis based on chemical shift perturbation will assist in locating the binding site accurately. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have automated the mapping of binding sites for fast chemical exchange systems using information obtained from 15N HSQC spectra of protein serially titrated with ligand of increasing concentrations. The automated program Auto-FACE (Auto-FAst Chemical Exchange analyzer determines the parameters, e.g. rate of change of perturbation, binding equilibrium constant and magnitude of chemical shift perturbation to map the binding site residues.Interestingly, the rate of change of perturbation at lower ligand concentration is highly sensitive in differentiating the binding site residues from the non-binding site residues. To validate this program, the interaction between the protein hBcl(XL and the ligand BH3I-1 was studied. Residues in the hydrophobic BH3 binding groove of hBcl(XL were easily identified to be crucial for interaction with BH3I-1 from other residues that also exhibited perturbation. The geometrically averaged equilibrium constant (3.0 x 10(4 calculated for the residues present at the identified binding site is consistent with the values obtained by other techniques like isothermal calorimetry and fluorescence polarization assays (12.8 x 10(4. Adjacent to the primary site, an additional binding site was identified which had an affinity of 3.8 times weaker

  12. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  13. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  14. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  15. STUDY OF ESTROGEN BINDING SITE ON HUMAN EJACULATED SPERMATOZOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUJin-Shong; WANGYi-Fei

    1989-01-01

    The specific estrogen binding site for 17β-estradiol has been investigated on human spermatozoa by electron microscopec autoradiography. The results show that the binding sites were distributed over the surface of human spermatozoa: acrosomal cap, equatorial

  16. Being a binding site: characterizing residue composition of binding sites on proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván, Gábor; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince

    2007-12-30

    The Protein Data Bank contains the description of more than 45,000 three-dimensional protein and nucleic-acid structures today. Started to exist as the computer-readable depository of crystallographic data complementing printed articles, the proper interpretation of the content of the individual files in the PDB still frequently needs the detailed information found in the citing publication. This fact implies that the fully automatic processing of the whole PDB is a very hard task. We first cleaned and re-structured the PDB data, then analyzed the residue composition of the binding sites in the whole PDB for frequency and for hidden association rules. Main results of the paper: (i) the cleaning and repairing algorithm (ii) redundancy elimination from the data (iii) application of association rule mining to the cleaned non-redundant data set. We have found numerous significant relations of the residue-composition of the ligand binding sites on protein surfaces, summarized in two figures. One of the classical data-mining methods for exploring implication-rules, the association-rule mining, is capable to find previously unknown residue-set preferences of bind ligands on protein surfaces. Since protein-ligand binding is a key step in enzymatic mechanisms and in drug discovery, these uncovered preferences in the study of more than 19,500 binding sites may help in identifying new binding protein-ligand pairs.

  17. The Allosteric Switching Mechanism in Bacteriophage MS2

    CERN Document Server

    Perkett, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    In this article we use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopt different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We disc...

  18. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantcheva, Adriana K; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Nissen, Poul

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding.

  19. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands.

  20. Ion-Regulated Allosteric Binding of Fullerenes (C-60 and C-70) by Tetrathiafulvalene-Calix[4]pyrroles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, C. M.; Lim, J. M.; Larsen, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    crystal X-ray diffraction methods and in dichloromethane solution by means of continuous variation plots and UV-vis spectroscopic titrations. These analyses revealed a 1:1 stoichiometry between the anion-bound TTF-C4Ps and the complexed ftillerenes. The latter guests are bound within the bowl-like cup...... of the two test fullerenes by inducing a conformational change from the 1,3-alternate to the cone conformer of the TTF-C4Ps, thus acting as positive heterotropic allosteric effectors. For a particular halide anion, the choice of tetraalkylammonium salts serves to modulate the strength of the TTF-C4P...

  1. Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulations of Allosteric Cooperativity

    CERN Document Server

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between a protein and a ligand are often accompanied by a redistribution of the population of thermally accessible conformations. This dynamic response of the protein's functional energy landscape enables a protein to modulate binding affinities and control binding sensitivity to ligand concentration. In this paper, we investigate the structural origins of binding affinity and allosteric cooperativity of binding two calcium ions to each domain of calmodulin (CaM) through simulations of a simple coarse-grained model. In this model, the protein's conformational transitions between open and closed conformational ensembles are simulated explicitly and ligand binding and unbinding is treated implicitly at the mean field level. Ligand binding is cooperative because the binding sites are coupled through a shift in the dominant conformational ensemble upon binding. The classic Monod-Wyman-Changeux model of allostery with appropriate binding free energy to the open and closed ensembles accurately describe...

  2. High affinity and temperature sensitivity of blood oxygen binding in Pangasianodon hypophthalmus due to lack of chloride-hemoglobin allosteric interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Phuong, Le My; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Jensen, Frank B; Wang, Tobias; Bayley, Mark

    2015-06-01

    Air-breathing fishes represent interesting organisms in terms of understanding the physiological changes associated with the terrestrialization of vertebrates, and, further, are of great socio-economic importance for aquaculture in Southeast Asia. To understand how environmental factors, such as high temperature, affect O2 transport in air-breathing fishes, this study assessed the effects of temperature on O2 binding of blood and Hb in the economically important air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus. To determine blood O2 binding properties, blood was drawn from resting cannulated fishes and O2 binding curves made at 25°C and 35°C. To determine the allosteric regulation and thermodynamics of Hb O2 binding, Hb was purified, and O2 equilibria were recorded at five temperatures in the absence and presence of ATP and Cl(-). Whole blood had a high O2 affinity (O2 tension at half saturation P50 = 4.6 mmHg at extracellular pH 7.6 and 25°C), a high temperature sensitivity of O2 binding (apparent heat of oxygenation ΔH(app) = -28.3 kcal/mol), and lacked a Root effect. Further, the data on Hb revealed weak ATP binding and a complete lack of Cl(-) binding to Hb, which, in part, explains the high O2 affinity and high temperature sensitivity of blood O2 binding. This study demonstrates how a potent mechanism for increasing O2 affinity is linked to increased temperature sensitivity of O2 transport and provides a basic framework for a better understanding of how hypoxia-adapted species will react to increasing temperatures.

  3. Allosteric modulation of ATP-gated P2X receptor channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddou, Claudio; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Seven mammalian purinergic receptor subunits, denoted P2X1 to P2X7, and several spliced forms of these subunits have been cloned. When heterologously expressed, these cDNAs encode ATP-gated non-selective cation channels organized as trimers. All activated receptors produce cell depolarization and promote Ca2+ influx through their pores and indirectly by activating voltage-gated calcium channels. However, the biophysical and pharmacological properties of these receptors differ considerably, and the majority of these subunits are also capable of forming heterotrimers with other members of the P2X receptor family, which confers further different properties. These channels have three ATP binding domains, presumably located between neighboring subunits, and occupancy of at least two binding sites is needed for their activation. In addition to the orthosteric binding sites for ATP, these receptors have additional allosteric sites that modulate the agonist action at receptors, including sites for trace metals, protons, neurosteroids, reactive oxygen species and phosphoinositides. The allosteric regulation of P2X receptors is frequently receptor-specific and could be a useful tool to identify P2X members in native tissues and their roles in signaling. The focus of this review is on common and receptor-specific allosteric modulation of P2X receptors and the molecular base accounting for allosteric binding sites. PMID:21639805

  4. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2‧-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway.

  5. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  6. Selective Negative Allosteric Modulation Of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors - A Structural Perspective of Ligands and Mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Isberg, Vignir; Tehan, Benjamin G

    2015-01-01

    modulators. In this analysis, we make the first comprehensive structural comparison of all metabotropic glutamate receptors, placing selective negative allosteric modulators and critical mutants into the detailed context of the receptor binding sites. A better understanding of how the different m...

  7. Molecular mechanism of the allosteric regulation of the αγ heterodimer of human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tengfei; Peng, Yingjie; Huang, Wei; Ding, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase catalyzes the decarboxylation of isocitrate (ICT) into α-ketoglutarate in the Krebs cycle. It exists as the α2βγ heterotetramer composed of the αβ and αγ heterodimers. Previously, we have demonstrated biochemically that the α2βγ heterotetramer and αγ heterodimer can be allosterically activated by citrate (CIT) and ADP. In this work, we report the crystal structures of the αγ heterodimer with the γ subunit bound without or with different activators. Structural analyses show that CIT, ADP and Mg2+ bind adjacent to each other at the allosteric site. The CIT binding induces conformational changes at the allosteric site, which are transmitted to the active site through the heterodimer interface, leading to stabilization of the ICT binding at the active site and thus activation of the enzyme. The ADP binding induces no further conformational changes but enhances the CIT binding through Mg2+-mediated interactions, yielding a synergistic activation effect. ICT can also bind to the CIT-binding subsite, which induces similar conformational changes but exhibits a weaker activation effect. The functional roles of the key residues are verified by mutagenesis, kinetic and structural studies. Our structural and functional data together reveal the molecular mechanism of the allosteric regulation of the αγ heterodimer. PMID:28098230

  8. Engineering allosteric regulation into the hinge region of a circularly permuted TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Valéry; Fastrez, Jacques; Soumillion, Patrice

    2010-09-01

    In nature, the activity of many enzymes involved in important biochemical pathways is controlled by binding a ligand in a site remote from the active site. The allosteric sites are frequently located in hinge regulatory subunits, in which a conformational change can occur and propagate to the active site. The enzymatic activity is then enhanced or decreased depending on the type of effectors. Many artificial binding sites have been created to engineer an allosteric regulation. Generally, these sites were engineered near the active site in loops or at the surface of contiguous helices or strands but rarely in hinge regions. This work aims at exploring the possibility of regulating a monomeric enzyme whose active site is located at the interface between two domains. We anticipated that binding of a ligand in the hinge region linking the domains would modify their positioning and, consequently, modulate the activity. Here, we describe the design of two mutants in a circularly permuted TEM-1 (cpTEM-1) beta-lactamase. The first one, cpTEM-1-His(3) was created by a rational design. It shows little regulation upon metal ion binding except for a weak activation with Zn(2+). The second one, cpTEM-1-3M-His(2), was selected by a directed evolution strategy. It is allosterically down-regulated by Zn(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+) with binding affinities around 300 microM.

  9. An allosteric inhibitor of protein arginine methyltransferase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarheyeva, Alena; Senisterra, Guillermo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dong, Aiping; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Wasney, Gregory A; Chau, Irene; Marcellus, Richard; Hajian, Taraneh; Liu, Feng; Korboukh, Ilia; Smil, David; Bolshan, Yuri; Min, Jinrong; Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Loppnau, Peter; Poda, Gennadiy; Griffin, Carly; Aman, Ahmed; Brown, Peter J; Jin, Jian; Al-Awar, Rima; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Schapira, Matthieu; Vedadi, Masoud

    2012-08-01

    PRMT3, a protein arginine methyltransferase, has been shown to influence ribosomal biosynthesis by catalyzing the dimethylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S2. Although PRMT3 has been reported to be a cytosolic protein, it has been shown to methylate histone H4 peptide (H4 1-24) in vitro. Here, we report the identification of a PRMT3 inhibitor (1-(benzo[d][1,2,3]thiadiazol-6-yl)-3-(2-cyclohexenylethyl)urea; compound 1) with IC50 value of 2.5 μM by screening a library of 16,000 compounds using H4 (1-24) peptide as a substrate. The crystal structure of PRMT3 in complex with compound 1 as well as kinetic analysis reveals an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Mutating PRMT3 residues within the allosteric site or using compound 1 analogs that disrupt interactions with allosteric site residues both abrogated binding and inhibitory activity. These data demonstrate an allosteric mechanism for inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferases, an emerging class of therapeutic targets.

  10. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  11. Characterization of an allosteric citalopram-binding site at the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Breum Larsen, Mads; Neubauer, Henrik Amtoft

    2005-01-01

          rate, of [3H]S-citalopram from human SERT, is retarded by the presence of       serotonin, as well as by several antidepressants, when present in the       dissociation buffer. Dissociation of [3H]S-citalopram from SERT is most       potently inhibited by S-citalopram followed by R...... is independent of       temperature, or the presence of Na+ in the dissociation buffer.       Dissociation of [3H]S-citalopram from a complex with the SERT       double-mutant, N208Q/N217Q, which has been suggested to be unable to       self-assemble into oligomeric complexes, is retarded to an extent similar...

  12. [G-protein-coupled receptors targeting: the allosteric approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, Julien A; Pantel, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are a major family of drug targets. Essentially all drugs targeting these receptors on the market compete with the endogenous ligand (agonists or antagonists) for binding the receptor. Recently, non-competitive compounds binding to distinct sites from the cognate ligand were documented in various classes of these receptors. These compounds, called allosteric modulators, generally endowed of a better selectivity are able to modulate specifically the endogenous signaling of the receptor. To better understand the promising potential of this class of GPCRs targeting compounds, this review highlights the properties of allosteric modulators, the strategies used to identify them and the challenges associated with the development of these compounds.

  13. Substrate and drug binding sites in LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyola, Ajeeta; Karpowich, Nathan K; Zhen, Juan; Marden, Jennifer; Reith, Maarten E; Wang, Da-Neng

    2010-08-01

    LeuT is a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter family, which includes the neuronal transporters for serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The original crystal structure of LeuT shows a primary leucine-binding site at the center of the protein. LeuT is inhibited by different classes of antidepressants that act as potent inhibitors of the serotonin transporter. The newly determined crystal structures of LeuT-antidepressant complexes provide opportunities to probe drug binding in the serotonin transporter, of which the exact position remains controversial. Structure of a LeuT-tryptophan complex shows an overlapping binding site with the primary substrate site. A secondary substrate binding site was recently identified, where the binding of a leucine triggers the cytoplasmic release of the primary substrate. This two binding site model presents opportunities for a better understanding of drug binding and the mechanism of inhibition for mammalian transporters.

  14. Computational modeling of allosteric communication reveals organizing principles of mutation-induced signaling in ABL and EGFR kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The emerging structural information about allosteric kinase complexes and the growing number of allosteric inhibitors call for a systematic strategy to delineate and classify mechanisms of allosteric regulation and long-range communication that control kinase activity. In this work, we have investigated mechanistic aspects of long-range communications in ABL and EGFR kinases based on the results of multiscale simulations of regulatory complexes and computational modeling of signal propagation in proteins. These approaches have been systematically employed to elucidate organizing molecular principles of allosteric signaling in the ABL and EGFR multi-domain regulatory complexes and analyze allosteric signatures of the gate-keeper cancer mutations. We have presented evidence that mechanisms of allosteric activation may have universally evolved in the ABL and EGFR regulatory complexes as a product of a functional cross-talk between the organizing αF-helix and conformationally adaptive αI-helix and αC-helix. These structural elements form a dynamic network of efficiently communicated clusters that may control the long-range interdomain coupling and allosteric activation. The results of this study have unveiled a unifying effect of the gate-keeper cancer mutations as catalysts of kinase activation, leading to the enhanced long-range communication among allosterically coupled segments and stabilization of the active kinase form. The results of this study can reconcile recent experimental studies of allosteric inhibition and long-range cooperativity between binding sites in protein kinases. The presented study offers a novel molecular insight into mechanistic aspects of allosteric kinase signaling and provides a quantitative picture of activation mechanisms in protein kinases at the atomic level.

  15. Effector-induced structural fluctuation regulates the ligand affinity of an allosteric protein: binding of inositol hexaphosphate has distinct dynamic consequences for the T and R states of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiang-jin; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Ho, Nancy T; Ho, Chien

    2008-04-29

    The present study reports distinct dynamic consequences for the T- and R-states of human normal adult hemoglobin (Hb A) due to the binding of a heterotropic allosteric effector, inositol hexaphosphate (IHP). A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique based on modified transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) has been used to investigate the effect of conformational exchange of Hb A in both deoxy and CO forms, in the absence and presence of IHP, at 14.1 and 21.1 T, and at 37 degrees C. Our results show that the majority of the polypeptide backbone amino acid residues of deoxy- and carbonmonoxy-forms of Hb A in the absence of IHP is not mobile on the micros-ms time scale, with the exception of several amino acid residues, that is, beta109Val and beta132Lys in deoxy-Hb A, and alpha40Lys in HbCO A. The mobility of alpha40Lys in HbCO A can be explained by the crystallographic data showing that the H-bond between alpha40Lys and beta146His in deoxy-Hb A is absent in HbCO A. However, the conformational exchange of beta109Val, which is located in the intradimer (alpha 1beta 1 or alpha 2beta 2) interface, is not consistent with the crystallographic observations that show rigid packing at this site. IHP binding appears to rigidify alpha40Lys in HbCO A, but does not significantly affect the flexibility of beta109Val in deoxy-Hb A. In the presence of IHP, several amino acid residues, especially those at the interdimer (alpha 1beta 2 or alpha 2beta 1) interface of HbCO A, exhibit significant conformational exchange. The affected residues include the proximal beta92His in the beta-heme pocket, as well as some other residues located in the flexible joint (betaC helix-alphaFG corner) and switch (alphaC helix-betaFG corner) regions that play an important role in the dimer-dimer rotation of Hb during the oxygenation process. These findings suggest that, upon IHP binding, HbCO A undergoes a conformational fluctuation near the R-state but biased toward the T

  16. Dynamic Coupling and Allosteric Networks in the α Subunit of Heterotrimeric G Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Malik, Rabia U.; Griggs, Nicholas W.; Skjærven, Lars; Traynor, John R.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Grant, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    G protein α subunits cycle between active and inactive conformations to regulate a multitude of intracellular signaling cascades. Important structural transitions occurring during this cycle have been characterized from extensive crystallographic studies. However, the link between observed conformations and the allosteric regulation of binding events at distal sites critical for signaling through G proteins remain unclear. Here we describe molecular dynamics simulations, bioinformatics analysis, and experimental mutagenesis that identifies residues involved in mediating the allosteric coupling of receptor, nucleotide, and helical domain interfaces of Gαi. Most notably, we predict and characterize novel allosteric decoupling mutants, which display enhanced helical domain opening, increased rates of nucleotide exchange, and constitutive activity in the absence of receptor activation. Collectively, our results provide a framework for explaining how binding events and mutations can alter internal dynamic couplings critical for G protein function. PMID:26703464

  17. Statistical Mechanics of Allosteric Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Tal; Mazutis, Linas; Phillips, Rob

    2016-07-07

    The concept of allostery in which macromolecules switch between two different conformations is a central theme in biological processes ranging from gene regulation to cell signaling to enzymology. Allosteric enzymes pervade metabolic processes, yet a simple and unified treatment of the effects of allostery in enzymes has been lacking. In this work, we take a step toward this goal by modeling allosteric enzymes and their interaction with two key molecular players-allosteric regulators and competitive inhibitors. We then apply this model to characterize existing data on enzyme activity, comment on how enzyme parameters (such as substrate binding affinity) can be experimentally tuned, and make novel predictions on how to control phenomena such as substrate inhibition.

  18. Allosteric regulation of helicase core activities of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by RNA binding to its RNA recognition motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatanga, Brighton; Andreou, Alexandra Z; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2017-01-23

    DEAD-box proteins share a structurally similar core of two RecA-like domains (RecA_N and RecA_C) that contain the conserved motifs for ATP-dependent RNA unwinding. In many DEAD-box proteins the helicase core is flanked by ancillary domains. To understand the regulation of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by its C-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM), we investigated the effect of RNA binding to the RRM on its position relative to the core, and on core activities. RRM/RNA complex formation substantially shifts the RRM from a position close to the RecA_C to the proximity of RecA_N, independent of RNA contacts with the core. RNA binding to the RRM is communicated to the core, and stimulates ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. The conformational space of the core depends on the identity of the RRM-bound RNA. Allosteric regulation of core activities by RNA-induced movement of ancillary domains may constitute a general regulatory mechanism of DEAD-box protein activity.

  19. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  20. Role of Arginine 293 and Glutamine 288 in Communication between Catalytic and Allosteric Sites in Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey (Case Western); (Colorado)

    2012-11-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 ({alpha}) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 ({beta}) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  1. Role of arginine 293 and glutamine 288 in communication between catalytic and allosteric sites in yeast ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Md Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2012-06-22

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 (α) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 (β) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  2. Predicted metal binding sites for phytoremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ashok; Roy, Sudeep; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Roy, Pratibha; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha

    2009-01-01

    Metal ion binding domains are found in proteins that mediate transport, buffering or detoxification of metal ions. The objective of the study is to design and analyze metal binding motifs against the genes involved in phytoremediation. This is being done on the basis of certain pre-requisite amino-acid residues known to bind metal ions/metal complexes in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP's). Earlier work on MAP's have shown that heavy metals accumulated by aromatic and medicinal plants do no...

  3. Using distal site mutations and allosteric inhibition to tune, extend and narrow the useful dynamic range of aptamer-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porchetta, Alessandro; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Ricci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Here we demonstrate multiple, complementary approaches by which to tune, extend or narrow the dynamic range of aptamer-based sensors. Specifically, we have employed both distal site mutations and allosteric control to tune the affinity and dynamic range of a fluorescent aptamer beacon. We show that allosteric control, achieved by using a set of easily designed oligonucleotide inhibitors that competes against the folding of the aptamer, allows to rationally and finely tune the affinity of our model aptamer across three orders of magnitude of target concentration with greater precision than that achieved using mutational approaches. Using these methods we generate sets of aptamers varying significantly in target affinity, which we then combined to recreate several of the mechanisms employed by nature to both narrow and broaden the dynamic range of biological receptors. Such ability to finely control the affinity and dynamic range of aptamers may find many applications in synthetic biology, drug delivery and targeted therapies, fields in which aptamers are of rapidly growing importance. PMID:23215257

  4. The therapeutic potential of allosteric ligands for free fatty acid sensitive GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Brian D; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most historically successful therapeutic targets. Despite this success there are many important aspects of GPCR pharmacology and function that have yet to be exploited to their full therapeutic potential. One in particular that has been gaining attention...... in recent times is that of GPCR ligands that bind to allosteric sites on the receptor distinct from the orthosteric site of the endogenous ligand. As therapeutics, allosteric ligands possess many theoretical advantages over their orthosteric counterparts, including more complex modes of action, improved...... safety, more physiologically appropriate responses, better target selectivity, and reduced likelihood of desensitisation and tachyphylaxis. Despite these advantages, the development of allosteric ligands is often difficult from a medicinal chemistry standpoint due to the more complex challenge...

  5. SAR studies on carboxylic acid series M(1) selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuduk, Scott D; Beshore, Douglas C

    2014-01-01

    There is mounting evidence from preclinical and early proof-of-concept studies suggesting that selective modulation of the M1 muscarinic receptor is efficacious in cognitive models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of nonselective M1 muscarinic agonists have previously shown positive effects on cognitive function in AD patients, but were limited due to cholinergic adverse events thought to be mediated by pan activation of the M2 to M5 sub-types. Thus, there is a need to identify selective activators of the M1 receptor to evaluate their potential in cognitive disorders. One strategy to confer selectivity for M1 is the identification of allosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators, which would target an allosteric site on the M1 receptor rather than the highly conserved orthosteric acetylcholine binding site. BQCA has been identified as a highly selective carboxylic acid M1 PAM and this review focuses on an extensive lead optimization campaign undertaken on this compound.

  6. Structure and localisation of drug binding sites on neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravna, Aina W; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Dahl, Svein G

    2009-10-01

    The dopamine (DAT), serotontin (SERT) and noradrenalin (NET) transporters are molecular targets for different classes of psychotropic drugs. The crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus LeuT(Aa) was used as a template for molecular modeling of DAT, SERT and NET, and two putative drug binding sites (pocket 1 and 2) in each transporter were identified. Cocaine was docked into binding pocket 1 of DAT, corresponding to the leucine binding site in LeuT(Aa), which involved transmembrane helices (TMHs) 1, 3, 6 and 8. Clomipramine was docked into binding pocket 2 of DAT, involving TMHs 1, 3, 6, 10 and 11, and extracellular loops 4 and 6, corresponding to the clomipramine binding site in a crystal structure of a LeuT(Aa)-clomipramine complex. The structures of the proposed cocaine- and tricyclic antidepressant-binding sites may be of particular interest for the design of novel DAT interacting ligands.

  7. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  8. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Andrés Peralta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators.

  9. Coarse-grained molecular simulations of allosteric cooperativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Portman, John J.

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between a protein and a ligand are often accompanied by a redistribution of the population of thermally accessible conformations. This dynamic response of the protein's functional energy landscape enables a protein to modulate binding affinities and control binding sensitivity to ligand concentration. In this paper, we investigate the structural origins of binding affinity and allosteric cooperativity of binding two Ca2+ ions to each domain of Calmodulin (CaM) through simulations of a simple coarse-grained model. In this model, the protein's conformational transitions between open and closed conformational ensembles are simulated explicitly and ligand binding and unbinding are treated implicitly within the grand canonical ensemble. Ligand binding is cooperative because the binding sites are coupled through a shift in the dominant conformational ensemble upon binding. The classic Monod-Wyman-Changeux model of allostery with appropriate binding free energies to the open and closed ensembles accurately describes the simulated binding thermodynamics. The simulations predict that the two domains of CaM have distinct binding affinity and cooperativity. In particular, the C-terminal domain binds Ca2+ with higher affinity and greater cooperativity than the N-terminal domain. From a structural point of view, the affinity of an individual binding loop depends sensitively on the loop's structural compatibility with the ligand in the bound ensemble, as well as the conformational flexibility of the binding site in the unbound ensemble.

  10. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes c...

  11. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A.; Golden, Barbara L. (Purdue); (Colorado)

    2010-05-24

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions.

  12. Study on the Model for Regulation of the Allosteric Enzyme Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Qian-Zhong(李前忠); LUO,Liao-Fu(罗辽复); ZHANG,Li-Rong(张利绒)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of activator molecule and repressive molecule on binding process between allosteric enzyme and substrate are disused by considering the heterotropic effect of the regulating molecule that binds to allosteric enzyme. A model of allosteric enzyme with heterotropic effect is presented. The cooperativity and anticooperativity in the regulation process are studied.

  13. Unraveling structural mechanisms of allosteric drug action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2014-05-01

    Orthosteric drugs block the active site to obstruct function; allosteric drugs modify the population of the active state, to modulate function. Available data lead us to propose that allosteric drugs can constitute anchors and drivers. The anchor docks into an allosteric pocket. The conformation with which it interacts is unchanged during the transition between the inactive and active states. The anchor provides the foundation that allows the driver to exert a 'pull' and/or 'push' action that shifts the receptor population from the inactive to the active state. The presence or absence of driver atom in an allosteric drug can exert opposite agonism. We map a strategy for driver identification and expect the allosteric trigger concept to transform agonist/antagonist drug discovery.

  14. High- and low-affinity binding of S-citalopram to the human serotonin transporter mutated at 20 putatively important amino acid positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Wiborg, Ove

    2005-01-01

    of presumed importance. Binding of S-citalopram, both to the high-affinity-binding site and to the allosteric binding site, was measured in these mutants with the purpose of investigating the connection between the two binding sites. The amino acid substitutions did not introduce large changes in the two...

  15. Kinetic and physiological effects of alterations in homologous isocitrate-binding sites of yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A P; McCammon, M T; McAlister-Henn, L

    2001-11-27

    Yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase is an allosterically regulated octameric enzyme composed of four each of two homologous but nonidentical subunits designated IDH1 and IDH2. Models based on the crystallographic structure of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase suggest that both yeast subunits contain isocitrate-binding sites. Identities in nine residue positions are predicted for the IDH2 site whereas four of the nine positions differ between the IDH1 and bacterial enzyme sites. Thus, we speculate that the IDH2 site is catalytic and that the IDH1 site may bind but not catalytically alter isocitrate. This was examined by kinetic analyses of enzymes with independent and concerted replacement of residues in each yeast IDH subunit site with the residues that differ in the other subunit site. Mutant enzymes were expressed in a yeast strain containing disrupted IDH1 and IDH2 loci and affinity-purified for kinetic analyses. The primary effects of various residue replacements in IDH2 were reductions of 30->300-fold in V(max) values, consistent with the catalytic function of this subunit. In contrast, replacement of all four residues in IDH1 produced a 17-fold reduction in V(max) under the same assay conditions, suggesting that the IDH1 site is not the primary catalytic site. However, single or multiple residue replacements in IDH1 uniformly increased half-saturation concentrations for isocitrate, implying that isocitrate can be bound at this site. Both subunits appear to contribute to cooperativity with respect to isocitrate, but AMP activation is lost only with residue replacements in IDH1. Overall, results are consistent with isocitrate binding by IDH2 for catalysis and with isocitrate binding by IDH1 being a prerequisite for allosteric activation by AMP. The effects of residue substitutions on enzyme function in vivo were assessed by analysis of various growth phenotypes. Results indicate a positive correlation between the level of IDH catalytic

  16. Dissecting allosteric effects of activator-coactivator complexes using a covalent small molecule ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningkun; Lodge, Jean M; Fierke, Carol A; Mapp, Anna K

    2014-08-19

    Allosteric binding events play a critical role in the formation and stability of transcriptional activator-coactivator complexes, perhaps in part due to the often intrinsically disordered nature of one or more of the constituent partners. The kinase-inducible domain interacting (KIX) domain of the master coactivator CREB binding protein/p300 is a conformationally dynamic domain that complexes with transcriptional activators at two discrete binding sites in allosteric communication. The complexation of KIX with the transcriptional activation domain of mixed-lineage leukemia protein leads to an enhancement of binding by the activation domain of CREB (phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain of CREB) to the second site. A transient kinetic analysis of the ternary complex formation aided by small molecule ligands that induce positive or negative cooperative binding reveals that positive cooperativity is largely governed by stabilization of the bound complex as indicated by a decrease in koff. Thus, this suggests the increased binding affinity for the second ligand is not due to an allosteric creation of a more favorable binding interface by the first ligand. This is consistent with data from us and from others indicating that the on rates of conformationally dynamic proteins approach the limits of diffusion. In contrast, negative cooperativity is manifested by alterations in both kon and koff, suggesting stabilization of the binary complex.

  17. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-04-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in internalization, and if antagonists binding to the CCR4 receptor could themselves evoke receptor internalization. CCL22 binding coupled CCR4 efficiently to β-arrestin and stimulated GTPγS binding however CCL17 did not couple to β-arrestin and only partially stimulated GTPγS binding. CCL22 potently induced internalization of almost all cell surface CCR4, while CCL17 showed only weak effects. We describe four small molecule antagonists that were demonstrated to bind to two distinct allosteric sites on the CCR4 receptor, and while both classes inhibited agonist ligand binding and chemotaxis, one of the allosteric sites also evoked receptor internalization. Furthermore, we also characterize an N-terminally truncated version of CCL22 which acts as a competitive antagonist at the orthosteric site, and surprisingly also evokes receptor internalization without demonstrating any agonist activity. Collectively this study demonstrates that orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the CCR4 receptor are capable of evoking receptor internalization, providing a novel strategy for drug discovery against this class of target.

  18. Elastic network model of allosteric regulation in protein kinase PDK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Gareth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural switches upon binding of phosphorylated moieties underpin many signalling networks. The ligand activation is a form of allosteric modulation of the protein, where the binding site is remote from the structural change in the protein. Recently this structural switch has been elegantly demonstrated with the crystallisation of the activated form of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. The purpose of the present work is to determine whether the allosteric coupling in PDK1 emerges at the level of a simple coarse grained model of protein dynamics. Results It is shown here that the allosteric effects of the agonist binding to the small lobe upon the activation loop in the large lobe of PDK1 are explainable within a simple 'ball and spring' elastic network model (ENM of protein dynamics. In particular, the model shows that the bound phospho peptide mimetic fluctuations have a high degree of correlation with the activation loop of PDK1. Conclusions The ENM approach to small molecule activation of proteins may offer a first pass predictive methodology where affinity is encoded in residues remote from the active site, and aid in the design of specific protein agonists that enhance the allosteric coupling and antagonist that repress it.

