WorldWideScience

Sample records for allosteric binding sites

  1. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Thomas T; Mincer, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  2. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase

    OpenAIRE

    Tiraidis, C.; Alexacou, K. M.; Zographos, Spyros E.; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Gimisis, T.; Oikonomakos, Nikos G.

    2007-01-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b–FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where th...

  3. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Gimisis, Thanasis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2007-08-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b-FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 A resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. The contacts from FR258900 to glycogen phosphorylase are dominated by nonpolar van der Waals interactions with Gln71, Gln72, Phe196, and Val45' (from the symmetry-related subunit), and also by ionic interactions from the carboxylate groups to the three arginine residues (Arg242, Arg309, and Arg310) that form the allosteric phosphate-recognition subsite. The binding of FR258900 to the protein promotes conformational changes that stabilize an inactive T-state quaternary conformation of the enzyme. The ligand-binding mode is different from those of the potent phenoxy-phthalate and acyl urea inhibitors, previously described, illustrating the broad specificity of the allosteric site. PMID:17600143

  4. An external sodium ion binding site controls allosteric gating in TRPV1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Oseguera, Andres; Bae, Chanhyung; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons are integrators of painful stimuli and heat, yet how they integrate diverse stimuli and sense temperature remains elusive. Here, we show that external sodium ions stabilize the TRPV1 channel in a closed state, such that removing the external ion leads to channel activation. In studying the underlying mechanism, we find that the temperature sensors in TRPV1 activate in two steps to favor opening, and that the binding of sodium to an extracellular site exerts allosteric control over temperature-sensor activation and opening of the pore. The binding of a tarantula toxin to the external pore also exerts control over temperature-sensor activation, whereas binding of vanilloids influences temperature-sensitivity by largely affecting the open/closed equilibrium. Our results reveal a fundamental role of the external pore in the allosteric control of TRPV1 channel gating and provide essential constraints for understanding how these channels can be tuned by diverse stimuli. PMID:26882503

  5. NMR Mapping of the IFNAR1-EC binding site on IFNα2 reveals allosteric changes in the IFNAR2-EC binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akabayov, Sabine Ruth; Biron, Zohar; Lamken, Peter; Piehler, Jacob; Anglister, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    All type I interferons (IFNs) bind to a common cell-surface receptor consisting of two subunits. IFNs initiate intracellular signal transduction cascades by simultaneous interaction with the extracellular domains of its receptor subunits IFNAR1 and IFNAR2. In this study we mapped the surface of IFNα2 interacting with the extracellular domain of IFNAR1 (IFNAR1-EC) by following changes in or the disappearance of the [1H,15N]-TROSY-HSQC cross peaks of IFNα2 caused by the binding of the extracellular domain of IFNAR1 (IFNAR1-EC) to the binary complex of IFNα2 with IFNAR2-EC. The NMR study on the 89 kDa complex was conducted at pH 8 and 308 K using an 800 MHz spectrometer. IFNAR1 binding affected a total of 47 out of 165 IFNα2 residues contained in two large patches on the face of the protein opposing the binding site for IFNAR2 and in a third patch located on the face containing the IFNAR2 binding site. The first two patches form the IFNAR1 binding site and one of these matches the IFNAR1 binding site previously identified by site-directed mutagenesis. The third patch partially matches the IFNα2 binding site for IFNAR2-EC indicating allosteric communication between the binding sites for the two receptor subunits. PMID:20047337

  6. Multiple Transmembrane Binding Sites for p-Trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a Photoreactive Torpedo Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Allosteric Inhibitor*

    OpenAIRE

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Husain, S. Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [3H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[3H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our unders...

  7. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  8. Docking of noncompetitive inhibitors into dengue virus type 2 protease: understanding the interactions with allosteric binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Rozana; Kiat, Tan Siew; Khalid, Norzulaani; Yusof, Rohana; Newhouse, E Irene; Newhouse, James S; Alam, Masqudul; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul

    2008-08-01

    A group of flavanones and their chalcones, isolated from Boesenbergia rotunda L., were previously reported to show varying degrees of noncompetitive inhibitory activities toward Dengue virus type 2 (Den2) protease. Results obtained from automated docking studies are in agreement with experimental data in which the ligands were shown to bind to sites other than the active site of the protease. The calculated K(i) values are very small, indicating that the ligands bind quite well to the allosteric binding site. Greater inhibition by pinostrobin, compared to the other compounds, can be explained by H-bonding interaction with the backbone carbonyl of Lys74, which is bonded to Asp75 (one of the catalytic triad residues). In addition, structure-activity relationship analysis yields structural information that may be useful for designing more effective therapeutic drugs against dengue virus infections. PMID:18656912

  9. Multiple transmembrane binding sites for p-trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a photoreactive Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor allosteric inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Stewart, Deirdre S; Husain, S Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2011-06-10

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[(3)H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our understanding of the locations of allosteric modulator binding sites in the nAChR, we now characterize the interactions of a second aryl diazirine etomidate derivative, TFD-etomidate (ethyl-1-(1-(4-(3-trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl)phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate). TFD-etomidate inhibited acetylcholine-induced currents with an IC(50) = 4 μM, whereas it inhibited the binding of [(3)H]phencyclidine to the Torpedo nAChR ion channel in the resting and desensitized states with IC(50) values of 2.5 and 0.7 mm, respectively. Similar to [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate bound to a site at the γ-α subunit interface, photolabeling αM2-10 (αSer-252) and γMet-295 and γMet-299 within γM3, and to a site in the ion channel, photolabeling amino acids within each subunit M2 helix that line the lumen of the ion channel. In addition, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate photolabeled in an agonist-dependent manner amino acids within the δ subunit M2-M3 loop (δIle-288) and the δ subunit transmembrane helix bundle (δPhe-232 and δCys-236 within δM1). The fact that TFD-etomidate does not compete with ion channel blockers at concentrations that inhibit acetylcholine responses indicates that binding to sites at the γ-α subunit interface and/or within δ subunit helix bundle mediates the TFD-etomidate inhibitory effect. These results also suggest that the γ-α subunit interface is a binding site for Torpedo nAChR negative allosteric modulators (TFD-etomidate) and for positive

  10. Exploring the allosteric mechanism of dihydrodipicolinate synthase by reverse engineering of the allosteric inhibitor binding sites and its application for lysine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Feng; Chen, Zhen; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2013-03-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) catalyzes the first committed reaction of L-lysine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants and is allosterically regulated by L-lysine. In previous studies, DHDPSs from different species were proved to have different sensitivity to L-lysine inhibition. In this study, we investigated the key determinants of feedback regulation between two industrially important DHDPSs, the L-lysine-sensitive DHDPS from Escherichia coli and L-lysine-insensitive DHDPS from Corynebacterium glutamicum, by sequence and structure comparisons and site-directed mutation. Feedback inhibition of E. coli DHDPS was successfully alleviated after substitution of the residues around the inhibitor's binding sites with those of C. glutamicum DHDPS. Interestingly, mutagenesis of the lysine binding sites of C. glutamicum DHDPS according to E. coli DHDPS did not recover the expected feedback inhibition but an activation of DHDPS by L-lysine, probably due to differences in the allosteic signal transduction in the DHDPS of these two organisms. Overexpression of L-lysine-insensitive E. coli DHDPS mutants in E. coli MG1655 resulted in an improvement of L-lysine production yield by 46 %. PMID:22644522

  11. Insecticidal 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides specifically bind with high affinity to a novel allosteric site in housefly GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Nakao, Toshifumi; Sato, Kazuyuki; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs) are an important target for existing insecticides such as fiproles. These insecticides act as noncompetitive antagonists (channel blockers) for insect GABARs by binding to a site within the intrinsic channel of the GABAR. Recently, a novel class of insecticides, 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides (BPBs), was shown to inhibit GABARs by binding to a site distinct from the site for fiproles. We examined the binding site of BPBs in the adult housefly by means of radioligand-binding and electrophysiological experiments. 3-Benzamido-N-(2,6-dimethyl-4-perfluoroisopropylphenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (BPB 1) (the N-demethyl BPB) was a partial, but potent, inhibitor of [(3)H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (GABA channel blocker) binding to housefly head membranes, whereas the 3-(N-methyl)benzamido congener (the N-methyl BPB) had low or little activity. A total of 15 BPB analogs were tested for their abilities to inhibit [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to the head membranes. The N-demethyl analogs, known to be highly effective insecticides, potently inhibited the [(3)H]BPB 1 binding, but the N-methyl analogs did not even though they, too, are considered highly effective. [(3)H]BPB 1 equally bound to the head membranes from wild-type and dieldrin-resistant (rdl mutant) houseflies. GABA allosterically inhibited [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. By contrast, channel blocker-type antagonists enhanced [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to housefly head membranes by increasing the affinity of BPB 1. Antiparasitic macrolides, such as ivermectin B1a, were potent inhibitors of [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. BPB 1 inhibited GABA-induced currents in housefly GABARs expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it failed to inhibit l-glutamate-induced currents in inhibitory l-glutamate receptors. Overall, these findings indicate that BPBs act at a novel allosteric site that is different from the site for channel blocker-type antagonists and that is probably overlapped with the site for macrolides

  12. Structural basis for allosteric cross-talk between the asymmetric nucleotide binding sites of a heterodimeric ABC exporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Michael; Hürlimann, Lea M; Böhm, Simon; Schöppe, Jendrik; Grütter, Markus G; Bordignon, Enrica; Seeger, Markus A

    2014-07-29

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate vital transport processes in every living cell. ATP hydrolysis, which fuels transport, displays positive cooperativity in numerous ABC transporters. In particular, heterodimeric ABC exporters exhibit pronounced allosteric coupling between a catalytically impaired degenerate site, where nucleotides bind tightly, and a consensus site, at which ATP is hydrolyzed in every transport cycle. Whereas the functional phenomenon of cooperativity is well described, its structural basis remains poorly understood. Here, we present the apo structure of the heterodimeric ABC exporter TM287/288 and compare it to the previously solved structure with adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) bound at the degenerate site. In contrast to other ABC exporter structures, the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of TM287/288 remain in molecular contact even in the absence of nucleotides, and the arrangement of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) is not influenced by AMP-PNP binding, a notion confirmed by double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements. Nucleotide binding at the degenerate site results in structural rearrangements, which are transmitted to the consensus site via two D-loops located at the NBD interface. These loops owe their name from a highly conserved aspartate and are directly connected to the catalytically important Walker B motif. The D-loop at the degenerate site ties the NBDs together even in the absence of nucleotides and substitution of its aspartate by alanine is well-tolerated. By contrast, the D-loop of the consensus site is flexible and the aspartate to alanine mutation and conformational restriction by cross-linking strongly reduces ATP hydrolysis and substrate transport. PMID:25030449

  13. Pharmacological characterization and modeling of the binding sites of novel 1,3-bis(pyridinylethynyl)benzenes as metabotropic glutamate receptor 5-selective negative allosteric modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølck, Christina; Harpsøe, Kasper; Gloriam, David E;

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) is a potential drug target in neurological and psychiatric disorders, and subtype-selective allosteric modulators have attracted much attention as potential drug candidates. In this study, the binding sites of three novel 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl......)pyridine (MPEP)-derived negative allosteric modulators, 2-, 3-, and 4-BisPEB, have been characterized. 2-, 3-, and 4-BisPEB are 1,3-bis(pyridinylethynyl)-benzenes and differ only by the position of the nitrogen atoms in the pyridine rings. Despite their high structural similarity, 2-BisPEB [1,3-bis(pyridin-2...

  14. Characterization of an allosteric citalopram-binding site at the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Breum Larsen, Mads; Neubauer, Henrik Amtoft;

    2005-01-01

    -citalopram, sertraline,       serotonin and paroxetine. EC50 values for S- and R-citalopram are 3.6 +/-       0.4 microm and 19.4 +/- 2.3 microm, respectively. Fluoxetine, venlafaxine       and duloxetine have no significant effect on the dissociation of       [3H]S-citalopram. Allosteric modulation of dissociation is...

  15. Exploiting protein flexibility to predict the location of allosteric sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjkovich Alejandro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allostery is one of the most powerful and common ways of regulation of protein activity. However, for most allosteric proteins identified to date the mechanistic details of allosteric modulation are not yet well understood. Uncovering common mechanistic patterns underlying allostery would allow not only a better academic understanding of the phenomena, but it would also streamline the design of novel therapeutic solutions. This relatively unexplored therapeutic potential and the putative advantages of allosteric drugs over classical active-site inhibitors fuel the attention allosteric-drug research is receiving at present. A first step to harness the regulatory potential and versatility of allosteric sites, in the context of drug-discovery and design, would be to detect or predict their presence and location. In this article, we describe a simple computational approach, based on the effect allosteric ligands exert on protein flexibility upon binding, to predict the existence and position of allosteric sites on a given protein structure. Results By querying the literature and a recently available database of allosteric sites, we gathered 213 allosteric proteins with structural information that we further filtered into a non-redundant set of 91 proteins. We performed normal-mode analysis and observed significant changes in protein flexibility upon allosteric-ligand binding in 70% of the cases. These results agree with the current view that allosteric mechanisms are in many cases governed by changes in protein dynamics caused by ligand binding. Furthermore, we implemented an approach that achieves 65% positive predictive value in identifying allosteric sites within the set of predicted cavities of a protein (stricter parameters set, 0.22 sensitivity, by combining the current analysis on dynamics with previous results on structural conservation of allosteric sites. We also analyzed four biological examples in detail, revealing

  16. Domain structure of the large subunit of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. Location of the binding site for the allosteric inhibitor UMP in the COOH-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large subunit of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase is responsible for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis from NH3 and for the binding of the allosteric activators ornithine and IMP and of the inhibitor UMP. Elastase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin inactivate the enzyme and cleave the large subunit at a site approximately 15 kDa from the COOH terminus UMP, IMP, and ornithine prevent this cleavage and the inactivation. Upon irradiation with ultraviolet light in the presence of [14C]UMP, the large subunit is labeled selectively and specifically. The labeling is inhibited by ornithine and IMP. Cleavage of the 15-kDa COOH-terminal region by prior treatment of the enzyme with trypsin prevents the labeling on subsequent irradation with [14C]UMP. The [14C]UMP-labeled large subunit is resistant to proteolytic cleavage, but if it is treated with SDS the resistance is lost, indicating that UMP is cross-linked to its binding site and that the protection is due to conformational factors. Since the binding sites for IMP and UMP overlap, most probably IMP also binds in this domain. The protection from proteolysis by ornithine suggests that ornithine binds in the same domain. To account for the effects of the allosteric effectors on the binding of ATP, the authors propose a scheme where the two halves of the large subunit form a pseudohomodimer by complementary isologous association, thus placing the NH2 half, which is involved in the binding of the molecule of ATP that yields Pi, close to the regulatory domain

  17. Mapping Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Allosteric Site(s): Critical Molecular Determinant and Signaling Profile of GAT100, a Novel, Potent, and Irreversibly Binding Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprairie, Robert B; Kulkarni, Abhijit R; Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Hurst, Dow P; Lynch, Diane; Reggio, Patricia H; Janero, David R; Pertwee, Roger G; Stevenson, Lesley A; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Thakur, Ganesh A

    2016-06-15

    agonism associated with Org27569 and PSNCBAM-1. Computational docking studies implicate C7.38(382) as a key feature of GAT100 ligand-binding motif. These data help inform the engineering of newer-generation, druggable CB1R allosteric modulators and demonstrate the utility of GAT100 as a covalent probe for mapping structure-function correlates characteristic of the druggable CB1R allosteric space. PMID:27046127

  18. An Allosteric Cross-Talk Between the Activation Loop and the ATP Binding Site Regulates the Activation of Src Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheta-Martínez, Encarna; Saladino, Giorgio; Morando, Maria Agnese; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Lelli, Moreno; Sutto, Ludovico; D’Amelio, Nicola; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation loop is a fundamental step in the activation of most protein kinases. In the case of the Src tyrosine kinase, a prototypical kinase due to its role in cancer and its historic importance, phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 in the activation loop is known to rigidify the structure and contribute to the switch from the inactive to a fully active form. However, whether or not phosphorylation is able per-se to induce a fully active conformation, that efficiently binds ATP and phosphorylates the substrate, is less clear. Here we employ a combination of solution NMR and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to fully map the effects of phosphorylation and ATP/ADP cofactor loading on the conformational landscape of Src tyrosine kinase. We find that both phosphorylation and cofactor binding are needed to induce a fully active conformation. What is more, we find a complex interplay between the A-loop and the hinge motion where the phosphorylation of the activation-loop has a significant allosteric effect on the dynamics of the C-lobe.

  19. Allosteric effects of R- and S-citalopram on the human 5-HT transporter: evidence for distinct high- and low-affinity binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Gether, Ulrik; Rasmussen, Søren G

    2007-01-01

    cells, and their 5-HT uptake and uptake inhibitor-binding abilities were studied. The hSERT mutations did not alter affinities for 5-HT or paroxetine, but high-affinity binding of S-citalopram was severely affected, particularly by the I172M, and Y95F/I172M mutations - K(i) respectively 4 nM (wild......-type), 35 nM, 1000 nM, and 17.100 nM (mutants). The allosteric site however, in wild-type hSERT and the three mutants was unaffected by the mutations as attenuation of the dissociation rate of the [(3)H]-paroxetine:hSERT complex in the presence of S-citalopram or paroxetine was the same for wild-type h...

  20. Computational fragment-based drug design to explore the hydrophobic sub-pocket of the mitotic kinesin Eg5 allosteric binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguievetskaia, Ksenia; Martin-Chanas, Laetitia; Vorotyntsev, Artem; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Brotel, Xavier; Adcock, Stewart A; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Delfaud, Francois; Moriaud, Fabrice

    2009-08-01

    Eg5, a mitotic kinesin exclusively involved in the formation and function of the mitotic spindle has attracted interest as an anticancer drug target. Eg5 is co-crystallized with several inhibitors bound to its allosteric binding pocket. Each of these occupies a pocket formed by loop 5/helix alpha2 (L5/alpha2). Recently designed inhibitors additionally occupy a hydrophobic pocket of this site. The goal of the present study was to explore this hydrophobic pocket with our MED-SuMo fragment-based protocol, and thus discover novel chemical structures that might bind as inhibitors. The MED-SuMo software is able to compare and superimpose similar interaction surfaces upon the whole protein data bank (PDB). In a fragment-based protocol, MED-SuMo retrieves MED-Portions that encode protein-fragment binding sites and are derived from cross-mining protein-ligand structures with libraries of small molecules. Furthermore we have excluded intra-family MED-Portions derived from Eg5 ligands that occupy the hydrophobic pocket and predicted new potential ligands by hybridization that would fill simultaneously both pockets. Some of the latter having original scaffolds and substituents in the hydrophobic pocket are identified in libraries of synthetically accessible molecules by the MED-Search software. PMID:19533373

  1. Differentiating a Ligand's Chemical Requirements for Allosteric Interactions from Those for Protein Binding. Phenylalanine Inhibition of Pyruvate Kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isoform of pyruvate kinase from brain and muscle of mammals (M1-PYK) is allosterically inhibited by phenylalanine. Initial observations in this model allosteric system indicate that Ala binds competitively with Phe, but elicits a minimal allosteric response. Thus, the allosteric ligand of this system must have requirements for eliciting an allosteric response in addition to the requirements for binding. Phe analogues have been used to dissect what chemical properties of Phe are responsible for eliciting the allosteric response. We first demonstrate that the L-2-aminopropanaldehyde substructure of the amino acid ligand is primarily responsible for binding to M1-PYK. Since the allosteric response to Ala is minimal and linear addition of methyl groups beyond the -carbon increase the magnitude of the allosteric response, we conclude that moieties beyond the -carbon are primarily responsible for allostery. Instead of an all-or-none mechanism of allostery, these findings support the idea that the bulk of the hydrophobic side chain, but not the aromatic nature, is the primary determinant of the magnitude of the observed allosteric inhibition. The use of these results to direct structural studies has resulted in a 1.65 Angstroms structure of M1-PYK with Ala bound. The coordination of Ala in the allosteric amino acid binding site confirms the binding role of the L-2-aminopropanaldehyde substructure of the ligand. Collectively, this study confirms that a ligand can have chemical regions specific for eliciting the allosteric signal in addition to the chemical regions necessary for binding

  2. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W. (SVIMR-A); (Avea); (Monash IPS)

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  3. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity.

  4. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Zachariah H; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T; Shaw, David E; Seeliger, Markus A

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  5. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  6. Allosteric and orthosteric sites in CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), a chimeric receptor approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Steen, Anne; Jensen, Pia C;

    2011-01-01

    -allosteric molecules. A chimera was successfully constructed between CCR5 and the closely related CCR2 by transferring all extracellular regions of CCR2 to CCR5, i.e. a Trojan horse that resembles CCR2 extracellularly but signals through a CCR5 transmembrane unit. The chimera bound CCR2 (CCL2 and CCL7), but not CCR5...... preserved, the allosteric enhancement of chemokine binding was disrupted. In summary, the Trojan horse chimera revealed that orthosteric and allosteric sites could be structurally separated and still act together with transmission of agonism and antagonism across the different receptor units....

  7. Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulation of an α1β3γ2 γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor by Binding to a Site in the Transmembrane Domain at the γ+-β- Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, Selwyn S; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Savechenkov, Pavel Y; Chiara, David C; Desai, Rooma; Bruzik, Karol S; Miller, Keith W; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2015-09-18

    In the process of developing safer general anesthetics, isomers of anesthetic ethers and barbiturates have been discovered that act as convulsants and inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) rather than potentiators. It is unknown whether these convulsants act as negative allosteric modulators by binding to the intersubunit anesthetic-binding sites in the GABAAR transmembrane domain (Chiara, D. C., Jayakar, S. S., Zhou, X., Zhang, X., Savechenkov, P. Y., Bruzik, K. S., Miller, K. W., and Cohen, J. B. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 19343-19357) or to known convulsant sites in the ion channel or extracellular domains. Here, we show that S-1-methyl-5-propyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl) barbituric acid (S-mTFD-MPPB), a photoreactive analog of the convulsant barbiturate S-MPPB, inhibits α1β3γ2 but potentiates α1β3 GABAAR responses. In the α1β3γ2 GABAAR, S-mTFD-MPPB binds in the transmembrane domain with high affinity to the γ(+)-β(-) subunit interface site with negative energetic coupling to GABA binding in the extracellular domain at the β(+)-α(-) subunit interfaces. GABA inhibits S-[(3)H]mTFD-MPPB photolabeling of γ2Ser-280 (γM2-15') in this site. In contrast, within the same site GABA enhances photolabeling of β3Met-227 in βM1 by an anesthetic barbiturate, R-[(3)H]methyl-5-allyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (mTFD-MPAB), which differs from S-mTFD-MPPB in structure only by chirality and two hydrogens (propyl versus allyl). S-mTFD-MPPB and R-mTFD-MPAB are predicted to bind in different orientations at the γ(+)-β(-) site, based upon the distance in GABAAR homology models between γ2Ser-280 and β3Met-227. These results provide an explanation for S-mTFD-MPPB inhibition of α1β3γ2 GABAAR function and provide a first demonstration that an intersubunit-binding site in the GABAAR transmembrane domain binds negative and positive allosteric modulators. PMID:26229099

  8. Steric hindrance mutagenesis in the conserved extracellular vestibule impedes allosteric binding of antidepressants to the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Shi, Lei; Beuming, Thijs;

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) controls synaptic serotonin levels and is the primary target for antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (e.g. (S)-citalopram) and tricyclic antidepressants (e.g. clomipramine). In addition to a high affinity binding site, SERT possesses a...... involved in the allosteric binding in the extracellular vestibule located above the central substrate binding (S1) site. Indeed, mutagenesis of selected residues in the vestibule reduces the allosteric potency of (S)-citalopram and clomipramine. The identified site is further supported by the inhibitory...

  9. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, B. R. C.; Schaub, M. T.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites. PMID:27561351

  10. Recent advance in the discovery of allosteric inhibitors binding to the AMP site of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase%果糖-1,6-二磷酸酶AMP变构抑制剂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李占梅; 别建波; 宋宏锐; 徐柏玲

    2011-01-01

    果糖-1,6-二磷酸酶(fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase,FBPase)是肝葡萄糖异生路径中的一个限速酶,催化果糖-1,6-二磷酸水解为果糖-6-磷酸.抑制FBPase的活性,可减少内源性葡萄糖的生成,降低血糖水平,FBPase抑制剂是潜在的新型治疗Ⅱ型糖尿病的药物.本文综述了近年来FBPase一磷酸腺苷(adenosine monophosphate,AMP)变构抑制剂研究的最新进展.%Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the pathway of gluconeogenesis, can catalyze the hydrolysis of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate to fructose-6-phosphate. Upon inhibiting the activity of FBPase, the production of endogenous glucose can be decreased and the level of blood glucose lowered. Therefore, inhibitors of FBPase are expected to be novel potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes. Recent research efforts were reviewed in the field of developing allosteric inhibitors interacting with the AMP binding site of FBPase.

  11. Comparison of crystal and solution hemoglobin binding of selected antigelling agents and allosteric modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper details comprehensive binding studies (solution and X-ray) of human hemoglobin A with a group of halogenated carboxylic acids that were investigated as potential antisickling agents. It is, to our knowledge, the first study to compare solution and crystal binding for a series of compounds under similar high-salt conditions used for cocrystallization. The compounds include [(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxy]acetic acid, [(p-bromobenzyl)oxy]acetic acid, clofibric acid, and bezafibrate. The location and stereochemistry of binding sites have been established by X-ray crystallography, while the number of binding sites and affinity constants were measured by using equilibrium dialysis. The observed crystal structures are consistent with the binding observed in solution and that the number of binding sites is independent of salt concentration, while the binding constant increases with increasing salt concentration. The studies also reveal that relatively small changes in the chemical structure of a drug molecule can result in entirely different binding sites on the protein. Moreover, the X-ray studies provide a possible explanation for the multiplicity in function exhibited by these compounds as allosteric modulators and/or antisickling agents. Finally, the studies indicate that these compounds bind differently to the R and T states of hemoglobin, and observation of special significance to the original design of these agents

  12. Comparison of crystal and solution hemoglobin binding of selected antigelling agents and allosteric modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehanna, A.S.; Abraham, D.J. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (USA))

    1990-04-24

    This paper details comprehensive binding studies (solution and X-ray) of human hemoglobin A with a group of halogenated carboxylic acids that were investigated as potential antisickling agents. It is, to our knowledge, the first study to compare solution and crystal binding for a series of compounds under similar high-salt conditions used for cocrystallization. The compounds include ((3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxy)acetic acid, ((p-bromobenzyl)oxy)acetic acid, clofibric acid, and bezafibrate. The location and stereochemistry of binding sites have been established by X-ray crystallography, while the number of binding sites and affinity constants were measured by using equilibrium dialysis. The observed crystal structures are consistent with the binding observed in solution and that the number of binding sites is independent of salt concentration, while the binding constant increases with increasing salt concentration. The studies also reveal that relatively small changes in the chemical structure of a drug molecule can result in entirely different binding sites on the protein. Moreover, the X-ray studies provide a possible explanation for the multiplicity in function exhibited by these compounds as allosteric modulators and/or antisickling agents. Finally, the studies indicate that these compounds bind differently to the R and T states of hemoglobin, and observation of special significance to the original design of these agents.

  13. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W. (U. Sao Paulo); (Kentucky)

    2012-05-25

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the A{beta} peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  14. Mapping of the Allosteric Site in Cholesterol Hydroxylase CYP46A1 for Efavirenz, a Drug That Stimulates Enzyme Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kyle W; Mast, Natalia; Hudgens, Jeffrey W; Lin, Joseph B; Turko, Illarion V; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-05-27

    Cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is a microsomal enzyme and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase that controls cholesterol elimination from the brain. This P450 is also a potential target for Alzheimer disease because it can be activated pharmacologically by some marketed drugs, as exemplified by efavirenz, the anti-HIV medication. Previously, we suggested that pharmaceuticals activate CYP46A1 allosterically through binding to a site on the cytosolic protein surface, which is different from the enzyme active site facing the membrane. Here we identified this allosteric site for efavirenz on CYP46A1 by using a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to MS, computational modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and analysis of the CYP46A1 crystal structure. We also mapped the binding region for the CYP46A1 redox partner oxidoreductase and found that the allosteric and redox partner binding sites share a common border. On the basis of the data obtained, we propose the mechanism of CYP46A1 allostery and the pathway for the signal transmission from the P450 allosteric site to the active site. PMID:27056331

  15. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-01-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM–MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM–MS data. PMID:27418477

  16. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    CERN Document Server

    Amor, Benjamin R C; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric regulation is central to many biochemical processes. Allosteric sites provide a target to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methods to predict them. Here, we present an efficient graph-theoretical approach for identifying allosteric sites and the mediating interactions that connect them to the active site. Using an atomistic graph with edges weighted by covalent and non-covalent bond energies, we obtain a bond-to-bond propensity that quantifies the effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. We use this propensity to detect the sites and communication pathways most strongly linked to the active site, assessing their significance through quantile regression and comparison against a reference set of 100 generic proteins. We exemplify our method in detail with three well-studied allosteric proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting the location of the allosteric site and identifying key allosteric interactions. Consistent prediction of...

  17. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  18. Chemogenomics of allosteric binding sites in GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemogenomic techniques connect the chemical and biological domains to establish ligand and target relationships not evident from the individual disciplines. Chemogenomics has been applied in lead generation, target classification, focused library design as well as selectivity and polypharmacology...

  19. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  20. Allosteric transition: a comparison of two models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Two recent models are in use for analysis of allosteric drug action at receptor sites remote from orthosteric binding sites. One is an allosteric two-state mechanical model derived in 2000 by David Hall. The other is an extended operational model developed in 2007 by Arthur Christopo......Introduction Two recent models are in use for analysis of allosteric drug action at receptor sites remote from orthosteric binding sites. One is an allosteric two-state mechanical model derived in 2000 by David Hall. The other is an extended operational model developed in 2007 by Arthur...

  1. Targeting the Akt1 allosteric site to identify novel scaffolds through virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Oya Gursoy; Olmez, Elif Ozkirimli; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2014-02-01

    Preclinical data and tumor specimen studies report that AKT kinases are related to many human cancers. Therefore, identification and development of small molecule inhibitors targeting AKT and its signaling pathway can be therapeutic in treatment of cancer. Numerous studies report inhibitors that target the ATP-binding pocket in the kinase domains, but the similarity of this site, within the kinase family makes selectivity a major problem. The sequence identity amongst PH domains is significantly lower than that in kinase domains and developing more selective inhibitors is possible if PH domain is targeted. This in silico screening study is the first time report toward the identification of potential allosteric inhibitors expected to bind the cavity between kinase and PH domains of Akt1. Structural information of Akt1 was used to develop structure-based pharmacophore models comprising hydrophobic, acceptor, donor and ring features. The 3D structural information of previously identified allosteric Akt inhibitors obtained from literature was employed to develop a ligand-based pharmacophore model. Database was generated with drug like subset of ZINC and screening was performed based on 3D similarity to the selected pharmacophore hypotheses. Binding modes and affinities of the ligands were predicted by Glide software. Top scoring hits were further analyzed considering 2D similarity between the compounds, interactions with Akt1, fitness to pharmacophore models, ADME, druglikeness criteria and Induced-Fit docking. Using virtual screening methodologies, derivatives of 3-methyl-xanthine, quinoline-4-carboxamide and 2-[4-(cyclohexa-1,3-dien-1-yl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]phenol were proposed as potential leads for allosteric inhibition of Akt1. PMID:24291487

  2. Labeling by [3H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine of two high affinity binding sites in guinea pig brain: Evidence for allosteric regulation by calcium channel antagonists and pseudoallosteric modulation by sigma ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium binding studies with the sigma receptor ligand [3H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([3H]DTG) demonstrated two high affinity binding sites in membranes prepared from guinea pig brain. The apparent Kd values of DTG for sites 1 and 2 were 11.9 and 37.6 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 1045 and 1423 fmol/mg of protein. Site 1 had high affinity for (+)-pentazocine, haloperidol, (R)-(+)-PPP, carbepentane, and other sigma ligands, suggesting a similarity with the dextromethorphan/sigma 1 binding site described by Musacchio et al. [Life Sci. 45:1721-1732 (1989)]. Site 2 had high affinity for DTG and haloperidol (Ki = 36.1 nM) and low affinity for most other sigma ligands. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that [3H]DTG dissociated in a biphasic manner from both site 1 and site 2. DTG and haloperidol increased the dissociation rate of [3H]DTG from site 1 and site 2, demonstrating the presence of pseudoallosteric interactions. Inorganic calcium channel blockers such as Cd2+ selectively increased the dissociation rate of [3H]DTG from site 2, suggesting an association of this binding site with calcium channels

  3. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam E. El-Fakahany

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An allosteric modulator is a ligand that binds to an allosteric site on the receptor and changes receptor conformation to produce increase (positive cooperativity or decrease (negative cooperativity in the binding or action of an orthosteric agonist (e.g., acetylcholine. Since the identification of gallamine as the first allosteric modulator of muscarinic receptors in 1976, this unique mode of receptor modulation has been intensively studied by many groups. This review summarizes over 30 years of research on the molecular mechanisms of allosteric interactions of drugs with the receptor and for new allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors with potential therapeutic use. Identification of positive modulators of acetylcholine binding and function that enhance neurotransmission and the discovery of highly selective allosteric modulators are mile-stones on the way to novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders involving impaired cognitive function.

  4. Allosteric, chiral-selective drug binding to DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Xiaogang; Trent, John O.; Fokt, Izabela; Priebe, Waldemar; Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2000-01-01

    The binding interactions of (−)-daunorubicin (WP900), a newly synthesized enantiomer of the anticancer drug (+)-daunorubicin, with right- and left-handed DNA, have been studied quantitatively by equilibrium dialysis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism. (+)-Daunorubicin binds selectively to right-handed DNA, whereas the enantiomeric WP900 ligand binds selectively to left-handed DNA. Further, binding of the enantiomeric pair to DNA is clearly chirally ...

  5. Plant Hormone Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Napier, Richard

    2004-01-01

    • Aims Receptors for plant hormones are becoming identified with increasing rapidity, although a frustrating number remain unknown. There have also been many more hormone‐binding proteins described than receptors. This Botanical Briefing summarizes what has been discovered about hormone binding sites, their discovery and descriptions, and will not dwell on receptor functions or activities except where these are relevant to understand binding.

  6. The N-Terminal Domain of the E. coli PriA Helicase Contains Both the DNA- and the Nucleotide-Binding Sites. Energetics of Domain-DNA Interactions and Allosteric Effect of the Nucleotide Cofactors§

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, Michal R.; Bujalowski, Paul J.; Jezewska, Maria J.; Gmyrek, Aleksandra M.; Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz

    2011-01-01

    Functional interactions of the E. coli PriA helicase 181N-terminal domain with the DNA and nucleotide cofactors have been quantitatively examined. The isolated 181N-terminal domain forms a stable dimer in solution, most probably reflecting the involvement of the domain in specific cooperative interactions of the intact PriA protein - dsDNA complex. Only one monomer of the domain dimer binds the DNA, i.e., the dimer has one effective DNA-binding site. Although the total site-size of the dimer ...

  7. Steric and allosteric effects of fatty acids on the binding of warfarin to human serum albumin revealed by molecular dynamics and free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Shin-Ichi; Amisaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) binds with drugs and fatty acids (FAs). This study was initiated to elucidate the relationship between the warfarin binding affinity of HSA and the positions of bound FA molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations of 11 HSA-warfarin-myristate complexes were performed. HSA-warfarin binding free energy was then calculated for each of the complexes by the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The results indicated that the magnitude of the binding free energy was smaller in HSA-warfarin complexes that had 4 or more myristate molecules than in complexes with no myristate molecules. The unfavorable effect on the HSA-warfarin binding affinity was caused sterically by the binding of a myristate molecule to the FA binding site closest to the warfarin binding site. On the other hand, the magnitude of HSA-warfarin binding free energy was largest when 3 myristate molecules were bound to the high-affinity sites. The strongest HSA-warfarin binding was attributable to favorable entropic contribution related to larger atomic fluctuations of the amino acid residues at the warfarin binding site. In the binding of 2 myristate molecules to the sites with the highest and second-highest affinities, allosteric modulation that enhanced electrostatic interactions between warfarin and some of the amino acid residues around the warfarin binding site was observed. This study clarified the structural and energetic properties of steric/allosteric effects of FAs on the HSA-warfarin binding affinity and illustrated the approach to analyze protein-ligand interactions in situations such that multiple ligands bind to the other sites of the protein. PMID:21720037

  8. Assessing the structural conservation of protein pockets to study functional and allosteric sites: implications for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daura Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the classical, active-site oriented drug-development approach reaching its limits, protein ligand-binding sites in general and allosteric sites in particular are increasingly attracting the interest of medicinal chemists in the search for new types of targets and strategies to drug development. Given that allostery represents one of the most common and powerful means to regulate protein function, the traditional drug discovery approach of targeting active sites can be extended by targeting allosteric or regulatory protein pockets that may allow the discovery of not only novel drug-like inhibitors, but activators as well. The wealth of available protein structural data can be exploited to further increase our understanding of allosterism, which in turn may have therapeutic applications. A first step in this direction is to identify and characterize putative effector sites that may be present in already available structural data. Results We performed a large-scale study of protein cavities as potential allosteric and functional sites, by integrating publicly available information on protein sequences, structures and active sites for more than a thousand protein families. By identifying common pockets across different structures of the same protein family we developed a method to measure the pocket's structural conservation. The method was first parameterized using known active sites. We characterized the predicted pockets in terms of sequence and structural conservation, backbone flexibility and electrostatic potential. Although these different measures do not tend to correlate, their combination is useful in selecting functional and regulatory sites, as a detailed analysis of a handful of protein families shows. We finally estimated the numbers of potential allosteric or regulatory pockets that may be present in the data set, finding that pockets with putative functional and effector characteristics are widespread across

  9. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Paer; Jansson, Anna; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower). Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM) and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD). PMID:27253209

  10. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chandramohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower. Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD.

  11. Basis for Half-Site Ligand Binding in Yeast NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase†

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, An-Ping; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Yeast NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase is an allosterically regulated octameric enzyme composed of four heterodimers of a catalytic IDH2 subunit and a regulatory IDH1 subunit. Despite structural predictions that the enzyme would contain eight isocitrate binding sites, four NAD+ binding sites, and four AMP binding sites, only half of the sites for each ligand are measurable in binding assays. Based on a potential interaction between side chains of Cys-150 residues in IDH2 subunits in eac...

  12. Allosteric vs. spontaneous exit-site (E-site) tRNA dissociation early in protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2011-10-11

    During protein synthesis, deacylated transfer RNAs leave the ribosome via an exit (E) site after mRNA translocation. How the ribosome regulates tRNA dissociation and whether functional linkages between the aminoacyl (A) and E sites modulate the dynamics of protein synthesis have long been debated. Using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments, we find that, during early cycles of protein elongation, tRNAs are often held in the E site until being allosterically released when the next aminoacyl tRNA binds to the A site. This process is regulated by the length and sequence of the nascent peptide and by the conformational state, detected by tRNA proximity, prior to translocation. In later cycles, E-site tRNA dissociates spontaneously. Our results suggest that the distribution of pretranslocation tRNA states and posttranslocation pathways are correlated within each elongation cycle via communication between distant subdomains in the ribosome, but that this correlation between elongation cycle intermediates does not persist into succeeding cycles. PMID:21969541

  13. The use of isomeric testosterone dimers to explore allosteric effects in substrate binding to cytochrome P450 CYP3A4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Ilia G; Mak, Piotr J; Grinkova, Yelena V; Bastien, Dominic; Bérubé, Gervais; Sligar, Stephen G; Kincaid, James R

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 is the main drug-metabolizing enzyme in the human liver, being responsible for oxidation of 50% of all pharmaceuticals metabolized by human P450 enzymes. Possessing a large substrate binding pocket, it can simultaneously bind several substrate molecules and often exhibits a complex pattern of drug-drug interactions. In order to better understand structural and functional aspects of binding of multiple substrate molecules to CYP3A4 we used resonance Raman and UV-VIS spectroscopy to document the effects of binding of synthetic testosterone dimers of different configurations, cis-TST2 and trans-TST2. We directly demonstrate that the binding of two steroid molecules, which can assume multiple possible configurations inside the substrate binding pocket of monomeric CYP3A4, can lead to active site structural changes that affect functional properties. Using resonance Raman spectroscopy, we have documented perturbations in the ferric and Fe-CO states by these substrates, and compared these results with effects caused by binding of monomeric TST. While the binding of trans-TST2 yields results similar to those obtained with monomeric TST, the binding of cis-TST2 is much tighter and results in significantly more pronounced conformational changes of the porphyrin side chains and Fe-CO unit. In addition, binding of an additional monomeric TST molecule in the remote allosteric site significantly improves binding affinity and the overall spin shift for CYP3A4 with trans-TST2 dimer bound inside the substrate binding pocket. This result provides the first direct evidence for an allosteric effect of the peripheral binding site at the protein-membrane interface on the functional properties of CYP3A4. PMID:26774838

  14. Allosteric role of the large-scale domain opening in biological catch-binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2009-05-01

    The proposed model demonstrates the allosteric role of the two-domain region of the receptor protein in the increased lifetimes of biological receptor/ligand bonds subjected to an external force. The interaction between the domains is represented by a bounded potential, containing two minima corresponding to the attached and separated conformations of the two protein domains. The dissociative potential with a single minimum describing receptor/ligand binding fluctuates between deep and shallow states, depending on whether the domains are attached or separated. A number of valuable analytic expressions are derived and are used to interpret experimental data for two catch bonds. The P-selectin/P-selectin-glycoprotein-ligand-1 (PSGL-1) bond is controlled by the interface between the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and lectin domains of P-selectin, and the type 1 fimbrial adhesive protein (FimH)/mannose bond is governed by the interface between the lectin and pilin domains of FimH. Catch-binding occurs in these systems when the external force stretches the receptor proteins and increases the interdomain distance. The allosteric effect is supported by independent measurements, in which the domains are kept separated by attachment of another ligand. The proposed model accurately describes the experimentally observed anomalous behavior of the lifetimes of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 and FimH/mannose complexes as a function of applied force and provides valuable insights into the mechanism of catch-binding.

  15. Elucidation of the ATP7B N-domain Mg2+-ATP coordination site and its allosteric regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Hercend

    Full Text Available The diagnostic of orphan genetic disease is often a puzzling task as less attention is paid to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of these rare disorders at the molecular level. We present here a multidisciplinary approach using molecular modeling tools and surface plasmonic resonance to study the function of the ATP7B protein, which is impaired in the Wilson disease. Experimentally validated in silico models allow the elucidation in the Nucleotide binding domain (N-domain of the Mg(2+-ATP coordination site and answer to the controversial role of the Mg(2+ ion in the nucleotide binding process. The analysis of protein motions revealed a substantial effect on a long flexible loop branched to the N-domain protein core. We demonstrated the capacity of the loop to disrupt the interaction between Mg(2+-ATP complex and the N-domain and propose a role for this loop in the allosteric regulation of the nucleotide binding process.

  16. Thermodynamic Characterization of New Positive Allosteric Modulators Binding to the Glutamate Receptor A2 Ligand-Binding Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Francotte, Pierre; Goffin, Eric; Botez, Iuliana; Danober, Laurence; Lestage, Pierre; Pirotte, Bernard; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen; Olsen, Lars; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-01

    5a (5-F) and 5b (6-F) are entropy driven. For 5d (8-F), both quantities were equal in size. Thermodynamic integration (TI) and one-step perturbation (OSP) were used to calculate the relative binding affinity of the modulators. The OSP calculations had a higher predictive power than those from TI......Positive allosteric modulation of the ionotropic glutamate receptor GluA2 presents a potential treatment of cognitive disorders, for example, Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we describe the synthesis, pharmacology, and thermodynamic studies of a series of monofluoro-substituted 3......,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxides. Measurements of ligand binding by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed similar binding affinities for the modulator series at the GluA2 LBD but differences in the thermodynamic driving forces. Binding of 5c (7-F) and 6 (no-F) is enthalpy driven, and...

  17. Allosteric modulation of caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Hans-Georg; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Caspases are proteolytic enzymes mainly involved in the induction and execution phases of apoptosis. This type of programmed cell death is an essential regulatory process required to maintain the integrity and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Inappropriate apoptosis is attributed a key role in many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, ischemic damage, autoimmune diseases and cancer. Allosteric modulation of the function of a protein occurs when the regulatory trigger, such as the binding of a small effector or inhibitor molecule, takes place some distance from the protein's active site. In recent years, several caspases have been identified that possess allosteric sites and binding of small molecule to these sites resulted in the modulation of enzyme activities. Regulation of caspase activity by small molecule allosteric modulators is believed to be of great therapeutic importance. In this review we give brief highlights on recent developments in identifying and characterizing natural and synthetic allosteric inhibitors as well as activators of caspases and discuss their potential in drug discovery and protein engineering. PMID:21807025

  18. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein-Seetharaman Judith

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%, the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%, the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86% and 8/9 (89% for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71% and 7/9 (78% for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by

  19. Allosteric vs. spontaneous exit-site (E-site) tRNA dissociation early in protein synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2011-01-01

    During protein synthesis, deacylated transfer RNAs leave the ribosome via an exit (E) site after mRNA translocation. How the ribosome regulates tRNA dissociation and whether functional linkages between the aminoacyl (A) and E sites modulate the dynamics of protein synthesis have long been debated. Using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments, we find that, during early cycles of protein elongation, tRNAs are often held in the E site until being allosterically relea...

  20. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Kinetics Demonstrate Long Range Allosteric Effects of Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deredge, Daniel; Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A; Wintrode, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    New nonnucleoside analogs are being developed as part of a multi-drug regimen to treat hepatitis C viral infections. Particularly promising are inhibitors that bind to the surface of the thumb domain of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B). Numerous crystal structures have been solved showing small molecule non-nucleoside inhibitors bound to the hepatitis C viral polymerase, but these structures alone do not define the mechanism of inhibition. Our prior kinetic analysis showed that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) do not block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from the initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex. Here we have mapped the effect of three NNI2 inhibitors on the conformational dynamics of the enzyme using hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. All three inhibitors rigidify an extensive allosteric network extending >40 Å from the binding site, thus providing a structural rationale for the observed disruption of the transition from distributive initiation to processive elongation. The two more potent inhibitors also suppress slow cooperative unfolding in the fingers extension-thumb interface and primer grip, which may contribute their stronger inhibition. These results establish that NNI2 inhibitors act through long range allosteric effects, reveal important conformational changes underlying normal polymerase function, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:27006396

  1. Presence of a putative steroidal allosteric site on glycoprotein hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mario; Dimida, Antonio; Ferrarini, Eleonora; Silvano, Elena; De Marco, Giuseppina; Agretti, Patrizia; Aloisi, Gabriella; Simoncini, Tommaso; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Tonacchera, Massimo; Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto

    2009-11-25

    In a previous work we found that the insecticide 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), inhibits the accumulation of cAMP as induced by the bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) in cells transfected with the TSH receptor. In this work, we demonstrate that the DDT molecular analogues, diethylstilbestrol and quercetine, are more potent inhibitors of the TSH receptor activity than DDT itself. The notion that all these compounds interfere with nuclear estrogen receptors, as either agonists (DDT and diethylstilbestrol) or antagonists (quercetin), prompted us to test the ability of the steroid hormone 17-beta-estradiol to inhibit the TSH receptor activity. We found that estrogen exposure causes a modest but significant inhibition of the bTSH induced cAMP accumulation both in transfected CHO-TSH receptor and Fischer Rat Thyroid Low Serum 5% (FRTL-5) cells. When applied to CHO cells transfected with the luteinizing hormone receptor, 17-beta-estradiol proved capable of inhibiting the hCG induced cAMP accumulation at a concentration as low as 10nM, though the effect was not greater than 35%. The effect of 17-beta-estradiol was not estrogen receptors mediated, as co-transfection of the estrogen receptor alpha and beta subunits with LH receptor caused cAMP to increase above the level attained by the sole hCG stimulation, and not to decrease it as expected. These data suggest the presence of a steroidal-like allosteric binding site on glycoprotein hormone receptors. PMID:19766106

  2. Ago-allosteric modulation and other types of allostery in dimeric 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Birgitte

    concept for 7TM receptors, it is proposed that the ago-allosteric modulators bind in the orthosteric binding site, but-importantly-in the "other" or allosteric protomer of the dimer. Hereby, they can act both as additive co-agonists, and through intermolecular cooperative effects between the protomers......, they may influence the potency of the endogenous agonist. It is of interest that at least some endogenous agonists can only occupy one protomer of a dimeric 7TM receptor complex at a time and thereby they leave the orthosteric binding site in the allosteric protomer free, potentially for binding of...