  19. Influence of sulfhydryl sites on metal binding by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Ryan M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2017-02-01

    The role of sulfhydryl sites within bacterial cell envelopes is still unknown, but the sites may control the fate and bioavailability of metals. Organic sulfhydryl compounds are important complexing ligands in aqueous systems and they can influence metal speciation in natural waters. Though representing only approximately 5-10% of the total available binding sites on bacterial surfaces, sulfhydryl sites exhibit high binding affinities for some metals. Due to the potential importance of bacterial sulfhydryl sites in natural systems, metal-bacterial sulfhydryl site binding constants must be determined in order to construct accurate models of the fate and distribution of metals in these systems. To date, only Cd-sulfhydryl binding has been quantified. In this study, the thermodynamic stabilities of Mn-, Co-, Ni-, Zn-, Sr- and Pb-sulfhydryl bacterial cell envelope complexes were determined for the bacterial species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Metal adsorption experiments were conducted as a function of both pH, ranging from 5.0 to 7.0, and metal loading, from 0.5 to 40.0 μmol/g (wet weight) bacteria, in batch experiments in order to determine if metal-sulfhydryl binding occurs. Initially, the data were used to calculate the value of the stability constants for the important metal-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes for each metal-loading condition studied, assuming a single binding reaction for the dominant metal-binding site type under the pH conditions of the experiments. For most of the metals that we studied, these calculated stability constant values increased significantly with decreasing metal loading, strongly suggesting that our initial assumption was not valid and that more than one type of binding occurs at the assumed binding site. We then modeled each dataset with two distinct site types with identical acidity constants: one site with a high metal-site stability constant value, which we take to represent metal-sulfhydryl binding and which dominates under low

  20. The allosteric switching mechanism in bacteriophage MS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkett, Matthew R.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    We use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopts different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We discuss changes in molecular interactions responsible for this shift. We then identify networks of amino acids with correlated motions to reveal the mechanism by which effects of TR binding span the protein. We find that TR binding strongly affects residues located at the 5-fold and quasi-sixfold interfaces in the assembled capsid, suggesting a mechanism by which the TR binding could direct formation of the native capsid geometry. The analysis predicts amino acids whose substitution by mutagenesis could alter populations of the conformational substates or their transition rates.

  1. Theoretical Study on the Allosteric Regulation of an Oligomeric Protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii by Cl− Ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongling Zhan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermophilic intracellular protease (PH1704 from Pyrococcus horikoshii that functions as an oligomer (hexamer or higher forms has proteolytic activity and remarkable stability. PH1704 is classified as a member of the C56 family of peptidases. This study is the first to observe that the use of Cl− as an allosteric inhibitor causes appreciable changes in the catalytic activity of the protease. Theoretical methods were used for further study. Quantum mechanical calculations indicated the binding mode of Cl− with Arg113. A molecular dynamics simulation explained how Cl− stabilized distinct contact species and how it controls the enzyme activity. The new structural insights obtained from this study are expected to stimulate further biochemical studies on the structures and mechanisms of allosteric proteases. It is clear that the discovery of new allosteric sites of the C56 family of peptidases may generate opportunities for pharmaceutical development and increases our understanding of the basic biological processes of this peptidase family.

  2. Allosteric indicator displacement enzyme assay for a cyanogenic glycoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, D Amilan; Elstner, Martin; Schiller, Alexander

    2013-10-18

    Indicator displacement assays (IDAs) represent an elegant approach in supramolecular analytical chemistry. Herein, we report a chemical biosensor for the selective detection of the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin in aqueous solution. The hybrid sensor consists of the enzyme β-glucosidase and a boronic acid appended viologen together with a fluorescent reporter dye. β-Glucosidase degrades the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin into hydrogen cyanide, glucose, and benzaldehyde. Only the released cyanide binds at the allosteric site of the receptor (boronic acid) thereby inducing changes in the affinity of a formerly bound fluorescent indicator dye at the other side of the receptor. Thus, the sensing probe performs as allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) for cyanide in water. Interference studies with inorganic anions and glucose revealed that cyanide is solely responsible for the change in the fluorescent signal. DFT calculations on a model compound revealed a 1:1 binding ratio of the boronic acid and cyanide ion. The fluorescent enzyme assay for β-glucosidase uses amygdalin as natural substrate and allows measuring Michaelis-Menten kinetics in microtiter plates. The allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) probe can also be used to detect cyanide traces in commercial amygdalin samples.

  3. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  4. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.;

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable o...

  5. Glutamate dehydrogenase: structure, allosteric regulation, and role in insulin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate. Only in the animal kingdom is this enzyme heavily allosterically regulated by a wide array of metabolites. The major activators are ADP and leucine and inhibitors include GTP, palmitoyl CoA, and ATP. Spontaneous mutations in the GTP inhibitory site that lead to the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HHS) syndrome have shed light as to why mammalian GDH is so tightly regulated. Patients with HHS exhibit hypersecretion of insulin upon consumption of protein and concomitantly extremely high levels of ammonium in the serum. The atomic structures of four new inhibitors complexed with GDH complexes have identified three different allosteric binding sites. Using a transgenic mouse model expressing the human HHS form of GDH, at least three of these compounds blocked the dysregulated form of GDH in pancreatic tissue. EGCG from green tea prevented the hyper-response to amino acids in whole animals and improved basal serum glucose levels. The atomic structure of the ECG-GDH complex and mutagenesis studies is directing structure-based drug design using these polyphenols as a base scaffold. In addition, all of these allosteric inhibitors are elucidating the atomic mechanisms of allostery in this complex enzyme.

  6. The structure and allosteric regulation of mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2012-03-15

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate. Only in the animal kingdom is this enzyme heavily allosterically regulated by a wide array of metabolites. The major activators are ADP and leucine, while the most important inhibitors include GTP, palmitoyl CoA, and ATP. Recently, spontaneous mutations in the GTP inhibitory site that lead to the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HHS) syndrome have shed light as to why mammalian GDH is so tightly regulated. Patients with HHS exhibit hypersecretion of insulin upon consumption of protein and concomitantly extremely high levels of ammonium in the serum. The atomic structures of four new inhibitors complexed with GDH complexes have identified three different allosteric binding sites. Using a transgenic mouse model expressing the human HHS form of GDH, at least three of these compounds were found to block the dysregulated form of GDH in pancreatic tissue. EGCG from green tea prevented the hyper-response to amino acids in whole animals and improved basal serum glucose levels. The atomic structure of the ECG-GDH complex and mutagenesis studies is directing structure-based drug design using these polyphenols as a base scaffold. In addition, all of these allosteric inhibitors are elucidating the atomic mechanisms of allostery in this complex enzyme.

  7. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Estrada

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/.

  8. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Javier; Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/.

  9. Discovery of Potential Orthosteric and Allosteric Antagonists of P2Y1R from Chinese Herbs by Molecular Simulation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R, which belongs to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, is an important target in ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The crystal structure of P2Y1R has been solved recently, which revealed orthosteric and allosteric ligand-binding sites with the details of ligand-protein binding modes. And it suggests that P2Y1R antagonists, which recognize two distinct sites, could potentially provide an efficacious and safe antithrombotic profile. In present paper, 2D similarity search, pharmacophore based screening, and molecular docking were used to explore the potential natural P2Y1R antagonists. 2D similarity search was used to classify orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of P2Y1R. Based on the result, pharmacophore models were constructed and validated by the test set. Optimal models were selected to discover potential P2Y1R antagonists of orthosteric and allosteric sites from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM. And the hits were filtered by Lipinski’s rule. Then molecular docking was used to refine the results of pharmacophore based screening and analyze the binding mode of the hits and P2Y1R. Finally, two orthosteric and one allosteric potential compounds were obtained, which might be used in future P2Y1R antagonists design. This work provides a reliable guide for discovering natural P2Y1R antagonists acting on two distinct sites from TCM.

  10. Discovery of Potential Orthosteric and Allosteric Antagonists of P2Y1R from Chinese Herbs by Molecular Simulation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang; Jiang, Lu-di; Qiao, Lian-sheng; Xiang, Yu-hong

    2016-01-01

    P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R), which belongs to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), is an important target in ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The crystal structure of P2Y1R has been solved recently, which revealed orthosteric and allosteric ligand-binding sites with the details of ligand-protein binding modes. And it suggests that P2Y1R antagonists, which recognize two distinct sites, could potentially provide an efficacious and safe antithrombotic profile. In present paper, 2D similarity search, pharmacophore based screening, and molecular docking were used to explore the potential natural P2Y1R antagonists. 2D similarity search was used to classify orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of P2Y1R. Based on the result, pharmacophore models were constructed and validated by the test set. Optimal models were selected to discover potential P2Y1R antagonists of orthosteric and allosteric sites from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). And the hits were filtered by Lipinski's rule. Then molecular docking was used to refine the results of pharmacophore based screening and analyze the binding mode of the hits and P2Y1R. Finally, two orthosteric and one allosteric potential compounds were obtained, which might be used in future P2Y1R antagonists design. This work provides a reliable guide for discovering natural P2Y1R antagonists acting on two distinct sites from TCM. PMID:27635149

  11. Cation binding site of cytochrome c oxidase: progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vygodina, Tatiana V; Kirichenko, Anna; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart binds Ca(2+) reversibly at a specific Cation Binding Site located near the outer face of the mitochondrial membrane. Ca(2+) shifts the absorption spectrum of heme a, which allowed earlier the determination of the kinetic and equilibrium characteristics of the binding, and, as shown recently, the binding of calcium to the site inhibits cytochrome oxidase activity at low turnover rates of the enzyme [Vygodina, Т., Kirichenko, A., Konstantinov, A.A (2013). Direct Regulation of Cytochrome c Oxidase by Calcium Ions. PloS ONE 8, e74436]. This paper summarizes further progress in the studies of the Cation Binding Site in this group presenting the results to be reported at 18th EBEC Meeting in Lisbon, 2014. The paper revises specificity of the bovine oxidase Cation Binding Site for different cations, describes dependence of the Ca(2+)-induced inhibition on turnover rate of the enzyme and reports very high affinity binding of calcium with the "slow" form of cytochrome oxidase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  12. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. (Parke-Davis Research Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital Site, Cambridge (England))

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  13. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...... have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion...

  14. Allosteric “beta-blocker” isolated from a DNA-encoded small molecule library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Seungkirl; Kahsai, Alem W.; Pani, Biswaranjan; Wang, Qin-Ting; Zhao, Shuai; Wall, Alissa L.; Strachan, Ryan T.; Staus, Dean P.; Wingler, Laura M.; Sun, Lillian D.; Sinnaeve, Justine; Choi, Minjung; Cho, Ted; Xu, Thomas T.; Hansen, Gwenn M.; Burnett, Michael B.; Lamerdin, Jane E.; Bassoni, Daniel L.; Gavino, Bryant J.; Husemoen, Gitte; Olsen, Eva K.; Franch, Thomas; Costanzi, Stefano; Chen, Xin; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) has been a model system for understanding regulatory mechanisms of G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) actions and plays a significant role in cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. Because all known β-adrenergic receptor drugs target the orthosteric binding site of the receptor, we set out to isolate allosteric ligands for this receptor by panning DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries comprising 190 million distinct compounds against purified human β2AR. Here, we report the discovery of a small-molecule negative allosteric modulator (antagonist), compound 15 [([4-((2S)-3-(((S)-3-(3-bromophenyl)-1-(methylamino)-1-oxopropan-2-yl)amino)-2-(2-cyclohexyl-2-phenylacetamido)-3-oxopropyl)benzamide], exhibiting a unique chemotype and low micromolar affinity for the β2AR. Binding of 15 to the receptor cooperatively enhances orthosteric inverse agonist binding while negatively modulating binding of orthosteric agonists. Studies with a specific antibody that binds to an intracellular region of the β2AR suggest that 15 binds in proximity to the G-protein binding site on the cytosolic surface of the β2AR. In cell-signaling studies, 15 inhibits cAMP production through the β2AR, but not that mediated by other Gs-coupled receptors. Compound 15 also similarly inhibits β-arrestin recruitment to the activated β2AR. This study presents an allosteric small-molecule ligand for the β2AR and introduces a broadly applicable method for screening DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries against purified GPCR targets. Importantly, such an approach could facilitate the discovery of GPCR drugs with tailored allosteric effects. PMID:28130548

  15. Modulation of RNase E activity by alternative RNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeyoung Kim

    Full Text Available Endoribonuclease E (RNase E affects the composition and balance of the RNA population in Escherichia coli via degradation and processing of RNAs. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of an RNA binding site between amino acid residues 25 and 36 (24LYDLDIESPGHEQK37 of RNase E. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the N-terminal catalytic domain of RNase E (N-Rne that was UV crosslinked with a 5'-32P-end-labeled, 13-nt oligoribonucleotide (p-BR13 containing the RNase E cleavage site of RNA I revealed that two amino acid residues, Y25 and Q36, were bound to the cytosine and adenine of BR13, respectively. Based on these results, the Y25A N-Rne mutant was constructed, and was found to be hypoactive in comparison to wild-type and hyperactive Q36R mutant proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that Y25A and Q36R mutations abolished the RNA binding to the uncompetitive inhibition site of RNase E. The Y25A mutation increased the RNA binding to the multimer formation interface between amino acid residues 427 and 433 (427LIEEEALK433, whereas the Q36R mutation enhanced the RNA binding to the catalytic site of the enzyme (65HGFLPL*K71. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the stable RNA-protein complex formation was positively correlated with the extent of RNA binding to the catalytic site and ribonucleolytic activity of the N-Rne proteins. These mutations exerted similar effects on the ribonucleolytic activity of the full-length RNase E in vivo. Our findings indicate that RNase E has two alternative RNA binding sites for modulating RNA binding to the catalytic site and the formation of a functional catalytic unit.

  16. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  17. Modeling lanthanide series binding sites on humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourret, Olivier; Martinez, Raul E

    2009-02-01

    Lanthanide (Ln) binding to humic acid (HA) has been investigated by combining ultrafiltration and ICP-MS techniques. A Langmuir-sorption-isotherm metal-complexation model was used in conjunction with a linear programming method (LPM) to fit experimental data representing various experimental conditions both in HA/Ln ratio (varying between 5 and 20) and in pH range (from 2 to 10) with an ionic strength of 10(-3) mol L(-1). The LPM approach, not requiring prior knowledge of surface complexation parameters, was used to solve the existing discrepancies in LnHA binding constants and site densities. The application of the LPM to experimental data revealed the presence of two discrete metal binding sites at low humic acid concentrations (5 mg L(-1)), with log metal complexation constants (logK(S,j)) of 2.65+/-0.05 and 7.00 (depending on Ln). The corresponding site densities were 2.71+/-0.57x10(-8) and 0.58+/-0.32x10(-8) mol of Ln(3+)/mg of HA (depending on Ln). Total site densities of 3.28+/-0.28x10(-8), 4.99+/-0.02x10(-8), and 5.01+/-0.01x10(-8) mol mg(-1) were obtained by LPM for humic acid, for humic acid concentrations of 5, 10, and 20 mg L(-1), respectively. These results confirm that lanthanide binding occurs mainly at weak sites (i.e., ca. 80%) and second at strong sites (i.e., ca. 20%). The first group of discrete metal binding sites may be attributed to carboxylic groups (known to be the main binding sites of Ln in HA), and the second metal binding group to phenolic moieties. Moreover, this study evidences heterogeneity in the distribution of the binding sites among Ln. Eventually, the LPM approach produced feasible and reasonable results, but it was less sensitive to error and did not require an a priori assumption of the number and concentration of binding sites.

  18. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  19. New insight into the binding modes of TNP-AMP to human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinya; Huang, Yunyuan; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, San; Zhu, Shuaihuan; Qin, Nian; Hong, Zongqin; Wei, Lin; Feng, Jiangtao; Ren, Yanliang; Feng, Lingling; Wan, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) contains two binding sites, a substrate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) active site and an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) allosteric site. The FBP active site works by stabilizing the FBPase, and the allosteric site impairs the activity of FBPase through its binding of a nonsubstrate molecule. The fluorescent AMP analogue, 2‧,3‧-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5‧-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) has been used as a fluorescent probe as it is able to competitively inhibit AMP binding to the AMP allosteric site and, therefore, could be used for exploring the binding modes of inhibitors targeted on the allosteric site. In this study, we have re-examined the binding modes of TNP-AMP to FBPase. However, our present enzyme kinetic assays show that AMP and FBP both can reduce the fluorescence from the bound TNP-AMP through competition for FBPase, suggesting that TNP-AMP binds not only to the AMP allosteric site but also to the FBP active site. Mutagenesis assays of K274L (located in the FBP active site) show that the residue K274 is very important for TNP-AMP to bind to the active site of FBPase. The results further prove that TNP-AMP is able to bind individually to the both sites. Our present study provides a new insight into the binding mechanism of TNP-AMP to the FBPase. The TNP-AMP fluorescent probe can be used to exam the binding site of an inhibitor (the active site or the allosteric site) using FBPase saturated by AMP and FBP, respectively, or the K247L mutant FBPase.

  20. Organism-adapted specificity of the allosteric regulation of pyruvate kinase in lactic acid bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Veith

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase (PYK is a critical allosterically regulated enzyme that links glycolysis, the primary energy metabolism, to cellular metabolism. Lactic acid bacteria rely almost exclusively on glycolysis for their energy production under anaerobic conditions, which reinforces the key role of PYK in their metabolism. These organisms are closely related, but have adapted to a huge variety of native environments. They include food-fermenting organisms, important symbionts in the human gut, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In contrast to the rather conserved inhibition of PYK by inorganic phosphate, the activation of PYK shows high variability in the type of activating compound between different lactic acid bacteria. System-wide comparative studies of the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria are required to understand the reasons for the diversity of these closely related microorganisms. These require knowledge of the identities of the enzyme modifiers. Here, we predict potential allosteric activators of PYKs from three lactic acid bacteria which are adapted to different native environments. We used protein structure-based molecular modeling and enzyme kinetic modeling to predict and validate potential activators of PYK. Specifically, we compared the electrostatic potential and the binding of phosphate moieties at the allosteric binding sites, and predicted potential allosteric activators by docking. We then made a kinetic model of Lactococcus lactis PYK to relate the activator predictions to the intracellular sugar-phosphate conditions in lactic acid bacteria. This strategy enabled us to predict fructose 1,6-bisphosphate as the sole activator of the Enterococcus faecalis PYK, and to predict that the PYKs from Streptococcus pyogenes and Lactobacillus plantarum show weaker specificity for their allosteric activators, while still having fructose 1,6-bisphosphate play the main activator role in vivo. These differences in the specificity of allosteric

  1. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  2. Probing binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein–RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein–protein and protein–RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein–RNA recognition sites with desired affinity. PMID:26365245

  3. In silico-screening approaches for lead generation: identification of novel allosteric modulators of human-erythrocyte pyruvate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ashutosh; Safo, Martin K

    2012-01-01

    Identification of allosteric binding site modulators have gained increased attention lately for their potential to be developed as selective agents with a novel chemotype and targeting perhaps a new and unique binding site with probable fewer side effects. Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (R-PK) is an important glycolytic enzyme that can be pharmacologically modulated through its allosteric effectors for the treatment of hemolytic anemia, sickle-cell anemia, hypoxia-related diseases, and other disorders arising from erythrocyte PK malfunction. An in-silico screening approach was applied to identify novel allosteric modulators of pyruvate kinase. A small-molecules database of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), was virtually screened based on structure/ligand-based pharmacophore. The virtual screening campaign led to the identification of several compounds with similar pharmacophoric features as fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), the natural allosteric activator of the kinase. The compounds were subsequently docked into the FBP-binding site using the programs FlexX and GOLD, and their interactions with the protein were analyzed with the energy-scoring function of HINT. Seven promising candidates were obtained from the NCI and subjected to kinetics analysis, which revealed both activators and inhibitors of the R-isozyme of PK (R-PK).

  4. Pactamycin binding site on archaebacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.G.

    1987-01-27

    The presence of a photoreactive acetophenone group in the protein synthesis inhibitor pactamycin and the possibility of obtaining active iodinated derivatives that retain full biological activity allow the antibiotic binding site on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus ribosomes to be photoaffinity labeled. Four major labeled proteins have been identified in the yeast ribosomes, i.e., YS10, YS18, YS21/24, and YS30, while proteins AL1a, AS10/L8, AS18/20, and AS21/22 appeared as radioactive spots in S. solfataricus. There seems to be a correlation between some of the proteins labeled in yeast and those previously reported in Escherichia coli indicating that the pactamycin binding sites of both species, which are in the small subunit close to the initiation factors and mRNA binding sites, must have similar characteristics.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of estrogen binding sites in human mammary lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buell, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The biochemical assay of human mammary carcinomas for estrogen receptors is of proven clinical utility, but the cellular localization of estrogen binding sites within these lesions is less certain. The author describes the identification of estrogen binding sites as visualized by thaw-mount autoradiography after in vitro incubation in a series of 17 benign and 40 malignant human female mammary lesions. The results on the in vitro incubation method compared favorably with data from in vivo studies in mouse uterus, a well-characterized estrogen target organ. In noncancerous breast biopsies, a variable proportion of epithelial cells contained specific estrogen binding sites. Histologically identifiable myoepithelial and stromal cells were, in general, unlabeled. In human mammary carcinomas, biochemically estrogen receptor-positive, labeled and unlabeled neoplastic epithelial cells were identified by autoradiography. Quantitative results from the autoradiographic method compared favorably with biochemical data.

  6. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  7. A novel non-opioid binding site for endomorphin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, I; Toth, F; Biyashev, D; Szatmari, I; Monory, K; Tomboly, C; Toth, G; Benyhe, S; Borsodi, A

    2016-08-01

    Endomorphins are natural amidated opioid tetrapeptides with the following structure: Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-1), and Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-2). Endomorphins interact selectively with the μ-opioid or MOP receptors and exhibit nanomolar or sub-nanomolar receptor binding affinities, therefore they suggested to be endogenous agonists for the μ-opioid receptors. Endomorphins mediate a number of characteristic opioid effects, such as antinociception, however there are several physiological functions in which endomorphins appear to act in a fashion that does not involve binding to and activation of the μ-opioid receptor. Our recent data indicate that a radiolabelled [(3)H]endomorphin-1 with a specific radioactivity of 2.35 TBq/mmol - prepared by catalytic dehalogenation of the diiodinated peptide precursor in the presence of tritium gas - is able to bind to a second, naloxone insensitive recognition site in rat brain membranes. Binding heterogeneity, i.e., the presence of higher (Kd = 0.4 nM / Bmax = 120 fmol/mg protein) and lower (Kd = 8.2 nM / Bmax = 432 fmol/mg protein) affinity binding components is observed both in saturation binding experiments followed by Schatchard analysis, and in equilibrium competition binding studies. The signs of receptor multiplicity, e.g., curvilinear Schatchard plots or biphasic displacement curves are seen only if the non-specific binding is measured in the presence of excess unlabeled endomorphin-1 and not in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The second, lower affinity non-opioid binding site is not recognized by heterocyclic opioid alkaloid ligands, neither agonists such as morphine, nor antagonists such as naloxone. On the contrary, endomorphin-1 is displaced from its lower affinity, higher capacity binding site by several natural neuropeptides, including methionine-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, nociceptin-orphanin FQ, angiotensin and FMRF-amide. This naloxone-insensitive, consequently non-opioid binding site seems

  8. Binding-site assessment by virtual fragment screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Huang

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of protein druggability (propensity to bind high-affinity drug-like small molecules would greatly benefit the fields of chemical genomics and drug discovery. We have developed a novel approach to quantitatively assess protein druggability by computationally screening a fragment-like compound library. In analogy to NMR-based fragment screening, we dock approximately 11,000 fragments against a given binding site and compute a computational hit rate based on the fraction of molecules that exceed an empirically chosen score cutoff. We perform a large-scale evaluation of the approach on four datasets, totaling 152 binding sites. We demonstrate that computed hit rates correlate with hit rates measured experimentally in a previously published NMR-based screening method. Secondly, we show that the in silico fragment screening method can be used to distinguish known druggable and non-druggable targets, including both enzymes and protein-protein interaction sites. Finally, we explore the sensitivity of the results to different receptor conformations, including flexible protein-protein interaction sites. Besides its original aim to assess druggability of different protein targets, this method could be used to identifying druggable conformations of flexible binding site for lead discovery, and suggesting strategies for growing or joining initial fragment hits to obtain more potent inhibitors.

  9. Molecular basis of positive allosteric modulation of GluN2B NMDA receptors by polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Laetitia; Zhu, Shujia; Carvalho, Stéphanie; Paoletti, Pierre

    2011-06-17

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) form glutamate-gated ion channels that have central roles in neuronal communication and plasticity throughout the brain. Dysfunctions of NMDARs are involved in several central nervous system disorders, including stroke, chronic pain and schizophrenia. One hallmark of NMDARs is that their activity can be allosterically regulated by a variety of extracellular small ligands. While much has been learned recently regarding allosteric inhibition of NMDARs, the structural determinants underlying positive allosteric modulation of these receptors remain poorly defined. Here, we show that polyamines, naturally occurring polycations that selectively enhance NMDARs containing the GluN2B subunit, bind at a dimer interface between GluN1 and GluN2B subunit N-terminal domains (NTDs). Polyamines act by shielding negative charges present on GluN1 and GluN2B NTD lower lobes, allowing their close apposition, an effect that in turn prevents NTD clamshell closure. Our work reveals the mechanistic basis for positive allosteric modulation of NMDARs. It provides the first example of an intersubunit binding site in this class of receptors, a discovery that holds promise for future drug interventions.

  10. Targeting Extracellular Domains D4 and D7 of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Reveals Allosteric Receptor Regulatory Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Hyde, Caroline A. C.; Giese, Alexandra; Stuttfeld, Edward; Abram Saliba, Johan; Villemagne, Denis; Schleier, Thomas; Binz, H. Kaspar; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) activate three receptor tyrosine kinases, VEGFR-1, -2, and -3, which regulate angiogenic and lymphangiogenic signaling. VEGFR-2 is the most prominent receptor in angiogenic signaling by VEGF ligands. The extracellular part of VEGF receptors consists of seven immunoglobulin homology domains (Ig domains). Earlier studies showed that domains 2 and 3 (D23) mediate ligand binding, while structural analysis of dimeric ligand/receptor complexes by electron...

  11. Characterization of Heparin-binding Site of Tissue Transglutaminase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Collighan, Russell J.; Pytel, Kamila; Rathbone, Daniel L.; Li, Xiaoling; Griffin, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional Ca2+-activated protein cross-linking enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it is involved in wound healing and scarring, tissue fibrosis, celiac disease, and metastatic cancer. Extracellular TG2 can also facilitate cell adhesion important in wound healing through a nontransamidating mechanism via its association with fibronectin, heparan sulfates (HS), and integrins. Regulating the mechanism how TG2 is translocated into the ECM therefore provides a strategy for modulating these physiological and pathological functions of the enzyme. Here, through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified the HS-binding site of TG2 202KFLKNAGRDCSRRSSPVYVGR222. We demonstrate the requirement of this binding site for translocation of TG2 into the ECM through a mechanism involving cell surface shedding of HS. By synthesizing a peptide NPKFLKNAGRDCSRRSS corresponding to the HS-binding site within TG2, we also demonstrate how this mimicking peptide can in isolation compensate for the RGD-induced loss of cell adhesion on fibronectin via binding to syndecan-4, leading to activation of PKCα, pFAK-397, and ERK1/2 and the subsequent formation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton organization. A novel regulatory mechanism for TG2 translocation into the extracellular compartment that depends upon TG2 conformation and the binding of HS is proposed. PMID:22298777

  12. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  13. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins: A Historical Perspective on the Development of Concepts and Techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-01

    Allostery is a mechanism by which the activity of a large numberof proteins is regulated. It is manifested as a change inthe activity, either ligand binding or catalysis of one site of aprotein due to a ligand binding to another distinct site of theprotein. The allosteric effect is transduced by a change in thestructural properties of the protein. It has been traditionallyunderstood using either the concerted MWC (Monod,Wyman and Changeux) model, or the sequential KNF (Koshland,Nemethy and Filmer) model of structural changes. However,allostery is fundamentally a thermodynamic process andrequires an alteration in the enthalpy or entropy associatedwith the process.

  14. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...

  15. Pharmacological and molecular characterization of the positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, L; Bissantz, C; Beck, J; Dellenbach, M; Woltering, T J; Wichmann, J; Gatti, S

    2017-02-16

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGlu2) plays an important role in the presynaptic control of glutamate release and several mGlu2 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been under assessment for their potential as antipsychotics. The binding mode of mGlu2 PAMs is better characterized in functional terms while few data are available on the relationship between allosteric and orthosteric binding sites. Pharmacological studies characterizing binding and effects of two different chemical series of mGlu2 PAMs are therefore carried out here using the radiolabeled mGlu2 agonist (3)[H]-LY354740 and mGlu2 PAM (3)[H]-2,2,2-TEMPS. A multidimensional approach to the PAM mechanism of action shows that mGlu2 PAMs increase the affinity of (3)[H]-LY354740 for the orthosteric site of mGlu2 as well as the number of (3)[H]-LY354740 binding sites. (3)[H]-2,2,2-TEMPS binding is also enhanced by the presence of LY354740. New residues in the allosteric rat mGlu2 binding pocket are identified to be crucial for the PAMs ligand binding, among these Tyr(3.40) and Asn(5.46). Also of remark, in the described experimental conditions S731A (Ser(5.42)) residue is important only for the mGlu2 PAM LY487379 and not for the compound PAM-1: an example of the structural differences among these mGlu2 PAMs. This study provides a summary of the information generated in the past decade on mGlu2 PAMs adding a detailed molecular investigation of PAM binding mode. Differences among mGlu2 PAM compounds are discussed as well as the mGlu2 regions interacting with mGlu2 PAM and NAM agents and residues driving mGlu2 PAM selectivity.

  16. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abha S Bais; Steffen Grossmann; Martin Vingron

    2007-08-01

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate putative regulatory mechanisms. A common strategy is to combine cross-species conservation with single sequence TFBS annotation to yield ``conserved TFBSs”. Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step approach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites differ from those of the surrounding sequence. Hence, it is desirable to have an approach that explicitly takes this factor into account. Although a plethora of approaches have been proposed for the prediction of conserved TFBSs, very few explicitly model TFBS evolutionary properties, while additionally being multi-step. Recently, we introduced a novel approach to simultaneously align and annotate conserved TFBSs in a pair of sequences. Building upon the standard Smith-Waterman algorithm for local alignments, SimAnn introduces additional states for profiles to output extended alignments or annotated alignments. That is, alignments with parts annotated as gaplessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair-profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. In this article, we extend this approach to explicitly incorporate evolution of binding sites in the SimAnn framework. We demonstrate the extension in the theoretical derivations through two position-specific evolutionary models, previously used for modelling TFBS evolution. In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the underlying assumptions, as compared to the original work. Finally, using a real dataset of experimentally verified binding sites in human-mouse sequence pairs, we compare the new approach (eSimAnn) to an existing multi-step tool that also considers TFBS evolution. Although it is widely accepted that binding sites evolve differently from the surrounding sequences, most comparative TFBS identification

  17. Allosteric Inhibition via R-state Destabilization in ATP Sulfurylase from Penicillium chrysogenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacRae, I. J.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the cooperative hexameric enzyme ATP sulfurylase from Penicillium chrysogenum bound to its allosteric inhibitor, 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS), was determined to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This structure represents the low substrate-affinity T-state conformation of the enzyme. Comparison with the high substrate-affinity R-state structure reveals that a large rotational rearrangement of domains occurs as a result of the R-to-T transition. The rearrangement is accompanied by the 17 {angstrom} movement of a 10-residue loop out of the active site region, resulting in an open, product release-like structure of the catalytic domain. Binding of PAPS is proposed to induce the allosteric transition by destabilizing an R-state-specific salt linkage between Asp 111 in an N-terminal domain of one subunit and Arg 515 in the allosteric domain of a trans-triad subunit. Disrupting this salt linkage by site-directed mutagenesis induces cooperative inhibition behavior in the absence of an allosteric effector, confirming the role of these two residues.

  18. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  19. Allosteric modulation of the HIV-1 gp120-gp41 association site by adjacent gp120 variable region 1 (V1 N-glycans linked to neutralization sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi E Drummer

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 gp120-gp41 complex, which mediates viral fusion and cellular entry, undergoes rapid evolution within its external glycan shield to enable escape from neutralizing antibody (NAb. Understanding how conserved protein determinants retain functionality in the context of such evolution is important for their evaluation and exploitation as potential drug and/or vaccine targets. In this study, we examined how the conserved gp120-gp41 association site, formed by the N- and C-terminal segments of gp120 and the disulfide-bonded region (DSR of gp41, adapts to glycan changes that are linked to neutralization sensitivity. To this end, a DSR mutant virus (K601D with defective gp120-association was sequentially passaged in peripheral blood mononuclear cells to select suppressor mutations. We reasoned that the locations of suppressors point to structural elements that are functionally linked to the gp120-gp41 association site. In culture 1, gp120 association and viral replication was restored by loss of the conserved glycan at Asn¹³⁶ in V1 (T138N mutation in conjunction with the L494I substitution in C5 within the association site. In culture 2, replication was restored with deletion of the N¹³⁹INN sequence, which ablates the overlapping Asn¹⁴¹-Asn¹⁴²-Ser-Ser potential N-linked glycosylation sequons in V1, in conjunction with D601N in the DSR. The 136 and 142 glycan mutations appeared to exert their suppressive effects by altering the dependence of gp120-gp41 interactions on the DSR residues, Leu⁵⁹³, Trp⁵⁹⁶ and Lys⁶⁰¹. The 136 and/or 142 glycan mutations increased the sensitivity of HIV-1 pseudovirions to the glycan-dependent NAbs 2G12 and PG16, and also pooled IgG obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals. Thus adjacent V1 glycans allosterically modulate the distal gp120-gp41 association site. We propose that this represents a mechanism for functional adaptation of the gp120-gp41 association site to an evolving glycan

  20. Convergent transmission of RNAi guide-target mismatch information across Argonaute internal allosteric network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas T Joseph

    Full Text Available In RNA interference, a guide strand derived from a short dsRNA such as a microRNA (miRNA is loaded into Argonaute, the central protein in the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC that silences messenger RNAs on a sequence-specific basis. The positions of any mismatched base pairs in an miRNA determine which Argonaute subtype is used. Subsequently, the Argonaute-guide complex binds and silences complementary target mRNAs; certain Argonautes cleave the target. Mismatches between guide strand and the target mRNA decrease cleavage efficiency. Thus, loading and silencing both require that signals about the presence of a mismatched base pair are communicated from the mismatch site to effector sites. These effector sites include the active site, to prevent target cleavage; the binding groove, to modify nucleic acid binding affinity; and surface allosteric sites, to control recruitment of additional proteins to form the RISC. To examine how such signals may be propagated, we analyzed the network of internal allosteric pathways in Argonaute exhibited through correlations of residue-residue interactions. The emerging network can be described as a set of pathways emanating from the core of the protein near the active site, distributed into the bulk of the protein, and converging upon a distributed cluster of surface residues. Nucleotides in the guide strand "seed region" have a stronger relationship with the protein than other nucleotides, concordant with their importance in sequence selectivity. Finally, any of several seed region guide-target mismatches cause certain Argonaute residues to have modified correlations with the rest of the protein. This arises from the aggregation of relatively small interaction correlation changes distributed across a large subset of residues. These residues are in effector sites: the active site, binding groove, and surface, implying that direct functional consequences of guide-target mismatches are mediated through the

  1. Convergent Transmission of RNAi Guide-Target Mismatch Information across Argonaute Internal Allosteric Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Thomas T.; Osman, Roman

    2012-01-01

    In RNA interference, a guide strand derived from a short dsRNA such as a microRNA (miRNA) is loaded into Argonaute, the central protein in the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) that silences messenger RNAs on a sequence-specific basis. The positions of any mismatched base pairs in an miRNA determine which Argonaute subtype is used. Subsequently, the Argonaute-guide complex binds and silences complementary target mRNAs; certain Argonautes cleave the target. Mismatches between guide strand and the target mRNA decrease cleavage efficiency. Thus, loading and silencing both require that signals about the presence of a mismatched base pair are communicated from the mismatch site to effector sites. These effector sites include the active site, to prevent target cleavage; the binding groove, to modify nucleic acid binding affinity; and surface allosteric sites, to control recruitment of additional proteins to form the RISC. To examine how such signals may be propagated, we analyzed the network of internal allosteric pathways in Argonaute exhibited through correlations of residue-residue interactions. The emerging network can be described as a set of pathways emanating from the core of the protein near the active site, distributed into the bulk of the protein, and converging upon a distributed cluster of surface residues. Nucleotides in the guide strand “seed region” have a stronger relationship with the protein than other nucleotides, concordant with their importance in sequence selectivity. Finally, any of several seed region guide-target mismatches cause certain Argonaute residues to have modified correlations with the rest of the protein. This arises from the aggregation of relatively small interaction correlation changes distributed across a large subset of residues. These residues are in effector sites: the active site, binding groove, and surface, implying that direct functional consequences of guide-target mismatches are mediated through the cumulative

  2. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  3. Bifunctional avidin with covalently modifiable ligand binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Leppiniemi

    Full Text Available The extensive use of avidin and streptavidin in life sciences originates from the extraordinary tight biotin-binding affinity of these tetrameric proteins. Numerous studies have been performed to modify the biotin-binding affinity of (streptavidin to improve the existing applications. Even so, (streptavidin greatly favours its natural ligand, biotin. Here we engineered the biotin-binding pocket of avidin with a single point mutation S16C and thus introduced a chemically active thiol group, which could be covalently coupled with thiol-reactive molecules. This approach was applied to the previously reported bivalent dual chain avidin by modifying one binding site while preserving the other one intact. Maleimide was then coupled to the modified binding site resulting in a decrease in biotin affinity. Furthermore, we showed that this thiol could be covalently coupled to other maleimide derivatives, for instance fluorescent labels, allowing intratetrameric FRET. The bifunctional avidins described here provide improved and novel tools for applications such as the biofunctionalization of surfaces.

  4. Allosteric drugs: the interaction of antitumor compound MKT-077 with human Hsp70 chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousaki, Aikaterini; Miyata, Yoshinari; Jinwal, Umesh K; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-08-19

    Hsp70 (heat shock protein 70 kDa) chaperones are key to cellular protein homeostasis. However, they also have the ability to inhibit tumor apoptosis and contribute to aberrant accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neuronal cells affected by tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Hence, Hsp70 chaperones are increasingly becoming identified as targets for therapeutic intervention in these widely abundant diseases. Hsp70 proteins are allosteric machines and offer, besides classical active-site targets, also opportunities to target the mechanism of allostery. In this work, it is demonstrated that the action of the potent anticancer compound MKT-077 (1-ethyl-2-[[3-ethyl-5-(3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-yliden)]-4-oxothiazolidin-2-ylidenemethyl] pyridinium chloride) occurs through a differential interaction with Hsp70 allosteric states. MKT-077 is therefore an "allosteric drug." Using NMR spectroscopy, we identify the compound's binding site on human HSPA8 (Hsc70). The binding pose is obtained from NMR-restrained docking calculations, subsequently scored by molecular-dynamics-based energy and solvation computations. Suggestions for the improvement of the compound's properties are made on the basis of the binding location and pose.

  5. Ceruloplasmin has two nearly identical sites that bind myeloperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhautdin, Bakytzhan; Goksoy Bakhautdin, Esen; Fox, Paul L

    2014-10-31

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a copper-containing ferroxidase with potent antioxidant activity. Cp is expressed by hepatocytes and activated macrophages and has been known as physiologic inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO). Enzymatic activity of MPO produces anti-microbial agents and strong prooxidants such as hypochlorous acid and has a potential to damage host tissue at the sites of inflammation and infection. Thus Cp-MPO interaction and inhibition of MPO has previously been suggested as an important control mechanism of excessive MPO activity. Our aim in this study was to identify minimal Cp domain or peptide that interacts with MPO. We first confirmed Cp-MPO interaction by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis of the interaction yielded 30nM affinity between Cp and MPO. We then designed and synthesized 87 overlapping peptides spanning the entire amino acid sequence of Cp. Each of the peptides was tested whether it binds to MPO by direct binding ELISA. Two of the 87 peptides, P18 and P76 strongly interacted with MPO. Amino acid sequence analysis of identified peptides revealed high sequence and structural homology between them. Further structural analysis of Cp's crystal structure by PyMOL software unfolded that both peptides represent surface-exposed sites of Cp and face nearly the same direction. To confirm our finding we raised anti-P18 antisera in rabbit and demonstrated that this antisera disrupts Cp-MPO binding and rescues MPO activity. Collectively, our results confirm Cp-MPO interaction and identify two nearly identical sites on Cp that specifically bind MPO. We propose that inhibition of MPO by Cp requires two nearly identical sites on Cp to bind homodimeric MPO simultaneously and at an angle of at least 120degrees, which, in turn, exerts tension on MPO and results in conformational change.

  6. (/sup 3/H)desipramine binding to rat brain tissue: binding to both noradrenaline uptake sites and sites not related to noradrenaline neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckstroem, I.T.Ro.; Ross, S.B.; Marcusson, J.O.

    1989-04-01

    The pharmacological and biochemical characteristics of (3H)desipramine binding to rat brain tissue were investigated. Competition studies with noradrenaline, nisoxetine, nortriptyline, and desipramine suggested the presence of more than one (3H)desipramine binding site. Most of the noradrenaline-sensitive binding represented a high-affinity site, and this site appeared to be the same as the high-affinity site of nisoxetine-sensitive binding. The (3H)desipramine binding sites were abolished by protease treatment, a result suggesting that the binding sites are protein in nature. When specific binding was defined by 0.1 microM nisoxetine, the binding was saturable and fitted a single-site binding model with a binding affinity of approximately 1 nM. This binding fraction was abolished by lesioning of the noradrenaline neurons with the noradrenaline neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4). In contrast, when 10 microM nisoxetine was used to define the specific binding, the binding was not saturable over the nanomolar range, but the binding fitted a two-site binding model with KD values of 0.5 and greater than 100 nM for the high- and low-affinity components, respectively. The high-affinity site was abolished after DSP4 lesioning, whereas the low-affinity site remained. The binding capacity (Bmax) for binding defined by 0.1 microM nisoxetine varied between brain regions, with very low density in the striatum (Bmax not possible to determine), 60-90 fmol/mg of protein in cortical areas and cerebellum, and 120 fmol/mg of protein in the hypothalamus. The binding capacities of these high-affinity sites correlated significantly with the regional distribution of (3H)noradrenaline uptake but not with 5-(3H)hydroxytryptamine uptake.

  7. The inhibitory binding site(s) of Zn2+ in cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Francesco; Giachini, Lisa; Boscherini, Federico; Venturoli, Giovanni; Capitanio, Giuseppe; Martino, Pietro Luca; Papa, Sergio

    2007-02-20

    EXAFS analysis of Zn binding site(s) in bovine-heart cytochrome c oxidase and characterization of the inhibitory effect of internal zinc on respiratory activity and proton pumping of the liposome reconstituted oxidase are presented. EXAFS identifies tetrahedral coordination site(s) for Zn(2+) with two N-histidine imidazoles, one N-histidine imidazol or N-lysine and one O-COOH (glutamate or aspartate), possibly located at the entry site of the proton conducting D pathway in the oxidase and involved in inhibition of the oxygen reduction catalysis and proton pumping by internally trapped zinc.

  8. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1.

  9. A Conserved Steroid Binding Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Ling; Mills, Denise A.; Buhrow, Leann; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh (Michigan)

    2010-09-02

    Micromolar concentrations of the bile salt deoxycholate are shown to rescue the activity of an inactive mutant, E101A, in the K proton pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. A crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme reveals, as predicted, deoxycholate bound with its carboxyl group at the entrance of the K path. Since cholate is a known potent inhibitor of bovine oxidase and is seen in a similar position in the bovine structure, the crystallographically defined, conserved steroid binding site could reveal a regulatory site for steroids or structurally related molecules that act on the essential K proton path.

  10. Minimal Zn2+ Binding Site of Amyloid-β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Kulikova, Alexandra A.; Golovin, Andrey V.; Tkachev, Yaroslav V.; Archakov, Alexander I.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc-induced aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease. Here we provide direct thermodynamic evidence that elucidates the role of the Aβ region 6–14 as the minimal Zn2+ binding site wherein the ion is coordinated by His6, Glu11, His13, and His14. With the help of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, the region 11–14 was determined as the primary zinc recognition site and considered an important drug-target candidate to prevent Zn2+-induced aggregation of Aβ. PMID:21081056

  11. Minimal Zn(2+) binding site of amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Kulikova, Alexandra A; Golovin, Andrey V; Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Archakov, Alexander I; Kozin, Sergey A; Makarov, Alexander A

    2010-11-17

    Zinc-induced aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease. Here we provide direct thermodynamic evidence that elucidates the role of the Aβ region 6-14 as the minimal Zn(2+) binding site wherein the ion is coordinated by His(6), Glu(11), His(13), and His(14). With the help of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, the region 11-14 was determined as the primary zinc recognition site and considered an important drug-target candidate to prevent Zn(2+)-induced aggregation of Aβ.

  12. Evolutionary computation for discovery of composite transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Gary B.; Porto, V. William; Varga, Gabor; Dow, Ernst R.; Craven, Andrew M.; Powers, David M.; Harlow, Harry B.; Su, Eric W.; Onyia, Jude E.; Su, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated the use of evolutionary computation for the discovery of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in promoter regions upstream of coexpressed genes. However, it remained unclear whether or not composite TFBS elements, commonly found in higher organisms where two or more TFBSs form functional complexes, could also be identified by using this approach. Here, we present an important refinement of our previous algorithm and test the identification of composite elem...

  13. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of the pactamycin binding site on eubacterial ribosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1985-07-02

    Pactamycin, an inhibitor of the initial steps of protein synthesis, has an acetophenone group in its chemical structure that makes the drug a potentially photoreactive molecule. In addition, the presence of a phenolic residue makes it easily susceptible to radioactive labeling. Through iodination, one radioactive derivative of pactamycin has been obtained with biological activities similar to the unmodified drug when tested on in vivo and cell-free systems. With the use of (/sup 125/I)iodopactamycin, ribosomes of Escherichia coli have been photolabeled under conditions that preserve the activity of the particles and guarantee the specificity of the binding sites. Under these conditions, RNA is preferentially labeled when free, small ribosomal subunits are photolabeled, but proteins are the main target in the whole ribosome. This indicates that an important conformational change takes place in the binding site on association of the two subunits. The major labeled proteins are S2, S4, S18, S21, and L13. These proteins in the pactamycin binding site are probably related to the initiation step of protein synthesis.

  15. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  16. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Lun Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  17. Anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 is an endogenous allosteric enhancer of CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Fabricio A; Ferreira, Juliano; Menezes de Lima, Octávio; Duarte, Filipe Silveira; Bento, Allisson Freire; Forner, Stefânia; Villarinho, Jardel G; Bellocchio, Luigi; Bellochio, Luigi; Wotjak, Carsten T; Lerner, Raissa; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Canetti, Claudio; Matias, Isabelle; Calixto, João Batista; Marsicano, Giovanni; Guimarães, Marilia Z P; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2012-12-18

    Allosteric modulation of G-protein-coupled receptors represents a key goal of current pharmacology. In particular, endogenous allosteric modulators might represent important targets of interventions aimed at maximizing therapeutic efficacy and reducing side effects of drugs. Here we show that the anti-inflammatory lipid lipoxin A(4) is an endogenous allosteric enhancer of the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor. Lipoxin A(4) was detected in brain tissues, did not compete for the orthosteric binding site of the CB(1) receptor (vs. (3)H-SR141716A), and did not alter endocannabinoid metabolism (as opposed to URB597 and MAFP), but it enhanced affinity of anandamide at the CB1 receptor, thereby potentiating the effects of this endocannabinoid both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, lipoxin A(4) displayed a CB(1) receptor-dependent protective effect against β-amyloid (1-40)-induced spatial memory impairment in mice. The discovery of lipoxins as a class of endogenous allosteric modulators of CB(1) receptors may foster the therapeutic exploitation of the endocannabinoid system, in particular for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs.

  19. Steered molecular dynamics study of inhibitor binding in the internal binding site in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhisen; Santos, Andrew P; Zhou, Qing; Liang, Lijun; Wang, Qi; Wu, Tao; Franzen, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The binding free energy of 4-bromophenol (4-BP), an inhibitor that binds in the internal binding site in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin (DHP) was calculated using Molecular Dynamics (MD) methods combined with pulling or umbrella sampling. The effects of systematic changes in the pulling speed, pulling force constant and restraint force constant on the calculated potential of mean force (PMF) are presented in this study. The PMFs calculated using steered molecular dynamics (SMD) were validated by umbrella sampling (US) in the strongly restrained regime. A series of restraint force constants ranging from 1000 down to 5 kJ/(mol nm(2)) were used in SMD simulations. This range was validated using US, however noting that weaker restraints give rise to a broader sampling of configurations. This comparison was further tested by a pulling simulation conducted without any restraints, which was observed to have a value closest to the experimentally measured free energy for binding of 4-BP to DHP based on ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and resonance Raman spectroscopies. The protein-inhibitor system is well suited for fundamental study of free energy calculations because the DHP protein is relatively small and the inhibitor is quite rigid. Simulation configuration structures are compared to the X-ray crystallography structures of the binding site of 4-BP in the distal pocket above the heme.

  20. Molecular modelling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provide insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pradeep K; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C

    2011-06-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: (1) in silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; (2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) scoring results ΔΔG(bind-cald) for both noscapine and Br-noscapine (3.915 and 3.025 kcal/mol) are in reasonably good agreement with our experimentally determined binding affinity (ΔΔG(bind-Expt) of 3.570 and 2.988 kcal/mol, derived from K(d) values); and (3) Br-noscapine competes with colchicine binding to tubulin. The simplest interpretation of these collective data is that Br-noscapine binds tubulin at a site overlapping with, or very close to colchicine-binding site of tubulin. Although we cannot rule out a formal possibility that Br-noscapine might bind to a site distinct and distant from the colchicine-binding site that might negatively influence the colchicine binding to tubulin.

  1. Allosteric modulation of the effect of escitalopram, paroxetine and fluoxetine: in-vitro and in-vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansari, Mostafa El; Wiborg, Ove; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame

    2006-01-01

    of escitalopram. This effect was suggested to occur via an allosteric modulation at the level of the 5-HT transporter. Using in-vitro binding assays at membranes from COS-1 cells expressing the human 5-HT transporter (hSERT) and in-vivo electrophysiological and microdialysis techniques in rats, the present study...... was directed at determining whether R-citalopram modifies the action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) known to act on allosteric sites namely escitalopram, and to a lesser extent paroxetine, compared to fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites. In-vitro binding studies showed that R......-citalopram attenuated the association rates of escitalopram and paroxetine to the 5-HT transporter, but had no effect on the association rates of fluoxetine, venlafaxine or sertraline. In the rat dorsal raphe nucleus, R-citalopram (250 microg/kg i.v.) blocked the suppressant effect on neuronal firing activity of both...

  2. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-08-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  3. Molecular modeling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provides insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, Pradeep K.; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: 1) In silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; 2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA)...

  4. Characterization of Binding Sites of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Qian; Jimmy Lin; Donald J. Zack

    2006-01-01

    To explore the nature of eukaryotic transcription factor (TF) binding sites and determine how they differ from surrounding DNA sequences, we examined four features associated with DNA binding sites: G+C content, pattern complexity,palindromic structure, and Markov sequence ordering. Our analysis of the regulatory motifs obtained from the TRANSFAC database, using yeast intergenic sequences as background, revealed that these four features show variable enrichment in motif sequences. For example, motif sequences were more likely to have palindromic structure than were background sequences. In addition, these features were tightly localized to the regulatory motifs, indicating that they are a property of the motif sequences themselves and are not shared by the general promoter "environment" in which the regulatory motifs reside. By breaking down the motif sequences according to the TF classes to which they bind, more specific associations were identified. Finally, we found that some correlations, such as G+C content enrichment, were species-specific, while others, such as complexity enrichment, were universal across the species examined. The quantitative analysis provided here should increase our understanding of protein-DNA interactions and also help facilitate the discovery of regulatory motifs through bioinformatics.

  5. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  6. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.; (Drexel-MED); (UPENN)

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  7. A Unitary Anesthetic-Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L.; Brannigan, G; Economou, N; Xi, J; Hall, M; Liu, R; Rossi, M; Dailey, W; Grasty, K; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  8. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Nicoletti, G. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia)); Holan, G. (CSIRO, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  10. The influence of allosteric modulators and transmembrane mutations on desensitisation and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzidaki, A.; D Oyley, J. M.; Gill-Thind, J. K.; Sheppard, T. D.; Millar, N S

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by binding at an extracellular orthosteric site. Previous studies have described several positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that are selective for homomeric α7 nAChRs. These include type I PAMs, which exert little or no effect on the rate of receptor desensitisation, and type II PAMs, which cause a dramatic loss of agonist-induced desensitisation. Here we report evidence that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs have divers...

  11. The influence of allosteric modulators and transmembrane mutations on desensitisation and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzidaki, Anna; D'Oyley, Jarryl M; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K.; Sheppard, Tom D; Millar, Neil S.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by binding at an extracellular orthosteric site. Previous studies have described several positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that are selective for homomeric α7 nAChRs. These include type I PAMs, which exert little or no effect on the rate of receptor desensitisation, and type II PAMs, which cause a dramatic loss of agonist-induced desensitisation. Here we report evidence that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs have divers...

  12. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance allow quantifying substrate binding to different binding sites of Bacillus subtilis xylanase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuyvers, Sven; Dornez, Emmie; Abou Hachem, Maher;

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first was a cat......Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first...

  13. Structural dynamics and energetics underlying allosteric inactivation of the cannabinoid receptor CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Jonathan F; Farrens, David L

    2015-07-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are surprisingly flexible molecules that can do much more than simply turn on G proteins. Some even exhibit biased signaling, wherein the same receptor preferentially activates different G-protein or arrestin signaling pathways depending on the type of ligand bound. Why this behavior occurs is still unclear, but it can happen with both traditional ligands and ligands that bind allosterically outside the orthosteric receptor binding pocket. Here, we looked for structural mechanisms underlying these phenomena in the marijuana receptor CB1. Our work focused on the allosteric ligand Org 27569, which has an unusual effect on CB1-it simultaneously increases agonist binding, decreases G--protein activation, and induces biased signaling. Using classical pharmacological binding studies, we find that Org 27569 binds to a unique allosteric site on CB1 and show that it can act alone (without need for agonist cobinding). Through mutagenesis studies, we find that the ability of Org 27569 to bind is related to how much receptor is in an active conformation that can couple with G protein. Using these data, we estimated the energy differences between the inactive and active states. Finally, site-directed fluorescence labeling studies show the CB1 structure stabilized by Org 27569 is different and unique from that stabilized by antagonist or agonist. Specifically, transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) movements associated with G-protein activation are blocked, but at the same time, helix 8/TM7 movements are enhanced, suggesting a possible mechanism for the ability of Org 27569 to induce biased signaling.

  14. Similarities between the Binding Sites of SB-206553 at Serotonin Type 2 and Alpha7 Acetylcholine Nicotinic Receptors: Rationale for Its Polypharmacological Profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Möller-Acuña

    Full Text Available Evidence from systems biology indicates that promiscuous drugs, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, are clinically better in terms of efficacy, than those that act in a more selective fashion. This has generated a new trend in drug development called polypharmacology. However, the rational design of promiscuous compounds is a difficult task, particularly when the drugs are aimed to act at receptors with diverse structure, function and endogenous ligand. In the present work, using docking and molecular dynamics methodologies, we established the most probable binding sites of SB-206553, a drug originally described as a competitive antagonist of serotonin type 2B/2C metabotropic receptors (5-HT2B/2CRs and more recently as a positive allosteric modulator of the ionotropic α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. To this end, we employed the crystal structures of the 5-HT2BR and acetylcholine binding protein as templates to build homology models of the 5-HT2CR and α7 nAChR, respectively. Then, using a statistical algorithm, the similarity between these binding sites was determined. Our analysis showed that the most plausible binding sites for SB-206553 at 5-HT2Rs and α7 nAChR are remarkably similar, both in size and chemical nature of the amino acid residues lining these pockets, thus providing a rationale to explain its affinity towards both receptor types. Finally, using a computational tool for multiple binding site alignment, we determined a consensus binding site, which should be useful for the rational design of novel compounds acting simultaneously at these two types of highly different protein targets.

  15. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  16. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  17. Examination of the thiamin diphosphate binding site in yeast transketolase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshalkina, L; Nilsson, U; Wikner, C; Kostikowa, T; Schneider, G

    1997-03-01

    The role of two conserved amino acid residues in the thiamin diphosphate binding site of yeast transketolase has been analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of E162, which is part of a cluster of glutamic acid residues at the subunit interface, by alanine or glutamine results in mutant enzymes with most catalytic properties similar to wild-type enzyme. The two mutant enzymes show, however, significant increases in the K0.5 values for thiamin diphosphate in the absence of substrate and in the lag of the reaction progress curves. This suggests that the interaction of E162 with residue E418, and possibly E167, from the second subunit is important for formation and stabilization of the transketolase dimer. Replacement of the conserved residue D382, which is buried upon binding of thiamin diphosphate, by asparagine and alanine, results in mutant enzymes severely impaired in thiamin diphosphate binding and catalytic efficiency. The 25-80-fold increase in K0.5 for thiamin diphosphate suggests that D382 is involved in cofactor binding, probably by electrostatic compensation of the positive charge of the thiazolium ring and stabilization of a flexible loop at the active site. The decrease in catalytic activities in the D382 mutants indicates that this residue might also be important in subsequent steps in catalysis.

  18. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Computational Investigation on the Allosteric Modulation of Androgen Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Min-Rui; LI Jun-Qian

    2012-01-01

    Androgens have similar structures with different biological activities. To identify molecular determinants responsible for the activity difference, we have docked six steroidal androgens to the binding site or the surface of androgen receptor by using molecular docking with computational investigation. The energy was calculated respectively based on the QM (quantum mechanics) and MM (molecular mechanics) methods. The result shows that the allosteric modulation of androgen receptor plays an important role in the binding process between androgens and receptor. The open state receptor is less stable than the close state one, but the latter is more favorable for binding with androgens. It is worthy of note that when the androgen receptors binding or without binding with androgen are in close state, they are difficult to return to their open state. This phenomenon is an exception of the well known two-state model theory in which the two states are reversible. Whether the internal of close state androgen receptor has a combination of androgen or not, the androgen receptor surface can be combined with another androgen, and their surface binding energies could be very close. The result is consistent with the experimental observations, but this phenomenon of continuous combination from open state is also an exception of the two-state model theory.

  20. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ting-Ying; Lin, Chih-Kang; Lin, Chih-Wei; Weng, Yi-Zhong; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2012-07-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes can be summarized as a PWM. This technique provides an effective alternative when the chromatin immunoprecipitation data are unavailable for PWM inference. To facilitate the procedure of predicting PWMs based on protein-DNA complexes or even structures of the unbound state, the web server, DBD2BS, is presented in this study. The DBD2BS uses an atom-level knowledge-based potential function to predict PWMs characterizing the sequences to which the query DBD structure can bind. For unbound queries, a list of 1066 DBD-DNA complexes (including 1813 protein chains) is compiled for use as templates for synthesizing bound structures. The DBD2BS provides users with an easy-to-use interface for visualizing the PWMs predicted based on different templates and the spatial relationships of the query protein, the DBDs and the DNAs. The DBD2BS is the first attempt to predict PWMs of DBDs from unbound structures rather than from bound ones. This approach increases the number of existing protein structures that can be exploited when analyzing protein-DNA interactions. In a recent study, the authors showed that the kernel adopted by the DBD2BS can generate PWMs consistent with those obtained from the experimental data. The use of DBD2BS to predict PWMs can be incorporated with sequence-based methods to discover binding sites in genome-wide studies. Available at: http://dbd2bs.csie.ntu.edu.tw/, http://dbd2bs.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/, and http://dbd2bs.ee.ncku.edu.tw.

  1. An allosteric signaling pathway of human 3-phosphoglycerate kinase from force distribution analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Palmai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3-Phosphogycerate kinase (PGK is a two domain enzyme, which transfers a phosphate group between its two substrates, 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate bound to the N-domain and ADP bound to the C-domain. Indispensable for the phosphoryl transfer reaction is a large conformational change from an inactive open to an active closed conformation via a hinge motion that should bring substrates into close proximity. The allosteric pathway resulting in the active closed conformation has only been partially uncovered. Using Molecular Dynamics simulations combined with Force Distribution Analysis (FDA, we describe an allosteric pathway, which connects the substrate binding sites to the interdomain hinge region. Glu192 of alpha-helix 7 and Gly394 of loop L14 act as hinge points, at which these two secondary structure elements straighten, thereby moving the substrate-binding domains towards each other. The long-range allosteric pathway regulating hPGK catalytic activity, which is partially validated and can be further tested by mutagenesis, highlights the virtue of monitoring internal forces to reveal signal propagation, even if only minor conformational distortions, such as helix bending, initiate the large functional rearrangement of the macromolecule.

  2. An allosteric signaling pathway of human 3-phosphoglycerate kinase from force distribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmai, Zoltan; Seifert, Christian; Gräter, Frauke; Balog, Erika

    2014-01-01

    3-Phosphogycerate kinase (PGK) is a two domain enzyme, which transfers a phosphate group between its two substrates, 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate bound to the N-domain and ADP bound to the C-domain. Indispensable for the phosphoryl transfer reaction is a large conformational change from an inactive open to an active closed conformation via a hinge motion that should bring substrates into close proximity. The allosteric pathway resulting in the active closed conformation has only been partially uncovered. Using Molecular Dynamics simulations combined with Force Distribution Analysis (FDA), we describe an allosteric pathway, which connects the substrate binding sites to the interdomain hinge region. Glu192 of alpha-helix 7 and Gly394 of loop L14 act as hinge points, at which these two secondary structure elements straighten, thereby moving the substrate-binding domains towards each other. The long-range allosteric pathway regulating hPGK catalytic activity, which is partially validated and can be further tested by mutagenesis, highlights the virtue of monitoring internal forces to reveal signal propagation, even if only minor conformational distortions, such as helix bending, initiate the large functional rearrangement of the macromolecule.

  3. Allosteric regulation of deubiquitylase activity through ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena eFaggiano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ataxin-3, the protein responsible for spinocerebellar ataxia type-3, is a cysteine protease that specifically cleaves poly-ubiquitin chains and participates in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. The enzymatic activity resides in the N-terminal Josephin domain. An unusual feature of ataxin-3 is its low enzymatic activity especially for mono-ubiquitinated substrates and short ubiquitin chains. However, specific ubiquitination at lysine 117 in the Josephin domain activates ataxin-3 through an unknown mechanism. Here, we investigate the effects of K117 ubiquitination on the structure and enzymatic activity of the protein. We show that covalently linked ubiquitin rests on the Josephin domain, forming a compact globular moiety and occupying a ubiquitin binding site previously thought to be essential for substrate recognition. In doing so, ubiquitination enhances enzymatic activity by locking the enzyme in an activated state. Our results indicate that ubiquitin functions both as a substrate and as an allosteric regulatory factor. We provide a novel example in which a conformational switch controls the activity of an enzyme that mediates deubiquitination.