  3. Impact of disruption of secondary binding site S2 on dopamine transporter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E A

    2016-09-01

    The structures of the leucine transporter, drosophila dopamine transporter, and human serotonin transporter show a secondary binding site (designated S2 ) for drugs and substrate in the extracellular vestibule toward the membrane exterior in relation to the primary substrate recognition site (S1 ). The present experiments are aimed at disrupting S2 by mutating Asp476 and Ile159 to Ala. Both mutants displayed a profound decrease in [(3) H]DA uptake compared with wild-type associated with a reduced turnover rate kcat . This was not caused by a conformational bias as the mutants responded to Zn(2+) (10 μM) similarly as WT. The dopamine transporters with either the D476A or I159A mutation both displayed a higher Ki for dopamine for the inhibition of [3H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding than did the WT transporter, in accordance with an allosteric interaction between the S1 and S2 sites. The results provide evidence in favor of a general applicability of the two-site allosteric model of the Javitch/Weinstein group from LeuT to dopamine transporter and possibly other monoamine transporters. X-ray structures of transporters closely related to the dopamine (DA) transporter show a secondary binding site S2 in the extracellular vestibule proximal to the primary binding site S1 which is closely linked to one of the Na(+) binding sites. This work examines the relationship between S2 and S1 sites. We found that S2 site impairment severely reduced DA transport and allosterically reduced S1 site affinity for the cocaine analog [(3) H]CFT. Our results are the first to lend direct support for the application of the two-site allosteric model, advanced for bacterial LeuT, to the human DA transporter. The model states that, after binding of the first DA molecule (DA1 ) to the primary S1 site (along with Na(+) ), binding of a second DA (DA2 ) to the S2 site triggers, through an allosteric interaction, the release of DA1 and Na(+) into the cytoplasm. PMID

  4. Rational engineering of enzyme allosteric regulation through sequence evolution analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seong Yang

    Full Text Available Control of enzyme allosteric regulation is required to drive metabolic flux toward desired levels. Although the three-dimensional (3D structures of many enzyme-ligand complexes are available, it is still difficult to rationally engineer an allosterically regulatable enzyme without decreasing its catalytic activity. Here, we describe an effective strategy to deregulate the allosteric inhibition of enzymes based on the molecular evolution and physicochemical characteristics of allosteric ligand-binding sites. We found that allosteric sites are evolutionarily variable and comprised of more hydrophobic residues than catalytic sites. We applied our findings to design mutations in selected target residues that deregulate the allosteric activity of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase. Specifically, charged amino acids at less conserved positions were substituted with hydrophobic or neutral amino acids with similar sizes. The engineered proteins successfully diminished the allosteric inhibition of E. coli FBPase without affecting its catalytic efficiency. We expect that our method will aid the rational design of enzyme allosteric regulation strategies and facilitate the control of metabolic flux.

  5. Ion-Regulated Allosteric Binding of Fullerenes (C-60 and C-70) by Tetrathiafulvalene-Calix[4]pyrroles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, C. M.; Lim, J. M.; Larsen, K. R.;

    2014-01-01

    The effect of ionic species on the binding of fullerenes (C-60 and C-70) by tetrathiafulvalene-calix[4]pyrrole (TTF-C4P) receptors and the nature of the resulting supramolecular complexes (TTF-C4P + fullerene + halide anion + tetraalkylammonium cation) was studied in the solid state through single...... the C4P in a ball-and-socket binding mode. The interactions between the TTF-C4P receptors and the fullerene guests are highly influenced by both the nature of halide anions and their counter tetraalkylammonium cations. Three halides (F-, Cl-, and Br-) were studied. All three potentiate the binding of...... the two test fullerenes by inducing a conformational change from the 1,3-alternate to the cone conformer of the TTF-C4Ps, thus acting as positive heterotropic allosteric effectors. For a particular halide anion, the choice of tetraalkylammonium salts serves to modulate the strength of the TTF-C4P...

  6. Identification of the Escherichia coli ADP-glucose synthetase inhibitor binding site(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoaffinity labeling agent 8-azido adenylate (AMP) is an inhibitor site specific probe of the E. coli ADPG synthetase. In the absence of light, 8-azido AMP exhibits the typical reversible allosteric kinetics of the physiological inhibitor AMP. In the presence of light (254 nm), [2-3H]8-azido AMP specifically and covalently incorporates into the enzyme. Photoincorporation is linearly related to loss of catalytic activity up to at least 65% inactivation. The substrate ADP-glucose (ADPG) provides nearly 100% protection from 8-azido AMP photoinactivation, while the substrate AMP provides approximately 50% protection and the inhibitor AMP provides approximately 30% protection. These three adenylate allosteric effects of E. coli ADPG synthetase also protect it from photoincorporation of 8-azido AMP. The reaction site(s) of [2-3H]-azido AMP with the enzyme was identified by reverse phase HPLC isolation and chemical characterization of CNBr and mouse submaxillary arginyl protease generated peptides containing the labeled analog. This site is the same as the major binding region of the substrate site specific probe, 8-azido ADP-[14C]glucose. Conformational analysis of this region predicts that it is a part of a Rossmann fold, the super-secondary structure found in many adenine nucleotide binding proteins. Two minor reaction regions of the enzyme with [2-3H]8-azido AMP were also identified. The three modified peptide regions may be juxtaposed in the enzyme's tertiary structure

  7. Spin exchange monitoring of the strong positive homotropic allosteric binding of a tetraradical by a synthetic receptor in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardelang, David; Casano, Gilles; Poulhès, Florent; Karoui, Hakim; Filippini, Jessica; Rockenbauer, Antal; Rosas, Roselyne; Monnier, Valérie; Siri, Didier; Gaudel-Siri, Anouk; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul

    2014-12-17

    The flexible tetranitroxide 4T has been prepared and was shown to exhibit a nine line EPR spectrum in water, characteristic of significant through space spin exchange (J(ij)) between four electron spins interacting with four nitrogen nuclei (J(ij) ≫ a(N)). Addition of CB[8] to 4T decreases dramatically all the Jij couplings, and the nine line spectrum is replaced by the characteristic three line spectrum of a mononitroxide. The supramolecular association between 4T and CB[8] involves a highly cooperative asymmetric complexation by two CB[8] (K1 = 4027 M(-1); K2 = 202,800 M(-1); α = 201) leading to a rigid complex with remote nitroxide moieties. The remarkable enhancement for the affinity of the second CB[8] corresponds to an allosteric interaction energy of ≈13 kJ mol(-1), which is comparable to that of the binding of oxygen by hemoglobin. These results are confirmed by competition and reduction experiments, DFT and molecular dynamics calculations, mass spectrometry, and liquid state NMR of the corresponding reduced complex bearing hydroxylamine moieties. This study shows that suitably designed molecules can generate allosteric complexation with CB[8]. The molecule must (i) carry several recognizable groups for CB[8] and (ii) be folded so that the first binding event reorganizes the molecule (unfold) for a better subsequent recognition. The presence of accessible protonable amines and H-bond donors to fit with the second point are also further stabilizing groups of CB[8] complexation. In these conditions, the spin exchange coupling between four radicals has been efficiently and finely tuned and the resulting allosteric complexation induced a dramatic stabilization enhancement of the included paramagnetic moieties in highly reducing conditions through the formation of the supramolecular 4T@CB[8]2 complex. PMID:25418528

  8. The propagation of binding interactions to remote sites in proteins: Analysis of the binding of the monoclonal antibody D1.3 to lysozyme

    OpenAIRE

    Freire, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of a ligand with a protein occurs at a local site (the binding site) and involves only a few residues; however, the effects of that interaction are often propagated to remote locations. The chain of events initiated by binding provides the basis for fundamental biological phenomena such as allosterism, signal transduction, and structural-stability modification. In this paper, a structure-based statistical thermodynamic approach is presented and used...

  9. An allosteric synthetic DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, L.; Curran, J F

    1999-01-01

    Allosteric DNA oligonucleotides are potentially useful diagnostic reagents. Here we develop a model system for the study of allosteric interactions in DNAs. A DNA that binds either Cibacron blue or cholic acid was isolated and partially characterized. Isolation was performed using a multi-stage SELEX. First, short oligos that bind either Cibacron blue or cholic acid were enriched from random oligonucleotide pools. Then, members of the two pools were fused to form longer oligos, which were the...

  10. Allosteric modulation of G-protein coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, Tracy A

    2004-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has more than 1000 members and is the largest family of proteins in the body. GPCRs mediate signalling of stimuli as diverse as light, ions, small molecules, peptides and proteins and are the targets for many pharmaceuticals. Most GPCR ligands...... are believed to activate (agonists) or inhibit (competitive antagonists) receptor signalling by binding the receptor at the same site as the endogenous agonist, the orthosteric site. In contrast, allosteric ligands modulate receptor function by binding to different regions in the receptor, allosteric...... outlines the current status and perspectives of allosteric modulation of GPCR function with emphasis on the pharmacology of endogenous and synthesised modulators, their receptor interactions and the therapeutic prospects of allosteric ligands compared to orthosteric ligands....

  11. Development of a highly selective allosteric antagonist radioligand for the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor and elucidation of its molecular basis of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maoqing; Vattelana, Ashton M; Lam, Polo C-H; Orry, Andrew J; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Haines, David R; Miller, Laurence J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of ligand binding to receptors provides insights useful for rational drug design. This work describes development of a new antagonist radioligand of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R), (2-fluorophenyl)-2,3-dihydro-3-[(3-isoquinolinylcarbonyl)amino]-6-methoxy-2-oxo-l-H-indole-3-propanoate (T-0632), and exploration of the molecular basis of its binding. This radioligand bound specifically with high affinity within an allosteric pocket of CCK1R. T-0632 fully inhibited binding and action of CCK at this receptor, while exhibiting no saturable binding to the closely related type 2 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK2R). Chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs were used to explore the molecular basis of T-0632 binding. Exchanging exonic regions revealed the functional importance of CCK1R exon 3, extending from the bottom of transmembrane segment (TM) 3 to the top of TM5, including portions of the intramembranous pocket as well as the second extracellular loop region (ECL2). However, CCK1R mutants in which each residue facing the pocket was changed to that present in CCK2R had no negative impact on T-0632 binding. Extending the chimeric approach to ECL2 established the importance of its C-terminal region, and site-directed mutagenesis of each nonconserved residue in this region revealed the importance of Ser(208) at the top of TM5. A molecular model of T-0632-occupied CCK1R was consistent with these experimental determinants, also identifying Met(121) in TM3 and Arg(336) in TM6 as important. Although these residues are conserved in CCK2R, mutating them had a distinct impact on the two closely related receptors, suggesting differential orientation. This establishes the molecular basis of binding of a highly selective nonpeptidyl allosteric antagonist of CCK1R, illustrating differences in docking that extend beyond determinants attributable to distinct residues lining the intramembranous pocket in the two receptor subtypes. PMID:25319540

  12. Activation and Allosteric Modulation of Human μ Opioid Receptor in Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartuzi, Damian; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Matosiuk, Dariusz

    2015-11-23

    Allosteric protein modulation has gained increasing attention in drug design. Its application as a mechanism of action could bring forth safer and more effective medicines. Targeting opioid receptors with allosteric modulators can result in better treatment of pain, depression, and respiratory and immune disorders. In this work we use recent reports on negative modulators of μ opioid receptor as a starting point for identification of allosteric sites and mechanisms of opioid receptor modulation using homology modeling and docking and molecular dynamics studies. An allosteric binding site description is presented. Results suggest a shared binding region for lipophilic allosteric ligands, reveal possible differences in the modulation mechanism between cannabinoids and salvinorin A, and show ambiguous properties of the latter. Also, they emphasize the importance of native-like environment in molecular dynamics simulations and uncover relationships between modulator and orthosteric ligand binding and receptor behavior. Relationships between ligands, transmission switch, and hydrophobic lock are analyzed. PMID:26517559

  13. Allosteric Regulation of Fibronectin/α5β1 Interaction by Fibronectin-Binding MSCRAMMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaowen; Garcia, Brandon L.; Visai, Livia; Prabhakaran, Sabitha; Meenan, Nicola A. G.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Humphries, Martin J.; Höök, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Adherence of microbes to host tissues is a hallmark of infectious disease and is often mediated by a class of adhesins termed MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules). Numerous pathogens express MSCRAMMs that specifically bind the heterodimeric human glycoprotein fibronectin (Fn). In addition to roles in adhesion, Fn-binding MSCRAMMs exploit physiological Fn functions. For example, several pathogens can invade host cells by a mechanism whereby MSCRAMM-bound Fn bridges interaction with α5β1 integrin. Here, we investigate two Fn-binding MSCRAMMs, FnBPA (Staphylococcus aureus) and BBK32 (Borrelia burgdorferi) to probe structure-activity relationships of MSCRAMM-induced Fn/α5β1integrin activation. Circular dichroism, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and dynamic light scattering techniques uncover a conformational rearrangement of Fn involving domains distant from the MSCRAMM binding site. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrate a significant enhancement of Fn/α5β1 integrin affinity in the presence of FnBPA or BBK32. Detailed kinetic analysis of these interactions reveal that this change in affinity can be attributed solely to an increase in the initial Fn/α5β1 on-rate and that this rate-enhancement is dependent on high-affinity Fn-binding by MSCRAMMs. These data implicate MSCRAMM-induced perturbation of specific intramolecular contacts within the Fn heterodimer resulting in activation by exposing previously cryptic α5β1 interaction motifs. By correlating structural changes in Fn to a direct measurement of increased Fn/α5β1 affinity, this work significantly advances our understanding of the structural basis for the modulation of integrin function by Fn-binding MSCRAMMs. PMID:27434228

  14. The role of hydration on the mechanism of allosteric regulation: in situ measurements of the oxygen-linked kinetics of water binding to hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvay, Andrés G; Grigera, J Raúl; Colombo, Marcio F

    2003-01-01

    We report here the first direct measurements of changes in protein hydration triggered by a functional binding. This task is achieved by weighing hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin films exposed to an atmosphere of 98% relative humidity during oxygenation. The binding of the first oxygen molecules to Hb tetramer triggers a change in protein conformation, which increases binding affinity to the remaining empty sites giving rise to the appearance of cooperative phenomena. Although crystallographic data have evidenced that this structural change increases the protein water-accessible surface area, isobaric osmotic stress experiments in aqueous cosolutions have shown that water binding is linked to Hb oxygenation. Now we show that the differential hydration between fully oxygenated and fully deoxygenated states of these proteins, determined by weighing protein films with a quartz crystal microbalance, agree with the ones determined by osmotic stress in aqueous cosolutions, from the linkage between protein oxygen affinity and water activity. The agreements prove that the changes in water activity brought about by adding osmolytes to the buffer solution shift biochemical equilibrium in proportion to the number of water molecules associated with the reaction. The concomitant kinetics of oxygen and of water binding to Hb have been also determined. The data show that the binding of water molecules to the extra protein surface exposed on the transition from the low-affinity T to the high-affinity R conformations of hemoglobin is the rate-limiting step of Hb cooperative reaction. This evidences that water binding is a crucial step on the allosteric mechanism regulating cooperative interactions, and suggests the possibility that environmental water activity might be engaged in the kinetic control of some important reactions in vivo. PMID:12524309

  15. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla (NCSU); (MCW); (BU)

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  16. Modeling spatial correlation of DNA deformations: Allosteric effects of DNA protein binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinliang; Cao, Jianshu; Hao Ge Collaboration; X. Sunney Xie Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    We report a study of DNA deformations by a coarse grained mechanical model. Recent single molecule experimental studies show that when DNA molecule is deformed by its binding to a protein, the binding affinity of a second protein at distance L away from the first binding site is altered. To explain this observation, the relaxation of deformation along the DNA chain is examined. Our method predicts a general exponentially decaying behavior for differenct deformation modes. As an example, inter-helical distance deformation is studied in details, and is found to decay at a previously unknown lengthscale of 10 base pairs as a result of the balance between inter and intra DNA strand energy. This lengthscale is in good agreement with the said single molecule experimental observation. This model of local deformation relaxation helps us better understand many important issues in DNA such as the enhanced flexibility of DNA at short lengthscales and DNA repair mechanism inside cells. Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University

  17. The S-enantiomer of R,S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism. Comparison with other serotonin transporter inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads Breum; Sánchez, Connie;

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  18. The S-enantiomer of R, S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads; Sanchez, Connie;

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  19. Accessibility of different histone H3-binding domains of UHRF1 is allosterically regulated by phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelato, Kathy A; Tauber, Maria; Ong, Michelle S; Winter, Stefan; Hiragami-Hamada, Kyoko; Sindlinger, Julia; Lemak, Alexander; Bultsma, Yvette; Houliston, Scott; Schwarzer, Dirk; Divecha, Nullin; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2014-06-19

    UHRF1 is a multidomain protein crucially linking histone H3 modification states and DNA methylation. While the interaction properties of its specific domains are well characterized, little is known about the regulation of these functionalities. We show that UHRF1 exists in distinct active states, binding either unmodified H3 or the H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) modification. A polybasic region (PBR) in the C terminus blocks interaction of a tandem tudor domain (TTD) with H3K9me3 by occupying an essential peptide-binding groove. In this state the plant homeodomain (PHD) mediates interaction with the extreme N terminus of the unmodified H3 tail. Binding of the phosphatidylinositol phosphate PI5P to the PBR of UHRF1 results in a conformational rearrangement of the domains, allowing the TTD to bind H3K9me3. Our results define an allosteric mechanism controlling heterochromatin association of an essential regulatory protein of epigenetic states and identify a functional role for enigmatic nuclear phosphatidylinositol phosphates. PMID:24813945

  20. Computational study on the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism in hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HCV NS3/4A protein is an attractive therapeutic target responsible for harboring serine protease and RNA helicase activities during the viral replication. Small molecules binding at the interface between the protease and helicase domains can stabilize the closed conformation of the protein and thus block the catalytic function of HCV NS3/4A protein via an allosteric regulation mechanism. But the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, we aimed to provide some insight into the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein by using computational methods. Four simulation systems were investigated. They include: apo state of HCV NS3/4A protein, HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with an allosteric inhibitor and the truncated form of the above two systems. The molecular dynamics simulation results indicate HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 4VA adopts a closed conformation (inactive state, while the truncated apo protein adopts an open conformation (active state. Further residue interaction network analysis suggests the communication of the domain-domain interface play an important role in the transition from closed to open conformation of HCV NS3/4A protein. However, the inhibitor stabilizes the closed conformation through interaction with several key residues from both the protease and helicase domains, including His57, Asp79, Asp81, Asp168, Met485, Cys525 and Asp527, which blocks the information communication between the functional domains interface. Finally, a dynamic model about the allosteric regulation and conformational changes of HCV NS3/4A protein was proposed and could provide fundamental insights into the allosteric mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein function regulation and design of new potent inhibitors.

  1. Escherichia coli DnaB Helicase–DnaC Protein Complex: Allosteric Effects of the Nucleotides on the Nucleic Acid Binding and the Kinetic Mechanism of NTP Hydrolysis. 3†

    OpenAIRE

    Roychowdhury, Anasuya; Szymanski, Michal R.; Jezewska, Maria J.; Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz

    2009-01-01

    Allosteric interactions between the DNA- and NTP-binding sites of the Escherichia coli DnaB helicase engaged in the DnaB–DnaC complex and the mechanism of NTP hydrolysis by the complex have been examined using the fluorescence titration, analytical ultracentrifugation, and rapid quench-flow technique. Surprisingly, the ssDNA affinity of the DnaB–DnaC complex is independent of the structure of the phosphate group of the cofactor bound to the helicase. Thus, the DnaC protein eliminates the anta...

  2. Allosteric modulators of the hERG K{sup +} channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhiyi, E-mail: z.yu@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl; Klaasse, Elisabeth, E-mail: elisabethklaasse@hotmail.com; Heitman, Laura H., E-mail: l.h.heitman@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl; IJzerman, Adriaan P., E-mail: ijzerman@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that block the cardiac K{sup +} channel encoded by the human ether-à-go-go gene (hERG) have been associated with QT interval prolongation leading to proarrhythmia, and in some cases, sudden cardiac death. Because of special structural features of the hERG K{sup +} channel, it has become a promiscuous target that interacts with pharmaceuticals of widely varying chemical structures and a reason for concern in the pharmaceutical industry. The structural diversity suggests that multiple binding sites are available on the channel with possible allosteric interactions between them. In the present study, three reference compounds and nine compounds of a previously disclosed series were evaluated for their allosteric effects on the binding of [{sup 3}H]astemizole and [{sup 3}H]dofetilide to the hERG K{sup +} channel. LUF6200 was identified as an allosteric inhibitor in dissociation assays with both radioligands, yielding similar EC{sub 50} values in the low micromolar range. However, potassium ions increased the binding of the two radioligands in a concentration-dependent manner, and their EC{sub 50} values were not significantly different, indicating that potassium ions behaved as allosteric enhancers. Furthermore, addition of potassium ions resulted in a concentration-dependent leftward shift of the LUF6200 response curve, suggesting positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them. In conclusion, our investigations provide evidence for allosteric modulation of the hERG K{sup +} channel, which is discussed in the light of findings on other ion channels. - Highlights: • Allosteric modulators on the hERG K{sup +} channel were evaluated in binding assays. • LUF6200 was identified as a potent allosteric inhibitor. • Potassium ions were found to behave as allosteric enhancers. • Positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them were proposed.

  3. Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Allosterically Block the Transition from Initiation to Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2016-05-01

    Replication of the hepatitis C viral genome is catalyzed by the NS5B (nonstructural protein 5B) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, which is a major target of antiviral drugs currently in the clinic. Prior studies established that initiation of RNA replication could be facilitated by starting with a dinucleotide (pGG). Here we establish conditions for efficient initiation from GTP to form the dinucleotide and subsequent intermediates leading to highly processive elongation, and we examined the effects of four classes of nonnucleoside inhibitors on each step of the reaction. We show that palm site inhibitors block initiation starting from GTP but not when starting from pGG. In addition we show that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) lead to the accumulation of abortive intermediates three-five nucleotides in length. Our kinetic analysis shows that NNI2 do not significantly block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex including displacement of the β-loop from the active site. Direct measurement in single turnover kinetic studies show that pyrophosphate release is faster than the chemistry step, which appears to be rate-limiting during processive synthesis. These results reveal important new details to define the steps involved in initiation and elongation during viral RNA replication, establish the allosteric mechanisms by which NNI2 inhibitors act, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:26851276

  4. An allosteric model of the inositol trisphosphate receptor with nonequilibrium binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inositol trisphosphate receptor (IPR) is a crucial ion channel that regulates the Ca2+ influx from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cytoplasm. A thorough study of the IPR channel contributes to a better understanding of calcium oscillations and waves. It has long been observed that the IPR channel is a typical biological system which performs adaptation. However, recent advances on the physical essence of adaptation show that adaptation systems with a negative feedback mechanism, such as the IPR channel, must break detailed balance and always operate out of equilibrium with energy dissipation. Almost all previous IPR models are equilibrium models assuming detailed balance and thus violate the dissipative nature of adaptation. In this article, we constructed a nonequilibrium allosteric model of single IPR channels based on the patch-clamp experimental data obtained from the IPR in the outer membranes of isolated nuclei of the Xenopus oocyte. It turns out that our model reproduces the patch-clamp experimental data reasonably well and produces both the correct steady-state and dynamic properties of the channel. Particularly, our model successfully describes the complicated bimodal [Ca2+] dependence of the mean open duration at high [IP3], a steady-state behavior which fails to be correctly described in previous IPR models. Finally, we used the patch-clamp experimental data to validate that the IPR channel indeed breaks detailed balance and thus is a nonequilibrium system which consumes energy. (paper)

  5. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Fischer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077: IC50 = 134 nM whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135: LLE = 2.91.

  6. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91). PMID:26938528

  7. Thioredoxin binding site of phosphoribulokinase overlaps the catalytic site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATP-regulatory binding site of phosphoribulokinase was studied using bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate (BrAcNHEtOP). BrAcNHEtOP binds to the active-regulatory binding site of the protein. Following trypsin degradation of the labeled protein, fragments were separated by HPLC and sequenced. (DT)

  8. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  9. Allosteric transition and binding of small molecule effectors causes curvature change in central β-sheets of selected enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Ellen; Bueno, Brenda; Kulshreshta, Sanjeev; Cieplak, Piotr; Argáez, Miguel; Velázquez, Leticia; Stec, Boguslaw

    2011-04-01

    A quantitative description of allosteric transition remains a significant science challenge. Many allosteric enzymes contain a central β-sheet in their catalytic domain. When an allosteric protein undergoes the transition between T (tense) and R (relaxed) allosteric states, this central β-sheet undergoes a conformational change. A traditional method of measuring this change, the root mean square deviation (RMSD), appears to be inadequate to describe such changes in meaningful quantitative manner. We designed a novel quantitative method to demonstrate this conformational transition by measuring the change in curvature of the central β-sheet when enzymes transition between allosteric states. The curvature was established by calculating the semiaxes of a 3-D hyperboloid fitted by least squares to the Cα atomic positions of the β-sheet. The two enzymes selected for this study, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) from pig kidney and aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ATCase) from E. coli, showed while transitioning between the allosteric states (T ⇔ R) a notable change in β-sheet curvature (∼5%) that results in a large lateral shift at the sheet's edge, which is necessary to convey the signal. The results suggest that the β-sheet participates in storing elastic energy associated with the transition. Establishing a tentative link between the energetics of the β-sheet in different allosteric states provides a more objective basis for the naming convention of allosteric states (tense or relaxed), and provides insight into the hysteretic nature of the transition. The approach presented here allows for a better understanding of the internal dynamics of allosteric enzymes by defining the domains that directly participate in the transition. PMID:20602244

  10. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Ron O.; Green, Hillary F.; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W.; Valcourt, James R.; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J. Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E.

    2013-11-01

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15Å from the classical, `orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  11. Flavopiridol inhibits glycogen phosphorylase by binding at the inhibitor site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomakos, N G; Schnier, J B; Zographos, S E; Skamnaki, V T; Tsitsanou, K E; Johnson, L N

    2000-11-01

    Flavopiridol (L86-8275) ((-)-cis-5, 7-dihydroxy-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-8-[4-(3-hydroxy-1-methyl)-piperidinyl] -4H-benzopyran-4-one), a potential antitumor drug, currently in phase II trials, has been shown to be an inhibitor of muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and to cause glycogen accumulation in A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (Kaiser, A., Nishi, K., Gorin, F.A., Walsh, D.A., Bradbury, E. M., and Schnier, J. B., unpublished data). Kinetic experiments reported here show that flavopiridol inhibits GPb with an IC(50) = 15.5 microm. The inhibition is synergistic with glucose resulting in a reduction of IC(50) for flavopiridol to 2.3 microm and mimics the inhibition of caffeine. In order to elucidate the structural basis of inhibition, we determined the structures of GPb complexed with flavopiridol, GPb complexed with caffeine, and GPa complexed with both glucose and flavopiridol at 1.76-, 2.30-, and 2.23-A resolution, and refined to crystallographic R values of 0.216 (R(free) = 0.247), 0.189 (R(free) = 0.219), and 0.195 (R(free) = 0.252), respectively. The structures provide a rational for flavopiridol potency and synergism with glucose inhibitory action. Flavopiridol binds at the allosteric inhibitor site, situated at the entrance to the catalytic site, the site where caffeine binds. Flavopiridol intercalates between the two aromatic rings of Phe(285) and Tyr(613). Both flavopiridol and glucose promote the less active T-state through localization of the closed position of the 280s loop which blocks access to the catalytic site, thereby explaining their synergistic inhibition. The mode of interactions of flavopiridol with GP is different from that of des-chloro-flavopiridol with CDK2, illustrating how different functional parts of the inhibitor can be used to provide specific and potent binding to two different enzymes. PMID:10924512

  12. Ligand binding and thermostability of different allosteric states of the insulin zinc-hexamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B;

    2006-01-01

    The influence of ligand binding and conformation state on the thermostability of hexameric zinc-insulin was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The insulin hexamer exists in equilibrium between the forms T6, T3R3, and R6. Phenolic ligands induce and stabilize the T3R3- and R6-states...... which are further stabilized by binding of certain anions that do not stabilize the T6-state. It was shown that the thermostability of the resorcinol-stabilized R6-state was significantly higher than that of the T6-state. Further analysis showed that phenol- and m-cresol-stabilized R6-hexamer loses...

  13. Allosteric-Site and Catalytic-Site Ligand Effects on PDE5 Functions are Associated with Distinct Changes in Physical Form of the Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Corbin, Jackie D.; Zoraghi, Roya; Francis, Sharron H.

    2009-01-01

    Native phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) homodimer contains distinct non-catalytic cGMP allosteric sites and catalytic sites for cGMP hydrolysis. Purified recombinant PDE5 was activated by pre-incubation with cGMP. Relatively low concentrations of cGMP produced a Native PAGE gel-shift of PDE5 from a single band position (lower band) to a band with decreased mobility (upper band); higher concentrations of cGMP produced a band of intermediate mobility (middle band) in addition to the upper band. Two p...

  14. Regulation of transcription attenuation and translation initiation by allosteric control of an RNA-binding protein: the Bacillus subtilis TRAP protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitzke, Paul

    2004-04-01

    Tryptophan allosterically controls the 11-subunit trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) of Bacillus subtilis. When activated by tryptophan, TRAP binds to multiple trinucleotide repeats in target transcripts. TRAP is responsible for the decision to terminate transcription in the leader region of the trpEDCFBA operon or to allow transcription to proceed into the structural genes. TRAP also regulates translation of trpE by promoting formation of an RNA structure that prevents ribosome binding. In addition, bound TRAP regulates translation initiation of pabA, trpP and ycbK by directly blocking ribosome binding. The anti-TRAP protein inhibits TRAP activity by competing with RNA for the RNA binding surface of TRAP. PMID:15063849

  15. [3]tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for [3]tetrahydrotrazodone ([3] THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of [3]THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, [3] THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that [3]THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors

  16. Erythropoietin binding sites in human foetal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekonen, F.; Rosenloef, K.; Rutanen, E.-M.

    1987-01-01

    Using /sup 125/I labelled recombinant DNA human erythropoietin (EP), we have explored the presence and properties of EP binding sites in foetal human tissues. The EP binding site is present in the foetal liver already during the first trimester of pregnancy. The binding site has a equilibrium association constant of 4.1-6.2 x 10/sup 9/l/mol and is specific for EP. The cross-reactivities of FSH, TSH, hCG, insulin and renin substrate were less than 0.01%. The EP binding capacity of foetal liver was 5.4-16 fmol/mg membrane protein. In foetal lung tissue, a slight EP binding activity was observed, whereas foetal spleen, muscle, brain, thyroid and placental tissues were virtually devoid of EP binding capacity. The same level of binding was reached at 37 deg. C in 1 h and at 4 deg. C in 24 h. The binding was pH-dependent with maximal specific binding at pH 7.7. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis analysis of covalently cross-linked /sup 125/I-EP to foetal liver membranes suggested that the EP binding site was composed of two subunits with an apparent mol wt of 41000 and 86000 dalton, respectively.

  17. Erythropoietin binding sites in human foetal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using 125I labelled recombinant DNA human erythropoietin (EP), we have explored the presence and properties of EP binding sites in foetal human tissues. The EP binding site is present in the foetal liver already during the first trimester of pregnancy. The binding site has a equilibrium association constant of 4.1-6.2 x 109l/mol and is specific for EP. The cross-reactivities of FSH, TSH, hCG, insulin and renin substrate were less than 0.01%. The EP binding capacity of foetal liver was 5.4-16 fmol/mg membrane protein. In foetal lung tissue, a slight EP binding activity was observed, whereas foetal spleen, muscle, brain, thyroid and placental tissues were virtually devoid of EP binding capacity. The same level of binding was reached at 37 deg. C in 1 h and at 4 deg. C in 24 h. The binding was pH-dependent with maximal specific binding at pH 7.7. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis analysis of covalently cross-linked 125I-EP to foetal liver membranes suggested that the EP binding site was composed of two subunits with an apparent mol wt of 41000 and 86000 dalton, respectively. (author)

  18. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  19. High affinity and temperature sensitivity of blood oxygen binding in Pangasianodon hypophthalmus due to lack of chloride-hemoglobin allosteric interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Phuong, Le My; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Jensen, Frank Bo; Wang, Tobias; Bayley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Air-breathing fishes represent interesting organisms in terms of understanding the physiological changes associated with the terrestrialization of vertebrates, and, further, are of great socio-economic importance for aquaculture in Southeast Asia. To understand how environmental factors, such as...... high temperature, affect O2 transport in air-breathing fishes, this study assessed the effects of temperature on O2 binding of blood and Hb in the economically important air-breathing fish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus. To determine blood O2 binding properties, blood was drawn from resting cannulated...... fishes and O2 binding curves made at 25°C and 35°C. To determine the allosteric regulation and thermodynamics of Hb O2 binding, Hb was purified, and O2 equilibria were recorded at five temperatures in the absence and presence of ATP and Cl-. Whole blood had a high O2 affinity (O2 tension at half...

  20. The binding site for neohesperidin dihydrochalcone at the human sweet taste receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratochwil Nicole A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in sweet taste perception among species depend on structural variations of the sweet taste receptor. The commercially used isovanillyl sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone activates the human but not the rat sweet receptor TAS1R2+TAS1R3. Analysis of interspecies combinations and chimeras of rat and human TAS1R2+TAS1R3 suggested that the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 is crucial for the activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Results By mutational analysis combined with functional studies and molecular modeling we identified a set of different amino acid residues within the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 that forms the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding pocket. Sixteen amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains 2 to 7 and one in the extracellular loop 2 of hTAS1R3 influenced the receptor's response to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Some of these seventeen residues are also part of the binding sites for the sweetener cyclamate or the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. In line with this observation, lactisole inhibited activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate competitively, whereas receptor activation by aspartame, a sweetener known to bind to the N-terminal domain of TAS1R2, was allosterically inhibited. Seven of the amino acid positions crucial for activation of hTAS1R2+hTAS1R3 by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are thought to play a role in the binding of allosteric modulators of other class C GPCRs, further supporting our model of the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone pharmacophore. Conclusion From our data we conclude that we identified the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding site at the human sweet taste receptor, which overlaps with those for the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. This readily delivers a molecular explanation of our finding that lactisole is a competitive inhibitor of the receptor

  1. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  2. Antidepressant binding site in a bacterial homologue of neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder K; Yamashita, Atsuko; Gouaux, Eric

    2007-08-23

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 A above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational design of

  3. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 (angstrom) above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  4. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  5. Allosteric Inactivation of a Trypsin-Like Serine Protease by An Antibody Binding to the 37- and 70-Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Lund, Ida K; Liu, Zhuo;

    2013-01-01

    for elucidating fundamental allosteric mechanisms. The monoclonal antibody mU1 has previously been shown to be able to inhibit the function of murine urokinase-type plasminogen activator in vivo. We have now mapped the epitope of mU1 to the catalytic domain's 37- and 70-loops, situated about 20 Å from...

  6. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  7. Interaction of SR 33557 with skeletal muscle calcium channel blocker receptors in the baboon: characterization of its binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure for the isolation of primate skeletal microsomal membranes was initiated. Membranes exhibited specific enzymatic markers such as 5'-nucleotidase, Ca2+,Mg(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase and an ATP-dependent calcium uptake. Baboon skeletal microsomes bound specifically with high-affinity potent Ca2+ channel blockers such as dihydropyridine, phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine derivatives. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding assays with [3H](+)-PN 200-110, [3H](-)-desmethoxyverapamil [( 3H](-)-D888) and [3H]-d-cis-dilitiazem were consistent with a single class of binding sites for the three radioligands. The pharmacological profile of SR 33557, an original compound with calcium antagonist properties, was investigated using radioligand binding studies. SR 33557 totally inhibited the specific binding of the three main classes of Ca2+ channel effectors and interacted allosterically with them. In addition, SR 33557 bound with high affinity to a homogeneous population of binding sites in baboon skeletal muscle

  8. Distinct roles of beta1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS), and ligand-associated metal-binding site (LIMBS) cation-binding sites in ligand recognition by integrin alpha2beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdramidou, Dimitra; Humphries, Martin J; Mould, A Paul

    2008-11-21

    Integrin-ligand interactions are regulated in a complex manner by divalent cations, and previous studies have identified ligand-competent, stimulatory, and inhibitory cation-binding sites. In collagen-binding integrins, such as alpha2beta1, ligand recognition takes place exclusively at the alpha subunit I domain. However, activation of the alphaI domain depends on its interaction with a structurally similar domain in the beta subunit known as the I-like or betaI domain. The top face of the betaI domain contains three cation-binding sites: the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), the ADMIDAS (adjacent to MIDAS), and LIMBS (ligand-associated metal-binding site). The role of these sites in controlling ligand binding to the alphaI domain has yet to be elucidated. Mutation of the MIDAS or LIMBS completely blocked collagen binding to alpha2beta1; in contrast mutation of the ADMIDAS reduced ligand recognition but this effect could be overcome by the activating monoclonal antibody TS2/16. Hence, the MIDAS and LIMBS appear to be essential for the interaction between alphaI and betaI, whereas occupancy of the ADMIDAS has an allosteric effect on the conformation of betaI. An activating mutation in the alpha2 I domain partially restored ligand binding to the MIDAS and LIMBS mutants. Analysis of the effects of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+) on ligand binding to these mutants showed that the MIDAS is a ligand-competent site through which Mn(2+) stimulates ligand binding, whereas the LIMBS is a stimulatory Ca(2+)-binding site, occupancy of which increases the affinity of Mg(2+) for the MIDAS. PMID:18820259

  9. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75 Binding Site of Integrase Block HIV Replication and Modulate Integrase Multimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Frauke; Shaw, Stephen; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Desimmie, Belete A.; Marchand, Arnaud; Butler, Scott; Smets, Wim; Chaltin, Patrick; Westby, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the HIV integrase (HIV IN) is a clinically validated approach for designing novel anti-HIV therapies. We have previously described the discovery of a novel class of integration inhibitors, 2-(quinolin-3-yl)acetic acid derivatives, blocking HIV replication at a low micromolar concentration through binding in the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV integrase, hence referred to as LEDGINs. Here we report the detailed characterization of their mode of action. The design of novel and more potent analogues with nanomolar activity enabled full virological evaluation and a profound mechanistic study. As allosteric inhibitors, LEDGINs bind to the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket in integrase, thereby blocking the interaction with LEDGF/p75 and interfering indirectly with the catalytic activity of integrase. Detailed mechanism-of-action studies reveal that the allosteric mode of inhibition is likely caused by an effect on HIV-1 integrase oligomerization. The multimodal inhibition by LEDGINs results in a block in HIV integration and in a replication deficiency of progeny virus. The allosteric nature of LEDGINs leads to synergy in combination with the clinically approved active site HIV IN strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) raltegravir, and cross-resistance profiling proves the distinct mode of action of LEDGINs and INSTIs. The allosteric nature of inhibition and compatibility with INSTIs underline an interest in further (clinical) development of LEDGINs. PMID:22664975

  10. Structural Studies of GABAA Receptor Binding Sites: Which Experimental Structure Tells us What?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthenkalam, Roshan; Hieckel, Marcel; Simeone, Xenia; Suwattanasophon, Chonticha; Feldbauer, Roman V; Ecker, Gerhard F; Ernst, Margot

    2016-01-01

    Atomic resolution structures of cys-loop receptors, including one of a γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA receptor) subtype, allow amazing insights into the structural features and conformational changes that these pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) display. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of more than 30 cys-loop receptor structures of homologous proteins that revealed several allosteric binding sites not previously described in GABAA receptors. These novel binding sites were examined in GABAA receptor homology models and assessed as putative candidate sites for allosteric ligands. Four so far undescribed putative ligand binding sites were proposed for follow up studies based on their presence in the GABAA receptor homology models. A comprehensive analysis of conserved structural features in GABAA and glycine receptors (GlyRs), the glutamate gated ion channel, the bacterial homologs Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC) and Gloeobacter violaceus GLIC, and the serotonin type 3 (5-HT3) receptor was performed. The conserved features were integrated into a master alignment that led to improved homology models. The large fragment of the intracellular domain that is present in the structure of the 5-HT3 receptor was utilized to generate GABAA receptor models with a corresponding intracellular domain fragment. Results of mutational and photoaffinity ligand studies in GABAA receptors were analyzed in the light of the model structures. This led to an assignment of candidate ligands to two proposed novel pockets, candidate binding sites for furosemide and neurosteroids in the trans-membrane domain were identified. The homology models can serve as hypotheses generators, and some previously controversial structural interpretations of biochemical data can be resolved in the light of the presented multi-template approach to comparative modeling. Crystal and cryo-EM microscopic structures of the closest homologs that were solved in different conformational

  11. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  12. Hemoglobin isoform differentiation and allosteric regulation of oxygen binding in the turtle, Trachemys scripta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Storz, Jay F.; Hoffmann, Federico G.;

    2013-01-01

    When freshwater turtles acclimatize to winter hibernation, there is a gradual transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, which may require adjustments of blood O2 transport before turtles become anoxic. Here, we report the effects of protons, anionic cofactors, and temperature on the O2......-binding properties of isolated hemoglobin (Hb) isoforms, HbA and HbD, in the turtle Trachemys scripta. We determined the primary structures of the constituent subunits of the two Hb isoforms, and we related the measured functional properties to differences in O2 affinity between untreated hemolysates from...... turtles that were acclimated to normoxia and anoxia. Our data show that HbD has a consistently higher O2 affinity compared with HbA, whereas Bohr and temperature effects, as well as thiol reactivity, are similar. Although sequence data show amino acid substitutions at two known β-chain ATP-binding site...

  13. Heat Capacity Changes and Disorder-to-Order Transitions in Allosteric Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressman, William J; Beckett, Dorothy

    2016-01-19

    Allosteric coupling in proteins is ubiquitous but incompletely understood, particularly in systems characterized by coupling over large distances. Binding of the allosteric effector, bio-5'-AMP, to the Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase, BirA, enhances the protein's dimerization free energy by -4 kcal/mol. Previous studies revealed that disorder-to-order transitions at the effector binding and dimerization sites, which are separated by 33 Å, are integral to functional coupling. Perturbations to the transition at the ligand binding site alter both ligand binding and coupled dimerization. Alanine substitutions in four loops on the dimerization surface yield a range of energetic effects on dimerization. A glycine to alanine substitution at position 142 in one of these loops results in a complete loss of allosteric coupling, disruption of the disorder-to-order transitions at both functional sites, and a decreased affinity for the effector. In this work, allosteric communication between the effector binding and dimerization surfaces in BirA was further investigated by performing isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on nine proteins with alanine substitutions in three dimerization surface loops. In contrast to BirAG142A, at 20 °C all variants bind to bio-5'-AMP with free energies indistinguishable from that measured for wild-type BirA. However, the majority of the variants exhibit altered heat capacity changes for effector binding. Moreover, the ΔCp values correlate with the dimerization free energies of the effector-bound proteins. These thermodynamic results, combined with structural information, indicate that allosteric activation of the BirA monomer involves formation of a network of intramolecular interactions on the dimerization surface in response to bio-5'-AMP binding at the distant effector binding site. PMID:26678378

  14. The Allosteric Switching Mechanism in Bacteriophage MS2

    CERN Document Server

    Perkett, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    In this article we use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopt different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We disc...

  15. Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulations of Allosteric Cooperativity

    CERN Document Server

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between a protein and a ligand are often accompanied by a redistribution of the population of thermally accessible conformations. This dynamic response of the protein's functional energy landscape enables a protein to modulate binding affinities and control binding sensitivity to ligand concentration. In this paper, we investigate the structural origins of binding affinity and allosteric cooperativity of binding two calcium ions to each domain of calmodulin (CaM) through simulations of a simple coarse-grained model. In this model, the protein's conformational transitions between open and closed conformational ensembles are simulated explicitly and ligand binding and unbinding is treated implicitly at the mean field level. Ligand binding is cooperative because the binding sites are coupled through a shift in the dominant conformational ensemble upon binding. The classic Monod-Wyman-Changeux model of allostery with appropriate binding free energy to the open and closed ensembles accurately describe...

  16. Solubilization and characterization of haloperidol-sensitive (+)-[3H]SKF-10,047 binding sites (sigma sites) from rat liver membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylamino]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) produced optimal solubilization of (+)-[3H]SKF-10,047 binding sites from rat liver membranes at a concentration of 0.2%, well below the critical micellular concentration of the detergent. The pharmacological selectivity of the liver (+)-[3H]SKF-10,047 binding sites corresponds to that of sigma sites from rat and guinea pig brain. When the affinities of 18 different drugs at (+)-[3H]SKF-10,047 binding sites in membranes and solubilized preparations were compared, a correlation coefficient of 0.99 and a slope of 1.03 were obtained, indicating that the pharmacological selectivity of rat liver sigma sites is retained after solubilization. In addition, the binding of 20 nM [3H]progesterone to solubilized rat liver preparations was found to exhibit a pharmacological selectivity appropriate for sigma sites. A stimulatory effect of phenytoin on (+)-[3H]SKF-10,047 binding to sigma sites persisted after solubilization. When the solubilized preparation was subjected to molecular sizing chromatography, a single peak exhibiting specific (+)-[3H]SKF-10,047 binding was obtained. The binding activity of this peak was stimulated symmetrically when assays were performed in the presence of 300 microM phenytoin. The molecular weight of the CHAPS-solubilized sigma site complex was estimated to be 450,000 daltons. After solubilization with CHAPS, rat liver sigma sites were enriched to 12 pmol/mg of protein. The present results demonstrate a successful solubilization of sigma sites from rat liver membranes and provide direct evidence that the gonadal steroid progesterone binds to sigma sites. The results also suggest that the anticonvulsant phenytoin binds to an associated allosteric site on the sigma site complex

  17. Nickel binding sites in histone proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Peana, Massimiliano Francesco; Solinas, Costantino; Medici, Serenella

    2012-01-01

    Nickel compounds are well known as human carcinogens, though the molecular events that are responsible for this are not well understood. It has been proposed that a crucial element in the mechanism of carcinogenesis is the binding of Ni(II) ions within the cell nucleus. It is known that DNA polymer binds Ni(II) only weakly, leaving the proteins of the cell nucleus as the likely Ni(II) targets. Being histone proteins the most abundant among them, they can be considered the primary sites fo...

  18. Allosteric inhibition of the NS2B-NS3 protease from dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Muslum; Ghosh, Sumana; Bell, Jeffrey A; Sherman, Woody; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2013-12-20

    Dengue virus is the flavivirus that causes dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic disease, and dengue shock syndrome, which are currently increasing in incidence worldwide. Dengue virus protease (NS2B-NS3pro) is essential for dengue virus infection and is thus a target of therapeutic interest. To date, attention has focused on developing active-site inhibitors of NS2B-NS3pro. The flat and charged nature of the NS2B-NS3pro active site may contribute to difficulties in developing inhibitors and suggests that a strategy of identifying allosteric sites may be useful. We report an approach that allowed us to scan the NS2B-NS3pro surface by cysteine mutagenesis and use cysteine reactive probes to identify regions of the protein that are susceptible to allosteric inhibition. This method identified a new allosteric site utilizing a circumscribed panel of just eight cysteine variants and only five cysteine reactive probes. The allosterically sensitive site is centered at Ala125, between the 120s loop and the 150s loop. The crystal structures of WT and modified NS2B-NS3pro demonstrate that the 120s loop is flexible. Our work suggests that binding at this site prevents a conformational rearrangement of the NS2B region of the protein, which is required for activation. Preventing this movement locks the protein into the open, inactive conformation, suggesting that this site may be useful in the future development of therapeutic allosteric inhibitors. PMID:24164286

  19. SiteComp: a server for ligand binding site analysis in protein structures

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yingjie; Yoo, Seungyeul; Sanchez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Computational characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins provides preliminary information for functional annotation, protein design and ligand optimization. SiteComp implements binding site analysis for comparison of binding sites, evaluation of residue contribution to binding sites and identification of sub-sites with distinct molecular interaction properties.

  20. Auto-FACE: an NMR based binding site mapping program for fast chemical exchange protein-ligand systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janarthanan Krishnamoorthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy offers a variety of experiments to study protein-ligand interactions at atomic resolution. Among these experiments, 15N Heteronuclear Single Quantum Correlation (HSQCexperiment is simple, less time consuming and highly informative in mapping the binding site of the ligand. The interpretation of 15N HSQC becomes ambiguous when the chemical shift perturbations are caused by non-specific interactions like allosteric changes and local structural rearrangement. Under such cases, detailed chemical exchange analysis based on chemical shift perturbation will assist in locating the binding site accurately. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have automated the mapping of binding sites for fast chemical exchange systems using information obtained from 15N HSQC spectra of protein serially titrated with ligand of increasing concentrations. The automated program Auto-FACE (Auto-FAst Chemical Exchange analyzer determines the parameters, e.g. rate of change of perturbation, binding equilibrium constant and magnitude of chemical shift perturbation to map the binding site residues.Interestingly, the rate of change of perturbation at lower ligand concentration is highly sensitive in differentiating the binding site residues from the non-binding site residues. To validate this program, the interaction between the protein hBcl(XL and the ligand BH3I-1 was studied. Residues in the hydrophobic BH3 binding groove of hBcl(XL were easily identified to be crucial for interaction with BH3I-1 from other residues that also exhibited perturbation. The geometrically averaged equilibrium constant (3.0 x 10(4 calculated for the residues present at the identified binding site is consistent with the values obtained by other techniques like isothermal calorimetry and fluorescence polarization assays (12.8 x 10(4. Adjacent to the primary site, an additional binding site was identified which had an affinity of 3.8 times weaker

  1. The propagation of binding interactions to remote sites in proteins: analysis of the binding of the monoclonal antibody D1.3 to lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, E

    1999-08-31

    The interaction of a ligand with a protein occurs at a local site (the binding site) and involves only a few residues; however, the effects of that interaction are often propagated to remote locations. The chain of events initiated by binding provides the basis for fundamental biological phenomena such as allosterism, signal transduction, and structural-stability modification. In this paper, a structure-based statistical thermodynamic approach is presented and used to predict the propagation of the stabilization effects triggered by the binding of the monoclonal antibody D1.3 to hen egg white lysozyme. Previously, Williams et al. [Williams, D. C., Benjamin, D. C., Poljak, R. J. & Rule, G. S. (1996) J. Mol. Biol. 257, 866-876] showed that the binding of this antibody affects the stability of hen egg white lysozyme and that the binding effects propagate to a selected number of residues at remote locations from the binding epitope. In this paper, we show that this phenomenon can be predicted from structure. The formalism presented here permits the identification of the structural path followed by cooperative interactions that originate at the binding site. It is shown that an important condition for the propagation of binding effects to distal regions is the presence of a significant fraction of residues with low structural stability in the uncomplexed binding site. A survey of protein structures indicates that many binding sites have a dual character and are defined by regions of high and low structural stabilities. The low-stability regions might be involved in the transmission of binding information to other regions in the protein. PMID:10468572

  2. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  3. Optimization of a Dibenzodiazepine Hit to a Potent and Selective Allosteric PAK1 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Alexei S; Amiri, Payman; Bellamacina, Cornelia; Bellance, Marie-Helene; Breitenstein, Werner; Daniel, Dylan; Denay, Regis; Fabbro, Doriano; Fernandez, Cesar; Galuba, Inga; Guerro-Lagasse, Stephanie; Gutmann, Sascha; Hinh, Linda; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Klopp, Julia; Lai, Albert; Lindvall, Mika K; Ma, Sylvia; Möbitz, Henrik; Pecchi, Sabina; Rummel, Gabriele; Shoemaker, Kevin; Trappe, Joerg; Voliva, Charles; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Marzinzik, Andreas L

    2015-07-01

    The discovery of inhibitors targeting novel allosteric kinase sites is very challenging. Such compounds, however, once identified could offer exquisite levels of selectivity across the kinome. Herein we report our structure-based optimization strategy of a dibenzodiazepine hit 1, discovered in a fragment-based screen, yielding highly potent and selective inhibitors of PAK1 such as 2 and 3. Compound 2 was cocrystallized with PAK1 to confirm binding to an allosteric site and to reveal novel key interactions. Compound 3 modulated PAK1 at the cellular level and due to its selectivity enabled valuable research to interrogate biological functions of the PAK1 kinase. PMID:26191365

  4. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 95-130. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulation * radioligand binding functional response Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  5. Surface binding sites in carbohydrate active enzymes: An emerging picture of structural and functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Cockburn, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    universal and is in fact rare among some families of enzymes. In some cases an alternative to possessing a CBM is for the enzyme to bind to the substrate at a site on the catalytic domain, but away from the active site. Such a site is termed a surface (or secondary) binding site (SBS). SBSs have been...... identified in enzymes from a wide variety of families, though almost half are found in the α-amylase family GH13. The roles attributed to SBSs are not limited to targeting the enzyme to the substrate, but also include a variety of others such as guiding the substrate into the active site, altering enzyme...... specificity and acting as an allosteric site. Although SBSs share many roles with CBMs they may not simply be an alternative to CBMs, but rather complementary as SBSs and CBMs frequently co-occur in enzymes. Despite a relatively long history, it is only in recent years that SBSs have been studied in great...

  6. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verespy Iii, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A; Desai, Umesh R

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80-100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  7. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  8. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  9. STUDY OF ESTROGEN BINDING SITE ON HUMAN EJACULATED SPERMATOZOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUJin-Shong; WANGYi-Fei

    1989-01-01

    The specific estrogen binding site for 17β-estradiol has been investigated on human spermatozoa by electron microscopec autoradiography. The results show that the binding sites were distributed over the surface of human spermatozoa: acrosomal cap, equatorial

  10. Chicoric acid binds to two sites and decreases the activity of the YopH bacterial virulence factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Sahu, Kamlesh K; Gorska, Magdalena; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-01-19

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a phenolic compound present in dietary supplements with a large spectrum of biological properties reported ranging from antioxidant, to antiviral, to immunostimulatory properties. Due to the fact that chicoric acid promotes phagocytic activity and was reported as an allosteric inhibitor of the PTP1B phosphatase, we examined the effect of CA on YopH phosphatase from pathogenic bacteria, which block phagocytic processes of a host cell. We performed computational studies of chicoric acid binding to YopH as well as validation experiments with recombinant enzymes. In addition, we performed similar studies for caffeic and chlorogenic acids to compare the results. Docking experiments demonstrated that, from the tested compounds, only CA binds to both catalytic and secondary binding sites of YopH. Our experimental results showed that CA reduces activity of recombinant YopH phosphatase from Yersinia enterocolitica and human CD45 phosphatase. The inhibition caused by CA was irreversible and did not induce oxidation of catalytic cysteine. We proposed that inactivation of YopH induced by CA is involved with allosteric inhibition by interacting with essential regions responsible for ligand binding. PMID:26735581

  11. Chicoric acid binds to two sites and decreases the activity of the YopH bacterial virulence factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Sahu, Kamlesh K.; Gorska, Magdalena; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a phenolic compound present in dietary supplements with a large spectrum of biological properties reported ranging from antioxidant, to antiviral, to immunostimulatory properties. Due to the fact that chicoric acid promotes phagocytic activity and was reported as an allosteric inhibitor of the PTP1B phosphatase, we examined the effect of CA on YopH phosphatase from pathogenic bacteria, which block phagocytic processes of a host cell. We performed computational studies of chicoric acid binding to YopH as well as validation experiments with recombinant enzymes. In addition, we performed similar studies for caffeic and chlorogenic acids to compare the results. Docking experiments demonstrated that, from the tested compounds, only CA binds to both catalytic and secondary binding sites of YopH. Our experimental results showed that CA reduces activity of recombinant YopH phosphatase from Yersinia enterocolitica and human CD45 phosphatase. The inhibition caused by CA was irreversible and did not induce oxidation of catalytic cysteine. We proposed that inactivation of YopH induced by CA is involved with allosteric inhibition by interacting with essential regions responsible for ligand binding. PMID:26735581

  12. Metabolite Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP): ROLE OF AMP AS AN ALLOSTERIC INHIBITOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Jung, Hunmin; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Pawlosky, Robert; Takeshima, Tomomi; Lee, Wan-Ru; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Laxman, Sunil; Wynn, R Max; Tu, Benjamin P; MacMillan, John B; De Brabander, Jef K; Veech, Richard L; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2016-05-13

    The carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-responsive transcription factor that plays an essential role in converting excess carbohydrate to fat storage in the liver. In response to glucose levels, ChREBP is regulated by nuclear/cytosol trafficking via interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, CRM-1 (exportin-1 or XPO-1), or importins. Nuclear localization of ChREBP was rapidly inhibited when incubated in branched-chain α-ketoacids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide. Here, we discovered that protein-free extracts of high fat-fed livers contained, in addition to ketone bodies, a new metabolite, identified as AMP, which specifically activates the interaction between ChREBP and 14-3-3. The crystal structure showed that AMP binds directly to the N terminus of ChREBP-α2 helix. Our results suggest that AMP inhibits the nuclear localization of ChREBP through an allosteric activation of ChREBP/14-3-3 interactions and not by activation of AMPK. AMP and ketone bodies together can therefore inhibit lipogenesis by restricting localization of ChREBP to the cytoplasm during periods of ketosis. PMID:26984404

  13. The N-terminal Peptide of Mammalian GTP Cyclohydrolase I Is an Autoinhibitory Control Element and Contributes to Binding the Allosteric Regulatory Protein GFRP*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Christina E.; Gross, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  14. The N-terminal peptide of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is an autoinhibitory control element and contributes to binding the allosteric regulatory protein GFRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Christina E; Gross, Steven S

    2011-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  15. Allosteric nucleotide-binding site in the mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I)

    OpenAIRE

    Grivennikova, Vera G.; Gladyshev, Grigory V.; Vinogradov, Andrei D.

    2011-01-01

    The rotenone-insensitive NADH:hexaammineruthenium III (HAR) oxidoreductase reactions catalyzed by bovine heart and Yarrowia lipolytica submitochondrial particles or purified bovine complex I are stimulated by ATP and other purine nucleotides. The soluble fraction of mammalian complex I (FP) and prokaryotic complex I homolog NDH-1 in Paracoccus denitrificans plasma membrane lack stimulation of their activities by ATP. The stimulation appears as a decrease in apparent Km values for NADH and HAR...

  16. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel's ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  17. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  18. Divergent allosteric patterns verify the regulatory paradigm for aspartate transcarbamylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, M E; Madison, L L; Glaser, S S; Wild, J R

    1999-12-17

    The native Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase, E.C. 2.1.3.2) provides a classic allosteric model for the feedback inhibition of a biosynthetic pathway by its end products. Both E. coli and Erwinia herbicola possess ATCase holoenzymes which are dodecameric (2(c3):3(r2)) with 311 amino acid residues per catalytic monomer and 153 and 154 amino acid residues per regulatory (r) monomer, respectively. While the quaternary structures of the two enzymes are identical, the primary amino acid sequences have diverged by 14 % in the catalytic polypeptide and 20 % in the regulatory polypeptide. The amino acids proposed to be directly involved in the active site and nucleotide binding site are strictly conserved between the two enzymes; nonetheless, the two enzymes differ in their catalytic and regulatory characteristics. The E. coli enzyme has sigmoidal substrate binding with activation by ATP, and inhibition by CTP, while the E. herbicola enzyme has apparent first order kinetics at low substrate concentrations in the absence of allosteric ligands, no ATP activation and only slight CTP inhibition. In an apparently important and highly conserved characteristic, CTP and UTP impose strong synergistic inhibition on both enzymes. The co-operative binding of aspartate in the E. coli enzyme is correlated with a T-to-R conformational transition which appears to be greatly reduced in the E. herbicola enzyme, although the addition of inhibitory heterotropic ligands (CTP or CTP+UTP) re-establishes co-operative saturation kinetics. Hybrid holoenzymes assembled in vivo with catalytic subunits from E. herbicola and regulatory subunits from E. coli mimick the allosteric response of the native E. coli holoenzyme and exhibit ATP activation. The reverse hybrid, regulatory subunits from E. herbicola and catalytic subunits from E. coli, exhibited no response to ATP. The conserved structure and diverged functional characteristics of the E. herbicola enzyme provides an opportunity

  19. Study on the Model for Regulation of the Allosteric Enzyme Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Qian-Zhong(李前忠); LUO,Liao-Fu(罗辽复); ZHANG,Li-Rong(张利绒)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of activator molecule and repressive molecule on binding process between allosteric enzyme and substrate are disused by considering the heterotropic effect of the regulating molecule that binds to allosteric enzyme. A model of allosteric enzyme with heterotropic effect is presented. The cooperativity and anticooperativity in the regulation process are studied.

  20. Molecular Mechanism of Allosteric Communication in Hsp70 Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Colombo, Giorgio; Milanesi, Luciano; Morra, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Allostery, or the capability of proteins to respond to ligand binding events with a variation in structure or dynamics at a distant site, is a common feature for biomolecular function and regulation in a large number of proteins. Intra-protein connections and inter-residue coordinations underlie allosteric mechanisms and react to binding primarily through a finely tuned modulation of motions and structures at the microscopic scale. Hence, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations...

  1. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  2. Poly(A) RNA and Paip2 act as allosteric regulators of poly(A)-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Oh, Jungsic; Park, Jonghyun; Paek, Ki Young; Rho, Sangchul; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-02-01

    When bound to the 3' poly(A) tail of mRNA, poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) modulates mRNA translation and stability through its association with various proteins. By visualizing individual PABP molecules in real time, we found that PABP, containing four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), adopts a conformation on poly(A) binding in which RRM1 is in proximity to RRM4. This conformational change is due to the bending of the region between RRM2 and RRM3. PABP-interacting protein 2 actively disrupts the bent structure of PABP to the extended structure, resulting in the inhibition of PABP-poly(A) binding. These results suggest that the changes in the configuration of PABP induced by interactions with various effector molecules, such as poly(A) and PABP-interacting protein 2, play pivotal roles in its function. PMID:24293655

  3. Role of Arginine 293 and Glutamine 288 in Communication between Catalytic and Allosteric Sites in Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey (Case Western); (Colorado)

    2012-11-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 ({alpha}) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 ({beta}) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  4. Characteristics of human erythrocyte insulin binding sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    Insulin and human erythrocyte cell membrane interactions were studied with respect to binding and dissociation. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin to erythrocytes was directly proportional to the cell concentration. The optimum pH for binding was 8.1. The initial binding rate was directly proportional to, and the steady state insulin binding was reversely proportional to, the incubation temperature. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin was 12.10 +/- 1...

  5. Elastic network model of allosteric regulation in protein kinase PDK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Gareth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural switches upon binding of phosphorylated moieties underpin many signalling networks. The ligand activation is a form of allosteric modulation of the protein, where the binding site is remote from the structural change in the protein. Recently this structural switch has been elegantly demonstrated with the crystallisation of the activated form of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. The purpose of the present work is to determine whether the allosteric coupling in PDK1 emerges at the level of a simple coarse grained model of protein dynamics. Results It is shown here that the allosteric effects of the agonist binding to the small lobe upon the activation loop in the large lobe of PDK1 are explainable within a simple 'ball and spring' elastic network model (ENM of protein dynamics. In particular, the model shows that the bound phospho peptide mimetic fluctuations have a high degree of correlation with the activation loop of PDK1. Conclusions The ENM approach to small molecule activation of proteins may offer a first pass predictive methodology where affinity is encoded in residues remote from the active site, and aid in the design of specific protein agonists that enhance the allosteric coupling and antagonist that repress it.

  6. Rational design of allosteric regulation of homoserine dehydrogenase by a nonnatural inhibitor L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-02-20

    Allosteric proteins, which can sense different signals, are interesting biological parts for synthetic biology. In particular, the design of an artificial allosteric enzyme to sense an unnatural signal is both challenging and highly desired, for example, for a precise and dynamical control of fluxes of growth-essential but byproduct pathways in metabolic engineering of industrial microorganisms. In this work, we used homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH) of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is naturally allosterically regulated by threonine and isoleucine, as an example to demonstrate the feasibility of reengineering an allosteric enzyme to respond to an unnatural inhibitor L-lysine. For this purpose, the natural threonine binding sites of HSD were first predicted and verified by mutagenesis experiments. The threonine binding sites were then engineered to a lysine binding pocket. The reengineered HSD only responds to lysine inhibition but not to threonine. This is a significant step toward the construction of artificial molecular circuits for dynamic control of growth-essential byproduct formation pathway for lysine biosynthesis. PMID:24344690

  7. The allosteric switching mechanism in bacteriophage MS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkett, Matthew R.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    We use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopts different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We discuss changes in molecular interactions responsible for this shift. We then identify networks of amino acids with correlated motions to reveal the mechanism by which effects of TR binding span the protein. We find that TR binding strongly affects residues located at the 5-fold and quasi-sixfold interfaces in the assembled capsid, suggesting a mechanism by which the TR binding could direct formation of the native capsid geometry. The analysis predicts amino acids whose substitution by mutagenesis could alter populations of the conformational substates or their transition rates.

  8. Selective Negative Allosteric Modulation Of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors - A Structural Perspective of Ligands and Mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Isberg, Vignir; Tehan, Benjamin G;

    2015-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors have a wide range of modulatory functions in the central nervous system. They are among the most highly pursued drug targets, with relevance for several neurological diseases, and a number of allosteric modulators have entered clinical trials. However, so far...... this has not led to a marketed drug, largely because of the difficulties in achieving subtype-selective compounds with desired properties. Very recently the first crystal structures were published for the transmembrane domain of two metabotropic glutamate receptors in complex with negative allosteric...... modulators. In this analysis, we make the first comprehensive structural comparison of all metabotropic glutamate receptors, placing selective negative allosteric modulators and critical mutants into the detailed context of the receptor binding sites. A better understanding of how the different m...

  9. Negative Example Aided Transcription Factor Binding Site Search

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2011-01-01

    Computational approaches to transcription factor binding site identification have been actively researched for the past decade. Negative examples have long been utilized in de novo motif discovery and have been shown useful in transcription factor binding site search as well. However, understanding of the roles of negative examples in binding site search is still very limited. We propose the 2-centroid and optimal discriminating vector methods, taking into account negative examples. Cross-val...

  10. LASAGNA: A novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Background Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provid...

  11. Searching for transcription factor binding sites in vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Chih; Huang Chun-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Computational approaches to transcription factor binding site identification have been actively researched in the past decade. Learning from known binding sites, new binding sites of a transcription factor in unannotated sequences can be identified. A number of search methods have been introduced over the years. However, one can rarely find one single method that performs the best on all the transcription factors. Instead, to identify the best method for a particular trans...

  12. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzyma...

  13. Allosteric indicator displacement enzyme assay for a cyanogenic glycoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, D Amilan; Elstner, Martin; Schiller, Alexander

    2013-10-18

    Indicator displacement assays (IDAs) represent an elegant approach in supramolecular analytical chemistry. Herein, we report a chemical biosensor for the selective detection of the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin in aqueous solution. The hybrid sensor consists of the enzyme β-glucosidase and a boronic acid appended viologen together with a fluorescent reporter dye. β-Glucosidase degrades the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin into hydrogen cyanide, glucose, and benzaldehyde. Only the released cyanide binds at the allosteric site of the receptor (boronic acid) thereby inducing changes in the affinity of a formerly bound fluorescent indicator dye at the other side of the receptor. Thus, the sensing probe performs as allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) for cyanide in water. Interference studies with inorganic anions and glucose revealed that cyanide is solely responsible for the change in the fluorescent signal. DFT calculations on a model compound revealed a 1:1 binding ratio of the boronic acid and cyanide ion. The fluorescent enzyme assay for β-glucosidase uses amygdalin as natural substrate and allows measuring Michaelis-Menten kinetics in microtiter plates. The allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) probe can also be used to detect cyanide traces in commercial amygdalin samples. PMID:24123550

  14. Whole-genome cartography of estrogen receptor alpha binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yo Lin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation-paired end diTag cloning and sequencing strategy, we mapped estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha binding sites in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We identified 1,234 high confidence binding clusters of which 94% are projected to be bona fide ERalpha binding regions. Only 5% of the mapped estrogen receptor binding sites are located within 5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start sites of adjacent genes, regions containing the proximal promoters, whereas vast majority of the sites are mapped to intronic or distal locations (>5 kb from 5' and 3' ends of adjacent transcript, suggesting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms over significant physical distances. Of all the identified sites, 71% harbored putative full estrogen response elements (EREs, 25% bore ERE half sites, and only 4% had no recognizable ERE sequences. Genes in the vicinity of ERalpha binding sites were enriched for regulation by estradiol in MCF-7 cells, and their expression profiles in patient samples segregate ERalpha-positive from ERalpha-negative breast tumors. The expression dynamics of the genes adjacent to ERalpha binding sites suggest a direct induction of gene expression through binding to ERE-like sequences, whereas transcriptional repression by ERalpha appears to be through indirect mechanisms. Our analysis also indicates a number of candidate transcription factor binding sites adjacent to occupied EREs at frequencies much greater than by chance, including the previously reported FOXA1 sites, and demonstrate the potential involvement of one such putative adjacent factor, Sp1, in the global regulation of ERalpha target genes. Unexpectedly, we found that only 22%-24% of the bona fide human ERalpha binding sites were overlapping conserved regions in whole genome vertebrate alignments, which suggest limited conservation of functional binding sites. Taken together, this genome-scale analysis suggests complex but definable rules governing ERalpha

  15. Accessibility of different histone H3-binding domains of UHRF1 is allosterically regulated by phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate.

    OpenAIRE

    Gelato, K.; Tauber, M; Ong, M; Winter, S.; Hamada, K; Sindlinger, J.; Lemak, A.; Bultsma, Y.; Houliston, S.; Schwarzer, D; Divecha, N.; C. Arrowsmith; Fischle, W

    2014-01-01

    UHRF1 is a multidomain protein crucially linking histone H3 modification states and DNA methylation. While the interaction properties of its specific domains are well characterized, little is known about the regulation of these functionalities. We show that UHRF1 exists in distinct active states, binding either unmodified H3 or the H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) modification. A polybasic region (PBR) in the C terminus blocks interaction of a tandem tudor domain (TTD) with H3K9me3 by occ...

  16. Predicted metal binding sites for phytoremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ashok; Roy, Sudeep; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Roy, Pratibha; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha

    2009-01-01

    Metal ion binding domains are found in proteins that mediate transport, buffering or detoxification of metal ions. The objective of the study is to design and analyze metal binding motifs against the genes involved in phytoremediation. This is being done on the basis of certain pre-requisite amino-acid residues known to bind metal ions/metal complexes in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP's). Earlier work on MAP's have shown that heavy metals accumulated by aromatic and medicinal plants do no...

  17. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A.; Golden, Barbara L. (Purdue); (Colorado)

    2010-05-24

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions.

  18. [3H]-ouabain binding sites and (Na+ + K+)ATPase activity in heart of rats fed cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of cholesterol on the characteristics of ouabain binding sites and (Na+ + K+)ATPase activity in heart. Three groups of male, weanling, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 5 weeks diets containing 0, 1 or 2% cholesterol. Membranes were prepared from deoxycholate-treated heart homogenates by differential centrifugation and assayed for ouabain binding and (Na+ + K+)ATPase activity. Membranes were incubated with [3H]-ouabain in the presence of 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.4) and rapidly filtered on glass fiber filters, GF/A. Non-specific binding was measured in the presence of 6 mM non-labeled ouabain. Concentration of [3H]-ouabain binding sites (B/sub max/) was decreased and the binding affinity was increased in the membranes of rats fed 2% cholesterol. The ouabain-sensitive (Na+ + K+)ATPase activity was 50-75% lower in membranes prepared from heart of rats fed cholesterol. The Mg2+-ATPase activity was not changed by dietary cholesterol. The results suggest that cholesterol feeding decreases the number of (Na+ + K+)ATPase units and allosterically modifies the enzyme

  19. Evolution of Metal(Loid) Binding Sites in Transcriptional Regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, E.; Thiyagarajan, S.; Cook, J.D.; Stemmler, T.L.; Gil, J.A.; Mateos, L.M.; Rosen, B.P.

    2009-05-22

    Expression of the genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of small metalloregulatory proteins respond to transition metals, heavy metals, and metalloids, including As(III), Sb(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). These homodimeric repressors bind to DNA in the absence of inducing metal(loid) ion and dissociate from the DNA when inducer is bound. The regulatory sites are often three- or four-coordinate metal binding sites composed of cysteine thiolates. Surprisingly, in two different As(III)-responsive regulators, the metalloid binding sites were in different locations in the repressor, and the Cd(II) binding sites were in two different locations in two Cd(II)-responsive regulators. We hypothesize that ArsR/SmtB repressors have a common backbone structure, that of a winged helix DNA-binding protein, but have considerable plasticity in the location of inducer binding sites. Here we show that an As(III)-responsive member of the family, CgArsR1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, binds As(III) to a cysteine triad composed of Cys{sup 15}, Cys{sup 16}, and Cys{sup 55}. This binding site is clearly unrelated to the binding sites of other characterized ArsR/SmtB family members. This is consistent with our hypothesis that metal(loid) binding sites in DNA binding proteins evolve convergently in response to persistent environmental pressures.

  20. In silico-screening approaches for lead generation: identification of novel allosteric modulators of human-erythrocyte pyruvate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ashutosh; Safo, Martin K

    2012-01-01

    Identification of allosteric binding site modulators have gained increased attention lately for their potential to be developed as selective agents with a novel chemotype and targeting perhaps a new and unique binding site with probable fewer side effects. Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (R-PK) is an important glycolytic enzyme that can be pharmacologically modulated through its allosteric effectors for the treatment of hemolytic anemia, sickle-cell anemia, hypoxia-related diseases, and other disorders arising from erythrocyte PK malfunction. An in-silico screening approach was applied to identify novel allosteric modulators of pyruvate kinase. A small-molecules database of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), was virtually screened based on structure/ligand-based pharmacophore. The virtual screening campaign led to the identification of several compounds with similar pharmacophoric features as fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), the natural allosteric activator of the kinase. The compounds were subsequently docked into the FBP-binding site using the programs FlexX and GOLD, and their interactions with the protein were analyzed with the energy-scoring function of HINT. Seven promising candidates were obtained from the NCI and subjected to kinetics analysis, which revealed both activators and inhibitors of the R-isozyme of PK (R-PK). PMID:22052500

  1. New insight into the binding modes of TNP-AMP to human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinya; Huang, Yunyuan; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, San; Zhu, Shuaihuan; Qin, Nian; Hong, Zongqin; Wei, Lin; Feng, Jiangtao; Ren, Yanliang; Feng, Lingling; Wan, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) contains two binding sites, a substrate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) active site and an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) allosteric site. The FBP active site works by stabilizing the FBPase, and the allosteric site impairs the activity of FBPase through its binding of a nonsubstrate molecule. The fluorescent AMP analogue, 2‧,3‧-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5‧-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) has been used as a fluorescent probe as it is able to competitively inhibit AMP binding to the AMP allosteric site and, therefore, could be used for exploring the binding modes of inhibitors targeted on the allosteric site. In this study, we have re-examined the binding modes of TNP-AMP to FBPase. However, our present enzyme kinetic assays show that AMP and FBP both can reduce the fluorescence from the bound TNP-AMP through competition for FBPase, suggesting that TNP-AMP binds not only to the AMP allosteric site but also to the FBP active site. Mutagenesis assays of K274L (located in the FBP active site) show that the residue K274 is very important for TNP-AMP to bind to the active site of FBPase. The results further prove that TNP-AMP is able to bind individually to the both sites. Our present study provides a new insight into the binding mechanism of TNP-AMP to the FBPase. The TNP-AMP fluorescent probe can be used to exam the binding site of an inhibitor (the active site or the allosteric site) using FBPase saturated by AMP and FBP, respectively, or the K247L mutant FBPase.

  2. Temperature and pressure adaptation of the binding site of acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochachka, P W

    1974-12-01

    1. Studies with a carbon substrate analogue, 3,3-dimethylbutyl acetate, indicate that the hydrophobic contribution to binding at the anionic site of acetylcholinesterase is strongly disrupted at low temperatures and high pressures. 2. Animals living in different physical environments circumvent this problem by adjusting the enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding. 3. An extreme example of this adaptational strategy is supplied by brain acetylcholinesterase extracted from an abyssal fish living at 2 degrees C and up to several hundred atmospheres of pressure. This acetylcholinesterase appears to have a smaller hydrophobic binding region in the anionic site, playing a measurably decreased role in ligand binding. PMID:4462739

  3. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P2 preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P2 preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-[3H]nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-[3H]nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine

  4. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meri, T; Amdahl, H; Lehtinen, M J; Hyvärinen, S; McDowell, J V; Bhattacharjee, A; Meri, S; Marconi, R; Goldman, A; Jokiranta, T S

    2013-01-01

    To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH). FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20). We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii). We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site." PMID:23637600

  5. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a mul...

  6. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Joachim Haupt

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology - a drug's ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand

  7. Identification, characterization, and developmental regulation of embryonic benzodiazepine binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the identification and characterization of 2 classes of benzodiazepine binding sites in the embryonic chick CNS. Binding was examined by competition and saturation binding experiments, using as radioligands 3H-flunitrazepam, a classical benzodiazepine anxiolytic, and 3H-Ro5-4864, a convulsant benzodiazepine. The results demonstrate that high-affinity (KD = 2.3 nM) 3H-flunitrazepam binding sites (site-A) are present by embryonic day 5 (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 27) and increase throughout development (Bmax = 0.3 and 1.3 pmol/mg protein in 7 and 20 d brain membranes, respectively). When 7 or 20 d brain membranes are photoaffinity-labeled with 3H-flunitrazepam and ultraviolet light, the radioactivity migrates as 2 bands on SDS-PAGE, consistent with Mrs of 48,000 and 51,000. GABA potentiates 3H-flunitrazepam binding at both 7 and 20 d of development, indicating that site-A is coupled to receptors for GABA early in development. Importantly, we have also identified a novel site (site-B) that binds classical benzodiazepine agonists with low affinity (micromolar) but displays high affinity for Ro5-4864 (KD = 41 nM). Site-B displays characteristics expected for a functional receptor, including stereospecificity and sensitivity to inactivation by heat and protease treatment. Saturation binding studies employing 3H-Ro5-4864 indicate that the levels of site-B are similar in 7 and 20 d brain (ca. 2.5 pmol/mg protein). The function of site-B is not known, but its preponderance in 7 d brain, relative to site-A, suggests that it might be important during early embryonic development

  8. Reliable prediction of transcription factor binding sites by phylogenetic verification

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaoman; Zhong, Sheng; Wong, Wing H.

    2005-01-01

    We present a statistical methodology that largely improves the accuracy in computational predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in eukaryote genomes. This method models the cross-species conservation of binding sites without relying on accurate sequence alignment. It can be coupled with any motif-finding algorithm that searches for overrepresented sequence motifs in individual species and can increase the accuracy of the coupled motif-finding algorithm. Because this method is ...

  9. DISTINCT ROLES OF β1 MIDAS, ADMIDAS AND LIMBS CATION-BINDING SITES IN LIGAND RECOGNITION BY INTEGRIN α2β1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdramidou, Dimitra; Humphries, Martin J.; Mould, A. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Integrin-ligand interactions are regulated in a complex manner by divalent cations, and previous studies have identified ligand-competent, stimulatory, and inhibitory cation-binding sites. In collagen-binding integrins, such as α2β1, ligand recognition takes place exclusively at the α subunit I domain. However, activation of the αI domain depends on its interaction with a structurally similar domain in the β subunit known as the I-like or βI domain. The top face of the βI domain contains three cation-binding sites: the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), the ADMIDAS (adjacent to MIDAS) and LIMBS (ligand-associated metal binding site). The role of these sites in controlling ligand binding to the αI domain has yet to be elucidated. Mutation of the MIDAS or LIMBS completely blocked collagen binding to α2β1; in contrast mutation of the ADMIDAS reduced ligand recognition but this effect could be overcome by the activating mAb TS2/16. Hence, the MIDAS and LIMBS appear to be essential for the interaction between αI and βI whereas occupancy of the ADMIDAS has an allosteric effect on the conformation of βI. An activating mutation in the α2 I domain partially restored ligand binding to the MIDAS and LIMBS mutants. Analysis of the effects of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Mn2+ on ligand binding to these mutants showed that the MIDAS is a ligand-competent site through which Mn2+ stimulates ligand binding, whereas the LIMBS is a stimulatory Ca2+-binding site, occupancy of which increases the affinity of Mg2+ for the MIDAS. PMID:18820259

  10. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  11. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  12. Pathways of allosteric regulation in Hsp70 chaperones

    OpenAIRE

    Kityk, Roman; Vogel, Markus; Schlecht, Rainer; Bukau, Bernd; Mayer, Matthias P

    2015-01-01

    Central to the protein folding activity of Hsp70 chaperones is their ability to interact with protein substrates in an ATP-controlled manner, which relies on allosteric regulation between their nucleotide-binding (NBD) and substrate-binding domains (SBD). Here we dissect this mechanism by analysing mutant variants of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 DnaK blocked at distinct steps of allosteric communication. We show that the SBD inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the NBD through a highly ...

  13. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei;

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...

  14. Calculation of binding constants and concentration of binding sites in a reaction of a ligand with a heterogeneous system of binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for the calculation of association constants and the concentration of binding sites in a reaction of a ligand with a heterogeneous system of binding sites. The Scatchard plot for such a system is curvelinear and the method employs previously established relationships between the parameters of the limiting slopes to such a curve and the above mentioned association constants and concentrations of binding sites. The special case of a system with two different and non-interacting groups of binding sites was solved. The expressions thus obtained were used to characterize the reaction of a polypeptide neurotoxin with its specific binding sites in a membranal preparation from insect central nervous system. Moreover it is evident from these expressions that the widely accepted method to analyze such system, by an intuitive generalization of the method applicable to homogeneous systems, is erroneous and should be avoided. (author)

  15. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H] bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/106 cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of [3H] bremazocine with an IC50 value = 0.57μM. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, [D-Pen2, D-Pen5] enkephalin and β-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC50 = 60μM, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  16. Human chorionic ganodotropin binding sites in the human endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existence of high-affinity and low-capacity specific binding sites for luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been reported in porcine, rabbit and rat uteri. The authors have identified the hCG binding sites in the human endometrium collected from 35-42-year-old ovulatory and anovulatory women. The binding characteristics of hCG to endometrial tissue preparations from ovulatory and anovulatory women showed saturability with high affinity and low capacity. Scatchard plot analysis showed the dissociation constant of specific binding sites in the ovulatory women to be 3.5x10-10 mol/l and in anovulatory women to be 3.1x10-10 mol/l. The maximum binding capacity varied considerably between ovulatory and anovulatory endometrium. Among the divalent metal ions tested Zn2+ effected a remarkable increase in [125I]hCG binding to the endometrium, whereas Mn2+ showed a marginal increase and other metal ions did not have any effect. Data obtained with human endometrium indicate an influence of the functional state of the ovary on [125I]hCG binding to endometrium. 14 refs., 3 figs

  17. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  18. Modulation of global low-frequency motions underlies allosteric regulation: demonstration in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Rodgers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein "design space" that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have

  19. 3H-spiroperidol binding sites in blood platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3H-spiroperidol, an antagonist of dopamine receptors in brain (striatum), was found to bind to human and rat platelet membrane preparations. The binding was rapid, reversible, saturable and specific. Unlabelled haloperidol displaced the specifically bound 3H-spiroperidol. Binding equilibrium was attained in 15 min at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C. Scatchard analysis of 3H-spiroperidol binding revealed a single population of binding site with Kd of 7.6 nM in rat platelet membrane and Kd of 15 nM in human platelet membrane. Unlabelled 5-hydroxytryptamine produced no significant effect on 3H-spiroperidol binding to rat or human blood platelet membranes in the presence or absence of haloperidol. Some dopaminergic agents, known to inhibit spiroperidol binding in corpus striatum, also inhibited the same in rat and human blood platelet membranes under in vitro conditions. This study suggests the presence of specific 3H-spiroperidol binding sites in blood platelets

  20. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1.

  1. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A; Golden, Barbara L

    2010-06-01

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions. PMID:20410239

  2. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  3. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of 35S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cell envelope obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. Experiments distinguishing the effect of pH on penicillin binding by PBP 5/6 from its effect on beta-lactamase activity indicated that although substantial binding occurred at the lowest pH, the amount of binding increased with pH, reaching a maximum at pH 10. Based on earlier studies, it is proposed that the binding at high pH involves the formation of a covalent bond between the C-7 of penicillin and free epsilon amino groups of the PBPs. At pHs ranging from 4 to 8, position 1 of penicillin, occupied by sulfur, is considered to be the site that establishes a covalent bond with the sulfhydryl groups of PBP 5. The use of specific blockers of free epsilon amino groups or sulfhydryl groups indicated that wherever the presence of each had little or no effect on the binding of penicillin by PBP 5, the presence of both completely prevented binding. The specific blocker of the hydroxyl group of serine did not affect the binding of penicillin

  4. Mutations in Antibody Fragments Modulate Allosteric Response Via Hydrogen-Bond Network Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Livesay, Dennis R; Jacobs, Donald J

    2016-05-10

    A mechanical perturbation method that locally restricts conformational entropy along the protein backbone is used to identify putative allosteric sites in a series of antibody fragments. The method is based on a distance constraint model that integrates mechanical and thermodynamic viewpoints of protein structure wherein mechanical clamps that mimic substrate or cosolute binding are introduced. Across a set of six single chain-Fv fragments of the anti-lymphotoxin-β receptor antibody, statistically significant responses are obtained by averaging over 10 representative structures sampled from a molecular dynamics simulation. As expected, the introduced clamps locally rigidify the protein, but long-ranged increases in both rigidity and flexibility are also frequently observed. Expanding our analysis to every molecular dynamics frame demonstrates that the allosteric responses are modulated by fluctuations within the hydrogen-bond network where the native ensemble is comprised of conformations that both are, and are not, affected by the perturbation in question. Population shifts induced by the mutations alter the allosteric response by adjusting which hydrogen-bond networks are the most probable. These effects are compared using response maps that track changes across each single chain-Fv fragment, thus providing valuable insight into how sensitive allosteric mechanisms are to mutations. PMID:27166802

  5. Coevolutionary analysis enabled rational deregulation of allosteric enzyme inhibition in Corynebacterium glutamicum for lysine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Meyer, Weiqian; Rappert, Sugima; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Product feedback inhibition of allosteric enzymes is an essential issue for the development of highly efficient microbial strains for bioproduction. Here we used aspartokinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAK), a key enzyme controlling the biosynthesis of industrially important aspartate family amino acids, as a model to demonstrate a fast and efficient approach to the deregulation of allostery. In the last 50 years many researchers and companies have made considerable efforts to deregulate this enzyme from allosteric inhibition by lysine and threonine. However, only a limited number of positive mutants have been identified so far, almost exclusively by random mutation and selection. In this study, we used statistical coupling analysis of protein sequences, a method based on coevolutionary analysis, to systematically clarify the interaction network within the regulatory domain of CgAK that is essential for allosteric inhibition. A cluster of interconnected residues linking different inhibitors' binding sites as well as other regions of the protein have been identified, including most of the previously reported positions of successful mutations. Beyond these mutation positions, we have created another 14 mutants that can partially or completely desensitize CgAK from allosteric inhibition, as shown by enzyme activity assays. The introduction of only one of the inhibition-insensitive CgAK mutations (here Q298G) into a wild-type C. glutamicum strain by homologous recombination resulted in an accumulation of 58 g/liter L-lysine within 30 h of fed-batch fermentation in a bioreactor. PMID:21531824

  6. Insulin binding sites in various segments of the rabbit nephron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, R.; Emmanouel, D.S.; Katz, A.I.

    1983-07-01

    Insulin binds specifically to basolateral renal cortical membranes and modifies tubular electrolyte transport, but the target sites of this hormone in the nephron have not been identified. Using a microassay that permits measurement of hormone binding in discrete tubule segments we have determined the binding sites of /sup 125/I-insulin along the rabbit nephron. Assays were performed under conditions that minimize insulin degradation, and specific binding was measured as the difference between /sup 125/I-insulin bound in the presence or absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled hormone. Insulin monoiodinated in position A14 was used in all assays. Specific insulin binding (attomol . cm-1 +/- SE) was highest in the distal convoluted tubule (180.5 +/- 15.0) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (132.9 +/- 14.6), followed by the proximal convoluted and straight tubule. When expressed per milligram protein, insulin binding capacity was highest along the entire thick ascending limb (medullary and cortical portions) and the distal convoluted tubule, i.e., the ''diluting segment'' (congruent to 10(-13) mol . mg protein-1), and was lower (congruent to 4 X 10(-14) mol . mg protein-1), and remarkably similar, in all other nephron segments. Binding specificity was verified in competition studies with unlabeled insulin, insulin analogues (proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin), and unrelated hormones (glucagon, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone). In addition, serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibody from two patients with type B insulin resistance syndrome markedly inhibited insulin binding to isolated tubules. Whether calculated per unit tubule length or protein content, insulin binding is highest in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, the same nephron sites where a regulatory role in sodium transport has been postulated for this hormone.

  7. Insulin binding sites in various segments of the rabbit nephron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin binds specifically to basolateral renal cortical membranes and modifies tubular electrolyte transport, but the target sites of this hormone in the nephron have not been identified. Using a microassay that permits measurement of hormone binding in discrete tubule segments we have determined the binding sites of 125I-insulin along the rabbit nephron. Assays were performed under conditions that minimize insulin degradation, and specific binding was measured as the difference between 125I-insulin bound in the presence or absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled hormone. Insulin monoiodinated in position A14 was used in all assays. Specific insulin binding (attomol . cm-1 +/- SE) was highest in the distal convoluted tubule (180.5 +/- 15.0) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (132.9 +/- 14.6), followed by the proximal convoluted and straight tubule. When expressed per milligram protein, insulin binding capacity was highest along the entire thick ascending limb (medullary and cortical portions) and the distal convoluted tubule, i.e., the ''diluting segment'' (congruent to 10(-13) mol . mg protein-1), and was lower (congruent to 4 X 10(-14) mol . mg protein-1), and remarkably similar, in all other nephron segments. Binding specificity was verified in competition studies with unlabeled insulin, insulin analogues (proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin), and unrelated hormones (glucagon, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone). In addition, serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibody from two patients with type B insulin resistance syndrome markedly inhibited insulin binding to isolated tubules. Whether calculated per unit tubule length or protein content, insulin binding is highest in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, the same nephron sites where a regulatory role in sodium transport has been postulated for this hormone

  8. Orthosteric and Allosteric Regulation in Trypsin-Like Peptidases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann-Tofting, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Trypsin-like serine peptidases play an important role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, the latter including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Binding of natural ligands to functional sites on the peptidase surface balances the level of activity and substrate specificity of...... peptidase and allosterically modulate the function of the active site, represents two important activity-regulating mechanisms in trypsin-like serine peptidases. Development of specific orthosteric agents as therapeutics is a challenge due to similar active site topology within the trypsin-like serine...... peptidase. The thesis describes how X-ray crystal structure analysis and biochemical analysis were used to demonstrate new concepts for orthosteric regulation of activity in the trypsin-like serine peptidase urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), studying two types of orthosteric agents, namely cyclic...

  9. Sourcing the affinity of flavonoids for the glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor site via crystallography, kinetics and QM/MM-PBSA binding studies: comparison of chrysin and flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsanou, Katerina E; Hayes, Joseph M; Keramioti, Maria; Mamais, Michalis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Kato, Atsushi; Leonidas, Demetres D; Zographos, Spyros E

    2013-11-01

    Flavonoids have been discovered as novel inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a target to control hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the GPb-chrysin complex at 1.9 Å resolution. Chrysin is accommodated at the inhibitor site intercalating between the aromatic side chains of Phe285 and Tyr613 through π-stacking interactions. Chrysin binds to GPb approximately 15 times weaker (Ki=19.01 μM) than flavopiridol (Ki=1.24 μM), exclusively at the inhibitor site, and both inhibitors display similar behavior with respect to AMP. To identify the source of flavopiridols' stronger affinity, molecular docking with Glide and postdocking binding free energy calculations using QM/MM-PBSA have been performed and compared. Whereas docking failed to correctly rank inhibitor binding conformations, the QM/MM-PBSA method employing M06-2X/6-31+G to model the π-stacking interactions correctly reproduced the experimental results. Flavopiridols' greater binding affinity is sourced to favorable interactions of the cationic 4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl substituent with GPb, with desolvation effects limited by the substituent conformation adopted in the crystallographic complex. Further successful predictions using QM/MM-PBSA for the flavonoid quercetagetin (which binds at the allosteric site) leads us to propose the methodology as a useful and inexpensive tool to predict flavonoid binding. PMID:23279842

  10. Binding-site assessment by virtual fragment screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Huang

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of protein druggability (propensity to bind high-affinity drug-like small molecules would greatly benefit the fields of chemical genomics and drug discovery. We have developed a novel approach to quantitatively assess protein druggability by computationally screening a fragment-like compound library. In analogy to NMR-based fragment screening, we dock approximately 11,000 fragments against a given binding site and compute a computational hit rate based on the fraction of molecules that exceed an empirically chosen score cutoff. We perform a large-scale evaluation of the approach on four datasets, totaling 152 binding sites. We demonstrate that computed hit rates correlate with hit rates measured experimentally in a previously published NMR-based screening method. Secondly, we show that the in silico fragment screening method can be used to distinguish known druggable and non-druggable targets, including both enzymes and protein-protein interaction sites. Finally, we explore the sensitivity of the results to different receptor conformations, including flexible protein-protein interaction sites. Besides its original aim to assess druggability of different protein targets, this method could be used to identifying druggable conformations of flexible binding site for lead discovery, and suggesting strategies for growing or joining initial fragment hits to obtain more potent inhibitors.