  4. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  5. Monoclonal Anti—CD4 Antibody MT310 Binds HIV-1 gp120 Binding Site on CD4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tests show the monoclonal anti—CD4 antibody (mAb) MT310 recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4 as part of its mechanism for strongly inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of CD4+ T cells. In competition tests, mAb MT310 and mAb Leu3a (an anti-CD4 mAb recognizing the gp120-binding site) all inhibited gp120-binding to CD4+ T lymphocytes, while mAb MT405 did not. This result suggests that MT310, like Leu3a, recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4. To further confirm whether MT310 recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4, we prepared rabbit anti-idiotypic antisera (Ab2) against MT310 (Ab1). The anti-idiotypic antisera against MT310 inhibited binding of MT310 and Leu3a to human CD4+ T lymphocytes, but did not block binding of MT151 with the second domain of CD4, while rabbit anti-idiotypic antisera to MT151 could block binding of itself to these cells, but could not inhibit the binding of MT310 and Leu3a, further indicating that MT310 recognized the gp120-binding site on CD4.

  6. The CK2 alpha/CK2 beta interface of human protein kinase CK2 harbors a binding pocket for small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Brunstein, Elena; Issinger, Olaf-Georg;

    2008-01-01

    , selective CK2 inhibitors are required. An often-used CK2 inhibitor is 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB). In a complex structure with human CK2 alpha, DRB binds to the canonical ATP cleft, but additionally it occupies an allosteric site that can be alternatively filled by glycerol....... Inhibition kinetic studies corroborate the dual binding mode of the inhibitor. Structural comparisons reveal a surprising conformational plasticity of human CK2 alpha around both DRB binding sites. After local rearrangement, the allosteric site serves as a CK2 beta interface. This opens the potential...

  7. Allosteric Inhibition of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Revealed by Ibudilast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y.; Crichlow, G; Vermeire, J; Leng, L; Du, X; Hodsdon, M; Bucala, R; Cappello, M; Gross, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    AV411 (ibudilast; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine) is an antiinflammatory drug that was initially developed for the treatment of bronchial asthma but which also has been used for cerebrovascular and ocular indications. It is a nonselective inhibitor of various phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and has varied antiinflammatory activity. More recently, AV411 has been studied as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain and opioid withdrawal through its actions on glial cells. As described herein, the PDE inhibitor AV411 and its PDE-inhibition-compromised analog AV1013 inhibit the catalytic and chemotactic functions of the proinflammatory protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Enzymatic analysis indicates that these compounds are noncompetitive inhibitors of the p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) tautomerase activity of MIF and an allosteric binding site of AV411 and AV1013 is detected by NMR. The allosteric inhibition mechanism is further elucidated by X-ray crystallography based on the MIF/AV1013 binary and MIF/AV1013/HPP ternary complexes. In addition, our antibody experiments directed against MIF receptors indicate that CXCR2 is the major receptor for MIF-mediated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  8. Methods and systems for identifying ligand-protein binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-05-06

    The invention provides a novel integrated structure and system-based approach for drug target prediction that enables the large-scale discovery of new targets for existing drugs Novel computer-readable storage media and computer systems are also provided. Methods and systems of the invention use novel sequence order-independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity techniques to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures even promiscuous structural features of different binding sites for a drug on known targets. The drug\\'s PPE is combined with an approximation of the drug delivery profile to facilitate large-scale prediction of novel drug- protein interactions with several applications to biological research and drug development.

  9. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward;

    2014-01-01

    diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele......Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central...... to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...

  10. Genome-wide prediction, display and refinement of binding sites with information theory-based models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeder J Steven

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present Delila-genome, a software system for identification, visualization and analysis of protein binding sites in complete genome sequences. Binding sites are predicted by scanning genomic sequences with information theory-based (or user-defined weight matrices. Matrices are refined by adding experimentally-defined binding sites to published binding sites. Delila-Genome was used to examine the accuracy of individual information contents of binding sites detected with refined matrices as a measure of the strengths of the corresponding protein-nucleic acid interactions. The software can then be used to predict novel sites by rescanning the genome with the refined matrices. Results Parameters for genome scans are entered using a Java-based GUI interface and backend scripts in Perl. Multi-processor CPU load-sharing minimized the average response time for scans of different chromosomes. Scans of human genome assemblies required 4–6 hours for transcription factor binding sites and 10–19 hours for splice sites, respectively, on 24- and 3-node Mosix and Beowulf clusters. Individual binding sites are displayed either as high-resolution sequence walkers or in low-resolution custom tracks in the UCSC genome browser. For large datasets, we applied a data reduction strategy that limited displays of binding sites exceeding a threshold information content to specific chromosomal regions within or adjacent to genes. An HTML document is produced listing binding sites ranked by binding site strength or chromosomal location hyperlinked to the UCSC custom track, other annotation databases and binding site sequences. Post-genome scan tools parse binding site annotations of selected chromosome intervals and compare the results of genome scans using different weight matrices. Comparisons of multiple genome scans can display binding sites that are unique to each scan and identify sites with significantly altered binding strengths

  11. Mechanisms of in vivo binding site selection of the hematopoietic master transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thu-Hang; Minderjahn, Julia; Schmidl, Christian; Hoffmeister, Helen; Schmidhofer, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Längst, Gernot; Benner, Christopher; Rehli, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is crucial for the development of many hematopoietic lineages and its binding patterns significantly change during differentiation processes. However, the 'rules' for binding or not-binding of potential binding sites are only partially understood. To unveil basic characteristics of PU.1 binding site selection in different cell types, we studied the binding properties of PU.1 during human macrophage differentiation. Using in vivo and in vitro binding assays, as well as computational prediction, we show that PU.1 selects its binding sites primarily based on sequence affinity, which results in the frequent autonomous binding of high affinity sites in DNase I inaccessible regions (25-45% of all occupied sites). Increasing PU.1 concentrations and the availability of cooperative transcription factor interactions during lineage differentiation both decrease affinity thresholds for in vivo binding and fine-tune cell type-specific PU.1 binding, which seems to be largely independent of DNA methylation. Occupied sites were predominantly detected in active chromatin domains, which are characterized by higher densities of PU.1 recognition sites and neighboring motifs for cooperative transcription factors. Our study supports a model of PU.1 binding control that involves motif-binding affinity, PU.1 concentration, cooperativeness with neighboring transcription factor sites and chromatin domain accessibility, which likely applies to all PU.1 expressing cells.

  12. Distribution of intercalative dye binding sites in chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurquin, P F; Seligy, V L

    1976-04-01

    Actinomycin D (AMD) and ethidium bromide (EB) were found to bind to chromatin isolated from a variety of gander tissues according to a strong and weak process analogous to that found for deproteinized DNA. Distribution of the dye intercalation sites in chromatin and DNA were evaluated at low r-values (dye bound per nucleotide) by following the appearance of free dye released from chromatin and DNA during thermal denaturation. The AMD dissociation profiles closely resembled the DNA or chromatin-DNA denaturation profiles; whereas the EB derivative dissociation profiles, indicated 3 major transitions for transcriptionally active chromatin with the main component corresponding to the single component which characterizes DNA. The DNA-like component was greatly reduced for mature erythrocyte chromatin but could be generated by removal of histone I and V. Removal of residual non acid-soluble proteins from dehistonized chromatin, urea treatment or dissociation and reconstitution of chromatin favoured conversion to the DNA-like component with loss of the other two. This study indicates that more than one type of binding exists generally in chromatin.

  13. ncDNA and drift drive binding site accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruths Troy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS in an organism’s genome positively correlates with the complexity of the regulatory network of the organism. However, the manner by which TFBS arise and accumulate in genomes and the effects of regulatory network complexity on the organism’s fitness are far from being known. The availability of TFBS data from many organisms provides an opportunity to explore these issues, particularly from an evolutionary perspective. Results We analyzed TFBS data from five model organisms – E. coli K12, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, A. thaliana – and found a positive correlation between the amount of non-coding DNA (ncDNA in the organism’s genome and regulatory complexity. Based on this finding, we hypothesize that the amount of ncDNA, combined with the population size, can explain the patterns of regulatory complexity across organisms. To test this hypothesis, we devised a genome-based regulatory pathway model and subjected it to the forces of evolution through population genetic simulations. The results support our hypothesis, showing neutral evolutionary forces alone can explain TFBS patterns, and that selection on the regulatory network function does not alter this finding. Conclusions The cis-regulome is not a clean functional network crafted by adaptive forces alone, but instead a data source filled with the noise of non-adaptive forces. From a regulatory perspective, this evolutionary noise manifests as complexity on both the binding site and pathway level, which has significant implications on many directions in microbiology, genetics, and synthetic biology.

  14. Functional roles of ATP-binding residues in the catalytic site of human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hui-Chih; Chien, Yu-Ching; Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Chang, Gu-Gang; Liu, Guang-Yaw

    2005-09-27

    Human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme is inhibited by ATP. The X-ray crystal structures have revealed that two ATP molecules occupy both the active and exo site of the enzyme, suggesting that ATP might act as an allosteric inhibitor of the enzyme. However, mutagenesis studies and kinetic evidences indicated that the catalytic activity of the enzyme is inhibited by ATP through a competitive inhibition mechanism in the active site and not in the exo site. Three amino acid residues, Arg165, Asn259, and Glu314, which are hydrogen-bonded with NAD+ or ATP, are chosen to characterize their possible roles on the inhibitory effect of ATP for the enzyme. Our kinetic data clearly demonstrate that Arg165 is essential for catalysis. The R165A enzyme had very low enzyme activity, and it was only slightly inhibited by ATP and not activated by fumarate. The values of K(m,NAD) and K(i,ATP) to both NAD+ and malate were elevated. Elimination of the guanidino side chain of R165 made the enzyme defective on the binding of NAD+ and ATP, and it caused the charge imbalance in the active site. These effects possibly caused the enzyme to malfunction on its catalytic power. The N259A enzyme was less inhibited by ATP but could be fully activated by fumarate at a similar extent compared with the wild-type enzyme. For the N259A enzyme, the value of K(i,ATP) to NAD+ but not to malate was elevated, indicating that the hydrogen bonding between ATP and the amide side chain of this residue is important for the binding stability of ATP. Removal of this side chain did not cause any harmful effect on the fumarate-induced activation of the enzyme. The E314A enzyme, however, was severely inhibited by ATP and only slightly activated by fumarate. The values of K(m,malate), K(m,NAD), and K(i,ATP) to both NAD+ and malate for E314A were reduced to about 2-7-folds compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. It can be concluded that mutation of Glu314 to Ala eliminated the repulsive effects

  15. Energetics of allosteric negative coupling in the zinc sensor S. aureus CzrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, Nicholas E; Giedroc, David P

    2009-12-16

    The linked equilibria of an allosterically regulated protein are defined by the structures, residue-specific dynamics and global energetics of interconversion among all relevant allosteric states. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to probe the global thermodynamics of allosteric negative regulation of the binding of the paradigm ArsR-family zinc sensing repressor Staphylococcus aureus CzrA to the czr DNA operator (CzrO) by Zn(2+). Zn(2+) binds to the two identical binding sites on the free CzrA homodimer in two discernible steps. A larger entropic driving force Delta(-TDeltaS) of -4.7 kcal mol(-1) and a more negative DeltaC(p) characterize the binding of the first Zn(2+) relative to the second. These features suggest a modest structural transition in forming the Zn(1) state followed by a quenching of the internal dynamics on filling the second zinc site, which collectively drive homotropic negative cooperativity of Zn(2+) binding (Delta(DeltaG) = 1.8 kcal mol(-1)). Negative homotropic cooperativity also characterizes Zn(2+) binding to the CzrA*CzrO complex (Delta(DeltaG) = 1.3 kcal mol(-1)), although the underlying energetics are vastly different, with homotropic Delta(DeltaH) and Delta(-TDeltaS) values both small and slightly positive. In short, Zn(2+) binding to the complex fails to induce a large structural or dynamical change in the CzrA bound to the operator. The strong heterotropic negative linkage in this system (DeltaG(c)(t) = 6.3 kcal mol(-1)) therefore derives from the vastly different structures of the apo-CzrA and CzrA*CzrO reference states (DeltaH(c)(t) = 9.4 kcal mol(-1)) in a way that is reinforced by a global rigidification of the allosterically inhibited Zn(2) state off the DNA (TDeltaS(c)(t) = -3.1 kcal mol(-1), i.e., DeltaS(c)(t) > 0). The implications of these findings for other metalloregulatory proteins are discussed.

  16. The structure of pyruvate kinase from Leishmania mexicana reveals details of the allosteric transition and unusual effector specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigden, D J; Phillips, S E; Michels, P A; Fothergill-Gilmore, L A

    1999-08-20

    Glycolysis occupies a central role in cellular metabolism, and is of particular importance for the catabolic production of ATP in protozoan parasites such as Leishmania and Trypanosoma. In these organisms pyruvate kinase plays a key regulatory role, and is unique in responding to fructose 2,6-bisphosphate as allosteric activator. The determination of the first eukaryotic pyruvate kinase crystal structure in the T-state is reported. A comparison of the leishmania and yeast R-state enzymes reveals fewer differences than the previous comparison of Escherichia coli T-state and rabbit muscle non-allosteric enzymes. Structural changes related to the allosteric transition can therefore be distinguished from those that are a consequence of the inherent wide structural divergence between bacterial and mammalian proteins. The allosteric transition involves significant changes in a tightly packed array of eight alpha helices at the interface near the catalytic site. At the other interface the allosteric transition appears to be accompanied by the bending of a ten-stranded intersubunit beta sheet adjacent to the effector site. Helix Calpha1 makes contacts to the N-terminal helical domain and bridges both interfaces. A comparison of the effector sites of the leishmania and yeast enzymes reveals the structural basis for the different effector specificity. Two loops comprising residues 443-453 and 480-489 adopt very different conformations in the two enzymes, and Lys453 and His480 that are a feature of trypanosomatid enzymes provide probable ligands for the 2-phospho group of the effector molecule. These differences offer an opportunity for the design of drugs that would bind to the trypanosomatid enzymes but not to those of the mammalian host.

  17. Study on Synthesis and Binding Ability of a New Anion Receptor Containing NH Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO,Yan-Hong; LIN,Hai; LIN,Hua-Kuan

    2007-01-01

    A new colorimetric recognition receptor 1 based on the dual capability containing NH binding sites of selectively sensing anionic guest species has been synthesized. Compared with other halide anions, its UV/Vis absorption spectrum in dimethyl sulfoxide showed the response toward the presence of fluoride anion with high selectivity,and also displayed dramatic color changes from colorless to yellow in the presence of TBAF (5 × 10-5 mol/L). The similar UV/Vis absorption spectrum change also occurred when 1 was treated with AcO- while a little change with H2PO-4 and OH-. Receptor 1 has almost not affinity abilities to Cl-, Br- and I-. The binding ability of receptor 1to fluoride with high selectivity over other halides contributes to the anion size and the ability of forming hydrogen bonding. While the different ability of binding with geometrically triangular (AcO-), tetrahedral (H2PO-4 ) and linear (OH-) anions maybe result from their geometry configuration.

  18. L-(TH)glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-08-12

    The anatomical distribution of L-(TH)glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-(TH)glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of CaS , Cl and Na ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-(TH)2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-(TH)AP5), (TH)kainate ((TH)KA) and (TH) -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ((TH)AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.). 29 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  19. Identification of an Allosteric Pocket on Human Hsp70 Reveals a Mode of Inhibition of This Therapeutically Important Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodina, Anna; Patel, Pallav D.; Kang, Yanlong; Patel, Yogita; Baaklini, Imad; Wong, Michael J.H.; Taldone, Tony; Yan, Pengrong; Yang, Chenghua; Maharaj, Ronnie; Gozman, Alexander; Patel, Maulik R.; Patel, Hardik J.; Chirico, William; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Talele, Tanaji T.; Young, Jason C.; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hsp70s are important cancer chaperones that act upstream of Hsp90 and exhibit independent anti-apoptotic activities. To develop chemical tools for the study of human Hsp70, we developed a homology model that unveils a previously unknown allosteric site located in the nucleotide binding domain of Hsp70. Combining structure-based design and phenotypic testing, we discovered a previously unknown inhibitor of this site, YK5. In cancer cells, this compound is a potent and selective binder of the cytosolic but not the organellar human Hsp70s and has biological activity partly by interfering with the formation of active oncogenic Hsp70/Hsp90/client protein complexes. YK5 is a small molecule inhibitor rationally designed to interact with an allosteric pocket of Hsp70 and represents a previously unknown chemical tool to investigate cellular mechanisms associated with Hsp70. PMID:24239008

  20. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-09-02

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  1. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  2. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  3. High affinity and temperature sensitivity of blood oxygen binding in Pangasianodon hypophthalmus due to lack of chloride-hemoglobin allosteric interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Phuong, Le My; Huong, Do Thi Thanh

    2015-01-01

    , such as high temperature, affect O2 transport in air-breathing fishes, this study assessed the effects of temperature on O2 binding of blood and Hb in the economically important air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus. To determine blood O2 binding properties, blood was drawn from resting cannulated...

  4. Mechanism of allosteric regulation of β2-adrenergic receptor by cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manna, Moutusi; Niemelä, Miia; Tynkkynen, Joona

    2016-01-01

    ) - a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor - is modulated by cholesterol in an allosteric fashion. Extensive atomistic simulations show that cholesterol regulates b2AR by limiting its conformational variability. The mechanism of action is based on the binding of cholesterol at specific high-affinity sites located...... near the transmembrane helices 5-7 of the receptor. The alternative mechanism, where the β2AR conformation would be modulated by membrane-mediated interactions, plays only a minor role. Cholesterol analogues also bind to cholesterol binding sites and impede the structural flexibility of β2AR, however...... cholesterol generates the strongest effect. The results highlight the capacity of lipids to regulate the conformation of membrane receptors through specific interactions....

  5. A3 Adenosine Receptor Allosteric Modulator Induces an Anti-Inflammatory Effect: In Vivo Studies and Molecular Mechanism of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Cohen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR is overexpressed in inflammatory cells and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals with inflammatory conditions. Agonists to the A3AR are known to induce specific anti-inflammatory effects upon chronic treatment. LUF6000 is an allosteric compound known to modulate the A3AR and render the endogenous ligand adenosine to bind to the receptor with higher affinity. The advantage of allosteric modulators is their capability to target specifically areas where adenosine levels are increased such as inflammatory and tumor sites, whereas normal body cells and tissues are refractory to the allosteric modulators due to low adenosine levels. LUF6000 administration induced anti-inflammatory effect in 3 experimental animal models of rat adjuvant induced arthritis, monoiodoacetate induced osteoarthritis, and concanavalin A induced liver inflammation in mice. The molecular mechanism of action points to deregulation of signaling proteins including PI3K, IKK, IκB, Jak-2, and STAT-1, resulting in decreased levels of NF-κB, known to mediate inflammatory effects. Moreover, LUF6000 induced a slight stimulatory effect on the number of normal white blood cells and neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effect of LUF6000, mechanism of action, and the differential effects on inflammatory and normal cells position this allosteric modulator as an attractive and unique drug candidate.

  6. Quick and Simple Detection Technique to Assess the Binding of Antimicrotubule Agents to the Colchicine-Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortin Sébastien

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Development of antimitotic binding to the colchicine-binding site for the treatment of cancer is rapidly expanding. Numerous antimicrotubule agents are prepared every year, and the determination of their binding affinity to tubulin requires the use of purified tubulins and radiolabeled ligands. Such a procedure is costly and time-consuming and therefore is limited to the most promising candidates. Here, we report a quick and inexpensive method that requires only usual laboratory resources to assess the binding of antimicrotubules to colchicine-binding site. The method is based on the ability of N,N'-ethylene-bis(iodoacetamide (EBI to crosslink in living cells the cysteine residues at position 239 and 354 of β-tubulin, residues which are involved in the colchicine-binding site. The β-tubulin adduct formed by EBI is easily detectable by Western blot as a second immunoreacting band of β-tubulin that migrates faster than β-tubulin. The occupancy of colchicine-binding site by pertinent antimitotics inhibits the formation of the EBI: β-tubulin adduct, resulting in an assay that allows the screening of new molecules targeting this binding site.

  7. Quick and Simple Detection Technique to Assess the Binding of Antimicrotubule Agents to the Colchicine-Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Development of antimitotic binding to the colchicine-binding site for the treatment of cancer is rapidly expanding. Numerous antimicrotubule agents are prepared every year, and the determination of their binding affinity to tubulin requires the use of purified tubulins and radiolabeled ligands. Such a procedure is costly and time-consuming and therefore is limited to the most promising candidates. Here, we report a quick and inexpensive method that requires only usual laboratory resources to assess the binding of antimicrotubules to colchicine-binding site. The method is based on the ability of N,N'-ethylene-bis(iodoacetamide (EBI to crosslink in living cells the cysteine residues at position 239 and 354 of β-tubulin, residues which are involved in the colchicine-binding site. The β-tubulin adduct formed by EBI is easily detectable by Western blot as a second immunoreacting band of β-tubulin that migrates faster than β-tubulin. The occupancy of colchicine-binding site by pertinent antimitotics inhibits the formation of the EBI: β-tubulin adduct, resulting in an assay that allows the screening of new molecules targeting this binding site.

  8. Molecular mechanism of allosteric substrate activation in a thiamine diphosphate-dependent decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versées, Wim; Spaepen, Stijn; Wood, Martin D H; Leeper, Finian J; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steyaert, Jan

    2007-11-30

    Thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are involved in a wide variety of metabolic pathways. The molecular mechanism behind active site communication and substrate activation, observed in some of these enzymes, has since long been an area of debate. Here, we report the crystal structures of a phenylpyruvate decarboxylase in complex with its substrates and a covalent reaction intermediate analogue. These structures reveal the regulatory site and unveil the mechanism of allosteric substrate activation. This signal transduction relies on quaternary structure reorganizations, domain rotations, and a pathway of local conformational changes that are relayed from the regulatory site to the active site. The current findings thus uncover the molecular mechanism by which the binding of a substrate in the regulatory site is linked to the mounting of the catalytic machinery in the active site in this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme.

  9. Prediction of nucleosome positioning based on transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfu Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DNA of all eukaryotic organisms is packaged into nucleosomes, the basic repeating units of chromatin. The nucleosome consists of a histone octamer around which a DNA core is wrapped and the linker histone H1, which is associated with linker DNA. By altering the accessibility of DNA sequences, the nucleosome has profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is of great importance for the study of genomic control mechanisms. Transcription factors (TFs have been suggested to play a role in nucleosome positioning in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR feature selection algorithm, the nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA, and the incremental feature selection (IFS method were used to identify the most important TFs that either favor or inhibit nucleosome positioning by analyzing the numbers of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in 53,021 nucleosomal DNA sequences and 50,299 linker DNA sequences. A total of nine important families of TFs were extracted from 35 families, and the overall prediction accuracy was 87.4% as evaluated by the jackknife cross-validation test. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that TFs are more likely to bind linker DNA sequences than the sequences in the nucleosomes. In addition, our results imply that there may be some TFs that are important for nucleosome positioning but that play an insignificant role in discriminating nucleosome-forming DNA sequences from nucleosome-inhibiting DNA sequences. The hypothesis that TFs play a role in nucleosome positioning is, thus, confirmed by the results of this study.

  10. Shared binding sites in Lepidoptera for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, S; González-Cabrera, J; Tabashnik, B E; Ferré, J

    2001-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxins act by binding to specific target sites in the insect midgut epithelial membrane. The best-known mechanism of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins is reduced binding to target sites. Because alteration of a binding site shared by several toxins may cause resistance to all of them, knowledge of which toxins share binding sites is useful for predicting cross-resistance. Conversely, cross-resistance among toxins suggests that the toxins share a binding site. At least two strains of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) with resistance to Cry1A toxins and reduced binding of Cry1A toxins have strong cross-resistance to Cry1Ja. Thus, we hypothesized that Cry1Ja shares binding sites with Cry1A toxins. We tested this hypothesis in six moth and butterfly species, each from a different family: Cacyreus marshalli (Lycaenidae), Lobesia botrana (Tortricidae), Manduca sexta (Sphingidae), Pectinophora gossypiella (Gelechiidae), P. xylostella (Plutellidae), and Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae). Although the extent of competition varied among species, experiments with biotinylated Cry1Ja and radiolabeled Cry1Ac showed that Cry1Ja and Cry1Ac competed for binding sites in all six species. A recent report also indicates shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins in Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae). Thus, shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A occur in all lepidopteran species tested so far.

  11. Sparse networks of directly coupled, polymorphic, and functional side chains in allosteric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltan Ghoraie, Laleh; Burkowski, Forbes; Zhu, Mu

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of coupled side-chain fluctuations alone in the allosteric behavior of proteins. Moreover, examination of X-ray crystallography data has recently revealed new information about the prevalence of alternate side-chain conformations (conformational polymorphism), and attempts have been made to uncover the hidden alternate conformations from X-ray data. Hence, new computational approaches are required that consider the polymorphic nature of the side chains, and incorporate the effects of this phenomenon in the study of information transmission and functional interactions of residues in a molecule. These studies can provide a more accurate understanding of the allosteric behavior. In this article, we first present a novel approach to generate an ensemble of conformations and an efficient computational method to extract direct couplings of side chains in allosteric proteins, and provide sparse network representations of the couplings. We take the side-chain conformational polymorphism into account, and show that by studying the intrinsic dynamics of an inactive structure, we are able to construct a network of functionally crucial residues. Second, we show that the proposed method is capable of providing a magnified view of the coupled and conformationally polymorphic residues. This model reveals couplings between the alternate conformations of a coupled residue pair. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first computational method for extracting networks of side chains' alternate conformations. Such networks help in providing a detailed image of side-chain dynamics in functionally important and conformationally polymorphic sites, such as binding and/or allosteric sites.

  12. Binding of lipoic acid induces conformational change and appearance of a new binding site in methylglyoxal modified serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suji, George; Khedkar, Santosh A; Singh, Sreelekha K; Kishore, Nand; Coutinho, Evans C; Bhor, Vikrant M; Sivakami, S

    2008-06-01

    The binding of lipoic acid (LA), to methylglyoxal (MG) modified BSA was studied using isothermal titration calorimetry in combination with enzyme kinetics and molecular modelling. The binding of LA to BSA was sequential with two sites, one with higher binding constant and another comparatively lower. In contrast the modified protein showed three sequential binding sites with a reduction in affinity at the high affinity binding site by a factor of 10. CD results show appreciable changes in conformation of the modified protein as a result of binding to LA. The inhibition of esterase like activity of BSA by LA revealed that it binds to site II in domain III of BSA. The pH dependence of esterase activity of native BSA indicated a catalytic group with a pK(a) = 7.9 +/- 0.1, assigned to Tyr411 with the conjugate base stabilised by interaction with Arg410. Upon modification by MG, this pK(a) increased to 8.13. A complex obtained by docking of LA to BSA and BSA in which Arg410 is modified to hydroimidazolone showed that the long hydrocarbon chain of lipoic acid sits in a cavity different from the one observed for unmodified BSA. The molecular electrostatic potential showed that the modification of Arg410 reduced the positive electrostatic potential around the protein-binding site. Thus it can be concluded that the modification of BSA by MG resulted in altered ligand binding characteristics due to changes in the internal geometry and electrostatic potential at the binding site.

  13. Chromatographic analysis of the effects of fatty acids and glycation on binding by probes for Sudlow sites I and II to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Debolt, Erin; Suresh, D; Hage, David S

    2016-05-15

    The primary endogenous ligands of human serum albumin (HSA) are non-esterified fatty acids, with 0.1-2mol of fatty acids normally being bound to HSA. In type II diabetes, fatty acid levels in serum are often elevated, and the presence of high glucose results in an increase in the non-enzymatic glycation of HSA. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used to examine the combined effects of glycation and the presence of long chain fatty acids on the binding of HSA with R-warfarin and l-tryptophan (i.e., probes for Sudlow sites I and II, the major sites for drugs on this protein). Zonal elution competition studies were used to examine the interactions of myristic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid with these probes on HSA. It was found that all these fatty acids had direct competition with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I of normal HSA and glycated HSA, with the glycated HSA typically having stronger binding for the fatty acids at this site. At Sudlow site II, direct competition was observed for all the fatty acids with l-tryptophan when using normal HSA, while glycated HSA gave no competition or positive allosteric interactions between these fatty acids and l-tryptophan. These data indicated that glycation can alter the interactions of drugs and fatty acids at specific binding sites on HSA. The results of this study should lead to a better understanding of how these interactions may change during diabetes and demonstrate how HPAC can be used to examine drug/solute-protein interactions in complex systems.

  14. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J;

    1993-01-01

    can replicate by using various tRNA molecules as primers and propose primer binding site-tRNA primer interactions to be of major importance for tRNA primer selection. However, efficient primer selection does not require perfect Watson-Crick base pairing at all 18 positions of the primer binding site.......(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus......Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching tRNA...

  15. Peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites on striated muscles of the rat: Properties and effect of denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.E.; Ickstadt, A. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.); Hopf, H.Ch. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1985-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites mediate some direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles, the properties of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding to rat biceps and rat diaphragm homogenates were investigated. In both tissues a single population of sites was found with a Ksub(D) value of 3 nmol/l. The density of these sites in both muscles was higher than the density in rat brain, but was considerably lower than in rat kidney. Competition experiments indicate a substrate specificity of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding similar to the properties already demonstrated for the specific binding of this ligand to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in many other tissues. The properties of these sites in the rat diaphragm are not changed after motoric denervation by phrenicectomy. It is concluded that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites are not involved in direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles.

  16. In vitro site selection of a consensus binding site for the Drosophila melanogaster Tbx20 homolog midline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Najand

    Full Text Available We employed in vitro site selection to identify a consensus binding sequence for the Drosophila melanogaster Tbx20 T-box transcription factor homolog Midline. We purified a bacterially expressed T-box DNA binding domain of Midline, and used it in four rounds of precipitation and polymerase-chain-reaction based amplification. We cloned and sequenced 54 random oligonucleotides selected by Midline. Electromobility shift-assays confirmed that 27 of these could bind the Midline T-box. Sequence alignment of these 27 clones suggests that Midline binds as a monomer to a consensus sequence that contains an AGGTGT core. Thus, the Midline consensus binding site we define in this study is similar to that defined for vertebrate Tbx20, but differs from a previously reported Midline binding sequence derived through site selection.

  17. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  18. Evolutionary computation for discovery of composite transcription factor binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Gary B.; Porto, V. William; Varga, Gabor; Dow, Ernst R.; Craven, Andrew M.; Powers, David M.; Harlow, Harry B.; Su, Eric W.; Onyia, Jude E.; Su, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated the use of evolutionary computation for the discovery of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in promoter regions upstream of coexpressed genes. However, it remained unclear whether or not composite TFBS elements, commonly found in higher organisms where two or more TFBSs form functional complexes, could also be identified by using this approach. Here, we present an important refinement of our previous algorithm and test the identification of composite elements using NFAT/AP-1 as an example. We demonstrate that by using appropriate existing parameters such as window size, novel-scoring methods such as central bonusing and methods of self-adaptation to automatically adjust the variation operators during the evolutionary search, TFBSs of different sizes and complexity can be identified as top solutions. Some of these solutions have known experimental relationships with NFAT/AP-1. We also indicate that even after properly tuning the model parameters, the choice of the appropriate window size has a significant effect on algorithm performance. We believe that this improved algorithm will greatly augment TFBS discovery. PMID:18927103

  19. Multiplicity of carbohydrate-binding sites in -prism fold lectins: occurrence and possible evolutionary implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok Sharma; Divya Chandran; Desh D Singh; M Vijayan

    2007-09-01

    The -prism II fold lectins of known structure, all from monocots, invariably have three carbohydrate-binding sites in each subunit/domain. Until recently, -prism I fold lectins of known structure were all from dicots and they exhibited one carbohydrate-binding site per subunit/domain. However, the recently determined structure of the -prism fold I lectin from banana, a monocot, has two very similar carbohydrate-binding sites. This prompted a detailed analysis of all the sequences appropriate for two-lectin folds and which carry one or more relevant carbohydrate-binding motifs. The very recent observation of a -prism I fold lectin, griffithsin, with three binding sites in each domain further confirmed the need for such an analysis. The analysis demonstrates substantial diversity in the number of binding sites unrelated to the taxonomical position of the plant source. However, the number of binding sites and the symmetry within the sequence exhibit reasonable correlation. The distribution of the two families of -prism fold lectins among plants and the number of binding sites in them, appear to suggest that both of them arose through successive gene duplication, fusion and divergent evolution of the same primitive carbohydrate-binding motif involving a Greek key. Analysis with sequences in individual Greek keys as independent units lends further support to this conclusion. It would seem that the preponderance of three carbohydrate-binding sites per domain in monocot lectins, particularly those with the -prism II fold, is related to the role of plant lectins in defence.