  11. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-08-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  12. Allosteric modulation of the effect of escitalopram, paroxetine and fluoxetine: in-vitro and in-vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansari, Mostafa El; Wiborg, Ove; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame;

    2006-01-01

    escitalopram. This effect was suggested to occur via an allosteric modulation at the level of the 5-HT transporter. Using in-vitro binding assays at membranes from COS-1 cells expressing the human 5-HT transporter (hSERT) and in-vivo electrophysiological and microdialysis techniques in rats, the present study...... was directed at determining whether R-citalopram modifies the action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) known to act on allosteric sites namely escitalopram, and to a lesser extent paroxetine, compared to fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites. In-vitro binding studies...... showed that R-citalopram attenuated the association rates of escitalopram and paroxetine to the 5-HT transporter, but had no effect on the association rates of fluoxetine, venlafaxine or sertraline. In the rat dorsal raphe nucleus, R-citalopram (250 microg/kg i.v.) blocked the suppressant effect on...

  13. Stabilizing a Flexible Interdomain Hinge Region Harboring the SMB Binding Site Drives uPAR into Its Closed Conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Gandhi, Sonu; Yuan, Cai;

    2015-01-01

    domains is inherently flexible and binding of uPA drives uPAR into its closed conformation, which presents the higher affinity state for vitronectin thus providing an allosteric regulatory mechanism. Using a new class of epitope mapped monoclonal anti-uPAR antibodies, we now demonstrate...

  14. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Thuesen, Cathrine K; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A;

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless......, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with...... therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to...

  15. Allosteric modulation of caspase 3 through mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jad Walters

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A mutation in the allosteric site of the caspase 3 dimer interface of Val266 to histidine abolishes activity of the enzyme, and models predict that the mutation mimics the action of small molecule allosteric inhibitors by preventing formation of the active site. Mutations were coupled to His266 at two sites in the interface, E124A and Y197C. We present results from X-ray crystallography, enzymatic activity and molecular dynamics simulations for seven proteins, consisting of single, double and triple mutants. The results demonstrate that considering allosteric inhibition of caspase 3 as a shift between discrete ‘off-state’ or ‘on-state’ conformations is insufficient. Although His266 is accommodated in the interface, the structural defects are propagated to the active site through a helix on the protein surface. A more comprehensive view of allosteric regulation of caspase 3 requires the representation of an ensemble of inactive states and shows that subtle structural changes lead to the population of the inactive ensemble.

  16. Agonist binding to high-affinity dopamine sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have characterized the dopamine D/sub 3/ site and its binding requirements. The dopamine D/sub 3/ site in calf caudate crude homogenate has a site density of 214-230 fmoles/mg. protein by both /sup 3/H-apomorphine (/sup 3/H-AOP) and /sup 3/H-dopamine (/sup 3/H-DA) Scatchard analysis of specific binding (SB). Stereospecific subsets of /sup 3/H-APO and /sup 3/H-DA sites were defined by the use of agonist and antagonist enantiomer-pairs as a rigorous test for D/sub 3/ site heterogeneity. IC/sub 50/ values for both /sup 3/H-APO and /sup 3/H-DA SB sites were assessed for 55 agonist ligands and an excellent correlation was obtained. The authors conclude that both /sup 3/H-ligands label the same D/sub 3/ site. The D/sub 3/ site affinities of 105 dopamine-agonist ligands, in particular 2-aminotetralins,, aporphines and flexible dopamine analogues were measured. Low D/sub 3/-site affinities of N-quaternary analogues confirm the need for a lone pair. Subadditivity of substituents' effects in semi-flexible DA analogues confirms their postulate that sidechain conformation is the critical determinant of affinity. They conclude that there are at least two high-affinity ligand conformations of the DA sidechain pharmacophore. These binding requirements are presented as two interface-Geometry tetrahedral models of the double H-bond interface between the D/sub 3/ site and the ideal ligand.

  17. Thymocyte plasma membrane: the location of specific glucocorticoid binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In modern molecular endocrinology it is now possible to determine the localization of receptors for biologically active substances with the aid of ligands, with high affinity for the receptor, immobilized on polymers. The purpose of this paper is to study the ability of hydrocortisone (HC), immobilized on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-HC), to reduce binding of tritium-HC by thymocytes of adrenalectomized rats. It is determined that specific binding sites for HC on rat thymocytes are also accessible for PVP-HC, which, due to the fact that this immobilized version of HC does not penetrate into the cell, leads to the conclusion that the binding sites for HC itself are located in the plasma membrane

  18. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype was...

  19. Structures of quinone binding sites in bc complexes: Functional implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near-atomic resolution structures are becoming available for the respiratory chain enzyme known as ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase or the cytochrome bc1 complex. Here we examine our current structure for the chicken bc1 complex to see what it can tell us about the mode of binding and mechanism of reaction of quinone at the two active sites

  20. Reliable prediction of transcription factor binding sites by phylogenetic verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoman; Zhong, Sheng; Wong, Wing H

    2005-11-22

    We present a statistical methodology that largely improves the accuracy in computational predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in eukaryote genomes. This method models the cross-species conservation of binding sites without relying on accurate sequence alignment. It can be coupled with any motif-finding algorithm that searches for overrepresented sequence motifs in individual species and can increase the accuracy of the coupled motif-finding algorithm. Because this method is capable of accurately detecting TF binding sites, it also enhances our ability to predict the cis-regulatory modules. We applied this method on the published chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip data in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found that its sensitivity and specificity are 9% and 14% higher than those of two recent methods. We also recovered almost all of the previously verified TF binding sites and made predictions on the cis-regulatory elements that govern the tight regulation of ribosomal protein genes in 13 eukaryote species (2 plants, 4 yeasts, 2 worms, 2 insects, and 3 mammals). These results give insights to the transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:16286651

  1. Stabilizing a flexible interdomain hinge region harboring the SMB binding site drives uPAR into its closed conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Gandhi, Sonu; Yuan, Cai; Luo, Zhipu; Li, Rui; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Sidenius, Nicolai; Huang, Mingdong; Ploug, Michael

    2015-03-27

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a multidomain glycolipid-anchored membrane protein, which facilitates extracellular matrix remodeling by focalizing plasminogen activation to cell surfaces via its high-affinity interaction with uPA. The modular assembly of its three LU (Ly6/uPAR-like) domains is inherently flexible and binding of uPA drives uPAR into its closed conformation, which presents the higher-affinity state for vitronectin thus providing an allosteric regulatory mechanism. Using a new class of epitope-mapped anti-uPAR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), we now demonstrate that the reciprocal stabilization is indeed also possible. By surface plasmon resonance studies, we show that these mAbs and vitronectin have overlapping binding sites on uPAR and that they share Arg91 as hotspot residue in their binding interfaces. The crystal structure solved for one of these uPAR·mAb complexes at 3.0Å clearly shows that this mAb preselects the closed uPAR conformation with an empty but correctly assembled large hydrophobic binding cavity for uPA. Accordingly, these mAbs inhibit the uPAR-dependent lamellipodia formation and migration on vitronectin-coated matrices irrespective of the conformational status of uPAR and its occupancy with uPA. This is the first study to the best of our knowledge, showing that the dynamic assembly of the three LU domains in uPARwt can be driven toward the closed form by an external ligand, which is not engaging the hydrophobic uPA binding cavity. As this binding interface is also exploited by the somatomedin B domain of vitronectin, therefore, this relationship should be taken into consideration when exploring uPAR-dependent cell adhesion and migration in vitronectin-rich environments. PMID:25659907

  2. Promoter-distal RNA polymerase II binding discriminates active from inactive CCAAT/ enhancer-binding protein beta binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Daniel; Roberts, Brian S.; Carleton, Julia B.; Partridge, E. Christopher; White, Michael A.; Cohen, Barak A.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to thousands of DNA sequences in mammalian genomes, but most of these binding events appear to have no direct effect on gene expression. It is unclear why only a subset of TF bound sites are actively involved in transcriptional regulation. Moreover, the key genomic features that accurately discriminate between active and inactive TF binding events remain ambiguous. Recent studies have identified promoter-distal RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) binding at enhancer elements, suggesting that these interactions may serve as a marker for active regulatory sequences. Despite these correlative analyses, a thorough functional validation of these genomic co-occupancies is still lacking. To characterize the gene regulatory activity of DNA sequences underlying promoter-distal TF binding events that co-occur with RNAP2 and TF sites devoid of RNAP2 occupancy using a functional reporter assay, we performed cis-regulatory element sequencing (CRE-seq). We tested more than 1000 promoter-distal CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB)-bound sites in HepG2 and K562 cells, and found that CEBPB-bound sites co-occurring with RNAP2 were more likely to exhibit enhancer activity. CEBPB-bound sites further maintained substantial cell-type specificity, indicating that local DNA sequence can accurately convey cell-type–specific regulatory information. By comparing our CRE-seq results to a comprehensive set of genome annotations, we identified a variety of genomic features that are strong predictors of regulatory element activity and cell-type–specific activity. Collectively, our functional assay results indicate that RNAP2 occupancy can be used as a key genomic marker that can distinguish active from inactive TF bound sites. PMID:26486725

  3. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abha S Bais; Steffen Grossmann; Martin Vingron

    2007-08-01

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate putative regulatory mechanisms. A common strategy is to combine cross-species conservation with single sequence TFBS annotation to yield ``conserved TFBSs”. Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step approach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites differ from those of the surrounding sequence. Hence, it is desirable to have an approach that explicitly takes this factor into account. Although a plethora of approaches have been proposed for the prediction of conserved TFBSs, very few explicitly model TFBS evolutionary properties, while additionally being multi-step. Recently, we introduced a novel approach to simultaneously align and annotate conserved TFBSs in a pair of sequences. Building upon the standard Smith-Waterman algorithm for local alignments, SimAnn introduces additional states for profiles to output extended alignments or annotated alignments. That is, alignments with parts annotated as gaplessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair-profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. In this article, we extend this approach to explicitly incorporate evolution of binding sites in the SimAnn framework. We demonstrate the extension in the theoretical derivations through two position-specific evolutionary models, previously used for modelling TFBS evolution. In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the underlying assumptions, as compared to the original work. Finally, using a real dataset of experimentally verified binding sites in human-mouse sequence pairs, we compare the new approach (eSimAnn) to an existing multi-step tool that also considers TFBS evolution. Although it is widely accepted that binding sites evolve differently from the surrounding sequences, most comparative TFBS identification

  4. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  5. In vitro pharmacological evaluation of the radiolabeled C-terminal substance P analogue Lys-Phe-Phe-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2: Does a specific binding site exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyszyn, Aleksandra; Csibrany, Balazs; Keresztes, Attila; Mallareddy, Jayapal Reddy; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Misicka, Aleksandra; Toth, Geza; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we report the synthesis, radiolabeling and comprehensive pharmacological evaluation of a C-terminally truncated tachykinin derivative, 3H-KFFGLM-NH2. The C-terminal fragments of endogenous tachykinins are pharmacophores responsible for interaction with the tachykinin receptors NK1, NK2 and NK3. The N-terminal fragments are responsible for modulation of receptor selectivity and interactions with other receptor systems. To evaluate and separate the function of an NK-pharmacophore from the activity of its parent neurokinin, KFFGLM-NH2 was synthesized in both tritiated and unlabeled forms. It has been proposed that the obtained NK-binding profiles of specific reference ligands and KFFGLM-NH2 differentiate monomeric and dimeric forms of NK receptors. We hypothesize that dimers of NK receptors could be specific receptor(s) for C-terminal fragments of all neurokinins as well as their C-terminal fragments, including H-KFFGLM-NH2. Dissociation of dimers into monomers opens access to additional allosteric binding sites. Fully elongated undecapeptide substance P interacts with both the "tachykinin pocket" and the "allosteric pocket" on the monomeric NK1 receptor, resulting in high and selective activation. However, C-terminal hexapeptide fragment analogues, recognizing only the "tachykinin pocket", may have less specific interactions with all tachykinin receptors in both monomeric and dimeric forms. PMID:25574743

  6. SuperSite: dictionary of metabolite and drug binding sites in proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Raphael André; Günther, Stefan; Jansen, Dominic; Heeger, Carolin; Thaben, Paul Florian; Preissner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The increasing structural information about target-bound compounds provide a rich basis to study the binding mechanisms of metabolites and drugs. SuperSite is a database, which combines the structural information with various tools for the analysis of molecular recognition. The main data is made up of 8000 metabolites including 1300 drugs, bound to about 290 000 different receptor binding sites. The analysis tools include features, like the highlighting of evolutionary conserved receptor resi...

  7. Architecture of the sugar binding sites in carbohydrate binding proteins--a computer modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V S; Lam, K; Qasba, P K

    1998-11-01

    Different sugars, Gal, GalNAc and Man were docked at the monosaccharide binding sites of Erythrina corallodenron (EcorL), peanut lectin (PNA), Lathyrus ochrus (LOLI), and pea lectin (PSL). To study the lectin-carbohydrate interactions, in the complexes, the hydroxymethyl group in Man and Gal favors, gg and gt conformations respectively, and is the dominant recognition determination. The monosaccharide binding site in lectins that are specific to Gal/GalNAc is wider due to the additional amino acid residues in loop D as compared to that in lectins specific to Man/Glc, and affects the hydrogen bonds of the sugar involving residues from loop D, but not its orientation in the binding site. The invariant amino acid residues Asp from loop A, and Asn and an aromatic residue (Phe or Tyr) in loop C provides the basic architecture to recognize the common features in C4 epimers. The invariant Gly in loop B together with one or two residues in the variable region of loop D/A holds the sugar tightly at both ends. Loss of any one of these hydrogen bonds leads to weak interaction. While the subtle variations in the sequence and conformation of peptide fragment that resulted due to the size and location of gaps present in amino acid sequence in the neighborhood of the sugar binding site of loop D/A seems to discriminate the binding of sugars which differ at C4 atom (galacto and gluco configurations). The variations at loop B are important in discriminating Gal and GalNAc binding. The present study thus provides a structural basis for the observed specificities of legume lectins which uses the same four invariant residues for binding. These studies also bring out the information that is important for the design/engineering of proteins with the desired carbohydrate specificity. PMID:9849627

  8. Shared Binding Sites in Lepidoptera for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ja and Cry1A Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero, Salvador; González-Cabrera, Joel; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Ferré, Juan

    2001-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxins act by binding to specific target sites in the insect midgut epithelial membrane. The best-known mechanism of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins is reduced binding to target sites. Because alteration of a binding site shared by several toxins may cause resistance to all of them, knowledge of which toxins share binding sites is useful for predicting cross-resistance. Conversely, cross-resistance among toxins suggests that the toxins share a binding site. At lea...

  9. High- and low-affinity binding of S-citalopram to the human serotonin transporter mutated at 20 putatively important amino acid positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Wiborg, Ove

    2005-01-01

    uptake inhibitors and serotonin (5-HT) have been found on SERT. At one site, uptake inhibitors bind with high-affinity to SERT, thereby blocking the uptake of 5-HT. The other site is a low-affinity allosteric site, which influences the dissociation of uptake inhibitors, such as imipramine, paroxetine......, and citalopram from the first site, when occupied by 5-HT and a few uptake inhibitors like paroxetine and citalopram. In this study, the connection between the high-affinity binding site and the allosteric affinity-modulating site was investigated by introducing 20 single amino acid substitutions into...

  10. Binding site of MraZ transcription factor in Mollicutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisunov, G Y; Evsyutina, D V; Semashko, T A; Arzamasov, A A; Manuvera, V A; Letarov, A V; Govorun, V M

    2016-06-01

    Mollicutes (mycoplasmas) feature a significant loss of known regulators of gene expression. Here, we identified the recognition site of the MraZ-family regulator of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, which is conserved in many species of different clades within class Mollicutes. The MraZ binding site is AAAGTG[T/G], in the promoter of mraZ gene it forms a series of direct repeats with a structure (AAAGTG[T/G]N3)k, where k = 3 most frequently. MraZ binds to a single repeat as an octamer complex. MraZ can also bind a single binding site or a series of repeats with different spacer lengths (2-4 nt); thus, it may play a role in the regulation of multiple operons in Mollicutes. In M. gallisepticum, MraZ acts as a transcriptional activator. The overexpression of MraZ leads to moderate filamentation of cells and the formation of aggregates, likely as a result of incomplete cytokinesis. PMID:26945841

  11. Pumiliotoxin B binds to a site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel that is allosterically coupled to other binding sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Gusovsky, F; Rossignol, D P; McNeal, E T; Daly, J W

    1988-01-01

    Pumiliotoxin B (PTX-B), an alkaloid that has cardiotonic and myotonic activity, increases sodium influx in guinea pig cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes. In the presence of scorpion venom (Leiurus) or purified alpha-scorpion toxin, the PTX-B-induced sodium influx is enhanced severalfold. PTX-B alone has no effect on sodium flux in N18 neuroblastoma cells but, in the presence of alpha-scorpion toxin, stimulation of sodium influx by PTX-B reaches levels comparable to that attained with the sod...

  12. 14C-glucose binding assay of the glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of determining the binding sites of glucose transporter in rat muscular cell membrane was introduced. The crude products of cell membrane form the skeletal muscle of control and insulin treated rats were prepared, and then fractionated in sucrose gradient. Both plasma membrane and microsome membrane were incubated with D-[U-14C] glucose respectively for the measurement of radioactivity and Scatchard plot analysis. It was found that the binding sites of glucose transporter in plasma membrane and intracellular membrane were 5.6 nmol 14C-glucose/mg protein and 8.7 nmol 14C-glucose-mg protein respectively at basic state. Insulin treatment in experimental groups caused approximately 146% increase in plasma membrane fraction and 88% decrease in intracellular membrane fraction. Moreover, the kinetic data of Scatchard plot curve were similar to those of the [3H]-cytochalasin B binding assay. D-[U-14C] glucose binding assay of glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane is simple, easy and practicable. The D-[U-14C] glucose is commercially available

  13. Computational Investigation on the Allosteric Modulation of Androgen Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Min-Rui; LI Jun-Qian

    2012-01-01

    Androgens have similar structures with different biological activities. To identify molecular determinants responsible for the activity difference, we have docked six steroidal androgens to the binding site or the surface of androgen receptor by using molecular docking with computational investigation. The energy was calculated respectively based on the QM (quantum mechanics) and MM (molecular mechanics) methods. The result shows that the allosteric modulation of androgen receptor plays an important role in the binding process between androgens and receptor. The open state receptor is less stable than the close state one, but the latter is more favorable for binding with androgens. It is worthy of note that when the androgen receptors binding or without binding with androgen are in close state, they are difficult to return to their open state. This phenomenon is an exception of the well known two-state model theory in which the two states are reversible. Whether the internal of close state androgen receptor has a combination of androgen or not, the androgen receptor surface can be combined with another androgen, and their surface binding energies could be very close. The result is consistent with the experimental observations, but this phenomenon of continuous combination from open state is also an exception of the two-state model theory.

  14. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorica, E.; Spector, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/10/sup 6/ cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine with an IC/sub 50/ value = 0.57..mu..M. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, (D-Pen/sup 2/, D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin and ..beta..-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC/sub 50/ = 60..mu..M, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Molecular Basis of Enhanced Activity in Factor VIIa-Trypsin Variants Conveys Insights into Tissue Factor-mediated Allosteric Regulation of Factor VIIa Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Anders B.; Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Svensson, L. Anders; Pedersen, Anette A.; Østergaard, Henrik; Overgaard, Michael T.; Olsen, Ole H.; Gandhi, Prafull S

    2016-01-01

    The complex of coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa), a trypsin-like serine protease, and membrane-bound tissue factor (TF) initiates blood coagulation upon vascular injury. Binding of TF to FVIIa promotes allosteric conformational changes in the FVIIa protease domain and improves its catalytic...... properties. Extensive studies have revealed two putative pathways for this allosteric communication. Here we provide further details of this allosteric communication by investigating FVIIa loop swap variants containing the 170 loop of trypsin that display TF-independent enhanced activity. Using x......-ray crystallography, we show that the introduced 170 loop from trypsin directly interacts with the FVIIa active site, stabilizing segment 215-217 and activation loop 3, leading to enhanced activity. Molecular dynamics simulations and novel fluorescence quenching studies support that segment 215-217 conformation is...

  16. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.;

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...... potency against class 1 HDACs and are active in tissue culture against various human cancer cell lines. Importantly, enzymological analysis of 26 indicates that the cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide is a fast-on/ off competitive inhibitor of HDACs 1−3 with Ki values of 49, 33, and 37 nM, respectively. Our proof...

  17. Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P2) binds at the active site of rabbit liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fru-2,6-P2 and AMP are potent inhibitors of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase). AMP inhibits by binding to an allosteric site. While Fru-2,6-P2 and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (Fru-1,6-P2) binding is mutually exclusive, a controversy exists as to whether Fru-2,6-P2 inhibits by binding to the active site or a regulatory site. To address this question, the aromatic region of the 1H NMR spectrum of FBPase was examined in the absence and presence of Fru-1,6-P2, Fru-2,6-P2, and AMP. All of the spectral perturbations produced by Fru-1,6-P2 binding were also seen with Fru-2,6-P2: (1) the C2-H of His 1 (pKa=7.1) shifted downfield 0.03 ppm (pH 5.3); (2) the C2-H of His 2 shifted downfield 0.03 ppm (pH 5.3) and broadened; (3) several resonances in the phe/tyr region of the spectrum decreased in intensity. In addition, both fructose bisphosphates produced a change in the exchange rate of AMP from past/intermediate in the binary enzyme AMP complex to slow exchange in the ternary complex. AMP produced similar changes in the phe/tyr region of the spectrum. Unlike the fructose bisphosphates, AMP binding produced: (1) broadening of the C2-H of His 1; (2) no effect on His 2 and; (3) an enhancement of the intensity of a resonance at 7.25 ppm (pH 5.3). The results are consistent with an active site binding mode of inhibition for Fru-2,6-P2. AMP binding to a regulatory site was apparent from the different results obtained with this ligand

  18. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct

  19. The next generation of transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Mathelier

    Full Text Available Finding where transcription factors (TFs bind to the DNA is of key importance to decipher gene regulation at a transcriptional level. Classically, computational prediction of TF binding sites (TFBSs is based on basic position weight matrices (PWMs which quantitatively score binding motifs based on the observed nucleotide patterns in a set of TFBSs for the corresponding TF. Such models make the strong assumption that each nucleotide participates independently in the corresponding DNA-protein interaction and do not account for flexible length motifs. We introduce transcription factor flexible models (TFFMs to represent TF binding properties. Based on hidden Markov models, TFFMs are flexible, and can model both position interdependence within TFBSs and variable length motifs within a single dedicated framework. The availability of thousands of experimentally validated DNA-TF interaction sequences from ChIP-seq allows for the generation of models that perform as well as PWMs for stereotypical TFs and can improve performance for TFs with flexible binding characteristics. We present a new graphical representation of the motifs that convey properties of position interdependence. TFFMs have been assessed on ChIP-seq data sets coming from the ENCODE project, revealing that they can perform better than both PWMs and the dinucleotide weight matrix extension in discriminating ChIP-seq from background sequences. Under the assumption that ChIP-seq signal values are correlated with the affinity of the TF-DNA binding, we find that TFFM scores correlate with ChIP-seq peak signals. Moreover, using available TF-DNA affinity measurements for the Max TF, we demonstrate that TFFMs constructed from ChIP-seq data correlate with published experimentally measured DNA-binding affinities. Finally, TFFMs allow for the straightforward computation of an integrated TF occupancy score across a sequence. These results demonstrate the capacity of TFFMs to accurately model DNA

  20. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Dupont

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126 with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA. We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126 binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12 binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site.

  1. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  2. Binding characterization, synthesis and biological evaluation of RXRα antagonists targeting the coactivator binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dingyu; Guo, Shangjie; Chen, Ziwen; Bao, Yuzhou; Huang, Fengyu; Xu, Dan; Zhang, Xindao; Zeng, Zhiping; Zhou, Hu; Zhang, Xiaokun; Su, Ying

    2016-08-15

    Previously we identified the first retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRα) modulators that regulate the RXRα biological function via binding to the coregulator-binding site. Here we report the characterization of the interactions between the hit molecule and RXRα through computational modeling, mutagenesis, SAR and biological evaluation. In addition, we reported studies of additional new compounds and identified a molecule that mediated the NF-κB pathway by inhibiting the TNFα-induced IκBα degradation and p65 nuclear translocation. PMID:27450787

  3. Positive allosteric action of eburnamonine on cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proska, J; Tucek, S

    1996-06-01

    It was discovered recently that alcuronium and strychnine (which is a precursor of alcuronium) allosterically increase the affinity of cardiac muscarinic receptors for the antagonist, N-methylscopolamine. We have now investigated the effects of l-eburnamonine and vincamine, which are both closely related to strychnine. In experiments on rat heart atria, l-eburnamonine was found to increase the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine with Ehlert's cooperativity coefficient alpha = 0.35, which indicates that the strength of its allosteric action is close to that of alcuronium and strychnine (alpha = 0.31 and 0.44, respectively). However, the affinity of l-eburnamonine for the cardiac muscarinic receptors is lower than the affinities of alcuronium and strychnine (KAR = 22.6 microM, 0.15 microM, and 3.4 microM, respectively). In spite of its extremely close similarity to l-eburnamonine, vincamine has a negative allosteric effect on the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine (alpha = 4.1; KAR = 22.8 microM). It is likely that a systematic investigation of the allosteric effects of the analogues of strychnine will not only yield new allosteric effectors on muscarinic receptors, but also clarify the structural features responsible for the direction (positive or negative) of their allosteric effect. PMID:8813554

  4. A unified framework and an alternative mechanism for allosteric regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, J

    2007-01-01

    Allosteric regulation is an important property for many proteins. Several models have been proposed to explain the allosteric effect, such as the concerted MWC (Monod, Wyman, Changeux) model, the sequential KNF (Koshland, Nemethy, Filmer) model, and recent population shift models. Here we discuss a unified theoretical framework to describe allosteric effects. The existing models appear as special cases of the framework. The theoretical work also reveals an alternative mechanism currently overlooked. Theoretically it is possible that the reactivity of a protein is limited by some internal conformational change step (due to slow effective diffusion along rugged potential surfaces). Effector binding may modify the ruggedness and thus the protein dynamics and reactivity. Compared to conventional models, the new mechanism has less requirements on the mechanical properties of an allosteric protein to propagate mechanical signals over long distances. Thus some signal transduction proteins may adopt the new mechanism...

  5. Metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins need the help of cofactors for their successful folding and functioning. Metal ions, i.e., Zn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ etc., are typical biological cofactors. Binding of metal ions can reshape the energy landscapes of proteins, thereby modifying the folding and allosteric motions. For example, such binding may make the intrinsically disordered proteins have funneled energy landscapes, consequently, ensures their spontaneous folding. In addition, the binding may activate certain biological processes by inducing related conformational changes of regulation proteins. However, how the local interactions involving the metal ion binding can induce the global conformational motions of proteins remains elusive. Investigating such question requires multiple models with different details, including quantum mechanics, atomistic models, and coarse grained models. In our recent work, we have been developing such multiscale methods which can reasonably model the metal ion binding induced charge transfer, protonation/deprotonation, and large conformational motions of proteins. With such multiscale model, we elucidated the zinc-binding induced folding mechanism of classical zinc finger and the calcium-binding induced dynamic symmetry breaking in the allosteric motions of calmodulin. In addition, we studied the coupling of folding, calcium binding and allosteric motions of calmodulin domains. In this talk, I will introduce the above progresses on the metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions. We thank the finacial support from NSFC and the 973 project.

  6. Overlapping binding site for the endogenous agonist, small-molecule agonists, and ago-allosteric modulators on the ghrelin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Frimurer, Thomas M; Mokrosinski, Jacek;

    2008-01-01

    mutational map for agonism but it was not identical with the map for the agonist property of these small-molecule ligands. In molecular models, built over the inactive conformation of rhodopsin, low energy conformations of the nonpeptide agonists could be docked to satisfy many of their mutational hits. It...

  7. Benzothiazole Derivative as a Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis Shikimate Kinase Inhibitor: Identification and Elucidation of Its Allosteric Mode of Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Rukmankesh; Rajput, Vikrant Singh; Gupta, Monika; Chib, Reena; Kumar, Amit; Wazir, Priya; Khan, Inshad Ali; Nargotra, Amit

    2016-05-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase (Mtb-SK) is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids through the shikimate pathway. Since it is proven to be essential for the survival of the microbe and is absent from mammals, it is a promising target for anti-TB drug discovery. In this study, a combined approach of in silico similarity search and pharmacophore building using already reported inhibitors was used to screen a procured library of 20,000 compounds of the commercially available ChemBridge database. From the in silico screening, 15 hits were identified, and these hits were evaluated in vitro for Mtb-SK enzyme inhibition. Two compounds presented significant enzyme inhibition with IC50 values of 10.69 ± 0.9 and 46.22 ± 1.2 μM. The best hit was then evaluated for the in vitro mode of inhibition where it came out to be an uncompetitive and noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to shikimate (SKM) and ATP, respectively, suggesting its binding at an allosteric site. Potential binding sites of Mtb-SK were identified which confirmed the presence of an allosteric binding pocket apart from the ATP and SKM binding sites. The docking simulations were performed at this pocket in order to find the mode of binding of the best hit in the presence of substrates and the products of the enzymatic reaction. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidated the probability of inhibitor binding at the allosteric site in the presence of ADP and shikimate-3-phosphate (S-3-P), that is, after the formation of products of the reaction. The inhibitor binding may prevent the release of the product from Mtb-SK, thereby inhibiting its activity. The binding stability and the key residue interactions of the inhibitor to this product complex were also revealed by the MD simulations. Residues ARG43, ILE45, and PHE57 were identified as crucial that were involved in interactions with the best hit. This is the first report of an allosteric binding site of Mtb-SK, which

  8. An allosteric modulator of HIV-1 protease shows equipotent inhibition of wild-type and drug-resistant proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Peter M-U; Dunbar, James B; Gestwicki, Jason E; Carlson, Heather A

    2014-08-14

    NMR and MD simulations have demonstrated that the flaps of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1p) adopt a range of conformations that are coupled with its enzymatic activity. Previously, a model was created for an allosteric site located between the flap and the core of HIV-1p, called the Eye site (Biopolymers 2008, 89, 643-652). Here, results from our first study were combined with a ligand-based, lead-hopping method to identify a novel compound (NIT). NIT inhibits HIV-1p, independent of the presence of an active-site inhibitor such as pepstatin A. Assays showed that NIT acts on an allosteric site other than the dimerization interface. MD simulations of the ligand-protein complex show that NIT stably binds in the Eye site and restricts the flaps. That bound state of NIT is consistent with a crystal structure of similar fragments bound in the Eye site (Chem. Biol. Drug Des. 2010, 75, 257-268). Most importantly, NIT is equally potent against wild-type and a multidrug-resistant mutant of HIV-1p, which highlights the promise of allosteric inhibitors circumventing existing clinical resistance. PMID:25062388

  9. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A

    2016-08-23

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor-translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  10. Coenzyme A Binding to the Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb Increases Conformational Sampling of Antibiotic Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaohu [ORNL; Norris, Adrianne [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Serpersu, Engin H [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to describe the dynamic properties of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb (AAC) in its apo and coenzyme A (CoASH) bound forms. The {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra indicate a partial structural change and coupling of the CoASH binding site with another region in the protein upon the CoASH titration into the apo enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a significant structural and dynamic variation of the long loop in the antibiotic binding domain in the form of a relatively slow (250 ns), concerted opening motion in the CoASH enzyme complex and that binding of the CoASH increases the structural flexibility of the loop, leading to an interchange between several similar equally populated conformations.

  11. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial [3H]diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli [3H]diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing [3H]benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed

  12. Mechanisms of allosteric gene regulation by NMR quantification of microsecond-millisecond protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleckner, Ian R; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2012-01-13

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) is a paradigmatic allosteric protein that regulates the tryptophan biosynthetic genes associated with the trp operon in bacilli. The ring-shaped 11-mer TRAP is activated for recognition of a specific trp-mRNA target by binding up to 11 tryptophan molecules. To characterize the mechanisms of tryptophan-induced TRAP activation, we have performed methyl relaxation dispersion (MRD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that probe the time-dependent structure of TRAP in the microsecond-to-millisecond "chemical exchange" time window. We find significant side chain flexibility localized to the RNA and tryptophan binding sites of the apo protein and that these dynamics are dramatically reduced upon ligand binding. Analysis of the MRD NMR data provides insights into the structural nature of transiently populated conformations sampled in solution by apo TRAP. The MRD data are inconsistent with global two-state exchange, indicating that conformational sampling in apo TRAP is asynchronous. These findings imply a temporally heterogeneous population of structures that are incompatible with RNA binding and substantiate the study of TRAP as a paradigm for probing and understanding essential dynamics in allosteric, regulatory proteins. PMID:22115774

  13. Novel positive allosteric modulators of the human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Hugo R; Gu, Ruo-Xu; Feuerbach, Dominik; Guo, Bao-Bao; Ye, Yong; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2011-06-14

    The pharmacological activity of a series of novel amide derivatives was characterized on several nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Ca(2+) influx results indicate that these compounds are not agonists of the human (h) α4β2, α3β4, α7, and α1β1γδ AChRs; compounds 2-4 are specific positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of hα7 AChRs, whereas compounds 1-4, 7, and 12 are noncompetitive antagonists of the other AChRs. Radioligand binding results indicate that PAMs do not inhibit binding of [(3)H]methyllycaconitine but enhance binding of [(3)H]epibatidine to hα7 AChRs, indicating that these compounds do not directly, but allosterically, interact with the hα7 agonist sites. Additional competition binding results indicate that the antagonistic action mediated by these compounds is produced by direct interaction with neither the phencyclidine site in the Torpedo AChR ion channel nor the imipramine and the agonist sites in the hα4β2 and hα3β4 AChRs. Molecular dynamics and docking results suggest that the binding site for compounds 2-4 is mainly located in the inner β-sheet of the hα7-α7 interface, ∼12 Å from the agonist locus. Hydrogen bond interactions between the amide group of the PAMs and the hα7 AChR binding site are found to be critical for their activity. The dual PAM and antagonistic activities elicited by compounds 2-4 might be therapeutically important. PMID:21510634

  14. A Unitary Anesthetic-Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L.; Brannigan, G; Economou, N; Xi, J; Hall, M; Liu, R; Rossi, M; Dailey, W; Grasty, K; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  15. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.; (Drexel-MED); (UPENN)

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  16. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  17. Designing allosteric control into enzymes by chemical rescue of structure

    OpenAIRE

    Deckert, Katelyn; Budiardjo, S. Jimmy; Brunner, Luke C.; Lovell, Scott; Karanicolas, John

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activity has been engineered into enzymes for purposes ranging from controlling cell morphology to reprogramming cellular signaling pathways. Where these successes have typically fused a naturally allosteric domain to the enzyme of interest, here we instead demonstrate an approach for designing a de novo allosteric effector site directly into the catalytic domain of an enzyme. This approach is distinct from traditional chemical rescue of enzymes in that it relies on disruptio...

  18. Identification of an allosteric pocket on human hsp70 reveals a mode of inhibition of this therapeutically important protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodina, Anna; Patel, Pallav D; Kang, Yanlong; Patel, Yogita; Baaklini, Imad; Wong, Michael J H; Taldone, Tony; Yan, Pengrong; Yang, Chenghua; Maharaj, Ronnie; Gozman, Alexander; Patel, Maulik R; Patel, Hardik J; Chirico, William; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Talele, Tanaji T; Young, Jason C; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2013-12-19

    Hsp70s are important cancer chaperones that act upstream of Hsp90 and exhibit independent anti-apoptotic activities. To develop chemical tools for the study of human Hsp70, we developed a homology model that unveils a previously unknown allosteric site located in the nucleotide binding domain of Hsp70. Combining structure-based design and phenotypic testing, we discovered a previously unknown inhibitor of this site, YK5. In cancer cells, this compound is a potent and selective binder of the cytosolic but not the organellar human Hsp70s and has biological activity partly by interfering with the formation of active oncogenic Hsp70/Hsp90/client protein complexes. YK5 is a small molecule inhibitor rationally designed to interact with an allosteric pocket of Hsp70 and represents a previously unknown chemical tool to investigate cellular mechanisms associated with Hsp70. PMID:24239008

  19. A3 Adenosine Receptor Allosteric Modulator Induces an Anti-Inflammatory Effect: In Vivo Studies and Molecular Mechanism of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Cohen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR is overexpressed in inflammatory cells and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals with inflammatory conditions. Agonists to the A3AR are known to induce specific anti-inflammatory effects upon chronic treatment. LUF6000 is an allosteric compound known to modulate the A3AR and render the endogenous ligand adenosine to bind to the receptor with higher affinity. The advantage of allosteric modulators is their capability to target specifically areas where adenosine levels are increased such as inflammatory and tumor sites, whereas normal body cells and tissues are refractory to the allosteric modulators due to low adenosine levels. LUF6000 administration induced anti-inflammatory effect in 3 experimental animal models of rat adjuvant induced arthritis, monoiodoacetate induced osteoarthritis, and concanavalin A induced liver inflammation in mice. The molecular mechanism of action points to deregulation of signaling proteins including PI3K, IKK, IκB, Jak-2, and STAT-1, resulting in decreased levels of NF-κB, known to mediate inflammatory effects. Moreover, LUF6000 induced a slight stimulatory effect on the number of normal white blood cells and neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effect of LUF6000, mechanism of action, and the differential effects on inflammatory and normal cells position this allosteric modulator as an attractive and unique drug candidate.

  20. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-03-21

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include: (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a multimeric protein assembly with cofactors and metal ions and (3) analysis of consensus interaction motifs within the ensembles and identification of conserved determinants of these interactions. Currently the database contains 585 proteins with 650 peptide-binding sites. http://peptisite.ucsd.edu/ link allows searching for the sites of interest and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web-browser plugin. This structural database for protein-peptide interactions enables understanding of structural principles of these interactions and may assist the development of an efficient peptide docking benchmark. PMID:24406170

  1. Photoaffinity labelling of t-RNA binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the photoaffinity labelling of E.coli ribosomes in the region of peptidyl transferase, an analogue to the substrate peptidyl-tRNA-ethyl-2-diazomalalonyl-Phe-tRNAsup(Phe) was synthesized. UV irradiation of the reversible complex with 70S ribosomes and poly(U) led to the formation of a covalent bond between N-acyl-Phe-tRNA and 23S-rRNA. The irreversibly bound N-acyl-phenylalanyl group may be transferred to puromycin in a reaction catalyzed by peptidyl transferase, in the presence of the Phe-tRNA, it forms products of a peptide synthesis covalently bound to 23S-RNA. The 23S-rRNA sequence thus labelled, which has not yet been identified, should therefore be in the active centre of the peptidyl transferase or in its near neighbourhood. An analysis of the reaction product showed that the N-acyl-Phe-tRNA is bound specifically to one or more sites of a 3'-terminal 18S fragment of the 23S-RNA. An attempt to prove the existence of further tRNA interaction with ribosonal substrate binding sites led to the discovery of a poly(U2,G)-stimulated, UV-inducible irreversible binding of valin-specific tRNA (E.coli) to 16S-rRNA in one or several tRNA decoding sites. A preliminary analysis of the T1 fragments of tRNAsup(Val) after binding to 16S-rRNA indicates that the DHU loop of tRNA takes part in this photoreaction. (orig.)

  2. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Quader Saad; Huang Chun-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC) and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this pape...

  3. Specificity of intersubunit general anesthetic-binding sites in the transmembrane domain of the human α1β3γ2 γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, David C; Jayakar, Selwyn S; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Xi; Savechenkov, Pavel Y; Bruzik, Karol S; Miller, Keith W; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2013-07-01

    GABA type A receptors (GABAAR), the brain's major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors, are the targets for many general anesthetics, including volatile anesthetics, etomidate, propofol, and barbiturates. How such structurally diverse agents can act similarly as positive allosteric modulators of GABAARs remains unclear. Previously, photoreactive etomidate analogs identified two equivalent anesthetic-binding sites in the transmembrane domain at the β(+)-α(-) subunit interfaces, which also contain the GABA-binding sites in the extracellular domain. Here, we used R-[(3)H]5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl) barbituric acid (R-mTFD-MPAB), a potent stereospecific barbiturate anesthetic, to photolabel expressed human α1β3γ2 GABAARs. Protein microsequencing revealed that R-[(3)H]mTFD-MPAB did not photolabel the etomidate sites at the β(+)-α(-) subunit interfaces. Instead, it photolabeled sites at the α(+)-β(-) and γ(+)-β(-) subunit interfaces in the transmembrane domain. On the (+)-side, α1M3 was labeled at Ala-291 and Tyr-294 and γ2M3 at Ser-301, and on the (-)-side, β3M1 was labeled at Met-227. These residues, like those in the etomidate site, are located at subunit interfaces near the synaptic side of the transmembrane domain. The selectivity of R-etomidate for the β(+)-α(-) interface relative to the α(+)-β(-)/γ(+)-β(-) interfaces was >100-fold, whereas that of R-mTFD-MPAB for its sites was >50-fold. Each ligand could enhance photoincorporation of the other, demonstrating allosteric interactions between the sites. The structural heterogeneity of barbiturate, etomidate, and propofol derivatives is accommodated by varying selectivities for these two classes of sites. We hypothesize that binding at any of these homologous intersubunit sites is sufficient for anesthetic action and that this explains to some degree the puzzling structural heterogeneity of anesthetics. PMID:23677991

  4. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  5. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  6. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether-phosphine or thioether-phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand-metal domains (RhI or CuI sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (ZnII sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, 'condensed' or 'open'. Combining the ether-phosphine ligand with the appropriate RhI or CuI transition-metal precursors results in 'open' macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether-phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their 'open' macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3- and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the 'open' macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the macrocyclic cavity.

  7. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveri, Christopher G.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.; Nguyen, Son Binh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pink, Maren (NWU); (Indiana)

    2008-04-12

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether-phosphine or thioether-phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand-metal domains (Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (Zn{sup II} sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, 'condensed' or 'open'. Combining the ether-phosphine ligand with the appropriate Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} transition-metal precursors results in 'open' macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether-phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their 'open' macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3- and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the 'open' macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the

  8. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance allow quantifying substrate binding to different binding sites of Bacillus subtilis xylanase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuyvers, Sven; Dornez, Emmie; Abou Hachem, Maher;

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first was a...

  9. The Structural Basis for Allosteric Inhibition of a Threonine-sensitive Aspartokinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuying; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Viola, Ronald E.

    2008-01-01

    The commitment step to the aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is the phosphorylation of aspartic acid catalyzed by aspartokinase (AK). Most microorganisms and plants have multiple forms of this enzyme, and many of these isofunctional enzymes are subject to feedback regulation by the end products of the pathway. However, the archeal species Methanococcus jannaschii has only a single, monofunctional form of AK. The substrate l-aspartate binds to this recombinant enzyme in two different orientations, providing the first structural evidence supporting the relaxed regiospecificity previously observed with several alternative substrates of Escherichia coli AK (Angeles, T. S., Hunsley, J. R., and Viola, R. E. (1992) Biochemistry31 ,799 -8051731937). Binding of the nucleotide substrate triggers significant domain movements that result in a more compact quaternary structure. In contrast, the highly cooperative binding of the allosteric regulator l-threonine to multiple sites on this dimer of dimers leads to an open enzyme structure. A comparison of these structures supports a mechanism for allosteric regulation in which the domain movements induced by threonine binding causes displacement of the substrates from the enzyme, resulting in a relaxed, inactive conformation. PMID:18334478

  10. The Structural Basis for Allosteric Inhibition of a Threonine-sensitive Aspartokinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuying; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Viola, Ronald E. (Toledo)

    2008-10-08

    The commitment step to the aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is the phosphorylation of aspartic acid catalyzed by aspartokinase (AK). Most microorganisms and plants have multiple forms of this enzyme, and many of these isofunctional enzymes are subject to feedback regulation by the end products of the pathway. However, the archeal species Methanococcus jannaschii has only a single, monofunctional form of AK. The substrate l-aspartate binds to this recombinant enzyme in two different orientations, providing the first structural evidence supporting the relaxed regiospecificity previously observed with several alternative substrates of Escherichia coli AK. Binding of the nucleotide substrate triggers significant domain movements that result in a more compact quaternary structure. In contrast, the highly cooperative binding of the allosteric regulator l-threonine to multiple sites on this dimer of dimers leads to an open enzyme structure. A comparison of these structures supports a mechanism for allosteric regulation in which the domain movements induced by threonine binding causes displacement of the substrates from the enzyme, resulting in a relaxed, inactive conformation.

  11. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor [(Ser99, Tyr126)ANF] binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF [des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2] (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease

  13. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  14. Pathways of allosteric regulation in Hsp70 chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kityk, Roman; Vogel, Markus; Schlecht, Rainer; Bukau, Bernd; Mayer, Matthias P

    2015-01-01

    Central to the protein folding activity of Hsp70 chaperones is their ability to interact with protein substrates in an ATP-controlled manner, which relies on allosteric regulation between their nucleotide-binding (NBD) and substrate-binding domains (SBD). Here we dissect this mechanism by analysing mutant variants of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 DnaK blocked at distinct steps of allosteric communication. We show that the SBD inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the NBD through a highly conserved hydrogen bond network, and define the signal transduction pathway that allows bound substrates to trigger ATP hydrolysis. We identify variants deficient in only one direction of allosteric control and demonstrate that ATP-induced substrate release is more important for chaperone activity than substrate-stimulated ATP hydrolysis. These findings provide evidence of an unexpected dichotomic allostery mechanism in Hsp70 chaperones and provide the basis for a comprehensive mechanical model of allostery in Hsp70s. PMID:26383706

  15. The Nature of Allosteric Inhibition in Glutamate Racemase: discovery and characterization of a cryptic inhibitory pocket using atomistic MD simulations and pKa calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Whalen, Katie L.; Tussey, Kenneth B.; Blanke, Steven R.; Spies, M. Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme inhibition via allostery, in which the ligand binds remotely from the active site, is a poorly understood phenomenon, and represents a significant challenge to structure-based drug design. Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major component of Bacillus spores, is shown to inhibit glutamate racemase from Bacillus anthracis, a monosubstrate/monoproduct enzyme, in a novel allosteric fashion. Glutamate racemase has long been considered an important drug target for its integral role in bacterial cell...

  16. TIM-4 structures identify a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site where phosphatidylserine binds

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Cesar; Ballesteros, Angela; Martinez-Muñoz, Laura; Mellado, Mario; Kaplan, Gerardo G.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2007-01-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins are important regulators of T cell responses. They have been linked to autoimmunity and cancer. Structures of the murine TIM-4 identified a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site (MILIBS) in the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of the TIM family. The characteristic CC’ loop of the TIM domain and the hydrophobic FG loop shaped a narrow cavity where acidic compounds penetrate and coordinate to a metal ion bound to conserved residues in the TI...

  17. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  18. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited [3H]flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not [3H]muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-[3H]butylbicycloorthobenzoate [( 3H] TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively [3H] flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-[3H]CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated [3H]muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-[3H]CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for [3H]flunitrazepam, [3H]muscimol and [3H]TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested

  19. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for /sup 125/I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells.

  20. Demonstration of specific binding sites for 3H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for 3H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (3H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for 3H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for 3H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane

  1. Demonstration of specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabchi, A.E.; Wimalasena, J.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (/sup 3/H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for /sup 3/H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane.

  2. L-(TH)glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-08-12

    The anatomical distribution of L-(TH)glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-(TH)glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of CaS , Cl and Na ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-(TH)2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-(TH)AP5), (TH)kainate ((TH)KA) and (TH) -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ((TH)AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.). 29 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  3. Allosteric Mechanisms in Chaperonin Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Ranit; Horovitz, Amnon

    2016-06-01

    Chaperonins are nanomachines that facilitate protein folding by undergoing energy (ATP)-dependent movements that are coordinated in time and space owing to complex allosteric regulation. They consist of two back-to-back stacked oligomeric rings with a cavity at each end where protein substrate folding can take place. Here, we focus on the GroEL/GroES chaperonin system from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, on the more poorly characterized eukaryotic chaperonin CCT/TRiC. We describe their various functional (allosteric) states and how they are affected by substrates and allosteric effectors that include ATP, ADP, nonfolded protein substrates, potassium ions, and GroES (in the case of GroEL). We also discuss the pathways of intra- and inter-ring allosteric communication by which they interconvert and the coupling between allosteric transitions and protein folding reactions. PMID:26726755

  4. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  5. Study on Synthesis and Binding Ability of a New Anion Receptor Containing NH Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO,Yan-Hong; LIN,Hai; LIN,Hua-Kuan

    2007-01-01

    A new colorimetric recognition receptor 1 based on the dual capability containing NH binding sites of selectively sensing anionic guest species has been synthesized. Compared with other halide anions, its UV/Vis absorption spectrum in dimethyl sulfoxide showed the response toward the presence of fluoride anion with high selectivity,and also displayed dramatic color changes from colorless to yellow in the presence of TBAF (5 × 10-5 mol/L). The similar UV/Vis absorption spectrum change also occurred when 1 was treated with AcO- while a little change with H2PO-4 and OH-. Receptor 1 has almost not affinity abilities to Cl-, Br- and I-. The binding ability of receptor 1to fluoride with high selectivity over other halides contributes to the anion size and the ability of forming hydrogen bonding. While the different ability of binding with geometrically triangular (AcO-), tetrahedral (H2PO-4 ) and linear (OH-) anions maybe result from their geometry configuration.

  6. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  7. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner

  8. Contrasting Effects of Allosteric and Orthosteric Agonists on M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Internalization and Down-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Rachel L.; Christopher J Langmead; Wood, Martyn D; Challiss, R.A. John

    2009-01-01

    A new class of subtype-selective muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor agonist that activates the receptor through interaction at a site distinct from the orthosteric acetylcholine binding site has been reported recently. Here, we have compared the effects of orthosteric (oxotremorine-M, arecoline, pilocarpine) and allosteric [4-n-butyl-1-[4-(2-methylphenyl)-4-oxo-1-butyl] piperidine (AC-42); 1-[3-(4-butyl-1-piperidinyl)propyl]-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone (77-LH-28-1)] agonists on M1 mAC...

  9. Identification of an Allosteric Pocket on Human Hsp70 Reveals a Mode of Inhibition of This Therapeutically Important Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Rodina, Anna; Patel, Pallav D.; Kang, Yanlong; Patel, Yogita; Baaklini, Imad; Wong, Michael J. H.; Taldone, Tony; Yan, Pengrong; Yang, Chenghua; Maharaj, Ronnie; Gozman, Alexander; Patel, Maulik R.; Patel, Hardik J.; Chirico, William; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye

    2013-01-01

    Hsp70s are important cancer chaperones that act upstream of Hsp90 and exhibit independent anti-apoptotic activities. To develop chemical tools for the study of human Hsp70, we developed a homology model that unveils a previously unknown allosteric site located in the nucleotide binding domain of Hsp70. Combining structure-based design and phenotypic testing, we discovered a previously unknown inhibitor of this site, YK5. In cancer cells, this compound is a potent and selective binder of the c...

  10. XAS and Pulsed EPR Studies of the Copper Binding Site in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith,S.; Bencze, K.; Wasiukanis, K.; Benore-Parsons, T.; Stemmler, T.

    2008-01-01

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 Angstroms, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a CuO3N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit.

  11. Nuclear estradiol-binding sites in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalle, B; Peyrat, J P; Bonneterre, J; Hecquet, B; Dewailly, D; Lefebvre, J

    1983-09-01

    The binding of estradiol to nuclear fractions extracted from human breast carcinomatous tissue was demonstrated. The material, which was extracted with KCl, had an approximate molecular weight of 37,000 and bound estradiol with both high and low affinity (Kd congruent to 1 nM, type A receptors; Kd congruent to 30 nM, type B receptors) as calculated according to the method of Scatchard. Competition studies indicated that both components were specific for estradiol, and among the 134 tumors studied the receptors were found to be linked in almost all cases. Thirty-six % of the tumors were nuclear receptor positive. Cytoplasmic estradiol and progesterone receptors were also measured. Among the cytoplasmic tumors positive for cytoplasmic and progesterone receptors, 37% were devoid of both types of nuclear receptors; this may explain the failure of endocrine therapy in some cases. The determination of nuclear binding sites in human breast tumors appeared to be an interesting criterion for the assessment of estradiol-dependent cell growth. PMID:6683589

  12. A sialic acid binding site in a human picornavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Zocher

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The picornaviruses coxsackievirus A24 variant (CVA24v and enterovirus 70 (EV70 cause continued outbreaks and pandemics of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC, a highly contagious eye disease against which neither vaccines nor antiviral drugs are currently available. Moreover, these viruses can cause symptoms in the cornea, upper respiratory tract, and neurological impairments such as acute flaccid paralysis. EV70 and CVA24v are both known to use 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac for cell attachment, thus providing a putative link between the glycan receptor specificity and cell tropism and disease. We report the structures of an intact human picornavirus in complex with a range of glycans terminating in Neu5Ac. We determined the structure of the CVA24v to 1.40 Å resolution, screened different glycans bearing Neu5Ac for CVA24v binding, and structurally characterized interactions with candidate glycan receptors. Biochemical studies verified the relevance of the binding site and demonstrated a preference of CVA24v for α2,6-linked glycans. This preference can be rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations that show that α2,6-linked glycans can establish more contacts with the viral capsid. Our results form an excellent platform for the design of antiviral compounds to prevent AHC.

  13. An aprotinin binding site localized in the hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor from calf uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, V; Medici, N; Abbondanza, C; Minucci, S; Moncharmont, B; Molinari, A M; Puca, G A

    1990-07-31

    It has been proposed that the estrogen receptor bears proteolytic activity responsible for its own transformation. This activity was inhibited by aprotinin. Incubation of transformed ER with aprotinin modified the proteolytic digestion of the hormone binding subunit by proteinase K. The smallest hormone-binding fragment of the ER, obtained by tryptic digestion, was still able to bind to aprotinin. These results suggest that aprotinin interacts with ER and the hormone-binding domain of ER is endowed with a specific aprotinin-binding site. PMID:1696480

  14. The N-terminal Peptide of Mammalian GTP Cyclohydrolase I Is an Autoinhibitory Control Element and Contributes to Binding the Allosteric Regulatory Protein GFRP*

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, Christina E.; Gross, Steven S.

    2010-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may als...

  15. ncDNA and drift drive binding site accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruths Troy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS in an organism’s genome positively correlates with the complexity of the regulatory network of the organism. However, the manner by which TFBS arise and accumulate in genomes and the effects of regulatory network complexity on the organism’s fitness are far from being known. The availability of TFBS data from many organisms provides an opportunity to explore these issues, particularly from an evolutionary perspective. Results We analyzed TFBS data from five model organisms – E. coli K12, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, A. thaliana – and found a positive correlation between the amount of non-coding DNA (ncDNA in the organism’s genome and regulatory complexity. Based on this finding, we hypothesize that the amount of ncDNA, combined with the population size, can explain the patterns of regulatory complexity across organisms. To test this hypothesis, we devised a genome-based regulatory pathway model and subjected it to the forces of evolution through population genetic simulations. The results support our hypothesis, showing neutral evolutionary forces alone can explain TFBS patterns, and that selection on the regulatory network function does not alter this finding. Conclusions The cis-regulome is not a clean functional network crafted by adaptive forces alone, but instead a data source filled with the noise of non-adaptive forces. From a regulatory perspective, this evolutionary noise manifests as complexity on both the binding site and pathway level, which has significant implications on many directions in microbiology, genetics, and synthetic biology.

  16. The Role of Protein-Ligand Contacts in Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli Catabolite Activator Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Philip D.; Rodgers, Thomas L.; Glover, Laura C.; Korhonen, Heidi J.; Richards, Shane A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Hodgson, David R. W.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distant site. Both experimental and theoretical evidence demonstrate that allostery can be communicated through altered slow relaxation protein dynamics without conformational change. The catabolite activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli is an exemplar for the analysis of such entropically driven allostery. Negative allostery in CAP occurs between identical cAMP binding sites. Changes to the cAMP-binding pocket can therefore impact the allosteric properties of CAP. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of coarse-grained modeling, isothermal calorimetry, and structural analysis, that decreasing the affinity of CAP for cAMP enhances negative cooperativity through an entropic penalty for ligand binding. The use of variant cAMP ligands indicates the data are not explained by structural heterogeneity between protein mutants. We observe computationally that altered interaction strength between CAP and cAMP variously modifies the change in allosteric cooperativity due to second site CAP mutations. As the degree of correlated motion between the cAMP-contacting site and a second site on CAP increases, there is a tendency for computed double mutations at these sites to drive CAP toward noncooperativity. Naturally occurring pairs of covarying residues in CAP do not display this tendency, suggesting a selection pressure to fine tune allostery on changes to the CAP ligand-binding pocket without a drive to a noncooperative state. In general, we hypothesize an evolutionary selection pressure to retain slow relaxation dynamics-induced allostery in proteins in which evolution of the ligand-binding site is occurring. PMID:26187469

  17. High-affinity dextromethorphan binding sites in guinea pig brain. II. Competition experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craviso, G L; Musacchio, J M

    1983-05-01

    Binding of dextromethorphan (DM) to guinea pig brain is stereoselective, since levomethorphan is 20 times weaker than DM in competing for DM sites. In general, opiate agonists and antagonists as well as their corresponding dextrorotatory isomers are weak competitors for tritiated dextromethorphan ([3H]DM) binding sites and display IC50 values in the micromolar range. In contrast, several non-narcotic, centrally acting antitussives are inhibitory in the nanomolar range (IC50 values for caramiphen, carbetapentane, dimethoxanate, and pipazethate are 25 nM, 9 nM, 41 nM, and 190 nM, respectively). Other antitussives, such as levopropoxyphene, chlophedianol, and fominoben, have poor affinity for DM sites whereas the antitussive noscapine enhances DM binding by increasing the affinity of DM for its central binding sites. Additional competition studies indicate that there is no correlation of DM binding with any of the known or putative neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. DM binding is also not related to tricyclic antidepressant binding sites or biogenic amine uptake sites. However, certain phenothiazine neuroleptics and typical and atypical antidepressants inhibit binding with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Moreover, the anticonvulsant drug diphenylhydantoin enhances DM binding in a manner similar to that of noscapine. Preliminary experiments utilizing acid extracts of brain have not demonstrated the presence of an endogenous ligand for DM sites. The binding characteristics of DM sites studied in rat and mouse brain indicate that the relative potencies of several antitussives to inhibit specific DM binding vary according to species. High-affinity, saturable, and stereoselective [3H]DM binding sites are present in liver homogenates, but several differences have been found for these peripheral binding sites and those described for brain. Although the nature of central DM binding sites is not known, the potent interaction of several classes of centrally

  18. The allosteric regulation of axial/rhombic population in a “Type 1” copper site. Multi-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopic and density functional studies of pseudoazurin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The co-existence of “axial” and “rhombic” coordination environments has been demonstrated in a “Type 1” copper site of Pseudoazurin. This observation opens up previously not considered interpretations for the relationship between geometry and electronic structure of the four coordinate copper site. The Met16 variants of pseudoazurin were considered as model systems for investigating the effect of weak interactions from the second coordination sphere. The correlation between geometric and electronic structures of “Type 1” copper site was evaluated by the multi-edge (Cu K-edge and S K-edge) X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of Met16 variants of pseudoazurin. The co-existing axial and rhombic sites in pseudoazurin were characterized by Cu–ligand distances, effective nuclear charge, and Cu–S(Cys) covalency from XAS. The XAS results were correlated with DFT calculations for investigating the effect of protein environment from the inner-sphere and beyond around the Cu site. The combined experimental and theoretical results support the presence of a close correlation between outer sphere environment and inner sphere coordination environment. This is achieved in pseudoazurin by a previously undisclosed allosteric effect that involves a rearrangement of the protein tertiary structure. (author)

  19. Chromatographic analysis of the effects of fatty acids and glycation on binding by probes for Sudlow sites I and II to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Debolt, Erin; Suresh, D; Hage, David S

    2016-05-15

    The primary endogenous ligands of human serum albumin (HSA) are non-esterified fatty acids, with 0.1-2mol of fatty acids normally being bound to HSA. In type II diabetes, fatty acid levels in serum are often elevated, and the presence of high glucose results in an increase in the non-enzymatic glycation of HSA. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used to examine the combined effects of glycation and the presence of long chain fatty acids on the binding of HSA with R-warfarin and l-tryptophan (i.e., probes for Sudlow sites I and II, the major sites for drugs on this protein). Zonal elution competition studies were used to examine the interactions of myristic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid with these probes on HSA. It was found that all these fatty acids had direct competition with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I of normal HSA and glycated HSA, with the glycated HSA typically having stronger binding for the fatty acids at this site. At Sudlow site II, direct competition was observed for all the fatty acids with l-tryptophan when using normal HSA, while glycated HSA gave no competition or positive allosteric interactions between these fatty acids and l-tryptophan. These data indicated that glycation can alter the interactions of drugs and fatty acids at specific binding sites on HSA. The results of this study should lead to a better understanding of how these interactions may change during diabetes and demonstrate how HPAC can be used to examine drug/solute-protein interactions in complex systems. PMID:26468085

  20. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecule kinase inhibitors are invaluable targeted therapeutics for the treatment of various human diseases, especially cancers. While the majority of approved and developed preclinical small-molecule inhibitors are characterized as type I or type II inhibitors that target the ATP......-binding pocket of kinases, the remarkable sequential and structural similarity among ATP pockets renders the selective inhibition of kinases a daunting challenge. Therefore, targeting allosteric pockets of kinases outside the highly conversed ATP pocket has been proposed as a promising alternative to overcome...

  1. Osteopontin: A uranium phosphorylated binding-site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein, we describe the structural investigation of one possible uranyl binding site inside a non structured protein. This approach couples spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and theoretical calculations (DFT) and studies the interaction of uranyl ions with a phospho-peptide, thus mimicking a possible osteopontin (OPN) hydroxyapatite growth-inhibition site. Although thermodynamical aspects were investigated by using time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), structural characterization was performed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the U L(III)-edge combined with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. From the vibrational and fluorescence spectra, several structural models of a UO22+/peptide complex were developed and subsequently refined by using theoretical calculations to fit the experimental EXAFS obtained. The structural effect of the pH value was also considered under acidic to moderately acidic conditions (pH 1.5-5.5). Most importantly, the uranyl/peptide coordination environment was similar to that of the native protein. (authors)

  2. Mapping convulsants’ binding to the GABA-A receptor chloride ionophore: a proposed model for channel binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Kalueff, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors play a key role in brain inhibitory neurotransmission, and are ligand-activated chloride channels blocked by numerous convulsant ligands. Here we summarize data on binding of picrotoxin, tetrazoles, β-lactams, bicyclophosphates, butyrolactones and neurotoxic pesticides to GABA-A ionophore, and discuss functional and structural overlapping of their binding sites. The paper reviews data on convulsants’ binding sensitivity to different point mutati...

  3. MicroRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaochun; Rennie, William A; Mallick, Bibekanand; Kanoria, Shaveta; Long, Dang; Wolenc, Adam; Carmack, C Steven; Ding, Ye

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Since the discovery of lin-4, the founding member of the miRNA family, over 360 miRNAs have been identified for Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Prediction and validation of targets are essential for elucidation of regulatory functions of these miRNAs. For C. elegans, crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) has been successfully performed for the identification of target mRNA sequences bound by Argonaute protein ALG-1. In addition, reliable annotation of the 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) as well as developmental stage-specific expression profiles for both miRNAs and 3' UTR isoforms are available. By utilizing these data, we developed statistical models and bioinformatics tools for both transcriptome-scale and developmental stage-specific predictions of miRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs. In performance evaluation via cross validation on the ALG-1 CLIP data, the models were found to offer major improvements over established algorithms for predicting both seed sites and seedless sites. In particular, our top-ranked predictions have a substantially higher true positive rate, suggesting a much higher likelihood of positive experimental validation. A gene ontology analysis of stage-specific predictions suggests that miRNAs are involved in dynamic regulation of biological functions during C. elegans development. In particular, miRNAs preferentially target genes related to development, cell cycle, trafficking, and cell signaling processes. A database for both transcriptome-scale and stage-specific predictions and software for implementing the prediction models are available through the Sfold web server at http://sfold.wadsworth.org. PMID:24827614

  4. Engineering of binding affinity at metal ion binding sites for the stabilization of proteins: Subtilisin as a test case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A weak Ca2+ binding site in the bacterial serine protease subtilisin BPN' was chosen as a model to explore the feasibility of stabilizing a protein by increasing the binding affinity at a metal ion binding site. The existence of this weak Ca2+ binding site was first discovered through a study of the rate of thermal inactivation of wild-type subtilisin BPN' at 65/degrees/C as a function of the free [Ca2+]. Increasing the [Ca2+] in the range of 0.10-100 mM caused a 100-fold decrease in the rate of thermal inactivation. The data were found to closely fit a theoretical titration curve for a single Ca2+ specific binding site with an apparent log K/sub a/ = 1.49. A series of refined X-ray crystal structures of subtilisin in the presence of 0.0, 25.0, and 40.0 mM CaCl2 has allowed a detailed structural characterization of this Ca2+ binding site. Negatively charged side chains were introduced in the vicinity of the bound Ca2+ by changing Pro 172 and Gly 131 to Asp residues through site-directed and random mutagenesis techniques, respectively. These changes were found to increase the affinity of the Ca2+ binding site by 3.4- and 2-fold, respectively, when compared with the wild-type protein. X-ray studies of these new variants of subtilisin revealed the carboxylate side chains to be 6.8 and 13.2 /Angstrom/, respectively, from the bound Ca2+. These distances and the degree of enhanced binding are consistent with simple electrostatic theory. Moreover, when both Asp changes were introduced together, the binding affinity for Ca2+ was found to be increased about 6-fold over that for the wild-type protein, suggesting an independent and nearly additive effect on the total electrostatic potential at this locus

  5. Shared binding sites in Lepidoptera for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, S; González-Cabrera, J; Tabashnik, B E; Ferré, J

    2001-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxins act by binding to specific target sites in the insect midgut epithelial membrane. The best-known mechanism of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins is reduced binding to target sites. Because alteration of a binding site shared by several toxins may cause resistance to all of them, knowledge of which toxins share binding sites is useful for predicting cross-resistance. Conversely, cross-resistance among toxins suggests that the toxins share a binding site. At least two strains of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) with resistance to Cry1A toxins and reduced binding of Cry1A toxins have strong cross-resistance to Cry1Ja. Thus, we hypothesized that Cry1Ja shares binding sites with Cry1A toxins. We tested this hypothesis in six moth and butterfly species, each from a different family: Cacyreus marshalli (Lycaenidae), Lobesia botrana (Tortricidae), Manduca sexta (Sphingidae), Pectinophora gossypiella (Gelechiidae), P. xylostella (Plutellidae), and Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae). Although the extent of competition varied among species, experiments with biotinylated Cry1Ja and radiolabeled Cry1Ac showed that Cry1Ja and Cry1Ac competed for binding sites in all six species. A recent report also indicates shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins in Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae). Thus, shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A occur in all lepidopteran species tested so far. PMID:11722929

  6. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J;

    1993-01-01

    Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...... can replicate by using various tRNA molecules as primers and propose primer binding site-tRNA primer interactions to be of major importance for tRNA primer selection. However, efficient primer selection does not require perfect Watson-Crick base pairing at all 18 positions of the primer binding site....

  7. The hepcidin-binding site on ferroportin is evolutionarily conserved

    OpenAIRE

    De Domenico, Ivana; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Nelson, Jenifer M.; Phillips, John D.; Ajioka, Richard S.; Kay, Michael S.; Kushner, James P.; Ganz, Tomas; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian iron homeostasis is regulated by the interaction of the liver-produced peptide hepcidin and its receptor, the iron transporter ferroportin. Hepcidin binds to ferroportin resulting in degradation of ferroportin and decreased cellular iron export. We identify the hepcidin-binding domain (HBD) on ferroportin and show that a synthetic 19 amino acid peptide corresponding to the HBD recapitulates the characteristics and specificity of hepcidin binding to cell surface ferroportin. The bind...

  8. Energy-dependent fitness: A quantitative model for the evolution of yeast transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Mustonen, Ville; Kinney, Justin; Callan, Curtis G.; Lässig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We present a genomewide cross-species analysis of regulation for broad-acting transcription factors in yeast. Our model for binding site evolution is founded on biophysics: the binding energy between transcription factor and site is a quantitative phenotype of regulatory function, and selection is given by a fitness landscape that depends on this phenotype. The model quantifies conservation, as well as loss and gain, of functional binding sites in a coherent way. Its predictions are supported...

  9. Multiplicity of carbohydrate-binding sites in -prism fold lectins: occurrence and possible evolutionary implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok Sharma; Divya Chandran; Desh D Singh; M Vijayan

    2007-09-01

    The -prism II fold lectins of known structure, all from monocots, invariably have three carbohydrate-binding sites in each subunit/domain. Until recently, -prism I fold lectins of known structure were all from dicots and they exhibited one carbohydrate-binding site per subunit/domain. However, the recently determined structure of the -prism fold I lectin from banana, a monocot, has two very similar carbohydrate-binding sites. This prompted a detailed analysis of all the sequences appropriate for two-lectin folds and which carry one or more relevant carbohydrate-binding motifs. The very recent observation of a -prism I fold lectin, griffithsin, with three binding sites in each domain further confirmed the need for such an analysis. The analysis demonstrates substantial diversity in the number of binding sites unrelated to the taxonomical position of the plant source. However, the number of binding sites and the symmetry within the sequence exhibit reasonable correlation. The distribution of the two families of -prism fold lectins among plants and the number of binding sites in them, appear to suggest that both of them arose through successive gene duplication, fusion and divergent evolution of the same primitive carbohydrate-binding motif involving a Greek key. Analysis with sequences in individual Greek keys as independent units lends further support to this conclusion. It would seem that the preponderance of three carbohydrate-binding sites per domain in monocot lectins, particularly those with the -prism II fold, is related to the role of plant lectins in defence.

  10. Ligand binding studies in the mouse olfactory bulb: identification and characterisation of a L-[3H]carnosine binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding sites for the dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-t-histidine) have been detected in membranes prepared from mouse olfactory bulbs. The binding of L-[3H]- carnosine was saturable, reversible and stereospecific and had a Ksub(d) of about 770 nM. The stereospecific binding of L-carnosine represented about 30% of the totoal binding at pH 6.8, and decreased markedly with increasing pH. Binding was stimulated by calcium, unaffected by zinc, magnesium or manganese and inhibted by sodium and potassium. Carnosine binding was sensitive to trypsin and phospholipases A and C, but not to neuraminidase. Nystatin and filipin, which interact with membrane lipids, also interfered with binding. Some peptide analogues of carnosine were potent inhibitors of binding, but a variety of drugs serving as potent inhibitors in other binding systems had no effect on carnosine binding. Carnosine binding to mouse olfactory bulb membranes was 15-fold higher than that seen in membranes prepared from cerebral hemispheres, 5-fold higher than in cerebellum membranes and 3-fold higher than in membranes from spinal medulla and the olfactory tubercle-lateral olfactory tract area. (Auth.)

  11. Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Study of Potential Negative Allosteric Modulators of mGluR1 from Chinese Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludi Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The metabotropic glutamate subtype 1 (mGluR1, a member of the metabotropic glutamate receptors, is a therapeutic target for neurological disorders. However, due to the lower subtype selectivity of mGluR1 orthosteric compounds, a new targeted strategy, known as allosteric modulators research, is needed for the treatment of mGluR1-related diseases. Recently, the structure of the seven-transmembrane domain (7TMD of mGluR1 has been solved, which reveals the binding site of allosteric modulators and provides an opportunity for future subtype-selectivity drug design. In this study, a series of computer-aided drug design methods were utilized to discover potential mGluR1 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs. Pharmacophore models were constructed based on three different structure types of mGluR1 NAMs. After validation using the built-in parameters and test set, the optimal pharmacophore model of each structure type was selected and utilized as a query to screen the Traditional Chinese Medicine Database (TCMD. Then, three different hit lists of compounds were obtained. Molecular docking was used based on the latest crystal structure of mGluR1-7TMD to further filter these hits. As a compound with high QFIT and LibDock Score was preferred, a total of 30 compounds were retained. MD simulation was utilized to confirm the stability of potential compounds binding. From the computational results, thesinine-4ʹ-O-β-d-glucoside, nigrolineaxanthone-P and nodakenin might exhibit negative allosteric moderating effects on mGluR1. This paper indicates the applicability of molecular simulation technologies for discovering potential natural mGluR1 NAMs from Chinese herbs.

  12. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  13. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehteshami, Mehdi [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboob, Soltanali [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza, E-mail: rashidi@tbzmed.ac.ir [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP-BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP-BSA complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions.

  14. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP–BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: ► Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. ► Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. ► Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP–BSA complex. ► Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions

  15. Knowledge-based annotation of small molecule binding sites in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchenko Anna R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of protein-small molecule interactions is vital for understanding protein function and for practical applications in drug discovery. To benefit from the rapidly increasing structural data, it is essential to improve the tools that enable large scale binding site prediction with greater emphasis on their biological validity. Results We have developed a new method for the annotation of protein-small molecule binding sites, using inference by homology, which allows us to extend annotation onto protein sequences without experimental data available. To ensure biological relevance of binding sites, our method clusters similar binding sites found in homologous protein structures based on their sequence and structure conservation. Binding sites which appear evolutionarily conserved among non-redundant sets of homologous proteins are given higher priority. After binding sites are clustered, position specific score matrices (PSSMs are constructed from the corresponding binding site alignments. Together with other measures, the PSSMs are subsequently used to rank binding sites to assess how well they match the query and to better gauge their biological relevance. The method also facilitates a succinct and informative representation of observed and inferred binding sites from homologs with known three-dimensional structures, thereby providing the means to analyze conservation and diversity of binding modes. Furthermore, the chemical properties of small molecules bound to the inferred binding sites can be used as a starting point in small molecule virtual screening. The method was validated by comparison to other binding site prediction methods and to a collection of manually curated binding site annotations. We show that our method achieves a sensitivity of 72% at predicting biologically relevant binding sites and can accurately discriminate those sites that bind biological small molecules from non-biological ones. Conclusions

  16. Identifying barbiturate binding sites in a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with [3H]allyl m-trifluoromethyldiazirine mephobarbital, a photoreactive barbiturate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Stewart, Deirdre S; Chiara, David C; Savechenkov, Pavel Y; Bruzik, Karol S; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2014-05-01

    At concentrations that produce anesthesia, many barbituric acid derivatives act as positive allosteric modulators of inhibitory GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and inhibitors of excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent research on [(3)H]R-mTFD-MPAB ([(3)H]R-5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyldiazirinylphenyl)barbituric acid), a photoreactive barbiturate that is a potent and stereoselective anesthetic and GABAAR potentiator, has identified a second class of intersubunit binding sites for general anesthetics in the α1β3γ2 GABAAR transmembrane domain. We now characterize mTFD-MPAB interactions with the Torpedo (muscle-type) nAChR. For nAChRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes, S- and R-mTFD-MPAB inhibited ACh-induced currents with IC50 values of 5 and 10 µM, respectively. Racemic mTFD-MPAB enhanced the equilibrium binding of [(3)H]ACh to nAChR-rich membranes (EC50 = 9 µM) and inhibited binding of the ion channel blocker [(3)H]tenocyclidine in the nAChR desensitized and resting states with IC50 values of 2 and 170 µM, respectively. Photoaffinity labeling identified two binding sites for [(3)H]R-mTFD-MPAB in the nAChR transmembrane domain: 1) a site within the ion channel, identified by photolabeling in the nAChR desensitized state of amino acids within the M2 helices of each nAChR subunit; and 2) a site at the γ-α subunit interface, identified by photolabeling of γMet299 within the γM3 helix at similar efficiency in the resting and desensitized states. These results establish that mTFD-MPAB is a potent nAChR inhibitor that binds in the ion channel preferentially in the desensitized state and binds with lower affinity to a site at the γ-α subunit interface where etomidate analogs bind that act as positive and negative nAChR modulators. PMID:24563544

  17. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  18. A negative allosteric modulator modulates GABAB-receptor signalling through GB2 subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Chen, Linhai; Liu, Lei; Xia, Zhixiong; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Nan, Fajun; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-03-15

    An γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB)-receptor mediates slow and prolonged synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system, which represents an interesting target for the treatment of various diseases and disorders of the central nervous system. To date, only one activator of the GABAB-receptor, baclofen, is on the market for the treatment of spasticity. Inhibitors of the GABAB-receptor, such as antagonists, show anti-absence seizure activity and pro-cognitive properties. In a search for allosteric compounds of the GABAB-receptor, although several positive allosteric modulators have been developed, it is only recently that the first negative allosteric modulator (NAM), CLH304a (also named Compound 14), has been reported. In the present study, we provide further information on the mechanism of action of CLH304a, and also show the possibility of designing more NAMs, such as CLH391 and CLH393, based on the structure of CLH304a. First we show that CLH304a inhibits native GABAB-receptor activity in cultured cerebellar granular neurons. We then show that CLH304a has inverse agonist properties and non-competitively inhibits the effect of agonists, indicating that it binds at a different site to GABA. The GABAB-receptor is a mandatory heterodimer made of GB1 subunits, in which agonists bind, and GB2 subunits, which activate G-proteins. By using various combinations made up of wild-type and/or mutated GB1 and GB2 subunits, we show that CLH304a acts on the heptahelical domain of GB2 subunits. These data revealed the possibility of designing innovative NAMs acting in the heptahelical domain of the GB2 subunits, offering novel possibilities for therapeutic intervention based on GABAB-receptor inhibition. PMID:26772870

  19. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, [3H] dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for [3H] [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and [3H]ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites

  20. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M.; Christiansen, Camilla;

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch...

  1. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  2. Active site and laminarin binding in glycoside hydrolase family 55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchetti, Christopher M; Takasuka, Taichi E; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S; Yik, Eric J; Bergeman, Lai F; Fox, Brian G

    2015-05-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100-10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  3. Using circular permutation analysis to redefine the R17 coat protein binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J M; Pan, T; LeCuyer, K A; Uhlenbeck, O C

    1993-12-14

    The bacteriophage R17 coat protein binding site consists of an RNA hairpin with a single purine nucleotide bulge in the helical stem. Circular permutation analysis (CPA) was used to examine binding effects caused by a single break in the phosphodiester backbone. This method revealed that breakage of all but one phosphodiester bond within a well-defined binding site substantially reduced the binding affinity. This is probably due to destabilization of the hairpin structure upon breaking the ribose phosphates at these positions. One circularly permuted isomer with the 5' and 3' ends at the bulged nucleotide bound with wild-type affinity. However, extending the 5' end of this CP isomer greatly reduces binding, making it unlikely that this circularly permuted binding site will be active when embedded in a larger RNA. CPA also locates the 5' and 3' boundaries of protein binding sites on the RNA. The 5' boundary of the R17 coat protein site as defined by CPA was two nucleotides shorter (nucleotides -15 to +2) than the previously determined site (-17 to +2). The smaller binding site was verified by terminal truncation experiments. A minimal-binding fragment (-14 to +2) was synthesized and was found to bind tightly to the coat protein. The site size determined by 3-ethyl-1-nitrosourea-modification interference was larger at the 5' end (-16 to +1), probably due, however, to steric effects of ethylation of phosphate oxygens. Thus, the apparent site size of a protein binding site is dependent upon the method used. PMID:7504949

  4. Effects of the dopamine D2 allosteric modulator, PAOPA, on the expression of GRK2, arrestin-3, ERK1/2, and on receptor internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipannita Basu

    Full Text Available The activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is intricately regulated by a range of intracellular proteins, including G protein-coupled kinases (GRKs and arrestins. Understanding the effects of ligands on these signaling pathways could provide insights into disease pathophysiologies and treatment. The dopamine D2 receptor is a GPCR strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Previous studies from our lab have shown the preclinical efficacy of a novel allosteric drug, 3(R-[(2(S-pyrrolidinylcarbonylamino]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide (PAOPA, in attenuating schizophrenia-like behavioural abnormalities in rodent models of the disease. As an allosteric modulator, PAOPA binds to a site on the D2 receptor, which is distinct from the endogenous ligand-binding site, in order to modulate the binding of the D2 receptor ligand, dopamine. The exact signaling pathways affected by this allosteric modulator are currently unknown. The objectives of this study were to decipher the in vivo effects, in rats, of chronic PAOPA administration on D2 receptor regulatory and downstream molecules, including GRK2, arrestin-3 and extracellular receptor kinase (ERK 1/2. Additionally, an in vitro cellular model was also used to study PAOPA's effects on D2 receptor internalization. Results from western immunoblots showed that chronic PAOPA treatment increased the striatal expression of GRK2 by 41%, arrestin-3 by 34%, phospho-ERK1 by 51% and phospho-ERK2 by 36%. Results also showed that the addition of PAOPA to agonist treatment in cells increased D2 receptor internalization by 33%. This study provides the foundational evidence of putative signaling pathways, and changes in receptor localization, affected by treatment with PAOPA. It improves our understanding on the diverse mechanisms of action of allosteric modulators, while advancing PAOPA's development into a novel drug for the

  5. Evidence for a non-opioid sigma binding site din the guinea-pig myenteric plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of a binding site to (+)-(3H)SKF 10,047 was demonstrated in a guinea-pig myenteric plexus (MYP) membrane preparation. Specific binding to this receptor was saturable, reversible, linear with protein concentration and consisted of two components, a high affinity site and a low affinity site. Morphine and naloxone 10-4M were unable to displace (+)-(3H)SKF 10,047 binding. Haloperidol, imipramine, ethylketocyclazocine and propranolol were among the most potent compounds to inhibit this specific binding. These results suggest the presence of a non-opioid haloperidol sensitive sigma receptor in the MYP of the guinea-pig

  6. Evidence for a non-opioid sigma binding site din the guinea-pig myenteric plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, F.; Pascaud, X.; Vauche, D.; Junien, J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a binding site to (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 was demonstrated in a guinea-pig myenteric plexus (MYP) membrane preparation. Specific binding to this receptor was saturable, reversible, linear with protein concentration and consisted of two components, a high affinity site and a low affinity site. Morphine and naloxone 10/sup -4/M were unable to displace (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding. Haloperidol, imipramine, ethylketocyclazocine and propranolol were among the most potent compounds to inhibit this specific binding. These results suggest the presence of a non-opioid haloperidol sensitive sigma receptor in the MYP of the guinea-pig.

  7. Multiple propofol-binding sites in a γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) identified using a photoreactive propofol analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, Selwyn S; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Chiara, David C; Dostalova, Zuzana; Savechenkov, Pavel Y; Bruzik, Karol S; Dailey, William P; Miller, Keith W; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    Propofol acts as a positive allosteric modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs), an interaction necessary for its anesthetic potency in vivo as a general anesthetic. Identifying the location of propofol-binding sites is necessary to understand its mechanism of GABAAR modulation. [(3)H]2-(3-Methyl-3H-diaziren-3-yl)ethyl 1-(phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (azietomidate) and R-[(3)H]5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (mTFD-MPAB), photoreactive analogs of 2-ethyl 1-(phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (etomidate) and mephobarbital, respectively, have identified two homologous but pharmacologically distinct classes of intersubunit-binding sites for general anesthetics in the GABAAR transmembrane domain. Here, we use a photoreactive analog of propofol (2-isopropyl-5-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]phenol ([(3)H]AziPm)) to identify propofol-binding sites in heterologously expressed human α1β3 GABAARs. Propofol, AziPm, etomidate, and R-mTFD-MPAB each inhibited [(3)H]AziPm photoincorporation into GABAAR subunits maximally by ∼ 50%. When the amino acids photolabeled by [(3)H]AziPm were identified by protein microsequencing, we found propofol-inhibitable photolabeling of amino acids in the β3-α1 subunit interface (β3Met-286 in β3M3 and α1Met-236 in α1M1), previously photolabeled by [(3)H]azietomidate, and α1Ile-239, located one helical turn below α1Met-236. There was also propofol-inhibitable [(3)H]AziPm photolabeling of β3Met-227 in βM1, the amino acid in the α1-β3 subunit interface photolabeled by R-[(3)H]mTFD-MPAB. The propofol-inhibitable [(3)H]AziPm photolabeling in the GABAAR β3 subunit in conjunction with the concentration dependence of inhibition of that photolabeling by etomidate or R-mTFD-MPAB also establish that each anesthetic binds to the homologous site at the β3-β3 subunit interface. These results establish that AziPm as well as propofol bind to the homologous

  8. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    OpenAIRE

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L; Shi, Lei; Gracia, Luis; Raniszewska, Klaudia; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog LeuT. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopami...

  9. PREDICTION OF ANTIGENIC AND BINDING SITES OF NEUROTOXIN 23 OF SCORPION (LYCHASMUCRONACTUS SP.)

    OpenAIRE

    Bharati K Thosare; Ingale, Arun G

    2015-01-01

    Identification of antigenic and binding site of protein is highly desirable for the design of vaccines and immunodiagnostics. The present exercise deals with a prediction of antigenic as well as binding sites of neurotoxin 23 of Lychasmucronactus. This species of scorpion having diverse molecules of toxic peptide, the peptide neurotoxin 23 is 96 amino acids long of which 23 to 96 specifically code for neurotoxin. The total of 27 such different ligand binding residue were identifie...

  10. A systematic, large-scale comparison of transcription factor binding site models

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach, Daniela; Schwarz, Jana Marie; Peter N. Robinson; Schuelke, Markus; Seelow, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Background The modelling of gene regulation is a major challenge in biomedical research. This process is dominated by transcription factors (TFs) and mutations in their binding sites (TFBSs) may cause the misregulation of genes, eventually leading to disease. The consequences of DNA variants on TF binding are modelled in silico using binding matrices, but it remains unclear whether these are capable of accurately representing in vivo binding. In this study, we present a systematic comparison ...

  11. Algorithm for prediction of tumour suppressor p53 affinity for binding sites in DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Veprintsev, Dmitry B.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that binds DNA in the vicinity of the genes it controls. The affinity of p53 for specific binding sites relative to other DNA sequences is an inherent driving force for specificity, all other things being equal. We measured the binding affinities of systematically mutated consensus p53 DNA-binding sequences using automated fluorescence anisotropy titrations. Based on measurements of the effects of every possible single base-pair substitution...

  12. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  13. Distinct Allostery Induced in the Cyclic GMP-binding, Cyclic GMP-specific Phosphodiesterase (PDE5) by Cyclic GMP, Sildenafil, and Metal Ions*

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2010-01-01

    The activity of many proteins orchestrating different biological processes is regulated by allostery, where ligand binding at one site alters the function of another site. Allosteric changes can be brought about by either a change in the dynamics of a protein, or alteration in its mean structure. We have investigated the mechanisms of allostery induced by chemically distinct ligands in the cGMP-binding, cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase, PDE5. PDE5 is the target for catalytic site inhibitors, s...

  14. Structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase from Maricaulis maris with the allosteric inhibitor L-arginine bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Jin, Zhongmin; M Allewell, Norma; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-08-01

    Maricaulis maris N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (mmNAGS/K) catalyzes the first two steps in L-arginine biosynthesis and has a high degree of sequence and structural homology to human N-acetylglutamate synthase, a regulator of the urea cycle. The synthase activity of both mmNAGS/K and human NAGS are regulated by L-arginine, although L-arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of mmNAGS/K, but an activator of human NAGS. To investigate the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K by L-arginine, we have determined the structure of the mmNAGS/K complexed with L-arginine at 2.8 Å resolution. In contrast to the structure of mmNAGS/K in the absence of L-arginine where there are conformational differences between the four subunits in the asymmetric unit, all four subunits in the L-arginine liganded structure have very similar conformations. In this conformation, the AcCoA binding site in the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain is blocked by a loop from the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, as a result of a domain rotation that occurs when L-arginine binds. This structural change provides an explanation for the allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K and related enzymes by L-arginine. The allosterically regulated mechanism for mmNAGS/K differs significantly from that for Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS (ngNAGS). To define the active site, several residues near the putative active site were mutated and their activities determined. These experiments identify roles for Lys356, Arg386, Asn391 and Tyr397 in the catalytic mechanism. PMID:23850694

  15. Structure-based network analysis of activation mechanisms in the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases: the regulatory spine residues are global mediators of structural stability and allosteric interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A James

    Full Text Available The ErbB protein tyrosine kinases are among the most important cell signaling families and mutation-induced modulation of their activity is associated with diverse functions in biological networks and human disease. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations of the ErbB kinases with the protein structure network modeling to characterize the reorganization of the residue interaction networks during conformational equilibrium changes in the normal and oncogenic forms. Structural stability and network analyses have identified local communities integrated around high centrality sites that correspond to the regulatory spine residues. This analysis has provided a quantitative insight to the mechanism of mutation-induced "superacceptor" activity in oncogenic EGFR dimers. We have found that kinase activation may be determined by allosteric interactions between modules of structurally stable residues that synchronize the dynamics in the nucleotide binding site and the αC-helix with the collective motions of the integrating αF-helix and the substrate binding site. The results of this study have pointed to a central role of the conserved His-Arg-Asp (HRD motif in the catalytic loop and the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG motif as key mediators of structural stability and allosteric communications in the ErbB kinases. We have determined that residues that are indispensable for kinase regulation and catalysis often corresponded to the high centrality nodes within the protein structure network and could be distinguished by their unique network signatures. The optimal communication pathways are also controlled by these nodes and may ensure efficient allosteric signaling in the functional kinase state. Structure-based network analysis has quantified subtle effects of ATP binding on conformational dynamics and stability of the EGFR structures. Consistent with the NMR studies, we have found that nucleotide-induced modulation of the residue interaction networks is not

  16. Identification of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl binding affinity and binding site subdomain IIA in human serum albumin by spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xi; Wu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Li; Sun, Ying

    2010-03-01

    Pyrazosulfuron-ethyl (PY) is a sulfonylurea herbicide developed by DuPont which has been widely used for weed control in cereals. The determination of PY binding affinity and binding site in human serum albumin (HSA) by spectroscopic methods is the subject of this work. From the fluorescence emission, circular dichroism and three-dimensional fluorescence results, the interaction of PY with HSA caused secondary structure changes in the protein. Fluorescence data demonstrated that the quenching of HSA fluorescence by PY was the result of the formation of HSA-PY complex at 1:1 molar ratio, a static mechanism was confirmed to lead to the fluorescence quenching. Hydrophobic probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) displacement results show that hydrophobic patches are the major sites for PY binding on HSA. The thermodynamic parameters Δ H° and Δ S° were calculated to be -36.32 kJ mol -1 and -35.91 J mol -1 K -1, which illustrated van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds interactions were the dominant intermolecular force in stabilizing the complex. Also, site marker competitive experiments showed that the binding of PY to HSA took place primarily in subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I). What presented in this paper binding research enriches our knowledge of the interaction between sulfonylurea herbicides and the physiologically important protein HSA.

  17. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  18. Structure and allosteric effects of low-molecular-weight activators on the protein kinase PDK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindie, Valerie; Stroba, Adriana; Zhang, Hua;

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation transduces a large set of intracellular signals. One mechanism by which phosphorylation mediates signal transduction is by prompting conformational changes in the target protein or interacting proteins. Previous work described an allosteric site mediating phosphorylation-d...

  19. A biophysical model for analysis of transcription factor interaction and binding site arrangement from genome-wide binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How transcription factors (TFs interact with cis-regulatory sequences and interact with each other is a fundamental, but not well understood, aspect of gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a computational method to address this question, relying on the established biophysical principles. This method, STAP (sequence to affinity prediction, takes into account all combinations and configurations of strong and weak binding sites to analyze large scale transcription factor (TF-DNA binding data to discover cooperative interactions among TFs, infer sequence rules of interaction and predict TF target genes in new conditions with no TF-DNA binding data. The distinctions between STAP and other statistical approaches for analyzing cis-regulatory sequences include the utility of physical principles and the treatment of the DNA binding data as quantitative representation of binding strengths. Applying this method to the ChIP-seq data of 12 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, we found that the strength of TF-DNA binding could be significantly modulated by cooperative interactions among TFs with adjacent binding sites. However, further analysis on five putatively interacting TF pairs suggests that such interactions may be relatively insensitive to the distance and orientation of binding sites. Testing a set of putative Nanog motifs, STAP showed that a novel Nanog motif could better explain the ChIP-seq data than previously published ones. We then experimentally tested and verified the new Nanog motif. A series of comparisons showed that STAP has more predictive power than several state-of-the-art methods for cis-regulatory sequence analysis. We took advantage of this power to study the evolution of TF-target relationship in Drosophila. By learning the TF-DNA interaction models from the ChIP-chip data of D. melanogaster (Mel and applying them to the genome of D. pseudoobscura (Pse, we found that only about half of the

  20. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario, (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  1. Prediction of the key binding site of odorant-binding protein of Holotrichia oblita Faldermann (Coleoptera: Scarabaeida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X; Wang, Q; Wang, B; Zhong, T; Cao, Y; Li, K; Yin, J

    2014-06-01

    The scarab beetle Holotrichia oblita Faldermann (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is a predominant underground pest in the northern parts of China, and its larvae (grubs) cause great economic losses because of its wide range of host plants and covert habitats. Environmentally friendly strategies for controlling adults would have novel and broad potential applications. One potential pest management measure is the regulation of olfactory chemoreception to control target insect pests. In the process of olfactory recognition, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are believed to carry hydrophobic odorants from the environment to the surface of olfactory receptor neurons. To obtain a better understanding of the relationship between OBP structures and their ligands, homology modelling and molecular docking have been conducted on the interaction between HoblOBP1 and hexyl benzoate in the present study. Based on the results, site-directed mutagenesis and binding experiments were combined to describe the binding sites of HoblOBP1 and to explore its ligand-binding mechanism. After homology modelling of HoblOBP1, it was found that the three-dimensional structure of HoblOBP1 consists of six α-helices and three disulphide bridges that connect the helices, and the hydrophobic pockets are both composed of five helices. Based on the docking study, we found that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic interactions are both important in the bonding between HoblOBP1 and hexyl benzoate. Intramolecular residues formed the hydrogen bonds in the C terminus of the protein and the bonds are crucial for the ligand-binding specificity. Finally, MET48, ILE80 and TYR111 are binding sites predicted for HoblOBP1. Using site-directed mutagenesis and fluorescence assays, it was found that ligands could not be recognized by mutant of Tyr111. A possible explanation is that the compound could not be recognized by the mutant, and remains in the binding cavity because of the loss of the intramolecular

  2. Impact of Binding Site Comparisons on Medicinal Chemistry and Rational Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrt, Christiane; Brinkjost, Tobias; Koch, Oliver

    2016-05-12

    Modern rational drug design not only deals with the search for ligands binding to interesting and promising validated targets but also aims to identify the function and ligands of yet uncharacterized proteins having impact on different diseases. Additionally, it contributes to the design of inhibitors with distinct selectivity patterns and the prediction of possible off-target effects. The identification of similarities between binding sites of various proteins is a useful approach to cope with those challenges. The main scope of this perspective is to describe applications of different protein binding site comparison approaches to outline their applicability and impact on molecular design. The article deals with various substantial application domains and provides some outstanding examples to show how various binding site comparison methods can be applied to promote in silico drug design workflows. In addition, we will also briefly introduce the fundamental principles of different protein binding site comparison methods. PMID:27046190

  3. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi; Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Ando, Hiromune; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity. PMID:27318092

  4. An NMR-Based Structural Rationale for Contrasting Stoichiometry and Ligand Binding Site(s) in Fatty Acid-binding Proteins†

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yan; Estephan, Rima; Yang, Xiaomin; Vela, Adriana; Wang, Hsin; Bernard, Cédric; Stark, Ruth E.