  20. Determination of energies and sites of binding of PFOA and PFOS to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Muscionico, Isabella; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2010-11-25

    Structure and energies of the binding sites of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) to human serum albumin (HSA) were determined through molecular modeling. The calculations consisted of a compound approach based on docking, followed by molecular dynamics simulations and by the estimation of the free binding energies adopting WHAM-umbrella sampling and semiempirical methodologies. The binding sites so determined are common either to known HSA fatty acids sites or to other HSA sites known to bind to pharmaceutical compounds such as warfarin, thyroxine, indole, and benzodiazepin. Among the PFOA binding sites, five have interaction energies in excess of -6 kcal/mol, which become nine for PFOS. The calculated binding free energy of PFOA to the Trp 214 binding site is the highest among the PFOA complexes, -8.0 kcal/mol, in good agreement with literature experimental data. The PFOS binding site with the highest energy, -8.8 kcal/mol, is located near the Trp 214 binding site, thus partially affecting its activity. The maximum number of ligands that can be bound to HSA is 9 for PFOA and 11 for PFOS. The calculated data were adopted to predict the level of complexation of HSA as a function of the concentration of PFOA and PFOS found in human blood for different levels of exposition. The analysis of the factors contributing to the complex binding energy permitted to outline a set of guidelines for the rational design of alternative fluorinated surfactants with a lower bioaccumulation potential.

  1. Allosteric motions in structures of yeast NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander B; Hu, Gang; Hart, P John; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2008-04-18

    Mitochondrial NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) are key regulators of flux through biosynthetic and oxidative pathways in response to cellular energy levels. Here we present the first structures of a eukaryotic member of this enzyme family, the allosteric, hetero-octameric, NAD(+)-specific IDH from yeast in three forms: 1) without ligands, 2) with bound analog citrate, and 3) with bound citrate + AMP. The structures reveal the molecular basis for ligand binding to homologous but distinct regulatory and catalytic sites positioned at the interfaces between IDH1 and IDH2 subunits and define pathways of communication between heterodimers and heterotetramers in the hetero-octamer. Disulfide bonds observed at the heterotetrameric interfaces in the unliganded IDH hetero-octamer are reduced in the ligand-bound forms, suggesting a redox regulatory mechanism that may be analogous to the "on-off" regulation of non-allosteric bacterial IDHs via phosphorylation. The results strongly suggest that eukaryotic IDH enzymes are exquisitely tuned to ensure that allosteric activation occurs only when concentrations of isocitrate are elevated.

  2. Allosteric Motions in Structures of Yeast NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor,A.; Hu, G.; Hart, P.; McAlister-Henn, L.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) are key regulators of flux through biosynthetic and oxidative pathways in response to cellular energy levels. Here we present the first structures of a eukaryotic member of this enzyme family, the allosteric, hetero-octameric, NAD+-specific IDH from yeast in three forms: (1) without ligands, (2) with bound analog citrate, and (3) with bound citrate + AMP. The structures reveal the molecular basis for ligand binding to homologous but distinct regulatory and catalytic sites positioned at the interfaces between IDH1 and IDH2 subunits and define pathways of communication between heterodimers and heterotetramers in the hetero-octamer. Disulfide bonds observed at the heterotetrameric interfaces in the unliganded IDH hetero-octamer are reduced in the ligand-bound forms, suggesting a redox regulatory mechanism that may be analogous to the 'on-off' regulation of non-allosteric bacterial IDHs via phosphorylation. The results strongly suggest that eukaryotic IDH enzymes are exquisitely tuned to ensure that allosteric activation occurs only when concentrations of isocitrate are elevated.

  3. Identification of novel allosteric regulators of human-erythrocyte pyruvate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharalkar, Shilpa S; Joshi, Gajanan S; Musayev, Faik N; Fornabaio, Micaela; Abraham, Donald J; Safo, Martin K

    2007-11-01

    Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (PK) is an important glycolytic enzyme, and manipulation of its regulatory behavior by allosteric modifiers is of interest for medicinal purposes. Human-erythrocyte PK was expressed in Rosetta cells and purified on an Ni-NTA column. A search of the small-molecules database of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), using the UNITY software, led to the identification of several compounds with similar pharmacophores as fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), the natural allosteric activator of the human kinases. The compounds were subsequently docked into the FBP binding site using the programs FlexX and GOLD, and their interactions with the protein were analyzed with the energy-scoring function of HINT. Seven promising candidates, compounds 1-7, were obtained from the NCI, and subjected to kinetics analysis, which revealed both activators and inhibitors of the R-isozyme of PK (R-PK). The allosteric effectors discovered in this study could prove to be lead compounds for developing medications for the treatment of hemolytic anemia, sickle-cell anemia, hypoxia-related diseases, and other disorders arising from erythrocyte PK malfunction.

  4. Prediction of calcium-binding sites by combining loop-modeling with machine learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altman Russ B

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein ligand-binding sites in the apo state exhibit structural flexibility. This flexibility often frustrates methods for structure-based recognition of these sites because it leads to the absence of electron density for these critical regions, particularly when they are in surface loops. Methods for recognizing functional sites in these missing loops would be useful for recovering additional functional information. Results We report a hybrid approach for recognizing calcium-binding sites in disordered regions. Our approach combines loop modeling with a machine learning method (FEATURE for structure-based site recognition. For validation, we compared the performance of our method on known calcium-binding sites for which there are both holo and apo structures. When loops in the apo structures are rebuilt using modeling methods, FEATURE identifies 14 out of 20 crystallographically proven calcium-binding sites. It only recognizes 7 out of 20 calcium-binding sites in the initial apo crystal structures. We applied our method to unstructured loops in proteins from SCOP families known to bind calcium in order to discover potential cryptic calcium binding sites. We built 2745 missing loops and evaluated them for potential calcium binding. We made 102 predictions of calcium-binding sites. Ten predictions are consistent with independent experimental verifications. We found indirect experimental evidence for 14 other predictions. The remaining 78 predictions are novel predictions, some with intriguing potential biological significance. In particular, we see an enrichment of beta-sheet folds with predicted calcium binding sites in the connecting loops on the surface that may be important for calcium-mediated function switches. Conclusion Protein crystal structures are a potentially rich source of functional information. When loops are missing in these structures, we may be losing important information about binding sites and active

  5. Structural Perspectives on the Evolutionary Expansion of Unique Protein-Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Shaytan, Alexey K; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-09-15

    Structures of protein complexes provide atomistic insights into protein interactions. Human proteins represent a quarter of all structures in the Protein Data Bank; however, available protein complexes cover less than 10% of the human proteome. Although it is theoretically possible to infer interactions in human proteins based on structures of homologous protein complexes, it is still unclear to what extent protein interactions and binding sites are conserved, and whether protein complexes from remotely related species can be used to infer interactions and binding sites. We considered biological units of protein complexes and clustered protein-protein binding sites into similarity groups based on their structure and sequence, which allowed us to identify unique binding sites. We showed that the growth rate of the number of unique binding sites in the Protein Data Bank was much slower than the growth rate of the number of structural complexes. Next, we investigated the evolutionary roots of unique binding sites and identified the major phyletic branches with the largest expansion in the number of novel binding sites. We found that many binding sites could be traced to the universal common ancestor of all cellular organisms, whereas relatively few binding sites emerged at the major evolutionary branching points. We analyzed the physicochemical properties of unique binding sites and found that the most ancient sites were the largest in size, involved many salt bridges, and were the most compact and least planar. In contrast, binding sites that appeared more recently in the evolution of eukaryotes were characterized by a larger fraction of polar and aromatic residues, and were less compact and more planar, possibly due to their more transient nature and roles in signaling processes.

  6. Oestradiol and testosterone binding sites in mice tibiae and their relationship with bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Ventanas, J; Burgos, J

    1986-11-01

    High affinity oestradiol and testosterone binding sites were found in tibiae cytosol from entire male and female of different ages. Scatchard assay allowed to estimate a Kd of 2.7 X 10(-9) M for oestradiol binding sites indicating that the 3H-oestradiol binding was of high affinity. Oestradiol and testosterone binding sites abundance in mice tibiae are subject to change with age. It is not easy to establish a direct correlation between these changes and the values reported here on bone growth in weight and length, however seems possible to point a negative relationship between bone lengthening and oestradiol binding site levels in female, as well a positive relationship with testosterone in both sexes. The presence of oestradiol and testosterone binding sites in epiphyses and not in the diaphyses reinforces the hypothesis that both are playing some role in bone growth.

  7. Alignment-free ultra-high-throughput comparison of druggable protein-ligand binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill, Nathanaël; Rognan, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Inferring the biological function of a protein from its three-dimensional structure as well as explaining why a drug may bind to various targets is of crucial importance to modern drug discovery. Here we present a generic 4833-integer vector describing druggable protein-ligand binding sites that can be applied to any protein and any binding cavity. The fingerprint registers counts of pharmacophoric triplets from the Calpha atomic coordinates of binding-site-lining residues. Starting from a customized data set of diverse protein-ligand binding site pairs, the most appropriate metric and a similarity threshold could be defined for similar binding sites. The method (FuzCav) has been used in various scenarios: (i) screening a collection of 6000 binding sites for similarity to different queries; (ii) classifying protein families (serine endopeptidases, protein kinases) by binding site diversity; (iii) discriminating adenine-binding cavities from decoys. The fingerprint generation and comparison supports ultra-high throughput (ca. 1000 measures/s), does not require prior alignment of protein binding sites, and is able to detect local similarity among subpockets. It is thus particularly well suited to the functional annotation of novel genomic structures with low sequence identity to known X-ray templates.

  8. Identification of a second substrate-binding site in solute-sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Lee, Ashley S E; Bracher, Susanne; Jung, Heinrich; Paz, Aviv; Kumar, Jay P; Abramson, Jeff; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-02

    The structure of the sodium/galactose transporter (vSGLT), a solute-sodium symporter (SSS) from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, shares a common structural fold with LeuT of the neurotransmitter-sodium symporter family. Structural alignments between LeuT and vSGLT reveal that the crystallographically identified galactose-binding site in vSGLT is located in a more extracellular location relative to the central substrate-binding site (S1) in LeuT. Our computational analyses suggest the existence of an additional galactose-binding site in vSGLT that aligns to the S1 site of LeuT. Radiolabeled galactose saturation binding experiments indicate that, like LeuT, vSGLT can simultaneously bind two substrate molecules under equilibrium conditions. Mutating key residues in the individual substrate-binding sites reduced the molar substrate-to-protein binding stoichiometry to ~1. In addition, the related and more experimentally tractable SSS member PutP (the Na(+)/proline transporter) also exhibits a binding stoichiometry of 2. Targeting residues in the proposed sites with mutations results in the reduction of the binding stoichiometry and is accompanied by severely impaired translocation of proline. Our data suggest that substrate transport by SSS members requires both substrate-binding sites, thereby implying that SSSs and neurotransmitter-sodium symporters share common mechanistic elements in substrate transport.

  9. CD91 interacts with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) through the MBL-associated serine protease-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duus, Karen; Thielens, Nicole M; Lacroix, Monique; Tacnet, Pascale; Frachet, Philippe; Holmskov, Uffe; Houen, Gunnar

    2010-12-01

    CD91 plays an important role in the scavenging of apoptotic material, possibly through binding to soluble pattern-recognition molecules. In this study, we investigated the interaction of CD91 with mannan-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins and lung surfactant proteins. Both MBL and L-ficolin were found to bind CD91. The MBL-CD91 interaction was time- and concentration-dependent and could be inhibited by known ligands of CD91. MBL-associated serine protease 3 (MASP-3) also inhibited binding between MBL and CD91, suggesting that the site of interaction is located at or near the MASP-MBL interaction site. This was confirmed by using MBL mutants deficient for MASP binding that were unable to interact with CD91. These findings demonstrate that MBL and L-ficolin interact with CD91, strongly suggesting that they have the potential to function as soluble recognition molecules for scavenging microbial and apoptotic material by CD91.

  10. CD91 interacts with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) through the MBL-associated serine protease-binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Karen; Thielens, Nicole M; Lacroix, Monique;

    2010-01-01

    CD91 plays an important role in the scavenging of apoptotic material, possibly through binding to soluble pattern-recognition molecules. In this study, we investigated the interaction of CD91 with mannan-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins and lung surfactant proteins. Both MBL and L-ficolin were found...... to bind CD91. The MBL-CD91 interaction was time- and concentration-dependent and could be inhibited by known ligands of CD91. MBL-associated serine protease 3 (MASP-3) also inhibited binding between MBL and CD91, suggesting that the site of interaction is located at or near the MASP-MBL interaction site....... This was confirmed by using MBL mutants deficient for MASP binding that were unable to interact with CD91. These findings demonstrate that MBL and L-ficolin interact with CD91, strongly suggesting that they have the potential to function as soluble recognition molecules for scavenging microbial and apoptotic...

  11. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  12. Identification of an allosteric modulator of the serotonin transporter with novel mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Fontana, Andreia Cristina Karklin; Rose, Deja Renée; Mortensen, Ole Valente

    2013-09-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) play an essential role in the termination and regulation of serotonin signaling in the brain. SERT is also the target of antidepressants and psychostimulants. Molecules with novel activities and modes of interaction with regard to SERT function are of great scientific and clinical interest. We explored structural regions outside the putative serotonin translocation pathway to identify potential binding sites for allosteric transporter modulators (ATMs). Mutational studies revealed a pocket of amino acids outside the orthosteric substrate binding sites located in the interface between extracellular loops 1 and 3 that when mutated affect transporter function. Using the structure of the bacterial transporter homolog leucine transporter as a template, we developed a structural model of SERT. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to further characterize the allosteric pocket that was identified by site-directed mutagenesis studies and employed this pocket in a virtual screen for small-molecule modulators of SERT function. In functional transport assays, we found that one of the identified molecules, ATM7, increased the reuptake of serotonin, possibly by facilitating the interaction of serotonin with transport-ready conformations of SERT when concentrations of serotonin were low and rate limiting. In addition, ATM7 potentiates 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy")-induced reversed transport by SERT. Taking advantage of a conformationally sensitive residue in transmembrane domain 6, we demonstrate that ATM7 mechanistically stabilizes an outward-facing conformation of SERT. Taken together these observations demonstrate that ATM7 acts through a novel mechanism that involves allosteric modulation of SERT function.

  13. Positive versus negative modulation of different endogenous chemokines for CC-chemokine receptor 1 by small molecule agonists through allosteric versus orthosteric binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Thiele, Stefanie; Ulven, Trond

    2008-01-01

    5 and not CCL3 activation is affected by substitutions in the main ligand binding pocket including the conserved GluVII:06 anchor point. A series of metal ion chelator complexes were found to act as full agonists on CCR1 and to be critically affected by the same substitutions in the main ligand...

  14. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehteshami, Mehdi [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboob, Soltanali [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza, E-mail: rashidi@tbzmed.ac.ir [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP-BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP-BSA complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions.

  15. Using TESS to predict transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    This unit describes how to use the Transcription Element Search System (TESS). This Web site predicts transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in DNA sequence using two different kinds of models of sites, strings and positional weight matrices. The binding of transcription factors to DNA is a major part of the control of gene expression. Transcription factors exhibit sequence-specific binding; they form stronger bonds to some DNA sequences than to others. Identification of a good binding site in the promoter for a gene suggests the possibility that the corresponding factor may play a role in the regulation of that gene. However, the sequences transcription factors recognize are typically short and allow for some amount of mismatch. Because of this, binding sites for a factor can typically be found at random every few hundred to a thousand base pairs. TESS has features to help sort through and evaluate the significance of predicted sites.

  16. Chalcones as positive allosteric modulators of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a new target for a privileged structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsera, Beatriz; Mulet, José; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, José G; Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Borges, Ricardo; Freitas, Andiara E; López, Manuela G; García-López, M Teresa; González-Muñiz, Rosario; Pérez de Vega, María Jesús; Valor, Luis M; Svobodová, Lucie; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco; Criado, Manuel

    2014-10-30

    The α7 acetylcholine nicotine receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that is involved in cognition disorders, schizophrenia, pain and inflammation among other diseases. Therefore, the development of new agents that target this receptor has great significance. Positive allosteric modulators might be advantageous, since they facilitate receptor responses without directly interacting with the agonist binding site. Here we report the search for and further design of new positive allosteric modulators having the relatively simple chalcone structure. From the natural product isoliquiritigenin as starting point, chalcones substituted with hydroxyl groups at defined locations were identified as optimal and specific promoters of α7 nicotinic function. The most potent compound (2,4,2',5'-tetrahydroxychalcone, 111) was further characterized showing its potential as neuroprotective, analgesic and cognitive enhancer, opening the way for future developments around the chalcone structure.

  17. Characterization of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland and median eminence of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Calvo, J.R.; Rubio, A.; Goberna, R.; Guerrero, J.M. (Univ. of Seville School of Medicine, Sevilla (Spain))

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of specific melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland (HG) and median eminence (ME) of the rat was studied using ({sup 125}I)melatonin. Binding of melatonin to membrane crude preparations of both tissues was dependent on time and temperature. Thus, maximal binding was obtained at 37{degree}C after 30-60 min incubation. Binding was also dependent on protein concentration. The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin was saturable, exhibiting only the class of binding sites in both tissues. The dissociation constants (Kd) were 170 and 190 pM for ME and HG, respectively. The concentration of the binding sites in ME was 8 fmol/mg protein, and in the HG 4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin to ME or HG was inhibited by increasing concentration of native melatonin; 50% inhibition was observed at about 702 and 422 nM for ME and HG, respectively. Additionally, the ({sup 125}I)melatonin binding to the crude membranes was not affected by the addition of different drugs such as norepinephrine, isoproterenol, phenylephrine, propranolol, or prazosin. The results confirm the presence of melatonin binding sites in median eminence and show, for the first time, the existence of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland.

  18. Gephyrin-binding peptides visualize postsynaptic sites and modulate neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Hans Michael; Hausrat, Torben Johann; Neubert, Franziska;

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptors are the major mediators of fast synaptic inhibition in the human central nervous system and are established drug targets. However, all drugs targeting these receptors bind to the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the receptors, which inherently...

  19. Discovery & development of small molecule allosteric modulators of glycoprotein hormone receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj G Nataraja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycoprotein hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH are heterodimeric proteins with a common subunit and hormone-specific subunit. These hormones are dominant regulators of reproduction and metabolic processes. Receptors for the glycoprotein hormones belong to the family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR. FSH receptor (FSHR and LH receptor (LHR are primarily expressed in somatic cells in ovary and testis to promote egg and sperm production in women & men respectively. TSH receptor (TSHR is expressed in thyroid cells and regulates the secretion of T3 & T4. Glycoprotein hormones bind to the large extracellular domain of the receptor and cause a conformational change in the receptor that leads to activation of more than one intracellular signaling pathway. Several small molecules have been described to activate/inhibit glycoprotein hormone receptors through allosteric sites of the receptor. Small molecule allosteric modulators have the potential to be administered orally to patients thus improving the convenience of treatment. It has been a challenge to develop a small molecule allosteric agonist for glycoprotein hormones that can mimic the agonistic effects of the large natural ligand to activate similar signaling pathways. However, in the past few years, there have been several promising reports describing distinct chemical series with improved potency in preclinical models. In parallel, proposal of new structural model for FSH receptor and in silico docking studies of small molecule ligands to glycoprotein hormone receptors provide a giant leap on the understanding of the mechanism of action of the natural ligands and new chemical entities on the receptors. This review will focus on the current status of small molecule allosteric modulators of glycoprotein hormone receptors, their effects on common signaling pathways in cells, their utility for clinical

  20. Shared RNA-binding sites for interacting members of the Drosophila ELAV family of neuronal proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Borgeson, Claudia D.; Samson, Marie-Laure

    2005-01-01

    The product of the Drosophila embryonic lethal abnormal visual system is a conserved protein (ELAV) necessary for normal neuronal differentiation and maintenance. It possesses three RNA-binding domains and is involved in the regulation of RNA metabolism. The long elav 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) is necessary for autoregulation. We used RNA-binding assays and in vitro selection to identify the ELAV best binding site in the elav 3′-UTR. This site resembles ELAV-binding sites identified prev...

  1. Evidence for a non-opioid sigma binding site din the guinea-pig myenteric plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, F.; Pascaud, X.; Vauche, D.; Junien, J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a binding site to (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 was demonstrated in a guinea-pig myenteric plexus (MYP) membrane preparation. Specific binding to this receptor was saturable, reversible, linear with protein concentration and consisted of two components, a high affinity site and a low affinity site. Morphine and naloxone 10/sup -4/M were unable to displace (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding. Haloperidol, imipramine, ethylketocyclazocine and propranolol were among the most potent compounds to inhibit this specific binding. These results suggest the presence of a non-opioid haloperidol sensitive sigma receptor in the MYP of the guinea-pig.

  2. Inhibition of RNA polymerase by captan at both DNA and substrate binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, G; Lewis, R A

    1992-12-01

    RNA synthesis carried out in vitro by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase was inhibited irreversibly by captan when T7 DNA was used as template. An earlier report and this one show that captan blocks the DNA binding site on the enzyme. Herein, it is also revealed that captan acts at the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site, and kinetic relationships of the action of captan at the two sites are detailed. The inhibition by captan via the DNA binding site of the enzyme was confirmed by kinetic studies and it was further shown that [14C]captan bound to the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase. This subunit contains the DNA binding site. Competitive-like inhibition by captan versus UTP led to the conclusion that captan also blocked the NTP binding site. In support of this conclusion, [14C]captan was observed to bind to the beta subunit which contains the NTP binding site. Whereas, preincubation of RNA polymerase with both DNA and NTPs prevented captan inhibition, preincubation with either DNA or NTPs alone was insufficient to protect the enzyme from the action of captan. Furthermore, the interaction of [14C]captan with the beta and beta' subunits was not prevented by a similar preincubation. Captan also bound, to a lesser extent, to the alpha and sigma subunits. Therefore, captan binding appears to involve interaction with RNA polymerase at sites in addition to those for DNA and NTP; however, this action does not inhibit the polymerase activity.

  3. Does transcription play a role in creating a condensin binding site?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved condensin complex is essential for the condensation and integrity of chromosomes through cell division. Published data argue that high levels of transcription contribute to specify some condensin-binding sites on chromosomes but the exact role of transcription in this process remains elusive. Here we discuss our recent data addressing the role of transcription in establishing a condensin-binding site.

  4. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  5. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Ortiz Zacarías, Natalia V.; de Vries, Henk; Han, Gye Won; Gustavsson, Martin; Dabros, Marta; Zhao, Chunxia; Cherney, Robert J.; Carter, Percy; Stamos, Dean; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Heitman, Laura H.; Tebben, Andrew; Kufareva, Irina; Handel , Tracy M. (Vertex Pharm); (Leiden-MC); (USC); (BMS); (UCSD)

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, here we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.

  6. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  7. Allosteric drug discrimination is coupled to mechanochemical changes in the kinesin-5 motor core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Elizabeth D; Buckley, Rebecca; Learman, Sarah; Richard, Jessica; Parke, Courtney; Worthylake, David K; Wojcik, Edward J; Walker, Richard A; Kim, Sunyoung

    2010-06-11

    Essential in mitosis, the human Kinesin-5 protein is a target for >80 classes of allosteric compounds that bind to a surface-exposed site formed by the L5 loop. Not established is why there are differing efficacies in drug inhibition. Here we compare the ligand-bound states of two L5-directed inhibitors against 15 Kinesin-5 mutants by ATPase assays and IR spectroscopy. Biochemical kinetics uncovers functional differences between individual residues at the N or C termini of the L5 loop. Infrared evaluation of solution structures and multivariate analysis of the vibrational spectra reveal that mutation and/or ligand binding not only can remodel the allosteric binding surface but also can transmit long range effects. Changes in L5-localized 3(10) helix and disordered content, regardless of substitution or drug potency, are experimentally detected. Principal component analysis couples these local structural events to two types of rearrangements in beta-sheet hydrogen bonding. These transformations in beta-sheet contacts are correlated with inhibitory drug response and are corroborated by wild type Kinesin-5 crystal structures. Despite considerable evolutionary divergence, our data directly support a theorized conserved element for long distance mechanochemical coupling in kinesin, myosin, and F(1)-ATPase. These findings also suggest that these relatively rapid IR approaches can provide structural biomarkers for clinical determination of drug sensitivity and drug efficacy in nucleotide triphosphatases.

  8. Spatial distribution of predicted transcription factor binding sites in Drosophila ChIP peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettie, Kade P; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Drewell, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    In the development of the Drosophila embryo, gene expression is directed by the sequence-specific interactions of a large network of protein transcription factors (TFs) and DNA cis-regulatory binding sites. Once the identity of the typically 8-10bp binding sites for any given TF has been determined by one of several experimental procedures, the sequences can be represented in a position weight matrix (PWM) and used to predict the location of additional TF binding sites elsewhere in the genome. Often, alignments of large (>200bp) genomic fragments that have been experimentally determined to bind the TF of interest in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies are trimmed under the assumption that the majority of the binding sites are located near the center of all the aligned fragments. In this study, ChIP/chip datasets are analyzed using the corresponding PWMs for the well-studied TFs; CAUDAL, HUNCHBACK, KNIRPS and KRUPPEL, to determine the distribution of predicted binding sites. All four TFs are critical regulators of gene expression along the anterio-posterior axis in early Drosophila development. For all four TFs, the ChIP peaks contain multiple binding sites that are broadly distributed across the genomic region represented by the peak, regardless of the prediction stringency criteria used. This result suggests that ChIP peak trimming may exclude functional binding sites from subsequent analyses.

  9. Evaluation of the Significance of Starch Surface Binding Sites on Human Pancreatic α-Amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Caner, Sami; Kwan, Emily; Li, Chunmin; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-11-01

    Starch provides the major source of caloric intake in many diets. Cleavage of starch into malto-oligosaccharides in the gut is catalyzed by pancreatic α-amylase. These oligosaccharides are then further cleaved by gut wall α-glucosidases to release glucose, which is absorbed into the bloodstream. Potential surface binding sites for starch on the pancreatic amylase, distinct from the active site of the amylase, have been identified through X-ray crystallographic analyses. The role of these sites in the degradation of both starch granules and soluble starch was probed by the generation of a series of surface variants modified at each site to disrupt binding. Kinetic analysis of the binding and/or cleavage of substrates ranging from simple maltotriosides to soluble starch and insoluble starch granules has allowed evaluation of the potential role of each such surface site. In this way, two key surface binding sites, on the same face as the active site, are identified. One site, containing a pair of aromatic residues, is responsible for attachment to starch granules, while a second site featuring a tryptophan residue around which a malto-oligosaccharide wraps is shown to heavily influence soluble starch binding and hydrolysis. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms by which enzymes tackle the degradation of largely insoluble polymers and also present some new approaches to the interrogation of the binding sites involved.

  10. Characterization of the binding sites for dicarboxylic acids on bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonsgard, J H; Meredith, S C

    1991-06-15

    Dicarboxylic acids are prominent features of several diseases, including Reye's syndrome and inborn errors of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, dicarboxylic acids are potentially toxic to cellular processes. Previous studies [Tonsgard, Mendelson & Meredith (1988) J. Clin. Invest. 82, 1567-1573] demonstrated that long-chain dicarboxylic acids have a single high-affinity binding site and between one and three lower-affinity sites on albumin. Medium-chain-length dicarboxylic acids have a single low-affinity site. We further characterized dicarboxylic acid binding to albumin in order to understand the potential effects of drugs and other ligands on dicarboxylic acid binding and toxicity. Progesterone and oleate competitively inhibit octadecanedioic acid binding to the single high-affinity site. Octanoate inhibits binding to the low-affinity sites. Dansylated probes for subdomain 2AB inhibit dodecanedioic acid binding whereas probes for subdomain 3AB do not. In contrast, low concentrations of octadecanedioic acid inhibit the binding of dansylated probes to subdomain 3AB and 2AB. L-Tryptophan, which binds in subdomain 3AB, inhibits hexadecanedioic acid binding but has no effect on dodecanedioic acid. Bilirubin and acetylsalicylic acid, which bind in subdomain 2AB, inhibit the binding of medium-chain and long-chain dicarboxylic acids. Our results suggest that long-chain dicarboxylic acids bind in subdomains 2C, 3AB and 2AB. The single low-affinity binding site for medium-chain dicarboxylic acids is in subdomain 2AB. These studies suggest that dicarboxylic acids are likely to be unbound in disease states and may be potentially toxic.

  11. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  12. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionas Erb

    Full Text Available The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1 occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  13. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Allosteric Transitions in Leishmania mexicana Pyruvate Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naithani, Ankita; Taylor, Paul; Erman, Burak; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D

    2015-09-15

    A comparative molecular dynamics analysis of the pyruvate kinase from Leishmania mexicana is presented in the absence and presence of the allosteric effector fructose 2,6-bisphosphate. Comparisons of the simulations of the large 240 kDa apo and holo tetramers show that binding of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate cools the enzyme and reduces dynamic movement, particularly of the B-domain. The reduced dynamic movement of the holo form traps the pyruvate kinase tetramer in its enzymatically active state with the B-domain acting as a lid to cover the active site. The simulations are also consistent with a transition of the mobile active-site α6' helix, which would adopt a helical conformation in the active R-state and a less structured coil conformation in the inactive T-state. Analysis of the rigid body motions over the trajectory highlights the concerted anticorrelated rigid body rocking motion of the four protomers, which drives the T to R transition. The transitions predicted by these simulations are largely consistent with the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model for allosteric activation but also suggest that rigidification or cooling of the overall structure upon effector binding plays an additional role in enzyme activation.

  14. Dynamical network of residue-residue contacts reveals coupled allosteric effects in recognition, catalysis, and mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Urmi; Holliday, Michael J; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-04-26

    Detailed understanding of how conformational dynamics orchestrates function in allosteric regulation of recognition and catalysis remains ambiguous. Here, we simulate CypA using multiple-microsecond-long atomistic molecular dynamics in explicit solvent and carry out NMR experiments. We analyze a large amount of time-dependent multidimensional data with a coarse-grained approach and map key dynamical features within individual macrostates by defining dynamics in terms of residue-residue contacts. The effects of substrate binding are observed to be largely sensed at a location over 15 Å from the active site, implying its importance in allostery. Using NMR experiments, we confirm that a dynamic cluster of residues in this distal region is directly coupled to the active site. Furthermore, the dynamical network of interresidue contacts is found to be coupled and temporally dispersed, ranging over 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Finally, using network centrality measures we demonstrate the changes in the communication network, connectivity, and influence of CypA residues upon substrate binding, mutation, and during catalysis. We identify key residues that potentially act as a bottleneck in the communication flow through the distinct regions in CypA and, therefore, as targets for future mutational studies. Mapping these dynamical features and the coupling of dynamics to function has crucial ramifications in understanding allosteric regulation in enzymes and proteins, in general.

  15. Functional identification and characterization of sodium binding sites in Na symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Donald D F; Jiang, Xuan; Gorraitz, Edurne; Hirayama, Bruce A; Wright, Ernest M

    2013-11-19

    Sodium cotransporters from several different gene families belong to the leucine transporter (LeuT) structural family. Although the identification of Na(+) in binding sites is beyond the resolution of the structures, two Na(+) binding sites (Na1 and Na2) have been proposed in LeuT. Na2 is conserved in the LeuT family but Na1 is not. A biophysical method has been used to measure sodium dissociation constants (Kd) of wild-type and mutant human sodium glucose cotransport (hSGLT1) proteins to identify the Na(+) binding sites in hSGLT1. The Na1 site is formed by residues in the sugar binding pocket, and their mutation influences sodium binding to Na1 but not to Na2. For the canonical Na2 site formed by two -OH side chains, S392 and S393, and three backbone carbonyls, mutation of S392 to cysteine increased the sodium Kd by sixfold. This was accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the apparent sugar and phlorizin affinities. We suggest that mutation of S392 in the Na2 site produces a structural rearrangement of the sugar binding pocket to disrupt both the binding of the second Na(+) and the binding of sugar. In contrast, the S393 mutations produce no significant changes in sodium, sugar, and phlorizin affinities. We conclude that the Na2 site is conserved in hSGLT1, the side chain of S392 and the backbone carbonyl of S393 are important in the first Na(+) binding, and that Na(+) binding to Na2 promotes binding to Na1 and also sugar binding.