    2011-01-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is a 14-kDa cytosolic polypeptide, differing from other family members in number of ligand binding sites, diversity of bound ligands, and transfer of fatty acid(s) to membranes primarily via aqueous diffusion rather than direct collisional interactions. Distinct two-dimensional 1H-15N NMR signals indicative of slowly exchanging LFABP assemblies formed during stepwise ligand titration were exploited, without solving the protein-ligand complex structures...

  5. Evidence for two distinct binding sites for tau on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrides, Victoria; Massie, Michelle R.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Lew, John

    2004-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau regulates diverse and essential microtubule functions, from the nucleation and promotion of microtubule polymerization to the regulation of microtubule polarity and dynamics, as well as the spacing and bundling of axonal microtubules. Thermodynamic studies show that tau interacts with microtubules in the low- to mid-nanomolar range, implying moderate binding affinity. At the same time, it is well established that microtubule-bound tau does not undergo exchange with the bulk medium readily, suggesting that the tau-microtubule interaction is essentially irreversible. Given this dilemma, we investigated the mechanism of interaction between tau and microtubules in kinetic detail. Stopped-flow kinetic analysis reveals moderate binding affinity between tau and preassembled microtubules and rapid dissociation/association kinetics. In contrast, when microtubules are generated by copolymerization of tubulin and tau, a distinct population of microtubule-bound tau is observed, the binding of which seems irreversible. We propose that reversible binding occurs between tau and the surface of preassembled microtubules, whereas irreversible binding results when tau is coassembled with tubulin into a tau-microtubule copolymer. Because the latter is expected to be physiologically relevant, its characterization is of central importance. PMID:15096589

  6. Differential modulation by cations of sigma and phencyclidine binding sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation attempted to differentiate haloperidol-sensitive sigma sites (sigma H) from phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites in rat brain membranes. We studied the effects of several cations at physiologically relevant concentrations on the binding of radioligands selective for sigma H sites ([3H]haloperidol, [3H](+)3-PPP**), and [3H](+)SKF10,047, or for PCP sites ([3H]PCP and [3H]TCP). The PCP sites displayed a markedly greater sensitivity to cations than sigma H sites. This property was reflected by a greater extent of inhibition of the binding of PCP-selective relative to sigma H-selective ligands at a given cation concentration, as well as by lower IC50's and by steeper slopes of the cation dose-response curves. Divalent cations were approximately 100 times more potent than monovalent cations. All cations were inhibitory, except Sr2+ and Ba2+ which, at micromolar concentrations, enhanced PCP binding but not sigma H binding. Thus, PCP-selective sites appeared to be distinct from sigma H sites with regards to several aspects of cation modulation. This is consistent with the view that PCP and sigma H sites are distinct molecular entities. Further, the marked cation sensitivity of the PCP site is consistent with the current hypothesis according to which the PCP site is linked to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-cation channel complex

  7. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    OpenAIRE

    Mashiur Rahman; Farzana Prianka; Mohammad Shohel; Md. Abdul Mazid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED) at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 a...

  8. Resistance to Linezolid Caused by Modifications at Its Binding Site on the Ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S.; Vester, Birte

    2012-01-01

    linezolid binding site, so this review will therefore focus on the various changes that can adversely affect drug binding and confer resistance. High-resolution structures of linezolid bound to the 50S ribosomal subunit show that it binds in a deep cleft that is surrounded by 23S rRNA nucleotides. Mutation...... evidence has been presented to confirm this. Furthermore, recent findings on the Cfr methyltransferase underscore the modification of 23S rRNA as a highly effective and transferable form of linezolid resistance. On a positive note, detailed knowledge of the linezolid binding site has facilitated the design...

  9. Characterization and autoradiographic localization of multiple tachykinin binding sites in gastrointestinal tract and bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burcher, E.; Buck, S.H.; Lovenberg, W.; O' Donohue, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Binding sites for the (125I)Bolton-Hunter-labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE) and substance P (BHSP) were investigated using crude membrane suspensions and autoradiography. In smooth muscle membranes from guinea-pig small intestine and rat duodenum, specific binding of BHSK was saturable and reversible, showing a single class of sites with a KD of 1 to 3 nM and maximum number of specific binding sites of 1 to 2 fmol/mg of wet weight tissue. Pharmacological characterization of this binding revealed a novel receptor site (K) with affinity for substance K greater than kassinin greater than or equal to eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin. Inhibition of the binding of BHSK in membranes from mouse urinary bladder exhibited a similar K-type pattern. In rat duodenum and mouse bladder membranes, the binding of BHE was inhibited by substance K greater than kassinin greater than eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin indicating the same receptor site as for BHSK. In rat cerebral cortex membranes BHE binding was inhibited by neuromedin K = kassinin = eledoisin greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than substance P indicating a definitive tachykinin E receptor site. The same displacement pattern of BHE binding was also detected in longitudinal muscle membranes from the guinea-pig small intestine. In mouse bladder membranes and in rat and guinea-pig intestine, the binding of BHSP was inhibited by substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than or equal to eledoisin = kassinin greater than neuromedin K indicating a definitive tachykinin P receptor site. Autoradiographic binding sites for both BHSK and BHSP were seen in circular muscle of the rat stomach, small intestine and colon and in circular and longitudinal muscle of the guinea-pig small intestine and colon.

  10. An Overview of the Prediction of Protein DNA-Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and DNA play an important role in many essential biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and repair. The identification of amino acid residues involved in DNA-binding sites is critical for understanding the mechanism of these biological activities. In the last decade, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict protein DNA-binding sites based on protein sequence and/or structural information, which play an important role in complementing experimental strategies. At this time, approaches can be divided into three categories: sequence-based DNA-binding site prediction, structure-based DNA-binding site prediction, and homology modeling and threading. In this article, we review existing research on computational methods to predict protein DNA-binding sites, which includes data sets, various residue sequence/structural features, machine learning methods for comparison and selection, evaluation methods, performance comparison of different tools, and future directions in protein DNA-binding site prediction. In particular, we detail the meta-analysis of protein DNA-binding sites. We also propose specific implications that are likely to result in novel prediction methods, increased performance, or practical applications.

  11. Location and nature of calcium-binding sites in salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The location of the calcium-binding sites in the human acidic proline-rich proteins, salivary proteins A and C, was determined by equilibrium dialysis of the tryptic peptides with buffers containing 45Ca. All the calcium-binding sites are located in the NH2-terminal tryptic peptide (TX peptide). The nature of the calcium binding sites in the TX peptide and native salivary proteins A and C, as well as dephosphorylated proteins was compared. Two types of sites can be distinguished in peptide TX. Type I sites have an apparent dissociation constant (K) of 38 μM and are responsible for the binding of 2.6 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. The corresponding figures for Type II sites are 780 μM and 5.3 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. In the native proteins, the amount of calcium bound at the type II sites decreases to 3.9 mol of Ca/mol of proteins A and C and K increases to 1100 μM. The amount of calcium bound at type I sites decreases to 1.5 mol/mol of protein A and 0.6 mol/mol of protein C, but there is no change in K. Dephosphorylation affects the calcium binding at both types of sites. The experiments indicate that the COOH-terminal parts of the native proteins affect the number and the nature of the protein calcium-binding sites. Proton and phosphorous NMR data demonstrate that β-COOH in aspartic acid, as well as phosphoserine, are part of the calcium-binding sites. The difference in calcium binding to salivary proteins A and C may be due at least partially to differences in the environment of one or more aspartic acids

  12. Location and nature of calcium-binding sites in salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennick, A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario); McLaughlin, A.C.; Grey, A.A.; Madapallimattam, G.

    1981-05-25

    The location of the calcium-binding sites in the human acidic proline-rich proteins, salivary proteins A and C, was determined by equilibrium dialysis of the tryptic peptides with buffers containing /sup 45/Ca. All the calcium-binding sites are located in the NH/sub 2/-terminal tryptic peptide (TX peptide). The nature of the calcium binding sites in the TX peptide and native salivary proteins A and C, as well as dephosphorylated proteins was compared. Two types of sites can be distinguished in peptide TX. Type I sites have an apparent dissociation constant (K) of 38 ..mu..M and are responsible for the binding of 2.6 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. The corresponding figures for Type II sites are 780 ..mu..M and 5.3 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. In the native proteins, the amount of calcium bound at the type II sites decreases to 3.9 mol of Ca/mol of proteins A and C and K increases to 1100 ..mu..M. The amount of calcium bound at type I sites decreases to 1.5 mol/mol of protein A and 0.6 mol/mol of protein C, but there is no change in K. Dephosphorylation affects the calcium binding at both types of sites. The experiments indicate that the COOH-terminal parts of the native proteins affect the number and the nature of the protein calcium-binding sites. Proton and phosphorous NMR data demonstrate that ..beta..-COOH in aspartic acid, as well as phosphoserine, are part of the calcium-binding sites. The difference in calcium binding to salivary proteins A and C may be due at least partially to differences in the environment of one or more aspartic acids.

  13. The origins of enhanced activity in factor VIIa analogs and the interplay between key allosteric sites revealed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Andersen, Mette D; Olsen, Ole H; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Ostergaard, Henrik; Jensen, Ole N; Stennicke, Henning R; Persson, Egon

    2008-01-01

    region rather than imitate the TF-induced effect. Hydrogen exchange analysis of the FVIIa(M306D) variant, which was unresponsive to stimulation by TF, correlated widespread reductions in exchange to the single mutation in the TF-binding region. These results reveal the delicate interplay between key...

  14. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of [3H]-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time

  15. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  16. SITE-DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS OF PROPOSED ACTIVE-SITE RESIDUES OF PENICILLIN-BINDING PROTEIN-5 FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLINDEN, MPG; DEHAAN, L; DIDEBERG, O; KECK, W

    1994-01-01

    Alignment of the amino acid sequence of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) with the sequences of other members of the family of active-site-serine penicillin-interacting enzymes predicted the residues playing a role in the catalytic mechanism of PBP5. Apart from the active-site (Ser(44)), Lys(47),

  17. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors.

  18. Investigation of the metal binding site in methionine aminopeptidase by density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Techau; Norrby, Per-Ola; Liljefors, Tommy

    2002-01-01

    All methionine aminopeptidases exhibit the same conserved metal binding site. The structure of this site with either Co2+ ions or Zn2+ ions was investigated using density functional theory. The calculations showed that the structure of the site was not influenced by the identity of the metal ions...... bridging oxygen, which is part of either a water molecule or a hydroxide ion. Within the site of hMetAP-2 the results strongly indicate that a hydroxide ion bridges the metal ions. By contrast, the nature of the oxygen bridging the metal ions within the metal binding site of eMetAP-1 cannot be determined...

  19. Saturable triiodothyronine-binding sites in the pituitary nuclei of salmonid teleost fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-affinity, limited-capacity, 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3)-binding sites were established by in vitro saturation analysis in cell nuclei of the pituitary gland of arctic charr. The sites were extracted from the purified nuclei using 0.4 M NaCl and incubated with [125I]T3 in the presence of 0.2 M NaCl. T3 saturable binding attained equilibrium after 18-24 hr of incubation at 4 degrees. The association constant ranged from 6.7 to 20.1 liters.mol-1 x 10(9), indicating a T3 affinity greater than that for T3-binding sites in rainbow trout liver. The maximal binding capacity ranged from 0.93 to 2.05 10(-13) mol.mg DNA-1, representing a mean site abundance corresponding to 60% of that for nuclei from trout liver. Thyroxine (T4) completely displaced [125I]T3 in the pituitary nuclei of arctic charr and T3 completely displaced [125I]T4 in the pituitary nuclei of rainbow trout, suggesting that in salmonids both T4 and T3 bind to the same single class of sites. However, the site affinity for T4 was approximately 20-50x less than that for T3. The possible roles of these sites in pituitary function as well as their relationship to other nuclear T3-binding sites in salmonid fish are discussed

  20. Computational investigation of stoichiometric effects, binding site heterogeneities, and selectivities of molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracina, Jacob J; Bergkvist, Magnus; Sharfstein, Susan T

    2016-06-01

    A series of quantum mechanical (QM) computational optimizations of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) systems were used to determine optimal monomer-to-target ratios. Imidazole- and xanthine-derived target molecules were studied. The investigation included both small-scale models (3-7 molecules) and larger-scale models (15-35 molecules). The optimal ratios differed between the small and larger scales. For the larger models containing multiple targets, binding-site surface area analysis was used to quantify the heterogeneity of these sites. The more fully surrounded sites had greater binding energies. No discretization of binding modes was seen, furthering arguments for continuous affinity distribution models. Molecular mechanical (MM) docking was then used to measure the selectivities of the QM-optimized binding sites. Selectivity was also shown to improve as binding sites become more fully encased by the monomers. For internal sites, docking consistently showed selectivity favoring the molecules that had been imprinted via QM geometry optimizations. The computationally imprinted sites were shown to exhibit size-, shape-, and polarity-based selectivity. Here we present a novel approach to investigate the selectivity and heterogeneity of imprinted polymer binding sites, by applying the rapid orientation screening of MM docking to the highly accurate QM-optimized geometries. Modeling schemes were designed such that no computing clusters or other specialized modeling equipment would be required. Improving the in silico analysis of MIP system properties will ultimately allow for the production of more sensitive and selective polymers. PMID:27207254

  1. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the high-affinity cation binding site of the purple membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, Leonardo; Sepulcre Sánchez, Francesc; Cladera Cerdà, Josep Bartomeu; Duñach, Mireia; Labarta, A.; Tejada, J.; Padrós Morell, Esteve

    1998-01-01

    Binding of Mn2+ or Mg2+ to the high-affinity site of the purple membrane from Halobacterium salinarium has been studied by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry or by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, respectively. The binding of Mn2+ cation, in a low-spin state, to the high-affinity site occurs through a major octahedral local symmetry character with a minor rhombic distortion and a coordination number of six. A molecular model of this binding site in the Schiff b...

  2. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  3. Quantitative autoradiography of [125I] apamin binding sites in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, P K; Horvath, E; Seibold, G; Habermann, E

    1984-01-01

    The binding sites for [125I] apamin in the central nervous system of rat, guinea-pig, chicken and frog were assessed by quantitative autoradiography on X-ray film. In rat and guinea-pig brain apamin labels preferentially the limbic-olfactory system, i.e. nucleus olfactorius, nuclei septi, habenula and hippocampus. In the rat spinal cord the peptide binds preferentially to the substantia gelatinosa. Tectum opticum and nuclei isthmi are labelled in chicken brain. In frog brain no preferentially "apamin-stained" area was found. The role of the cerebral binding sites is still unknown, whereas the spinal sites may be involved in apamin poisoning. PMID:6335967

  4. Quantitative autoradiography of [125I] apamin binding sites in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding sites for [125I] apamin in the central nervous system of rat, guinea-pig, chicken and frog were assessed by quantitative autoradiography on X-ray film. In rat and guinea-pig brain apamin labels preferentially the limbic-olfactory system, i.e. nucleus olfactorius, nuclei septi, habenula and hippocampus. In the rat spinal cord the peptide binds preferentially to the substantia gelatinosa. Tectum opticum and nuclei isthmi are labelled in chicken brain. In frog brain no preferentially 'apamin-stained' area was found. The role of the cerebral binding sites is still unknown, whereas the spinal sites may be involved in apamin poisoning. (author)

  5. Quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 125/I) apamin binding sites in the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janicki, P.K.; Horvath, E.; Habermann, E. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Rudolf-Buchheim-Institut fuer Pharmakologie); Seibold, G. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Strahlenzentrum)

    1984-12-01

    The binding sites for (/sup 125/I) apamin in the central nervous system of rat, guinea-pig, chicken and frog were assessed by quantitative autoradiography on X-ray film. In rat and guinea-pig brain apamin labels preferentially the limbic-olfactory system, i.e. nucleus olfactorius, nuclei septi, habenula and hippocampus. In the rat spinal cord the peptide binds preferentially to the substantia gelatinosa. Tectum opticum and nuclei isthmi are labelled in chicken brain. In frog brain no preferentially 'apamin-stained' area was found. The role of the cerebral binding sites is still unknown, whereas the spinal sites may be involved in apamin poisoning.

  6. Bacterial Surface Display of Metal-Binding Sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotrba, P.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Ruml, T.

    Dordrecht: Springer, 2011 - (Kotrba, P.; Macková, M.; Macek, T.), s. 249-283 ISBN 978-94-007-0442-8 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : bioremediation * biosorption * metal-binding peptide * cell-surface display Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  7. Phosphorus Binding Sites in Proteins: Structural Preorganization and Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, Mathias Felix; Greisen, Per Junior; Junker, Märta Caroline;

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus is a ubiquitous element of the cell, which is found throughout numerous key molecules related to cell structure, energy and information storage and transfer, and a diverse array of other cellular functions. In this work, we adopt an approach often used for characterizing metal binding ...

  8. Structural insights into the allosteric effects of 4EBP1 on the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Nadeem; Tempel, Wolfram; Nedyalkova, Lucy; Volpon, Laurent; Wernimont, Amy K; Osborne, Michael J.; Park, Hee-won; Borden, Katherine L. B.

    2011-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E plays key roles in cap dependent translation and mRNA export. These functions rely on binding the 7-methylguanosine moiety (5′cap) to the 5′-end of all mRNAs. eIF4E is regulated by proteins such as eIF4G and eIF4E binding proteins (4EBPs) that bind the dorsal surface of eIF4E, distal to the cap binding site, and modulate cap binding activity. Both proteins increase the affinity of eIF4E for 5′cap. Our understanding of the allosteric effects a...

  9. Allosteric activation of coagulation factor VIIa visualized by hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Jørgensen, Thomas; Olsen, Ole H; Persson, Egon; Jensen, Ole; Stennicke, Henning R; Andersen, Mette

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) is a serine protease that, after binding to tissue factor (TF), plays a pivotal role in the initiation of blood coagulation. We used hydrogen exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to visualize the details of FVIIa activation by comparing the exchange kinetics of ...... provide novel insights into the cofactor-induced activation of this important protease and reveal the potential for allosteric regulation in the trypsin family of proteases....

  10. Rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, S.H.; Burcher, E.

    1985-11-01

    The specific binding of the /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE), and substance P (BHSP) was examined in crude membrane suspensions and by autoradiography in rat submaxillary gland. All three ligands at 0.1 nM concentrations exhibited binding that was inhibited by tachykinins in a potency rank order of substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than eledoisin greater than kassinin greater than neuromedin K with slope factors essentially equal to unity. All tachykinins were 5 to 10 times more potent in inhibiting BHSK and BHE binding compared to BHSP binding. Autoradiographic visualization of BHSK and BHSP binding sites in the gland revealed extensive labeling of mucous and serous acini. The intensity of labeling was much less for BHSK than for BHSP. The results indicate that the rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites.

  11. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L; Shi, Lei; Gracia, Luis; Raniszewska, Klaudia; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Løland, Claus Juul

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog Leu......T. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopamine and amphetamine, as well as for benztropine-like DAT inhibitors. We validated our models by detailed...... mutagenesis and by trapping the radiolabeled cocaine analog [3H]CFT in the transporter, either by cross-linking engineered cysteines or with an engineered Zn2+-binding site that was situated extracellularly to the predicted common binding pocket. Our data demonstrate the molecular basis for the competitive...

  12. Binding of [125I] Concanavalin A to isolated Langerhans islets of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans islets of rats were isolated using Lacy's collagenase technique and were incubated in vitro. The binding of iodine-labelled Concanavalin A to isolated Langerhans islets was investigated. We were unable to decide whether multiple Concanavalin A binding sites are located on the cell membrane, or whether the Concanavalin A binding sites are negatively influenced via a allosteric protein. Although the secretion mechanism induced by sulfony urea is not influenced by Concanavalin A, enhanced binding of Concanavalin A indicates that the region of identification cannot be identical for glucose and sulfonyl urea. (orig./MG)

  13. Internal binding sites for MSH: Analyses in wild-type and variant Cloudman melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma cells express both external (plasma membrane) and internal binding sites for MSH. Using 125I-beta melanotropin (beta-MSH) as a probe, we report here an extensive series of studies on the biological relevance of these internal sites. Cells were swollen in a hypotonic buffer and lysed, and a particulate fraction was prepared by high-speed centrifugation. This fraction was incubated with 125I-beta-MSH with or without excess nonradioactive beta-MSH in the cold for 2 hours. The material was then layered onto a step-wise sucrose gradient and centrifuged; fractions were collected and counted in a gamma counter or assayed for various enzymatic activities. The following points were established: (1) Specific binding sites for MSH were observed sedimenting at an average density of 50% sucrose in amelanotic cells and at higher densities in melanotic cells. (2) These sites were similar in density to those observed when intact cells were labeled externally with 125I-beta-MSH and then warmed to promote internalization of the hormone. (3) Most of the internal binding sites were not as dense as fully melanized melanosomes. (4) In control experiments, the MSH binding sites were not found in cultured hepatoma cells. (5) Variant melanoma cells, which differed from the wild-type in their responses to MSH, had reduced expression of internal binding sites even though their ability to bind MSH to the outer cell surface appeared normal. (MSH-induced responses included changes in tyrosinase, dopa oxidase, and dopachrome conversion factor activities, melanization, proliferation, and morphology.) (6) Isobutylmethylxanthine, which enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH, also enhanced expression of internal binding sites. The results indicate that expression of internal binding sites for MSH is an important criterion for cellular responsiveness to the hormone

  14. Conversion of MyoD to a Neurogenic Factor: Binding Site Specificity Determines Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Fong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MyoD and NeuroD2, master regulators of myogenesis and neurogenesis, bind to a “shared” E-box sequence (CAGCTG and a “private” sequence (CAGGTG or CAGATG, respectively. To determine whether private-site recognition is sufficient to confer lineage specification, we generated a MyoD mutant with the DNA-binding specificity of NeuroD2. This chimeric mutant gained binding to NeuroD2 private sites but maintained binding to a subset of MyoD-specific sites, activating part of both the muscle and neuronal programs. Sequence analysis revealed an enrichment for PBX/MEIS motifs at the subset of MyoD-specific sites bound by the chimera, and point mutations that prevent MyoD interaction with PBX/MEIS converted the chimera to a pure neurogenic factor. Therefore, redirecting MyoD binding from MyoD private sites to NeuroD2 private sites, despite preserved binding to the MyoD/NeuroD2 shared sites, is sufficient to change MyoD from a master regulator of myogenesis to a master regulator of neurogenesis.

  15. Localization of 125I-insulin binding sites in the rat hypothalamus by quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro autoradiography and computer video densitometry were used to localize and quantify binding of 125I-insulin in the hypothalamus of the rat brain. Highest specific binding was found in the arculate, dorsomedial, suprachiasmatic, paraventricular and periventricular regions. Significantly lower binding was present in the ventromedial nucleus and median eminence. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that insulin modulates the neural regulation of feeding by acting at sites in the hypothalamus. (author)

  16. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of u...

  17. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.;

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurol. disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resoln. x-ray crystal...... structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been detd., providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small mol. antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compd. to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate...... the binding mode of SR48692 and other small mol. compds. to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were obsd., despite...

  18. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  19. Evidence for two distinct binding sites for tau on microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Makrides, Victoria; Massie, Michelle R.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Lew, John

    2004-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau regulates diverse and essential microtubule functions, from the nucleation and promotion of microtubule polymerization to the regulation of microtubule polarity and dynamics, as well as the spacing and bundling of axonal microtubules. Thermodynamic studies show that tau interacts with microtubules in the low- to mid-nanomolar range, implying moderate binding affinity. At the same time, it is well established that microtubule-bound tau does not undergo ex...

  20. Microbes Bind Complement Inhibitor Factor H via a Common Site

    OpenAIRE

    Meri, T.; Amdahl, H.; Lehtinen, M. J.; Hyvärinen, S.; McDowell, J.V.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Meri, S.; Marconi, R.; Goldman, A; Jokiranta, T. S.

    2013-01-01

    To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH). FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic ...

  1. Europium ion as a probe for binding sites to carrageenans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Ana P.; Goncalves, Rogeria R.; Serra, Osvaldo A. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil); Zaniquelli, Maria Elisabete D. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil)], E-mail: medzaniquelli@ffclrp.usp.br; Wong, Kenneth [Laboratorio de Fisico-Quimica, Centro de Pesquisas de Paulinia, Rhodia Brasil, Paulinia, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    Carrageenans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from red algae, present a coil-helix transition and helix aggregation dependence on the type and concentration of counterions. In this study, we focus attention on a mixed valence counterion system: Eu{sup 3+}/Na{sup +} or K{sup +} with different gel-forming carrageenans: kappa, iota, and kappa-2. Results of stationary and time-dependent luminescence showed to be a suitable tool to probe ion binding to both the negatively charged sulfate group and the hydroxyl groups present in the biopolymer. For lower europium ion concentrations, a single longer decay emission lifetime was detected, which was attributed to the binding of europium ion to the carrageenan sulfate groups. An additional decay ascribed to europium binding to hydroxyl groups was observed above a threshold concentration, and this decay was dependent on the carrageenan charge density. Symmetry of the europium ion microenvironment was estimated by the ratio between the intensities of its emission bands, which has been shown to depend on the concentration of europium ions and on the specificity of the monovalent counterion bound to the carrageenan.

  2. Europium ion as a probe for binding sites to carrageenans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrageenans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from red algae, present a coil-helix transition and helix aggregation dependence on the type and concentration of counterions. In this study, we focus attention on a mixed valence counterion system: Eu3+/Na+ or K+ with different gel-forming carrageenans: kappa, iota, and kappa-2. Results of stationary and time-dependent luminescence showed to be a suitable tool to probe ion binding to both the negatively charged sulfate group and the hydroxyl groups present in the biopolymer. For lower europium ion concentrations, a single longer decay emission lifetime was detected, which was attributed to the binding of europium ion to the carrageenan sulfate groups. An additional decay ascribed to europium binding to hydroxyl groups was observed above a threshold concentration, and this decay was dependent on the carrageenan charge density. Symmetry of the europium ion microenvironment was estimated by the ratio between the intensities of its emission bands, which has been shown to depend on the concentration of europium ions and on the specificity of the monovalent counterion bound to the carrageenan

  3. pH dependence of the kinetic properties of allosteric phosphofructokinase from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville-Bonne, D; Bourgain, F; Garel, J R

    1991-06-11

    The pH dependence of the activity of the allosteric phosphofructokinase from Escherichia coli has been studied in the pH range from 6 to 9, in the absence or presence of allosteric effectors. The sigmoidal cooperative saturation of phosphofructokinase by fructose 6-phosphate has been analyzed according to the Hill equation, and the following results have been obtained: (i) the apparent affinity for Fru-6P, as measured by the half-saturating concentration, [Fru-6P]0.5, does not change with pH; (ii) the cooperativity, as measured empirically by the Hill coefficient, nH, increases markedly with pH and reaches a value of 5.5-6 at pH 9; (iii) the catalytic rate constant, kcat, is controlled by the ionization of a critical group which has a pK of 7 in the absence of effector and must be deprotonated for phosphofructokinase to be active. The observation that pH affects both the cooperativity and the maximum velocity suggests that the catalytic efficiency of a given active site could be modified by the binding of fructose 6-phosphate to other remote sites. Finding values of the cooperativity coefficient larger than the number of substrate binding sites indicates that slow conformational changes may occur in phosphofructokinase. The cooperative saturation of phosphofructokinase by fructose 6-phosphate appears more complex than described by the classical concerted model at steady state and could involve two slowly interconverting states which differ in both their turnover rate constants and their affinities for fructose 6-phosphate. The presence of GDP shifts the pK of the critical group which controls kcat from 7 to 6.6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1828369

  4. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  5. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is Functionally Affected by Mutations on Actin Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hai Dong; Wei-Ping Tang; Jia-Yao Liu

    2013-01-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin,and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments.To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L.AtADF1,we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo.Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G-and F-actin binding.The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A,R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding.Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L.plants overexpressing these mutants,we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth.Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional,unless the affinity foractin monomers is also affected.The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding,depolymerization of actin polymers,and therefore in the control of actin organization.

  6. Biomimetic Design Results in a Potent Allosteric Inhibitor of Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase from Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovpen, Yulia V; Conly, Cuylar J T; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2016-02-17

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), an enzyme required for bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis, catalyzes the condensation of pyruvate and β-aspartate semialdehyde (ASA) to form a cyclic product which dehydrates to form dihydrodipicolinate. DHDPS has, for several years, been considered a putative target for novel antibiotics. We have designed the first potent inhibitor of this enzyme by mimicking its natural allosteric regulation by lysine, and obtained a crystal structure of the protein-inhibitor complex at 2.2 Å resolution. This novel inhibitor, which we named "bislysine", resembles two lysine molecules linked by an ethylene bridge between the α-carbon atoms. Bislysine is a mixed partial inhibitor with respect to the first substrate, pyruvate, and a noncompetitive partial inhibitor with respect to ASA, and binds to all forms of the enzyme with a Ki near 200 nM, more than 300 times more tightly than lysine. Hill plots show that the inhibition is cooperative, indicating that the allosteric sites are not independent despite being located on opposite sides of the protein tetramer, separated by approximately 50 Å. A mutant enzyme resistant to lysine inhibition, Y110F, is strongly inhibited by this novel inhibitor, suggesting this may be a promising strategy for antibiotic development. PMID:26836694

  7. Structural Insights into the Allosteric Operation of the Lon AAA+ Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Chu; Su, Shih-Chieh; Su, Ming-Yuan; Liang, Pi-Hui; Feng, Chia-Cheng; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Chang, Chung-I

    2016-05-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease (LonA) is an evolutionarily conserved protease that couples the ATPase cycle into motion to drive substrate translocation and degradation. A hallmark feature shared by AAA+ proteases is the stimulation of ATPase activity by substrates. Here we report the structure of LonA bound to three ADPs, revealing the first AAA+ protease assembly where the six protomers are arranged alternately in nucleotide-free and bound states. Nucleotide binding induces large coordinated movements of conserved pore loops from two pairs of three non-adjacent protomers and shuttling of the proteolytic groove between the ATPase site and a previously unknown Arg paddle. Structural and biochemical evidence supports the roles of the substrate-bound proteolytic groove in allosteric stimulation of ATPase activity and the conserved Arg paddle in driving substrate degradation. Altogether, this work provides a molecular framework for understanding how ATP-dependent chemomechanical movements drive allosteric processes for substrate degradation in a major protein-destruction machine. PMID:27041592

  8. Quantitative autoradiography of 3H-nomifensine binding sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of 3H-nomifensine binding sites in the rat brain has been studied by quantitative autoradiography. The binding of 3H-nomifensine to caudate putamen sections was saturable, specific, of a highly affinity (Kd = 56 nM) and sodium-dependent. The dopamine uptake inhibitors benztropine, nomifensine, cocaine, bupropion and amfonelic acid were the most potent competitors of 3H-nomifensine binding to striatal sections. The highest levels of (benztropine-displaceable) 3H-nomifensine binding sites were found in the caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle and the nucleus accumbens. 6-Hydroxy-dopamine-induced lesion of the ascending dopaminergic bundle resulted in a marked decrease in the 3H-ligand binding in these areas. Moderately high concentrations of the 3H-ligand were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the anteroventral thalamic nucleus, the cingulate cortex, the lateral septum, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the zona incerta and some hypothalamic nuclei. There were low levels of binding sites in the habenula, the dorsolateral geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the ventral tegmental area and the periaqueductal gray matter. These autoradiographic data are consistent with the hypothesis that 3H-nomifensine binds primarily to the presynaptic uptake site for dopamine but also labels the norepinephrine uptake site. 33 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  9. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scatton, B.; Dubois, A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Zahniser, N.R.; Fage, D.

    1985-03-04

    The distribution of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in the rat brain has been studied by quantitative autoradiography. The binding of /sup 3/H-nomifensine to caudate putamen sections was saturable, specific, of a highly affinity (Kd = 56 nM) and sodium-dependent. The dopamine uptake inhibitors benztropine, nomifensine, cocaine, bupropion and amfonelic acid were the most potent competitors of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding to striatal sections. The highest levels of (benztropine-displaceable) /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites were found in the caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle and the nucleus accumbens. 6-Hydroxy-dopamine-induced lesion of the ascending dopaminergic bundle resulted in a marked decrease in the /sup 3/H-ligand binding in these areas. Moderately high concentrations of the /sup 3/H-ligand were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the anteroventral thalamic nucleus, the cingulate cortex, the lateral septum, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the zona incerta and some hypothalamic nuclei. There were low levels of binding sites in the habenula, the dorsolateral geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the ventral tegmental area and the periaqueductal gray matter. These autoradiographic data are consistent with the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-nomifensine binds primarily to the presynaptic uptake site for dopamine but also labels the norepinephrine uptake site. 33 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. Radiolabelling of phoneutria nigriventer spider toxin (Tx1): a tool to study its binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neurotoxin Tx1, isolated from the venom of the South American spider Phoneutria nigriventer produces tail elevation and spastic paralysis of posterior limbs after intracerebral ventricular injection in mice. Tx1 also produces ileum contraction in bioassay. We have investigated the binding of radioiodinated-Tx1 (125 I-Tx1) on the preparation of myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle membrane from guinea pig ileum (MPLM) as a tool to characterize the interaction of this neurotoxin with its site. The neurotoxin Tx1 was radioiodinated with Na125 I by the lactoperoxidase method. 125 I-Tx1 specifically binds to a single class of noninteracting binding sites of high affinity (Kd= 3.5 x 10-10 M) and low capacity (1.2 pmol/mg protein). The specific binding increased in parallel with the protein concentration. In competition experiments the ligands of ionic channels used (sodium, potassium and calcium) did not affect the binding of 125 I-Tx1 to MPLM neither did the cholinergic ligands (hemicholinium-3, hexamethonium, d-tubocurarine and atropine). Another neurotoxin (Tx2-6, one of the isoforms of Tx2 pool) decreased toxin with MPLM and showed that toxin has a specific and saturable binding site in guinea pig ileum and this binding site appears to be related to the Tx2 site. (author)

  11. Protective Action of Resveratrol in Human Skin: Possible Involvement of Specific Receptor Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Bastianetto; Yvan Dumont; Albert Duranton; Freya Vercauteren; Lionel Breton; Rémi Quirion

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol with purported protecting action on various disorders associated with aging. It has been suggested that resveratrol could exert its protective action by acting on specific plasma membrane polyphenol binding sites (Han Y.S., et al. (2006) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 318:238-245). The purpose of this study was to investigate, in human skin, the possible existence of specific binding sites that mediate the protective action of resveratrol. METHODS A...

  12. DETERMINANTS OF LIGAND BINDING AFFINITY AND COOPERATIVITY AT THE GLUT1 ENDOFACIAL SITE

    OpenAIRE

    Robichaud, Trista; Appleyard, Antony N.; Herbert, Richard B.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Carruthers, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Cytochalasin B (CB) and forskolin (FSK) inhibit GLUT1-mediated sugar transport in red cells by binding at or close to the GLUT1 endofacial sugar binding site. Paradoxically, very low concentrations of each of these inhibitors produce a modest stimulation of sugar transport (Cloherty, E. K., Levine, K. B., & Carruthers, A. (2001). The red blood cell glucose transporter presents multiple, nucleotide-sensitive sugar exit sites. Biochemistry, 40(51), 15549–15561). This result is consistent with t...

  13. Partial enterectomy decreases somatostatin-binding sites in residual intestine of rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Colás Escudero, Begoña; Bodega Magro, Guillermo; Sanz, M.; Prieto Villapún, Juan Carlos; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    1988-01-01

    Three weeks after partial enterectomy in the rabbit there was an increased somatostatin concentration and a decreased number of somatostatin-binding sites (without changes in the corresponding affinity values) in the cytosol of the residual intestinal tissue, except in the terminal ileum and the colon. Five weeks after surgery both the somatostatin concentration and the number of somatostatin-binding sites returned towards control values. These results suggest that an increase in bowel ...

  14. Substance P receptor binding sites are expressed by glia in vivo after neuronal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, the authors examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were examined. Specific receptor binding sites for each of these neurotransmitters were identified in the rabbit forebrain but were not detected in the normal optic nerve or tract. In the transected optic nerve and tract, only receptor binding sites for substance P were expressed at detectable levels. The density of substance P receptor binding sites observed in this glial scar is among the highest observed in the rabbit forebrain. Ligand displacement and saturation experiments indicate that the substance P receptor binding site expressed by the glial scar has pharmacological characteristics similar to those of substance P receptors in the rabbit striatum, rat brain, and rat and canine gut. The present study demonstrates that glial cells in vivo express high concentrations of substance P receptor binding sites after transection of retinal ganglion cell axons. Because substance P has been shown to regulate inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues, substance P may also, by analogy, be involved in regulating the glial response to injury in the central nervous system

  15. Flow-cytometric determination of high-density-lipoprotein binding sites on human leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this method, leukocytes were isolated from 6 mL of EDTA-blood by density-gradient centrifugation and subsequently incubated with rhodamine isothiocyanate (RITC)-conjugated high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The receptor-bound conjugate particles were determined by fluorescent flow cytometry and compared with 125I-labeled HDL binding data for the same cells. Human granulocytes express the highest number of HDL binding sites (9.4 x 10(4)/cell), followed by monocytes (7.3 x 10(4)/cell) and lymphocytes (4.0 x 10(4)/cell). Compared with conventional analysis of binding of 125I-labeled HDL in tissue-culture dishes, the present determination revealed significantly lower values for nonspecific binding. In competition studies, the conjugate competes for the same binding sites as 125I-labeled HDL. With the use of tetranitromethane-treated HDL3, which fails to compete for the HDL receptor sites while nonspecific binding is not affected, we could clearly distinguish between 37 degrees C surface binding and specific 37 degrees C uptake of RITC-HDL3, confirming that the HDL receptor leads bound HDL particles into an intracellular pathway rather than acting as a docking type of receptor. Patients with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia showed a significantly higher number of HDL binding sites in the granulocyte population but normal in lymphocytes and monocytes, indicating increased uptake of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins. In patients with familial hypercholesterolemia, HDL binding was increased in all three cell types, indicating increased cholesterol uptake and increased cholesterol synthesis. The present method allows rapid determination of HDL binding sites in leukocytes from patients with various forms of hyper- and dyslipoproteinemias

  16. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.; Robey, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly and...... of 25 mu M, while the IC50 of AP-(27-38)-peptide and AP-(33-38)-peptide are 10 mu M and 2 mu M, respectively, The understanding of the structure and function of active AP peptides will be useful for development of amyloid-targeted diagnostics and therapeutics....

  17. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalevskaya, N.V.; Bokhovchuk, F.M.; Vuister, G.W.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-t

  18. Identifying Barbiturate Binding Sites in a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor with [3H]Allyl m-Trifluoromethyldiazirine Mephobarbital, a Photoreactive Barbiturate

    OpenAIRE

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Chiara, David C.; Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Bruzik, Karol S.; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    At concentrations that produce anesthesia, many barbituric acid derivatives act as positive allosteric modulators of inhibitory GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and inhibitors of excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent research on [3H]R-mTFD-MPAB ([3H]R-5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyldiazirinylphenyl)barbituric acid), a photoreactive barbiturate that is a potent and stereoselective anesthetic and GABAAR potentiator, has identified a second class of intersubunit binding si...

  19. Ca2+ binding sites in calmodulin and troponin C alter interhelical angle movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kunihiko; Toyama, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideo; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Saito, Tsutomu; Iwamoto, Masatoshi; Yeh, Jay Z; Narahashi, Toshio

    2004-03-12

    Molecular dynamics analyses were performed to examine conformational changes in the C-domain of calmodulin and the N-domain of troponin C induced by binding of Ca(2+) ions. Analyses of conformational changes in calmodulin and troponin C indicated that the shortening of the distance between Ca(2+) ions and Ca(2+) binding sites of helices caused widening of the distance between Ca(2+) binding sites of helices on opposite sides, while the hydrophobic side chains in the center of helices hardly moved due to their steric hindrance. This conformational change acts as the clothespin mechanism. PMID:15013750

  20. Localization of binding sites for purified Escherichia coli P fimbriae in the human kidney.

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, T K; Virkola, R; Holthöfer, H

    1986-01-01

    Binding sites in the human kidney for purified P fimbriae of pyelonephritogenic Escherichia coli were determined. The purified KS71A (F7(1)) fimbriae bound only to epithelial elements of the kidney, i.e., to the apical aspect of proximal and distal tubular cells, as well as to the apical and cytoplasmic sites of collecting ducts. In addition, binding was seen at the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney and at the parietal epithelium of the glomeruli. The binding was specifically inhibit...

  1. Solution measurement of DNA curvature in papillomavirus E2 binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Jeff M.; Maher, L. James

    2003-01-01

    ‘Indirect readout’ refers to the proposal that proteins can recognize the intrinsic three-dimensional shape or flexibility of a DNA binding sequence apart from direct protein contact with DNA base pairs. The differing affinities of human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 proteins for different E2 binding sites have been proposed to reflect indirect readout. DNA bending has been observed in X-ray structures of E2 protein–DNA complexes. X-ray structures of three different E2 DNA binding sites revealed di...

  2. Molecular simulations of Taxawallin I inside classical taxol binding site of β-tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inamullah; Nisar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Manzoor; Shah, Hamidullah; Iqbal, Zafar; Saeed, Muhammad; Halimi, Syed Muhammad Ashhad; Kaleem, Waqar Ahmad; Qayum, Mughal; Aman, Akhter; Abdullah, Syed Muhammad

    2011-03-01

    A new taxoid Taxawallin I (1) along with two known taxoids (2-3) were isolated from methanolic bark extract of Taxus wallichiana Zucc. Structural characterization was confirmed by mass and NMR spectral techniques. Taxawallin I exhibited significant in-vitro anticancer activity against HepG2, A498, NCI-H226 and MDR 2780AD cancer lines. Tubulin binding assay was performed to assess its tubulin binding activity. Molecular docking analysis was performed to study the potential binding mode inside the taxol binding site of β-tubulin. PMID:20969934

  3. Crystallographic location of two Zn2+ binding sites in the avian cytochrome bc1 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chicken mitochondrial ubiquinol cytochrome c oxidoreductase (bc1 complex) is inhibited by Zn2+ ions, but with higher Ki (∼3 microm) than the corresponding bovine enzyme. When equilibrated with mother liquor containing 200 mM ZnCl2 for 7 days, the crystalline chicken bc1 complex specifically binds Zn2+ at 4 sites representing two sites on each monomer in the dimer. These two sites are close to the stigmatellin-binding site, taken to be center Qo of the Q-cycle mechanism, and are candidates for the inhibitory site. One binding site is actually in the hydrophobic channel between the Qo site and the bulk lipid phase, and may interfere with quinone binding. The other is in a hydrophilic area between cytochromes b and c1, and might interfere with the egress of protons from the Qo site to the intermembrane aqueous medium. No zinc was bound near the putative proteolytic active site of subunits 1 and 2 (homologous to mitochondrial processing peptidase) under these conditions

  4. Identification of neomycin B-binding site in T box antiterminator model RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anupam, Rajaneesh; Denapoli, Leyna; Muchenditsi, Abigael; Hines, Jennifer V

    2008-04-15

    The T box transcription antitermination mechanism regulates the expression of unique genes in many Gram-positive bacteria by responding, in a magnesium-dependent manner, to uncharged cognate tRNA base pairing with an antiterminator RNA element and other regions of the 5'-untranslated region. Model T box antiterminator RNA is known to bind aminoglycosides, ligands that typically bind RNA in divalent metal ion-binding sites. In this study, enzymatic footprinting and spectroscopic assays were used to identify and characterize the binding site of neomycin B to an antiterminator model RNA. Neomycin B binds the antiterminator bulge nucleotides in an electrostatic-dependent manner and displaces 3-4 monovalent cations, indicating that the antiterminator likely contains a divalent metal ion-binding site. Neomycin B facilitates rather than inhibits tRNA binding indicating that bulge-targeted inhibitors that bind the antiterminator via non-electrostatic interactions may be the more optimal candidates for antiterminator-targeted ligand design. PMID:18329274

  5. In vivo labelling in several rat tissues of 'peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites in several rat tissues were labelled by intravenous injection of [3H]PK 11195 and [3H]RO5-4864. Binding was saturable in all tissues studied and regional distribution paralleled the in vitro binding. A similar potency order of displacing compounds was found in vivo and in vitro PK 11195 > PK 11211 > RO5-4864 > diazepam > dipyridamole > clonazepam. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to examine the effects of pharmacological manipulation on the binding sites in their native state. However, some properties (broader maximum during time course, higher percentage of particulate binding in the brain and independence of temperature) make [3H]PK 11195 the most suitable ligand for this kind of studies. (Auth.)

  6. Effect of cysteamine on cytosolic somatostatin binding sites in rabbit duodenal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Administration of cysteamine in rabbits elicited a rapid depletion of both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin. A significant reduction was observed within 5 min, returning toward control values by 150 min. The depletion of somatostatin was associated with an increase in the binding capacity and a decrease in the affinity of both high- and low-affinity binding sites present in cytosol of duodenal mucosa. Incubation of cytosolic fraction from control rabbits with 1 mM cysteamine did not modify somatostatin binding. Furthermore, addition of cysteamine at the time of binding assay did not affect the integrity of 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin. It is concluded that in vivo administration of cysteamine to rabbits depletes both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin and leads to up-regulation of duodenal somatostatin binding sites

  7. Allosteric Inhibitors of the NS3 Protease from the Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abian, Olga; Vega, Sonia; Sancho, Javier; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) from the hepatitis C virus processes the non-structural region of the viral precursor polyprotein in infected hepatic cells. The NS3 protease activity has been considered a target for drug development since its identification two decades ago. Although specific inhibitors have been approved for clinical therapy very recently, resistance-associated mutations have already been reported for those drugs, compromising their long-term efficacy. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new anti-HCV agents with low susceptibility to resistance-associated mutations. Regarding NS3 protease, two strategies have been followed: competitive inhibitors blocking the active site and allosteric inhibitors blocking the binding of the accessory viral protein NS4A. In this work we exploit the intrinsic Zn+2-regulated plasticity of the protease to identify a new type of allosteric inhibitors. In the absence of Zn+2, the NS3 protease adopts a partially-folded inactive conformation. We found ligands binding to the Zn+2-free NS3 protease, trap the inactive protein, and block the viral life cycle. The efficacy of these compounds has been confirmed in replicon cell assays. Importantly, direct calorimetric assays reveal a low impact of known resistance-associated mutations, and enzymatic assays provide a direct evidence of their inhibitory activity. They constitute new low molecular-weight scaffolds for further optimization and provide several advantages: 1) new inhibition mechanism simultaneously blocking substrate and cofactor interactions in a non-competitive fashion, appropriate for combination therapy; 2) low impact of known resistance-associated mutations; 3) inhibition of NS4A binding, thus blocking its several effects on NS3 protease. PMID:23936097

  8. Resonance energy transfer study on the proximity relationship between the GTP binding site and the rifampicin binding site of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terbium(III) upon complexation with guanosine 5'-triphosphate showed remarkable enhancement of fluorescence emission at 488 and 545 nm when excited at 295 nm. Analysis of the binding data yielded a value for the mean Kd between Tb(III) and GTP of 0.2 μM, with three binding sites for TB(III) on GTP. 31P and 1H NMR measurements revealed that Tb(III) mainly binds the phosphate moiety of GTP. Fluorescence titration of the emission signals of the TbGTP complex with varying concentrations of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase resulted in a Kd values of 4 μM between the TbGTP and the enzyme. It was observed that TbGTP can be incorporated in the place of GTP during E. coli RNA polymerase catalyzed abortive synthesis of dinucleotide tetraphosphate at T7A2 promoter. Both the substrate TbGTP and the inhibitor of the initiation of transcription rifampicin bind to the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase. This allows the measurement of the fluorescence excited-state energy transfer from the donor TbGTP-RNA polymerase to the acceptor rifampicin. Both emission bands of Tb(III) overlap with the rifampicin absorption, and the distances at 50% efficiency of energy transfer were calculated to be 28 and 24 angstrom for the 488- and 545-nm emission bands, respectively. The distance between the substrate binding site and the rifampicin binding site on the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase was measured to be around 30 angstrom. This suggest that the nature of inhibition of transcription by rifampicin is essentially noncompetitive with the substrate

  9. Robust transcriptome-wide discovery of RNA-binding protein binding sites with enhanced CLIP (eCLIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Shishkin, Alexander A; Gelboin-Burkhart, Chelsea; Fang, Mark Y; Sundararaman, Balaji; Blue, Steven M; Nguyen, Thai B; Surka, Christine; Elkins, Keri; Stanton, Rebecca; Rigo, Frank; Guttman, Mitchell; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-06-01

    As RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play essential roles in cellular physiology by interacting with target RNA molecules, binding site identification by UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) of ribonucleoprotein complexes is critical to understanding RBP function. However, current CLIP protocols are technically demanding and yield low-complexity libraries with high experimental failure rates. We have developed an enhanced CLIP (eCLIP) protocol that decreases requisite amplification by ∼1,000-fold, decreasing discarded PCR duplicate reads by ∼60% while maintaining single-nucleotide binding resolution. By simplifying the generation of paired IgG and size-matched input controls, eCLIP improves specificity in the discovery of authentic binding sites. We generated 102 eCLIP experiments for 73 diverse RBPs in HepG2 and K562 cells (available at https://www.encodeproject.org), demonstrating that eCLIP enables large-scale and robust profiling, with amplification and sample requirements similar to those of ChIP-seq. eCLIP enables integrative analysis of diverse RBPs to reveal factor-specific profiles, common artifacts for CLIP and RNA-centric perspectives on RBP activity. PMID:27018577

  10. DNA-MATRIX: a tool for constructing transcription factor binding sites Weight matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash Singh,

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable effort to date, DNA transcription factor binding sites prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for the researchers. Currently the genome wide transcription factor binding sites prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence or weight matrix. Although there are known transcription factor binding sites pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a DNA-MATRIX tool for searching putative transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences. DNA-MATRIX uses the simple heuristic approach for weight matrix construction, which can be transformed into different formats as per the requirement of researcher’s for further genome wide prediction and therefore provides the possibility to identify the conserved known DNA binding sites in the coregulated genes and also to search for a great variety of different regulatory binding patterns. The user may construct and save specific weight or frequency matrices in different formats derived through user selected set of known motif sequences.

  11. Oligomycin frames a common drug-binding site in the ATP synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Jindrich; Osowski, Daniel; Walters, D. Eric; Mueller, David M. (Rosalind)

    2015-12-01

    We report the high-resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) crystal structure of oligomycin bound to the subunit c10 ring of the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Oligomycin binds to the surface of the c10 ring making contact with two neighboring molecules at a position that explains the inhibitory effect on ATP synthesis. The carboxyl side chain of Glu59, which is essential for proton translocation, forms an H-bond with oligomycin via a bridging water molecule but is otherwise shielded from the aqueous environment. The remaining contacts between oligomycin and subunit c are primarily hydrophobic. The amino acid residues that form the oligomycin-binding site are 100% conserved between human and yeast but are widely different from those in bacterial homologs, thus explaining the differential sensitivity to oligomycin. Prior genetics studies suggest that the oligomycin-binding site overlaps with the binding site of other antibiotics, including those effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thereby frames a common 'drug-binding site.' We anticipate that this drug-binding site will serve as an effective target for new antibiotics developed by rational design.

  12. Subtilases and metal binding - the weak binding site of sutilisins revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; MacAuley, K.; Brzozowski, A. M.; Borchert, T. V.; Wilson, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2007), s. 28. ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics /6./. 29.03.2007-31.03.2007, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1K05008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : subtilisin-like proteases * metal binding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  13. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Manuela; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA) represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK), but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated) unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data. PMID:27092480

  14. Shift in the Equilibrium between On and Off States of the Allosteric Switch in Ras-GppNHp Affected by Small Molecules and Bulk Solvent Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, Genevieve; Buhrman, Greg; Mattos, Carla (NCSU)

    2012-08-31

    Ras GTPase cycles between its active GTP-bound form promoted by GEFs and its inactive GDP-bound form promoted by GAPs to affect the control of various cellular functions. It is becoming increasingly apparent that subtle regulation of the GTP-bound active state may occur through promotion of substates mediated by an allosteric switch mechanism that induces a disorder to order transition in switch II upon ligand binding at an allosteric site. We show with high-resolution structures that calcium acetate and either dithioerythritol (DTE) or dithiothreitol (DTT) soaked into H-Ras-GppNHp crystals in the presence of a moderate amount of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can selectively shift the equilibrium to the 'on' state, where the active site appears to be poised for catalysis (calcium acetate), or to what we call the 'ordered off' state, which is associated with an anticatalytic conformation (DTE or DTT). We also show that the equilibrium is reversible in our crystals and dependent on the nature of the small molecule present. Calcium acetate binding in the allosteric site stabilizes the conformation observed in the H-Ras-GppNHp/NOR1A complex, and PEG, DTE, and DTT stabilize the anticatalytic conformation observed in the complex between the Ras homologue Ran and Importin-{beta}. The small molecules are therefore selecting biologically relevant conformations in the crystal that are sampled by the disordered switch II in the uncomplexed GTP-bound form of H-Ras. In the presence of a large amount of PEG, the ordered off conformation predominates, whereas in solution, in the absence of PEG, switch regions appear to remain disordered in what we call the off state, unable to bind DTE.

  15. Identification of candidate transcription factor binding sites in the cattle genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A resource that provides candidate transcription factor binding sites does not currently exist for cattle. Such data is necessary, as predicted sites may serve as excellent starting locations for future 'omics studies to develop transcriptional regulation hypotheses. In order to generate this resour...

  16. Characterization of an intracellular hyaluronic acid binding site in isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    125I-HA, prepared by chemical modification at the reducing sugar, specifically binds to rat hepatocytes in suspension or culture. Intact hepatocytes have relatively few surface 125I-HA binding sites and show low specific binding. However, permeabilization of hepatocytes with the nonionic detergent digitonin results in increased specific 125I-HA binding (45-65%) and a very large increase in the number of specific 125I-HA binding sites. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium 125I-HA binding to permeabilized hepatocytes in suspension at 4 degrees C indicates a Kd = 1.8 x 10(-7) M and 1.3 x 10(6) molecules of HA (Mr approximately 30,000) bound per cell at saturation. Hepatocytes in primary culture for 24 h show the same affinity but the total number of HA molecules bound per cell at saturation decreases to approximately 6.2 x 10(5). Increasing the ionic strength above physiologic concentrations decreases 125I-HA binding to permeable cells, whereas decreasing the ionic strength above causes an approximately 4-fold increase. The divalent cation chelator EGTA does not prevent binding nor does it release 125I-HA bound in the presence of 2 mM CaCl2, although higher divalent cation concentrations stimulate 125I-HA binding. Ten millimolar CaCl2 or MnCl2 increases HA binding 3-6-fold compared to EGTA-treated cells. Ten millimolar MgCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2 increased HA binding by 2-fold. The specific binding of 125I-HA to digitonin-treated hepatocytes at 4 degrees C increased greater than 10-fold at pH 5.0 as compared to pH 7

  17. Characterization of an intracellular hyaluronic acid binding site in isolated rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, S.J.; Raja, R.H.; Weigel, P.H. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

    1990-11-13

    125I-HA, prepared by chemical modification at the reducing sugar, specifically binds to rat hepatocytes in suspension or culture. Intact hepatocytes have relatively few surface 125I-HA binding sites and show low specific binding. However, permeabilization of hepatocytes with the nonionic detergent digitonin results in increased specific 125I-HA binding (45-65%) and a very large increase in the number of specific 125I-HA binding sites. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium 125I-HA binding to permeabilized hepatocytes in suspension at 4 degrees C indicates a Kd = 1.8 x 10(-7) M and 1.3 x 10(6) molecules of HA (Mr approximately 30,000) bound per cell at saturation. Hepatocytes in primary culture for 24 h show the same affinity but the total number of HA molecules bound per cell at saturation decreases to approximately 6.2 x 10(5). Increasing the ionic strength above physiologic concentrations decreases 125I-HA binding to permeable cells, whereas decreasing the ionic strength above causes an approximately 4-fold increase. The divalent cation chelator EGTA does not prevent binding nor does it release 125I-HA bound in the presence of 2 mM CaCl2, although higher divalent cation concentrations stimulate 125I-HA binding. Ten millimolar CaCl2 or MnCl2 increases HA binding 3-6-fold compared to EGTA-treated cells. Ten millimolar MgCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2 increased HA binding by 2-fold. The specific binding of 125I-HA to digitonin-treated hepatocytes at 4{degrees}C increased greater than 10-fold at pH 5.0 as compared to pH 7.

  18. Autoradiographic localization of (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in the rat adrenal gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, D.P.; Maciejewski, A.R.; Printz, M.P.

    1985-03-01

    To gain greater insight into sites of action of circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) within the adrenal, we have localized the (/sup 125/I)-Ang II binding site using in vitro autoradiography. Autoradiograms were generated either by apposition of isotope-sensitive film or with emulsion-coated coverslips to slide-mounted adrenal sections labeled in vitro with 1.0 nM (/sup 125/I)-Ang II. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that Ang II binding sites were concentrated in a thin band in the outer cortex (over the cells of the zona glomerulosa) and in the adrenal medulla, which at higher power was seen as dense patches. Few sites were evident in the inner cortex. The existence of Ang II binding sites in the adrenal medulla was confirmed by conventional homogenate binding techniques which revealed a single class of high affinity Ang II binding site (K/sub d/ . 0.7nM, B/sub max/ . 168.7 fmol/mg). These results suggest that the adrenal medulla may be a target for direct receptor-mediated actions of Ang II.

  19. Regression applied to protein binding site prediction and comparison with classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gala Jean-Luc

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural genomics centers provide hundreds of protein structures of unknown function. Therefore, developing methods enabling the determination of a protein function automatically is imperative. The determination of a protein function can be achieved by studying the network of its physical interactions. In this context, identifying a potential binding site between proteins is of primary interest. In the literature, methods for predicting a potential binding site location generally are based on classification tools. The aim of this paper is to show that regression tools are more efficient than classification tools for patches based binding site predictors. For this purpose, we developed a patches based binding site localization method usable with either regression or classification tools. Results We compared predictive performances of regression tools with performances of machine learning classifiers. Using leave-one-out cross-validation, we showed that regression tools provide better predictions than classification ones. Among regression tools, Multilayer Perceptron ranked highest in the quality of predictions. We compared also the predictive performance of our patches based method using Multilayer Perceptron with the performance of three other methods usable through a web server. Our method performed similarly to the other methods. Conclusion Regression is more efficient than classification when applied to our binding site localization method. When it is possible, using regression instead of classification for other existing binding site predictors will probably improve results. Furthermore, the method presented in this work is flexible because the size of the predicted binding site is adjustable. This adaptability is useful when either false positive or negative rates have to be limited.

  20. ATP-site binding inhibitor effectively targets mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Jayson; Shannon, Craig; Mohan, Avinash; Laurent, Dimitri; Murali, Raj; Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena

    2016-03-01

    The PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling axis is central to the transformed phenotype of glioblastoma (GBM) cells, due to frequent loss of tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10). The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is present in two cellular multi-protein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which have distinct subunit composition, substrates and mechanisms of action. Targeting the mTOR protein is a promising strategy for GBM therapy. However, neither of these complexes is fully inhibited by the allosteric inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin or its analogs. Herein, we provide evidence that the combined inhibition of mTORC1/2, using the ATP-competitive binding inhibitor PP242, would effectively suppress GBM growth and dissemination as compared to an allosteric binding inhibitor of mTOR. GBM cells treated with PP242 demonstrated significantly decreased activation of mTORC1 and mTORC2, as shown by reduced phosphorylation of their substrate levels, p70 S6KThr389 and AKTSer473, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, insulin induced activation of these kinases was abrogated by pretreatment with PP242 as compared with rapamycin. Unlike rapamycin, PP242 modestly activates extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2), as shown by expression of pERKThr202/Tyr204. Cell proliferation and S-phase entry of GBM cells was significantly suppressed by PP242, which was more pronounced compared to rapamycin treatment. Lastly, PP242 significantly suppressed the migration of GBM cells, which was associated with a change in cellular behavior rather than cytoskeleton loss. In conclusion, these results underscore the potential therapeutic use of the PP242, a novel ATP-competitive binding inhibitor of mTORC1/2 kinase, in suppression of GBM growth and dissemination. PMID:26719046

  1. Endogenously generated plasmin at the vascular wall injury site amplifies lysine binding site-dependent plasminogen accumulation in microthrombi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemostasis; however, it remains unclear how and when the system is triggered to induce thrombolysis. Using intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the process of plasminogen binding to laser-induced platelet-rich microthrombi generated in the mesenteric vein of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. The accumulation of GFP-expressing platelets as well as exogenously infused Alexa Fluor 568-labeled Glu-plasminogen (Glu-plg on the injured vessel wall was assessed by measuring the increase in the corresponding fluorescence intensities. Glu-plg accumulated in a time-dependent manner in the center of the microthrombus, where phosphatidylserine is exposed on platelet surfaces and fibrin formation takes place. The rates of binding of Glu-plg in the presence of ε-aminocaproic acid and carboxypeptidase B, as well as the rates of binding of mini-plasminogen lacking kringle domains 1-4 and lysine binding sites, were significantly lower than that of Glu-plg alone, suggesting that the binding was dependent on lysine binding sites. Furthermore, aprotinin significantly suppressed the accumulation of Glu-plg, suggesting that endogenously generated plasmin activity is a prerequisite for the accumulation. In spite of the endogenous generation of plasmin and accumulation of Glu-plg in the center of microthrombi, the microthrombi did not change in size during the 2-hour observation period. When human tissue plasminogen activator was administered intravenously, Glu-plg further accumulated and the microthrombi were lysed. Glu-plg appeared to accumulate in the center of microthrombi in the early phase of microthrombus formation, and plasmin activity and lysine binding sites were required for this accumulation.

  2. Transcriptional stimulation via SC site of Bombyx sericin-1 gene through an interaction with a DNA binding protein SGF-3.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuno, K.; Takiya, S; Hui, C C; Suzuki, T.; Fukuta, M.; Ueno, K.; Suzuki, Y

    1990-01-01

    Three protein binding sites have been identified in the upstream region of the sericin-1 gene. Two of them, SA and SC sites, have been known as putative cis-acting elements. Using synthetic oligonucleotides of these binding sites, it was found that silk gland factor-1 (SGF-1) binds to the SA site, and silk gland factor-3 (SGF-3) binds to the SC site but not to a mutated SC site, SCM. Tissue distribution of the two factors was different. SGF-3 is present abundantly in the middle silk gland (MS...

  3. Autoradiographic demonstration of oxytocin-binding sites in the macula densa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckel, M.E.; Freund-Mercier, M.J. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Strasbourg (France))

    1989-08-01

    Specific oxytocin (OT)-binding sites were localized in the rat kidney with use of a selective {sup 125}I-labeled OT antagonist ({sup 125}I-OTA). High concentrations of OT binding sites were detected on the juxtaglomerular apparatus with use of the conventional film autoradiographic technique. No labeling occurred on other renal structures. The cellular localization of the OT binding sites within the juxtaglomerular apparatus was studied in light microscope autoradiography, on semithin sections from paraformaldehyde-fixed kidney slices incubated in the presence of {sup 125}I-OTA. These preparations revealed selective labeling of the macula densa, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. Control experiments showed first that {sup 125}I-OTA binding characteristics were not noticeably altered by prior paraformaldehyde fixation of the kidneys and second that autoradiographic detection of the binding sites was not impaired by histological treatments following binding procedures. In view of the role of the macula densa in the tubuloglomerular feedback, the putative OT receptors of this structure might mediate the stimulatory effect of OT on glomerular filtration.

  4. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the α subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K d of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site

  5. Putative hAPN receptor binding sites in SARS_CoV spike protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUXiao-Jing; LUOCheng; LinJian-Cheng; HAOPei; HEYou-Yu; GUOZong-Ming; QINLei; SUJiong; LIUBo-Shu; HUANGYin; NANPeng; LIChuan-Song; XIONGBin; LUOXiao-Min; ZHAOGuo-Ping; PEIGang; CHENKai-Xian; SHENXu; SHENJian-Hua; ZOUJian-Ping; HEWei-Zhong; SHITie-Liu; ZHONGYang; JIANGHua-Liang; LIYi-Xue

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To obtain the information of ligand-receptor binding between thd S protein of SARS_CoV and CD13, identify the possible interacting domains or motifs related to binding sites, and provide clues for studying the functions of SARS proteins and designing anti-SARS drugs and vaccines. METHODS: On the basis of comparative genomics, the homology search, phylogenetic analyses, and multi-sequence alignment were used to predict CD13 related interacting domains and binding sites sites in the S protein of SARS_CoV. Molecular modeling and docking simulation methods were employed to address the interaction feature between CD13 and S protein of SARS_CoV in validating the bioinformatics predictions. RESULTS:Possible binding sites in the SARS_CoV S protein to CD13 have been mapped out by using bioinformatics analysis tools. The binding for one protein-protein interaction pair (D757-R761 motif of the SARS_CoV S protein to P585-A653 domain of CD13) has been simulated by molecular modeling and docking simulation methods. CONCLUSION:CD13 may be a possible receptor of the SARS_CoV S protein which may be associated with the SARS infection. This study also provides a possible strategy for mapping the possible binding receptors of the proteins in a genome.

  6. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  7. A high affinity binding site for cytokinin to a particulate fraction in carrot suspension cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrot suspension cells contain one class of high affinity binding sites for cytokinin in an 80,000 X g particulate fraction. Binding of [8-14C] - benzylaminopurine (BA) to this fraction assayed by a sedimentation method was found to be optimal at ph 6.0 and thermolabile. Specific binding was proved in competition experiments in which labelled BA was displaced by increasing concentrations of unlabelled BA. Scatchard plots of these results displayed a dissociation constant (Ksub(d)) of 33+- 6 n.M. The number of binding sites found was 1,100+-120 fmol g-1 fresh weight which is equivalent to a frequency of 23,000 binding sites per cell. The specificity of the binding sites to cytokinins and their analogues followed the sequence BA with highest affinity, kinetin, zeatin, iP and adenine. The cytokinin ribosides generally had a lower affinity than their cytokinin bases, and the affinity decreased in the order [9 R] BA, [9 R] iP, [i R]Z, [9 R] A. (author)

  8. Cloning and characterisation of a nuclear, site specific ssDNA binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, M P; Russchen, B; Snippe, L; Wijnholds, J; Ab, G

    1995-07-11

    Estradiol inducible, liver-specific expression of the apoVLDL II gene is mediated through the estrogen receptor and a variety of other DNA-binding proteins. In the present study we report the cloning and characterisation of a single-strand DNA binding protein that interacts with the lower strand of a complex regulatory site, which includes the major estrogen responsive element and a site that resembles the rat albumin site D (apoVLDL II site D). Based on its binding specificity determined with electro-mobility shift assays, the protein is named single-strand D-box binding factor (ssDBF). Analysis of the deduced 302 amino acid sequence revealed that the protein belongs to the heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B family (hnRNP A/B) and resembles other known eukaryotic single-strand DNA binding proteins. Transient transfection experiments in a chicken liver cell-line showed that the protein represses estrogen-induced transcription. A protein with similar binding characteristics is present in liver nuclear extract. The relevance of the occurrence of this protein to the expression of the apoVLDL II gene is discussed. PMID:7630716

  9. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism by which delta9 tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5'-Trimethylammonium-delta8THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-8THC modified on the 5' carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of [3H]-5'-trimethylammonium-delta-8THC ([3H]TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. [3H]TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of [3H]TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight

  10. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiur Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 and diazepam as site-2 specific probe. Results: Different analysis of binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin suggested two sets of association constants: high affinity association constant (k1 = 11.0 x 105 M-1 with low capacity (n1 = 2 and low affinity association (k2 = 4.0×105 M-1 constant with high capacity (n2 = 8 at pH 7.4 and 27°C. During concurrent administration of palmitic acid and metoprolol succinate in presence or absence of ranitidine or diazepam, it was found that palmitic acid displaced metoprolol succinate from its binding site on BSA resulting reduced binding of metoprolol succinate to BSA. The increment in free fraction of metoprolol succinate was from 26.27% to 55.08% upon the addition of increased concentration of palmitic acid at a concentration of 0×10-5 M to 16×10-5 M. In presence of ranitidine and diazepam, palmitic acid further increases the free fraction of metoprolol succinate from 33.05% to 66.95% and 40.68% to 72.88%, respectively. Conclusion: This data provided the evidence of interaction at higher concentration of palmitic acid at the binding sites on BSA, which might change the pharmacokinetic properties of metoprolol succinate.

  11. A nuclear magnetic resonance-based structural rationale for contrasting stoichiometry and ligand binding site(s) in fatty acid-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Estephan, Rima; Yang, Xiaomin; Vela, Adriana; Wang, Hsin; Bernard, Cédric; Stark, Ruth E

    2011-03-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is a 14 kDa cytosolic polypeptide, differing from other family members in the number of ligand binding sites, the diversity of bound ligands, and the transfer of fatty acid(s) to membranes primarily via aqueous diffusion rather than direct collisional interactions. Distinct two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals indicative of slowly exchanging LFABP assemblies formed during stepwise ligand titration were exploited, without determining the protein-ligand complex structures, to yield the stoichiometries for the bound ligands, their locations within the protein binding cavity, the sequence of ligand occupation, and the corresponding protein structural accommodations. Chemical shifts were monitored for wild-type LFABP and an R122L/S124A mutant in which electrostatic interactions viewed as being essential to fatty acid binding were removed. For wild-type LFABP, the results compared favorably with the data for previous tertiary structures of oleate-bound wild-type LFABP in crystals and in solution: there are two oleates, one U-shaped ligand that positions the long hydrophobic chain deep within the cavity and another extended structure with the hydrophobic chain facing the cavity and the carboxylate group lying close to the protein surface. The NMR titration validated a prior hypothesis that the first oleate to enter the cavity occupies the internal protein site. In contrast, (1)H and (15)N chemical shift changes supported only one liganded oleate for R122L/S124A LFABP, at an intermediate location within the protein cavity. A rationale based on protein sequence and electrostatics was developed to explain the stoichiometry and binding site trends for LFABPs and to put these findings into context within the larger protein family. PMID:21226535

  12. Arylfluorosulfates Inactivate Intracellular Lipid Binding Protein(s) through Chemoselective SuFEx Reaction with a Binding Site Tyr Residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wentao; Dong, Jiajia; Plate, Lars; Mortenson, David E; Brighty, Gabriel J; Li, Suhua; Liu, Yu; Galmozzi, Andrea; Lee, Peter S; Hulce, Jonathan J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Saez, Enrique; Powers, Evan T; Wilson, Ian A; Sharpless, K Barry; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-06-15

    Arylfluorosulfates have appeared only rarely in the literature and have not been explored as probes for covalent conjugation to proteins, possibly because they were assumed to possess high reactivity, as with other sulfur(VI) halides. However, we find that arylfluorosulfates become reactive only under certain circumstances, e.g., when fluoride displacement by a nucleophile is facilitated. Herein, we explore the reactivity of structurally simple arylfluorosulfates toward the proteome of human cells. We demonstrate that the protein reactivity of arylfluorosulfates is lower than that of the corresponding aryl sulfonyl fluorides, which are better characterized with regard to proteome reactivity. We discovered that simple hydrophobic arylfluorosulfates selectively react with a few members of the intracellular lipid binding protein (iLBP) family. A central function of iLBPs is to deliver small-molecule ligands to nuclear hormone receptors. Arylfluorosulfate probe 1 reacts with a conserved tyrosine residue in the ligand-binding site of a subset of iLBPs. Arylfluorosulfate probes 3 and 4, featuring a biphenyl core, very selectively and efficiently modify cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), both in vitro and in living cells. The X-ray crystal structure of the CRABP2-4 conjugate, when considered together with binding site mutagenesis experiments, provides insight into how CRABP2 might activate arylfluorosulfates toward site-specific reaction. Treatment of breast cancer cells with probe 4 attenuates nuclear hormone receptor activity mediated by retinoic acid, an endogenous client lipid of CRABP2. Our findings demonstrate that arylfluorosulfates can selectively target single iLBPs, making them useful for understanding iLBP function. PMID:27191344

  13. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  14. Isolation of active site and antibody-binding fragments of human erythrocyte transglutaminase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytically active human erythrocyte transglutaminase (TGase) was purified using an immunoaffinity column prepared from a monoclonal antibody to guinea pig liver TGase. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by incorporation of iodo[14C]acetamide to the level of 1 mole per 1 mole of TGase. The 14C-labeled TGase was digested with cyanogen bromide, subjected to HPLC, and four pure peptides were isolated with molecular weights ranging from 3-22 KDa. Only one of the peptides was radiolabeled and characterized as an active site peptide of 10 KDa. Another peptide of 18 KDa was identified as a monoclonal antibody-binding domain of TGase. Although the active site and the antibody-binding domain were present on different cyanogen bromide fragments, the mouse anti-TGase inhibited 100% of TGase activity. The results suggest that the antibody-binding site is not located on the enzyme active site sequence, but that the three dimensional space configuration of the antigen-antibody complex hinders substrate binding to the active site. The radiolabeled active site cysteine residue was not found in the N-terminal 21 amino acids of the 10 KDa peptide. Additional fragments of the active site peptide are currently being analyzed

  15. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, 3H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a 3H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of 3H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A4, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each

  16. Mercury Binding Sites in Thiol-Functionalized Mesostructured Silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica with anhydrous compositions of (SiO2)1-x(LSiO1.5)x, where L is a mercaptopropyl group and x is the fraction of functionalized framework silicon centers, are effective trapping agents for the removal of mercuric(II) ions from water. In the present work, we investigate the mercury-binding mechanism for representative thiol-functionalized mesostructures by atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and by Raman spectroscopy. The mesostructures with wormhole framework structures and compositions corresponding to x = 0.30 and 0.50 were prepared by direct assembly methods in the presence of a structure-directing amine porogen. PDF analyses of five mercury-loaded compositions with Hg/S ratios of 0.50-1.30 provided evidence for the bridging of thiolate sulfur atoms to two metal ion centers and the formation of chain structures on the pore surfaces. We find no evidence for Hg-O bonds and can rule out oxygen coordination of the mercury at greater than the 10% level. The relative intensities of the PDF peaks corresponding to Hg-S and Hg-Hg atomic pairs indicate that the mercury centers cluster on the functionalized surfaces by virtue of thiolate bridging, regardless of the overall mercury loading. However, the Raman results indicate that the complexation of mercury centers by thiolate depends on the mercury loading. At low mercury loadings (Hg/S (le) 0.5), the dominant species is an electrically neutral complex in which mercury most likely is tetrahedrally coordinated to bridging thiolate ligands, as in Hg(SBut)2. At higher loadings (Hg/S 1.0-1.3), mercury complex cations predominate, as evidenced by the presence of charge-balancing anions (nitrate) on the surface. This cationic form of bound mercury is assigned a linear coordination to two bridging thiolate ligands.

  17. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  18. Comparison of Different Ranking Methods in Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Liu, Qi; Kang, Hong; Cao, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruixin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, although many ligand-binding site prediction methods have been developed, there has still been a great demand to improve the prediction accuracy and compare different prediction algorithms to evaluate their performances. In this work, in order to improve the performance of the protein-ligand binding site prediction method presented in our former study, a comparison of different binding site ranking lists was studied. Four kinds of properties, i.e., pocket size, distance from the protein centroid, sequence conservation and the number of hydrophobic residues, have been chosen as the corresponding ranking criterion respectively. Our studies show that the sequence conservation information helps to rank the real pockets with the most successful accuracy compared to others. At the same time, the pocket size and the distance of binding site from the protein centroid are also found to be helpful. In addition, a multi-view ranking aggregation method, which combines the information among those four properties, was further applied in our study. The results show that a better performance can be achieved by the aggregation of the complementary properties in the prediction of ligand-binding sites. PMID:22942732

  19. Imatinib binding to human serum albumin modulates heme association and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muzio, Elena; Polticelli, Fabio; Trezza, Viviana; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2014-10-15

    Imatinib, an inhibitor of the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase, is approximately 95% bound to plasma proteins, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) being the primary carrier. However, human serum albumin (HSA) may represent the secondary carrier of imatinib in pathological states characterized by low AGP levels, such as pancreatic cancer, hepatic cirrhosis, hepatitis, hyperthyroidism, nephrotic syndrome, malnutrition, and cachexia. Here, thermodynamics of imatinib binding to full-length HSA and its recombinant Asp1-Glu382 truncated form (containing only the FA1, FA2, FA6, and FA7 binding sites; trHSA), in the absence and presence of ferric heme (heme-Fe(III)), and the thermodynamics of heme-Fe(III) binding to HSA and trHSA, in the absence and presence of imatinib, has been investigated. Moreover, the effect of imatinib on kinetics of peroxynitrite detoxification by ferric human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) and ferric truncated human serum heme-albumin (trHSA-heme-Fe(III)) has been explored. All data were obtained at pH 7.0, and 20.0 °C and 37.0 °C. Imatinib binding to the FA7 site of HSA and trHSA inhibits allosterically heme-Fe(III) association to the FA1 site and vice versa, according to linked functions. Moreover, imatinib binding to the secondary FA2 site of HSA-heme-Fe(III) inhibits allosterically peroxynitrite detoxification. Docking simulations and local structural comparison with other imatinib-binding proteins support functional data indicating the preferential binding of imatinib to the FA1 and FA7 sites of HSA, and to the FA2 and FA7 sites of HSA-heme-Fe(III). Present results highlight the allosteric coupling of the FA1, FA2, and FA7 sites of HSA, and may be relevant in modulating ligand binding and reactivity properties of HSA in vivo. PMID:25057771

  20. Allosteric Optical Control of a Class B G-Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Johnston, Natalie R; von Ohlen, Yorrick; Meyer-Berg, Helena; Jones, Ben J; Bloom, Stephen R; Rutter, Guy A; Trauner, Dirk; Hodson, David J

    2016-05-01

    Allosteric regulation promises to open up new therapeutic avenues by increasing drug specificity at G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, drug discovery efforts are at present hampered by an inability to precisely control the allosteric site. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and testing of PhotoETP, a light-activated positive allosteric modulator of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), a class B GPCR involved in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in humans. PhotoETP potentiates Ca(2+) , cAMP, and insulin responses to glucagon-like peptide-1 and its metabolites following illumination of cells with blue light. PhotoETP thus provides a blueprint for the production of small-molecule class B GPCR allosteric photoswitches, and may represent a useful tool for understanding positive cooperativity at the GLP-1R. PMID:27059784

  1. Modular insulators: genome wide search for composite CTCF/thyroid hormone receptor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Weth

    Full Text Available The conserved 11 zinc-finger protein CTCF is involved in several transcriptional mechanisms, including insulation and enhancer blocking. We had previously identified two composite elements consisting of a CTCF and a TR binding site at the chicken lysozyme and the human c-myc genes. Using these it has been demonstrated that thyroid hormone mediates the relief of enhancer blocking even though CTCF remains bound to its binding site. Here we wished to determine whether CTCF and TR combined sites are representative of a general feature of the genome, and whether such sites are functional in regulating enhancer blocking. Genome wide analysis revealed that about 18% of the CTCF regions harbored at least one of the four different palindromic or repeated sequence arrangements typical for the binding of TR homodimers or TR/RXR heterodimers. Functional analysis of 10 different composite elements of thyroid hormone responsive genes was performed using episomal constructs. The episomal system allowed recapitulating CTCF mediated enhancer blocking function to be dependent on poly (ADP-ribose modification and to mediate histone deacetylation. Furthermore, thyroid hormone sensitive enhancer blocking could be shown for one of these new composite elements. Remarkably, not only did the regulation of enhancer blocking require functional TR binding, but also the basal enhancer blocking activity of CTCF was dependent on the binding of the unliganded TR. Thus, a number of composite CTCF/TR binding sites may represent a subset of other modular CTCF composite sites, such as groups of multiple CTCF sites or of CTCF/Oct4, CTCF/Kaiso or CTCF/Yy1 combinations.

  2. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular TH-naloxone binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-07-27

    The binding of the opiate antagonist TH-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, TH-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables.

  3. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular 3H-naloxone binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of the opiate antagonist 3H-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, 3H-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables

  4. The Adenovirus Type 3 Dodecahedron's RGD Loop Comprises an HSPG Binding Site That Influences Integrin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lortat-Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human type 3 adenovirus dodecahedron (a virus like particle made of twelve penton bases features the ability to enter cells through Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans (HSPGs and integrins interaction and is used as a versatile vector to deliver DNA or proteins. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the pseudoviral particle with Heparan Sulphate (HS oligosaccharide shows an extradensity on the RGD loop. A set of mutants was designed to study the respective roles of the RGD sequence (RGE mutant and of a basic sequence located just downstream. Results showed that the RGE mutant binding to the HS deficient CHO-2241 cells was abolished and unexpectedly, mutation of the basic sequence (KQKR to AQAS dramatically decreased integrin recognition by the viral pseudoparticle. This basic sequence is thus involved in integrin docking, showing a close interplay between HSPGs and integrin receptors.

  5. Discovering structural motifs using a structural alphabet: Application to magnesium-binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Carmay

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many metalloproteins, sequence motifs characteristic of metal-binding sites have not been found or are so short that they would not be expected to be metal-specific. Striking examples of such metalloproteins are those containing Mg2+, one of the most versatile metal cofactors in cellular biochemistry. Even when Mg2+-proteins share insufficient sequence homology to identify Mg2+-specific sequence motifs, they may still share similarity in the Mg2+-binding site structure. However, no structural motifs characteristic of Mg2+-binding sites have been reported. Thus, our aims are (i to develop a general method for discovering structural patterns/motifs characteristic of ligand-binding sites, given the 3D protein structures, and (ii to apply it to Mg2+-proteins sharing 2+-structural motifs are identified as recurring structural patterns. Results The structural alphabet-based motif discovery method has revealed the structural preference of Mg2+-binding sites for certain local/secondary structures: compared to all residues in the Mg2+-proteins, both first and second-shell Mg2+-ligands prefer loops to helices. Even when the Mg2+-proteins share no significant sequence homology, some of them share a similar Mg2+-binding site structure: 4 Mg2+-structural motifs, comprising 21% of the binding sites, were found. In particular, one of the Mg2+-structural motifs found maps to a specific functional group, namely, hydrolases. Furthermore, 2 of the motifs were not found in non metalloproteins or in Ca2+-binding proteins. The structural motifs discovered thus capture some essential biochemical and/or evolutionary properties, and hence may be useful for discovering proteins where Mg2+ plays an important biological role. Conclusion The structural motif discovery method presented herein is general and can be applied to any set of proteins with known 3D structures. This new method is timely considering the increasing number of structures for

  6. Outer membrane protein binding sites of complement component 3 during opsonization of Haemophilus influenzae.

    OpenAIRE

    Hetherington, S V; Patrick, C C; Hansen, E J

    1993-01-01

    Complement component 3 (C3) binding to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is an important step in host defense against invasive disease, but the details of this process remain poorly understood. We have shown that the P1 and P2 outer membrane proteins (OMPs) serve as binding sites for C3 on serum-opsonized Hib. Whole-cell lysates of opsonized Hib were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the resolved proteins were transferred to nitrocellulose. Immunobl...

  7. A Novel Alignment-Free Method for Comparing Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Minli Xu; Zhengchang Su

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM) or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between ...

  8. Novel Phosphotidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Binding Sites on Focal Adhesion Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Feng; Blake Mertz

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a protein tyrosine kinase that is ubiquitously expressed, recruited to focal adhesions, and engages in a variety of cellular signaling pathways. Diverse cellular responses, such as cell migration, proliferation, and survival, are regulated by FAK. Prior to activation, FAK adopts an autoinhibited conformation in which the FERM domain binds the kinase domain, blocking access to the activation loop and substrate binding site. Activation of FAK occurs through confor...

  9. The binding sites for benztropines and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Heidi Bisgaard; Larsen, M Andreas B; Mazier, Sonia;

    2011-01-01

    Analogs of benztropines (BZTs) are potent inhibitors of the dopamine transporter (DAT) but are less effective than cocaine as behavioral stimulants. As a result, there have been efforts to evaluate these compounds as leads for potential medication for cocaine addiction. Here we use computational...... with a larger decrease in the affinity for BZT than for JHW007. Summarized, our data suggest that BZTs display a classical competitive binding mode with binding sites overlapping those of cocaine and dopamine....

  10. Structural proof of a dimeric positive modulator bridging two identical AMPA receptor-binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Birgitte Høiriis; Harpsøe, Kasper; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen;

    2007-01-01

    have dramatically increased potencies, more than three orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding monomers. Dimer (R,R)-2a was cocrystallized with the GluR2-S1S2J construct, and an X-ray crystallographic analysis showed (R,R)-2a to bridge two identical binding pockets on two neighboring GluR2...... subunits. Thus, this is biostructural evidence of a homomeric dimer bridging two identical receptor-binding sites....

  11. Functional identification of catalytic metal ion binding sites within RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Hougland

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The viability of living systems depends inextricably on enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions. For many enzymes in this class, including several ribozymes, divalent metal ions serve as obligate cofactors. Understanding how metal ions mediate catalysis requires elucidation of metal ion interactions with both the enzyme and the substrate(s. In the Tetrahymena group I intron, previous work using atomic mutagenesis and quantitative analysis of metal ion rescue behavior identified three metal ions (MA, MB, and MC that make five interactions with the ribozyme substrates in the reaction's transition state. Here, we combine substrate atomic mutagenesis with site-specific phosphorothioate substitutions in the ribozyme backbone to develop a powerful, general strategy for defining the ligands of catalytic metal ions within RNA. In applying this strategy to the Tetrahymena group I intron, we have identified the pro-SP phosphoryl oxygen at nucleotide C262 as a ribozyme ligand for MC. Our findings establish a direct connection between the ribozyme core and the functionally defined model of the chemical transition state, thereby extending the known set of transition-state interactions and providing information critical for the application of the recent group I intron crystallographic structures to the understanding of catalysis.

  12. A Unified Model of the GABA(A) Receptor Comprising Agonist and Benzodiazepine Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning; Bergmann, Rikke; Sørensen, Pernille Louise; Sander, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    -gated chloride channel (GluCl) from C. elegans and includes additional structural information from the prokaryotic ligand-gated ion channel ELIC in a few regions. Available mutational data of the binding sites are well explained by the model and the proposed ligand binding poses. We suggest a GABA binding mode...... similar to the binding mode of glutamate in the GluCl X-ray structure. Key interactions are predicted with residues a1R66, b2T202, a1T129, b2E155, b2Y205 and the backbone of b2S156. Muscimol is predicted to bind similarly, however, with minor differences rationalized with quantum mechanical energy...

  13. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoto, Phillip C.; Martin, Bryan T.; Wright, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways.

  14. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoto, Phillip C; Martin, Bryan T; Wright, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways. PMID:27353957

  15. Molecular docking characterizes substrate-binding sites and efflux modulation mechanisms within P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo J; Ferreira, Maria-José U; dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2013-07-22

    P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) is one of the best characterized ABC transporters, often involved in the multidrug-resistance phenotype overexpressed by several cancer cell lines. Experimental studies contributed to important knowledge concerning substrate polyspecificity, efflux mechanism, and drug-binding sites. This information is, however, scattered through different perspectives, not existing a unifying model for the knowledge available for this transporter. Using a previously refined structure of murine Pgp, three putative drug-binding sites were hereby characterized by means of molecular docking. The modulator site (M-site) is characterized by cross interactions between both Pgp halves herein defined for the first time, having an important role in impairing conformational changes leading to substrate efflux. Two other binding sites, located next to the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer, were identified as the substrate-binding H and R sites by matching docking and experimental results. A new classification model with the ability to discriminate substrates from modulators is also proposed, integrating a vast number of theoretical and experimental data. PMID:23802684

  16. Characterization of specific binding sites for [3H](d)-N-allylnormetazocine in rat brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding of [3H](d)-N-allylnormetazocine ([3H](d)-NANM) to rat brain membranes is stereospecific, reversible, and saturable (Bmax . 260 fmol/mg of protein) and manifests moderately high affinity (Kd . 20 nM). The rank order of potency among opioidbenzomorphans and phencyclidine (PCP) analogs for competition for [3H](d)-NANM-binding sites is as follows: (d)-NANM . PCP-3-OH greater than (d)-cyclazocine greater than N-ethylphenylcyclohexylamine greater than PCP greater than (l)-cyclazocine . dextrorphan greater than (d/l)-ethylketocyclazocine greater than (d/l)-bremazocine greater than (1)-NANM greater than 1-phenylcyclohexylamine greater than levorphanol. Other opioid ligands, relatively selective for each of the types of opioid binding sites other than sigma, such as morphine (mu), H-Tyr-D-Ala(Me)Phe-NH-CH2-OH (mu), D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (delta), tifluadom (kappa), and U 50488 (kappa) as well as etorphine and naloxone were all unable to compete with [3H](d)-NANM for specific binding even at a concentration of 1 microM. Regional distribution studies of [3H](d)-NANM-binding sites show high density in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and amygdala and low density in cerebellum and nonfrontal neocortex membranes of the rat brain. These binding sites are very sensitive to protein-modifying enzymes and reagents such as trypsin and N-ethylmaleimide and to heat denaturation. These results provide direct biochemical evidence for the existence of distinct (d)-NANM-binding sites in rat brain

  17. Rational design of a protein that binds integrin αvβ3 outside the ligand binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Yin, Lu; Yang, Jenny J.; Lee, Hsiauwei; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Yan, Chunli; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Wang, Siming; Ma, Cheng; Sun, Li; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 expression is altered in various diseases and has been proposed as a drug target. Here we use a rational design approach to develop a therapeutic protein, which we call ProAgio, that binds to integrin αvβ3 outside the classical ligand-binding site. We show ProAgio induces apoptosis of integrin αvβ3-expressing cells by recruiting and activating caspase 8 to the cytoplasmic domain of integrin αvβ3. ProAgio also has anti-angiogenic activity and strongly inhibits growth of tumour xenografts, but does not affect the established vasculature. Toxicity analyses demonstrate that ProAgio is not toxic to mice. Our study reports a new integrin-targeting agent with a unique mechanism of action, and provides a template for the development of integrin-targeting therapeutics. PMID:27241473

  18. Interaction of triprolidine hydrochloride with serum albumins: thermodynamic and binding characteristics, and influence of site probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, B; Hegde, Ashwini H; Kalanur, Shankara S; Katrahalli, Umesha; Seetharamappa, J

    2011-04-01

    The interaction between triprolidine hydrochloride (TRP) to serum albumins viz. bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by spectroscopic methods. The experimental results revealed the static quenching mechanism in the interaction of TRP with protein. The number of binding sites close to unity for both TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA indicated the presence of single class of binding site for the drug in protein. The binding constant values of TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA were observed to be 4.75 ± 0.018 × 10(3) and 2.42 ± 0.024 × 10(4)M(-1) at 294 K, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces played the major role in the binding of TRP to proteins. The distance of separation between the serum albumin and TRP was obtained from the Förster's theory of non-radioactive energy transfer. The metal ions viz., K(+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) were found to influence the binding of the drug to protein. Displacement experiments indicated the binding of TRP to Sudlow's site I on both BSA and HSA. The CD, 3D fluorescence spectra and FT-IR spectral results revealed the changes in the secondary structure of protein upon interaction with TRP. PMID:21215548

  19. Distribution of [3H]diadenosine tetraphosphate binding sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of the diadenosine tetraphosphate high-affinity binding sites has been studied in rat brain by an autoradiographic method using [3H]diadenosine tetraphosphate as the ligand. The binding characteristics are comparable to those described in studies performed on rat brain synaptosomes. White matter is devoid of specific binding. The range of binding site densities in gray matter varies from 3 to 15 fmol/mg of tissue, exhibiting a widespread but heterogeneous distribution. The highest densities correspond to the seventh cranial nerve, medial superior olive, pontine nuclei, glomerular and external plexiform layers of the olfactory bulb, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellar cortex. Intermediate density levels of binding correspond to different cortical areas, several nuclei of the amygdala, and the oriens and pyramidal layers of the hippocampal formation.The localization of diadenosine tetraphosphate binding sites in the brain may provide information on the places where diadenosine polyphosphate compounds can be expected to function in the central nervous system. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Wnts grasp the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 at two distinct binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, Krisztina; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2015-10-01

    Wnts have a structure resembling a hand with "thumb" and "index" fingers that grasp the cysteine rich domains of Frizzled receptors at two distinct binding sites. In the present work we show that the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 is also bound by Wnts at two sites. Using C-terminal domains of Wnt5a and Wnt7a and arginine-scanning mutagenesis of the WIF domain we demonstrate that, whereas the N-terminal, lipid-modified "thumb" of Wnts interacts with the alkyl-binding site of the WIF domain, the C-terminal domain of Wnts (Wnt-CTD) binds to a surface on the opposite side of the WIF domain. PMID:26342861

  1. Site-Specific Oligonucleotide Binding Represses Transcription of the Human c-myc Gene in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Michael; Czernuszewicz, Graznya; Postel, Edith H.; Flint, S. Jane; Hogan, Michael E.

    1988-07-01

    A 27-base-long DNA oligonucleotide was designed that binds to duplex DNA at a single site within the 5' end of the human c-myc gene, 115 base pairs upstream from the transcription origin P1. On the basis of the physical properties of its bound complex, it was concluded that the oligonucleotide forms a colinear triplex with the duplex binding site. By means of an in vitro assay system, it was possible to show a correlation between triplex formation at -115 base pairs and repression of c-myc transcription. The possibility is discussed that triplex formation (site-specific RNA binding to a DNA duplex) could serve as the basis for an alternative program of gene control in vivo.

  2. PREDICTION OF ANTIGENIC AND BINDING SITES OF NEUROTOXIN 23 OF SCORPION (LYCHASMUCRONACTUS SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharati K Thosare

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of antigenic and binding site of protein is highly desirable for the design of vaccines and immunodiagnostics. The present exercise deals with a prediction of antigenic as well as binding sites of neurotoxin 23 of Lychasmucronactus. This species of scorpion having diverse molecules of toxic peptide, the peptide neurotoxin 23 is 96 amino acids long of which 23 to 96 specifically code for neurotoxin. The total of 27 such different ligand binding residue were identified by ConSurf and Raptor X server. The web tool Ellipro which implements Modeller and Jmol viewer, predicted and visualized the linear and discontinuous antibody epitopes ofneurotoxin 23 protein sequence.Thus the information discussed here provides a clue for understanding antigenic site and molecular function of neurotoxin 23.