  16. [Type-I and -II estradiol binding sites in the endometrium during blastocyst implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, A; Calzada, L; Hicks, J J; Velázquez, A

    1989-04-01

    The properties of type I and occupied and unoccupied type II cytosolic estrogen binding sites in the rat endometrium were analyzed on day five of pregnancy; the samples studied correspond to blastocyst receptive endometrium (implantation sites), nonreceptive endometrium and ovariectomized uterine horn endometrium, from the same pregnancy rats. The occupied binding site type II was analyzed by exchange assays. Dissociation constant obtained from experiments carried out at 4 or 25 degrees C are similar for each one of the binding site at the three different endometrium samples; the binding capacity (femtomoles/mg protein) from the sites type I and type II and the ratio between occupied (by endogenous estradiol) and unoccupied site type II, seems to be characteristic for each one of the three analyzed endometrium.

  17. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the osteoinductive protein NELL1 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Imai, Arisa; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2015-12-21

    Neural epidermal growth factor-like (NEL)-like 1 (NELL1) is a secretory osteogenic protein comprising an N-terminal thrombospondin-1-like (TSPN) domain, four von Willebrand factor type C domains, and six epidermal growth factor-like repeats. NELL1 shows heparin-binding activity; however, the biological significance remains to be explored. In this report, we demonstrate that NELL1 binds to cell surface proteoglycans through its TSPN domain. Major heparin-binding sites were identified on the three-dimensional structural model of the TSPN domain of NELL1. Mutant analysis of the heparin-binding sites indicated that the heparin-binding activity of the TSPN domain is involved in interaction of NELL1 with cell surface proteoglycans.

  18. Identification of selective agonists and positive allosteric modulators for µ- and δ-opioid receptors from a single high-throughput screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Neil T; Wehrman, Tom; Bassoni, Daniel; O'Connell, Jonathan; Banks, Martyn; Zhang, Litao; Alt, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Hetero-oligomeric complexes of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) may represent novel therapeutic targets exhibiting different pharmacology and tissue- or cell-specific site of action compared with receptor monomers or homo-oligomers. An ideal tool for validating this concept pharmacologically would be a hetero-oligomer selective ligand. We set out to develop and execute a 1536-well high-throughput screen of over 1 million compounds to detect potential hetero-oligomer selective ligands using a β-arrestin recruitment assay in U2OS cells coexpressing recombinant µ- and δ-opioid receptors. Hetero-oligomer selective ligands may bind to orthosteric or allosteric sites, and we might anticipate that the formation of hetero-oligomers may provide novel allosteric binding pockets for ligand binding. Therefore, our goal was to execute the screen in such a way as to identify positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) as well as agonists for µ, δ, and hetero-oligomeric receptors. While no hetero-oligomer selective ligands were identified (based on our selection criteria), this single screen did identify numerous µ- and δ-selective agonists and PAMs as well as nonselective agonists and PAMs. To our knowledge, these are the first µ- and δ-opioid receptor PAMs described in the literature.

  19. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  20. NbIT--a new information theory-based analysis of allosteric mechanisms reveals residues that underlie function in the leucine transporter LeuT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V LeVine

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex networks of interacting residues and microdomains in the structures of biomolecular systems underlie the reliable propagation of information from an input signal, such as the concentration of a ligand, to sites that generate the appropriate output signal, such as enzymatic activity. This information transduction often carries the signal across relatively large distances at the molecular scale in a form of allostery that is essential for the physiological functions performed by biomolecules. While allosteric behaviors have been documented from experiments and computation, the mechanism of this form of allostery proved difficult to identify at the molecular level. Here, we introduce a novel analysis framework, called N-body Information Theory (NbIT analysis, which is based on information theory and uses measures of configurational entropy in a biomolecular system to identify microdomains and individual residues that act as (i-channels for long-distance information sharing between functional sites, and (ii-coordinators that organize dynamics within functional sites. Application of the new method to molecular dynamics (MD trajectories of the occluded state of the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT identifies a channel of allosteric coupling between the functionally important intracellular gate and the substrate binding sites known to modulate it. NbIT analysis is shown also to differentiate residues involved primarily in stabilizing the functional sites, from those that contribute to allosteric couplings between sites. NbIT analysis of MD data thus reveals rigorous mechanistic elements of allostery underlying the dynamics of biomolecular systems.

  1. NbIT--a new information theory-based analysis of allosteric mechanisms reveals residues that underlie function in the leucine transporter LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-05-01

    Complex networks of interacting residues and microdomains in the structures of biomolecular systems underlie the reliable propagation of information from an input signal, such as the concentration of a ligand, to sites that generate the appropriate output signal, such as enzymatic activity. This information transduction often carries the signal across relatively large distances at the molecular scale in a form of allostery that is essential for the physiological functions performed by biomolecules. While allosteric behaviors have been documented from experiments and computation, the mechanism of this form of allostery proved difficult to identify at the molecular level. Here, we introduce a novel analysis framework, called N-body Information Theory (NbIT) analysis, which is based on information theory and uses measures of configurational entropy in a biomolecular system to identify microdomains and individual residues that act as (i)-channels for long-distance information sharing between functional sites, and (ii)-coordinators that organize dynamics within functional sites. Application of the new method to molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of the occluded state of the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT identifies a channel of allosteric coupling between the functionally important intracellular gate and the substrate binding sites known to modulate it. NbIT analysis is shown also to differentiate residues involved primarily in stabilizing the functional sites, from those that contribute to allosteric couplings between sites. NbIT analysis of MD data thus reveals rigorous mechanistic elements of allostery underlying the dynamics of biomolecular systems.

  2. NbIT - A New Information Theory-Based Analysis of Allosteric Mechanisms Reveals Residues that Underlie Function in the Leucine Transporter LeuT

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Michael V.; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks of interacting residues and microdomains in the structures of biomolecular systems underlie the reliable propagation of information from an input signal, such as the concentration of a ligand, to sites that generate the appropriate output signal, such as enzymatic activity. This information transduction often carries the signal across relatively large distances at the molecular scale in a form of allostery that is essential for the physiological functions performed by biomolecules. While allosteric behaviors have been documented from experiments and computation, the mechanism of this form of allostery proved difficult to identify at the molecular level. Here, we introduce a novel analysis framework, called N-body Information Theory (NbIT) analysis, which is based on information theory and uses measures of configurational entropy in a biomolecular system to identify microdomains and individual residues that act as (i)-channels for long-distance information sharing between functional sites, and (ii)-coordinators that organize dynamics within functional sites. Application of the new method to molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of the occluded state of the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT identifies a channel of allosteric coupling between the functionally important intracellular gate and the substrate binding sites known to modulate it. NbIT analysis is shown also to differentiate residues involved primarily in stabilizing the functional sites, from those that contribute to allosteric couplings between sites. NbIT analysis of MD data thus reveals rigorous mechanistic elements of allostery underlying the dynamics of biomolecular systems. PMID:24785005

  3. Binding site turnover produces pervasive quantitative changes in transcription factor binding between closely related Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression play an important role in evolution, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory evolution are poorly understood. Here we compare genome-wide binding of the six transcription factors that initiate segmentation along the anterior-posterior axis in embryos of two closely related species: Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila yakuba. Where we observe binding by a factor in one species, we almost always observe binding by that factor to the orthologous sequence in the other species. Levels of binding, however, vary considerably. The magnitude and direction of the interspecies differences in binding levels of all six factors are strongly correlated, suggesting a role for chromatin or other factor-independent forces in mediating the divergence of transcription factor binding. Nonetheless, factor-specific quantitative variation in binding is common, and we show that it is driven to a large extent by the gain and loss of cognate recognition sequences for the given factor. We find only a weak correlation between binding variation and regulatory function. These data provide the first genome-wide picture of how modest levels of sequence divergence between highly morphologically similar species affect a system of coordinately acting transcription factors during animal development, and highlight the dominant role of quantitative variation in transcription factor binding over short evolutionary distances.

  4. SITE-DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS OF PROPOSED ACTIVE-SITE RESIDUES OF PENICILLIN-BINDING PROTEIN-5 FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLINDEN, MPG; DEHAAN, L; DIDEBERG, O; KECK, W

    1994-01-01

    Alignment of the amino acid sequence of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) with the sequences of other members of the family of active-site-serine penicillin-interacting enzymes predicted the residues playing a role in the catalytic mechanism of PBP5. Apart from the active-site (Ser(44)), Lys(47),

  5. DO-RIP-seq to quantify RNA binding sites transcriptome-wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Cindo O; Friedersdorf, Matthew B; Bisogno, Laura S; Keene, Jack D

    2016-11-10

    Post-transcriptional processes orchestrate gene expression through dynamic protein-RNA interactions. These interactions occur at specific sites determined by RNA sequence, secondary structure, or nucleotide modifications. Methods have been developed either to quantify binding of whole transcripts or to identify the binding sites, but there is none proven to quantify binding at both the whole transcript and binding site levels. Here we describe digestion optimized RNA immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing (DO-RIP-seq) as a method that quantitates at the whole transcript target (RIP-Seq-Like or RSL) level and at the binding site level (BSL) using continuous metrics. DO-RIP-seq methodology was developed using the RBP HuR/ELAVL1 as a test case (Nicholson et al., 2016). DO-RIP-seq employs treatment of cell lysates with a nuclease under optimized conditions to yield partially digested RNA fragments bound by RNA binding proteins, followed by immunoprecipitations that capture the digested RNA-protein complexes and assess non-specific or background interactions. Analyses of sequenced cDNA libraries made from the bound RNA fragments yielded two types of enrichment scores; one for RSL binding events and the other for BSL events (Nicholson et al., 2016). These analyses plus the extensive read coverage of DO-RIP-seq allows seamless integration of binding site and whole transcript information. Therefore, DO-RIP-seq is useful for quantifying RBP binding events that are regulated during dynamic biological processes.

  6. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario, (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  7. Impact of Binding Site Comparisons on Medicinal Chemistry and Rational Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrt, Christiane; Brinkjost, Tobias; Koch, Oliver

    2016-05-12

    Modern rational drug design not only deals with the search for ligands binding to interesting and promising validated targets but also aims to identify the function and ligands of yet uncharacterized proteins having impact on different diseases. Additionally, it contributes to the design of inhibitors with distinct selectivity patterns and the prediction of possible off-target effects. The identification of similarities between binding sites of various proteins is a useful approach to cope with those challenges. The main scope of this perspective is to describe applications of different protein binding site comparison approaches to outline their applicability and impact on molecular design. The article deals with various substantial application domains and provides some outstanding examples to show how various binding site comparison methods can be applied to promote in silico drug design workflows. In addition, we will also briefly introduce the fundamental principles of different protein binding site comparison methods.

  8. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi; Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Ando, Hiromune; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity.

  9. An Overview of the Prediction of Protein DNA-Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and DNA play an important role in many essential biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and repair. The identification of amino acid residues involved in DNA-binding sites is critical for understanding the mechanism of these biological activities. In the last decade, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict protein DNA-binding sites based on protein sequence and/or structural information, which play an important role in complementing experimental strategies. At this time, approaches can be divided into three categories: sequence-based DNA-binding site prediction, structure-based DNA-binding site prediction, and homology modeling and threading. In this article, we review existing research on computational methods to predict protein DNA-binding sites, which includes data sets, various residue sequence/structural features, machine learning methods for comparison and selection, evaluation methods, performance comparison of different tools, and future directions in protein DNA-binding site prediction. In particular, we detail the meta-analysis of protein DNA-binding sites. We also propose specific implications that are likely to result in novel prediction methods, increased performance, or practical applications.

  10. Statistical Mechanics of Transcription-Factor Binding Site Discovery Using Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J; Sengupta, Anirvan M

    2011-04-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are a commonly used tool for inference of transcription factor (TF) binding sites from DNA sequence data. We exploit the mathematical equivalence between HMMs for TF binding and the "inverse" statistical mechanics of hard rods in a one-dimensional disordered potential to investigate learning in HMMs. We derive analytic expressions for the Fisher information, a commonly employed measure of confidence in learned parameters, in the biologically relevant limit where the density of binding sites is low. We then use techniques from statistical mechanics to derive a scaling principle relating the specificity (binding energy) of a TF to the minimum amount of training data necessary to learn it.

  11. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    OpenAIRE

    Mashiur Rahman; Farzana Prianka; Mohammad Shohel; Md. Abdul Mazid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED) at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 a...

  12. Defining the plasticity of transcription factor binding sites by Deconstructing DNA consensus sequences: the PhoP-binding sites among gamma/enterobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Harari

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulators recognize specific DNA sequences. Because these sequences are embedded in the background of genomic DNA, it is hard to identify the key cis-regulatory elements that determine disparate patterns of gene expression. The detection of the intra- and inter-species differences among these sequences is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both differential gene expression and evolution. Here, we address this problem by investigating the target promoters controlled by the DNA-binding PhoP protein, which governs virulence and Mg(2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. PhoP is particularly interesting; it is highly conserved in different gamma/enterobacteria, regulating not only ancestral genes but also governing the expression of dozens of horizontally acquired genes that differ from species to species. Our approach consists of decomposing the DNA binding site sequences for a given regulator into families of motifs (i.e., termed submotifs using a machine learning method inspired by the "Divide & Conquer" strategy. By partitioning a motif into sub-patterns, computational advantages for classification were produced, resulting in the discovery of new members of a regulon, and alleviating the problem of distinguishing functional sites in chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray genome-wide analysis. Moreover, we found that certain partitions were useful in revealing biological properties of binding site sequences, including modular gains and losses of PhoP binding sites through evolutionary turnover events, as well as conservation in distant species. The high conservation of PhoP submotifs within gamma/enterobacteria, as well as the regulatory protein that recognizes them, suggests that the major cause of divergence between related species is not due to the binding sites, as was previously suggested for other regulators. Instead, the divergence may be attributed to the fast evolution of orthologous target

  13. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...... for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon...... sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites...

  14. Allosteric modulators for the treatment of schizophrenia: targeting glutamatergic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menniti, Frank S; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Pandit, Jayvardhan; Zagouras, Panayiotis; Volkmann, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly debilitating mental disorder which afflicts approximately 1% of the global population. Cognitive and negative deficits account for the lifelong disability associated with schizophrenia, whose symptoms are not effectively addressed by current treatments. New medicines are needed to treat these aspects of the disease. Neurodevelopmental, neuropathological, genetic, and behavioral pharmacological data indicate that schizophrenia stems from a dysfunction of glutamate synaptic transmission, particularly in frontal cortical networks. A number of novel pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms affecting glutamatergic synaptic transmission have emerged as viable targets for schizophrenia. While developing orthosteric glutamatergic agents for these targets has proven extremely difficult, targeting allosteric sites of these targets has emerged as a promising alternative. From a medicinal chemistry perspective, allosteric sites provide an opportunity of finding agents with better drug-like properties and greater target specificity. Furthermore, allosteric modulators are better suited to maintaining the highly precise temporal and spatial aspects of glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Herein, we review neuropathological and genomic/genetic evidence underscoring the importance of glutamate synaptic dysfunction in the etiology of schizophrenia and make a case for allosteric targets for therapeutic intervention. We review progress in identifying allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors, NMDA receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors, all with the aim of restoring physiological glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Challenges remain given the complexity of schizophrenia and the difficulty in studying cognition in animals and humans. Nonetheless, important compounds have emerged from these efforts and promising preclinical and variable clinical validation has been achieved.

  15. Partial enterectomy decreases somatostatin-binding sites in residual intestine of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, B; Bodegas, G; Sanz, M; Prieto, J C; Arilla, E

    1988-05-01

    1. Three weeks after partial enterectomy in the rabbit there was an increased somatostatin concentration and a decreased number of somatostatin-binding sites (without changes in the corresponding affinity values) in the cytosol of the residual intestinal tissue, except in the terminal ileum and the colon. 2. Five weeks after surgery both the somatostatin concentration and the number of somatostatin-binding sites returned towards control values. 3. These results suggest that an increase in bowel somatostatin content could lead to down-regulation of somatostatin-binding sites in the intestinal mucosa.

  16. Brominated lipids identify lipid binding sites on the surface of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Aleksander W; Gardiner, Alastair T; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2007-03-20

    This study describes the use of brominated phospholipids to distinguish between lipid and detergent binding sites on the surface of a typical alpha-helical membrane protein. Reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were cocrystallized with added brominated phospholipids. X-ray structural analysis of these crystals has revealed the presence of two lipid binding sites from the characteristic strong X-ray scattering from the bromine atoms. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach to mapping lipid binding sites at the surface of membrane proteins.

  17. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M.; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  18. An Experimentally Based Computer Search Identifies Unstructured Membrane-binding Sites in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, Hanna; Guag, Jake; Remmert, Kirsten; Chacko, Susan; Korn, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Programs exist for searching protein sequences for potential membrane-penetrating segments (hydrophobic regions) and for lipid-binding sites with highly defined tertiary structures, such as PH, FERM, C2, ENTH, and other domains. However, a rapidly growing number of membrane-associated proteins (including cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, GTP-binding proteins, and their effectors) bind lipids through less structured regions. Here, we describe the development and testing of a simple computer search program that identifies unstructured potential membrane-binding sites. Initially, we found that both basic and hydrophobic amino acids, irrespective of sequence, contribute to the binding to acidic phospholipid vesicles of synthetic peptides that correspond to the putative membrane-binding domains of Acanthamoeba class I myosins. Based on these results, we modified a hydrophobicity scale giving Arg- and Lys-positive, rather than negative, values. Using this basic and hydrophobic scale with a standard search algorithm, we successfully identified previously determined unstructured membrane-binding sites in all 16 proteins tested. Importantly, basic and hydrophobic searches identified previously unknown potential membrane-binding sites in class I myosins, PAKs and CARMIL (capping protein, Arp2/3, myosin I linker; a membrane-associated cytoskeletal scaffold protein), and synthetic peptides and protein domains containing these newly identified sites bound to acidic phospholipids in vitro. PMID:20018884

  19. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  20. Europium ion as a probe for binding sites to carrageenans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Ana P.; Goncalves, Rogeria R.; Serra, Osvaldo A. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil); Zaniquelli, Maria Elisabete D. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil)], E-mail: medzaniquelli@ffclrp.usp.br; Wong, Kenneth [Laboratorio de Fisico-Quimica, Centro de Pesquisas de Paulinia, Rhodia Brasil, Paulinia, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    Carrageenans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from red algae, present a coil-helix transition and helix aggregation dependence on the type and concentration of counterions. In this study, we focus attention on a mixed valence counterion system: Eu{sup 3+}/Na{sup +} or K{sup +} with different gel-forming carrageenans: kappa, iota, and kappa-2. Results of stationary and time-dependent luminescence showed to be a suitable tool to probe ion binding to both the negatively charged sulfate group and the hydroxyl groups present in the biopolymer. For lower europium ion concentrations, a single longer decay emission lifetime was detected, which was attributed to the binding of europium ion to the carrageenan sulfate groups. An additional decay ascribed to europium binding to hydroxyl groups was observed above a threshold concentration, and this decay was dependent on the carrageenan charge density. Symmetry of the europium ion microenvironment was estimated by the ratio between the intensities of its emission bands, which has been shown to depend on the concentration of europium ions and on the specificity of the monovalent counterion bound to the carrageenan.

  1. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel M; Thuesen, Cathrine K; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A;

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless...... potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area...... around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro...

  2. Predicting DNA-binding sites of proteins based on sequential and 3D structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bi-Qing; Feng, Kai-Yan; Ding, Juan; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play important roles in many biological processes. To understand the molecular mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction, it is necessary to identify the DNA-binding sites in DNA-binding proteins. In the last decade, computational approaches have been developed to predict protein-DNA-binding sites based solely on protein sequences. In this study, we developed a novel predictor based on support vector machine algorithm coupled with the maximum relevance minimum redundancy method followed by incremental feature selection. We incorporated not only features of physicochemical/biochemical properties, sequence conservation, residual disorder, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, but also five three-dimensional (3D) structural features calculated from PDB data to predict the protein-DNA interaction sites. Feature analysis showed that 3D structural features indeed contributed to the prediction of DNA-binding site and it was demonstrated that the prediction performance was better with 3D structural features than without them. It was also shown via analysis of features from each site that the features of DNA-binding site itself contribute the most to the prediction. Our prediction method may become a useful tool for identifying the DNA-binding sites and the feature analysis described in this paper may provide useful insights for in-depth investigations into the mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction.

  3. Roles of multiple surface sites, long substrate binding clefts, and carbohydrate binding modules in the action of amylolytic enzymes on polysaccharide substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Seo, E.S.; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2008-01-01

    with a characteristic subsite binding energy profile around the catalytic site. Furthermore, several amylolytic enzymes that facilitate attack on the natural substrate, i.e. the endosperm starch granules, have secondary sugar binding sites either situated on the surface of the protein domain or structural unit...... that contains the catalytic site or belonging to a separate starch binding domain. The role of surface sites in the function of barley alpha-amylase 1 has been investigated by using mutational analysis in conjunction with carbohydrate binding analyses and crystallography. The ability to bind starch depends...

  4. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  5. Three-dimensional binding sites volume assessment during cardiac pacing lead extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich Lien Nguyen

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Real-time 3D binding sites assessment is feasible and improves transvenous lead extraction outcomes. Its role as a complementary information requires extensive validation, and might be beneficial for a tailored strategy.

  6. Probing and mapping the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymer surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, Memed, E-mail: memi@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2014-10-01

    Molecular imprinting is an effective technique for preparing recognition sites which act as synthetic receptors on polymeric surfaces. Herein, we synthesized MIP surfaces with specific binding sites for streptavidin and characterized them at nanoscale by using two different atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. While the single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) reveals the unbinding kinetics between streptavidin molecule and binding sites, simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) was employed, for the first time, to directly map the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymers. Streptavidin modified AFM cantilever showed specific unbinding events with an unbinding force around 300 pN and the binding probability was calculated as 35.2% at a given loading rate. In order to prove the specificity of the interaction, free streptavidin molecules were added to AFM liquid cell and the binding probability was significantly decreased to 7.6%. Moreover, the recognition maps show that the smallest recognition site with a diameter of around ∼ 21 nm which corresponds to a single streptavidin molecule binding site. We believe that the potential of combining SMFS and TREC opens new possibilities for the characterization of MIP surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Graphical abstract: Simultaneous Topography and RECognition (TREC) imaging is a novel characterization technique to reveal binding sites on molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Highlights: • Highly specific streptavidin printed polymer surfaces were synthesized. • Unbinding kinetic rate of single streptavidin molecule was studied by SMFS. • The distribution of binding pockets was revealed for the first time by TREC imaging. • TREC showed that the binding pockets formed nano-domains on MIP surface. • SMFS and TREC are powerful AFM techniques for characterization of MIP surfaces.

  7. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  8. Dynamics Correlation Network for Allosteric Switching of PreQ1 Riboswitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Jinmai; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are a class of metabolism control elements mostly found in bacteria. Due to their fundamental importance in bacteria gene regulation, riboswitches have been proposed as antibacterial drug targets. Prequeuosine (preQ1) is the last free precursor in the biosynthetic pathway of queuosine that is crucial for translation efficiency and fidelity. However, the regulation mechanism for the preQ1 riboswitch remains unclear. Here we constructed fluctuation correlation network based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the regulation mechanism. The results suggest that the correlation network in the bound riboswitch is distinctly different from that in the apo riboswitch. The community network indicates that the information freely transfers from the binding site of preQ1 to the expression platform of the P3 helix in the bound riboswitch and the P3 helix is a bottleneck in the apo riboswitch. Thus, a hypothesis of “preQ1-binding induced allosteric switching” is proposed to link riboswitch and translation regulation. The community networks of mutants support this hypothesis. Finally, a possible allosteric pathway of A50-A51-A52-U10-A11-G12-G56 was also identified based on the shortest path algorithm and confirmed by mutations and network perturbation. The novel fluctuation network analysis method can be used as a general strategy in studies of riboswitch structure-function relationship. PMID:27484311

  9. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is Functionally Affected by Mutations on Actin Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hai Dong; Wei-Ping Tang; Jia-Yao Liu

    2013-01-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin,and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments.To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L.AtADF1,we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo.Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G-and F-actin binding.The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A,R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding.Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L.plants overexpressing these mutants,we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth.Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional,unless the affinity foractin monomers is also affected.The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding,depolymerization of actin polymers,and therefore in the control of actin organization.

  10. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.;

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...... of 25 mu M, while the IC50 of AP-(27-38)-peptide and AP-(33-38)-peptide are 10 mu M and 2 mu M, respectively, The understanding of the structure and function of active AP peptides will be useful for development of amyloid-targeted diagnostics and therapeutics....

  11. Radiolabelling of phoneutria nigriventer spider toxin (Tx1): a tool to study its binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Diniz, Carlos Roberto; Nascimento, Marta Cordeiro [FUNED, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, Maria Elena de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia

    1996-07-01

    The neurotoxin Tx1, isolated from the venom of the South American spider Phoneutria nigriventer produces tail elevation and spastic paralysis of posterior limbs after intracerebral ventricular injection in mice. Tx1 also produces ileum contraction in bioassay. We have investigated the binding of radioiodinated-Tx1 ({sup 125} I-Tx1) on the preparation of myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle membrane from guinea pig ileum (MPLM) as a tool to characterize the interaction of this neurotoxin with its site. The neurotoxin Tx1 was radioiodinated with Na{sup 125} I by the lactoperoxidase method. {sup 125} I-Tx1 specifically binds to a single class of noninteracting binding sites of high affinity (Kd= 3.5 x 10{sup -10} M) and low capacity (1.2 pmol/mg protein). The specific binding increased in parallel with the protein concentration. In competition experiments the ligands of ionic channels used (sodium, potassium and calcium) did not affect the binding of {sup 125} I-Tx1 to MPLM neither did the cholinergic ligands (hemicholinium-3, hexamethonium, d-tubocurarine and atropine). Another neurotoxin (Tx2-6, one of the isoforms of Tx2 pool) decreased toxin with MPLM and showed that toxin has a specific and saturable binding site in guinea pig ileum and this binding site appears to be related to the Tx2 site. (author)

  12. Discovery and validation of information theory-based transcription factor and cofactor binding site motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruipeng; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-11-28

    Data from ChIP-seq experiments can derive the genome-wide binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) and other regulatory proteins. We analyzed 765 ENCODE ChIP-seq peak datasets of 207 human TFs with a novel motif discovery pipeline based on recursive, thresholded entropy minimization. This approach, while obviating the need to compensate for skewed nucleotide composition, distinguishes true binding motifs from noise, quantifies the strengths of individual binding sites based on computed affinity and detects adjacent cofactor binding sites that coordinate with the targets of primary, immunoprecipitated TFs. We obtained contiguous and bipartite information theory-based position weight matrices (iPWMs) for 93 sequence-specific TFs, discovered 23 cofactor motifs for 127 TFs and revealed six high-confidence novel motifs. The reliability and accuracy of these iPWMs were determined via four independent validation methods, including the detection of experimentally proven binding sites, explanation of effects of characterized SNPs, comparison with previously published motifs and statistical analyses. We also predict previously unreported TF coregulatory interactions (e.g. TF complexes). These iPWMs constitute a powerful tool for predicting the effects of sequence variants in known binding sites, performing mutation analysis on regulatory SNPs and predicting previously unrecognized binding sites and target genes.

  13. Identifying ligand binding sites and poses using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Chodera, John D; Yang, Yanzhi; Shirts, Michael R

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to identify small molecule ligand binding sites and poses within a given protein crystal structure using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. The Hamiltonians used vary from the physical end state of protein interacting with the ligand to an unphysical end state where the ligand does not interact with the protein. As replicas explore the space of Hamiltonians interpolating between these states, the ligand can rapidly escape local minima and explore potential binding sites. Geometric restraints keep the ligands from leaving the vicinity of the protein and an alchemical pathway designed to increase phase space overlap between intermediates ensures good mixing. Because of the rigorous statistical mechanical nature of the Hamiltonian exchange framework, we can also extract binding free energy estimates for all putative binding sites. We present results of this methodology applied to the T4 lysozyme L99A model system for three known ligands and one non-binder as a control, using an implicit solvent. We find that our methodology identifies known crystallographic binding sites consistently and accurately for the small number of ligands considered here and gives free energies consistent with experiment. We are also able to analyze the contribution of individual binding sites to the overall binding affinity. Our methodology points to near term potential applications in early-stage structure-guided drug discovery.

  14. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quader Saad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this paper, we propose ML-Consensus (Mixed-Length Consensus: a consensus model for variable-length TFBS which does not exclude any reported binding sites. Methods We consider Pairwise Score (PS as a measure of positional dependence of nucleotides within an alignment of TFBS. We investigate how the prediction accuracy of ML-Consensus is affected by the incorporation of IC and PS with a particular binding site alignment strategy. We perform cross-validations for datasets of six species from the TRANSFAC public database, and analyze the results using ROC curves and the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-ranks test. Results We observe that the incorporation of IC and PS in ML-Consensus results in statistically significant improvement in the prediction accuracy of the model. Moreover, the existence of a core region among the known binding sites (of any length is witnessed by the pairwise coexistence of nucleotides within the core length. Conclusions These observations suggest the possibility of an efficient multiple sequence alignment algorithm for aligning TFBS, accommodating known binding sites of any length, for optimal (or near-optimal TFBS prediction. However, designing such an algorithm is a matter of further investigation.

  15. Quantitative determination of angiotensin II binding sites in rat brain and pituitary gland by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel, A.; Correa, F.M.A.; Niwa, M.; Saavedra, J.M. (National Inst. of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1984-11-26

    Rat brain and pituitary angiotensin II (AII) binding sites were quantitated by incubation of tissue sections with /sup 125/I-(Sar/sup 1/) AII, Ultrofilm radioautography, computerized densitometry, and comparison with /sup 125/I-standards at appropriate film exposure times. The highest number of AII binding sites was found in anterior pituitary and the circumventricular organs, organon subfornicalis and organon vasculosum laminae terminalis.

  16. Guanine Nucleotides Modulate Cell Surface cAMP-Binding Sites in Membranes from Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1984-01-01

    D. discoideum contains kinetically distinguishable cell surface cAMP binding sites. One class, S, is slowly dissociating and has high affinity for cAMP (Kd = 15 nM, t½ = 15 s). A second class is fast dissociating (t½ about 1 s) and is composed of high affinity binding sites H (Kd ≈ 60 nM), and low a

  17. In Silico Docking, Molecular Dynamics and Binding Energy Insights into the Bolinaquinone-Clathrin Terminal Domain Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed K. Abdel-Hamid

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME is a process that regulates selective internalization of important cellular cargo using clathrin-coated vesicles. Perturbation of this process has been linked to many diseases including cancer and neurodegenerative conditions. Chemical proteomics identified the marine metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-methoxy-3-(((1S,4aS,8aS-1,4a,5-trimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalen-2-ylmethylcyclohexa- 2,5-diene-1,4-dione (bolinaquinone as a clathrin inhibitor. While being an attractive medicinal chemistry target, the lack of data about bolinaquinone’s mode of binding to the clathrin enzyme represents a major limitation for its structural optimization. We have used a molecular modeling approach to rationalize the observed activity of bolinaquinone and to predict its mode of binding with the clathrin terminal domain (CTD. The applied protocol started by global rigid-protein docking followed by flexible docking, molecular dynamics and linear interaction energy calculations. The results revealed the potential of bolinaquinone to interact with various pockets within the CTD, including the clathrin-box binding site. The results also highlight the importance of electrostatic contacts over van der Waals interactions for proper binding between bolinaquinone and its possible binding sites. This study provides a novel model that has the potential to allow rapid elaboration of bolinaquinone analogues as a new class of clathrin inhibitors.

  18. Effects of the dopamine D2 allosteric modulator, PAOPA, on the expression of GRK2, arrestin-3, ERK1/2, and on receptor internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipannita Basu

    Full Text Available The activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is intricately regulated by a range of intracellular proteins, including G protein-coupled kinases (GRKs and arrestins. Understanding the effects of ligands on these signaling pathways could provide insights into disease pathophysiologies and treatment. The dopamine D2 receptor is a GPCR strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Previous studies from our lab have shown the preclinical efficacy of a novel allosteric drug, 3(R-[(2(S-pyrrolidinylcarbonylamino]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide (PAOPA, in attenuating schizophrenia-like behavioural abnormalities in rodent models of the disease. As an allosteric modulator, PAOPA binds to a site on the D2 receptor, which is distinct from the endogenous ligand-binding site, in order to modulate the binding of the D2 receptor ligand, dopamine. The exact signaling pathways affected by this allosteric modulator are currently unknown. The objectives of this study were to decipher the in vivo effects, in rats, of chronic PAOPA administration on D2 receptor regulatory and downstream molecules, including GRK2, arrestin-3 and extracellular receptor kinase (ERK 1/2. Additionally, an in vitro cellular model was also used to study PAOPA's effects on D2 receptor internalization. Results from western immunoblots showed that chronic PAOPA treatment increased the striatal expression of GRK2 by 41%, arrestin-3 by 34%, phospho-ERK1 by 51% and phospho-ERK2 by 36%. Results also showed that the addition of PAOPA to agonist treatment in cells increased D2 receptor internalization by 33%. This study provides the foundational evidence of putative signaling pathways, and changes in receptor localization, affected by treatment with PAOPA. It improves our understanding on the diverse mechanisms of action of allosteric modulators, while advancing PAOPA's development into a novel drug for the

  19. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  20. Cycloxaprid insecticide: nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding site and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xusheng; Swenson, Tami L; Casida, John E

    2013-08-21

    Cycloxaprid (CYC) is a novel neonicotinoid prepared from the (nitromethylene)imidazole (NMI) analogue of imidacloprid. In this study we consider whether CYC is active per se or only as a proinsecticide for NMI. The IC50 values (nM) for displacing [(3)H]NMI binding are 43-49 for CYC and 2.3-3.2 for NMI in house fly and honeybee head membranes and 302 and 7.2, respectively, in mouse brain membranes, potency relationships interpreted as partial conversion of some CYC to NMI under the assay conditions. The 6-8-fold difference in toxicity of injected CYC and NMI to house flies is consistent with their relative potencies as in vivo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors in brain measured with [(3)H]NMI binding assays. CYC metabolism in mice largely involves cytochrome P450 pathways without NMI as a major intermediate. Metabolites of CYC tentatively assigned are five monohydroxy derivatives and one each of dihydroxy, nitroso, and amino modifications. CYC appears be a proinsecticide, serving as a slow-release reservoir for NMI with selective activity for insect versus mammalian nAChRs.

  1. MBSTAR: multiple instance learning for predicting specific functional binding sites in microRNA targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Dip; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by binding to specific sites in the 3'untranslated regions of its target genes. Machine learning based miRNA target prediction algorithms first extract a set of features from potential binding sites (PBSs) in the mRNA and then train a classifier to distinguish targets from non-targets. However, they do not consider whether the PBSs are functional or not, and consequently result in high false positive rates. This substantially affects the follow up functional validation by experiments. We present a novel machine learning based approach, MBSTAR (Multiple instance learning of Binding Sites of miRNA TARgets), for accurate prediction of true or functional miRNA binding sites. Multiple instance learning framework is adopted to handle the lack of information about the actual binding sites in the target mRNAs. Biologically validated 9531 interacting and 973 non-interacting miRNA-mRNA pairs are identified from Tarbase 6.0 and confirmed with PAR-CLIP dataset. It is found that MBSTAR achieves the highest number of binding sites overlapping with PAR-CLIP with maximum F-Score of 0.337. Compared to the other methods, MBSTAR also predicts target mRNAs with highest accuracy. The tool and genome wide predictions are available at http://www.isical.ac.in/~bioinfo_miu/MBStar30.htm.

  2. Assessment of algorithms for inferring positional weight matrix motifs of transcription factor binding sites using protein binding microarray data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Orenstein

    Full Text Available The new technology of protein binding microarrays (PBMs allows simultaneous measurement of the binding intensities of a transcription factor to tens of thousands of synthetic double-stranded DNA probes, covering all possible 10-mers. A key computational challenge is inferring the binding motif from these data. We present a systematic comparison of four methods developed specifically for reconstructing a binding site motif represented as a positional weight matrix from PBM data. The reconstructed motifs were evaluated in terms of three criteria: concordance with reference motifs from the literature and ability to predict in vivo and in vitro bindings. The evaluation encompassed over 200 transcription factors and some 300 assays. The results show a tradeoff between how the methods perform according to the different criteria, and a dichotomy of method types. Algorithms that construct motifs with low information content predict PBM probe ranking more faithfully, while methods that produce highly informative motifs match reference motifs better. Interestingly, in predicting high-affinity binding, all methods give far poorer results for in vivo assays compared to in vitro assays.

  3. Allosteric dynamics of SAMHD1 studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, K. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-10-01

    SAMHD1 is a human cellular enzyme that blocks HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells and non-cycling CD4+T cells. The enzyme is an allosterically regulated triphosphohydrolase that modulates the level of cellular dNTP. The virus restriction is attributed to the lowering of the pool of dNTP in the cell to a point where reverse-transcription is impaired. Mutations in SAMHD1 are also implicated in Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome. A mechanistic understanding of the allosteric activation of the enzyme is still elusive. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the allosteric site dynamics of the protein and to examine the connection between the stability of the tetrameric complex and the Allosite occupancy.

  4. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of [3H]ANSTO-14 binding to the sigma 1 binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V H; Mardon, K; Kassiou, M; Christie, M D

    1999-02-01

    N-(4-phenylbutyl)-3-hydroxy-4-azahexacyclo[5.4.1.0(2,6).0(3, 10).0(5,9) .0(8,11)]dodecane (ANSTO-14) showed the highest activity for the sigma 1 site (Ki = 9.4 nM) and 19-fold sigma 1/sigma 2 selectivity. The present study showed that [3H]ANSTO-14 binds to a single high-affinity site in guinea pig brain membranes with an equilibrium Ki of 8.0 +/- 0.3 nM, in good agreement with the kinetic studies (Kd = 13.3 +/- 5.4 nM, n = 4), and a Bmax of 3.199 +/- 105 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). The in vivo biodistribution of [3H]ANSTO-14 showed a high uptake in the diencephalon. Pretreatment of rats with sigma ligands including (+)-pentazocine (sigma 1), ANSTO-14 (sigma 1), and DTG (sigma 1 and sigma 2) did not significantly reduce radiotracer uptake in the brain, but did in the spleen. A labelled metabolite was found in the liver and brain. Due to its insensitivity to sigma ligands, the accumulation of [3H]ANSTO-14 in the brain indicates high nonspecific binding. Therefore, [3H]ANSTO-14 is a suitable ligand for labelling sigma 1 sites in vitro but is not suitable for brain imaging of sigma binding sites in vivo.

  5. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebeson, Amy; Xi, Liqun; Zhang, Quanwei; Sigmund, Audrey; Wang, Ji-Ping; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  6. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sebeson

    Full Text Available The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  7. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog Leu......T. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopamine and amphetamine, as well as for benztropine-like DAT inhibitors. We validated our models by detailed...... inhibition of dopamine transport by cocaine....

  8. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M.; Christiansen, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch...... to soluble polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with α-1,6 linkages, suggesting that branch points are key structural elements in recognition by SBS2. Mutation at both SBS1 and SBS2 eliminated binding to all starch granule types tested. Taken together, the findings indicate that the two SBSs act in concert...

  9. Structure-based network analysis of activation mechanisms in the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases: the regulatory spine residues are global mediators of structural stability and allosteric interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A James

    Full Text Available The ErbB protein tyrosine kinases are among the most important cell signaling families and mutation-induced modulation of their activity is associated with diverse functions in biological networks and human disease. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations of the ErbB kinases with the protein structure network modeling to characterize the reorganization of the residue interaction networks during conformational equilibrium changes in the normal and oncogenic forms. Structural stability and network analyses have identified local communities integrated around high centrality sites that correspond to the regulatory spine residues. This analysis has provided a quantitative insight to the mechanism of mutation-induced "superacceptor" activity in oncogenic EGFR dimers. We have found that kinase activation may be determined by allosteric interactions between modules of structurally stable residues that synchronize the dynamics in the nucleotide binding site and the αC-helix with the collective motions of the integrating αF-helix and the substrate binding site. The results of this study have pointed to a central role of the conserved His-Arg-Asp (HRD motif in the catalytic loop and the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG motif as key mediators of structural stability and allosteric communications in the ErbB kinases. We have determined that residues that are indispensable for kinase regulation and catalysis often corresponded to the high centrality nodes within the protein structure network and could be distinguished by their unique network signatures. The optimal communication pathways are also controlled by these nodes and may ensure efficient allosteric signaling in the functional kinase state. Structure-based network analysis has quantified subtle effects of ATP binding on conformational dynamics and stability of the EGFR structures. Consistent with the NMR studies, we have found that nucleotide-induced modulation of the residue interaction networks is not

  10. Differential Modulation of Annexin I Binding Sites on Monocytes and Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Euzger

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific binding sites for the anti-inflammatory protein annexin I have been detected on the surface of human monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN. These binding sites are proteinaceous in nature and are sensitive to cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes trypsin, collagenase, elastase and cathepsin G. When monocytes and PMN were isolated independently from peripheral blood, only the monocytes exhibited constitutive annexin I binding. However PMN acquired the capacity to bind annexin I following co-culture with monocytes. PMN incubation with sodium azide, but not protease inhibitors, partially blocked this process. A similar increase in annexin I binding capacity was also detected in PMN following adhesion to endothelial monolayers. We propose that a juxtacrine activation rather than a cleavage-mediated transfer is involved in this process. Removal of annexin I binding sites from monocytes with elastase rendered monocytes functionally insensitive to full length annexin I or to the annexin I-derived pharmacophore, peptide Ac2-26, assessed as suppression of the respiratory burst. These data indicate that the annexin I binding site on phagocytic cells may have an important function in the feedback control of the inflammatory response and their loss through cleavage could potentiate such responses.

  11. A Disease-Causing Variant in PCNA Disrupts a Promiscuous Protein Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Caroline M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Kelch, Brian A

    2016-03-27

    The eukaryotic DNA polymerase sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen or PCNA, is a ring-shaped protein complex that surrounds DNA to act as a sliding platform for increasing processivity of cellular replicases and for coordinating various cellular pathways with DNA replication. A single point mutation, Ser228Ile, in the human PCNA gene was recently identified to cause a disease whose symptoms resemble those of DNA damage and repair disorders. The mutation lies near the binding site for most PCNA-interacting proteins. However, the structural consequences of the S228I mutation are unknown. Here, we describe the structure of the disease-causing variant, which reveals a large conformational change that dramatically transforms the binding pocket for PCNA client proteins. We show that the mutation markedly alters the binding energetics for some client proteins, while another, p21(CIP1), is only mildly affected. Structures of the disease variant bound to peptides derived from two PCNA partner proteins reveal that the binding pocket can adjust conformation to accommodate some ligands, indicating that the binding site is dynamic and pliable. Our work has implications for the plasticity of the binding site in PCNA and reveals how a disease mutation selectively alters interactions to a promiscuous binding site that is critical for DNA metabolism.

  12. Putative cholesterol-binding sites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, Mikhail A; Lee, Po-Hsien; Ott, Albrecht; Helms, Volkhard

    2013-04-01

    Using molecular docking, we identified a cholesterol-binding site in the groove between transmembrane helices 1 and 7 near the inner membrane-water interface of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry into cells. In this docking pose, the amino group of lysine K67 establishes a hydrogen bond with the hydroxyl group of cholesterol, whereas tyrosine Y302 stacks with cholesterol by its aromatic side chain, and a number of residues form hydrophobic contacts with cholesterol. Sequence alignment showed that a similar putative cholesterol-binding site is also present in CCR5, another HIV coreceptor. We suggest that the interaction of cholesterol with these putative cholesterol-binding sites in CXCR4 and CCR5 is responsible for the presence of these receptors in lipid rafts, for the effect of cholesterol on their conformational stability and function, and for the role that cell cholesterol plays in the cell entry of HIV strains that use these membrane proteins as coreceptors. We propose that mutations of residues that are involved in cholesterol binding will make CXCR4 and CCR5 insensitive to membrane cholesterol content. Cholesterol-binding sites in HIV coreceptors are potential targets for steroid drugs that bind to CXCR4 and CCR5 with higher binding affinity than cholesterol, but do not stabilize the native conformation of these proteins.

  13. Syntax compensates for poor binding sites to encode tissue specificity of developmental enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Emma K; Olson, Katrina M; Zhang, Wei; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Levine, Michael S

    2016-06-07

    Transcriptional enhancers are short segments of DNA that switch genes on and off in response to a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Despite the discovery of the first enhancer more than 30 y ago, the relationship between primary DNA sequence and enhancer activity remains obscure. In particular, the importance of "syntax" (the order, orientation, and spacing of binding sites) is unclear. A high-throughput screen identified synthetic notochord enhancers that are activated by the combination of ZicL and ETS transcription factors in Ciona embryos. Manipulation of these enhancers elucidated a "regulatory code" of sequence and syntax features for notochord-specific expression. This code enabled in silico discovery of bona fide notochord enhancers, including those containing low-affinity binding sites that would be excluded by standard motif identification methods. One of the newly identified enhancers maps upstream of the known enhancer that regulates Brachyury (Ci-Bra), a key determinant of notochord specification. This newly identified Ci-Bra shadow enhancer contains binding sites with very low affinity, but optimal syntax, and therefore mediates surprisingly strong expression in the notochord. Weak binding sites are compensated by optimal syntax, whereas enhancers containing high-affinity binding affinities possess suboptimal syntax. We suggest this balance has obscured the importance of regulatory syntax, as noncanonical binding motifs are typically disregarded by enhancer detection methods. As a result, enhancers with low binding affinities but optimal syntax may be a vastly underappreciated feature of the regulatory genome.

  14. Detection of cell type and marker specificity of nuclear binding sites for anionic carbohydrate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovanec, M; Smetana, K; Purkrábková, T; Holíková, Z; Dvoránková, B; André, S; Pytlík, R; Hozák, P; Plzák, J; Sedo, A; Vacík, J; Gabius, H

    2004-01-01

    The emerging functionality of glycosaminoglycan chains engenders interest in localizing specific binding sites using cytochemical tools. We investigated nuclear binding of labeled heparin, heparan sulfate, a sulfated fucan, chondroitin sulfate, and hyaluronic acid in epidermal keratinocytes, bone marrow stromal cells, 3T3 fibroblasts and glioma cells using chemically prepared biotinylated probes. Binding of the markers was cell-type specific and influenced by extraction of histones, but was not markedly affected by degree of proliferation, differentiation or malignancy. Cell uptake of labeled heparin and other selected probes and their transport into the nucleus also was monitored. Differences between keratinocytes and bone marrow stromal cells were found. Preincubation of permeabilized bone marrow stromal cells with label-free heparin reduced the binding of carrier-immobilized hydrocortisone to its nuclear receptors. Thus, these tools enabled binding sites for glycosaminoglycans to be monitored in routine assays.

  15. Effect of cysteamine on cytosolic somatostatin binding sites in rabbit duodenal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guijarro, L; Lopez-Ruiz, M P; Bodegas, G; Prieto, J C; Arilla, E

    1987-04-01

    Administration of cysteamine in rabbits elicited a rapid depletion of both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin. A significant reduction was observed within 5 min, returning toward control values by 150 min. The depletion of somatostatin was associated with an increase in the binding capacity and a decrease in the affinity of both high- and low-affinity binding sites present in cytosol of duodenal mucosa. Incubation of cytosolic fraction from control rabbits with 1 mM cysteamine did not modify somatostatin binding. Furthermore, addition of cysteamine at the time of binding assay did not affect the integrity of 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin. It is concluded that in vivo administration of cysteamine to rabbits depletes both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin and leads to up-regulation of duodenal somatostatin binding sites.

  16. Crystal structure of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius aspartate carbamoyltransferase in complex with its allosteric activator CTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Dirk; Xu, Ying; Aerts, Tony; Van Petegem, Filip; Van Beeumen, Jozef J

    2008-07-18

    Aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ATCase) is a paradigm for allosteric regulation of enzyme activity. B-class ATCases display very similar homotropic allosteric behaviour, but differ extensively in their heterotropic patterns. The ATCase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, for example, is strongly activated by its metabolic pathway's end product CTP, in contrast with Escherichia coli ATCase which is inhibited by CTP. To investigate the structural basis of this property, we have solved the crystal structure of the S. acidocaldarius enzyme in complex with CTP. Structure comparison reveals that effector binding does not induce similar large-scale conformational changes as observed for the E. coli ATCase. However, shifts in sedimentation coefficients upon binding of the bi-substrate analogue PALA show the existence of structurally distinct allosteric states. This suggests that the so-called "Nucleotide-Perturbation model" for explaining heterotropic allosteric behaviour, which is based on global conformational strain, is not a general mechanism of B-class ATCases.

  17. Oligomycin frames a common drug-binding site in the ATP synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Jindrich; Osowski, Daniel; Walters, D. Eric; Mueller, David M. (Rosalind)

    2015-12-01

    We report the high-resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) crystal structure of oligomycin bound to the subunit c10 ring of the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Oligomycin binds to the surface of the c10 ring making contact with two neighboring molecules at a position that explains the inhibitory effect on ATP synthesis. The carboxyl side chain of Glu59, which is essential for proton translocation, forms an H-bond with oligomycin via a bridging water molecule but is otherwise shielded from the aqueous environment. The remaining contacts between oligomycin and subunit c are primarily hydrophobic. The amino acid residues that form the oligomycin-binding site are 100% conserved between human and yeast but are widely different from those in bacterial homologs, thus explaining the differential sensitivity to oligomycin. Prior genetics studies suggest that the oligomycin-binding site overlaps with the binding site of other antibiotics, including those effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thereby frames a common 'drug-binding site.' We anticipate that this drug-binding site will serve as an effective target for new antibiotics developed by rational design.

  18. DNA-MATRIX: a tool for constructing transcription factor binding sites Weight matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash Singh,

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable effort to date, DNA transcription factor binding sites prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for the researchers. Currently the genome wide transcription factor binding sites prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence or weight matrix. Although there are known transcription factor binding sites pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a DNA-MATRIX tool for searching putative transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences. DNA-MATRIX uses the simple heuristic approach for weight matrix construction, which can be transformed into different formats as per the requirement of researcher’s for further genome wide prediction and therefore provides the possibility to identify the conserved known DNA binding sites in the coregulated genes and also to search for a great variety of different regulatory binding patterns. The user may construct and save specific weight or frequency matrices in different formats derived through user selected set of known motif sequences.

  19. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  20. Structure and allosteric effects of low-molecular-weight activators on the protein kinase PDK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindie, Valerie; Stroba, Adriana; Zhang, Hua

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation transduces a large set of intracellular signals. One mechanism by which phosphorylation mediates signal transduction is by prompting conformational changes in the target protein or interacting proteins. Previous work described an allosteric site mediating phosphorylation-d...

  1. Cooperativity between calmodulin-binding sites in Kv7.2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Alessandro; Alberdi, Araitz; Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Fernández-Orth, Juncal; Gómez-Posada, Juan Camilo; Areso, Pilar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Among the multiple roles assigned to calmodulin (CaM), controlling the surface expression of Kv7.2 channels by binding to two discontinuous sites is a unique property of this Ca(2+) binding protein. Mutations that interfere with CaM binding or the sequestering of CaM prevent this M-channel component from exiting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which reduces M-current density in hippocampal neurons, enhancing excitability and offering a rational mechanism to explain some forms of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC). Previously, we identified a mutation (S511D) that impedes CaM binding while allowing the channel to exit the ER, hinting that CaM binding may not be strictly required for Kv7.2 channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Alternatively, this interaction with CaM might escape detection and, indeed, we now show that the S511D mutant contains functional CaM-binding sites that are not detected by classical biochemical techniques. Surface expression and function is rescued by CaM, suggesting that free CaM in HEK293 cells is limiting and reinforcing the hypothesis that CaM binding is required for ER exit. Within the CaM-binding domain formed by two sites (helix A and helix B), we show that CaM binds to helix B with higher apparent affinity than helix A, both in the presence and absence of Ca(2+), and that the two sites cooperate. Hence, CaM can bridge two binding domains, anchoring helix A of one subunit to helix B of another subunit, in this way influencing the function of Kv7.2 channels.

  2. A quantitative model for the in vivo assessment of drug binding sites with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mintun, M.A.; Raichle, M.E.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Wooten, G.F.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-03-01

    We propose an in vivo method for use with positron emission tomography (PET) that results in a quantitative characterization of neuroleptic binding sites using radiolabeled spiperone. The data are analyzed using a mathematical model that describes transport, nonspecific binding, and specific binding in the brain. The model demonstrates that the receptor quantities Bmax (i.e., the number of binding sites) and KD-1 (i.e., the binding affinity) are not separably ascertainable with tracer methodology in human subjects. We have, therefore, introduced a new term, the binding potential, equivalent to the product BmaxKD-1, which reflects the capacity of a given tissue, or region of a tissue, for ligand-binding site interaction. The procedure for obtaining these measurements is illustrated with data from sequential PET scans of baboons after intravenous injection of carrier-added (18F)spiperone. From these data we estimate the brain tissue nonspecific binding of spiperone to be in the range of 94.2 to 95.3%, and the regional brain spiperone permeability (measured as the permeability-surface area product) to be in the range of 0.025 to 0.036 cm3/(s X ml). The binding potential of the striatum ranged from 17.4 to 21.6; these in vivo estimates compare favorably to in vitro values in the literature. To our knowledge this represents the first direct evidence that PET can be used to characterize quantitatively, locally and in vivo, drug binding sites in brain. The ability to make such measurements with PET should permit the detailed investigation of diseases thought to result from disorders of receptor function.

  3. Ivermectin binding sites in human and invertebrate Cys-loop receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy Peter; Lynch, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    Ivermectin is a gold standard antiparasitic drug that has been used successfully to treat billions of humans, livestock and pets. Until recently, the binding site on its Cys-loop receptor target had been a mystery. Recent protein crystal structures, site-directed mutagenesis data and molecular mo...... for a wide variety of human neurological disorders....

  4. Endogenously generated plasmin at the vascular wall injury site amplifies lysine binding site-dependent plasminogen accumulation in microthrombi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemostasis; however, it remains unclear how and when the system is triggered to induce thrombolysis. Using intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the process of plasminogen binding to laser-induced platelet-rich microthrombi generated in the mesenteric vein of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. The accumulation of GFP-expressing platelets as well as exogenously infused Alexa Fluor 568-labeled Glu-plasminogen (Glu-plg on the injured vessel wall was assessed by measuring the increase in the corresponding fluorescence intensities. Glu-plg accumulated in a time-dependent manner in the center of the microthrombus, where phosphatidylserine is exposed on platelet surfaces and fibrin formation takes place. The rates of binding of Glu-plg in the presence of ε-aminocaproic acid and carboxypeptidase B, as well as the rates of binding of mini-plasminogen lacking kringle domains 1-4 and lysine binding sites, were significantly lower than that of Glu-plg alone, suggesting that the binding was dependent on lysine binding sites. Furthermore, aprotinin significantly suppressed the accumulation of Glu-plg, suggesting that endogenously generated plasmin activity is a prerequisite for the accumulation. In spite of the endogenous generation of plasmin and accumulation of Glu-plg in the center of microthrombi, the microthrombi did not change in size during the 2-hour observation period. When human tissue plasminogen activator was administered intravenously, Glu-plg further accumulated and the microthrombi were lysed. Glu-plg appeared to accumulate in the center of microthrombi in the early phase of microthrombus formation, and plasmin activity and lysine binding sites were required for this accumulation.

  5. Structural proof of a dimeric positive modulator bridging two identical AMPA receptor-binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Birgitte Høiriis; Harpsøe, Kasper; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen;

    2007-01-01

    Dimeric positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors were designed, synthesized, and characterized pharmacologically in electrophysiological experiments. The designed compounds are dimers of arylpropylsulfonamides and have been constructed without a linker. The monomeric...

  6. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    different classes of protein pocket dynamics: (1) appearance/disappearance of a subpocket in an existing pocket; (2) appearance/disappearance of an adjacent pocket on the protein surface in the direct vicinity of an already existing pocket; (3) pocket breathing, which may be caused by side-chain fluctuations or backbone or interdomain vibrational motion; (4) opening/closing of a channel or tunnel, connecting a pocket inside the protein with solvent, including lid motion; and (5) the appearance/disappearance of an allosteric pocket at a site on a protein distinct from an already existing pocket with binding of a ligand to the allosteric binding site affecting the original pocket. We suggest that the class of pocket dynamics, as well as the type and extent of protein motion affecting the binding pocket, should be factors considered in choosing the most appropriate computational approach to study a given binding pocket. Furthermore, we examine the relationship between pocket dynamics classes and induced fit, conformational selection, and gating models of ligand binding on binding kinetics and thermodynamics. We discuss the implications of protein binding pocket dynamics for drug design and conclude with potential future directions for computational analysis of protein binding pocket dynamics.

  7. The mechanism of allosteric inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    Full Text Available As the prototypical member of the PTP family, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in type 2 diabetes. The extremely conserved catalytic site of PTP1B renders the design of selective PTP1B inhibitors intractable. Although discovered allosteric inhibitors containing a benzofuran sulfonamide scaffold offer fascinating opportunities to overcome selectivity issues, the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of PTP1B has remained elusive. Here, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, coupled with a dynamic weighted community analysis, were performed to unveil the potential allosteric signal propagation pathway from the allosteric site to the catalytic site in PTP1B. This result revealed that the allosteric inhibitor compound-3 induces a conformational rearrangement in helix α7, disrupting the triangular interaction among helix α7, helix α3, and loop11. Helix α7 then produces a force, pulling helix α3 outward, and promotes Ser190 to interact with Tyr176. As a result, the deviation of Tyr176 abrogates the hydrophobic interactions with Trp179 and leads to the downward movement of the WPD loop, which forms an H-bond between Asp181 and Glu115. The formation of this H-bond constrains the WPD loop to its open conformation and thus inactivates PTP1B. The discovery of this allosteric mechanism provides an overall view of the regulation of PTP1B, which is an important insight for the design of potent allosteric PTP1B inhibitors.

  8. The origins of enhanced activity in factor VIIa analogs and the interplay between key allosteric sites revealed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Andersen, Mette D; Olsen, Ole H;

    2008-01-01

    to investigate the conformational effects of site-directed mutagenesis at key positions in FVIIa and the origins of enhanced intrinsic activity of FVIIa analogs. The differences in hydrogen exchange of two highly active variants, FVIIa(DVQ) and FVIIa(VEAY), imply that enhanced catalytic efficiency was attained...

  9. Discriminating between HuR and TTP binding sites using the k-spectrum kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Debra S.; Dowell, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Background The RNA binding proteins (RBPs) human antigen R (HuR) and Tristetraprolin (TTP) are known to exhibit competitive binding but have opposing effects on the bound messenger RNA (mRNA). How cells discriminate between the two proteins is an interesting problem. Machine learning approaches, such as support vector machines (SVMs), may be useful in the identification of discriminative features. However, this method has yet to be applied to studies of RNA binding protein motifs. Results Applying the k-spectrum kernel to a support vector machine (SVM), we first verified the published binding sites of both HuR and TTP. Additional feature engineering highlighted the U-rich binding preference of HuR and AU-rich binding preference for TTP. Domain adaptation along with multi-task learning was used to predict the common binding sites. Conclusion The distinction between HuR and TTP binding appears to be subtle content features. HuR prefers strongly U-rich sequences whereas TTP prefers AU-rich as with increasing A content, the sequences are more likely to be bound only by TTP. Our model is consistent with competitive binding of the two proteins, particularly at intermediate AU-balanced sequences. This suggests that fine changes in the A/U balance within a untranslated region (UTR) can alter the binding and subsequent stability of the message. Both feature engineering and domain adaptation emphasized the extent to which these proteins recognize similar general sequence features. This work suggests that the k-spectrum kernel method could be useful when studying RNA binding proteins and domain adaptation techniques such as feature augmentation could be employed particularly when examining RBPs with similar binding preferences. PMID:28333956

  10. Characterization of two different melatonin binding sites in peripheral tissues of the teleost Tinca tinca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Patiño, M A; Guijarro, A I; Alonso-Gómez, A L; Delgado, M J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to localize and characterize 2-iodo-melatonin ([(125)I]Mel) binding sites in peripheral tissues of the teleost Tinca tinca. A wide distribution of [(125)I]Mel binding sites in peripheral locations of the tench is found, with highest densities being measured in the heart, gills and kidney, and low density of [(125)I]Mel binding sites in gastrointestinal tract, spleen, liver and gonads. Saturation, kinetics, and pharmacological approaches revealed the presence of, at least, two different [(125)I]Mel binding sites in the tench peripheral tissues. The unique characterized subtype in the heart fulfils all the criteria for a canonical melatonin receptor belonging to MT(1) family (the binding is saturable, reversible, and inhibited by GTP analogs), and gives support for the presence of a functional melatonin receptor in the heart of the tench. In contrast, kinetic and pharmacological studies in the kidney revealed the preponderance of a melatonin binding site belonging to the MT(3)-like receptor subtype. Moreover, the decrease of specific binding in both, heart and kidney membranes, and the decrease of affinity in the kidney, produced by the addition of a non-hydrolysable GTP analog, and sodium cations suggest the presence of G(i/o)-proteins (that mediate inhibition of cAMP formation) coupled to such melatonin binding sites. Our results also point to different G(i/o)-proteins involved in the underlying mechanism of melatonin binding sites activation in the kidney. Additionally, the kinetics of [(125)I]Mel binding in kidney membrane preparations is a highly thermosensitive process, being necessary to perform the assays at 4 °C since the equilibrium was not reached at 25 °C assay temperature. The time needed to complete association of [(125)I]Mel at such low temperature is only 15s, whereas 100s is required to displace [(125)I]Mel specific binding by the unlabeled melatonin in kidney membranes. Present results support previous reports on

  11. PhyloScan: identification of transcription factor binding sites using cross-species evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newberg Lee A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When transcription factor binding sites are known for a particular transcription factor, it is possible to construct a motif model that can be used to scan sequences for additional sites. However, few statistically significant sites are revealed when a transcription factor binding site motif model is used to scan a genome-scale database. Methods We have developed a scanning algorithm, PhyloScan, which combines evidence from matching sites found in orthologous data from several related species with evidence from multiple sites within an intergenic region, to better detect regulons. The orthologous sequence data may be multiply aligned, unaligned, or a combination of aligned and unaligned. In aligned data, PhyloScan statistically accounts for the phylogenetic dependence of the species contributing data to the alignment and, in unaligned data, the evidence for sites is combined assuming phylogenetic independence of the species. The statistical significance of the gene predictions is calculated directly, without employing training sets. Results In a test of our methodology on synthetic data modeled on seven Enterobacteriales, four Vibrionales, and three Pasteurellales species, PhyloScan produces better sensitivity and specificity than MONKEY, an advanced scanning approach that also searches a genome for transcription factor binding sites using phylogenetic information. The application of the algorithm to real sequence data from seven Enterobacteriales species identifies novel Crp and PurR transcription factor binding sites, thus providing several new potential sites for these transcription factors. These sites enable targeted experimental validation and thus further delineation of the Crp and PurR regulons in E. coli. Conclusion Better sensitivity and specificity can be achieved through a combination of (1 using mixed alignable and non-alignable sequence data and (2 combining evidence from multiple sites within an intergenic

  12. The roles of histidine residues at the starch-binding site in streptococcal-binding activities of human salivary amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C C; Miyamoto, M; Ramalingam, K; Hemavathy, K C; Levine, M J; Ramasubbu, N

    1999-02-01

    Human salivary alpha-amylase participates in the initial digestion of starch and may be involved in the colonization of viridans streptococci in the mouth. To elucidate the role of histidine residues located near the starch-binding site on the streptococcal-binding activity, the wild type and three histidine mutants, H52A, H299A and H305A were constructed and expressed in a baculovirus system. While His52 is located near the non-reducing end of the starch-binding pocket (subsite S3/S4), the residues His299 and His305 are located near the subsites S1/S1'. For the wild type, the cDNA encoding the leader and secreted sequences of human salivary amylase was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from a human submandibular salivary-gland cDNA library, and subcloned into the baculovirus shuttle vector pVL1392 downstream of the polyhedrin promoter. Oligonucleotide-based, site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate the mutants expressed in the baculovirus system. Replacing His52 or His299 or His305 to Ala residue did not alter the bacterial-binding activity significantly, but these mutants did show differences in their catalytic activities. The mutant H52A showed negligible reduction in enzymatic activity compared to that of wild type for the hydrolysis of starch and oligosaccharides. In contrast, the H299A and H305A mutants showed a 12 to 13-fold reduction (90-92%) in starch-hydrolysing activity. In addition, the k(cat) for the hydrolysis of oligosaccharides by H299A decreased by as much as 11-fold for maltoheptaoside. This reduction was even higher (40-fold) for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl maltoside, with a significant change in K(M). The mutant H305A, however, exhibited a reduction in k(cat) only, with no changes in the K(M) for the hydrolysis of oligosaccharides. The reduction in the k(cat) for the H305A mutant was almost 93% for maltoheptaoside hydrolysis. The pH activity profile for the H305A mutant was also significantly different from that of the wild type

  13. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  14. Structure and binding efficiency relations of QB site inhibitors of photosynthetic reaction centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husu, Ivan; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Fiser, Béla; Gómez-Bengoa, Enrique; Nagy, László

    2015-04-01

    Many herbicides employed in agriculture and also some antibiotics bind to a specific site of the reaction centre protein (RC) blocking the photosynthetic electron transport. Crystal structures showed that all these compounds bind at the secondary ubiquinone (QB) site albeit to slightly different places. Different herbicide molecules have different binding affinities (evaluated as inhibition constants, KI, and binding enthalpy values, ΔHbind). The action of inhibitors depends on the following parameters: (i) herbicide molecular structure; (ii) interactions between herbicide and quinone binding site; (iii) protein environment. In our investigations KI and ΔHbind were determined for several inhibitors. Bound herbicide structures were optimized and their intramolecular charge distributions were calculated. Experimental and calculated data were compared to those available from databank crystal structures. We can state that the herbicide inhibition efficiency depends on steric and electronic, i.e. geometry of binding with the protein and molecular charge distribution, respectively. Apolar bulky groups on N-7 atom of the inhibitor molecule (like t-buthyl in terbutryn) are preferable for establishing stronger interactions with QB site, while such substituents are not recommended on N-8. The N-4,7,8 nitrogen atoms maintain a larger electron density so that more effective H-bonds are formed between the inhibitor and the surrounding amino acids of the protein.