  3. Ivermectin binding sites in human and invertebrate Cys-loop receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynagh, Timothy; Lynch, Joseph W

    2012-08-01

    Ivermectin is a gold standard antiparasitic drug that has been used successfully to treat billions of humans, livestock and pets. Until recently, the binding site on its Cys-loop receptor target had been a mystery. Recent protein crystal structures, site-directed mutagenesis data and molecular modelling now explain how ivermectin binds to these receptors and reveal why it is selective for invertebrate members of the Cys-loop receptor family. Combining this with emerging genomic information, we are now in a position to predict species sensitivity to ivermectin and better understand the molecular basis of ivermectin resistance. An understanding of the molecular structure of the ivermectin binding site, which is formed at the interface of two adjacent subunits in the transmembrane domain of the receptor, should also aid the development of new lead compounds both as anthelmintics and as therapies for a wide variety of human neurological disorders. PMID:22677714

  4. Receptor binding site-deleted foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus protects cattle from FMD.

    OpenAIRE

    McKenna, T S; Lubroth, J; Rieder, E; Baxt, B; Mason, P W

    1995-01-01

    Binding of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) to cells requires an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence in the capsid protein VP1. We have genetically engineered an FMDV in which these three amino acids have been deleted, producing a virus particle which is unable to bind to cells. Cattle vaccinated with these receptor binding site-deleted virions were protected from disease when challenged with a virulent virus, demonstrating that these RGD-deleted viruses could serve as the basis ...

  5. Sodium-dependent reorganization of the sugar-binding site of SGLT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirayama, Bruce A; Loo, Donald D F; Díez-Sampedro, Ana;

    2007-01-01

    The sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter SGLT1 undergoes a series of voltage- and ligand-induced conformational changes that underlie the cotransport mechanism. In this study we describe how the binding of external Na changes the conformation of the sugar-binding domain, exposing residues that...... involved in transport. Arranging the four TMHs to account for Na-dependent accessibility and potential for sugar interaction allows us to propose a testable model for the SGLT1 sugar binding site. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov-20...

  6. Novel benzimidazole inhibitors bind to a unique site in the kinesin spindle protein motor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Payal R; Shipps, Gerald W; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Smith, Catherine K; Chuang, Cheng-Chi; Sanden, David; Basso, Andrea D; Vilenchik, Lev; Gray, Kimberly; Annis, D Allen; Nickbarg, Elliott; Ma, Yao; Lahue, Brian; Herbst, Ronald; Le, Hung V

    2010-09-28

    Affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) screening of kinesin spindle protein (KSP) followed by enzyme inhibition studies and temperature-dependent circular dichroism (TdCD) characterization was utilized to identify a series of benzimidazole compounds. This series also binds in the presence of Ispinesib, a known anticancer KSP inhibitor in phase I/II clinical trials for breast cancer. TdCD and AS-MS analyses support simultaneous binding implying existence of a novel non-Ispinesib binding pocket within KSP. Additional TdCD analyses demonstrate direct binding of these compounds to Ispinesib-resistant mutants (D130V, A133D, and A133D + D130V double mutant), further strengthening the hypothesis that the compounds bind to a distinct binding pocket. Also importantly, binding to this pocket causes uncompetitive inhibition of KSP ATPase activity. The uncompetitive inhibition with respect to ATP is also confirmed by the requirement of nucleotide for binding of the compounds. After preliminary affinity optimization, the benzimidazole series exhibited distinctive antimitotic activity as evidenced by blockade of bipolar spindle formation and appearance of monoasters. Cancer cell growth inhibition was also demonstrated either as a single agent or in combination with Ispinesib. The combination was additive as predicted by the binding studies using TdCD and AS-MS analyses. The available data support the existence of a KSP inhibitory site hitherto unknown in the literature. The data also suggest that targeting this novel site could be a productive strategy for eluding Ispinesib-resistant tumors. Finally, AS-MS and TdCD techniques are general in scope and may enable screening other targets in the presence of known drugs, clinical candidates, or tool compounds that bind to the protein of interest in an effort to identify potency-enhancing small molecules that increase efficacy and impede resistance in combination therapy. PMID:20718440

  7. Structure-Based Statistical Mechanical Model Accounts for the Causality and Energetics of Allosteric Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnera, Enrico; Berezovsky, Igor N

    2016-03-01

    Allostery is one of the pervasive mechanisms through which proteins in living systems carry out enzymatic activity, cell signaling, and metabolism control. Effective modeling of the protein function regulation requires a synthesis of the thermodynamic and structural views of allostery. We present here a structure-based statistical mechanical model of allostery, allowing one to observe causality of communication between regulatory and functional sites, and to estimate per residue free energy changes. Based on the consideration of ligand free and ligand bound systems in the context of a harmonic model, corresponding sets of characteristic normal modes are obtained and used as inputs for an allosteric potential. This potential quantifies the mean work exerted on a residue due to the local motion of its neighbors. Subsequently, in a statistical mechanical framework the entropic contribution to allosteric free energy of a residue is directly calculated from the comparison of conformational ensembles in the ligand free and ligand bound systems. As a result, this method provides a systematic approach for analyzing the energetics of allosteric communication based on a single structure. The feasibility of the approach was tested on a variety of allosteric proteins, heterogeneous in terms of size, topology and degree of oligomerization. The allosteric free energy calculations show the diversity of ways and complexity of scenarios existing in the phenomenology of allosteric causality and communication. The presented model is a step forward in developing the computational techniques aimed at detecting allosteric sites and obtaining the discriminative power between agonistic and antagonistic effectors, which are among the major goals in allosteric drug design. PMID:26939022

  8. Autoradiographic distribution of 125I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanin (GAL) binding sites in coronal sections of the rat brain were demonstrated using autoradiographic methods. Scatchard analysis of 125I-GAL binding to slide-mounted tissue sections revealed saturable binding to a single class of receptors with a Kd of approximately 0.2 nM. 125I-GAL binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the following areas: prefrontal cortex, the anterior nuclei of the olfactory bulb, several nuclei of the amygdaloid complex, the dorsal septal area, dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the ventral pallidum, the internal medullary laminae of the thalamus, medial pretectal nucleus, nucleus of the medial optic tract, borderline area of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus adjacent to the spinal trigeminal tract, the substantia gelatinosa and the superficial layers of the dorsal spinal cord. Moderate binding was observed in the piriform, periamygdaloid, entorhinal, insular cortex and the subiculum, the nucleus accumbens, medial forebrain bundle, anterior hypothalamic, ventromedial, dorsal premamillary, lateral and periventricular thalamic nuclei, the subzona incerta, Forel's field H1 and H2, periventricular gray matter, medial and superficial gray strata of the superior colliculus, dorsal parts of the central gray, peripeduncular area, the interpeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra zona compacta, ventral tegmental area, the dorsal and ventral parabrachial and parvocellular reticular nuclei. The preponderance of GAL-binding in somatosensory as well as in limbic areas suggests a possible involvement of GAL in a variety of brain functions

  9. Disruption of NAD~+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manali; Phadke; Natalia; Krynetskaia; Anurag; Mishra; Carlos; Barrero; Salim; Merali; Scott; A; Gothe; Evgeny; Krynetskiy

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GAPDH),and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS:We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters(diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching(FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding.RESULTS:Using MALDI-TOF analysis,we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94,S98,and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH,we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH inthe nuclear fractions of A549,HCT116,and SW48 cancer cel s after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis,and estimated enzymatic properties,intranuclear distribution,and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+(Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99 I vs 57 ± 11.1 μmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP(fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION:Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners.

  10. Computational prediction of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minli; Su, Zhengchang

    2009-01-01

    Background Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), also known as catabolite gene activator protein (CAP), is an important transcriptional regulator widely distributed in many bacteria. The biological processes under the regulation of CRP are highly diverse among different groups of bacterial species. Elucidation of CRP regulons in cyanobacteria will further our understanding of the physiology and ecology of this important group of microorganisms. Previously, CRP has been experimentally studied in only two cyanobacterial strains: Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120; therefore, a systematic genome-scale study of the potential CRP target genes and binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes is urgently needed. Results We have predicted and analyzed the CRP binding sites and regulons in 12 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes using a highly effective cis-regulatory binding site scanning algorithm. Our results show that cyanobacterial CRP binding sites are very similar to those in E. coli; however, the regulons are very different from that of E. coli. Furthermore, CRP regulons in different cyanobacterial species/ecotypes are also highly diversified, ranging from photosynthesis, carbon fixation and nitrogen assimilation, to chemotaxis and signal transduction. In addition, our prediction indicates that crp genes in modern cyanobacteria are likely inherited from a common ancestral gene in their last common ancestor, and have adapted various cellular functions in different environments, while some cyanobacteria lost their crp genes as well as CRP binding sites during the course of evolution. Conclusion The CRP regulons in cyanobacteria are highly diversified, probably as a result of divergent evolution to adapt to various ecological niches. Cyanobacterial CRPs may function as lineage-specific regulators participating in various cellular processes, and are important in some lineages. However, they are dispensable in some other lineages. The loss of CRPs in these species

  11. Computational prediction of cAMP receptor protein (CRP binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhengchang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP, also known as catabolite gene activator protein (CAP, is an important transcriptional regulator widely distributed in many bacteria. The biological processes under the regulation of CRP are highly diverse among different groups of bacterial species. Elucidation of CRP regulons in cyanobacteria will further our understanding of the physiology and ecology of this important group of microorganisms. Previously, CRP has been experimentally studied in only two cyanobacterial strains: Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120; therefore, a systematic genome-scale study of the potential CRP target genes and binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes is urgently needed. Results We have predicted and analyzed the CRP binding sites and regulons in 12 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes using a highly effective cis-regulatory binding site scanning algorithm. Our results show that cyanobacterial CRP binding sites are very similar to those in E. coli; however, the regulons are very different from that of E. coli. Furthermore, CRP regulons in different cyanobacterial species/ecotypes are also highly diversified, ranging from photosynthesis, carbon fixation and nitrogen assimilation, to chemotaxis and signal transduction. In addition, our prediction indicates that crp genes in modern cyanobacteria are likely inherited from a common ancestral gene in their last common ancestor, and have adapted various cellular functions in different environments, while some cyanobacteria lost their crp genes as well as CRP binding sites during the course of evolution. Conclusion The CRP regulons in cyanobacteria are highly diversified, probably as a result of divergent evolution to adapt to various ecological niches. Cyanobacterial CRPs may function as lineage-specific regulators participating in various cellular processes, and are important in some lineages. However, they are dispensable in some other lineages. The

  12. FunFOLDQA: a quality assessment tool for protein-ligand binding site residue predictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Roche

    Full Text Available The estimation of prediction quality is important because without quality measures, it is difficult to determine the usefulness of a prediction. Currently, methods for ligand binding site residue predictions are assessed in the function prediction category of the biennial Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP experiment, utilizing the Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC and Binding-site Distance Test (BDT metrics. However, the assessment of ligand binding site predictions using such metrics requires the availability of solved structures with bound ligands. Thus, we have developed a ligand binding site quality assessment tool, FunFOLDQA, which utilizes protein feature analysis to predict ligand binding site quality prior to the experimental solution of the protein structures and their ligand interactions. The FunFOLDQA feature scores were combined using: simple linear combinations, multiple linear regression and a neural network. The neural network produced significantly better results for correlations to both the MCC and BDT scores, according to Kendall's τ, Spearman's ρ and Pearson's r correlation coefficients, when tested on both the CASP8 and CASP9 datasets. The neural network also produced the largest Area Under the Curve score (AUC when Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC analysis was undertaken for the CASP8 dataset. Furthermore, the FunFOLDQA algorithm incorporating the neural network, is shown to add value to FunFOLD, when both methods are employed in combination. This results in a statistically significant improvement over all of the best server methods, the FunFOLD method (6.43%, and one of the top manual groups (FN293 tested on the CASP8 dataset. The FunFOLDQA method was also found to be competitive with the top server methods when tested on the CASP9 dataset. To the best of our knowledge, FunFOLDQA is the first attempt to develop a method that can be used to assess ligand binding site

  13. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  14. Identification of Covalent Binding Sites Targeting Cysteines Based on Computational Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Danfeng; Tian, Haozhong; Jiao, Yu; Shi, Zhihao; Ran, Ting; Liu, Haichun; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Qiao, Xin; Pan, Jing; Yin, Lingfeng; Zhou, Weineng; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2016-09-01

    Covalent drugs have attracted increasing attention in recent years due to good inhibitory activity and selectivity. Targeting noncatalytic cysteines with irreversible inhibitors is a powerful approach for enhancing pharmacological potency and selectivity because cysteines can form covalent bonds with inhibitors through their nucleophilic thiol groups. However, most human kinases have multiple noncatalytic cysteines within the active site; to accurately predict which cysteine is most likely to form covalent bonds is of great importance but remains a challenge when designing irreversible inhibitors. In this work, FTMap was first applied to check its ability in predicting covalent binding site defined as the region where covalent bonds are formed between cysteines and irreversible inhibitors. Results show that it has excellent performance in detecting the hot spots within the binding pocket, and its hydrogen bond interaction frequency analysis could give us some interesting instructions for identification of covalent binding cysteines. Furthermore, we proposed a simple but useful covalent fragment probing approach and showed that it successfully predicted the covalent binding site of seven targets. By adopting a distance-based method, we observed that the closer the nucleophiles of covalent warheads are to the thiol group of a cysteine, the higher the possibility that a cysteine is prone to form a covalent bond. We believe that the combination of FTMap and our distance-based covalent fragment probing method can become a useful tool in detecting the covalent binding site of these targets. PMID:27483186

  15. Cortisol decreases 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding sites in the duck thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, A.M.S.; Liu, Z.M.; Tang, F.; Pang, S.F. (Univ. of Hong Kong (China))

    1994-03-01

    The immunosuppressive effect of chronic glucocorticoid treatment on 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding in the duck thymus was studied. Two-week-old ducks were injected intraperitoneally with either 1 mg of cortisol per day (experimental group) or an equivalent volume of vehicle (control group) in the middle of the light period for seven days. 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding assays were performed on thymic membranes. Cortisol injection reduced the body weight gain, size of the bursa of Fabricius and absolute weights of the primary lymphoid organs but had no effect on the spleen weights. The relative weights of the spleen were increased while those of the primary lymphoid organs were unchanged. The density of the thymus 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding sites was decreased while the affinity was not affected. The modulation of the thymic 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding sites by changes in the immune status of the duck suggests that these binding sites represent physiologically relevant melatonin receptors and that melatonin exerts its action on the lymphoid tissues directly. The authors findings support the hypothesis that the thymus is the target site for the immunomodulatory interactions between the pineal melatonin and the adrenal steroids. A possible inhibitory influence of adrenal steroids on the immuno-enhancing effect of melatonin is also suggested. 34 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. The nucleotide-binding site of Aquifex aeolicus LpxC

    OpenAIRE

    Buetow, Lori; Dawson, Alice; Hunter, William N.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of recombinant Aquifex aeolicus UDP-3-O-acyl-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase (LpxC) in complex with UDP has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Previous studies have characterized the binding sites of the fatty-acid and sugar moieties of the substrate, UDP-(3-O-hydroxymyristoyl)-N-­acetylglucosamine, but not that of the nucleotide. The uracil-binding site is constructed from amino acids that are highly conserved across species. Hydrophobic associations with the Phe155 and ...

  17. Increased number of ouabain binding sites in lymphocytes from borderline hypertensives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Pedersen, K E; Klitgaard, N A;

    1989-01-01

    Lymphocytes were used as a cellular model for the in vitro measurements of maximal ouabain binding sites in order to assess any changes in young men at increased risk of developing essential hypertension, and to analyse whether any such changes were associated to borderline hypertension and...... triglyceride, and serum cholesterol, which may influence the number of ouabain binding sites. Only BMI entered the stepwise model. These results indicate the presence of an increased number of sodium-potassium pumps in lymphocytes from borderline hypertensives. This difference may be attributed to the blood...

  18. Determination of the binding sites for oxaliplatin on insulin using mass spectrometry-based approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charlotte; Sprenger, Richard R.; Stürup, Stefan; Højrup, Peter

    2011-01-01

    fragmentation of the intact insulin-oxaliplatin adduct using nano-electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nESI-Q-ToF-MS), the major binding site was assigned to histidine5 on the insulin B chain. In order to simplify the interpretation of the mass spectrum, the disulphide bridges...... were reduced. This led to the additional identification of cysteine6 on the A chain as a binding site along with histidine5 on the B chain. Digestion of insulin-oxaliplatin with endoproteinase Glu-C (GluC) followed by reduction led to the formation of five peptides with Pt(dach) attached...

  19. Characterization of Genomic Vitamin D Receptor Binding Sites through Chromatin Looping and Opening

    OpenAIRE

    Seuter, Sabine; Neme, Antonio; Carlberg, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a transcription factor that mediates the genomic effects of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Genome-wide there are several thousand binding sites and hundreds of primary 1,25(OH)2D3 target genes, but their functional relation is largely elusive. In this study, we used ChIA-PET data of the transcription factor CTCF in combination with VDR ChIP-seq data, in order to map chromatin domains containing VDR binding sites. In total, we found 1,599 such VDR cont...

  20. Tristetraprolin binding site atlas in the macrophage transcriptome reveals a switch for inflammation resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlyarov, Vitaly; Fallmann, Jörg; Ebner, Florian; Huemer, Jakob; Sneezum, Lucy; Ivin, Masa; Kreiner, Kristina; Tanzer, Andrea; Vogl, Claus; Hofacker, Ivo; Kovarik, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Precise regulation of mRNA decay is fundamental for robust yet not exaggerated inflammatory responses to pathogens. However, a global model integrating regulation and functional consequences of inflammation-associated mRNA decay remains to be established. Using time-resolved high-resolution RNA binding analysis of the mRNA-destabilizing protein tristetraprolin (TTP), an inflammation-limiting factor, we qualitatively and quantitatively characterize TTP binding positions in the transcriptome of immunostimulated macrophages. We identify pervasive destabilizing and non-destabilizing TTP binding, including a robust intronic binding, showing that TTP binding is not sufficient for mRNA destabilization. A low degree of flanking RNA structuredness distinguishes occupied from silent binding motifs. By functionally relating TTP binding sites to mRNA stability and levels, we identify a TTP-controlled switch for the transition from inflammatory into the resolution phase of the macrophage immune response. Mapping of binding positions of the mRNA-stabilizing protein HuR reveals little target and functional overlap with TTP, implying a limited co-regulation of inflammatory mRNA decay by these proteins. Our study establishes a functionally annotated and navigable transcriptome-wide atlas (http://ttp-atlas.univie.ac.at) of cis-acting elements controlling mRNA decay in inflammation. PMID:27178967

  1. Characterization of pancreatic somatostatin binding sites with a 125I-somatostatin 28 analog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatostatin binding to guinea pig pancreatic acinar cell plasma membranes was characterized with an iodinated stable analog of somatostatin 28 (S28): 125I-[Leu8,DTrp22,Tyr25]S28. The binding was highly dependent on calcium ions. In 0.2 mM free Ca2+ medium, binding at 37 degrees C was saturable, slowly reversible and exhibited a single class of high affinity binding sites (KD = 0.05 +/- 0.01 nM, Bmax = 157 +/- 33 fmol/mg protein). Dissociation of bound radioactivity occurred with biphasic kinetics. Rate of dissociation increased when dissociation was measured at a time before equilibrium binding was reached. In 30 nM free Ca2+ medium, binding affinity and maximal binding capacity were decreased by about 4-fold. Decreasing calcium concentrations increased the amount of rapidly dissociating form of the receptor. Somatostatin 14 antagonist, Des AA1,2[AzaAla4-5,DTrp8, Phe12-13]-somatostatin was active at the membrane level in inhibiting the binding. We conclude that using 125I-[Leu8,DTrp22,Tyr25]S28 as radioligand allows us to characterize a population of specific somatostatin receptors which are not different from those we previously described with the radioligand 125I-[Tyr11]-somatostatin. Somatostatin receptors could exist in two interconvertible forms. Calcium ions are an essential component in the regulation of the conformational change of somatostatin receptors

  2. Germline V-genes sculpt the binding site of a family of antibodies neutralizing human cytomegalovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Christy A.; Bryson, Steve; McLean, Gary R.; Creagh, A. Louise; Pai, Emil F.; Schrader, John W. (Toronto); (UBC)

    2008-10-17

    Immunoglobulin genes are generated somatically through specialized mechanisms resulting in a vast repertoire of antigen-binding sites. Despite the stochastic nature of these processes, the V-genes that encode most of the antigen-combining site are under positive evolutionary selection, raising the possibility that V-genes have been selected to encode key structural features of binding sites of protective antibodies against certain pathogens. Human, neutralizing antibodies to human cytomegalovirus that bind the AD-2S1 epitope on its gB envelope protein repeatedly use a pair of well-conserved, germline V-genes IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Here, we present crystallographic, kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the binding site of such an antibody and that of its primary immunoglobulin ancestor. These show that these germline V-genes encode key side chain contacts with the viral antigen and thereby dictate key structural features of the hypermutated, high-affinity neutralizing antibody. V-genes may thus encode an innate, protective immunological memory that targets vulnerable, invariant sites on multiple pathogens.

  3. Structural Features of Ion Transport and Allosteric Regulation in Sodium-Calcium Exchanger (NCX) Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giladi, Moshe; Tal, Inbal; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) proteins extrude Ca(2+) from the cell to maintain cellular homeostasis. Since NCX proteins contribute to numerous physiological and pathophysiological events, their pharmacological targeting has been desired for a long time. This intervention remains challenging owing to our poor understanding of the underlying structure-dynamic mechanisms. Recent structural studies have shed light on the structure-function relationships underlying the ion-transport and allosteric regulation of NCX. The crystal structure of an archaeal NCX (NCX_Mj) along with molecular dynamics simulations and ion flux analyses, have assigned the ion binding sites for 3Na(+) and 1Ca(2+), which are being transported in separate steps. In contrast with NCX_Mj, eukaryotic NCXs contain the regulatory Ca(2+)-binding domains, CBD1 and CBD2, which affect the membrane embedded ion-transport domains over a distance of ~80 Å. The Ca(2+)-dependent regulation is ortholog, isoform, and splice-variant dependent to meet physiological requirements, exhibiting either a positive, negative, or no response to regulatory Ca(2+). The crystal structures of the two-domain (CBD12) tandem have revealed a common mechanism involving a Ca(2+)-driven tethering of CBDs in diverse NCX variants. However, dissociation kinetics of occluded Ca(2+) (entrapped at the two-domain interface) depends on the alternative-splicing segment (at CBD2), thereby representing splicing-dependent dynamic coupling of CBDs. The HDX-MS, SAXS, NMR, FRET, equilibrium (45)Ca(2+) binding and stopped-flow techniques provided insights into the dynamic mechanisms of CBDs. Ca(2+) binding to CBD1 results in a population shift, where more constraint conformational states become highly populated without global conformational changes in the alignment of CBDs. This mechanism is common among NCXs. Recent HDX-MS studies have demonstrated that the apo CBD1 and CBD2 are stabilized by interacting with each other, while Ca(2+) binding to CBD1

  4. Spatial determinants of the alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, Siana M; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-01-01

    The biological functions of RNA-protein complexes are, for the most part, poorly defined. Here, we describe experiments that are aimed at understanding the functional significance of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-coat protein binding, an interaction that parallels the initiation of viral RNA replication. Peptides representing the RNA-binding domain of the viral coat protein are biologically active in initiating replication and bind to a 39-nt 3'-terminal RNA with a stoichiometry of two peptides: 1 RNA. To begin to understand how RNA-peptide interactions induce RNA conformational changes and initiate replication, the AMV RNA fragment was experimentally manipulated by increasing the interhelical spacing, by interrupting the apparent nucleotide symmetry, and by extending the binding site. In general, both asymmetric and symmetric insertions between two proposed hairpins diminished binding, whereas 5' and 3' extensions had minimal effects. Exchanging the positions of the binding site hairpins resulted in only a moderate decrease in peptide binding affinity without changing the hydroxyl radical footprint protection pattern. To assess biological relevance in viral RNA replication, the nucleotide changes were transferred into infectious genomic RNA clones. RNA mutations that disrupted coat protein binding also prevented viral RNA replication without diminishing coat protein mRNA (RNA 4) translation. These results, coupled with the highly conserved nature of the AUGC865-868 sequence, suggest that the distance separating the two proposed hairpins is a critical binding determinant. The data may indicate that the 5' and 3' hairpins interact with one of the bound peptides to nucleate the observed RNA conformational changes. PMID:14681584

  5. A reexamination of information theory-based methods for DNA-binding site identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Neill Michael C

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching for transcription factor binding sites in genome sequences is still an open problem in bioinformatics. Despite substantial progress, search methods based on information theory remain a standard in the field, even though the full validity of their underlying assumptions has only been tested in artificial settings. Here we use newly available data on transcription factors from different bacterial genomes to make a more thorough assessment of information theory-based search methods. Results Our results reveal that conventional benchmarking against artificial sequence data leads frequently to overestimation of search efficiency. In addition, we find that sequence information by itself is often inadequate and therefore must be complemented by other cues, such as curvature, in real genomes. Furthermore, results on skewed genomes show that methods integrating skew information, such as Relative Entropy, are not effective because their assumptions may not hold in real genomes. The evidence suggests that binding sites tend to evolve towards genomic skew, rather than against it, and to maintain their information content through increased conservation. Based on these results, we identify several misconceptions on information theory as applied to binding sites, such as negative entropy, and we propose a revised paradigm to explain the observed results. Conclusion We conclude that, among information theory-based methods, the most unassuming search methods perform, on average, better than any other alternatives, since heuristic corrections to these methods are prone to fail when working on real data. A reexamination of information content in binding sites reveals that information content is a compound measure of search and binding affinity requirements, a fact that has important repercussions for our understanding of binding site evolution.

  6. Number of active transcription factor binding sites is essential for the Hes7 oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Angelis Martin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly accepted that embryonic segmentation of vertebrates is regulated by a segmentation clock, which is induced by the cycling genes Hes1 and Hes7. Their products form dimers that bind to the regulatory regions and thereby repress the transcription of their own encoding genes. An increase of the half-life of Hes7 protein causes irregular somite formation. This was shown in recent experiments by Hirata et al. In the same work, numerical simulations from a delay differential equations model, originally invented by Lewis, gave additional support. For a longer half-life of the Hes7 protein, these simulations exhibited strongly damped oscillations with, after few periods, severely attenuated the amplitudes. In these simulations, the Hill coefficient, a crucial model parameter, was set to 2 indicating that Hes7 has only one binding site in its promoter. On the other hand, Bessho et al. established three regulatory elements in the promoter region. Results We show that – with the same half life – the delay system is highly sensitive to changes in the Hill coefficient. A small increase changes the qualitative behaviour of the solutions drastically. There is sustained oscillation and hence the model can no longer explain the disruption of the segmentation clock. On the other hand, the Hill coefficient is correlated with the number of active binding sites, and with the way in which dimers bind to them. In this paper, we adopt response functions in order to estimate Hill coefficients for a variable number of active binding sites. It turns out that three active transcription factor binding sites increase the Hill coefficient by at least 20% as compared to one single active site. Conclusion Our findings lead to the following crucial dichotomy: either Hirata's model is correct for the Hes7 oscillator, in which case at most two binding sites are active in its promoter region; or at least three binding sites are active, in which

  7. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such as binding propensity, neighboring residues in the vicinity of binding sites, conservation score and conformational switching. Results We observed that the binding propensities of amino acid residues are specific for protein-protein complexes. Further, typical dipeptides and tripeptides showed high preference for binding, which is unique to protein-protein complexes. Most of the binding site residues are highly conserved among homologous sequences. Our analysis showed that 7% of residues changed their conformations upon protein-protein complex formation and it is 9.2% and 6.6% in the binding and non-binding sites, respectively. Specifically, the residues Glu, Lys, Leu and Ser changed their conformation from coil to helix/strand and from helix to coil/strand. Leu, Ser, Thr and Val prefer to change their conformation from strand to coil/helix. Conclusions The results obtained in this study will be helpful for understanding and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes.

  8. Tritium-bradykinin binding site localization in guinea pig urinary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradykinin (BK) causes vasodilation and increases free water and sodium excretion in the kidney and stimulates smooth muscle contraction in the ureter and bladder. Several proposed sites of action for BK include the renal medullary collecting duct, renal blood vessels and the ureter and bladder smooth muscle. This study employs 3H-BK autoradiography to localize the sites of BK action. 3H-BK binding sites in the kidney are localized in the medullary interstitium where BK may produce prostaglandins which mediate its blood flow, natriuretic and diuretic effects. 3H-BK binding sites in the ureter and bladder are localized in the lamina propria below the basal epithelial layer and absent over the muscle layers suggesting an indirect action on urinary tract smooth muscle

  9. Allosteric inhibition enhances the efficacy of ABL kinase inhibitors to target unmutated BCR-ABL and BCR-ABL-T315I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Afsar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+ acute lymphatic leukemia (Ph + ALL are caused by the t(9;22, which fuses BCR to ABL resulting in deregulated ABL-tyrosine kinase activity. The constitutively activated BCR/ABL-kinase “escapes” the auto-inhibition mechanisms of c-ABL, such as allosteric inhibition. The ABL-kinase inhibitors (AKIs Imatinib, Nilotinib or Dasatinib, which target the ATP-binding site, are effective in Ph + leukemia. Another molecular therapy approach targeting BCR/ABL restores allosteric inhibition. Given the fact that all AKIs fail to inhibit BCR/ABL harboring the ‘gatekeeper’ mutation T315I, we investigated the effects of AKIs in combination with the allosteric inhibitor GNF2 in Ph + leukemia. Methods The efficacy of this approach on the leukemogenic potential of BCR/ABL was studied in Ba/F3 cells, primary murine bone marrow cells, and untransformed Rat-1 fibroblasts expressing BCR/ABL or BCR/ABL-T315I as well as in patient-derived long-term cultures (PDLTC from Ph + ALL-patients. Results Here, we show that GNF-2 increased the effects of AKIs on unmutated BCR/ABL. Interestingly, the combination of Dasatinib and GNF-2 overcame resistance of BCR/ABL-T315I in all models used in a synergistic manner. Conclusions Our observations establish a new approach for the molecular targeting of BCR/ABL and its resistant mutants using a combination of AKIs and allosteric inhibitors.

  10. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  11. Locating the binding sites of antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and curcumin with tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Bourassa, P; Mandeville, J S; Bekale, L; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-09-01

    We located the binding sites of antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and curcumin on tRNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using constant tRNA concentration and various polyphenol contents. FTIR, UV-visible, CD spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to determine polyphenol binding sites, the binding constant and the effects of polyphenol complexation on tRNA conformation and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that polyphenols bind tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs through hydrophilic, hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of K(res-tRNA)=8.95(±0.80)×10(3) M(-1), K(gen-tRNA)=3.07(±0.5)×10(3) M(-1) and K(cur-tRNA)=1.55(±0.3)×10(4) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several nucleobases in polyphenol-tRNA adduct formation with free binding energy of -4.43 for resveratrol, -4.26 kcal/mol for genistein and -4.84 kcal/mol for curcumin, indicating that the interaction process is spontaneous at room temperature. While tRNA remains in A-family structure, major biopolymer aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polyphenol contents. PMID:26093317

  12. rRNA Binding Sites and the Molecular Mechanism of Action of the Tetracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwudi, Chinwe U

    2016-08-01

    The tetracycline antibiotics are known to be effective in the treatment of both infectious and noninfectious disease conditions. The 16S rRNA binding mechanism currently held for the antibacterial action of the tetracyclines does not explain their activity against viruses, protozoa that lack mitochondria, and noninfectious conditions. Also, the mechanism by which the tetracyclines selectively inhibit microbial protein synthesis against host eukaryotic protein synthesis despite conservation of ribosome structure and functions is still questionable. Many studies have investigated the binding of the tetracyclines to the 16S rRNA using the small ribosomal subunit of different bacterial species, but there seems to be no agreement between various reports on the exact binding site on the 16S rRNA. The wide range of activity of the tetracyclines against a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens, viruses, protozoa, and helminths, as well as noninfectious conditions, indicates a more generalized effect on RNA. In the light of recent evidence that the tetracyclines bind to various synthetic double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) of random base sequences, suggesting that the double-stranded structures may play a more important role in the binding of the tetracyclines to RNA than the specific base pairs, as earlier speculated, it is imperative to consider possible alternative binding modes or sites that could help explain the mechanisms of action of the tetracyclines against various pathogens and disease conditions. PMID:27246781

  13. Pathogenesis of Shigella diarrhea: rabbit intestinal cell microvillus membrane binding site for Shigella toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the binding of purified 125I-labeled shigella toxin to rabbit jejunal microvillus membranes (MVMs). Toxin binding was concentration dependent, saturable, reversible, and specifically inhibited by unlabeled toxin. The calculated number of toxin molecules bound at 40C was 7.9 X 10(10) (3 X 10(10) to 2 X 10(11))/micrograms of MVM protein or 1.2 X 10(6) per enterocyte. Scatchard analysis showed the binding site to be of a single class with an equilibrium association constant, K, of 4.7 X 10(9) M-1 at 40C. Binding was inversely related to the temperature of incubation. A total of 80% of the labeled toxin binding at 40C dissociated from MVM when the temperature was raised to 370C, but reassociated when the temperature was again brought to 40C. There was no structural or functional change of MVM due to toxin as monitored by electron microscopy or assay of MVM sucrase activity. These studies demonstrate a specific binding site for shigella toxin on rabbit MVMs. The physiological relevance of this receptor remains to be determined

  14. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Selvaraj S; Jayaram B; Saranya N; Gromiha M; Fukui Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such...

  15. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel; (Harvard-Med); (EMBL)

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  16. Characterization of two heparan sulphate-binding sites in the mycobacterial adhesin Hlp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Previato Jose O

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histone-like Hlp protein is emerging as a key component in mycobacterial pathogenesis, being involved in the initial events of host colonization by interacting with laminin and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. In the present study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR was used to map the binding site(s of Hlp to heparan sulfate and identify the nature of the amino acid residues directly involved in this interaction. Results The capacity of a panel of 30 mer synthetic peptides covering the full length of Hlp to bind to heparin/heparan sulfate was analyzed by solid phase assays, NMR, and affinity chromatography. An additional active region between the residues Gly46 and Ala60 was defined at the N-terminal domain of Hlp, expanding the previously defined heparin-binding site between Thr31 and Phe50. Additionally, the C-terminus, rich in Lys residues, was confirmed as another heparan sulfate binding region. The amino acids in Hlp identified as mediators in the interaction with heparan sulfate were Arg, Val, Ile, Lys, Phe, and Thr. Conclusion Our data indicate that Hlp interacts with heparan sulfate through two distinct regions of the protein. Both heparan sulfate-binding regions here defined are preserved in all mycobacterial Hlp homologues that have been sequenced, suggesting important but possibly divergent roles for this surface-exposed protein in both pathogenic and saprophic species.

  17. H274Y's Effect on Oseltamivir Resistance: What Happens Before the Drug Enters the Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Muhammad; Mohamed, Nornisah; Mohamad, Suriyati; Janezic, Dusanka; Damodaran, K V; Wahab, Habibah A

    2016-01-25

    Increased reports of oseltamivir (OTV)-resistant strains of the influenza virus, such as the H274Y mutation on its neuraminidase (NA), have created some cause for concern. Many studies have been conducted in the attempt to uncover the mechanism of OTV resistance in H274Y NA. However, most of the reported studies on H274Y focused only on the drug-bound system, so the direct effects of the mutation on NA itself prior to drug binding still remain unclear. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations of NA in apo form, followed by principal component analysis and interaction energy calculations, were performed to investigate the structural changes of the NA binding site as a result of the H274Y mutation. It was observed that the disruption of the NA binding site due to the H274Y mutation was initiated by the repulsive effect of Y274 on the 250-loop, which in turn altered the hydrogen-bonding network around residue 274. The rotated W295 side chain caused the upward movement of the 340-loop. Consequently, sliding box docking results suggested that the binding pathway of OTV was compromised because of the disruption of this binding site. This study also highlighted the importance of the functional group at C6 of the sialic acid mimicry. It is hoped that these results will improve the understanding of OTV resistance and shed some light on the design of a novel anti-influenza drug. PMID:26703840

  18. Identification of the third binding site of arsenic in human arsenic (III methyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangli Li

    Full Text Available Arsenic (III methyltransferase (AS3MT catalyzes the process of arsenic methylation. Each arsenite (iAs(3+ binds to three cysteine residues, methylarsenite (MMA(3+ binds to two, and dimethylarsenite (DMA(3+ binds to one. However, only two As-binding sites (Cys156 and Cys206 have been confirmed on human AS3MT (hAS3MT. The third As-binding site is still undefined. Residue Cys72 in Cyanidioschyzon merolae arsenite S-adenosylmethyltransferase (CmArsM may be the third As-binding site. The corresponding residue in hAS3MT is Cys61. Functions of Cys32, Cys61, and Cys85 in hAS3MT are unclear though Cys32, Cys61, and Cys85 in rat AS3MT have no effect on the enzyme activity. This is why the functions of Cys32, Cys61, and Cys85 in hAS3MT merit investigation. Here, three mutants were designed, C32S, C61S, and C85S. Their catalytic activities and conformations were determined, and the catalytic capacities of C156S and C206S were studied. Unlike C85S, mutants C32S and C61S were completely inactive in the methylation of iAs(3+ and active in the methylation of MMA(3+. The catalytic activity of C85S was also less pronounced than that of WT-hAS3MT. All these findings suggest that Cys32 and Cys61 markedly influence the catalytic activity of hAS3MT. Cys32 and Cys61 are necessary to the first step of methylation but not to the second. Cys156 and Cys206 are required for both the first and second steps of methylation. The S(C32 is located far from arsenic in the WT-hAS3MT-SAM-As model. The distances between S(C61 and arsenic in WT-hAS3MT-As and WT-hAS3MT-SAM-As models are 7.5 Å and 4.1 Å, respectively. This indicates that SAM-binding to hAS3MT shortens the distance between S(C61 and arsenic and promotes As-binding to hAS3MT. This is consistent with the fact that SAM is the first substrate to bind to hAS3MT and iAs is the second. Model of WT-hAS3MT-SAM-As and the experimental results indicate that Cys61 is the third As-binding site.

  19. The CK2 alpha/CK2 beta interface of human protein kinase CK2 harbors a binding pocket for small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Brunstein, Elena; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    The Ser/Thr kinase CK2 (previously called casein kinase 2) is composed of two catalytic chains (CK2 alpha) attached to a dimer of noncatalytic subunits (CK2 beta). CK2 is involved in suppression of apoptosis, cell survival, and tumorigenesis. To investigate these activities and possibly affect them......, selective CK2 inhibitors are required. An often-used CK2 inhibitor is 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB). In a complex structure with human CK2 alpha, DRB binds to the canonical ATP cleft, but additionally it occupies an allosteric site that can be alternatively filled by glycerol....... Inhibition kinetic studies corroborate the dual binding mode of the inhibitor. Structural comparisons reveal a surprising conformational plasticity of human CK2 alpha around both DRB binding sites. After local rearrangement, the allosteric site serves as a CK2 beta interface. This opens the potential to...

  20. Investigation of the Copper Binding Site And the Role of Histidine As a Ligand in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.R.; Bencze, K.Z.; Russ, K.A.; Wasiukanis, K.; Benore-Parsons, M.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 {angstrom}, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a Cu-O{sub 3}N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit.

  1. The Human p73 Promoter: Characterization and Identification of Functional E2F Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnam S. Seelan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available p73, a member of the p53 family, is overexpressed in many cancers. To understand the mechanism(s underlying this overexpression, we have undertaken a detailed characterization of the human p73 promoter. The promoter is strongly activated in cells expressing exogenous E2F1 and suppressed by exogenous Rb. At least three functional E2F binding sites, located immediately upstream of exon 1 (at-284,-155 and-132 mediate this induction. 5' serially deleted promoter constructs and constructs harboring mutated E2F sites were analyzed for their response to exogenously expressed E2F1 or Rb to establish functionality of these sites. Authenticity of E2F sites was further confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA using E2F1 /DP1 heterodimers synthesized in vitro, followed by competition assays with unlabeled wild-type or mutant oligonucleotides and supershift analysis using anti-E2F1 antibodies. In vivo binding of E2F1 to the p73 promoter was demonstrated using nuclear extracts prepared from E2F1-inducible Saos2 cells. The region conferring the highest promoter activity was found to reside between-113 to-217 of the p73 gene. Two of the three functional E2F sites (at-155 and-132 reside within this region. Our results suggest that regulation of p73 expression is primarily mediated through binding of E2 F1 to target sites at-155 and-132.

  2. Tuning the ion selectivity of tetrameric cation channels by changing the number of ion binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derebe, Mehabaw G.; Sauer, David B.; Zeng, Weizhong; Alam, Amer; Shi, Ning; Jiang, Youxing (UTSMC); (ETH Zurich)

    2015-11-30

    Selective ion conduction across ion channel pores is central to cellular physiology. To understand the underlying principles of ion selectivity in tetrameric cation channels, we engineered a set of cation channel pores based on the nonselective NaK channel and determined their structures to high resolution. These structures showcase an ensemble of selectivity filters with a various number of contiguous ion binding sites ranging from 2 to 4, with each individual site maintaining a geometry and ligand environment virtually identical to that of equivalent sites in K{sup +} channel selectivity filters. Combined with single channel electrophysiology, we show that only the channel with four ion binding sites is K{sup +} selective, whereas those with two or three are nonselective and permeate Na{sup +} and K{sup +} equally well. These observations strongly suggest that the number of contiguous ion binding sites in a single file is the key determinant of the channel's selectivity properties and the presence of four sites in K{sup +} channels is essential for highly selective and efficient permeation of K{sup +} ions.

  3. Elucidation of binding mechanism and identification of binding site for an anti HIV drug, stavudine on human blood proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, B; Hegde, Ashwini H; Seetharamappa, J

    2013-05-01

    The binding of stavudine (STV) to two human blood proteins [human hemoglobin (HHb) and human serum albumin (HSA)] was studied in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by spectroscopic methods viz., fluorescence, UV absorption, resonance light scattering, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and three-dimensional fluorescence. The binding parameters of STV-blood protein were determined from fluorescence quenching studies. Stern-Volmer plots indicated the presence of static quenching mechanism in the interaction of STV with blood proteins. The values of n close to unity indicated that one molecule of STV bound to one molecule of blood protein. The binding process was found to be spontaneous. Analysis of thermodynamic parameters revealed the presence of hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces between protein and STV. Displacement experiments indicated the binding of STV to Sudlow's site I on HSA. Secondary structures of blood proteins have undergone changes upon interaction with STV as evident from the reduction of α-helices (from 46.11% in free HHb to 38.34% in STV-HHb, and from 66.44% in free HSA to 52.26% in STV-HSA). Further, the alterations in secondary structures of proteins in the presence of STV were confirmed by synchronous and 3D-fluorescence spectral data. The distance between the blood protein (donor) and acceptor (STV) was found to be 5.211 and 5.402 nm for STV-HHb and STV-HSA, respectively based on Föster's non-radiative energy transfer theory. Effect of some metal ions was also investigated. The fraction of STV bound to HSA was found to be 87.8%. PMID:23275205

  4. Specific binding sites for proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, H; Hirata, Y; Iwashina, M; Sato, K; Marumo, F

    1996-07-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), a potent and novel vasodilator 52-residue peptide originally isolated from pheochromocytoma, is processed from a precursor molecule (preproAM) in which another unique 20-residue sequence, termed proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP), exists. Using [125I Tyr0] rat PAMP as a radioligand, we have examined PAMP binding sites in various rat tissues and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from rat aorta. Specific binding sites for rat PAMP, although very low, were widely distributed in various rat tissues examined. The relatively more abundant sites were present in aorta and adrenal glands, followed by lung, kidney, brain, spleen, and heart. An equilibrium binding study using cultured rat VSMC revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity [dissociation constant (Kd): 3.5 x 10(-8) M] binding sites for rat PAMP with a maximal binding capacity of 4.5 x 10(6) sites per cell. Binding studies revealed that synthetic rat PAMP(1-19)-NH2 was about 10-fold less potent, and rat PAMP(1-20)-OH and human PAMP were about 20-fold less potent than rat PAMP(1-20)-NH2. SDS-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis after affinity-labeling of membranes from various rat tissues (aorta, adrenal glands, lung) and VSMC revealed a distinct labeled band with the apparent molecular mass of 90 kDa, which was diminished by excess unlabeled rat PAMP. A nonhydrolyzable GTP analog (GTP-gammaS) dose-dependently reduced binding of [125I] rat PAMP to VSMC membranes, while ATP-gammaS had no effect. Neither cyclic AMP nor inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate formation was affected by rat PAMP in rat VSMC. The present study demonstrates for the first time that PAMP receptors are widely distributed in various rat tissues, among which aorta and adrenal glands have the most abundant sites. Our data suggest that PAMP receptors are functionally coupled to G-proteins, although its signal transduction remains obscure. The present study also shows that amidation of C-terminal residue

  5. The role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Karapetyan, Sargis

    2015-01-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ul...

  6. The conserved WW-domain binding sites in Dystroglycan C-terminus are essential but partially redundant for Dystroglycan function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yatsenko, A S; Kucherenko, M M; Pantoja, M;

    2009-01-01

    function in the establishment of oocyte polarity in Drosophila. If either WW binding site is mutated, the Dg protein can still be active. However, simultaneous mutations in both WW binding sites abolish the Dg activities in both overexpression and loss-of-function oocyte polarity assays in vivo....... Additionally, sequence comparisons of WW binding sites in 12 species of Drosophila, as well as in humans, reveal a high level of conservation. This preservation throughout evolution supports the idea that both WW binding sites are functionally required. CONCLUSION: Based on the obtained results we propose that...

  7. The function of the secondary DNA-binding site of RecA protein during DNA strand exchange.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazin, A V; Kowalczykowski, S C

    1998-01-01

    RecA protein features two distinct DNA-binding sites. During DNA strand exchange, the primary site binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), forming the helical RecA nucleoprotein filament. The weaker secondary site binds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during the homology search process. Here we demonstrate that this site has a second important function. It binds the ssDNA strand that is displaced from homologous duplex DNA during DNA strand exchange, stabilizing the initial heteroduplex DNA product...

  8. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S. (Oregon HSU)

    2012-05-24

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  9. External location of sites on pig erythrocyte membranes that bind nitrobenzylthioinosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleoside transport in erythrocytes of various species is inhibited by the binding of nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) to high affinity sites associated with nucleoside transport elements of the plasma membrane. The present study examined binding of [3H]NBMPR to unsealed ghosts and to sealed right-side-out vesicles (ROVs) and inside-out vesicles (IOVs) prepared from pig erythrocytes. Kd values for NBMPR dissociation from the ligand-site complex in unsealed ghosts, ROVs and IOVs were similar (1.6-2.4 nM), and Bmax values (mean +/- SD) were, respectively, 22.2 +/- 5.5, 25.8 +/- 6.4, and 37.3 +/- 4.0 molecules/fg of protein, reflecting differences in the protein content of the membrane preparations. When temperatures were decreased from 22 degrees to 4 degrees, NBMPR binding to erythrocyte membrane preparations was reduced in IOVs relative to that in unsealed ghosts and ROVs. At 22 degrees, the association of NBMPR molecules with IOVs was slower than with ROVs and unsealed ghosts, differences that were virtually eliminated by permeabilization of the membrane preparations with saponin. Thus, the binding sites were more accessible to external NBMPR in sealed ROVs and unsealed ghosts than in sealed IOVs, indicating that the NBMPR sites are located on the extracellular aspect of the membrane