  15. Membrane androgen binding sites are preferentially expressed in human prostate carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delakas Dimitrios

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in males. Nevertheless, to this moment, there is no specific routine diagnostic marker to be used in clinical practice. Recently, the identification of a membrane testosterone binding site involved in the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton structures and PSA secretion, on LNCaP human prostate cancer cells has been reported. We have investigated whether this membrane testosterone binding component could be of value for the identification of prostate cancer. Methods Using a non-internalizable testosterone-BSA-FITC analog, proven to bind on membrane sites only in LNCaP cells, we have investigated the expression of membrane testosterone binding sites in a series of prostate carcinomas (n = 14, morphologically normal epithelia, taken from areas of the surgical specimens far from the location of the carcinomas (n = 8 and benign prostate hyperplasia epithelia (n = 10. Isolated epithelial cells were studied by flow cytometry, and touching preparations, after 10-min incubation. In addition, routine histological slides were assayed by confocal laser microscopy. Results We show that membrane testosterone binding sites are preferentially expressed in prostate carcinoma cells, while BPH and non-malignant epithelial cells show a low or absent binding. Conclusions Our results indicate that membrane testosterone receptors might be of use for the rapid routine identification of prostate cancer, representing a new diagnostic marker of the disease.

  16. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  17. Putative hAPN receptor binding sites in SARS_CoV spike protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUXiao-Jing; LUOCheng; LinJian-Cheng; HAOPei; HEYou-Yu; GUOZong-Ming; QINLei; SUJiong; LIUBo-Shu; HUANGYin; NANPeng; LIChuan-Song; XIONGBin; LUOXiao-Min; ZHAOGuo-Ping; PEIGang; CHENKai-Xian; SHENXu; SHENJian-Hua; ZOUJian-Ping; HEWei-Zhong; SHITie-Liu; ZHONGYang; JIANGHua-Liang; LIYi-Xue

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To obtain the information of ligand-receptor binding between thd S protein of SARS_CoV and CD13, identify the possible interacting domains or motifs related to binding sites, and provide clues for studying the functions of SARS proteins and designing anti-SARS drugs and vaccines. METHODS: On the basis of comparative genomics, the homology search, phylogenetic analyses, and multi-sequence alignment were used to predict CD13 related interacting domains and binding sites sites in the S protein of SARS_CoV. Molecular modeling and docking simulation methods were employed to address the interaction feature between CD13 and S protein of SARS_CoV in validating the bioinformatics predictions. RESULTS:Possible binding sites in the SARS_CoV S protein to CD13 have been mapped out by using bioinformatics analysis tools. The binding for one protein-protein interaction pair (D757-R761 motif of the SARS_CoV S protein to P585-A653 domain of CD13) has been simulated by molecular modeling and docking simulation methods. CONCLUSION:CD13 may be a possible receptor of the SARS_CoV S protein which may be associated with the SARS infection. This study also provides a possible strategy for mapping the possible binding receptors of the proteins in a genome.

  18. Autoradiographic demonstration of oxytocin-binding sites in the macula densa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckel, M.E.; Freund-Mercier, M.J. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Strasbourg (France))

    1989-08-01

    Specific oxytocin (OT)-binding sites were localized in the rat kidney with use of a selective {sup 125}I-labeled OT antagonist ({sup 125}I-OTA). High concentrations of OT binding sites were detected on the juxtaglomerular apparatus with use of the conventional film autoradiographic technique. No labeling occurred on other renal structures. The cellular localization of the OT binding sites within the juxtaglomerular apparatus was studied in light microscope autoradiography, on semithin sections from paraformaldehyde-fixed kidney slices incubated in the presence of {sup 125}I-OTA. These preparations revealed selective labeling of the macula densa, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. Control experiments showed first that {sup 125}I-OTA binding characteristics were not noticeably altered by prior paraformaldehyde fixation of the kidneys and second that autoradiographic detection of the binding sites was not impaired by histological treatments following binding procedures. In view of the role of the macula densa in the tubuloglomerular feedback, the putative OT receptors of this structure might mediate the stimulatory effect of OT on glomerular filtration.

  19. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiur Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 and diazepam as site-2 specific probe. Results: Different analysis of binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin suggested two sets of association constants: high affinity association constant (k1 = 11.0 x 105 M-1 with low capacity (n1 = 2 and low affinity association (k2 = 4.0×105 M-1 constant with high capacity (n2 = 8 at pH 7.4 and 27°C. During concurrent administration of palmitic acid and metoprolol succinate in presence or absence of ranitidine or diazepam, it was found that palmitic acid displaced metoprolol succinate from its binding site on BSA resulting reduced binding of metoprolol succinate to BSA. The increment in free fraction of metoprolol succinate was from 26.27% to 55.08% upon the addition of increased concentration of palmitic acid at a concentration of 0×10-5 M to 16×10-5 M. In presence of ranitidine and diazepam, palmitic acid further increases the free fraction of metoprolol succinate from 33.05% to 66.95% and 40.68% to 72.88%, respectively. Conclusion: This data provided the evidence of interaction at higher concentration of palmitic acid at the binding sites on BSA, which might change the pharmacokinetic properties of metoprolol succinate.

  20. Functional identification of catalytic metal ion binding sites within RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Hougland

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The viability of living systems depends inextricably on enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions. For many enzymes in this class, including several ribozymes, divalent metal ions serve as obligate cofactors. Understanding how metal ions mediate catalysis requires elucidation of metal ion interactions with both the enzyme and the substrate(s. In the Tetrahymena group I intron, previous work using atomic mutagenesis and quantitative analysis of metal ion rescue behavior identified three metal ions (MA, MB, and MC that make five interactions with the ribozyme substrates in the reaction's transition state. Here, we combine substrate atomic mutagenesis with site-specific phosphorothioate substitutions in the ribozyme backbone to develop a powerful, general strategy for defining the ligands of catalytic metal ions within RNA. In applying this strategy to the Tetrahymena group I intron, we have identified the pro-SP phosphoryl oxygen at nucleotide C262 as a ribozyme ligand for MC. Our findings establish a direct connection between the ribozyme core and the functionally defined model of the chemical transition state, thereby extending the known set of transition-state interactions and providing information critical for the application of the recent group I intron crystallographic structures to the understanding of catalysis.

  1. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects. In resista......The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects....... In resistance arteries, the long-lasting contractile effects can only be partly and reversibly relaxed by low-molecular-weight ET(A) antagonists (ERAs). However, the neuropeptide calcitonin-gene-related peptide selectively terminates binding of ET1 to ET(A). We propose that ET1 binds polyvalently to ET(A......) and that ERAs and the physiological antagonist allosterically reduce ET(A) functions. Combining the two-state model and the two-domain model of GPCR function and considering receptor activation beyond agonist binding might lead to better anti-endothelinergic drugs. Future studies could lead to compounds...

  2. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Capra

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/.

  3. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, John A; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Singh, Mona; Funkhouser, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/).

  4. Localization of the Substrate-binding Site in the Homodimeric Mannitol Transporter, EIImtl, of Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opačić, Milena; Vos, Erwin P. P.; Hesp, Ben H.; Broos, Jaap

    2010-01-01

    The mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli, EIImtl, belongs to a class of membrane proteins coupling the transport of substrates with their chemical modification. EIImtl is functional as a homodimer, and it harbors one high affinity mannitol-binding site in the membrane-embedded C domain (IICmtl). To localize this binding site, 19 single Trp-containing mutants of EIImtl were biosynthetically labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) and mixed with azi-mannitol, a substrate analog acting as a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor. Typically, for mutants showing FRET, only one 5-FTrp was involved, whereas the 5-FTrp from the other monomer was too distant. This proves that the mannitol-binding site is asymmetrically positioned in dimeric IICmtl. Combined with the available two-dimensional projection maps of IICmtl, it is concluded that a second resting binding site is present in this transporter. Active transport of mannitol only takes place when EIImtl becomes phosphorylated at Cys384 in the cytoplasmic B domain. Stably phosphorylated EIImtl mutants were constructed, and FRET experiments showed that the position of mannitol in IICmtl remains the same. We conclude that during the transport cycle, the phosphorylated B domain has to move to the mannitol-binding site, located in the middle of the membrane, to phosphorylate mannitol. PMID:20522557

  5. Localization of the substrate-binding site in the homodimeric mannitol transporter, EIImtl, of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacić, Milena; Vos, Erwin P P; Hesp, Ben H; Broos, Jaap

    2010-08-13

    The mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli, EII(mtl), belongs to a class of membrane proteins coupling the transport of substrates with their chemical modification. EII(mtl) is functional as a homodimer, and it harbors one high affinity mannitol-binding site in the membrane-embedded C domain (IIC(mtl)). To localize this binding site, 19 single Trp-containing mutants of EII(mtl) were biosynthetically labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) and mixed with azi-mannitol, a substrate analog acting as a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor. Typically, for mutants showing FRET, only one 5-FTrp was involved, whereas the 5-FTrp from the other monomer was too distant. This proves that the mannitol-binding site is asymmetrically positioned in dimeric IIC(mtl). Combined with the available two-dimensional projection maps of IIC(mtl), it is concluded that a second resting binding site is present in this transporter. Active transport of mannitol only takes place when EII(mtl) becomes phosphorylated at Cys(384) in the cytoplasmic B domain. Stably phosphorylated EII(mtl) mutants were constructed, and FRET experiments showed that the position of mannitol in IIC(mtl) remains the same. We conclude that during the transport cycle, the phosphorylated B domain has to move to the mannitol-binding site, located in the middle of the membrane, to phosphorylate mannitol.

  6. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  7. Allosteric activation of the 5-HT3AB receptor by mCPBG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Timothy F; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2015-04-01

    The 5-HT3AB receptor contains three A and two B subunits in an A-A-B-A-B order. However, serotonin function at the 5-HT3AB receptor has been shown to depend solely on the A-A interface present in the homomeric receptor. Using mutations at sites on both the primary (E122) and complementary (Y146) faces of the B subunit, we demonstrate that meta-chlorophenyl biguanide (mCPBG), a 5-HT3 selective agonist, is capable of binding to and activating the 5-HT3AB receptor at all five subunit interfaces of the heteromer. Further, mCPBG is capable of allosterically modulating the activity of serotonin from these sites. While these five binding sites are similar enough that they conform to a monophasic dose - response relationship, we uncover subtle differences in the heteromeric binding sites. We also find that the A-A interface appears to contribute disproportionately to the efficacy of 5-HT3AB receptor activation.

  8. Binding Sites of miR-1273 Family on the mRNA of Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Ivashchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined binding sites of 2,578 miRNAs in the mRNAs of 12,175 human genes using the MirTarget program. It found that the miRNAs of miR-1273 family have between 33 and 1,074 mRNA target genes, with a free hybridization energy of 90% or more of its maximum value. The miR-1273 family consists of miR-1273a, miR-1273c, miR-1273d, miR-1273e, miR-1273f, miR-1273g-3p, miR-1273g-5p, miR-1273h-3p, and miR-1273h-5p. Unique miRNAs (miR-1273e, miR-1273f, and miR-1273g-3p have more than 400 target genes. We established 99 mRNA nucleotide sequences that contain arranged binding sites for the miR-1273 family. High conservation of each miRNA binding site in the mRNA of the target genes was found. The arranged binding sites of the miR-1273 family are located in the 5′UTR, CDS, or 3′UTR of many mRNAs. Five repeating sites containing some of the miR-1273 family’s binding sites were found in the 3′UTR of several target genes. The oligonucleotide sequences of miR-1273 binding sites located in CDSs code for homologous amino acid sequences in the proteins of target genes. The biological role of unique miRNAs was also discussed.

  9. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular TH-naloxone binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-07-27

    The binding of the opiate antagonist TH-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, TH-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables.

  10. Prenatal exposure to methylmercury alters development of adrenergic receptor binding sites in peripheral sympathetic target tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slotkin, T.A.; Orband, L.; Cowdery, T.; Kavlock, R.J.; Bartolome, J.

    1987-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on sympathetic neurotransmission, effects on development of adrenergic receptor binding sites in peripheral tissues was evaluated. In the liver, methylmercury produced a dose-dependent increase in alpha/sub 1/, alpha/sub 2/, and beta-receptor binding of radioliganda throughout the first 5 weeks of postnatal life. Similarly, renal alpha-receptor subtypes showed increased binding capabilities, but binding to alpha-receptor sites was reduced. At least some of the changes in receptors appear to be of functional significance, as physiological reactivity to adrenergic stimulation is altered in the same directions in these two tissues. The actions of methylmercury displayed tissue specificity in that the same receptor populations were largely unaffected in other tissues (lung, heart). These results suggest that methylmercury exposure in utero alters adrenergic responses through targeted effects on postsynaptic receptor populations in specific tissues.

  11. Discovering structural motifs using a structural alphabet: Application to magnesium-binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Carmay

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many metalloproteins, sequence motifs characteristic of metal-binding sites have not been found or are so short that they would not be expected to be metal-specific. Striking examples of such metalloproteins are those containing Mg2+, one of the most versatile metal cofactors in cellular biochemistry. Even when Mg2+-proteins share insufficient sequence homology to identify Mg2+-specific sequence motifs, they may still share similarity in the Mg2+-binding site structure. However, no structural motifs characteristic of Mg2+-binding sites have been reported. Thus, our aims are (i to develop a general method for discovering structural patterns/motifs characteristic of ligand-binding sites, given the 3D protein structures, and (ii to apply it to Mg2+-proteins sharing 2+-structural motifs are identified as recurring structural patterns. Results The structural alphabet-based motif discovery method has revealed the structural preference of Mg2+-binding sites for certain local/secondary structures: compared to all residues in the Mg2+-proteins, both first and second-shell Mg2+-ligands prefer loops to helices. Even when the Mg2+-proteins share no significant sequence homology, some of them share a similar Mg2+-binding site structure: 4 Mg2+-structural motifs, comprising 21% of the binding sites, were found. In particular, one of the Mg2+-structural motifs found maps to a specific functional group, namely, hydrolases. Furthermore, 2 of the motifs were not found in non metalloproteins or in Ca2+-binding proteins. The structural motifs discovered thus capture some essential biochemical and/or evolutionary properties, and hence may be useful for discovering proteins where Mg2+ plays an important biological role. Conclusion The structural motif discovery method presented herein is general and can be applied to any set of proteins with known 3D structures. This new method is timely considering the increasing number of structures for

  12. The Adenovirus Type 3 Dodecahedron's RGD Loop Comprises an HSPG Binding Site That Influences Integrin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gout

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human type 3 adenovirus dodecahedron (a virus like particle made of twelve penton bases features the ability to enter cells through Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans (HSPGs and integrins interaction and is used as a versatile vector to deliver DNA or proteins. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the pseudoviral particle with Heparan Sulphate (HS oligosaccharide shows an extradensity on the RGD loop. A set of mutants was designed to study the respective roles of the RGD sequence (RGE mutant and of a basic sequence located just downstream. Results showed that the RGE mutant binding to the HS deficient CHO-2241 cells was abolished and unexpectedly, mutation of the basic sequence (KQKR to AQAS dramatically decreased integrin recognition by the viral pseudoparticle. This basic sequence is thus involved in integrin docking, showing a close interplay between HSPGs and integrin receptors.

  13. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  14. The plasminogen binding site of the C-type lectin tetranectin is located in the carbohydrate recognition domain, and binding is sensitive to both calcium and lysine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Lorentsen, R H; Jacobsen, C

    1998-01-01

    Tetranectin, a homotrimeric protein belonging to the family of C-type lectins and structurally highly related to corresponding regions of the mannose-binding proteins, is known specifically to bind the plasminogen kringle 4 protein domain, an interaction sensitive to lysine. Surface plasmon...... resonance and isothermal calorimetry binding analyses using single-residue and deletion mutant tetranectin derivatives produced in Escherichia coli showed that the kringle 4 binding site resides in the carbohydrate recognition domain and includes residues of the putative carbohydrate binding site...

  15. Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of the mammalian sigma1-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, M; Moebius, F F; Flandorfer, A; Knaus, H G; Striessnig, J; Kempner, E; Glossmann, H

    1996-07-23

    Sigma-ligands comprise several chemically unrelated drugs such as haloperidol, pentazocine, and ditolylguanidine, which bind to a family of low molecular mass proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. These so-called sigma-receptors are believed to mediate various pharmacological effects of sigma-ligands by as yet unknown mechanisms. Based on their opposite enantioselectivity for benzomorphans and different molecular masses, two subtypes are differentiated. We purified the sigma1-binding site as a single 30-kDa protein from guinea pig liver employing the benzomorphan(+)[3H]pentazocine and the arylazide (-)[3H]azidopamil as specific probes. The purified (+)[3H]pentazocine-binding protein retained its high affinity for haloperidol, pentazocine, and ditolylguanidine. Partial amino acid sequence obtained after trypsinolysis revealed no homology to known proteins. Radiation inactivation of the pentazocine-labeled sigma1-binding site yielded a molecular mass of 24 +/- 2 kDa. The corresponding cDNA was cloned using degenerate oligonucleotides and cDNA library screening. Its open reading frame encoded a 25.3-kDa protein with at least one putative transmembrane segment. The protein expressed in yeast cells transformed with the cDNA showed the pharmacological characteristics of the brain and liver sigma1-binding site. The deduced amino acid sequence was structurally unrelated to known mammalian proteins but it shared homology with fungal proteins involved in sterol synthesis. Northern blots showed high densities of the sigma1-binding site mRNA in sterol-producing tissues. This is also in agreement with the known ability of sigma1-binding sites to interact with steroids, such as progesterone.

  16. Deep sequencing of MYC DNA-binding sites in Burkitt lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkhard Seitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MYC is a key transcription factor involved in central cellular processes such as regulation of the cell cycle, histone acetylation and ribosomal biogenesis. It is overexpressed in the majority of human tumors including aggressive B-cell lymphoma. Especially Burkitt lymphoma (BL is a highlight example for MYC overexpression due to a chromosomal translocation involving the c-MYC gene. However, no genome-wide analysis of MYC-binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq has been conducted in BL so far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ChIP-Seq was performed on 5 BL cell lines with a MYC-specific antibody giving rise to 7,054 MYC-binding sites after bioinformatics analysis of a total of approx. 19 million sequence reads. In line with previous findings, binding sites accumulate in gene sets known to be involved in the cell cycle, ribosomal biogenesis, histone acetyltransferase and methyltransferase complexes demonstrating a regulatory role of MYC in these processes. Unexpectedly, MYC-binding sites also accumulate in many B-cell relevant genes. To assess the functional consequences of MYC binding, the ChIP-Seq data were supplemented with siRNA- mediated knock-downs of MYC in BL cell lines followed by gene expression profiling. Interestingly, amongst others, genes involved in the B-cell function were up-regulated in response to MYC silencing. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The 7,054 MYC-binding sites identified by our ChIP-Seq approach greatly extend the knowledge regarding MYC binding in BL and shed further light on the enormous complexity of the MYC regulatory network. Especially our observations that (i many B-cell relevant genes are targeted by MYC and (ii that MYC down-regulation leads to an up-regulation of B-cell genes highlight an interesting aspect of BL biology.

  17. An AP1 binding site upstream of the kappa immunoglobulin intron enhancer binds inducible factors and contributes to expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanke, J T; Marcuzzi, A; Podzorski, R P; Van Ness, B

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the kappa immunoglobulin light chain gene requires developmental- and tissue-specific regulation by trans-acting factors which interact with two distinct enhancer elements. A new protein-DNA interaction has been identified upstream of the intron enhancer, within the matrix-associated region of the J-C intron. The binding activity is greatly inducible in pre-B cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 but specific complexes are found at all stages of B cell development tested. The footprinted binding site is homologous to the consensus AP1 motif. The protein components of this complex are specifically competed by an AP1 consensus motif and were shown by supershift to include c-Jun and c-Fos, suggesting that this binding site is an AP1 motif and that the Jun and Fos families of transcription factors play a role in the regulation of the kappa light chain gene. Mutation of the AP1 motif in the context of the intron enhancer was shown to decrease enhancer-mediated activation of the promoter in both pre-B cells induced with LPS and constitutive expression in mature B cells. Images PMID:7816634

  18. Interaction of triprolidine hydrochloride with serum albumins: thermodynamic and binding characteristics, and influence of site probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, B; Hegde, Ashwini H; Kalanur, Shankara S; Katrahalli, Umesha; Seetharamappa, J

    2011-04-01

    The interaction between triprolidine hydrochloride (TRP) to serum albumins viz. bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by spectroscopic methods. The experimental results revealed the static quenching mechanism in the interaction of TRP with protein. The number of binding sites close to unity for both TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA indicated the presence of single class of binding site for the drug in protein. The binding constant values of TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA were observed to be 4.75 ± 0.018 × 10(3) and 2.42 ± 0.024 × 10(4)M(-1) at 294 K, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces played the major role in the binding of TRP to proteins. The distance of separation between the serum albumin and TRP was obtained from the Förster's theory of non-radioactive energy transfer. The metal ions viz., K(+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) were found to influence the binding of the drug to protein. Displacement experiments indicated the binding of TRP to Sudlow's site I on both BSA and HSA. The CD, 3D fluorescence spectra and FT-IR spectral results revealed the changes in the secondary structure of protein upon interaction with TRP.

  19. Marked reduction in the number of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites in geriatric depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeroff, C.B.; Knight, D.L.; Krishnan, R.R.; Slotkin, T.A.; Bissette, G.; Melville, M.L.; Blazer, D.G.

    1988-10-01

    The number (Bmax) and affinity (Kd) of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites was determined in young and middle-aged controls 50 years of age and younger (n = 25), elderly normal controls over 60 years of age (n = 18), patients who fulfilled DSM-III criteria for major depression who were under 50 years of age (n = 29), patients who fulfilled DSM-III criteria for major depression who were 60 years of age and older (n = 19), and patients who fulfilled both DSM-III criteria for primary degenerative dementia and National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke-Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria for probable Alzheimer's disease (n = 13). Both groups of depressed patients (under 50 and over 60 years of age) exhibited significant reductions (decreases 42%) in the number of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites with no change in affinity, when compared with their age-matched controls. There was little overlap in Bmax values between the elderly depressed patients and their controls. The patients with probable Alzheimer's disease showed no alteration in platelet-tritiated imipramine binding. There was no statistically significant relationship between postdexamethasone plasma cortisol concentrations and tritiated imipramine binding. These results indicate that platelet-tritiated imipramine binding may have potential utility as a diagnostic adjunct in geriatric depression, and moreover that the reduction in the number of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites is not due to hypercortisolemia.

  20. Functional diversification of paralogous transcription factors via divergence in DNA binding site motif and in expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry N Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene duplication is a major driver of evolutionary innovation as it allows for an organism to elaborate its existing biological functions via specialization or diversification of initially redundant gene paralogs. Gene function can diversify in several ways. Transcription factor gene paralogs in particular, can diversify either by changes in their tissue-specific expression pattern or by changes in the DNA binding site motif recognized by their protein product, which in turn alters their gene targets. The relationship between these two modes of functional diversification of transcription factor paralogs has not been previously investigated, and is essential for understanding adaptive evolution of transcription factor gene families. FINDINGS: Based on a large set of human paralogous transcription factor pairs, we show that when the DNA binding site motifs of transcription factor paralogs are similar, the expressions of the genes that encode the paralogs have diverged, so in general, at most one of the paralogs is highly expressed in a tissue. Moreover, paralogs with diverged DNA binding site motifs tend to be diverged in their function. Conversely, two paralogs that are highly expressed in a tissue tend to have dissimilar DNA binding site motifs. We have also found that in general, within a paralogous family, tissue-specific decrease in gene expression is more frequent than what is expected by chance. CONCLUSIONS: While previous investigations of paralogous gene diversification have only considered coding sequence divergence, by explicitly quantifying divergence in DNA binding site motif, our work presents a new paradigm for investigating functional diversification. Consistent with evolutionary expectation, our quantitative analysis suggests that paralogous transcription factors have survived extinction in part, either through diversification of their DNA binding site motifs or through alterations in their tissue-specific expression

  1. Computational prediction of cAMP receptor protein (CRP binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhengchang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP, also known as catabolite gene activator protein (CAP, is an important transcriptional regulator widely distributed in many bacteria. The biological processes under the regulation of CRP are highly diverse among different groups of bacterial species. Elucidation of CRP regulons in cyanobacteria will further our understanding of the physiology and ecology of this important group of microorganisms. Previously, CRP has been experimentally studied in only two cyanobacterial strains: Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120; therefore, a systematic genome-scale study of the potential CRP target genes and binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes is urgently needed. Results We have predicted and analyzed the CRP binding sites and regulons in 12 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes using a highly effective cis-regulatory binding site scanning algorithm. Our results show that cyanobacterial CRP binding sites are very similar to those in E. coli; however, the regulons are very different from that of E. coli. Furthermore, CRP regulons in different cyanobacterial species/ecotypes are also highly diversified, ranging from photosynthesis, carbon fixation and nitrogen assimilation, to chemotaxis and signal transduction. In addition, our prediction indicates that crp genes in modern cyanobacteria are likely inherited from a common ancestral gene in their last common ancestor, and have adapted various cellular functions in different environments, while some cyanobacteria lost their crp genes as well as CRP binding sites during the course of evolution. Conclusion The CRP regulons in cyanobacteria are highly diversified, probably as a result of divergent evolution to adapt to various ecological niches. Cyanobacterial CRPs may function as lineage-specific regulators participating in various cellular processes, and are important in some lineages. However, they are dispensable in some other lineages. The

  2. Disruption of NAD~+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manali; Phadke; Natalia; Krynetskaia; Anurag; Mishra; Carlos; Barrero; Salim; Merali; Scott; A; Gothe; Evgeny; Krynetskiy

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GAPDH),and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS:We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters(diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching(FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding.RESULTS:Using MALDI-TOF analysis,we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94,S98,and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH,we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH inthe nuclear fractions of A549,HCT116,and SW48 cancer cel s after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis,and estimated enzymatic properties,intranuclear distribution,and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+(Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99 I vs 57 ± 11.1 μmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP(fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION:Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners.

  3. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M; Christiansen, Camilla; Andersen, Joakim M; Rannes, Julie B; Blennow, Andreas; Svensson, Birte

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch degrading enzymes and critically important for their function. The affinity towards a variety of starch granules as well as soluble poly- and oligosaccharides of barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) wild-type and mutants of two SBSs (SBS1 and SBS2) was investigated using Langmuir binding analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy, affinity gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance to unravel functional roles of the SBSs. SBS1 was critical for binding to different starch types as Kd increased by 7-62-fold or was not measurable upon mutation. By contrast SBS2 was particularly important for binding to soluble polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with α-1,6 linkages, suggesting that branch points are key structural elements in recognition by SBS2. Mutation at both SBS1 and SBS2 eliminated binding to all starch granule types tested. Taken together, the findings indicate that the two SBSs act in concert to localize AMY1 to the starch granule surface and that SBS2 works synergistically with the active site in the degradation of amylopectin.

  4. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 125/I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skofitsch, G.; Sills, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-11-01

    Galanin (GAL) binding sites in coronal sections of the rat brain were demonstrated using autoradiographic methods. Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-GAL binding to slide-mounted tissue sections revealed saturable binding to a single class of receptors with a Kd of approximately 0.2 nM. /sup 125/I-GAL binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the following areas: prefrontal cortex, the anterior nuclei of the olfactory bulb, several nuclei of the amygdaloid complex, the dorsal septal area, dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the ventral pallidum, the internal medullary laminae of the thalamus, medial pretectal nucleus, nucleus of the medial optic tract, borderline area of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus adjacent to the spinal trigeminal tract, the substantia gelatinosa and the superficial layers of the dorsal spinal cord. Moderate binding was observed in the piriform, periamygdaloid, entorhinal, insular cortex and the subiculum, the nucleus accumbens, medial forebrain bundle, anterior hypothalamic, ventromedial, dorsal premamillary, lateral and periventricular thalamic nuclei, the subzona incerta, Forel's field H1 and H2, periventricular gray matter, medial and superficial gray strata of the superior colliculus, dorsal parts of the central gray, peripeduncular area, the interpeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra zona compacta, ventral tegmental area, the dorsal and ventral parabrachial and parvocellular reticular nuclei. The preponderance of GAL-binding in somatosensory as well as in limbic areas suggests a possible involvement of GAL in a variety of brain functions.

  5. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  6. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  7. Cortisol decreases 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding sites in the duck thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, A.M.S.; Liu, Z.M.; Tang, F.; Pang, S.F. (Univ. of Hong Kong (China))

    1994-03-01

    The immunosuppressive effect of chronic glucocorticoid treatment on 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding